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MORRIS/ESSEX HEALTH & LIFE

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | $3.95 MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

F E B R U A R Y / M A R C H 2 0 16 THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE

READY, SET, GO

Y O U R F R E S H S TA R T

A NEW YOU!

5 KEY CHANGES FOR YOUR BEST YEAR YET

M E E T M AT C H A



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TEST YOUR HEART SMARTS ROAD TRIP! 4 GETAWAYS ‘DATE NIGHT’ DILEMMA SOLVED TASTY TARTS 1/27/16 3:26 PM


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MORE THAN GREAT BURGERS AND STEAKS THE ORIGINAL AND ONLY ARTHUR’S TAVERN 700 Speedwell Ave. Morris Plains, NJ 07950

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Arthur’s Tavern in Morris Plains defines the standard for steakhouses in New Jersey. Bring your appetite! You will need it! Arthur’s Tavern is famous for delicious GIANT STEAKS, mouth-watering burgers, huge salads, overstuffed sandwiches and the freshest lunch and dinner specials. Value and quality are key at Arthur’s Tavern. We are more than just one of the best steak houses in New Jersey, the casual atmosphere of an “old-fashioned neighborhood tavern” leads to fun for all.

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Contents FEB/MAR 2016

FEATURES

22

KNOW YOUR HEART!

Take our true-false quiz to find out how ticker-savvy you are.

28

INVESTING IN HEALTH CARE

A Livingston businessman pledges time and money to a hospital building project.

29

BEAT RESTORED A new treatment for Afib helps a Totowa man get back to his busy life.

30

NATURAL BIRTH? NO PROBLEM! Saint Barnabas Medical Center unveils a spacious birthing suite for women who want to go au naturel.

32

SURGERY PREP

Patients are better prepared for colorectal surgery thanks to this special program.

34

HELPING HANDS When medical care is frightening for patients with special needs, ‘ambassadors’ can help.

38

YOUR FRESH START

Follow these 5 simple, straightforward tips to feel better and be better in “sweet ’16.” I N E V ERY I S S UE

10 5 8 6 0

4

E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

44

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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Visit Our New, High-Tech Office! J AY S . S CHUSTER, DDS A leader in cosmetic and restorative dentistry, Dr. Schuster is proud to be the only Morristown general dentist chosen by his peers as a New Jersey Monthly top dentist every year since 2009 as well as voted a U.S. topDentist.

TM

Complimentary

Cosmetic Consultation ($275 value)

Recent Smile Makeover Danielle

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metrodentalassociates.com free parking

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Contents FEB/MAR

22

62 DEPARTMENTS 17

48

Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in Morris and Essex counties.

The popular pick-me-up called matcha happens to have hearthealthy benefits too.

LOCAL BUZZ

20

57

Facts and insights you can use, including how sleep habits affect catching colds.

It’s been a rough ride, but Malbec has regained its reputation for subtlety and balance.

HEALTH NEWS

WINE + SPIRITS

24

62

Surprise her with a glittering heartfelt gift that will last a lifetime.

Pack the car. Four great weekend destinations are a short ride away.

JEWELRY BOX

26

HOME FRONT

Feather your nest with decorative items featuring bright bits of plumage.

44

48

POWER FOOD

ESCAPES

64

GATHERINGS Photos from recent events in and around Morris and Essex counties.

TASTES

Tarts aren’t always sweet! Here’s a trio of savory versions we know you’ll want to try.

6

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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Freeze Your Fat In Half The Time Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Dr. Brian S. Glatt is excited to be the first medical practice in the region to offer DualSculptingTM. CoolSculpting® is a non-surgical, non-invasive way to get rid of excess, stubborn fat. Now with our two machines DualSculptingTM is possible to reduce the procedure time in half. There is no downtime, no anesthesia and no incisions.

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AFTER

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SUBMENTAL PHOTO COURTESY OF SUZANNE KILMER, M.D.

“I cannot begin to express my gratitude for the tremendous care I received from you and your entire staff. My experience was nothing less than extraordinary.”

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Brian S. Glatt, MD, FACS

PREMIER PLASTIC SURGERY CENTER OF NJ

310 Madison Avenue, Suite 100 • Morristown, NJ 07960

973 889 9300 • www.drbrianglatt.com Breast Augmentation • Breast Lift and Reduction Mommy Makeover • Abdominoplasty • Face, Neck & Eyelid Lifts Liposuction • Rhinoplasty • Skin Care • Facial Peels Micro-Needling • Injectable Fillers

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1/25/16 12:23 PM


WELCOME LETTER

BARNABAS HEALTH

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER BARNABAS HEALTH BARRY H. OSTROWS K Y

VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC CORPORATE MARKETING AND BRANDING BARNABAS HEALTH MICHAEL J. SLUSAR Z

VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS BARNABAS HEALTH ELLEN GREENE

SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER STEPHEN P. ZIENIE WICZ , M. P. H., FACHE

DIRECTOR, MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER SALLY MALECH, M. P. H., R. D.

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER SAMANTHA ANTON

S AINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

94 O ld Shor t Hil ls Ro a d, Liv ing ston, NJ 07039 973.322.5000 or 1.888.724.7123 For more infor mat ion ab out S aint B ar nabas fa cilit ies and ser v ices, please v isit bar nabashealth.org/sbmc.

PUBLISHED BY

A COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION IT CAN BE TEMPTING TO DO THINGS THE SAME WAY you’ve always done them, and sometimes that’s fine. Every family, for example, has traditions that gain meaning from unchanged repetition. But for a hospital that won’t do. Saint Barnabas Medical Center can properly honor its own 151-year tradition of service to the community only by constantly innovating. Take the new treatment for “Afib” (atrial fibrillation, or a fast, irregular heartbeat) you’ll read about on page 29. It uses a process called ablation to restore regular cardiac rhythm. And while ablation has been around for some time, the “Afib hybrid maze,” this new method of applying it to the heart’s exterior, means that for appropriate patients it can be done with a small incision and the use of a tiny camera—instead of by opening the chest. It’s what science calls an elegant solution, and Saint Barnabas is one of a handful of places on the East Coast that offer it. For Tony Tomasello, a 72-year-old project manager for a demolition firm, it just means he’s been able to return to the active life he loves. Similarly, a spirit of innovation pervades the new Cooperman Family Pavilion, a thoroughly modern 241,000-square-foot facility we plan to open next year, with private rooms, up-to-the-minute facilities and a greatly enhanced Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. On page 28, you’ll meet a titan of the New York real estate world (and a longtime Livingston resident) who’s helping to make it happen. Sometimes inspiration comes from overseas. A program in Scandinavia was the model for our Comprehensive Pathway for Lower Intestinal Surgery (page 32), which prepares patients for colorectal procedures so they feel more in control. You can’t argue with the results of this innovation: fewer complications, shorter hospital stays, fewer readmissions and reduced reliance on painkillers. Also in this issue, you’ll read about a program that helps hospital patients with special needs cope with medical treatment (page 34) and a Birthing Room to accommodate moms-to-be who wish to give birth the “natural” way (page 30), and you can take a questionnaire (page 36) to find out if you need a medical evaluation for balance problems. Each article in its way reflects our commitment to innovation. And stay tuned—we’ll keep right on finding better ways to do things, in order to serve you better. Best regards,

WAINSCOT MEDIA

BARRY H. OSTROWSK Y PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER B A R N A B A S HE A LT H

STEPHEN P. ZIENIEWICZ, FACHE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER S A IN T B A R N A B A S ME DI CA L C E N T E R

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMC.

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CYBERKNIFE In our hands it does wonders

ALISON GRANN, MD CHAIRWOMAN I RADIATION ONCOLOGY

is one of the most experienced Radiation Oncologists in our region. Along with her highly skilled team, she uses CyberKnife速 to destroy tumors throughout the body painlessly with laser like precision. Because technology can only fight cancer when it is in the right hands.

973.322.5630

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www.sbmcCyberKnife.org

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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AGNIESZKA KORBICA PHOTOGRAPHY

Sunday, May 1, 2016 Essex County South Mountain Recreation Complex West Orange, NJ

HIT ‘RESTART’ ON THE YEAR IT’S BECOME SOMETHING

of a tradition for Morris/ Essex Health & Life to celebrate a fresh year’s possibilities in our February issue, and it’s not because we’ve misplaced our calendar. We know perfectly well that a month of 2016 has already slipped away— perhaps taking many of your well-intentioned New Year’s resolutions with it. That’s precisely why we think “Your Fresh Start” on page 38 is well timed. With the “Auld Lang Syne” hoopla over, February is perfect for settling down and deciding what steps toward greater health and well-being you’re actually prepared to take—and giving yourself credit even for tiny ones. Our article is built around five tips you can act upon today. It’s a chance to hit “restart” on your 2016—and it offers a few surprises. Did you know, for example, that research shows telling lies can actually harm your health? I’m not fibbing when I say tarts needn’t be sweet—we introduce you to three savory ones starting on page 44. While we’re talking about food, how about dinner and a movie? For some variations on this classic “date night” agenda—and other date ideas too—see page 17. And meet matcha on page 48 and Malbec on page 57—two very different drinks! In this issue you’ll also find a collection of glittering, heartfelt gifts (page 24), decorative accessories with a focus on feathers (page 26) and four fantastic weekend getaways (page 62). Whatever your personal focus this month, here’s wishing you—and your Valentine too—the finest February and March ever. Enjoy!

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Vibrance 8th Anniversary Celebration Now Through March is Customer Appreciation at Vibrance MedSpa Join us Every Thursday from 5-8 PM for Customer Appreciation, Q & A and Raffles for FREE Treatments! Defy Gravity by Adding Volume to the Apples of Your Cheeks With a Voluma Treatment - $75 off Botox - $13 per unit ®

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ED ITOR I N C H I EF ART DIRECTOR STEPHEN M. VITARBO EDITORIAL

MANAGING EDITOR CAROL BIALKOWSKI SENIOR EDITOR TIMOTHY KELLE Y ASSOCIATE EDITOR DARIUS AMOS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

LEE LUSARDI CONNOR, HARRY DOWDEN, DAVID LE VINE, JOSH SENS ART

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DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRISTINE HAMEL

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BE SOCIAL

Join our online community! LIKE us on Facebook: MorrisHealthandLife FOLLOW us on Twitter: @MsxHandL VIEW our boards on Pinterest: HealthandLife SEE our photos on Instagram: @HealthNLife Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Morris/Essex Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wain scotmedia.com. Morris/Essex Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials.

MORRIS/ESSEX HEALTH & LIFE is published 6 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 15, Issue 1. © 2016 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Morris and Essex counties: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

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ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Mark Dowden at 201.782.5730 or mark.dowden@wainscot media.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Morris/Essex Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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LOCALBUZZ MORRIS/ESSEX NEWS

Date night, 2.0

Dinner and a movie. A concert or show in the city. Binge-watching one of your favorite TV shows on Netflix. Do the same options pop into your head when planning a night out (or in) with your significant other? Read on for more ideas. Kick back at a coffeehouse. The Red Eye Café in Montclair features Fair Trade coffee from around the world, while The Coffee Mill Roasters in Millburn serves up freshly roasted brews as well as Balthazar pastries. Another option: Mara’s Café and Bakery in Denville, which offers some of the best baked goods to go with your cuppa joe. In the mood for something stronger? Grab a seat at the hip bar or at one of the cozy tables at Jersey Spirits in Fairfield and sample some Jersey Apple Hooch, Crossroads Whiskey, DSP.7 Gin or one of the distillery’s other handmade spirits. The tasting room is open until 9 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. If beer is your beverage of choice, head next door to Magnify Brewing and

REVIEWS

TIPS

TRENDS

try a Vine Shine IPA, Search Saison or Black Wheat. The craft brewer is open for tastings until 10 p.m. on Fridays, 9 p.m. on Saturdays. Broadway isn’t the only place where the curtain rises. The February slate at Millburn’s Paper Mill Playhouse features a can’t-miss production of A Bronx Tale. In Morristown, the Mayo Performing Arts Center boasts a diverse lineup—the legendary Beach Boys and the ’70s Southern rock group Marshall Tucker Band stop by this month, while the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra performs in March. Need a laugh? The Comedy Shoppe sets up shop in Mount Arlington’s Courtyard Marriott, where longtime funnymen Tom McTiernan and Rob Falcone have upcoming gigs. For a nontraditional date, visit Aspen Ice in Randolph, Mennen Sports Arena in Morristown or the Clary Anderson Arena in Montclair for an hour of weekend ice-skating. Test your fitness with indoor rock climbing at the Gravity Vault in Chatham or learn new culinary skills together during a cooking class at Kings Cooking Studio in Short Hills.

Mexican on the move

Your GPS isn’t playing games with you: El Matador, the popular Mexican restaurant in Bloomfield, has moved. But don’t fret, the eatery didn’t go far—it’s still in town, but in roomier digs at 418 Broad Street. The new space for the casual mom-and-pop joint brings added seating, elbow room and ambiance to enhance the dining experience. Though the address has changed, the mouthwatering menu stays the same—get handmade tortas, tostadas, tamales, taquitos and other authentic Mexican dishes. El Matador is as popular as ever, so don’t forget to make reservations if you dine in. Of course, you can always order your huaraches and sopes to go or for delivery ($25 minimum, $2.99 delivery fee). El Matador, 418 Broad St., Bloomfield, 973.748.1707; elmata dorbloomfield.com

CHARITABLE SHOPPING

Looking for a stunning Kate Spade or Valentino handbag? At Lucy’s Gift Boutique in Morristown you can buy designer clothing, accessories and many of the latest musthaves while doing a good deed. The holidays came and went in a flash, but Lucy’s makes sure shopping and charitable giving are always in season. The new boutique has something for everyone—from $10 earrings and bracelets to Gucci and Louis Vuitton bags. Owner Marisa Spagnoletti, who named the shop after her daughter, says 100 percent of the net profits from sales benefit the Maurice J. Spagnoletti Foundation (mauricejspagnoletti.com), which has funded charities such as the P.G. Chambers School for special needs children in Cedar Knolls and Flemington-based Safe in Hunterdon for women and children impacted by domestic violence. Her goal: to donate more than $25,000 to the charities by March. Spagnoletti started the foundation, which bears her late husband’s name, “to heal and come together to prevent violence.” Prominent New Jersey banker Maurice Spagnoletti was tragically shot and killed in 2011 while working in Puerto Rico. The crime remains unsolved. Lucy’s Gift Boutique, 168 South St., Morristown, 973.998.9938 MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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LOCAL BUZZ

SURVIVAL GEAR

Many Morris and Essex county residents didn’t break out their winter gear during the month of December. In fact, quite a few folks were spotted doing their holiday shopping in short sleeves! But as our late-January blizzard proved, there’s plenty of bone-chilling weather ahead. Here, editorial staff members at Morris/Essex Health & Life share the things they rely on most to help bridge the gap between now and the sunny days of spring.

Rita Guarna: Boots are my winter wardrobe go-to. They complete an outfit; you can wear them with a dress, with leggings, with jeans. I have fewer than a dozen pairs, so I’m no Imelda Marcos! But I do have them in all different colors and styles—black, brown, rust; flats and heels; leather and suede. Sam Edelman boots are my favorite—they are the perfect style and fit.

Darius Amos: Covering your head and neck makes a big difference when you’re trying to stay warm, even when you’re outside for just a few minutes. On colder days or when the heat just isn’t turned up high enough in the office, I’ll keep a scarf on while indoors. Banana Republic’s wool scarves serve double duty; they’re always fashionable and they protect you from the elements. My favorite in my collection is an orange wool scarf I’ve had for about five years.

Carol Bialkowski: GlyMiracle Skin Humectant helps my hands get through the winter. It’s amazing. It absorbs quickly and leaves your skin feeling soft and smooth—not at all greasy. And you can feel it working even after you wash your hands. Everyone in my family has their own tube!

Tim Kelley: It’s a bummer when the cold weather comes, but winter is also the time when I make “psychosomatic soup”—a recipe that was handed down in my family. It’s almost like a stew; it’s heavy on the vegetables—carrots, celery, turnips, canned tomatoes—and has barley and beef too. This is a wintertime ritual. I make a big pot of it and keep it in the fridge. It gets better as it gets older.

Every day counts February is chock-full of notable days—Groundhog Day, Valentine’s Day and Presidents’ Day. But February 2016 is extra special because there are 29 days in the month. Here are some fun facts about leap year and February 29: n Leap years are necessary to keep the calendar in sync with the solar year. While the calendar assumes the Earth revolves around the sun every 365 days, the trip actually takes a bit longer—365 days, 48 minutes and 46 seconds.

n In the United States, leap years coincide with presidential election years. n The odds of having a February 29 birthday are 1 in 1,461. n Notable leap year babies: swimmer and Irvington native Cullen Jones, rapper and New Jersey resident Ja Rule, Mark Foster of rock band Foster the People, actor Antonio Sabato Jr., hockey player Cam Ward. n There are 286 New Jersey residents registered on leapyearday .com, the official website for The Honor Society of Leap Year Day Babies.

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Wineglasses & paintbrushes Did you make a resolution to have more fun or be more social this year? Montclair wants to help you with your goals; the town now boasts three options to try the paint-and-sip trend. Uptown Art (50 Upper Montclair Plaza, 973.487.6347; uptownart.com), slated to open at press time, provides the perfect night out—you and your friends enjoy your favorite beverages while you paint a masterpiece. Perhaps a familiar skyline, a colorful sunset or a beautiful beach. There’s also a location in Denville (28 Diamond Spring Rd., 862.209.1717).

ArteVino Studio was set to open across the parking lot (51 Upper Montclair Plaza, 862.500.1165; artevinostudio .com), offering open BYOB painting sessions and private parties as well as classes suitable for kids. It also has a Millburn studio with the same programs (315A Millburn Ave., 973.671.5575). These studios join the original paintand-sip spot, Pinot’s Palette (351 Bloomfield Ave., 973.744.7500), giving Montclair residents and neighbors three locations to test their creativity and taste some vino.

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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HEALTH NEWS

10

The number of grams of grain-based fiber (think oats and quinoa) you need to eat daily to cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes by 25 percent.

WEIGHT FOR IT

—Diabetologia

Playing catch with weighted medicine balls has been shown to improve balance and may help prevent falls as we age. —University of Illinois at Chicago

IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE

CHEEK IT OUT

Restylane Lyft is the latest FDA-approved hyaluronic acid filler for cheek augmentation. Clinical trials showed that 88.7 percent of those treated with the filler had improved fullness after two months, with more than half maintaining it at the one-year mark.

4.2

AN APPLE A DAY…

Keeps the cardiologist away? Very likely. According to the Iowa Women’s Health Study, apples are associated with a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease. They contain antioxidant compounds, which control inflammation, are a good source of vitamin C and provide pectin, a soluble fiber that has been shown to help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels.

The number of times more likely you are to catch a cold after being exposed to the virus if you sleep fewer than six hours nightly. —Carnegie Mellon University

If you’re staring at a screen all day, be sure to take blink breaks. A recent study has found that the more screen time we clock, the less lubricating substance our eyes make. Why? Researchers say we blink less when doing screen work. Ordinarily we blink 15 to 20 times per minute, they say, but that rate is cut by up to one-half when we use digital devices. —JAMA Ophthalmology

300

The number of minutes per week it’s recommended that postmenopausal women exercise—at moderate to vigorous levels—to reduce their risk of breast cancer.

STAND UP!

—JAMA Oncology

TELLTALE SIGN OF ARTHRITIS?

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Check out your ring fingers. If they’re longer than your index fingers, you could be at an increased risk of knee osteoarthritis, according to a 2014 study of 14,500 adults. Researchers theorize that this trait may be linked to the effect of hormones on the growth of bone and cartilage. FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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Being sedentary has been found to be twice as deadly as being obese, so get moving. Even a daily 20-minute walk is enough to reduce chances of early death by 30 percent. —American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

—Rheumatology

1/25/16 10:48 AM


Experienced. Respected. Responsive. PATRICIA L. VERES has built her twenty (20) plus year career on an extensive trial and appellate practice with an emphasis on family law issues including divorce, custody, support, domestic violence, and related matters. Ms. Veres enthusiastically represents her clients from the most straightforward of matters to the most complex, high conflict, high asset cases, involving valuation of corporate interests, and the employment of custody and other experts. She takes pride in her keen attention to detail, tempered by the ability to strategically identify the more critical issues. A determined litigator, Ms. Veres is also empathetic to the clients’ goals, financial realities, and their peace of mind. The clients’ needs and attainable goals are always the highest priority. She is adept at identifying assets and income, as well as anticipating and avoiding potential problems, while advancing her clients’ interests throughout the process. Ms. Veres is also a skilled mediator and a proponent of alternative dispute resolution in appropriate circumstances. After gaining valuable experience working as an associate with prestigious law firms, Ms. Veres embarked on a solo family law practice that has since grown to the four-attorney firm that is now Veres & Riordan, LLC. Ms. Veres is a Certified Matrimonial Law Attorney and a Certified Court Approved Family Law Mediator. Her expertise reaches all aspects of family law. The firm specializes in family law matters, including contested and uncontested divorce matters, domestic violence matters, DCP&P matters, and other family related matters and appeals. Veres & Riordan also specialize mediation, post-judgment enforcement and modification applications, relocation, and change of custody.

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Linda K. Jenness, MSW, LCSW I am a NJ licensed psychotherapist (aka Licensed Clinical Social Worker) specializing in individual, group and family therapy. My approach is client based. My focus is on you and your needs and goals. It is important to me to get to know you well and to devise a treatment plan specifically for you. I whole-heartedly believe your personal goals can be accomplished in a supportive, caring, empathic, and confidential setting. There is great power in the practice of talk therapy and I feel very fortunate to be able to work with my clients and see positive results. • INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS—covering many issues, ranging from depression and anxiety, to life coaching, to personality disorders and much more. • GROUP SESSIONS—currently running, called “Mending a Broken Heart.” These are women’s support groups that focus on supporting each other in moving on after a difficult break up or divorce. • SPECIALIZE IN HELPING FAMILIES in their application process for an assisted living or nursing home for their loved one. As a former Admissions Director at such facilities, I have a certain expertise in this process and I am happy to share my knowledge with you and your family as you embark on this difficult journey.

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KNOW YOUR

TAKE THIS TRUE-FALSE QUIZ TO FIND OUT HOW TICKER-SAVVY YOU ARE.

HEART!

If you’re astute about your health, you make heart-healthy choices every month. But February, American Heart Month, is an especially good time to make sure you’re up to speed about how your lifestyle choices affect cardiac health. If you ace these 15 questions, take a bow. If you don’t, let the answers (on opposite page) guide you to a more heart-smart life.

1

To keep your heart strong, experts say you need to exercise an hour each day.

6

❑T ❑F

2 3

An aspirin a day keeps heart attack away.

❑T ❑F Fiber can lower your cholesterol, lessening your chances of heart disease.

❑T ❑F

4

For heart health, the more you sleep, the better.

❑T ❑F

5

Margarine is much more hearthealthy than butter.

❑T ❑F

The signs of a heart attack all center on your heart itself—you can safely assume that if your symptoms are elsewhere in your body, a heart attack is not the problem.

you feel a squeezing pain in the 11 Ifmiddle of your chest, you should

❑T ❑F

people can lower their heart12 Most disease risk by reducing their salt

7

A fat-free diet is the way to go when it comes to protecting your heart.

8

For a healthy heart, you should eat fish twice a week.

9

❑T ❑F

❑T ❑F Drink lots of red wine and your heart will be fine.

❑T ❑F

cholesterol level is a function 10 Your of the food you eat.

❑T ❑F

22

call your doctor immediately or head for an ER.

❑T ❑F

intake.

❑T ❑F smokers are one-and-a13 Cigarette half times more likely to die from heart disease than nonsmokers.

❑T ❑F and squash are good for 14 Carrots your heart.

❑T ❑F no relationship between 15 There’s stress and heart health.

❑T ❑F

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5. False. Butter has a lot of saturated fat and some trans fat (bad for your heart), but some hard margarine has even more trans fat. And trans fatty acids (made when hydrogen is added to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid) are not good for the heart. Spot trouble by checking labels for words like “partially hydrogenated oils.”

ANSWERS: 1. False. Good news—it’s less work than you may think! The American Heart Association (AHA) suggests at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity at least five days a week. Or try 25 minutes of more vigorous activity three days a week—think walking, swimming, or biking—broken up into 10- or 15-minute sessions. 2. True. The AHA recommends taking a daily low-dose aspirin if you’re at high risk of a heart attack or if you’ve already had one. Aspirin works to prevent blood clots, which cause most heart attacks. But be sure to check in with your doctor before starting any aspirin regime. 3. True. Fiber-rich foods include vegetables (peas, for example), beans, whole grains (such as oats) and fruits (raspberries are good). You can take a fiber supplement, but getting fiber through food (which also contains nutrients) is always the better choice. 4. False. In one study, people who slept more than nine hours per night were 37 percent more likely to have heart trouble than those who got just eight hours of slumber.

6. False. Symptoms can affect other parts of the body, such as your arms, back, neck, jaw and stomach. (In women especially, signs of heart attack may differ from the classic crushing chest pain.) 7. False. Studies show that people who drank full-fat dairy had no higher risk of heart disease than those who didn’t. Plus foods labeled “fatfree” can still have lots of salt or sugar (bad for your heart). The key is moderation. 8. True. Fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel are a great source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, and they’re low in unhealthy saturated fats. Don’t like fish? Talk to your doctor about omega-3 supplements. 9. False. O.K., this was an easy one. Sure, there are studies showing that drinking a daily glass of red wine may lower your risk of heart disease, but the AHA suggests no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women (one drink is 12 ounces of beer, 4 ounces of wine, or 1½ ounces of 80-proof spirits). And too much alcohol in any form can be a danger. Some words of wisdom: If you don’t drink, don’t start. Experts say the benefits don’t outweigh the possible risks (high blood pressure, a rise in triglycerides, an increase in weight, possible liver disease). 10. False. Eating healthy and exercising can often improve your cholesterol numbers, but

there are other factors too, including your genes. If your relatives (particularly your parents or grandparents) had high cholesterol levels, chances are you might too. (Note: if you were born with a gene called LTC4S, you may be four times as likely as the average person to develop heart disease later in life. Consult your doctor.) 11. True. Most heart attacks start slowly, usually with a slight discomfort, squeezing pain, or feeling of fullness in the center of the chest. The pressure can last for several minutes and can come and go. If you think this is happening to you, get checked out! Should it turn out to be a false alarm, you needn’t be embarrassed—you’re being properly vigilant. And anyway, you won’t die of embarrassment. 12. True. High-sodium diets have been tied to high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Keep in mind that large amounts of sodium are likely to be found in processed food and restaurant meals. Your goal: No more than 1,500 milligrams a day. 13. False. Actually, smokers are three times more likely than others to lose their lives to heart disease. Still hooked? Experts say you should look upon it as a medical problem, not a failure of will. Even if you’ve tried to quit before and failed, call the national stopsmoking hotline of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.800.QUIT.NOW, or check with your local hospital for smoking cessation programs. 14. True. In one study of 1,300 seniors, participants were 60 percent less likely to have heart problems if they consumed a daily cup of one of these veggies. 15. False. High levels of stress can put pressure on your heart and lead to an increased risk of heart disease. Boss driving you crazy? Up in the middle of the night worrying about bills? Fighting with your teenagers on a regular basis? Seek relief via exercise, meditation or even therapy. Your heart will thank you. MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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THESE BRIGHT BITS OF PLUMAGE AREN’T JUST FOR THE BIRDS. THEY CAN MAKE A ROOM’S SPIRIT SOAR.

Will the walls take flight, or just your imagination? Such are the reveries inspired by this stunning Feathers wallpaper from Graham & Brown.

A peacock motif lends subtle elegance to this Favrile glass vase from Tiffany Studios. Crafted from iron with a metal finish, this 44-inch-wide abstract wall art piece from Lamps Plus makes feathers a lively up-and-down motif.

Echoes of nature exert a haunting fascination in this featherinspired blue Catalina rug from Kas.

A white feather is traditionally associated with angels. On this orange throw pillow by A.S. Casanova, it’s heavenly comfort.

Crafted from refined porcelain in Portugal, the Carolyn dinnerware collection from Ralph Lauren promises to bring a touch of the exotic to your table.

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INGOODHEALTH

MEDICINE

T EC H N O LOG Y

PAT I E N T CAR E AT S A I N T B A R N A B A S M E D I C A L C E N T E R

Real estate executive Bruce Schonbraun and his wife, Lynn, are Livingston residents and strong supporters of the community. Three generations of their family make Saint Barnabas Medical Center their health care home.

“WE RECOGNIZE HOW IMPORTANT INDIVIDUAL PHILANTHROPY IS TO HEALTH CARE AND TO OUR MEDICAL CENTER.”

HEALTH CARE’S FUTURE

A BUSINESSMAN PLEDGES TIME AND MONEY TO A HOSPITAL BUILDING PROJECT—AND CHALLENGES OTHERS TO DO THE SAME. WHEN BRUCE AND LYNN SCHONBRAUN moved their young family to Livingston more than 40 years ago, they chose Saint Barnabas Medical Center as their hospital. Over the decades, they had two sons there, and they in turn produced five grandchildren, all of whom call Saint Barnabas their health care home. “Three generations in the same hospital—that’s pretty neat,” says Schonbraun. Senior managing director and co-leader of the Real Estate Solutions practice of New York-based FTI Consulting, Schonbraun is such a high-profile leader of the real estate community that readers of the newsletter The

Real Deal even know he’s partial to diet peach Snapple and Laughing Cow cheese. More important, this internationally recognized business adviser to the public and private real estate sectors, who’s been involved in more than $30 billion in transactions, also has a deep concern for the future of health care. That concern has inspired Schonbraun, 68, to give both his financial and his professional backing to Saint Barnabas Medical Center’s new Cooperman Family Pavilion and the accompanying parking garage. The Schonbrauns recently pledged $5 million to support the planned five-story,

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE COOPERMAN FAMILY PAVILION OR TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OPPORTUNITIES TO SUPPORT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, PLEASE CALL THE DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT AT 973.322.4330. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

INVESTING IN

241,000-square-foot expansion, and he is taking a leadership role as chairman of the SBMC Expansion Oversight Committee. It’s a role he is uniquely qualified to fill. “My wife and I feel very proud and fortunate to be in a position to do something meaningful for our community, both financially and as active participants,” he says. “I am at the point in my life where I am looking to give back, and there is nothing more important to a community than the highest level of health care. Given those needs and my background in real estate, I thought this was an excellent connection.” So do the leaders of the hospital. “We are extremely fortunate that Bruce and Lynn Schonbraun are our friends and advocates,” says Barry Ostrowsky, president and chief executive officer of Barnabas Health. “Bruce and Lynn have been active supporters of SBMC for many years and are well known for their involvement in the community. We appreciate their expertise, insight and commitment to Saint Barnabas Medical Center.” Schonbraun, who is also a trustee of Saint Barnabas, and his wife hope their actions will be a catalyst for others in the community. “We recognize how important individual philanthropy is to health care and to our medical center,” he says. “Our hope is that other people will be inspired to join me and my family to invest in the one service that every single person will ultimately require. There is nothing more important to any community than excellent health care.”—DAVID LEVINE

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

—BRUCE SCHONBRAUN


TO RESTORE THE BEAT

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

THANKS TO A NEW TREATMENT FOR ‘AFIB’—AN IRREGULAR HEARTBEAT— A TOTOWA MAN IS BACK TO HIS BUSY LIFE.

TONY TOMASELLO HAD ALWAYS BEEN VERY ACTIVE. SO WHEN a heart problem took away his energy, the Totowa resident was determined to find a solution. He discovered it at Saint Barnabas Medical Center, where he became the hospital’s first patient to receive a groundbreaking treatment for atrial fibrillation, or “Afib”— a fast, irregular heartbeat. “It’s like night and day, the difference in how I feel,” says Tomasello about the effects of the June 2015 procedure. “Now I’m back playing golf. I can get back on my motorcycle.” At 72, Tomasello still works as a project manager for a demolition firm—a physically demanding job he enjoys after 40-plus years in the industry. “Before, I couldn’t go up steps without being exhausted,” says the husband, father and grandfather. “Now I climb ladders and go up on roofs again.” Traditional treatments for Afib have included anti-arrhythmic medications, the use of electricity to “reset” the heart’s rhythm, and ablation—a process that employs heat, cold or radiofrequency energy to neutralize “hot spots” in tissue so that erratic signals are made normal again. But Tomasello posed a special challenge because of his enlarged heart. In the past, there were no reliable treatments for Afib patients with other cardiac conditions such as an enlarged heart or congestive heart failure. Today, however, a procedure called the “Afib hybrid maze” is giving them their lives back. The treatment consists of two types of David ablation. The first is performed on the outside Dobesh, M.D. of the heart through a small incision below

Climbing steps was exhausting for 72-year-old Tony Tomasello because of the atrial fibrillation that affected his heart. But now a new treatment has made a “night and day” difference.

the ribs. The second is done on the heart’s interior, using catheters threaded through veins in the leg. Saint Barnabas Medical Center is one of only a handful of East Coast centers to offer this minimally invasive treatment, notes cardiologist David Dobesh, M.D., who conducted Tomasello’s procedure with Frederic Sardari, M.D., vice chairman of Cardiothoracic Surgery. When the heart chambers are enlarged as in Tomasello’s case, explains Dr. Dobesh, more areas require ablation, including some that are more accessible from the outside. “Previously, ablation on the outside of the heart required opening the chest or collapsing the lungs,” he says. “Today we can go in through a small, laparoscopic incision and use a tiny camera to accurately direct the therapy.” Tomasello is grateful for the team at Saint Barnabas—including his daughter Nicole, a nurse at the hospital, who first suggested he go there. “It’s a step above anything else in this area,” he says. “The attitude of every staff member is incredible. They genuinely care about you.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT CARDIAC SERVICES AVAILABLE AT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, PLEASE CALL 973.322.5244 OR VISIT BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMC. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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IN GOOD HEALTH

CHILDBIRTH

THE NATURAL WAY

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The suite, which was opened in January, will accommodate the growing number of women in the area who wish to have a natural childbirth experience. It has been made larger to allow women to walk around while in labor— and that’s also facilitated by the use of mobile monitors. There is an immersion tub for women in labor, which can help relieve their pain and help them re-

lax. Nurses specially trained in natural childbirth will be on hand. A refrigerator can be stocked with favorite foods and drinks for the mom-to-be’s birthing partner, doula or whomever is invited to join in. “And this birthing suite is offset from the main labor and delivery unit, so it’s quieter,” says Michelle A. Aristizabal, M.D., an obstetrician/gynecologist who

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ISTOCK; COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

THERE IS A SE A CHANGE UNDER way in how women give birth in the United States. More and more women are choosing to have their babies naturally without medications. Understanding this, Barnabas Health has introduced a new birthing suite at Saint Barnabas Medical Center, a hospital where more than 5,500 women choose to have their babies each year.

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A NEW BIRTHING SUITE OFFERS MANY MOMSTO-BE THE HOMELIKE SETTING THEY SEEK.


“WOMEN CAN HAVE THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS — GIVING BIRTH AT A MAJOR HOSPITAL... BUT IN A COMFORTABLE, HOMELIKE ENVIRONMENT.” —MICHELLE ARISTIZABAL, M.D.

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

ISTOCK

is very involved in alternative births. “We have always supported natural birthing options, and this makes it more formal,” says Richard Miller, M.D., chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Saint Barnabas Medical Center. “This is one more way to meet the needs and desires of patients looking for a natural birth setting.” Over the past couple of decades, for a variety of reasons, the national rate of deliveries by C-section has risen, though it registered a slight decline nationally from 32.9 percent in 2009 to 32.2 percent in 2014. In our state in recent years a roughly 40 percent C-section rate has prevailed, according to Dr. Aristizabal. “Everybody is working on ways to change that,” she says, “because we should not be delivering almost half of all babies by C-section.” Home births are increasingly popular, but physicians still believe the hospital is the safest place to have a baby. The new birthing suite, says the doctor, creates a “middle ground,” where women can labor in an environment more like the home, but with advanced medical

Michelle A. Aristizabal, M.D.

Richard Miller, M.D.

IF YOU’RE CONSIDERING NATURAL CHILDBIRTH…

help at the ready just in case complications arise. “There has been bad press about hospitals being a cold place to give birth, but building this type of space shows that is not the case here,” says Dr. Aristizabal. “Women can have the best of both worlds—giving birth at a major hospital with all its resources, but in a comfortable, homelike environment.” For many women, the immersion tub is a welcome option for pain relief. “Hydrotherapy is a nice alternative to an epidural, because submersion therapy takes the weight of the baby off the pelvis,” the doctor says. “That is what women complain of most, even more than the contractions, which they can work through.” If the tub is not appealing, large showers help with muscle relaxation, she says. Other therapies, including aromatherapy, acupressure and hypnosis, are also available. And a woman can give birth in any position she feels most comfortable in. Though not necessarily mainstream yet, natural childbirth is increasingly being accepted by the medical establishment. “It’s not true that only midwives use the natural approach,” Dr. Aristizabal says. “My practice and others at Saint Barnabas actively work with patients in this model.” And now she and her colleagues have an optimal setting in which to assist women who make this choice. Dr. Miller explains: “The new birthing suite shows our commitment to serving our patients’ needs.” —D.L.

Women have been having babies “naturally” for millennia, but in the last several decades modern medicine has taken over. That change has improved safety, but in some women’s view it has also made the experience more clinical than it needs to be. If you wish to give birth without unnecessary intervention, you need to prepare accordingly, says the advocacy group Pregnancy.org. Consider these tips:

n Choose your health care provider carefully, asking questions and changing to another care provider if necessary. n Choose your birth place wisely, understanding that some hospitals and birth centers will provide options that make a natural birth a more reachable goal. n Learn comfort measures and coping techniques that will help you handle the stress of labor. Examples include massage, hypnotherapy and a warmwater bath. n Surround yourself with people who are supportive of your goal of a natural birth. n Some groups recommend that you agree in advance with your birthing partner on a specific code word, just in case. Say that word, and it means you’ve changed your mind about the natural approach and want immediate pain relief.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MATERNITY SERVICES AVAILABLE AT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, CALL 973.322.5360 OR VISIT BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMC. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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IN GOOD HEALTH

COLORECTAL SURGERY ISN’T FUN, BUT IT GOES MORE SMOOTHLY IF you know what to expect. That’s the reasoning behind a surgery preparation program at Saint Barnabas Medical Center whose degree of success has surprised even those who had great hopes for it. Says colorectal surgeon Mark E. Gilder, M.D.: “It’s remarkable.” The program’s name isn’t catchy—it’s called the Comprehensive Recovery Pathway for Lower Intestinal Surgery, or CRP for short. But it has brought tangible benefits for the patients who have participated. ISTOCK

WHEN PATIENTS NEED A COLORECTAL PROCEDURE, A SPECIAL PROGRAM NOW PREPARES THEM. RESULTS? FEWER COMPLICATIONS AND A FASTER RECOVERY.

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COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

SMARTENING UP FOR SURGERY


“WE CAN IMPROVE RESULTS BY INVOLVING PATIENTS IN THEIR CARE...IT ABSOLUTELY MAKES YOU SMILE.”

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

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—MARK E. GILDER, M.D. The CRP is designed to help people who need colorectal surgery better prepare for their operation and know what to expect during recovery. Armed with this knowledge, these patients feel less frightened, more in control and more involved in their care. Minimally invasive surgery with laparoscopy and robotics is used in a majority of individuals for this surgery. And with about 200 cases under its belt since it was launched in April 2015, the CRP has helped reduce patients’ average length of stay in the hospital, rates of complications, the use of narcotic pain medications, readmissions—“we’ve seen a reduction in everything,” says Luciana Mullman, manager of Specialty Surgical Programs. Dr. Gilder, who helped launch the program, confides that results have far exceeded even his initial expectations. “It takes your breath away how well it works,” he says. How it works is, in fact, quite simple. Any patient who is scheduled for colon or rectal surgery is encouraged to meet with a multidisciplinary team for an educational class, held the first and third Thursdays of every month. Those who cannot make it to class may instead schedule a one-on-one session. “The sessions cover everything leading up to surgery,” says Mullman, “including what to pack for the hospital and what electronic devices or hobbies or other distractions to bring, so you can focus on something other than sitting in a hospital room.” Even the tiniest of details are included, such as advising patients to bring chewing gum with them. “Chewing gum has been shown to help speed the return of normal bowel function after colon surgery,” she says. The team also covers pain management. “Pain is obviously a big fear for patients undergoing surgery, so we talk about what will be used.” One goal of the program is to use fewer opioids and narcotics, which are shown to slow down the digestive system and impede healing. Most important of all, she says, is going over what is expected of patients. “We tell them they will be up and walking the next day,” she says. “We don’t want them staying in bed all day. We tell them, ‘The quicker we get you out of the hospital, the better it is for you.’” The nurse-manager of the post-surgery Mark E. unit also describes what patients will enGilder, M.D. counter in recovery, and those who will

need an ostomy (an artificial opening through which to pass stool) receive additional instruction on what that entails. Every patient leaves the class or private consultation with a tote bag that contains an 18-page booklet outlining everything he or she needs to know about the procedure and recovery, an antiseptic body wash to use the night before and the morning of surgery to reduce the chance of surgical site infection and an electrolyte drink to consume the night before and morning of surgery to help curb appetite and help the patient stay hydrated. In some cases, the surgeon may recommend that a patient undertake “prehabilitation.” Patients who are in better condition before the operation have better outcomes, so individuals who are obese, sedentary, smokers or otherwise in less than optimal health spend time in the hospital’s cardiac rehabilitation center. “Many things are done with our patients to get them a little bit better prepared physically for surgery,” says Mullman. After surgery, when the patient is in the recovery unit, “the clinical aspect of the program kicks in,” she says. Preset orders, which are logged into the hospital’s computers, remind nursing staff to get patients up and moving, ask them to take a shower so they don’t feel “sick,” and note the nonnarcotic pain relief options. These include using local/regional blocks (injections of numbing agents at the surgical site) and intravenous acetaminophen. Holistic nurses are available for sessions in guided imagery, massage and other relaxation techniques to complement the medications. After discharge, a nurse calls the patient in 24 to 48 hours to make sure he or she understands how to use any prescribed medications and is following the doctor’s orders. “And then my team calls a month or so later to check in,” Mullman says. “Patients can also call us any time, and we can set them up with anything they need.” This concept of this prep program, which was pioneered in Scandinavia, has since spread across the United States. “We are taking the lead in New Jersey,” Dr. Gilder says. “In fact, our results are comparable to what they are seeing at the Mayo Clinic, and better than at Johns Hopkins and Duke.” Patient feedback has been very positive; one person reported that the program helped her “not feel like a victim—now I have control,” Mullman says. And that makes all the difference. “We can improve results by involving patients in their care,” Dr. Gilder says. “It absolutely makes you smile.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE COMPREHENSIVE RECOVERY PATHWAY FOR LOWER INTESTINAL SURGERY PROGRAM AT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, PLEASE CALL LUCIANA MULLMAN AT 973.322.9908 OR VISIT BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMC. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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IN GOOD HEALTH

HELP FOR PATIENTS WITH

SPECIAL NEEDS

LE T’S SAY YOU’RE UNDERGOING CHEMOTHER APY treatment for cancer, but you’ve had an allergic reaction to it. Of course you’re troubled. Now suppose one more thing: Your understanding of what’s happening to you is limited by the fact that you have Down syndrome. That was the case not long ago for Craig Rutkowski, 39, of Bayonne, who remains under the constant care of his devoted parents, Arlene and Edward Rutkowski, 69 and 71, respectively. His distress was great, and so was theirs. But fortunately, a special hospital initiative eased the experience for them all. It’s called the Special Needs Ambassadors Program, and it gives patients with special needs the extra help they may need to take medical treatments in stride. Volunteers from the hospital staff are specially trained to work with patients and their families, and to act as advocates for them with health care providers to make the accommodations necessary to ease their treatment. Arlene Rutkowski learned of the program when she first registered Craig at the Saint Barnabas Cancer Center. “They asked if we wanted to participate, and I said ‘Sure, anything that makes this whole thing easier would be wonderful,’” she says. “And they went out of their way to make this as easy as possible.” The program, which ran as a pilot for a full year before becoming official last September, developed from Saint Barnabas’ participation as a sponsor of the Special Olympics in 2014. Patricia Miller, operations director of the Cancer Center, and Frank Soldo, director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, were on a committee designed to educate staff members about special needs athletes. Both have special needs children of their own, and they hoped to take

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what they learned beyond the games and back to the hospital itself. “I have a son with autism, and so does Frank,” Miller says. “We live it, and we realize how ill-equipped we were to work with special needs patients and families to provide a good experience.” She found that when she brought her 15-year-old son, John, for testing or treatment it was very difficult for him. “The hospital can be very hard for patients with special needs to navigate,” she says. She came up with the idea of ambassadors. “It is not a clinical program; we are not giving care,” she says. “We listen to the experts—the family or the patient—and then we do what we can to accommodate the special needs patient and his or her family to ensure that treatments or procedures go as smoothly as possible.” For example, people with autism often find it hard to sit in a crowded waiting room. “It may trigger a meltdown,” says Miller. “But

COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

MEDICAL CARE CAN BE FRIGHTENING FOR THEM, BUT ‘AMBASSADORS’ COME TO THE RESCUE.

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COURTESY OF SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER

Craig Rutkowski is shown with his mother, Arlene (left) and Patricia Miller, operations director of the Saint Barnabas Cancer Center. The Special Needs Ambassadors Program helped to soothe his anxieties about his treatment.

if Mom says, ‘He can’t sit with 50 people,’ we will find a separate room, or let the family wait in the car and call them when we’re ready.” After Craig had an allergic reaction to his chemotherapy, he became very agitated at his next session. “The ambassadors brought a therapy dog to calm him,” Rutkowski says. “They explained port insertion

to him using a doll. They asked if he liked music, and what song he liked. He said ‘Yellow Submarine,’ and they were all singing ‘Yellow Submarine’ during the procedure.” Craig was given coloring books and movies to distract him. When he developed thrush, the ambassador had the kitchen make him a smoothie. “They were there every step of the way, every time he was there for an infu-

sion,” Rutkowski says. “It was spectacular, the way they talked to him—and us. It put us at ease too. They worry about the whole family.” (Fortunately, Craig is expected to make a full recovery.) When the pilot program was announced, 80 staff members volunteered, and to date 70 employees have been trained to be SNAP ambassadors. They’ve also received a toolkit containing an iPad and sensory or tactile materials that can help special needs patients stay calm during stressful situations. “In the training we also do role playing—for instance, acting out three difficult scenarios that happened here, and discussing how they could be dealt with differently,” says Miller. The program now is offered at the medical center Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. At least five ambassadors are on call every day. “If anyone in the hospital has a special needs patient, they can send out an in-house call to activate the team,” Miller says. “Most of us have crazy busy jobs here, so we try to sign up to be on call on days when we know we’ll be available.” Saint Barnabas plans to roll out the program to other Barnabas Health facilities in the coming months. Miller herself has seen the difference it can make. Her husband, Vincent, had to bring John in for a diagnostic radiology scan one day, and the ambassador, nurse Kim Anderson, handled it beautifully, she says. “John is almost nonverbal, so she talked to my husband, while asking John appropriate questions. My husband was blown away at how she included him just enough but didn’t expect too much.” Anderson allowed John to walk to the radiology lab, rather than be wheeled in his bed, and also made other accommodations that allowed him to feel more in control. “He handled it with much less of a struggle than it might have been,” says Miller. That’s exactly what these patients and their families need, says Rutkowski. “Many with special needs require more gentle care, just a little stroking, so they know that things will be OK.” —D.L.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE SPECIAL NEEDS AMBASSADORS PROGRAM AT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, PLEASE CALL PATRICIA MILLER AT 973.322.8218 OR WHEN VISITING THE HOSPITAL REQUEST A SNAP AMBASSADOR UPON REGISTRATION. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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IN GOOD HEALTH

KEEP YOUR BALANCE TAKE THIS QUESTIONNAIRE TO SEE IF YOU NEED EVALUATION AND TREATMENT FOR VESTIBULAR PROBLEMS. D O YO U E V ER FEEL D IZ Z Y? Hear a ringing in your ears? Have trouble getting out of bed or walking without support? If so, you may have a balance problem that can and should be treated. The Balance Center at Saint Barnabas Medical Center specializes in helping people get the right treatment for whatever is producing their balance problems. “These difficulties could be caused by neurological, visual or physical conditions,” says Marian Hightower, administrative coordinator and patient navigator at the Balance Center.

The center offers a 17-question screening questionnaire (below) to help you determine whether you should seek medical attention for these issues. “The purpose is to help us gauge problems and point the patient in the right direction,” she says. A variety of treatments are available, including medications and a type of physical therapy known as vestibular rehabilitation. If your score indicates that you need evaluation for possible balance problems, call the Balance Center at 973.322.5075.

:THE QUESTIONNAIRE: For each “yes” answer, add the listed number of points to your score.

❍ YES (+6) ❍ NO ❍ YES (+4) ❍ NO ❍ YES (+4) ❍ NO ❍ YES (+6) ❍ NO ❍ YES (+3) ❍ NO ❍ YES (+4) ❍ YES (+3) ❍ YES (+3) ❍ YES (+3) ❍ YES (+3) ❍ YES (+4) ❍ YES (+4)

❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO

❍ YES (+4) ❍ YES (+2) ❍ YES (+4) ❍ YES (+4) ❍ YES (+2)

❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO ❍ NO

1. Do you ever feel dizzy or light-headed? (6) 2. Have you ever suffered a stroke? (4) 3. H  ave you ever suffered any type of head or neck trauma, for example, in an auto accident, a sports injury or a work-related injury? (4) 4. Do objects appear to bounce or jump around when you are walking or running? (6) 5. If you experience dizziness, do you notice a spinning sensation? (3) 6. If you have dizziness, do sudden changes in position (such as bending down, tilting your head quickly, turning) make your symptoms worse? (4) 7. Have you noticed a sudden decrease in hearing? (3) 8. Do you feel that your hearing is significantly worse in one ear? (3) 9. Do you experience vision problems such as double vision or blurred vision? (3) 10. Do you have an increased sensitivity to light and/or sound? (3) 11. Do you experience dizziness when turning over in bed? (4) 12. Do you have dizziness when watching a moving object? (4) 13. If you experience dizziness, do you feel pain or pressure in your ears during an attack? (4) 14. Have you ever been knocked unconscious? (2) 15. Do you have frequent headaches or migraines? (4) 16. Does looking up or down cause you to become dizzy? (4) 17. Do you experience a ringing, buzzing or other sound in your ear(s)? (2)

—————————— SCORING : 5–9: Possible need for assessment. Your physician may want to consider vestibular diagnostic testing. 10 or greater: Vestibular evaluation, including vestibular diagnosis testing, is indicated.

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ISTOCK

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAILABLE AT THE BALANCE CENTER AT SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER, CALL 973.322.5075 OR VISIT BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMC.

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YOUR FRESH

START

BY LEE LUSARDI CONNOR

5 TIPS TO FEEL BETTER AND BE BETTER IN “SWEET ’16.”

THE WINTER OF A NEW YEAR IS A GREAT TIME TO RETHINK your habits and set the bar a bit higher when it comes to health and happiness. We all have different goals and struggles, but we needn’t feel alone—certain key principles can help us all. Consider these five simple, straightforward (notice we didn’t say “easy”) ways to increase your well-being, starting now.

THINK SMALL.

Eat better. Get fit. These are big goals, best approached with small steps, according to wellness coach Brett Blumenthal, author of 52 Small Changes: One Year to a Happier, Healthier You.“We all know that a major overhaul doesn’t happen with a snap of the fingers,” she says. “But a big change can be made up of many small ones, and if you focus on one thing for a week, you can maintain that change while you add a new one the following week.” One week’s emphasis on the goal of “eating better,” for example, could include slashing the sodium in your diet, or staying properly hydrated, or making certain smart choices at the supermarket. Blumenthal’s latest book, 52 Small Changes for the Mind, explores less tangible concepts, such as reducing stress and increasing happiness. Among her suggestions are “Make time for music each day” and “Smile as often as possible,” both of which are backed by research linking these practices to improved well-being. “We can all make micro-changes in our lives that add up and, over time, tend to become habit,” says Ben Michaelis, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist in Manhattan and author of Your Next Big Thing: 10 Small Steps to Get Moving and Get Happy. “And that’s when the benefits really start to accrue.” The small things you don’t do, or what Dr. Michaelis calls “micro denials”—the week without wine, the birthday party at which you skip the cake—can be just as important. “Every form of ancient wisdom or religion has some denial built into it, such as fasting,” he points out. “Denial gives you a sense of control over your environment. Having the wherewithal to hold back on something, even for a little while, helps our self-esteem.”

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BE TRUTHFUL.

No one gets through adult life being completely honest. In fact, a study at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst found that 60 percent of study subjects lied at least once during a 10-minute conversation. But recent research indicates that being more honest may not only be better for your conscience, but for your health as well. Anita Kelly, Ph.D., and Lijuan Wang, Ph.D., both professors at the University of Notre Dame, studied 72 healthy adults, splitting them into a “sincerity” group and a control group, and subjecting them to polygraph tests and health measures for five weeks. Members of the sincerity group were instructed to “speak honestly, truthfully and sincerely—not only about the big things, but also about the small things, such as why

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you were late. While you certainly can choose not to answer questions, you must always mean what you say.” Over the course of the study, the sincerity group reported significantly fewer health complaints (such as headaches, sore throats, nausea) than did members of the control group. The findings ring true to clinical psychologist Michael Friedman, Ph.D., a New Jersey resident with a practice in New York City. “In terms of anecdotal clinical evidence, my impression is that honesty is highly related to health and well-being,” he says. The reasons, he believes, are threefold: Suppression leads to stress. “There’s pretty good evidence that suppressing emotions and thoughts— whether you’re lying to others about what you feel or lying to yourself—makes depression and anxiety worse.” What you’re hiding is probably not healthy. “The way most people give themselves ‘permission’ to indulge in unhealthy behaviors—such as binge eating, smoking or excessive drinking—is predicated on the behavior being secret. You’re much more likely to engage in such behaviors if you feel OK lying about them.” Lack of sincerity shows. “If someone catches a whiff that you’re a dishonest person, they view you differently, trust you less and likely don’t want to deepen a relationship with you,” Dr. Friedman says. “It’s very rare that someone will confront you directly, but they’ll steer away from you. Over time, that becomes a problem, because satisfying social networks are strongly related to health and well-being.” As a general rule, the adage “To thine own self be true” applies, says Dr. Friedman. “People who are dishonest with others also tend not to be fully honest with themselves. All things being equal, the more honest you can be with yourself and others, the better off you’ll be.”

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REDUCE NOISE.

We’re surrounded by sound: Fluorescent lights buzz, air duct blowers blow, coworkers’ conversations float over the cubicle wall, traffic rumbles by. This so-called “social noise” has tripled over the past 30 years, according to research by the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise—and it’s causing damage to more than our hearing. In fact, unwanted noise can, by affecting stress and blood hormones, lead to hypertension, cardiovascular disease and even disruption in the brain’s executive functions (such as planning and reasoning). Our bodies are composed mostly of water, and water responds to sound vibrations. So when we are exposed to sound, we respond not only at an intellectual and emotional level, but literally at a cellular level too. Fortunately, most of us have a number of options when it comes to dialing down everyday noise. At work, noise-canceling earbuds or headphones are increasingly acceptable, thanks to their widespread use by millennials. At home, short of going all in on soundproofing, we can opt for actions that range from inexpensive (caulking and sealing all openings in walls and doors) to medium-expensive (investing in solid wood doors and thick rugs for wooden floors) to expensive (installing double-pane windows, which has the added benefit of lowering your

heating and cooling bills). We can choose not to have the TV and radio on constantly, or replace that background noise with soothing classical music or nature sounds such as waterfalls, crashing waves or singing birds. Even our naturally exuberant (i.e., noisy) children can be guided to creative activities that keep the clamor to a minimum, such as reading, drawing, doing jigsaw puzzles or playing board games. “Research shows that exposure to noise on a daily basis can affect people’s ability to perform duties on the job,” says Judy Levitan, an audiologist at the Speech and Hearing Center at Saint Barnabas Medical Center. The medical center sees the effects of noise on both recovering patients and infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, says Levitan, and that’s why “there is a focus on reducing noise within the hospital to improve the healing environment.” Spend some time thinking about how you can reduce the noise in your daily life. When you get in the car, do you automatically turn on the radio? Try driving without it and see if it makes a difference in your stress level. Did you hear the birds this morning or the rain on the roof—or did you automatically turn on the news and drown it out? Turn the TV off in the a.m. and see what happens. You may feel more relaxed—and you may find yourself talking to your spouse or children more. And that’s a good thing! MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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CONSIDER A COACH.

We can all go to the gym, take a fitness class online or buy all kinds of home fitness equipment. But more and more of us are turning to personalized training and health or wellness coaching, according to the 2015 International Fitness Industry Trend Report. Some reasons for this are self-evident: Personal training is tailored to your needs, makes you accountable and reduces the possibility of injury. Skilled personal trainers also know how to mix things up and help you figure out how to actually enjoy your workouts. Other factors are less obvious. “For insurance reasons, doctors are no longer able to spend as much time with a patient,” says certified personal trainer Carol Michaels of Carol Michaels Fitness in Short Hills. “They may tell you to lose weight, but not explain how. Or they send you to a physical therapy center, where the therapist may be running from one patient to another and may not be able to take time to understand the root cause of your injury—for instance, overuse or posture issues. So it is up to the personal trainer to spend a full hour with a client and really get to know the person’s needs.” For similar reasons, the relatively new field of health/wellness coaching is booming. Such coaching encompasses exercise, but also covers diet, behaviors and overall health management. “People say knowledge is power, but that’s not really true—it’s the applica-

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tion of knowledge that’s power,” says Lee Jordan, a personal trainer and health coach certified by the American Council on Exercise (ACE). “Tons of books offer nutritional and fitness guidance, but knowing and doing are two different things. As health coaches, what we do is walk down the path side by side with people throughout the day.” Jordan keeps in touch with clients around the country via texting and cloud-based apps that measure activity. Where a traditional nutritionist might, for example, tell a patient to keep a food diary and come back in two weeks, Jordan’s clients send photos of their meals or snacks. “This provides a moment of thoughtfulness for the patient, and allows me to capture a tremendous amount of data,” says Jordan. “It’s a very collaborative model. We become immersed in the client’s life.” (To find an ACE-certified health coach in your area, check out the “Find an ACE Pro” section at acefitness.org.) If one-on-one work is not your cup of tea, that’s cool—the idea is simply to find what is. “Some may find individualization intimidating, and prefer a group setting,” says Anthony Wall, ACE’s director of education. “The music, the flavor, the style of group fitness classes can be incredibly powerful too, and we see tremendous retention and engagement there. Others may find a combination of coaching and classes works best. In any case, you need to seek out the tools that can help you create sustainable lifestyle change.”

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OWN YOUR AGE. “We live in a world and time in which aging is defined as a failure,” says Bill Thomas, M.D., a geriatrician and author of Second Wind: Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper and More Connected Life. “We are all exposed to some really unhealthy messages, such as that the best version of you happened a long time ago and whatever you are now is less than what you were back when you were 45 or 28 or 17.” Yet a considerable body of research shows that better attitudes toward aging can lead to better health. For example, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging recently reported that people who held negative stereotypes about aging in their 40s were at greater risk of Alzheimer’s when they reached their late 60s. Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health found that individuals with positive impressions of aging were more likely to recover from a severe disability than their negative-minded peers—and lived an average of seven years longer. So pervasive is our societal preference for youth that many of us don’t even think to question our own attitudes, much less try to change them. But that’s what must be done,

says Dr. Thomas, who conducts annual “Age of Disruption” tours to try to change people’s ideas about aging. (For more information, see changingaging.org.) “Own your age!” he says. “Get yourself in front of a mirror and say, ‘I am myself right now. This is exactly how I’m supposed to look.’ You are awesome the way you are. To age is to be successful. Be who you are right now, and in doing so you’ll open the door to tremendous new possibilities.” And if you look in the mirror and don’t love what you see? “Finding fault much more often leads to doing nothing than it leads to doing something,” Dr. Thomas maintains. “What stops people from doing simple common-sense things for themselves—changing their diet, exercising more—is the fact that they feel bad about themselves. Own yourself first. Then you have a springboard for success.” And there’s one more thing. Beyond accepting the physical self, Dr. Thomas says, successful aging usually involves caring passionately about something bigger than you. “It could be your congregation, world peace, global climate change—anything. That caring leads to the best second half of life—and it connects you to other people.”

MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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THE ART OF THE TART

IT’S NOT ALWAYS A SWEET DESSERT! MANY TARTS LIVE UP TO THEIR NAME WITH DELIGHTFUL SAVORY FLAVORS. THEY’RE EASY TO PREPARE AND ELEGANT TO SERVE. HERE’S A TRIO YOU’LL WANT TO TRY.

BABY NEW ZEALAND SPINACH QUICHE Preparation 2 hours, 15 minutes (for the tart dough) and 20 minutes (for the filling). Rest 1 hour. Cooking 1 hour.

n 1 recipe Savory Pâté Brisée (see below) n 1/3 cup flour, for rolling out the dough Custard Filling n 2 cups whole milk n 2 cups cream n 2 eggs n 2 egg yolks n Fine salt and black pepper n Fresh nutmeg Filling

n Olive oil n 2 Tbs. butter n 7 oz. baby New Zealand spinach, washed, stalks removed

n 4½ oz. pork belly or unsmoked slab bacon Preheat the oven to 300°F. On a floured work surface, roll out the Savory Pâté Brisée to thick with a rolling pin. Place the dough in a buttered and floured pie pan. Crimp the edges. Lightly prick the crust all over with a fork. Chill the prepared dough in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Prebake this tart base at 300°F for 15 minutes. Set aside to cool.

1/8-inch

Combine the milk, cream, whole eggs and egg yolks in a mixing bowl. Season with salt and pepper, and add a bit of freshly grated nutmeg. Set aside. In a frying pan, melt the butter in a touch of olive oil, then add the spinach. Cook without allowing to brown. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside. Cut the pork belly into small matchsticks, and cook it in the pan without allowing it to brown. Set aside. Bring the oven temperature up to 350°F. Place the cooked spinach and the cooked pork in the prebaked, cooled tart shell. Pour the cream mixture over the top to cover. Bake for 35 minutes. Serve immediately. SAVORY PÂTÉ BRISÉE Preparation 15 minutes. Rest 2 hours.

n n n n n

2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened 1 tsp. fine salt 3½ Tbs. water 1 egg yolk

Sift the flour onto the workspace. Add the softened butter, cut into pieces. Combine the flour and butter with your fingertips until you achieve a sandy consistency. Add the salt, water and egg yolk. Mix the ingredients until they are evenly combined. Bring the dough together into a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap. Chill the dough for 2 hours until it becomes firm.

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IBERIAN CHORIZO AND MOZZARELLA TART Preparation 2 hours, 15 minutes (for the tart dough) and 20 minutes (for the filling). Rest 1 hour. Cooking 45 minutes.

n 1 recipe Savory Pâté Brisée (see page 44)

n 1/3 cup flour, for rolling out the dough Filling 1 onion 2 Tbs. olive oil 5 vine tomatoes 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 sprig thyme Fine salt and black pepper 4 cocktail tomatoes, cut into 3–4 rounds each

n n n n n n n

n 12 rounds of Iberian chorizo n 2 oz. mozzarella cheese, diced n A few leaves of dwarf basil Preheat the oven to 300°F. On a floured work surface, roll out the Savory Pâté Brisée with a rolling pin to between ¼- and 1/8-inch thick. Place the dough in a buttered tart pan. Crimp the edges. Lightly prick the crust all over with a fork. Chill the prepared dough in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Prebake this tart base at 300°F for 8 minutes. Set aside to cool. Make the tomato coulis. Thinly slice the onion. Heat the olive oil in a saucepan and add the onion. Quarter the vine tomatoes and add them, along with the garlic and the thyme. Season with salt and pepper. Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Purée the sauce in a blender or with an immersion blender, and pass it through a chinois. Pour some of the tomato coulis into the cooled, prebaked tart crust. Add the cocktail tomatoes, chorizo rounds and diced mozzarella. Bake at 350°F for 20 minutes. Garnish the tart with a few leaves of dwarf basil. Serve immediately.

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NYONS OLIVE, TAPENADE AND FRIED CAPER TART Preparation 2 hours, 15 minutes (for the tart dough) and 20 minutes (for the filling). Rest 1 hour. Cooking about 40 minutes.

■ 1 recipe Savory Pâté Brisée (see page 44) ■ 1/3 cup flour, for rolling out the dough Tapenade

■ 1¾ oz. anchovy fillets (about 12 anchovies)

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

2 cloves garlic, peeled 1 cup black olives, pitted ¼ cup chunk tuna in oil, drained 6 Tbs. capers Juice of ½ lemon ½ cup olive oil

Topping

■ 1 cup black olives, pitted ■ 10 capers ■ A few leaves of dwarf basil Preheat the oven to 300°F. On a floured work surface, roll out the Savory Pâté Brisée to 1/8-inch thick with a rolling pin. Place the dough in a buttered tart pan. Crimp the edges. Lightly prick the crust all over with a fork. Chill the prepared dough in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Prebake this tart base at 300°F for 8 minutes. Set aside to cool. Soak the anchovies in cool water to remove the excess salt. Rinse the anchovy fillets. Run the tuna, anchovy fillets, capers, lemon juice, black olives and garlic through a food processor. Pass the mixture through a very fine sieve, then place it into a mortar and pestle it, adding olive oil bit by bit, until it becomes thick and smooth. Bring the oven up to 350°F. Use a pastry brush to brush the tapenade over the tart crust, then sprinkle with black olives. Bake at 350°F for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, fry the capers until they open. Remove the tart from the oven and garnish it with the fried capers and a few leaves of dwarf basil. Serve immediately.

Reprinted with permission from © Tarts: Classic and Contemporary, Sweet and Savory by Frédéric Anton and Christelle Brua, Rizzoli New York, 2016. Images © Richard Haughton.

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make me a

POWER FOOD

MATCHA

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE PREPARATION PROCESS for some. For others, the bold, grassy hues are the attraction. One thing is sure: The powdered green tea known as matcha (rhymes with “gotcha”) has had a steep climb in popularity lately. The earthy beverage is actually a venerable one, with a role in traditional Japanese tea ceremonies that dates back centuries. But its new hip heyday seems to be today. Even avowed coffee snobs may be wooed by the health benefits and smooth buzz that matcha provides. Take the time to whisk yourself a bowl, and see if this verdant drink becomes your new go-to.

POWER UP

Most teas contain catechins, antioxidants that appear to protect against cancer by neutralizing highly reactive chemicals called free radicals. Catechins may also account for the heart-protective effect some research has found in green tea—and at least one study has shown that they can reduce body fat. Where does matcha fit

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into all this? Well, matcha’s catechin content is as much as three times that of other green teas. The beverage is also believed to aid cognitive function, especially in the elderly.

DID YOU KNOW?

Caffeine intake from matcha is similar to that from coffee, but the release rate is slower. So it gives longer-lasting energy with less of a grump-inducing crash. Since matcha powder is made from grinding the whole tea leaf, you could technically call it a loose-leaf tea (no bags here), but it’s really in a category of its own. Shading the leaves during growth weeks concentrates the flavor and color of the leaves before the late spring harvest. A quick steam makes sure those qualities are locked in before the cooling and drying process. Finally, after the stems are separated, the leaves are ready to be ground into the recognizable powdered form. (One caution: lead. Green tea often contains lead, which is absorbed by the plant from the environment. When traditional green tea is brewed, the

THIS GREEN TEA IS BECOMING A POPULAR PICK-ME-UP FOR THE HIP, HEALTHY SET. vast majority of the lead stays in the leaves, which are discarded. With matcha, the entire leaf is consumed, so you will ingest more lead. For this reason, an independent group called ConsumerLab.com recommends limiting matcha to one cup a day for adults only.)

BUY/STORE/SERVE

There is a wealth of matcha producers and sellers out there and, as with any tea, discovery is part of the fun—keep trying new kinds until you find the one you like best. If you want to prepare matcha at home, the process is simple: Sift some powder into your tea bowl, pour less-than-boiling water over it, and use a wooden (usually bamboo) whisk to mix the tea to a froth. Once the container is opened, make sure to keep your tea stored airtight and in a cool place such as a pantry or refrigerator drawer. Matcha also adds wonderful color and flavor to food items; green tea ice cream and baked goods are popular choices. Matcha pancakes, anyone? —HARRY DOWDEN

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2016 | MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ask the

HEALTH

PROFESSIONAL

QUESTIONS FROM READERS + ANSWERS BY LEADING HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

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[A] Heel pain can quickly put you out of commission. Dr. Michael Verdi of the Foot Health Center now offers Extracorporeal Pulse Activation (Epat), a new, advanced and FDA-cleared treatment that gets you back on your feet in no time. Traditional methods for heel pain, such as cortisone shots and frequent doctor visits are unnecessary with Epat. Highly effective, Epat is a noninvasive therapy with rapid recovery time. Treatment consists of gently directing pressure waves with a wand on the heel to stimulate blood circulation, resulting in rapid healing and regeneration of damaged tissue. Dr. Verdi, the founder of Foot Health Center, is among many achievements, a Diplomate of the American Board of Podiatric Surgery, Pediatric Footcare, Sports Medicine, and Bunion and Hammertoe Surgery. He has been on staff at Saint Barnabas Medical Center since 1995, and is board certified by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery, and is also a Fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgery. Please contact Foot Health Center to learn more about Epat.

“Compassion, experience and skill yield great results.”

M E E T T H E H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N A L

ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

Do you have chronic heel pain?

Michael V. Verdi, D.P.M., FACFAS • Board Certified Diplomate American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery • Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, D.P.M. degree 1993 • Fellow American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

Kirsten Barisonek, D.P.M.

• The George Washington University, BS 2006 • Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, D.P.M. degree 2011

Douglas N. DeLorenzo, D.P.M, FACFAS

• Board Certified Diplomate American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery • New York College of Podiatric Medicine, D.P.M. degree 1992 • Diplomate in Wound Care by the American Professional Wound Care Association  

Danielle Acampora, D.P.M.

• Rutgers University, BS 2007 • Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, D.P.M. Degree 2012 OFFICE SPECIALIZING IN: • Reconstructive Foot and Ankle Surgery • Bunion and Hammertoe Surgery • Genesis Plus Nail Laser for Toenail Fungus • EPAT for Heel Pain • Sports Medicine • Pediatric Foot Care • Wound Care/Diabetic Foot Care • Geriatric Foot Care • Foot and Ankle Surgery SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR OUR FULL LIST OF EXTENSIVE SERVICES OFFERED.

FOOT HEALTH CENTER, L.L.C. 1500 Pleasant Valley Way, Ste. 204, West Orange, NJ 07052

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ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES: Breast Procedures • Breast Augmentation - Asymmetry - Revision Surgery • Breast Lift • Breast Reduction • Breast Reconstruction • Gynecomastia (Male Breast Reduction) Body Procedures • Arm Lift • Buttock Lift • Brazilian Butt Lift • Coolsculpting • Labiaplasty (Vaginal Rejuvenation) • Liposuction • Mommy Makeover • Plastic Surgery After Weight Loss • Thigh Lift • Tummy Tuck Facial Procedures • Aesthetic Surgery of the Ear • Brow Lift • Eyelid Surgery • Face-Lift • Neck Lift • Liposuction of the Neck

What can I do to get back my pre-baby body? [A] Having children is incredibly rewarding, but no one warned us about the toll childbirth would take on our bodies! It’s comforting to know there is help to counteract these physical changes. The Mommy Makeover is a combination of procedures that can improve the unwanted effects of childbirth on the body. The Mommy Makeover focuses on the breasts, abdomen and hips. A makeover can bring back your once full and shapely breasts that may be suffering from sagging or deflation that often comes with pregnancy or nursing. It includes a lift, augmentation or reduction to correct sagging, enlarged areola, loss of upper fullness or nipples pointing south. We can improve your “postpartum pouch” with a tummy tuck to tighten muscles, remove excess skin or eliminate excess fat in the abdomen and hip area, adding liposuction if needed. If you are concerned about having multiple surgeries, performing the breast and body contouring procedures together decreases risk by exposing you to anesthesia one time. This means lower costs, and taking time away from your family or work only once. Mommy Makeovers can restore your body back to vibrancy, but it is also extremely crucial to carefully choose a surgeon for your needs. As a female board-certified plastic surgeon for over 25 years, I am uniquely sensitive to the aesthetic needs of female patients. I intimately understand your desire to step back into your more vibrant self. If you are ready to regain confidence about your appearance, please contact our office for a consultation.

M E E T T H E H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N A L

Beverly Friedlander,

M.D., FACS

Med Spa • Fillers: - Juvederm Ultra - Juvederm Ultra Plus - Voluma - Restylane - Restylane Lyft - Restylane Silk - Radiesse - Sculptra • Wrinkle Reduction - Botox - Dysport - Xeomin • Ultherapy • Lasers • Fractional Laser Resurfacing • CoolSculpting • Kybella • Hand Rejuvenation

• Board Certified Plastic Surgeon • City University of New York/State University of New York Health Science Center, BA-MD • Albert Einstein College of Medicine/ Montefiore Hospital, Residency • Top Plastic Surgeon, Consumer’s Research Council • Top Doctor, The Castle Connelly Guide • Leading Women Entrepreneur 2013 • American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS) • American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) • American College of Surgeons (ACS) • International College of Surgeons (ICS) • International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ISAPS)

BEVERLY FRIEDLANDER, M.D. 636 Morris Tpke., Ste. 1A, Short Hills, NJ 07078

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[A] Aging affects all layers of the face. The skin gets thinner, loses its recoil and sags. The fatty layers and the muscles shrink. Therefore rejuvenation has to deal with loose skin and the lost volume. These are the principles of the modern face-lift, which remains the foundation of effective facial rejuvenation. The volume is replenished by fat grafting or facial fillers like Restylane, Juvederm, Voluma or Radiesse. My surgical technique has been refined and perfected over many years, allowing me to be most effective while giving patients the fastest recovery. I normally perform my facelift, eyelid and brow lift procedures in a fully accredited surgery center or hospital under local anesthesia with moderate sedation given by a specialized nurse under my direct supervision. Here again I have refined the delivery of the local anesthesia, so that the patient experiences minimal discomfort. This has improved the results and the recovery by avoiding nausea and vomiting after the operation, therefore reducing bruising and swelling. The majority of my patients love this approach. However, they are all given the choice of heavy sedation by an anesthesiologist or general anesthesia. It is common that in ten days to two weeks, the patient can resume work or socialize. Fat grafting or fillers can be combined with these procedures or can be done in the office separately. I routinely use Botox and Dysport, which are very effective in controlling undesirable muscle activities, but I truly believe that other noninvasive technologies over-promise and always under-deliver.

M E E T T H E H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N A L

ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

What are the most effective facial rejuvenation techniques?

Farhad Rafizadeh, M.D., FACS HOSPITAL AFFILIATIONS: • Morristown Medical Center • Saint Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston • Saint Clare’s Hospital, Denville MEMBERSHIPS & AWARDS: • American Society of Plastic Surgeons • American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery • American College of Surgeons (FACS) • New York Regional Society of Plastic Surgeons • Morris County Medical Society • New Jersey State Medical Society • N J Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons • Top Doctor, Top Plastic Surgeon in New Jersey and New York, recognized on a yearly basis • Patient Choice Award, Compassionate Doctor Award, 2010 MEDICAL TRAINING AND EDUCATION: • NeuchÂtel University, Switzerland • Lausanne School of Medicine, Switzerland • Saint Barnabas Medical Center, General Surgery Residency • Morristown Memorial Hospital, Chief Residency • New York Hospital, Cornell Medical Center (New York Presbyterian) and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Fellowships SERVICES OFFERED: • Restylane/Juvederm FACE: • Rhinoplasty • Blepharoplasty • Lip Lift • Botox/Dysport • Brow Lift BREAST: • Eyelid Surgery • Breast Augmentation • Face-lift • Breast Lift • Fat Grafting • Breast Reconstruction • Filler Treatments • Breast Reduction • Otoplasty

BODY: • Abdominoplasty • Brachioplasty • Liposuction • Thigh Lift SKIN CARE: • ThermiTight RF Technology

FARHAD RAFIZADEH, M.D., FACS 101 Madison Ave., Morristown, NJ 07960

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973.267.0928

info@BetterPlasticsurgery.com

betterplasticsurgery.com

1/27/16 11:41 AM


Pharm.D., FAARFM • Owner, Head Compounding Pharmacist and Wellness Specialist • Doctor of Pharmacy with High Honors from Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University • Completed sterile and non-sterile compounding apprenticeship and ACPE accredited sterile training at Professional Compounding Centers of America (PCCA) in Houston, TX. • Full Fellow in Anti-Aging and Regenerative/ Functional Medicine (FAARFM) through American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (A4M) and Wellness/Nutrition/ Age-Management Consultant • Active member of New Jersey Academy of Compounding Pharmacists (NJACP)  and International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists (IACP) • Completed DAN! (Defeat Autism Now!) Practitioner seminar COMPOUNDING PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDED FOR THE FOLLOWING NEEDS: • Pain Management and Sports Medicine • Hormone Therapy for Women and Men • Adrenal/Thyroid Dysfunction • Pediatrics • Podiatry • Wound Care • Dermatology • Urogynecology – Pelvic Floor Disorder • Unavailable Medications & Shortages

[A] The debate and confusion about synthetic versus natural (bioidentical) hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has gone on for almost fifteen years. It greatly benefits menopausal and post-menopausal women to have a better understanding about the key effect HRT has on aging and vitality, and the differences between synthetic and bio-identical hormones. As the body ages, it suffers due to declining levels of hormones. A lack of hormones, such as natural estrogen has been linked to memory loss, cardiovascular disease and bone fracture. HRT can reverse those effects. Before any hormone therapy can be considered, it is imperative to understand the significant differences, benefits and risks between synthetic and bio-identical hormones. A majority of synthetic hormones do not produce the same results as natural hormones. Synthetics with dyes, fillers and a different substrate of hormone structure can produce severe side effects and send different messages throughout the body. HRT terminologies can become confusing, leading patients to worry. For example, progestin, a synthetic hormone, and progesterone, a natural hormone, are often mistakenly used interchangeably. However, progestin does not help certain physical issues that progesterone has proven to resolve. Progestin has been shown to stay in the body longer, causing increased risks of blood clots and vasospasms. A triad relationship between the patient, doctor and the pharmacist is necessary for successful therapy. All patients are unique and respond differently depending on the combination of hormone, dosing and delivery mode. Close monitoring and adjustments are essential, which is why the selection of an experienced compounding pharmacy is critical to a woman’s health. We work with you and your practitioner to provide customized hormone therapy delivering the needed hormones in appropriate dosages to meet your specific requirements.

ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

M E E T T H E H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N A L

D.H. John Kim,

Should I be afraid to transition into natural hormone replacement therapy (HRT)?

“No two women are alike, so hormone therapy needs to be customized based on the individual.”

ROBINSON DRUG AND COMPOUNDING CENTER 2 East Main St., Mendham, NJ 07945

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973.543.2525

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ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

Why are the form and function of a tummy tuck equally important? [A] For 20 years I have championed the concept that gaining functional improvement to the abdomen is as important as gaining cosmetic improvement. Diagnosis is the first step. I determine skin quality and quantity issues, fat issues (where it is located: under the skin or inside the abdomen, front of the torso or the hips/flanks) and abdominal wall issues (diastasis and hernias). This diagnosis sets the course of surgery. I’ll determine whether it is a skin only tummy tuck or complete, including abdominal wall contouring, whether liposuction would be beneficial, if this is only below the belly button or for the entire abdomen. Restoring the abdominal wall fascia to its tight state without defects equally across the entire abdomen enhances your waist’s shape, improves posture, and significantly improves core strength and fitness stamina, when compared to the presurgical condition. The most dramatic cosmetic and functional improvements come from the complete tummy tuck, known as abdominoplasty flankplasty, with abdominal wall repair. I use a customization principle when dealing with abdominal wall laxity issues. My approach involves suture techniques of the abdominal wall fascia that dramatically improve its shape and strength, yielding in many cases an idealized body. My website shows hundreds of views of before and after cases. Patients come from across the country and internationally for this procedure. A 53-year-old female patient showed me a photo of herself in a bikini at age 18. She said, “I keep looking at my new body and I still can’t figure out how you got me to look like this. I just can’t believe it!” It certainly is very gratifying to exceed expectations and deliver on dreams!

M E E T T H E H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N A L

Scott A. Spiro

M.D., FACS

• American College of Surgeons, Fellow • National Board of Medical Examiners, Diplomate • American Board of Surgery, Diplomate • American Board of Plastic Surgery, Diplomate • Included numerous times in the Consumers’ Research Council of America Guide to America’s Top Surgeons • Named Top Plastic Surgeon by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd., 2006-2010 • Named Top Doctor, NJ Monthly, 2007-2008 and 2010-2015 and Top Surgeon 2009-2010, 2013-2014 • Medical Honoree, American Cancer Society’s 34th Annual Diamond Ball, 2013 • Awarded Best Medical Spa, Suburban Essex, 2014 • Selected for the cover 2015 NJ Monthly Top Docs Issue

SPIRO PLASTIC SURGERY 101 Old Short Hills Rd., Ste. 510, West Orange, NJ 07052

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973.736.5907

SERVICES OFFERED: BODY: • Abdominoplasty • Fat Grafting • Total Body Lift • Liposuction • CoolSculpting Nonsurgical Fat Reduction BREAST: • Breast Augmentation • Breast Lift • Breast Revision • Breast Reduction • Breast Reconstruction • Challenging Breast Anomalies and Asymmetry • Gynecomastia FACIAL: • Facial Surgery • Rhinoplasty • Eyelid Surgery FULL MEDI-SPA SERVICES: • Botox • Fillers • Peels • Skin Care

drspiro.com

1/27/16 11:41 AM


[A] Yes. There’s an excellent, safe, nonsurgical treatment that tightens and smooths skin laxity under the chin and neck, called ThermiTight®. This procedure is less invasive than surgery. ThermiTight® uses radiofrequency energy to heat tissue underneath the skin, prompting the skin to repair existing collagen and produce new collagen over the next few months. You are awake and comfortable during the short procedure, which is done by gently inserting a blunt probe under the skin to heat up tissue to the desired level. There’s no downtime with the exception of temporary swelling. Requiring only a single treatment, its results should last 3-5 years or until the effects of natural aging have caught up. Call and learn how ThermiTight® can work for you.

Dawn M. Gangi, M.D. •R  eaders’ Choice Awards Winner, Morris/Essex Health & Life Magazine, 2014 and 2015 •M  ember, American Academy of Aesthetic Medicine

ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

Can I tighten loose skin under my chin without surgery?

“With over 25 years of experience in women’s health and beauty, I am dedicated to helping you look and feel your best.”

ETOILE COSMETIC MEDICINE STUDIO 1247 Sussex Tpke., Ste. 110, Randolph, NJ 07869

973.668.9106

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What would be different about your healthcare if its design were up to you? [A] Imagine what it would be like if you had a family doctor available 24/7 who truly listens to and understands your healthcare needs. Now, it’s possible. After a decade at a large practice handling thousands of patients every year, Dr. Dena Lacara knew there had to be a better way to deliver compassionate care. Continuum Care at Mecca is Dr. Lacara’s vision of the ideal primary care medical practice. She has recently transitioned her office into a smaller, personalized practice offering all-inclusive, direct primary care with unlimited, unhurried visits and calls, same or next day appointments and home visits for an affordable monthly fee. By eliminating the constraints of insurance, Dr. Lacara can now do what she always wanted to do by focusing on hundreds of patients instead of thousands. To see how Continuum Care at Mecca can benefit you and your family, call today to learn more.

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973.826.0440

drlacara@meccamedical.com

continuumatmecca.com

1/27/16 10:25 AM


ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL

How can I rejuvenate the skin on my neck and chin?

Janet Neigel, M.D., FACS

• Board-certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology • 10 Best in Client Satisfaction, American Institute of Plastic Surgeons 2016 • Voted NJ Top Doctor 2015

[A] There are several effective ways to make the skin on your neck and chin look younger and firmer. The newest treatment is Kybella™, a safe, FDAapproved, clinically proven and nonsurgical injection treating submental fat known as “the double chin.” Kybella™ destroys fat cells, resulting in contracted skin under the chin. On average, patients need two to four sessions, four to six weeks apart with little downtime and temporary swelling. For tightening, we offer Pelleve, an ongoing radio frequency heat process that stimulates collagen deep below the skin with no downtime. Several Pelleve spa treatments achieve optimal results. Neck liposuction tightens a severe case of sagging skin and laser treatments eliminate brown spots and sun damage on the neck, while firming up the skin. Patients can expect several days of downtime with these procedures. Remember, a procedure with more downtime typically means better results. Find out with a complimentary consultation how the Neigel Center can make you look years younger.

NEIGEL CENTER FOR COSMETIC & LASER SURGERY 254 Columbia Tpke., Ste. 200 Florham Park, NJ 07932

201 State Rte. 17 Rutherford, NJ 07070

973.410.1100 eyelid.com

JOB OPPORTUNITIES INDEPENDENT SALES REP Wainscot Media, publisher of Monmouth Health & Life magazine, is seeking an independent salesperson to sell corporate sponsorships of community events in northern and central New Jersey.

Start with a blank canvas. Add your favorite wine, some of your best friends, and leave with your own masterpiece at the end of a fun-filled evening! Our talented instructors will teach you step-by-step as you paint in a relaxed, group setting. BYOB, we provide everything else. Have your next night out at Uptown Art!

This independent position offers excellent earning potential. Backed by an innovative, entrepreneurial company, you’ll have the opportunity to expand into sales of other marketing products and services. If you’re a polished sales professional seeking flexibility in your work life, this may be the perfect opportunity for you. We invite you to send a cover letter and resume to personnel@ wainscotmedia.com.

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1/27/16 10:25 AM


WINE + SPIRITS

MALBEC’S comeback THIS ARGENTINE VARIETAL HAS REGAINED ITS REPUTATION FOR SUBTLETY AND BALANCE— AND HARD TIMES ACTUALLY HELPED. DON’T CRY FOR MALBEC, Argentina! The truth is, the wine for which that country is best known came through the economic crash of the late 1990s and early 2000s. It didn’t just survive; it flourished. Over time, the downturn had an unexpected upside, as runaway inflation corrected an imbalance in the market. In the sour climate, it no longer made sense to bottle low-end Malbecs because it was pretty much impossible to turn a profit on them. So vintners slashed production of their two-buck chuck—the subpar swill they’d been pumping out for years, staining Malbec’s image around the world. “So much cheap stuff had been getting out there that it was hurting Malbec’s reputation,” says Paul Hobbs, a veteran winemaker and wine importer. “It was a serious problem. But the Argentine economy solved it for us.” As it happens, Hobbs lent a hand as well. A former winemaker for Robert Mondavi, Hobbs has roots in Malbec that run decades deep. He first turned his mind to it in the late 1980s, when he traveled to Argentina and was struck by the varietal’s vast untapped potential. Though Malbec grew abundantly around Mendoza, the country’s largest wine-making region, its quantity far outstripped its quality. Most Argentine Malbec wound up in inexpensive blends known as “criollas”—hohum table wines with not much to recommend them other than their bargain-basement price. Hobbs envisioned a different fate for Malbec, a noble French-born grape that he believed just needed to be treated with more dignity. Using old-vine fruit grown by Nicolas Catena, one of Argentina’s most respected vintners, Hobbs began a deep dive into Malbec, applying Old World

practices to New World wine production. The result was Malbecs of unusual refinement, not the high-alcohol brutes that so many consumers had come to know. In 1999, Hobbs co-founded Viña Cobos, a Mendoza winery, where he experimented with varied root stocks, planting the varietal on new sites that showcased Malbec’s distinctive terroir. The wines he produced earned widespread accolades for their bright notes and balance. But in the world of Malbec they were the exception, not the rule. Cheap Malbec still flooded the market, and in the early aftermath of the crash it gushed out in even greater torrents. Much of it was overoaked and over-extracted, with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Some of it was fraudulently labeled. “It got so bad that there were ‘Malbecs’ on the market that didn’t contain any actual Malbec,” Hobbs says. “We used to joke that they were born with a birth certificate of Bonarda [a less nuanced grape varietal] but were traveling with a Malbec passport.” Meanwhile, Hobbs kept at it, and when the economic crash crushed the low end of the market, the Malbecs he had championed came to the fore. Hobbs has since been joined by a growing number of Malbec producers who are out to show the grape for all that it can be. Among them are wineries such as Riglos and Pulenta Estate, in the rolling folds of the Mendoza region, on terrain that inches toward the Andes foothills, where the climate and the soil give rise to complex fruit. Like Hobbs, the vintners on these properties lean toward low-tech practices, a minimalist approach that lets the winning traits of the grape shine through. Their vintages demonstrate impressive range—some lean and supple, others round-bodied and robust. And contrary to Malbec’s stubborn reputation as a varietal best suited to steakhouse fare, these wines are strikingly food-friendly, pairing beautifully with sirloin, sure, but also with pasta, seafood, curries and more. “To a lot of people, it used to seem that Malbec had a serious problem,” Hobbs says. “But the bigger problem was, we didn’t really understand the grape.” —JOSH SENS

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WHERE TOEAT F I N E

BERNARDSVILLE

THE BERNARDS INN Fine dining with an awardwinning wine collection, 27 Mine Brook Rd., 908.766.0002

BLOOMFIELD

FA M I LY

fare with Italian influences and live entertainment, 111 Main St., 908.879.6878

632 Meyersville Rd., 908.647.6302

REDWOODS GRILL AND BAR American cuisine with an emphasis on grilled beef, seafood and vegetables, 459 Main St., 908.879.7909

SMOKE RISE VILLAGE INN Fine American cuisine ser ved in a historic stone building, 9 Perimeter Rd., 973.838.7770

BAR CARA Authentic Italian fare including specialty pizzas, an extensive wine list and custom martinis, 1099 Broad St., 973.893.3681

DENVILLE

MES REVES French bistro menu in a café setting, 407 Broad St., 973.429.4888

THE AMERICAN BBQ COMPANY Casual American cuisine and barbecue, 94-1 Ford Rd., 973.664.1460

ORANGE SQUIRREL Contemporar y American and European cuisine, 412 Bloomfield Ave., 973.337.6421

CAFÉ METRO Healthy American fare in a casual atmosphere, 60 Diamond Spring Rd., 973.625.1055

STAMNA Mediterranean/Greek taverna, 1045 Broad St., 973.338.5151

CRISP Vegetarian, Middle Eastern eater y well known for its fresh and authentic made-to-order falafel sandwiches and salad-and-hummus bowls, 3000 Route 10, 973.970.9707

CALDWELL

CLOVERLEAF TAVERN American cuisine and beer bar with a family-casual atmosphere, 395 Bloomfield Ave., 973.226.9812 FORTE Authentic Italian cuisine and pizzeria, 182 Bloomfield Ave., 973.403.9411 IL VECCHIO CAFÉ Italian offerings including homemade pastas, paninis and calzones, Calandra’s Italian Village, 234 Bloomfield Ave., 973.226.8889

ALEXIS DINER Neighborhood family restaurant, 3130 Route 10 West, 973.361.8000

LA CUCINA Italian fare specializing in brick-oven pizza and delicatessen catering, 278 Diamond Spring Rd., 973.627.6200 THE SECOND HALF ON MAIN Traditional American cuisine, 5 E. Main St., 973.784.4040 SOGO Contemporar y Asian fusion and hibachi, 248 Route 46 West, 973.784.4981

SKARA ESTIATORIO Classic Greek cuisine, 300 Bloomfield Ave., 862.702.3098

THATCHER MCGHEE’S Irish pub and eater y, 53 Broadway, 973.586.3377

CHATHAM

YAMA SUSHI Japanese cuisine well known for its sushi, 5 E. Main St., 973.627.7712

D’ORO RISTORANTE Fresh, light Italian fare, BYO, 219 Main St., 973.701.6990

FAIRFIELD

KINNELON

LIVINGSTON

BAUMGART’S CAFÉ American and Asian cuisine with retro décor, 4175 Town Center Way, 973.422.0955 LITHOS Traditional Greek cuisine, 405 Eisenhower Pkwy., 973.758.1111 STRIP HOUSE Steak house with an extensive wine list, Westminster Hotel, 550 W. Mount Pleasant Ave., 973.548.0050

MADISON

54 MAIN An extensive menu of American cuisine, 54 Main St., 973.966.0252 BEGUM PALACE Authentic Indian cuisine, 300 Main St., 973.660.9100 DAVID’S RUMBA CAFE Latin cuisine, 6 Elmer St., 973.520.8160 IL MONDO VECCHIO Northern Italian fare, BYO, 72 Main St., 973.301.0024 L’ALLEGRIA Classic Italian cuisine, 11 Prospect St., 973.377.6808 SHANGHAI JAZZ Gourmet Asian fare in an intimate ja zz club, 24 Main St., 973.822.2899

RESTAURANT SERENADE Contemporar y French cuisine, 6 Roosevelt Ave., 973.701.0303

BRUSCHETTA Italian cuisine, 292 Passaic Ave., 973.227.6164

TAKUMA Japanese cuisine, 42 Lincoln Pl., 973.295.6868

SCALINI FEDELI Modern Italian with a French flair, 63 Main St., 973.701.9200

TIERNEY’S COPPERHOUSE Traditional American fare, 4 Little Falls Rd., 973.227.6066

MAPLEWOOD

CHESTER

GILLETTE

FORMOSA CHINESE RESTAURANT & SUSHI BAR Traditional Chinese fare with fresh seafood options, 79 W. Main St., 908.879.4848 FRESCO MEXICAN Traditional Mexican fare, 137 E. Main St., 908.955.7222 THE PUBLICK HOUSE TAVERN & INN Continental

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C A S UA L

CODA KITCHEN & BAR Sophisticated neighboorhood restaurant, 177 Maplewood Ave., 973.327.2247

CASA MAYA Sonoran-style Mexican fare, 615 Meyersville Rd., 908.580.0799

HLS RESTAURANT Casual juice-bar café with vegetarian dishes, 1859 Springfield Ave., 973.763.1127

CHIMNEY ROCK INN Casual American fare featuring gluten-free options, 342 Valley Rd., 908.580.1100

LORENA’S Sophisticated French BYO featuring foie gras, 168 Maplewood Ave., 973.763.4460

MEYERSVILLE INN Eclectic fare with seafood and Italian and Cajun influences and specialty drinks,

PARKWOOD DINER Neighborhood family restaurant, 1958 Springfield Ave., 973.313.3990

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ST. JAMES’S GATE PUBLICK HOUSE Casual Irish pub fare, 167 Maplewood Ave., 973.378.2222

GK’S RED DOG TAVERN Eclectic, contemporar y American dining, 1 Convent Rd., 973.585.5700

ECCOLA ITALIAN BISTRO Italian fare with daily specials, 1082 Route 46 West, 973.334.8211

VERJUS Eclectic fare with modern French influences, 1790 Springfield Ave., 973.378.8990

THE GRAND CAFÉ French Continental with Asian fusion, 42 Washington St., 973.540.9444

MIRCH MASALA GRILL Fine Indian cuisine, 1521 Route 46, 973.335.6000

MENDHAM

GRASSHOPPER OFF THE GREEN Traditional Irish pub and restaurant, 41-43 Morris St., 973.285.5150

RANDOLPH

BLACK HORSE TAVERN AND PUB Continental and American fare, 1 W. Main St., 973.543.7300 DANTE’S RISTORANTE BYO restaurant with Italian cuisine, 100 E. Main St., 973.543.5401

GUERRIERO’S RISTORANTE Authentic Neapolitanstyle dishes, 162 South St., 973.267.5055 J HINARI SUSHI Elegant Japanese and Korean cuisine, 5 Pine St., 973.290.0017

BLACK RIVER BARN Eclectic American fare, 1178 Route 10 West, 973.598.9988 LA STRADA RISTORANTE Traditional Italian cuisine, 1105 Route 10 East, 973.584.4607

MARKET TAVERNE American fare with a French twist, 995 Mt. Kemble Ave., 908.502.5106

MORRIS TAP & GRILL New American gastropub with vegetarian and gluten-free options, 500 Route 10 West, 973.891.1776

MING II Reinvented Pan Asian–inspired cuisine, 3 Speedwell Ave., 973.871.2323

NICOLE’S TEN Hip eater y ser ving eclectic New American cuisine, 246 Route 10 West, 973.442.9311

MINUTEMAN COUNTRY KITCHEN Family style restaurant, 990 Mount Kemble Ave., 973.425.9798

VERONA RESTAURANT Eclectic Italian cuisine, BYOB, 1171 Sussex Tpk., 973.895.8888

NAGANO JAPANESE RESTAURANT Authentic Japanese cuisine and sushi, 23 Washington St., 973.540.9120

ROCKAWAY

CARA MIA Upscale, traditional Italian fare, 194 Essex St., 973.379.8989

THE OFFICE TAVERN GRILL Fun, family-friendly eater y offering fresh twists on all-American pub fare, 3 South St., 973.285.0220

THE EXCHANGE American pub food featuring steaks, seafood and salads, 160 E. Main St., 973.627.8488

MOONSHINE Contemporar y American cuisine, 55 Main St., 973.218.6042

PAMIR Authentic Afghan cuisine and kabobs, 11 South St., 973.605.1095

RIVIERA MAYA Authentic Mexican cuisine, 116 Route 46. 862.209.1999

TINGA TAQUERIA Casual Mexican and barbecue, 321 Millburn Ave., 973.218.9500

PAZZO PAZZO Fresh, regional Italian food, 74 Speedwell Ave., 973.898.6606

THAI NAM PHET Traditional Thai, BYO, 296 Route 46 East, 973.627.8400

MONTCL AIR

ROD’S STEAK & SEAFOOD GRILLE Sur f and tur f fare with extensive wine list, 1 Convent Rd., 973.539.6666

SHORT HILLS

PIATTINO New Age Italian fare, with stone-fired oven and cocktails from scratch, 88 E. Main St., 973.543.0025 SAMMY’S Traditional American steak house with dr y-aged steaks and seafood specials, 353 Mendham Rd. West, 973.543.7675

MILLBURN

BASILICO Upscale Italian fare with modern twists on traditional favorites, 324 Millburn Ave., 973.379.7020 CAFÉ MONET Casual French bistro, BYO, 309 Millburn Ave., 973.376.8555

ACAPPELLO RISTORANTE Italian fare, 398 Bloomfield Ave., 973.746.2553 CUBAN PETE’S Cuban Caribbean cuisine with a tapas menu, 428 Bloomfield Ave., 973.746.1100 EGAN & SONS American pub food, featuring seasonal salads, seafood and burgers, 118 Walnut St., 973.744.1413 HALCYON Upscale seafood restaurant and lounge, 114 Walnut St., 973.744.4450 HLS RESTAURANT Casual juice-bar café with vegetarian dishes, 387 Bloomfield Ave., 973.337.8925 MESOB Ethiopian food with gluten-free and vegan options, 515 Bloomfield Ave., 973.655.9000 OSTERIA GIOTTO Casual Italian, BYO, 21-23 Midland Ave., 973.746.0111 PIG & PRINCE High-end pub fare featuring extensive beer list, 1 Lackawanna Plz., 973.233.1006 TOAST American cuisine with vegetarian/vegan menu, 700 Bloomfield Ave., 973.509.8099 THE WOOD PIT Casual American barbecue specializing in ribs, 108-110 Bloomfield Ave., 973.954.4679

MORRIS PL AINS

ARTHUR’S TAVERN Neighborhood steak house, 700 Speedwell Ave., 973.455.9705 CINNAMON Indian fare cooked in a clay oven, 2920 Route 10 West, 973.734.0040 LEMONGRASS Vietnamese and Thai fusion restaurant, 1729 Route 10 East, 973.998.6303

ROOTS STEAKHOUSE Old-fashioned New York-style steakhouse, 40 W. Park Pl., 973.326.1800

NEWARK

ADEGA GRILL Fine Portuguese and Spanish cuisine with a large wine selection, 130 Ferr y St., 973.589.0550 DON PEPE Traditional Spanish cuisine, offering fresh lobster and steak specials, 844 McCarter Hwy., 973.623.4662 FORNO’S OF SPAIN RESTAURANT Authentic Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 47 Ferr y St., 973.589.4767 IBERIA PENINSULA Casual Portuguese and Spanish fare featuring skewered chicken, beef, pork and sausage, 63-69 Ferr y St., 973.344.5611 SEABRA’S MARISQUEIRA Fine Portuguese fare specializing in fresh seafood, 87 Madison St., 973.465.1250 SPANISH TAVERN Classic Spanish fare with an emphasis on pairing the right Spanish wine with the meal, 103 McWhorter St., 973.589.4959

THE DINING ROOM Traditional American farm-totable cuisine in the casual luxur y of the Hilton Short Hills, 41 JFK Pkwy., 973.912.4756 LEGAL SEA FOODS Upscale eater y featuring fresh fish, The Mall at Short Hills, 1200 Morris Tpk., 973.467.0089

UPPER MONTCL AIR

DAI-KICHI Japanese and sushi fare featuring weekly specials, 608 Valley Rd., 973.744.2954 FOUR SEASONS KEBAB HOUSE Authentic Turkish cuisine, 594 Valley Rd., 973.707.7651 JACKIE’S GRILLETTE Healthy Mediterranean fare and fresh salads, 614 Valley Rd., 973.744.0090 UPSTAIRS Seasonal New American fare featuring specialty martinis, 608 Valley Rd., 973.744.4144 UPTOWN 596 Upscale bistro food, 596 Valley Rd., 973.744.0915

WEST ORANGE

FORTEZZA OSTERIA Lunch and dinner menu featuring traditional Italian dishes as well as salads, sandwiches and hamburgers, BYO, 320 Main St., 973.731.1053

PARSIPPANY

HIGHLAWN PAVILION New American cuisine with fresh seasonal produce, Eagle Rock Reser vation, 1 Crest Dr., 973.731.3463

CHAND PALACE Fine Indian cuisine, 257 Littleton Rd., 973.334.7600

THE MANOR RESTAURANT Upscale American and French cuisine with fresh seasonal produce, 111 Prospect Ave., 973.731.2360

AMIYA Contemporar y Indian cuisine, 252 Route 46 West, 973.521.9100

MINADO Japanese seafood buffet, 2888 Route 10 West, 973.734.4900 TABOR ROAD TAVERN New American fare, 510 Tabor Rd., 973.267.7004

MORRISTOWN

BLUE MOREL RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR New American cuisine using locally sourced ingredients and featuring a raw bar, 2 Whippany Rd., 973.451.2619 BRICK OVEN High-end traditional Italian fare made with fresh ingredients, 90 South St., 973.984.7700 ECLECTIC GRILLE Upscale American food with French, Italian and Mexican influences, 3 Speedwell Ave., 973.647.1234 END OF ELM New American fare, 140 Morris St., 973.998.4534 GEORGE & MARTHA’S Fine American fare featuring fresh steak and seafood, 67-71 Morris St., 973.267.4700

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF MSXHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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CAFFE NAVONA Creative regional Italian cuisine, 147 Route 46 West, 973.627.1606

MCLOONE’S BOATHOUSE Upscale interpretations of American classics, 9 Cherr y Ln., 862.252.7108 SUZY QUE’S Southern barbecue cuisine, 34 S. Valley Rd., 973.736.7899

WHARTON

HOT RODS Southern-style comfort food and barbecue, 19 N. Main St., 973.361.5050 LA DOLCE VITA Casual American/Italian BYO, 120 E. Dewey Ave., 973.361.6777 NEW ORLEANS STEAK HOUSE Casual Cajun cuisine featuring fresh steak and seafood, 75 Route 15, 973.366.7700

WHIPPANY

AULD SHEBEEN Authentic Irish pub, specializing in Irish meat loaf wrapped in maple bacon and hearty Guinness-and-beef stew, 1401 Route 10 East, 973.898.6454 IL CAPRICCIO Italian fare featuring fresh seafood, 633 Route 10 East, 973.884.9175

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BETHERE F E B RUA RY

Marc Anthony returns to New Jersey, Feb 13.

FEB 12–14 Be one of the first to experience the inaugural SOMA FILM FESTIVAL at the South Orange Performing Arts Center. The mission of the festival is to introduce unique and innovative films and filmmakers. An opening-night party from 7 to 9 p.m. on Feb. 12 will kick things off ($20 admission, separate from festival pass). Tickets: $45–$55. Find out all the details at somafilmfestival.com or call the box office at 973.313.2787. FEB 13 Two-time Grammy and five-time Latin Grammy Award winner MARC ANTHONY returns to the Prudential Center in Newark for his third consecutive Valentine’s Day weekend concert at 8 p.m. Tickets: $66–$196. Get all the info on this and other shows at prucenter.com or call 973.757.6600.

FEB 20 Hear classical music on the instruments it was written for, as MENDELSSOHN SONATAS ON PERIOD VIOLIN AND FORTEPIANO are performed at 8 p.m. at the Dorothy Young Center for the Arts at Drew University in Madison. Abigail Karr, violin, and Yi-heng Yang, fortepiano, have been highly praised for their historically informed performances. Tickets: $20. For details, visit drew.edu or call 973.408.3917.

FEB 22 Learn a new craft—woodcarving— from the NEW JERSEY WOODTURNERS at 7 p.m. at the Essex County Environmental Center in Roseland. Adults will discover the wonders of creating art from found pieces of wood. The fee is $10 per adult. Pre-registration is required. Get all the details at njwoodturners. com or call 973.228.8776.

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M A RC H

Bring the kids to Family Fun Day, March 12.

FEB 25 Come watch college basketball at its best as the SETON HALL PIRATES, a highly ranked team in the Big East, take on the Providence Friars at 7 p.m. at the Prudential Center in Newark. Tickets: $11–$66. Visit prucenter.com or call 973.757.6600.

FEB 27 Kids will come from here and there, kids will come from everywhere for the DR. SEUSS FAMILY FESTIVAL at the Morris Museum in Morristown, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This fun event celebrates all things Dr. Seuss, with story times, “oobleck” experiments, craft activities and more. Tickets: $10 for adults, $7 for children ages 3–12 and FREE for kids under 3. Get the whole story at morrismuseum. org and 973.971.3700.

FEB 27 For a sweet diversion, take in a MAPLE SUGARING DEMONSTRATION at the Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center in Chatham Township at 1 and 2:30 p.m. Learn how to identify and tap maple trees, collect sap, and make syrup over a wood-fired evaporator. You can also taste-test different delicious syrups. Admission: $3 per person, ages 3 and up. You can find more information at morrisparks.net or call 973.635.6629. MARCH 4 THE BLUES BROTHERS have returned! This time, Dan Aykroyd teams with Jim Belushi. Catch their act at 8 p.m. at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair. Tickets: $35– $125. Looking for more details? Head over to thewellmonttheater.com or call 973.783.9500. MARCH 6 Do some creative bonding with your 5- to 8-year-olds at PARENT AND CHILD CERAMICS at the Montclair Art Museum, 11 a.m.

Learn a new craft with NJ Woodturners, Feb 22.

Work together with your child to make a textured tile or wall hanging, and experiment with throwing on the potter’s wheel. Tickets: $60 members, $80 nonmembers (prices are for parent and child). Visit montclairartmuseum.org or call 973.259.5139 for more details.

MARCH 11–13 Design and craft lovers will be in heaven at SPRING CRAFT MORRISTOWN, celebrating its 26th year at the Morristown Armory. This unique event showcases the newest creations from 150 top American artists and craft makers. The show begins at 4 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. on Sunday. Admission: $9 and $8 for seniors. Want more information? Go to artrider .com or call 845.331.7900. MARCH 12 Don’t know where to take the kids? Go to FAMILY FUN DAY at the Museum of Early Trades & Crafts in Madison, beginning at 5 p.m. Family Fun Day is held the second Saturday of every month. Admission: $5 adults, $3 kids. Advance registration is recommended; call 973.377.2982, ext. 12 or visit metc.org.

MARCH 12, 19, 26 Here’s an exciting way to spend your Friday nights—come to Mennen Sports Arena in Morristown for the FRIDAY NIGHT SKATE with DJ Earl, from 8 to 10 p.m. Cost: $8 admission; $3.50 skate rental. Looking for more info? Visit morrisparks.net or call 973.326.7651. Send event listings to: Morris/Essex Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email us at editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published.

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COMMUNITY EVENTS FEBRUARY & MARCH 2016

Unless noted, all of the following programs are free and require registration. For a complete list of programs and to register online, please visit: barnabashealth.org/sbmcevents. PROGRAM LOCATIONS:

Heart Health Month: Get Your Heart Into It February 23: 10:45 am-Livingston Senior Community Center, 204 Hillside Ave., Livingston February 26: 1:00 pm-Caldwell Public Library, 268 Bloomfield Ave., Caldwell 1-888-724-7123

The Do’s and Don’ts of Stretching

SBMC - Saint Barnabas Medical Center, 94 Old Short Hills Road, Livingston, NJ

February 24: 6:30 pm JCC MetroWest • 973-322-5620

BHACC - Barnabas Health Ambulatory Care Center, 200 South Orange Ave., Livingston, NJ

Burn Peer Support Group

JCC MetroWest - Leon & Toby Cooperman JCC MetroWest, 760 Northfield Ave., West Orange, NJ (programs are open to the general public) Those interested in learning more about the latest programs and services offered by Saint Barnabas Medical Center and Barnabas Health Outpatient Centers can sign up for our free, monthly E-newsletter by visiting tinyurl.com/sbmcnews.

February 25 and March 24: 3:30 pm SBMC • 973-322-5856

Cooked and Uncorked Food and Wine Festival to Benefit The Burn Center at Saint Barnabas Medical Center

Free Cardiac and Concussion Screenings For Young Athletes

March 12: 8:00 am-12:00 pm Matthew J. Morahan III Health Assessment Center BHACC • To register and schedule an appointment: Teamlink@barnabashealth.org

Advances in Minimally Invasive Joint Replacement

Learn about MAKOplastay, a new robotic joint-replacement technology. March 16: 2:45 pm-Crane’s Mill, 459 Passaic Ave., West Caldwell March 16: 6:30 pm-Caldwell Public Library, 268 Bloomfield Ave., Caldwell 973-322-9908

February 29: 6:00 pm The Pines Manor, 2085 Route 27, Edison Tickets are $60 in advance and $65 at the door www.cookedanduncorked.com

Weight Loss Surgery Options March 2: 6:00 pm BHACC • 973-322-7433

Weight Loss Surgery Support Groups

Perinatal Bereavement Support Group

February 10 and March 9: 6:00 pm BHACC • 973-322-7433

March 2: 7:30 pm SBMC • 973-322-5745

Chinese Culture Day

FlyRed for Heart Disease To Benefit The Heart Disease Centers and Saint Barnabas Medical Center

February 13: 4:00 to 9:00 pm Livingston High School, 30 Robert H. Harp Dr., Livingston

Heart Health Month: Heart Healthy Eating February 16: 10:00 am JCC MetroWest • 973-322-5620

Heart Health Month: Red Wine and Dark Chocolate

February 18: 1:00 pm-Millburn Town Hall, 375 Millburn Ave., Millburn February 26: 1:00 pm-Caldwell Public Library, 268 Bloomfield Ave., Caldwell 1-888-724-7123

March 6: 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm or 3:00 pm Flywheel, 351 Millburn Ave., Millburn The cost per cycling session is $100 www.barnabashealth.org/FlyRed

The Importance of Sleep March 7: 6:00 pm SBMC • 1-888-724-7123

Highlights from the 38th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium March 10: 6:00 pm SBMC • 973-322-2671

ONGOING CHILDBIRTH & PARENTING CLASSES To learn more: barnabashealth.org/ maternity or call 973-322-5360

• Maternity Orientation & Tour • Siblings Class • Childbirth Preparation Class • Lamaze Refresher • Relaxing Birth Class • Breastfeeding Basics • Marvelous Multiples • New Moms’ Circle • Breastfeeding Support

SAINT BARNABAS MEDICAL CENTER 94 OLD SHORT HILLS ROAD, LIVINGSTON, NJ 07039 973-322-5000 • WWW.BARNABASHEALTH.ORG/SBMCEVENTS

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ESCAPES

The quick

PACK THE CAR! FOUR GREAT WEEKEND DESTINATIONS ARE JUST A SHORT RIDE AWAY.

GETAWAY

NOT QUITE A STAYCATION, A LONG WEEKEND GETAWAY CLOSE TO HOME IS a terrific option if you’re short on time, cash or frequent flyer miles. But different trips delight different types. Which of these four travel personalities is yours?

For the history buff: Philadelphia

The birthplace of America is the ultimate destination for history enthusiasts. First stop: Independence National Historic Park, home to Independence Hall, where the country’s forefathers discussed and adopted cornerstone documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The famed Liberty Bell is just a few steps away in the updated Liberty Bell Center. And the National Constitution Center has on display an original copy of the first public printing of the Constitution. Also nearby are the Betsy Ross House and Memorial, the Franklin Institute, one of the oldest science museums, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which features nearly 230,000 works of art as well as the iconic steps depicted in the film Rocky. The 3,600-acre Valley Forge National Historical Park, located less than an hour outside the city, is where George Washington’s Revolutionary army camped and persevered under grueling winter conditions.

For the foodie: Culinary Institute of America

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Some of the top chefs in the country got their start at the CIA in Hyde Park, N.Y., whose three student-staffed restaurants are open to the public Tuesday through Saturday for lunch and dinner. (A fourth, the Apple Pie Bakery Café, is closed on weekends.) What are you in the mood for? The menu at American Bounty (845.451.1011, americanbountyrestaurant.com) is inspired by the seasons and products of the Hudson Valley region, while Ristorante Caterina de Medici (845.451.1013, ristorantecaterinademedici. com) serves up authentic regional Italian cuisine in a grand Tuscan-style villa overlooking the Hudson River. Then there’s The Bocuse Restaurant (845.451.1012, bocuse restaurant.com), named for the famous French chef Paul Bocuse. Sleek and contemporary, it reimagines classic French cuisine— think lavender-pepper crusted tuna, pork loin with fennel puree and bamboo rice, roasted root vegetables en papillotte. Before heading home, be sure to tour the Vanderbilt Mansion, FDR’s home and Eleanor Roosevelt’s cottage Val-Kill, which are just minutes away from the CIA.

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For the spa-goer: The Spa at Norwich Inn

Go solo, bring the girls or take your significant other to The Spa at Norwich Inn (607 W. Thames St., Norwich, Conn., 1.800.275.4772; thespaatnorwichinn.com), where the pampering treatments range from traditional facial, massage and mani/pedi to a Milk and Honey Body Polish, Ayurvedic Mud Wrap and Craniosacral Therapy. Specialty services include reiki, a centuries-old Japanese healing technique, and raindrop therapy, a healing ritual in which nine aromatherapy essential oils are applied drop by drop and massaged into the skin. Overnight packages include breakfast and dinner, a fitness class, full use of the spa facility and accommodations at the inn, which boasts 49 guest rooms, spacious suites and luxury villas. There are also specially designed wine tasting and museum packages as well as a weekend “Spaliday” retreat. Fun fact: The original Norwich Inn, built in 1929, was a haven for the rich and famous, attracting such luminaries as George Bernard Shaw, Frank Sinatra and the Prince of Wales.

For the family: New York City

Need a reason to take the kids into Manhattan this winter? Here’s one, a 122-foot-long one, to be precise: A titanosaurus skeleton just arrived at the world-famous fossil halls of the American Museum of Natural History. This herbivore from Argentina is so massive that it grazes the 19-foot-high ceilings of the fourthfloor Wallach Orientation Center and extends out toward the elevator banks. Continue your exploration of history at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum, located aboard the USS Intrepid aircraft carrier, which served tours of duty in World War II and the Vietnam War. On the deck, you’ll find aircraft of all types, including warplanes, the space shuttle Enterprise and a British Airways Concorde jet. Don’t miss the former USS Growler, the only American diesel-powered strategic missile submarine open to the public. New York City’s outdoor ice skating rinks operate through April, weather permitting. The Rockefeller Center Rink is the city’s premier skate center, but you can also catch some ice magic at Wollman Rink in Central Park or at Bryant Park. Save time and money with a New York Pass, which offers quick entry to more than 80 NYC sightseeing hotspots. Buy one today (newyorkpass.com) and you’ll get a free “hopon, hop-off” ticket to ride the city’s doubledecker tour buses. MORRIS/ESSEX HE ALTH & LIFE

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GATHERINGS

‘CELEBRITY NERD-OFF’

MONTCLAIR FILM FESTIVAL

New Jersey Per forming Arts Center, Newark, montclair filmfest.org NJPAC recently hosted Stephen Colbert and J.J. Abrams as the late-night television talk show host and the Hollywood director vied in “nerdiness” to raise funds for the film festival.

1 Colbert and Abrams 2 Colbert takes a selfie with attendees. 3 Evelyn Colbert, Colbert, Bob Feinberg and Abrams

ANNUAL RECEPTION

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MORRIS COUNTY CRIMESTOPPERS Birchwood Manor, Whippany, mcsheriff.org At a 30th annual holiday fundraiser, the Crimestoppers commissioners made a presentation to Morris County Sheriff Edward V. Rochford in recognition of his 50 years in law enforcement. He received an American flag that flew over Ground Zero.

4 Michael Fedorko, Rochford and William Schievella

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A DAY OF FREE DENTISTRY Parsippany, rauchberg.com The dental practice recently held its annual Rauchberg Gives Back Day, providing free dental care to 30 patients who otherwise could not afford treatment. More than $10,000 worth of donated services were performed.

New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Newark, njpac.org At its annual celebration of Dr. King’s life and legacy, NJPAC honored Dr. Antoinette Ellis-Williams with the Steward of the Dream Award and Shane Harris with the Visionary of the Future Award. The program also included a performance by the Dance Theatre of Harlem.

5 Shane Harris 6 Dr. Antoinette Ellis-Williams

8 Dr. Mark Khaimov, Dr. Alan Rauchberg, Dr. Deepa Rupani and Dr. David Serratelli

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HONORING VETERANS MORRIS HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Charlie Brown’s, Chatham, morrishabitat.org The organization recently honored veterans at its Development Leadership Council breakfast. The guest speaker was Richard Eastman, military liaison for the Morris County Chamber of Commerce and civilian aide to the Secretary of Army.

7 Blair Schleicher Bravo, Robert Jackiun, Richard Eastman and Joseph Longo

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GETTY IMAGES (1–3), MORRIS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (4), DEIRDRE RYAN (5–6), MORRIS HABITAT FOR HUMANITY (7), RAUCHBERG DENTAL (8)

RAUCHBERG DENTAL GROUP

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. TRIBUTE

TO BE CONSIDERED FOR GATHERINGS, SEND HIGH-RESOLUTION PHOTOS AND INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR EVENT TO GATHERINGS@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM.

1/26/16 8:58 AM


Smile makeovers: For the Look You’ve Always Dreamed of

FROM THE DENTIST WHO’S BEEN FEATURED ON NBC’S DATELINE Dr. Edward A. Romano and his partner, Dr. Matthew Vaccaro, use only the very best of today’s advanced dental technology to achieve beautiful, lasting results. Custom-crafted veneers, one-visit porcelain crowns, onlays and inlays, and the BriteSmile™ in-office whitening system are just a few of the ways the doctors at Aesthetic Smiles of New Jersey can give you the smile of your dreams. Dr. Romano is a recognized leader in cosmetic dentistry who’s been featured on NBC’s Dateline. To discover why patients from across the United State and Europe trust their smiles to his care, take advantage of this great offer. Dr. Romano is the past President of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

Complimentary C O S M E T I C E VA L U AT I O N You’ll meet with Dr. Romano or Dr. Vaccaro and learn how today’s cosmetic procedures can give you a dazzling smile, plus get digital ‘before-and-after’ imaging of your beautiful results! It’s a $300 value, free!

310 MADISON AVE. • MORRISTOWN

esthetic Smiles of New Jersey World-class smiles—guaranteed

On the corner of Madison Avenue and Punchbowl Road across from The Abbey

973.285.5480

www.AestheticSmilesofNJ.com

Dr. Edward A. Romano Dr. Matthew Vaccaro

F L E X I B L E A P P O I N T M E N T S • F I N A N C I N G P L A N S • F R E E PA R K I N G

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Morris|Essex Health & Life: February/March 2016  

The Good Living Magazine

Morris|Essex Health & Life: February/March 2016  

The Good Living Magazine