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JULY 2019 | ISSUE NO. 3 | VOL. 30

JULY 2019 | ISSUE NO. 3 | VOL. 30

A RETAIL ROLE MODEL TAILORED WITH A TWIST BE A SMARTY PANTS IN 2020 TRICKS OF THE TRADE (SHOW)

THE AWARDS ISSUE

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JULY 2019

CONTENTS

90

DEPARTMENTS Editor’s Letter 14

Scene 32

Guest Editorial 16

Fashion 74

Ones to Watch 18

Last Look 96

On fashion and philanthropy. Retailer Peter Rose on reestablishing partnerships. Fresh collections to brighten your mix.

New things to do in NYC. Modern takes on tailored clothing. Inspiration from Italy.

FEATURES

82

Branding 22

Industry icon Ken Wyse shares some secrets.

Trade Show Talk 26

Find out what to expect at the summer shows.

Macy’s Star 42

Fashion director Durand Guion discusses translating trends.

66

Keeping it Special 48

62

Mr. Sid’s Stuart and Barry Segel compete with the big guys.

Social Responsibility 52 Outland Denim makes fashion more meaningful.

If the Shirt Fits 56

Stantt is reinventing an industry.

Online Insight 58

East Dane is doing it digitally.

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Sneakers and Stuff 62

Bodega captures a new generation.

Italian Treat 66

Gil Szczesny lives life with passion and style.

Model Behavior 68

Johannes Huebl on the value of influencers.

Smarty Pants 72

A by the numbers look at buying men's pants for 2020

Fashion 74

Interesting colorways and slouchy silhouettes are the very near future of tailored clothing.

High Impact Accessories 82

We curate the season's hottest add ons.

Experiential Retail 90 Who’s doing it and how?

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FULL PAGE AD (Hawke & Co).pdf

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CO N G RAT U L AT I O N S

DURAND, WE THANK YOU FOR ALL THE C

M

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SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE OVER THESE MANY YEARS. THE

CM

MY

CY

HEIGHT OF YOUR SUCCESS WILL CONTINUE TO GROW.

CMY

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YOUR PARTNERS AT

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Find Your Breeze.

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JULY 2019

THE MENSWEAR INDUSTRY’S MAGAZINE

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN  KAREN.ALBERG@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

CREATIVE DIRECTOR STEPHEN M. VITARBO STEPHEN.VITARBO@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

FASHION DIRECTOR STEPHEN GARNER  STEPHEN.GARNER@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

ART DIRECTOR VICTORIA BEALL

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR RITA GUARNA  RITA.GUARNA@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

ADVERTISING GROUP PUBLISHER SHAE MARCUS  SHAE.MARCUS@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

BRAND MANAGER MONICA DELLI SANTI

NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE KAREN AZARELLO

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES KRISTIN DAUSS, JESSICA SALERNO

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION & CIRCULATION CHRISTINE HAMEL

DIRECTOR, ADVERTISING SERVICES JACQUELYNN FISCHER

GRAPHIC DESIGNER, ADVERTISING SERVICES VIOLETA MULAJ

ACCOUNTING AGNES ALVES, MEGAN FRANK

ADVISORY BOARD LIZETTE CHIN PRESIDENT, MEN’S, UBM/INFORMA

BLAIR DELONGY VP OPERATIONS, JOHN CRAIG/CURRENTS

FRED DERRING FOUNDER, DLS OUTFITTERS

LINDSAY MORTON GAISER VP/GMM, ANDRISEN MORTON

DURAND GUION GROUP VP, FASHION OFFICE, MACY’S INC.

DONNY HUBBARD OWNER, HUBBARD CLOTHING

WILL LEVY PRESIDENT, OAK HALL

SHARIFA MURDOCK CO-OWNER/SALES DIRECTOR, LIBERTY FAIRS, CAPSULE, CABANA

JIM MURRAY PRESIDENT, A.K. RIKKS

BRUCE PASK MEN’S FASHION DIRECTOR, BERGDORF GOODMAN/NEIMAN MARCUS

BRUCE SCHEDLER VP, CHICAGO COLLECTIVE

WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT & CEO MARK DOWDEN

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS SHAE MARCUS, CARL OLSEN

VICE PRESIDENTS NIGEL EDELSHAIN, TOM FLANNERY, RITA GUARNA, CHRISTINE HAMEL

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SUBSCRIPTION/CIRCULATION INQUIRIES, CALL: 201-573-5541.

OFFICES CORPORATE OFFICE 1 MAYNARD DRIVE, PARK RIDGE, NJ 07656

EDITORIAL OFFICE 1120 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, NEW YORK, NY 10036

MR (ISSN 1049-6726, USPS 7885) IS PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR (JANUARY, FEBRUARY, JULY, AUGUST) MR MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA, 1 MAYNARD DRIVE, PARK RIDGE, NJ 07656. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT MAHWAH, NJ. AND AT ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO MR MAGAZINE, 1 MAYNARD DRIVE, PARK RIDGE, NJ 07656. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES: TO CHANGE AN ADDRESS OR REQUEST A SUBSCRIPTION, WRITE TO SUBSCRIPTIONS, MR MAGAZINE, 1 MAYNARD DRIVE, PARK RIDGE, NJ 07656; TELEPHONE: 201-573-5541. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: CONTACT SHAE MARCUS AT 856.797.2227 OR SHAE.MARCUS@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM. COPYRIGHT © 2019 BY WAINSCOT MEDIA, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 30, ISSUE 3.

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EDITOR'S LETTER

THE JOY OF GIVING How gratifying to be part of an industry that cares.

meals via a specialty retailer known for community service. And that’s how the MR/Heavenly Harvest Community Service Award came to be. This year’s recipient is our 2019 Best Specialty Store Mr. Sid in Newton and Boston: co-owners and brothers Stuart and Barry Segel will be donating 5,000 Heavenly Harvest meals through their local YMCA. Says Doherty, “Our meals are carefully designed recipes that exceed USDA nutritional recommendations; they

“Most of our industry’s generosity happens quietly behind the scenes.” PVH, Peerless, TJX, Burlington Stores and more). Even start-ups and independent specialty stores are doing more than their share to improve the world. Yes, philanthropy can be good for business, but most of our industry’s generosity happens quietly behind the scenes. One example: A few months ago I was approached by Jon McKinney, an industry pro who’s worked for several top menswear brands and recently joined the board of Heavenly Harvest, a nonprofit founded by celebrity chef John Doherty (now chef/owner at Blackbarn on E. 26th Street after 30 years at the Waldorf Astoria). Frustrated by the amount of fresh food that gets wasted while donated food is often a lesser quality, Doherty made it his goal was to create healthy farm-to-table meals for the hungry. McKinney’s idea was to distribute these

consist of locally sourced, high-quality ingredients cooked to perfection with no preservatives or artificial flavorings. Our hope is that families will feel proud to put this food on their table.” Did you know that more than 80 percent of those who experience food insecurity are working families that live at or below the poverty level? Some eat only one meal a day; many do without so they can feed their kids. MR is truly delighted to be partnering with this terrific organization. Another altruistic award winner is James

Bartle from Outland Denim. I cannot say enough about this amazing young man, who created a business after witnessing a young girl in Thailand who was up for sale. “She looked really frightened so I asked the rescue agency if there wasn’t something we could do to help her. I was told that there wasn’t, that human trafficking is an all-too common tragedy across the globe. I knew right then that I had to do something.” MR is thrilled to present Bartle with our first ever Social Responsibility Award; read more of his story on page 52. Like many of you, I sometimes wonder if a career in fashion is really all that meaningful. When I’m reminded of the important work our industry continues to do with such compassion and commitment, I am energized, inspired and very proud to be part of it.

PHOTO: CALLALILY STUDIOS

This annual Awards issue of MR magazine is always my favorite as I invariably learn so much from our honorees. This year’s eclectic group is exceptional, not just for their creativity and entrepreneurial spirit but also for their passion for giving back. With our country so divided about so many social and economic issues, it’s a joy to see companies actively involved in helping those in need. And it’s not just the big guys (although we can’t say enough about the generosity of Macy’s, G111,

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Durand, Warmest congratulations from the Nautica Team on receiving the well deserved award as MR’s 2019 Fashion Ambassador!

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GUEST EDITORIAL

A MISGUIDED GAME PLAN If it’s not a win-win, nobody wins!

By Peter Rose

Fair or unfair, specialty retailers today are living with the reality that the brands we helped build are selling directto-consumer. We nurture and grow it; they reciprocate by tapping into the pipeline that feeds us so it also can feed them. In my opinion, this strategy weakens the entire industry, sapping strength like any parasitic diversion of resources. The practice is rampant, it is rife, and it is embarrassingly misguided. On the other hand, I recently received a heartwarming email from Lisette L, a Montreal-based women’s sportswear brand that we independents helped turn into an industry powerhouse. When they made the decision to sell online a few years back, we didn’t drop them (some stores did), although we felt badly betrayed after helping them attain success. It’s a depressingly common story, of course, so this email marked a wonderful first for me: a vendor acting like a partner, assertively declaring that they’re in this with us,

“Vendors today are changing the rules to benefit their side of the table, virtually asking us to help them make us irrelevant.” to help us both win. Mind you, all they’re really doing is re-dedicating themselves to what worked for them in the first place. But they’re doing it! And I’m grateful for their decision to shut down their e-commerce site, which was no small sacrifice considering their sizable investment. I’m also relieved to hear someone admit they were wrong, realize their mistake and act to fix it. That takes courage. And vision. I’m proud of them. The 1974 NAMSB show in New York was my first

exposure to the menswear market. The show, mostly independent stores and quality brands, was electric. I loved and still love the camaraderie with these vendors, whether or not I still do business with them. These are business alliances based on years of trust: When that trust is broken, the relationship is at risk. And that’s where we are now, with vendors changing the rules to benefit their side of the table, while having the nerve to ask us to help them make us irrelevant. It can’t work that way. If the vendors fail, then the machine falls apart. If the retailers fail, the machine falls apart. How can vendors behave as if the game could possibly support a win-lose scenario? If it isn’t win-win, can any of us survive? It’s as likely as me winning the Mega-Millions jackpot! I still believe that real success requires a network of passionate, professional retail advocates for vendors who protect and nurture those retailers in return. The industry needs to re-establish these kinds of quality relationships. Like Lisette, they need to show that bolstering the retail sector in turn bolsters the wholesale sector. It’s the way to strengthen us all. I believe the best way vendors can attain that goal is by reestablishing partnerships with local independent retailers. Help US help YOU. We’re eager for the opportunity, and we surely will support any vendors with the courage to change course and rededicate themselves to doing business the old fashion way. It might be harder, but it’s certainly more rewarding. Peter Rose is owner of CHELSEA Menswear and Willow Tree Fashions in Wyandotte, MI. He can be reached at peterfisherrose@gmail.com.

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Many congratulations to

STUART AND BARRY for their amazing work with Mr Sid. Wishing you continued success and prosperity. Your friends at Castangia 1850, Alberto and Joey

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ONES TO WATCH

NEW THREADS

These four rising brands are serving up creatively designed fashion you should add to your mix. By Stephen Garner and Karen Alberg Grossman

BASIC RIGHTS

Founded in 2016 as a collaboration between a musician, a tailor and a designer, Basic Rights’ original premise was to provide foundational wardrobe pieces inspired by icons of men’s style that deliver on quality at an attainable price point. Fast forward to 2019, the brand is now creatively helmed by musician Freddie Cowan and continues to look to music and culture for inspiration. Basic Rights celebrity fans include Jude Law, Seth Rogen, and Idris Elba. The appeal is its core of relaxed loose shirting and versatile tailored trousers, which make up the brand’s signature silhouette. Premium and luxury fabrics are sourced from limited end of roll supplies mostly from Japan; interesting collaborations include its fall 2018 partnership with Scottish heritage manufacturer Aero Leather to re-release the leather jacket worn by David Bowie on the cover of the 1977 album “Heroes.” Price points are reasonable: between $50 and $225 retail, with leather jackets up to $750. The brand also is focusing on sustainability. “By sourcing fabrics from deadstock, much of the most damaging activity involved in developing fabrics is bypassed,” says Jack Cameron Gove, brand director. “The brand is building on this and has just announced a partnership with Trees for the Future to plant a tree for every item sold in an effort to offset the carbon created by each product. More initiatives are planned which the brand will be announcing this year.” For spring 2020, the collection takes inspiration from the color and life of Mexico City; expansion into suits and tailoring is next.

PROPAGANDA AGENCY

Heavily inspired by the 1970s, Propaganda Agency delivers a modern take on the rude-boy culture, color palettes and silhouettes of that time period. Founded by Jack Watkins, formerly of Band of Outsiders, the brand prides itself on its unique patterns and sustainably sourced alpaca and Pima cotton offerings with responsible manufacturing. Its most popular category is the hand-loomed knits, which are the brand’s signature piece. Wovens, chinos and cut-and-sew knits follow quickly behind in popularity and perform well, according to Watkins. Retail prices range from $165 to $595. Watkins is ramping up his wholesale efforts this season, with a larger international push as well as in the U.S., and is already seeing success in retailers like Ron Herman in Los Angeles and Japan, as well as Boon the Shop in South Korea and Ciaopanic in Japan. What’s up next for the brand? “I’m very excited about this spring season,” Watkins says. “We’ll see additional hand-loomed sweaters in alpaca/cotton blends, retro yarndyed stripes, colorful prints and embroidery on our button-ups and chinos. All will be timeless and distinctively Propaganda.”

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LIMITED EDITION

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ONES TO WATCH

PREPPIES ON ACID

Bryan (Bee) Beecroft is a creator at heart. “When I began my 34th year at Beecroft & Bull, the job was feeling like a Sisyphean undertaking. Toward the end, all I wanted to do was design cool things.” A lifelong admirer of the classic “Albert” slipper’ Beecroft had acquired a vast personal collection, but little was available beyond “velvets with crests and cutesy slogans.” He also disliked the unflattering long vamp that elongated his size 11 foot. Convinced he could do better, he discovered a fabulous domestic tannery for custom work, the best artisanal footwear factory in England and an exceptional woolen facility. Sourcing from all three, his collection comprises embossed leathers, fine woolens (beefy heritage flannels in solids, chalkstripes, windowpanes) and rich velvets. All footwear is crafted from a single piece of material with only one seam in the back; everything is made to order including custom linings, pipings and monograms. Prices are $275 and up for suggested retails of $595 to $995; turnaround time is eight weeks. “I view a well-turned-out man as an exclamation point: The dot at the bottom should never be boring,” Beecroft proclaims. And boring this footwear is not. After all, Beecroft has been awarded “Best Dressed in Menswear” on several occasions; his innate flair for juxtaposing different elements for a distinctive look has inspired many industry colleagues to dress more creatively. Check out Preppies on Acid at the July Project show and at the Chicago Collective.

AHNAH

Designed for people pursuing an active and creative lifestyle, Ahnah’s frames are made to be worn— whether it is lounging on the beach or hiking up a mountain. What sets this eyewear brand apart is the product is made with a balance of style, performance and the environment in mind—lenses are BPA-free, highly shatter-resistant and extra clear; acetates are made from wood pulp and cotton fibers that come from sustainably sourced raw materials. Launching with 13 styles, five frame colors and five lens colors, at the friendly price point of $290, the quality far exceeds the cost. Future collections will release at elevated price points and include more intricate design details, new materials and distinct shapes. The aim is to offer retailers and consumers the right mix of differentiated product and to always make sunglasses that can go anywhere. Founded by retailer Chris Gentile of Pilgrim Surf + Supply, this new eyewear brand combines form and function, featuring stylish frames with performance and environmental considerations in mind. Launching direct to consumer as well as wholesaling to independent retailers (The Next Door in Paris, Mohawk General in Los Angeles, Globe Specs in Tokyo), Ahnah provides quality eyewear that’s durable and sustainable without skimping on style.

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BRANDING

WYSE ADVICE Licensing maven Ken Wyse on life after PVH and new challenges for brands.

By Karen Alberg Grossman

“I had an amazing 30year career as PVH grew from $300 million to $10 billion…” 

—Ken Wyse

Ken Wyse thought he was retiring when he left PVH last year but as fate would have it, he’s busier than ever with Wyse Consulting. “My original idea was to name it Wyse Ass (for Wyse Associates) but my lawyer nixed it,” he says. “He was probably right: I need to be more careful with my sense of glib.” When contemplating retirement, Wyse had spoken to a few private equity firms, thinking he could prove useful finding gold in untapped mines. “I also lined up U.S. Polo Association and Jack Nicklaus, both of whom hired me to consult for them. These, coupled with a few other companies that requested my help, meant I suddenly had a business.” Although his workload is already more than planned, Wyse is not complaining. “As people who know me understand, I work to make money to give away,” he says. “My passion has always been the arts and education. I’m delighted that I can contribute to causes that are meaningful to me. As Larry Phillips, former chairman of PVH used to say: this is the rent that successful people should be happy to pay.” On the theory that today’s consumers are less interested in brands than they once were, Wyse doesn’t buy it. “When I first joined PVH, Allen Sirkin told me that it’s virtually impossible to kill a brand. They’ll have various iterations; they need to change and grow. But a brand that has a DNA, integrity, a clear story and a willingness to evolve can last a long

time…. I believe this is as true today as ever.” Asked for examples, he singles out two PVH anchors: Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein. He notes that Tommy stayed hot in Europe and Asia while struggling in the States when urban-inspired looks fell from favor. Back to its “preppy with a twist” roots, it’s hot again globally. As for Calvin, Wyse believes Raf Simons didn’t quite grasp that “the brand is more about underwear, jeans and sex than runway fashion. I believe it will bounce back: PVH gets its DNA.” His Wyse advice to young people hoping to launch a brand today: stick with what you believe in. “1. If you don’t have extraordinary passion for what you’re doing, don’t do it; 2. Make sure you can articulate your message cleanly and clearly; 3. Make sure you have the financial ability to get through a down cycle, finding backers who share your values; 4. Stay true to those values; 5. Know that even if only one out of 10 emerging brands will make it, you could be the one in 10. There’s lots of venture capital around, and many of these firms are out there looking for companies to invest in.” Wyse is also optimistic about brick-and-mortar retailing. “U.S. department stores should emulate Selfridges, a cross between a department store, an art museum and a food emporium,” he says. “I was recently in London and hate to admit that with all the historic sights to visit, I was in that store eight times, each time discovering something new, dazzled by every display. And shoppers were loaded with shopping bags, proving that people still crave an exciting in-store experience.”

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THE 2019 MR AWARD WINNERS

DURAND GUION

BODEGA

STUART AND BARRY SEGEL

GIL SZCZESNY

JAMES BARTLE

EAST DANE

STANTT

JOHANNES HUEBL

FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT

INSTAGRAM: @PROJECTSHOW WEB: UBMFASHION.COM

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TRADE SHOW TALK

WHAT TO EXPECT AT THE MENSWEAR TRADE SHOWS THIS SUMMER By Karen Alberg Grossman As trade show season approaches and competition intensifies for retailers’ time and travel budgets, show directors are going all out to provide the ultimate trade show experience. Improved perks include provocative educational seminars and panels, new networking opportunities, fabulous cocktail parties and endless avenues to discover new brands. Far from over, trade shows are being brilliantly reinvented. Five directors explain how:

Donnie Wechsler, Park Lane Hotel Show,

July 19-23 Widely considered the “civilized” trade show option in NYC, we’ve reorganized to make this the best hotel show experience possible, for both vendors and retailers. For vendors, we do a lot of hand holding to help them plan their setup and make it easy and convenient. We even help them make appointments, since appointments are critical to the success of any trade show, especially a hotel show. Even exhibitors with New York showrooms have found that it pays to present at the Park Lane: For less than $3,100, a vendor can join us in a centralized location that attracts top retailers and ensures that they get to work more accounts. The more accounts vendors see, the more productive the show is for them. For retailers, we’ve selected a warm, welcoming, upscale location that allows them to make the best use of their time in NYC, which has been diminishing over the years. Retailers, especially the independents, are not only watching expenses these days but they’re also contending with declining volume when they’re out of their stores. They can easily work several lines at the Park Lane in the same time it takes to get to and from Javits, or to and from showrooms around the city. Our July 2019 show at the Park Lane will feature almost 100 top menswear collections.

Lizette Chin, Project/MRKET, NYC and Las Vegas

NYC July 21-23; Las Vegas Aug 12-14 We have some really exciting news and enhanced programming for the upcoming PROJECT + MRKET New York fashion trade event. The two new initiatives that we’re introducing are “PROJECTION”, a new brand showcase, and Made in Italy where we evolve our partnership with the Italian Trade Commission to bring the best of Italian men’s fashion and culture to life. The PROJECTION installation is a unique space where we provide an innovative visual highlight of new brands and special product launches. This will give our retailers what they’ve been asking for—a place where they can find what’s new, right at the entrance so they can better map their routes. We’ve teamed up with Italian style aficionado Karl-Edwin Guerre (@ guerreisms) and MR’s Stephen Garner to host the live fashion presentations that acclaimed stylist Michael Macko will be producing. Other experiences onsite that will engage our community include panel discussions, visual photography displays and delightful Italian treats throughout the three days of the show. We’re also bringing back the PROJECT & MRKET Awards in three distinct categories: Best in Show, Best Emerging Brand and Best Booth Presentation. N:OW Forum offers a spectrum of presentations and panel discussions headed by trend forecasting agency WGSN and Highsnobiety to provide compelling insider perspectives on fashion topics as well as an array of networking opportunities and mixers for our vendors, retailers and guests to mingle in a relaxed environment over beer, wine and light bites. For Las Vegas, Aug. 12-14, our ONE MAGIC initiative means all our communities are hosted under one roof inside the Las Vegas Convention Center. This blending of footwear into the overall mix means buyers can finally shop men’s apparel, accessories and footwear in a single location.

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TRADE SHOW TALK

Bruce Schedler, Chicago Collective,

Sharifa Murdock, Liberty Fashion & Lifestyle Fairs, NYC and Las Vegas

NYC July 22-24; Las Vegas Aug. 12-14 For this upcoming show season, Liberty Fairs will be returning to Pier 94 in New York and making its much-anticipated return to the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas. We’ll be bringing in the best of the best in the world of men’s contemporary, classic, sportswear, and streetwear collections as well as apothecary and grooming, which we’ve become known for. We’re proud to share that brands such as C.P. Company, Fila, AG Jeans, as well as Hudson, will be returning to our New York and Las Vegas markets. Additionally, we’re thrilled to welcome Nifty Genius, Project X Paris, Scotch & Soda and many more to our brand roster. We’re so excited for what this show season will bring; it will truly be a must-attend event for the global fashion community!

Dee Jones, Dallas Men’s Show,

July 27-29 The Dallas Market Center will have its largest men’s show to date. Welcoming back the best brands in men’s apparel, accessories and footwear, this will be a recordsetting summer edition of the Dallas Men’s Show, featuring new showrooms and collections in addition to returning top brands and events. The show presents a larger-than-ever selection of traditional and contemporary menswear on the 8th and 15th floors of the World Trade Center and includes new leases and renewals adding up to nearly 3,000 square feet of permanent showrooms plus new temporary exhibitors. Among the new showrooms on the 7th floor in the World Trade Center, Freestone Sales will offer Vineyard Vines and True Grit. Plus new lines in the temp neighborhood will include The Normal Brand, Rock Monkey Outfitters, Samuel Hubbard, Southern Proper, Spazio, Stitch Apparel and S. Cohen. These new brands join returning exhibitors including Johnston & Murphy, Tommy Bahama, Lacoste, Barbour, Madison Creek Outfitters, Southern Marsh, Fish Hippie, Jack Victor, Samuelsohn, Martin Dingman, Peerless, Tallia and many more. The show will feature hospitalities such as complimentary daily breakfast and lunch and a buyers’ lounge for relaxation. In addition, the much-anticipated Men’s Show opening night party will be in the World Trade Center’s 15th floor sky lounge with sweeping downtown views, music, food, cocktails and a legendary party theme.

Aug. 4-6 I’m excited about the upcoming Chicago Collective! It’s virtually sold out at 368 exhibitors, which is where we want to be. We’re not trying to be the biggest show in the country, just the best. We can’t get any bigger and we’re happy with the intimacy and camaraderie our size show encourages. I’m especially grateful to our parent company for helping us survive some tenuous times and come back stronger than ever. I believe many of the strategic moves we’ve implemented over recent years have made a big difference, especially the buyer rebate program, which created a great group of core supporters. The other important initiative lately is traveling to stores around the country to get to know the retailers we hope to recruit. We’ve gotten aggressive about travel—one store at a time—as it definitely helps form relationships. Our Outreach Program also extends to Europe; recent trips to Pitti Uomo have resulted in a strong response from Italian, British and German exhibitors. So from a regional show with local reps, the Chicago Collective has evolved into a national/international powerhouse featuring owners and top execs of the world’s best menswear brands. In addition to our big outdoor party on the first night of the show (with special surprises this year), we will continue with all the little things our customers love: the Bloody Mary bar, the evening cocktails, the wine sponsor, the scotch sponsor, the UK spirit of choice (most recently Hendricks gin), and much, much more.

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The buzz is true: The Chicago Collective is the best menswear show this side of the Atlantic. Listen, we were surprised too. But we didn't just jump the line. Years of planning, building and revamping have established a show floor that works and a vibe that keeps you coming back.

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A NO BRAINER

WE’RE IN WITH THE IN CROWD

OUR SHOW IS BEYOND FUN

We believe in working smarter, not harder. Navigable, hassle-

All the brands you’re looking

August we are partnering with

free, relaxing: we’ve got the

for? They’re here. From the

Band of Indigo to bring you yet

best presentation and format

major players to the indie and

another epic Opening Night

anywhere. We make your job

emerging that you’ll want to be

Party at theMart River Park. Plus,

easy, which means you’ve

the first to discover, Chicago

once you wrap each day you’re

got more time to enjoy the

Collective brings together over

steps from world class dining

camaraderie of our tight-knit

350 exhibitors with the best

and exhilarating nightlife. So

community. This is the show you

lines in contemporary, denim,

what are you waiting for?

actively look forward to.

outerwear, accessories and

Like, REALLY fun. In fact, this

footwear. Come explore.

BAND OF INDIGO OPENING NIGHT PARTY FEATURING JAIMOE’S JASSSZ BAND Sunday: 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. [theMART River Park, along the Chicago River]

Debuting for Spring 2020, Band of Indigo offers an inspired collection by intersecting the worlds of music and denim with a spirit of passion and creative transcendence. To celebrate their launch, Band of Indigo is teaming up with the Chicago Collective to bring you an Opening Night Party like no other. In the spirit of old Chicago and its favorite music genre, our opening night party this season will feature Jaimoe’s Jasssz Band. Jaimoe is a straight legend. A founding member of The Allman Brothers Band and a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, this luminary of Southern Rock has a career that spans decades and is littered with accolades. Picture it: rich, soulful tunes drift out over the Chicago River on a hot summer night, as the coolest people in the industry catch up and take in the jaw-dropping city view. .

#chicagocollective

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THE BIG APPLE New things to do after trade show hours. By Brian Scott Lipton

MOULIN ROUGE

The glamour of Toulouse Lautrec’s Paris takes on a whole new look—and feel—in Moulin Rouge, the new Broadway extravaganza adapted from Baz Luhrmann’s ultra-popular 2001 film. Blending romance, melodrama, unbelievable visuals and a slew of pop songs from Lady Gaga, LaBelle, Beyoncé and countless others—sung by such esteemed theatrical talents as Karen Olivo, Aaron Tveit, Sahr Ngaujah and Danny Burstein—this spectacle-driven offering is bound to be boffo at the box office! (Al Hirschfeld Theatre. 302 West 45th St., ticketmaster.com)

HELEN’S

MINIMALISM/ MAXIMALISM

One can always count on The Museum at FIT to enlighten and educate us, even about our own industry. Its latest exhibition, “Minimalism/Maximalism,” features more than 90 garments, accessories and textiles from the permanent collection that explore the various ways minimalist and maximalist aesthetics have manifested themselves in fashion over the past three centuries. Come see distinctive designs from Rei Kawakubo, Coco Chanel, Balenciaga, Hardy Amies, André Courrèges, Raf Simons and many other visionaries. (227 W. 27th St., 212.217.4558)

One of China and Hong Kong’s most popular hangouts—with over 160 locations overseas—Helen’s finally makes its way across the ocean this summer. Nestled in a cozy downstairs space in the midst of the Meatpacking District, Helen’s offers such exotic cocktails as the Lychee Martini, Pearl of the Orient, China Doll and Bangkok Heat (yep, it’s got chili) along with a small selection of dim-sum-like dishes, such as beef pot stickers and pork chashu buns. (26 Ninth Ave., helensnewyork.com)

THE TWA HOTEL

Staying at the airport is usually a last resort, but the recently opened TWA Hotel at JFK Airport is more like an actual resort. Built on the site of Eero Saarinen’s landmark 1962 terminal, this luxurious 500+-room property includes eateries and lounges run by such industry giants as Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Rande Gerber, a gorgeous rooftop pool/bar, a public observation deck, a state-of-the-art fitness center, a variety of great shops and much more. You might even delay your flight home. (JFK Airport, 212.806.9000, twahotel.com)

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SCENE

GOLD BEAR

Every town needs a special sports bar where they can cheer on their hometown favorites. And you can definitely yell for (or at) the Yankees at Gold Bear, a bright, cleverly decorated bi-level space with more than 15 TVs (including a couple in private booths). Or you can just partake in its superb selection of draft beers, curated whiskey and craft cocktails, as well as nibble on everything from poutine with duck confit (an intriguing take on a Canadian favorite), short rib tacos, homemade tater tots or the house’s delicious Gold Bear burger. (377 Park Ave. S., 646.850.1400)

NORTH FORK

If you can’t make it out to the Hamptons or the Hudson Valley, you still can sample some of these regions’ local delicacies at North Fork, which is dedicated to a true farm-to-table experience. The extensive menu ranges from escargots and duck (both from Long Island) to Atlantic bass, Colorado lamb, grilled asparagus and roasted cauliflower (both from Coxsackie, N.Y.) and so much more. It’s all-American comfort food at its finest. (122 Christopher St. 917.261.6598)

MOXY NYC CHELSEA

BLT PRIME

Perhaps the only thing better than enjoying a great steak is eating it in a swanky restaurant. At the recently opened BLT Prime, sink into a curvy cognac leather banquette or sit around a beautifully appointed table and indulge in some of the finest cuts of meats to be found anywhere in Manhattan. And non-carnivores have no need to fear, as the extensive menu also includes such delicacies as tuna tartare, baked Ora King salmon, sautéed Dover sole and a lobster cobb salad. It’s prime dining to be sure. (1032 Lexington Ave., 212.995.8500)

This new boutique hotel in Chelsea’s flower district, designed by the legendary David Rockwell, has a variety of great spaces to check out. There are groundfloor eateries, Feroce Caffé, known for its authentic cappuccinos and espressos, and the beautifully designed Feroce Ristorante, where the menu features imported ingredients from historic brands and small producers from across Italy; the gorgeous second-floor Bar Feroce, a modern oasis where one can enjoy oven-fired pizzas and classic cocktails; the tranquil Bar Feroce’s Backyard, an all-season garden terrace; and the fabulous Fleur, the glamorous penthouse bar on the hotel’s 35th floor, which offers breathtaking views of New York City to enjoy while sipping luscious libations. (105 W. 28th St., 212.514.6699)

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THE MEN’S SHOW JULY 27- 29

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CLINTON HALL ROOFTOP BEER GARDEN

This muchawaited addition to Williamsburg’s POD hotel is NYC’s only solar-powered rooftop beer garden, which might be reason enough to visit. Better still, in addition to enjoying stunning outdoor views, guests can savor a wide selection of beer, wines and specialty cocktails like a Spicy Summer Margarita, the BK Mezcal Swizzle and the Clinton Cooler (made with Tito’s) along with an extensive menu featuring two types of hot dogs and three kinds of lobster rolls. All hail the hall! (247 Metropolitan Ave., 929.419.6988)

SOUTH STREET SEAPORT

THE SHED AT HUDSON YARDS

While much of the hoopla over the recently opened Hudson Yards has rightly focused on its multi-story shopping mall (home of NYC’s first Neiman Marcus) and “The Vessel,” a remarkable outdoor sculpture that serves as the complex’s centerpiece, one shouldn’t overlook The Shed. This state-of-theart performance space includes a spacious lounge, art gallery and theater that make it a very welcome addition to NYC’s cultural scene. Luckily, July is the perfect time to check out the McCourt theater, which is hosting “Dragon Spring Phoenix Rise,” a musical collaboration from the creators of the popular movie Kung Fu Panda, internationally renowned songstress Sia, Venezuelan artist Arca and dancer/choreographer Akram Khan, among others. Everybody rise, indeed! (545 W. 30th St., theshed.org)

Once considered a rather cheesy touristy destination, the revamped South Street Seaport is a now a must-go place for all, whether for seeing big-name acts atop Pier 17—July’s artists include Sarah Silverman, the Steve Miller Band and Sheryl Crow—taking in an exhibition like “The Printed Port” at the informative South Street Seaport Museum or visiting the cargo hold of the historic ship The Wavertree. New this summer (but only on weekends), you can take a 45-minute ride on New York's last working New-York-built wooden tugboat, the W.O. Decker, which will cruise the tip of lower Manhattan, giving its riders extraordinary views of the skyline, Battery Park, Castle Clinton National Monument and river views of 1 World Trade Center. (12 Fulton St.)

HALL x ODO

Chef Hiroki Odo has created an unforgettable dining experience with this unusual two-in-one space. In the a.m., it serves light breakfast fare and coffee and then churns out superb burgers and sandwiches for lunch (on weekdays) before transforming itself at night into an intimate craft cocktail bar with a specially curated menu of plates focusing on Washugyu beef. For those looking for an even more special dinner, guests can locate the hidden door in Hall, which leads to the speakeasy, Odo, where if you can snag a reserved seat at the 14-seat chef’s counter, you’ll be treated to a nine-course epicurean journey that simply has to be tasted to be believed! (17 W. 20th St., no phone)

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Directory LUXURY ITALIAN BRANDS

0909

Cantarelli

Fefè Napoli

BOOTH 5 61 ACCOUNT@0909.IT WWW.0909.IT U.S. CONTACT BLACK WATCH GROUP FASHION USA LLC MARC@BLACKWATCHAGENCY.COM

BO O TH 1 1 71 303TUSCANS@303TUSCANS-ETHICAL-FASHION.EU WWW.303TUSCANS-ETHICAL-FASHION.EU

BOOTH 1141 INFO@FEFEGLAMOUR.IT WWW.FEFEGLAMOUR.IT

Croclux

Ferrante

40 Colori BOOTH 530 INFO@ITALPLUS.COM WWW.40COLORI.COM U.S. CONTACT RANDI RUBIN, ESP SHOWROOM ELIZABETH@ESPSHOWROOM.COM

Adesi-Cashmere BOOTH 1175 SISTO@ADESITEX.IT U.S. CONTACT GC FASHION GROUP INC. GCFASHIONGROUP@GMAIL.COM

Andrea Bossi / Italwear BOOTH 114 3 INFO@ANDREABOSSI.COM WWW.ANDREABOSSI.COM U.S. CONTACT TARCISIO PACIOCCO ITALWEAR@MSN.COM

Arcurities

BO O TH 1 2 70

MILFORD LEATHERS STEFANIA@MILFORDLEATHERS.COM

B O O TH 1 1 6 0 FABIO@FERRANTE.IT WWW.FERRANTE.IT U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Dalmine 1952

Ficogrande Swimwear

LAPCINTURE@GMAIL.COM WWW.PELLETTERIALAP.IT U.S. CONTACT

BOO TH 1 1 4 0 DALMINE@ROBERTSON1770.COM WWW.DALMINE.COM

Di Bello by Fontani

BO O TH 1 1 79 INFO@LINEAFONTANI.IT WWW.FONTANIFIRENZE.IT U.S. CONTACT NICK XHUMBA DIBELLO@DIBELLO.COM

Dickson

BO O TH 1 2 73 INFO@DICKSON-CAMICIE.IT WWW.DICKSON-CAMICIE.IT

Dolcepunta

BOOTH 1259 INFO@ARCURICRAVATTE.IT WWW.ARCURICRAVATTE.IT U.S. CONTACT MARCELLO TARANTINO MARCELLOTARANTINO@SYMPATICO.CA

BO O TH 1 2 3 7 DOLCEPUNTA@DOLCEPUNTA.IT WWW.DOLCEPUNTA.IT U.S. CONTACT FUORI PORTA NICOLA@FUORIPORTANYC.COM

Belts+di Piazza Stefano

EEVYE

BOOTH 115 8 BELTS@RSADVNET.IT WWW.BELTS-PARMA.IT U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

BO O TH 4 3 6 IVANO@LASERMARKING.IT WWW.EEVYE.IT U.S. CONTACT REMO TULLIANI REMO@TULLIANI.COM

Calabrese 1924

Fabrizio Mancini

BOOTH 114 8 INFO@CALABRESE1924.COM WWW.CALABRESE1924.COM

BOO TH 1 2 79 INFO@FABRIZIOMANCINI.IT WWW.FABRIZIOMANCINI.COM

B O O TH 1 2 72 NKK@NKKSAS.IT WWW.FICOGRANDE.COM

Flannel Bay Napoli B O O TH 1 1 6 6 INFO@VESUVIOSRL.IT WWW.FLANNELBAY.IT U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Fray

B O O TH 1 1 3 7 GIACOMO.GUASINA@ME.COM WWW.FRAYITALY.COM U.S. CONTACT GIOVANNI VASTA ITALIANLIFESTYL_2013@LIBERO.IT

Galà Camiceria Ferrari

B O O TH 1 2 4 1 GALA.ABBIGLIAMENTO@VIRGILIO.IT WWW.GALÀ.COM

Giabsarchivio B O O TH 1 1 59 022@GIABS.IT WWW.GIABS.IT

Gicapri

B O O TH 1 2 6 0 EPS@EPSSRL.COM WWW.GCAPRI.IT

Gionfriddo

B O O TH 1 2 8 1 INFO@FILMORA.IT U.S. CONTACT JOE GIONFRIDDO THESWEATERGUY@HOTMAIL.COM

2 | FROM ITALY WITH LOVE

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Ingram - Reporter

BOOTH 1267 ITCPROMOTION@INGHIRAMI.COM WWW.INGRAM1949.COM/IT U.S. CONTACT ROMAN GERSHENGORN ROMAN.GERSHENGORN@BALLIN.COM

Italo Ferretti

BOOTH 114 2 INFO@ITALOFERRETTI.IT WWW.ITALOFERRETTI.COM U.S. CONTACT PINO TRICASE PINOTRI@AOL.COM

Lo.White

Paolo Vitale Handmade in Italy

BO O TH 1 1 6 7 AMMINISTRAZIONE@PAOLOVITALE.IT WWW.PAOLOVITALE.IT U.S. CONTACT GARY WEINER GWEINER213@GMAIL.COM

Pauri & Casati

BO O TH 1 1 78 CAMICERIASARTORIALEMILANO@GMAIL.COM WWW.CASATI-MILANO.IT U.S. CONTACT MASSIMO PAURI MASSIMOPAURI@VERIZON.NET

BOOTH 1278 INFO@LOWHITE.COM WWW.LOWHITE.COM U.S. CONTACT NICK DI BELLO DIBELLO@DIBELLO.COM

Piero Gabrieli Made In Italy

Mandelli

Ploumanac'h

BO O TH 1 2 74 PALAZZOSARTORIALE@GMAIL.COM WWW.PALAZZOSARTORIALE.COM

BOOTH 124 7 E.MANDELLI@MANDELLI-MILANO.IT WWW.MANDELLI-MILANO.IT

BO O TH 1 2 6 1 FILIPPO@KOSTNER.CO WWW.PLOUMANACH.IT

Marco De Luca Bosso

Rifugio - Handmade Leather Jackets Napoli

BOOTH 1161 DEMAPELLE@LIBERO.IT WWW.MARCODELUCABOSSO.IT U.S. CONTACT LUCA ERRICO LE@MANDELLI-MILANO.IT

Montechiaro Impulso Lorenzoni

BOOTH 1266 CUSTOMERSERVICE@MONTECHIAROUSA.COM WWW.MONTECHIAROUSA.COM U.S. CONTACT AGOSTINO TERZI CUSTOMERSERVICE@MONTECHIAROUSA.COM

Mora 1962

BOOTH 1156 INFO@FILMORA.IT WWW.MORA1962.IT U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Ortigni 1930

BOOTH 1271 INFO@SUTORIS.IT WWW.ORTIGNI.IT

Paolo Albizzati

BOOTH 1163 INFO@PAOLOALBIZZATI.COM WWW.PAOLOALBIZZATI.COM U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Paolo Scafora Napoli

BO O TH 1 1 50 INFO@ALFREDORIFUGIO.COM WWW.ALFREDORIFUGIO.COM U.S. CONTACT NICO ALBANESE NICOON5TH@GMAIL.COM

Sant'Andrea

BOO TH 1 1 3 6 MORESCO@SAINTANDREWS.IT WWW.SAINTANDREWS.IT U.S. CONTACT LUCIANO MORESCO MORESCO@SAINTANDREWS.IT

Sartoria Vestrucci

BOO TH 1 2 3 8 INFO@SARTORIAVESTRUCCI.COM WWW.VESTRUCCI.COM U.S. CONTACT 67 MADISON HOUSE SHOWROOM INFO@67MADISONHOUSE.COM

SEM

BOO TH 1 2 53 INFO@SEMCREAZIONI.IT WWW.SEMCREAZIONI.IT U.S. CONTACT STEFANO MASSA SM@NONSOLOMODA.CH

Settecorni

BO O TH 1 1 73 INFO@VINCENZODELAUZIERS.COM WWW.VINCENZODELAUZIERS.COM U.S. CONTACT GC FASHION GROUP GCFASHIONGROUP@GMAIL.COM

Silvio Fiorello

B O O TH 1 1 54 INFO@SILVIOFIORELLO.COM WWW.SILVIOFIORELLO.COM U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Stefano Bemer

B O O TH 1 2 3 6 INFO@STEFANOBEMER.COM WWW.STEFANOBEMER.COM U.S. CONTACT 67 MADISON HOUSE SHOWROOM INFO@67MADISONHOUSE.COM

Suprema B O O TH 1 2 58 L.ZAVAN@SUPREMALAB.IT WWW.SUPREMALAB.COM U.S. CONTACT ODVISION OLGAFD@O-DVISION.COM Taccaliti

B O O TH 1 1 6 2 G.TACCALITI@GIOVANNITACCALITI.IT WWW.TACCALITI.COM U.S. CONTACT JODINA TRADING JODINA@MSN.COM

Tiki Napoli Bagnoli Sartoria Napoli Valentini

B O O TH 1 1 70 INFO@TIKI.IT WWW.TIKI.IT U.S. CONTACT GC FASHION GROUP INC. GCFASHIONGROUP@GMAIL.COM

Tintoria Mattei Caliban Guglielminotti B O O TH 1 1 55 MICHELA.PETRALI@GIEMMEBRANDSCORPORATE.IT WWW.GIEMMEBRANDSCORPORATE.IT U.S. CONTACT GRUPPO MATTEI MICHELA.PETRALI@GRUPPOMATTEINC.COM

Vitaliano

B O O TH 1 2 51 VITALIANO@VITALIANOPANCALDI.COM WWW.VITALIANO.EU U.S. CONTACT RONN M. HARRIS RONN@RONN.ME

Walking Sticks

B O O TH 53 2 INFO@WALKING-STICK.EU WWW.WALKING-STICKS.EU

BOOTH 1168 INFO@PAOLOSCAFORANAPOLI.IT WWW.PAOLOSCAFORANAPOLI.IT FROM ITALY WITH LOVE | 3

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2019 MR AWARDS

AND THE WINNERS ARE: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, THEN CENTER)

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AWARD: JAMES BARTLE, OUTLAND DENIM MEN’S SPECIALTY STORE OF THE YEAR: STUART AND BARRY SEGEL, MR. SID RETAIL VISION AWARD: BODEGA MENSWEAR INFLUENCER OF THE YEAR: JOHANNES HUEBL ONLINE RETAILER OF THE YEAR: EAST DANE ITALIAN MEN’S STYLE AMBASSADOR: GIL SZCZESNY BEST EMERGING BRAND: STANTT DEPARTMENT STORE FASHION AMBASSADOR: DURAND GUION, MACY’S

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2019 MR DEPARTMENT STORE FASHION AMBASSADOR

THE REAL DEAL

It’s not just his personal style but more his candor, enthusiasm and generous spirit that make Durand Guion so well-loved in the menswear community. By Karen Alberg Grossman a career in fashion merchandising. Studying How many of us are lucky enough to have a business in college, Guion realized soon job we still love after 30 years? Macy’s VP/ enough this was not his passion so he took fashion director Durand Guion feels truly some time off. Although an ill-advised move blessed to engage in his passion every day. according to his parents, Guion now maintains He has no idea how many vendors he shops that taking that break to realign his priorities on a regular basis (it’s surely hundreds) but was one of his best decisions ever. “I needed somehow, he manages to visit even small that moment to gain clarity and focus,” he exemerging brands, not just for their sales poplains. “I ultimately went back to school for an tential at Macy’s but also to assist them with AA degree in fashion merchandising and then suggestions. For this, he claims no bragging rights. “It’s part of the ministry,” he explains. “And why not take a few minutes to give someone guidance? You never know Story: Experiential boutiques in 36 doors, product changes every 2-3 months Backstage: Off-price fashion in 173 doors, opening when or where you might find 50 more this year Online vendor direct: 700 vendors participate, will be 1,000 end of year The Market at Macy’s: A juried mini-lease that next great thing.” set-up where emerging brands can showcase exciting goods Virtual and Augmented Reality: In 80+ doors, including AR-enhanced Born and raised in San mirrors in beauty departments and apps to show Macy’s furniture in your own home Francisco where he lived until

RECENT BOLD MOVES AT MACY'S

Macy’s moved him to NYC ten years ago, Guion describes a happy childhood. “I’m from a small family: my mom (a teacher), dad (a chef) and one brother (a tech recruiter). My dad cooked dinners Mondays through Thursdays (which explains my great appreciation for food); my mom took over on weekends. From a fashion perspective, my biggest influence was my paternal grandmother. She was a single African-American woman from the South who moved to San Francisco in the late 1940s. A fabulous dresser with an amazing sense of style, she’d spend money on clothes that was unheard of for a woman in her situation. So I thank my grandma, Gracie Mae, for my love for fashion!” He may have inherited the gene, but it was talent combined with luck that propelled

a BA in speech and communication. I needed that break to understand I’d been following a path that wasn’t me.” His career track at Macy’s was also a bit fortuitous. Having worked retail all through high school and college, Guion considered applying to Macy’s a logical move. But not realizing that he needed to go through a formal college recruitment process and apply well in advance, Guion just showed up at the store and asked to join the executive training program. They told him those spots were filled long ago so he now had to prove himself as a selling supervisor. Letting go of his frustration, he took the job, put his heart into it and proved himself to be a star seller, supervisor and soon manager.

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MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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bust. With dress codes still casual, it’s a tricky business: size intensive, largely replenishment. But we’ve got a dynamic team and the best assortments. Our focus is on separates, top brands, fresh fashion, extended sizes and related furnishings. When we commit to a new look, we commit big: We can’t tiptoe around or it gets lost… . We’ve been promoting the concept of ‘more than one way to wear a suit’ and that’s been exciting!” Will Macy’s adopt the looser, more voluminous suit models now seen on European runways? “Not yet,” Guion says without hesitation. “Guys are finally comfortable in slim suits, in brighter blues, in seasonal fabrics (seersuckers, khakis), looks we couldn’t sell for decades. We don’t want to push them away from these too soon, especially since tailored is a such big investment—guys don’t buy suits the way they do jeans or tank tops, and we want to ensure they feel good about their investment. (Editor’s note: Macy’s suit retails run to about $1,000; they’re just starting to offer some MTM options.) Self Description: Curious, passionate, thoughtful, motivated, content Interests: Fashion, style, retail (I’ve loved these since childThat said, we’ll probably start hood), family, friends, food What he’d change about himself: I could be a bit more patient, not so quick to make judgments Road loosening up by introducing Not Taken: Teaching (I did some early in my career and loved it!) Reading Now (Book): What Got You Here Won’t Get You There wider lapels and pants styles Watching Now (Movie): Rocketman Binging Now (TV): Everything on Netflix Favorite NYC Restaurant:IL Cantinori Favorite Food: that are looser on top but still ALL Best vacation: Mykonos Best business travel: Japan Fashion Role Model: Suzanne Anderson (now a Macy's VP overseeing narrow on the bottom, to show private brands) Most admire: My parents. They’ve been my rock, my support system. Even when doubting my decisions, they off the shoe. Remember: It took continue to give me unconditional support Best Friend: My dog, Daniel: He’s 9 years old and quite the character! It cracks me up 15 years to evolve men’s clothing how many people in the industry always ask about him to slim; while it won’t take that long to go back (fast fashion will speed it up a bit), we’re not going from 0 to 60 plish far more than I might have otherwise.” overnight!” More recently, Macy’s SVP/GBM Mark The other exceptional business at Macy’s Stocker is filling that role. “Mark came into of late is activewear; Guion attributes this the men's business without the traditional strength to carrying all the right brands, to background, and I’m so impressed with how another exceptional team and to the fact that he’s pushed our men’s team to consistently activewear influences are being integrated deliver the best fashion. He’s been a true into everyday wear. “Much like the status game-changer and working closely with him men felt from wearing an Armani or Hugo to reimagine the future of the men’s store Boss suit a while back, wearing streetwear has been a rewarding experience.” He also for a new generation indicates membership praises his current associate fashion director in a community. It’s now less about price or Danny Kim for his terrific sense of style and proving you’ve arrived, and more about street vision, and Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette for cred, about being part of a tribe. It started his “unwavering support and belief in me. with sneakers: limited supply, frequent drops, I've known Jeff since I started my career at high price points. It’s not so much that you Macy’s; he is an amazing leader, and his trust were able to afford it but more simply that means the world to me.” you ‘get it’. And it’s now expanded with even Asked about Macy’s current menswear core national brands like Ralph Lauren, business, Guion is delighted to give a positive Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, Levi’s becoming at review. “Although it’s been tough elsewhere, least somewhat streetwear-inspired. In fact, our tailored clothing sales continue to be roFast forward a few years, Durand is working in a Macy’s buying office that happened to be near the fashion office. “Coincidentally, I had once interviewed Macy’s fashion director Ray Wills for a college assignment long before I thought of joining Macy’s. So there I was, this pesky little guy who kept popping into the fashion office. Then one day Wills retired, and with the help of a trend report I created using my personal collection of old GQ magazines, I somehow got the job!” A strong believer in mentors, Guion attributes his career path to many wonderful people along the way. “But the key to a department store fashion business is the relationship between the fashion director and the GMM. So I have to give a shout out to Paul Fitzpatrick, Menswear GMM at Macy’s West for many years. He really understood my strengths and challenged me to do more with them. His encouragement led me to accom-

GUION GETS PERSONAL

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WHY THE MENSWEAR MARKET LOVES GUION there are streetwear influences in virtually everything we do in casual sportswear. The young generation has owned it!” While Guion claims few disappointments in menswear these days, there’s always something. Neckwear, for example, is not among Macy’s more robust categories. “But you can’t beat yourself up for it,” he explains. “It’s a natural cycle so you just move on to something else. In fact, at a recent presentation in Chicago, I was almost late because I’d planned to wear a tie and it took a little longer for me to get that perfect knot. (It had been a while since I last tied one.)” What’s needed to make business better? Guion is thoughtful. “All retailers need to keep pace with the new customer: He’s moving faster, he’s more confident. He thinks of fashion and style in a very different way. We’ve got to stay in tune with where he’s getting his fashion information. We’ve got to stay on top of social media. If he’s moving to a more casual mindset, we can’t fight that; we’ve got to be right there with him, or better still, ahead of him. And whatever the trend, we’ve got to message the how-to. It’s not about selling a bunch of clothes but how do you curate it for him, how do you message it to him, how do you let him know how to wear it? I believe Macy’s is in a good position because we communicate multi-platform: print, TV, digital, in-store display. And our guys feel comfortable in our stores—with both familiar brands and some new exciting initiatives.” Asked which of these new exciting initiatives he’s most enthused about, Guion singles out Story and Market at Macy’s. “The acquisition of Story is teaching us to move quickly and be nimble, that we can’t wait for 95,000 approvals to make a decision because the mix changes every 60-90 days. As for Market at Macy’s (launched about two years ago), this is making it easier for small emerging brands to sell at Macy’s. It used to be that if a brand didn’t have the right infrastructure behind it, they couldn’t get in; now, virtually anyone can reach out, and we’ll help them determine if they’re a fit. Those who are get an opportunity to showcase their product for 30 days or even six months, depending on the deal. During this time, they learn about

“I’ve known Durand for many years —too many to count. He’s a class act, always was, always will be. I trust his taste level on just about any and everything. For years, no matter what position I was in, I’d call on Durand for tips, trends, advice and just to run ideas past him. He is so so smart! What’s also amazing (and obvious) about him is his personal sense of style: No one can quite pull it together like he can. But beyond his great taste and fashion insights, Durand is an incredibly astute businessman. He’s the whole package.” KAREN MURRAY, SEQUENTIAL BRANDS GROUP

“Durand is a great choice for the MR award! From a Nautica perspective, Durand is one of the true fashion authorities in the market today. There’s always a level of excitement when he walks into the showroom. His enthusiasm and passion for product is ever present. Not only does he bring a discerning eye to product but also gives honest feedback without being overly negative or critical. He respects brands and their DNA and looks to incorporate that in the big-picture thinking he directs throughout Macy’s. Aside from that, he’s a genuinely nice guy who is highly respected and admired by so many!” ELECTA VARNISH, NAUTICA

“Durand has been just a wonderful guy to work with over the years. His timely and sharp insight into fashion trends has helped us a great deal in terms of how we perceive the market. But more than anything else, he is open and congenial and interested in how we are doing, which means a lot. My guess is his schedule is pretty packed but Durand will always go out of his way to attend a brand event or collaboration launch, and I am sure it’s not easy to fit it all in. I remember once, he brought his dog (Daniel) to an event we had at the Florsheim store on Madison Avenue. He was clearly juggling a lot of things that night and needed to get his dog out but also wanted to make time for us. Daniel ended up being the hit of the party.” JOHN FLORSHEIM, WEYCO GROUP

“Durand is multi-talented and a great partner to Peerless. Not only can he spot a trend but he can also translate it perfectly for the mainstream American market. We are very fortunate to work so closely with Durand as we always gain invaluable insights into consumer behavior from his experience and instincts. He is clearly a treasured asset to the entire men’s fashion industry.” JOHN TIGHE, PEERLESS CLOTHING

“I’ve enjoyed working and traveling with Durand for more than 20 years. He’s always been a humble and honest gentleman (and of course, a great dresser!). He has a keen understanding of how to bring fashion to the Macy's consumer. I also admire his positive attitude and tremendous passion for both his job and the fashion community. He deserves to be recognized for always helping vendors by sharing his insights. It’s been a pleasure to see him grow in his professional career.” OSCAR FELDENKREIS, PERRY ELLIS INTERNATIONAL

“There are few people you meet in business that are as talented and professional as they are genuine and approachable. Durand Guion is one of these unique individuals, a creative genius. Durand’s relationship with Clarks spans back to his days at Macy’s West, where he was (and still is today) a huge advocate for our Bostonian and Clarks brands. He always provided great insight to trends, materials, patterns, color and seasonal direction to our Product Teams to help make us a better brand. One of the highlights of working with Durand is to see what interesting wardrobe he has pulled together to wear as he is always walking the ‘Red Carpet’ on Oscar night. I am very fortunate to call Durand a friend of Clarks, but more importantly, a personal friend.” JIM CLARIN, CLARKS AMERICAS INC. “Durand is a fashion executive for whom I have tremendous respect. He’s not only a true gentleman but also a dedicated

department store parameters with a goal to ultimately become a regular vendor. Of course, there’s a fee associated with the arrangement: It’s like a mini-leased departmen, but it’s a step into the future for many emerging brands. And it’s great for us to test promising vendors with new fashion concepts.” On the impact of online selling (editor’s note: Macy’s has reported 19 consecutive quarters of double-digit growth on its website, with 700 vendors now selling direct from the Macy’s platform), Guion remains a big believer in brick-and-mortar stores. “For many men, shopping online for fashion can be overwhelming. Our research shows that men like going into our stores, seeing new looks on mannequins,

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professional. His pulse on fashion trends, both domestic and international, is always ‘spot on,’ and his keen understanding for what is commercially viable sets him apart from many in the fashion world. Working with Durand for so long, I have a strong appreciation for his many talents, which has led to a personal friendship that I cherish.” RON RHEINGOLD, WEATHERPROOF VINTAGE

working for them; Durand is always seeking out what’s new.” DANIEL BOUSKILA, BMG IMPORTS

“To truly tell you my feeling about Durand I would need hours! Our relationship started nearly 20 years ago when he was with Macy’s West. It’s very rare to see someone who is fair, honest, and has an incredible pulse on trends. I’ve always valued his opinions and insights when in the market. (On a side note, I would kill to have his wardrobe, shoes and jewelry!) RALPH BEYDA, 2(X)IST

“Durand is one of fashion’s sherpas. He has exquisite taste, insatiable curiosity and a gift to edit the many and spotlight the important few. He mixes high and low with expert skill and can make any basic item work with a designer runway piece. With his well-honed business acumen, Durand drives millions of dollars in sales volume by influencing our brand partners and merchant teams to create, buy and sell the most important fashion trends. You have only to look at Durand to know a true original—so original that I’ve never seen him in the same outfit in the 20 plus years I’ve known him! Great choice MR magazine!” JEFF GENNETTE, MACY’S

“I’ve been working with Durand for at least 20 years, since back when he was at Macy’s West, and I can say without doubt that there are few others in our industry who have his passion, who live/eat/breathe fashion, who understand the consumer mindset, who are willing to do anything to get it right. I’ve had endless meaningful conversations with him over the years, and I can tell you: he grasps this business like no one else. People should listen to him! He has a wonderful point of view for every brand—not just what each does well but how each fits into the Macy’s landscape. And he understands retail as theater—how to create that wow factor. In every way, Durand is wonderful!” JEFF TWEEDY, SEAN JOHN “I’ve known Durand for seven or eight years, and we quickly developed a friendship, I think because we’re both so passionate about the industry (or maybe because he has a dog names Daniel…). I always look forward to having a drink or dinner with him because we have such great conversations on so many things. He truly lives his job! But what’s really wonderful about Durand is that he gives every vendor a chance: No matter how busy he is, he’ll shop a collection and recommend that his buyers shop it if it seems right for Macy’s Most merchants these days buy only what’s been

“Durand is a tremendous business partner. He is open, forward-thinking and very consumer focused. He is always smiling and creates great energy for everyone around him.” CHERYL ABEL-HODGES, CALVIN KLEIN

“Durand is a rare exception in this business. He is a visionary and creative executive who understands and emphasizes both the product and the numbers. Working with Durand is a gift because he deeply cares about all the product that sits on his floor. He understands and is able to predict the market in a way I’ve never seen. His feedback comes from a place of passion and knowledge that is unparalleled. What’s more, he keeps his pulse on all aspects of the men’s fashion market unlike anyone I’ve ever met. He can speak on any trend, brand or look as it relates to any market or region around the world. Durand knows what’s hot in every sector of the market from tailoring to fast fashion to athleisure. Working with him is incredibly inspiring. Even though we are a smaller brand, Durand makes time to meet with us for lunch multiple times a year just to catch up on a personal level and to offer advice and guidance. His attitude as a leader is inspiring because there’s no detail too small for him! Even his personal style is inspiring!" PHILIP BASSIS, REASON CLOTHING

“Durand has an intangible gift in his ability to understand and forecast the market trends both in the U.S. and globally. He values the importance of relationships and is not only an industry leader and innovator, but a true gentleman and a pleasure to work with.” DAN ORWIG, ITOCHU APPAREL GROUP you want to be, and what makes you most comfortable. Then you have to do some work! Realize that it’s OK to be influenced, or even to copy. If you see someone or something that inspires you, figure out how to incorporate that into your persona. Look at people whose style you admire and borrow what you think might work for you. And then, of course, come into Macy’s and let our personal stylists help you put it all together. This is a wonderful complementary service we offer: Our stylists can help you create a modern look with no spin (they don’t represent a brand). It’s one of Macy’s’ biggest assets (there’s no set spend; you don’t have to buy a thing) and I wish more guys would take advantage of it!”

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

viewing the extent of our assortments, getting advice from sales associates first hand.” And speaking of advice, we ask this fashion icon most known for his individual style (often described as original, unique, eclectic, directional), how one creates a personal brand. “It’s a good question for me since I’m a big fan of building, maintaining and protecting one’s personal brand. It’s something we don’t talk enough about, especially to young people getting started in their careers. You can be book smart, common-sense smart and street savvy but like it or not, people first judge you and form an impression by how you look. “How to do it? First and foremost, you have to know who you are, or at least who

“Durand is a rare talent. Not only can he predict a trend the first time he sees it but he is capable of single-handedly creating a new fashion look just by wearing it. You see him dressed up or down in a creative way and you wonder why you can’t put it together like that. “Unfortunately, you can’t teach what he does: It’s a God-given talent. Durand also happens to be a wonderfully open and genuine person: When he believes in something, he will always fight for it, politics aside. Bottom line: he is the real deal.” RONALD WURTZBURGER, PEERLESS CLOTHING

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2019 MR BEST SPECIALTY STORE

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SPENDING— IN ALL THE RIGHT PLACES

By investing in their sales team, their stores, their brand partnerships and their community, Mr. Sid has become a true retail role model. By Karen Alberg Grossman to work for TJX,” he recalls. “It was a great experience but after three years, I realized I’m better at working with people than spending all day in a buying office. So Stuart forewarned my dad (and took the brunt of his initial anger) but it all worked out. What I really love about retail is that you wear so many hats: I’ve always had a passion for marketing so I was able to pick up where my dad left off…” Division of labor was never an issue for the brothers: Stuart serves as president, overseeing merchandising but with his hands in just about everything; Barry is VP, heading up marketing, advertising, events and more. “Our dad laid it out that way,” explains Barry. “When we disagree (and we disagree plenty!), Stuart has seniority, and I’m fine with that: He does a great job, and somehow, we Established: 1967 Founders: Bobby and Ira Segel Store Size: Newton—15,000 square feet (12,000 selling space); Seaport—2,500 manage to respect each other’s square feet Key Brands: Zegna, Zanella, PT, Boglioli, Samuelsohn, Castangia, Isaia, Canali, Corneliani, Circolo 1901, Gran Sasso, opinions.” Adds Stuart, “In a famAlden Opening Price Suit: Sid Royale, MTM @ $1,595 In-Store Partners: Chivalry Grooming Parlor, Seaport Barbers Teams: Patriots ily business like this, you have to and Red Sox, of course! Recent Honors: Newton Fire Department monument in memory of Ira Segel; MR/Heavenly Harvest set your ego aside, appreciate each Community Service Award Success Secret: Supporting key vendors in tough times, growing together in good times. Next Move: other’s talents and recognize that An online component for exclusive niche product there can only be one president. In truth, our older sister (a lawyer who’s not in the business) is the real boss in But when Ira opened a Palm Beach store and and Barry happen to be two of the nicest the family. I’m grateful we’re all close: We live needed some help, I took the job and fell in guys you’ll meet: They're humble, personable, near each other and spend lots of family time love with it: the constant interaction with difhard-working, fun-loving and very genuine. together.” ferent personalities, the creativity, the quality, Mr. Sid was founded in 1967 by Bobby Apparently, Barry’s easygoing personality craftsmanship and heritage of luxury clothing. Segel; his brother Ira, a successful advertising helps balance Stuart’s highly competitive naexec, bought Bobby out a few years later. “It was I developed a passion, so here I am.” ture. In addition to “ultra-competitive,” Stuart (Stuart also mentions his passion for a contentious situation, and the brothers didn’t describes himself as “intense, loyal and a bit golf. “I’m not great—a 16 handicap—and I speak for some time,” confides Stuart. “Ultishy. I love to laugh, to have fun, and I go out of don’t get to play much these days. But years mately they reconciled and we learned a lot my way to ensure that this retail journey we’re ago, I was a bartender at a country club so I from the experience. Our dad was a character. on is truly enjoyable to everyone here. Who played all the time. I still maintain that being a He did a lot of great things that set the stage for bartender is the best foundation for any career, else would let their employees have a cocktail our culture today: The way he treated customon the selling floor at 5 p.m.? Maybe that’s and being a golfer is a great way to reinforce ers and vendors, his involvement in the comcrazy but I want our people to love their jobs: relationships.”) munity, his exuberant personality, all created a As for Barry, three and a half years young- Their work satisfaction enhances the shopping warmth that still permeates our organization. er, he’ d considered joining the family business experience for our customers. Some of our Ira had tremendous inner strength, was very people have worked here for 40 years, or else consistent (perhaps to a fault) and knew how to but wasn’t sure. “Right from college, I went To those who maintain it’s impossible to compete in today’s retail world without selling online, check out Mr. Sid! Defying the odds, second generation Stuart and Barry Segel opened a new menswear store at Boston Seaport last year. It’s doing great, as is their Newton landmark, thanks to the Segels’ heartfelt formula: offer the world’s finest menswear; hire, train and reward the best people; partner with top vendors; invest back in the business; give back to the community; bring in fresh fashion; and keep dreaming up creative ways (wine bar, event space, game room, grooming salon, customer cruises!) to keep clients coming back. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that Stuart

entertain. (He was serving bagels and hugging customers well before it was Vogue to do so.) But the big change with our generation is the merchandising. While Ira always carried a broad price range that included luxury product, his taste was ultra-conservative. Our mission is to advance our customers from a fashion perspective.” As is often the case in family businesses, Stuart never intended to join his dad in retailing: He went right from college to law school. “To be honest, our father didn’t really want his sons in the business; he wasn’t all that enamored of men’s clothing himself. And I certainly wasn’t known for my personal style.

FAST FACTS ON MR. SID

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they’re 33 years old and have worked here for 10 years. Ira would say don’t get too close to your employees but that’s not me: I want our people to feel part of our family.” Asked to describe each other, Barry says of Stuart, “He’s a caring person and a terrific manager. Yes he’s sometimes confrontational because he believes so strongly in what he’s doing, but that’s what makes him a great leader.” Says Stuart of Barry, “He’s very laid back, which is why we get along so well. Like me, he enjoys the lifestyle we promote: sports, spirits, food, music, travel. But he’s far more charming than I am: I’m convinced that many customers stop by the store just to schmooze with him. He’s caring, sensitive and an incredible father: There’s no finer person than Barry.” So will there be a third generation of Segels in the business? Stuart isn’t sure. “Our industry was made up of ‘characters’: It takes a certain personality type to succeed in the clothing business. Of course, it’s different today: It seems even boring people can make a fortune selling clothing online with no inventory but that’s still the exception.” He notes that so far, neither of his kids (18-year-old daughter Rachel, 16-year-old son Matthew) has shown much interest in the business. On the other hand, Barry’s 9-year-old son Jack appears ready to jump on board. “He’s only 9 but he’ d be happy to run the store tomorrow,” quips Barry, adding that “he’ d probably turn it into a restaurant.” On current business, Stuart is cautiously optimistic. “Despite the fast-changing retail scene, our business has been good: doubledigit growth for the last four years. Yes, it’s a different market today: We don’t have customers waiting in line for trunk shows Toasting the future, Stuart and Barry Segel.

or seasonal sales like they did years ago. But considering that in 2008 we lost 40 percent of our business overnight and we managed to build it back up, we’re proud of where we are. Of course, we have the advantage of being virtually the only game in town: There’s no menswear store in the Boston area that does what we do, so we can’t take too much credit. But at this point, we’ve reached a certain pinnacle so we need to figure out what’s next.” Certainly, building a Seaport store was a bold move. “We’ve always had an eye open for new opportunities,” explains Barry, “and the developer there is a friend and client. The Seaport today is a young, bustling neighborhood with high-end residential and commercial properties going in: start-ups, biotech companies, law firms, financial firms…. Since it’s always been tough to get Boston guys to come out to the suburbs, this seemed the logical move for us.”

was probably our first mistake. Mistake #2—we had no solid vendor partnerships in women’s. Mistake #3—we bought too much, too soon. And #4—Poor planning, from sellers to inventories. We stuck with women’s for three years (mistake #5) but learned some good lessons, most notably the importance of being really well prepared.” (So will they try women’s again? “Never say never,” is Stuart’s response.) As for today’s biggest challenges, Barry acknowledges the toll taken by casual dress codes. “Most guys don’t have to dress up anymore so our challenge is to inspire them to want to dress up. We find that once they get that first compliment on a modern suit or sportcoat, they want more.” As for the most obvious challenge—the increasing amount of online competition—Stuart still believes luxury customers prefer an in-store experience. (At this point, Mr. Sid has a fabulous website featuring fashion and lifestyle blogs, vendor

2019 MENSWEAR VOLUME BY CATEGORY Tailored Clothing: 55% Sportswear: 25% Dress Furnishings: 6% Shoes: 11% Accessories: 3% “We launched the Seaport store in November 2018,” says Stuart. “The mix is 80 percent the same as Newton, but the 20 percent that’s unique (Faherty, Parajumpers, Patrick Assaraf) is making a huge difference. Granted, the opening has not been without its struggles: A big leak set us back a bit. But in general, we’re really happy with the progress. Our sellers and tailors are terrific, and it’s amazing how many suits are selling—many of them private label.” Asked about mistakes they’ve made over the years, Stuart singles out their long-ago foray into women’s fashion. “This was back in the ’70s; we took over the entire lower level, which

and event listings, employee profiles and more but they don’t actually sell online.) “As a smaller retailer, how do we even begin to compete with the big guys, including our key vendors?” asks Stuart. “We’re so much about service, about personal relationships: The only way selling online might make sense for us is if we create exclusive offerings. But with so much product everywhere, we need to be sure that what we offer online is truly special and representative of our direction. For example, it doesn’t pay for us to sell Zegna online; they do a terrific job of that themselves. But when we design our own field coat with Manto or when Andrew designs a demi-boot with Alden—that’s the kind of exclusive niche business we think could work.” As for the charitable component of their business, (which includes recent collaborations with Heavenly Harvest to donate healthy meals to the hungry and with Fashion Speaks Out to help remove the stigma of mental illness), the Segels show much humility. “When we help our community, we also help our business because our customers value giving back. So we’re not all that comfortable positioning ourselves as philanthropists. We’d rather just stay behind the scenes, quietly doing what we do.” I suggest that Ira is likely smiling from heaven. “I hope he is,” says Stuart. “I believe he is.”

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Mr.Sid in Newton and Boston seaport, yesterday and today.

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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2019 MR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AWARD

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CHANGING LIVES

Outland Denim frees enslaved workers and creates very cool jeans. By Karen Alberg Grossman “Our brand is about changing lives,” explains James Bartle, founder of Outland Denim. “We give people in desperate need the skills to earn a sustainable income and live a better life.” About eight years ago, this young Australian was troubled by two emerging social trends: the enormous tragedy of human trafficking and the willingness of young consumers to spend more on brands with a conscience. Bartle began to wonder if it was possible for caring companies to help the 25 million people in forced labor around the world (4.8 million in the sex trade, 99 percent of whom are women and children). It took him a good five years of research to create a business model to bring freedom to enslaved peoples. The result is Outland Denim. “The core of the brand is Zero Exploitation,” Bartle expounds. “We’re not a give-back program; we don’t ask for donations. Instead, we work with rescue agencies in Thailand, Cambodia and Burma. We interview each girl they recommend to determine if she really wants to change her life. She then goes through multiple levels of employment, starting as an entry level

focused on shame, so for these young women to transform from outcasts to providers and even leaders is truly life-affirming.” Bartle grew up in rural Queensland among dirt roads, sheep and cattle farms. His dad was a pastor at the local church; Bartle was into camping, moto racing and performing at freestyle moto sports shows. “I learned compassion from my parents, whose front door was always open

trainee, often in shipping. As she masters each skill and proves her commitment (via performance, punctuality, attendance, attitude), she moves to the next level with an increase in pay. Sometimes, entry-level employees become managers, but the real story is the restoration of dignity to their lives. Many previously had been factory workers putting in 14-hour days, seven days a week, sleeping on concrete floors, not seeing their kids. The Cambodian culture is

to anyone needing food, shelter or help of any kind; I often slept on the couch to give some stranger my bed. But it wasn’t until I watched the movie Taken that I was inspired to start this business: The horrifying statistics on human trafficking at the end of the film convinced me that I needed to do something. So I connected with a rescue agency and travelled with it to observe what was happening. I’ll never forget that trip to Thailand where I first saw a little girl who

was for sale: She looked about 12 years old and really frightened. I asked the agency how we could help her, and they replied that there’s nothing we can do, that this type of tragedy is happening everywhere… “So that’s why Outland Denim was created. We know the solution isn’t charity, which is only a Band-Aid. We need to change the culture so that everyone in the supply chain benefits: those who plant the cotton, who weave the denim, who buy and sell the jeans. That was our goal: No one would need to donate because the model would benefit all.” Outland Denim now has more than 80 employees who are learning business and life skills. The jeans and related fashion items are selling well in top stores in Australia, the UK and Canada (Harry Rosen, Holt Renfrew, upscale independents) and soon the U.S. Several “influencers” (Meghan Markle, Leonardo DiCaprio) have been photographed wearing Outland jeans, giving a notable sales boost to this premium

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

“At the moment, sustainability is more expensive but the more companies that do it, the cheaper it will get.”  —James Bartle

James Bartle at work

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2019 MR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AWARD brand whose retail price points are in the $195-$205 range. Most importantly, the jeans are ethically and sustainably sourced using organic fibers Who's that girl in Outland Denim?

“A good 25 percent of our employees’ time is spent learning life skills.”  —Mike Purkis, Caulfeild Apparel Group

and vegetable dyes. “We can’t separate the social from the environmental issues,” explains Bartle. “We can’t have a factory polluting the surroundings of the people we want to help. So in addition to hiring a designer from the UK, we found a top sustainability expert from Turkey to manage the factory in Cambodia. We’ve invested heavily in a new state-of-the-art ozone washing facility, and we’re developing the most sustainable washes. At the moment, creating sustainable product is more expensive but the more companies that do it, the cheaper it will get. This is why we recently joined the Global Fashion Agenda with other leaders in sustainability. It’s kind of ironic: We spent hundreds of thousands of dollars doing the research, developing the supply chain and building the model to create this humanitarian brand and now that it’s working, we’re making it available for anyone to copy. But that’s the win, isn’t it? Although a few of our investors don’t quite understand it, it’s bigger than Outland. We want to see change in the world.” Mike Purkis, Canadian rep and president of Caulfeild Apparel (who bought into the Outland business as soon as he saw the collection and learned the backstory), reiterates this mission.

“Our goal is to share our principles, to ensure people understand that the $100 billion a year fashion industry has the power to wipe out poverty around the world. If everyone paid $1 more for clothing, we could save a lot of lives.” Bartle and his wife Erica have two young daughters, Isabel and Emily, so Outland’s humanitarian mission is all the more meaningful at this point in their lives. “Last year, our whole family spent three months in Cambodia, which was an amazing experience (except for our 2-year-old getting a serious bacterial infection). When our 6-year old first noticed a young girl rummaging through the garbage bin, she asked me what she was doing. I explained that the girl was probably hungry, and that the reason we were in this country was to help people who don’t have as much as we do. She immediately ran upstairs to our clean, comfortable unit and returned with an armful of her toys, declaring ‘Let’s go find her!’ I believe she now has a feel for what it’s about; I hope that sentiment stays with both of our girls forever.”

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GLOBAL BRANDS GROUP CONGRATULATES

THE 2019 MR AWARDS HONOREES DEPARTMENT STORE FASHION AMBASSADOR Durand Guion, Macy's MEN’S SPECIALTY RETAILER OF THE YEAR Stuart and Barry Segel, Mr. Sid SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AWARD James Bartle, Outland Denim BEST EMERGING BRAND Stantt RETAIL VISION AWARD Bodega ITALIAN MEN’S STYLE AMBASSADOR Gil Szczesny, Italian Trade Agency (ITA) ONLINE RETAILER OF THE YEAR East Dane MENSWEAR INFLUENCER OF THE YEAR Johannes Huebl

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2019 MR BEST EMERGING BRAND

FUTURE FITS

How one brand is single-handedly bringing the custom shirt business into the 21st century. By Stephen Garner Few companies have disrupted the traditional menswear industry like Stantt, co-founded in 2013 by Kirk Keel and Matt Hornbuckle. With the goal of becoming the middle ground between custom shirts and off-the-rack, Keel and Hornbuckle left their corporate marketing jobs and went to work on developing a line of shirts with a comprehensive sizing structure at a retail price of $98. Using nearly 200,000 measurements and millions of data points from 3D body scans, Keel and Hornbuckle created an algorithm that matches a customer to one of 99 unique sizes using just three measurements from your chest, waist and arm. “In our original data set, we found 99 sizes that fit roughly 95 percent of the male population perfectly, where as traditional S/M/L/XL sizing fits about 15 percent,” Keel said when we first met him back in 2015. After initially launching with a direct-to-consumer website, Keel and Hornbuckle quickly discovered their customers wanted to try on the shirts. “What we found over time is when we started doing pop-

“Brick-and-mortar shops are the last place we thought we’d find success in acquiring new customers...but our guy likes to try it on in-store…” ­­ —Kirk Keel ups, the guys really liked getting measured and trying on a variety of sizes to figure out their perfect fit,” says Keel. “Brick-and-mortar shops are the last place we thought we would find success in acquiring new customers when we initially launched. But our guy likes to try it on in-store and then return to the site to re-order the product in a different color or style.” Fast forward to summer 2019 and Stantt is now carried in more than 300 doors, including every Nordstrom store and approximately 180 specialty stores around the country. And the brand’s retail partners are ecstatic about their sell-throughs. Merchants who carry the brand boast doubling and tripling their custom shirt business by giving their customers a new reason to come into the store (and to keep coming back). In order to be more size-inclusive, Stantt has developed a bigand-tall shirt line that includes an additional 54 sizes catering to that market. Initially established in partnership with Westport Big & Tall, Stantt now carries the big-and-tall line in 10 additional stores and has just inked a deal with DXL. The brand also offers a lot more options than it first did when it

was testing brick and mortar. Prices now range to $235; delivery is stilll seven days. Reacting to customer needs from the initial specialty store partners, the brand has since added new fabrics, a mandarin collar, colored buttons, monogramming, alterations, spread collars, a side pocket and more. “We started with only six fabrics, one collar and one cuff, and now we are at a myriad of options,” notes Hornbuckle. “Our evolution has been very deliberate and intentional. I’m glad we are able to react quickly to what our customers are asking for.” Katie McCarthy, one of Stantt’s very first hires who has grown within the company to her current position as national sales director, also credits her relationship with Fred Derring and DLS Outfitters for helping them on the path to growth. “From those first 10 stores we signed at the first two DLS breakfasts, I personally have learned so much from them,” she says. “Like Andy Mallor, Michael Duru, Bruce from Mur-Lee's, these first customers have taught me so much. We’ve updated and changed some things based on their feedback; it has been a great partnership. “I will never forget that first meeting in New York with DLS and Fred’s retailers just started taking their shirts off and were wanting to be measured,” she adds. “And then we got to go to Chicago and repeat the meeting, and after that, Andrew Davis was our first store to sign up. We were in shock that stores actually wanted to buy our line. We were super excited, to say the least.” Former Gitman president John Minahan also played a major role in the brand’s wholesale success. “Getting the stores to commit to carrying 99 shirts for $3,000 was not easy,” he notes. “But once they got going with the product, the shirts sold themselves, and our retail partners are doing very well with them. I initially came onboard with Stantt because I thought it was just cool enough, just techy enough, but not scary. It allowed the stores to bring in something new and interesting that almost created an event around the product. In the end, I was just happy to introduce my old friends to my new friends, and it worked out!” Where does the brand go from here? Launching at the Park Lane show in New York this month (and a few days later at MRKET) is the brand’s new trouser program, which will include chinos, five-pocket pants, denim and dress trousers offered in a range of sizes with the same fast delivery window as the shirts program. “It’s our biggest launch since we initially started the company,” says Keel. “We already signed on a handful of stores to test the trouser program to make sure it runs smoothly, then we’ll roll it out to all of our retail partners. We think this will eventually be bigger than our shirting; the technology behind making these pants is one of the more remarkable things I’ve seen in menswear.”

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MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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ONLINE RETAILER OF THE YEAR

DIGITAL DANCE

East Dane’s head of buying Carlo Libaridian dishes on how a digitally-native retailer can continue to thrive. By Stephen Garner As one of the first online-only menswear retailers to embrace editorial content as a way to drive online sales, East Dane has had proven success in marketing to consumers who are increasingly buying clothing online. A subsidiary of Amazon, East Dane was launched in 2013 as the brother site to popular Shopbop.com, both of which are noted for mixing editorial and commerce. Its approachable mix of brands from Billy Reid to Faherty blends well with fashion brands like Y-3 and AMI. Throw in some compelling editorial features and you’ve got a winning combo. Here we catch up with East Dane’s head of buying Carlo Libaridian as he discusses how the menswear e-commerce site has evolved since its launch, how content sets the site apart from its competitors, and the retailer’s future.

MR: How has the business evolved since the site’s original launch?

Carlo: We launched East Dane in 2013, and a lot has changed for East Dane as well as for the larger men’s industry. Fundamentally, we have gotten closer to our customer. We have a much deeper understanding of the product he is looking for, how he shops, and what content engages him. We look to continue to evolve East Dane as our customers’ wants and needs evolve.

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Congratulations to our good friends

STUART AND BARRY SEGEL and the other inspiring honorees. • • • • •

FROM THE SARTORIAL GROUP OF WAINSCOT MEDIA DAVIDSONS CLOTHING FOR MEN GARMANY JOHN CRAIG LEVY’S M PENNER POCKETS MENSWEAR RALEIGH LIMITED SYD JEROME WOODBURY MEN’S SHOP

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2019 MR ONLINE RETAILER OF THE YEAR

MR: What are some of the key moments when you’ve made changes along the way in developing the site to what it is today?

Carlo: When aren’t we making changes! For us, it’s about constantly iterating on the site experience, product offering, and marketing initiatives to provide the best possible customer shopping experience. From brand launches including Lululemon x Robert Geller, The North Face, and Barbour, to developing capsules, and bringing influencers into the mix—anything that deepens the customers’ understanding of East Dane is within the realm of possibility.

MR: Where does content fit into how you do business?

Carlo: As a digital brand, content is the key way for us to communicate with our customer. From site, to social, and email, we are constantly testing and iterating on our content strategy. At its core, we are looking to create relatable content that shows our guy how to wear the trend, while inspiring him to try out the latest brands.

MR: What do you look for when buying next season’s product? Is there a specific audience or “guy” you are after?

Carlo: The East Dane customer wants to look and feel great in what he is wearing, appreciates good style and keeps up on the latest trends. At the same time, he wants this all without the fuss and in an accessible way. He prioritizes convenience, and values a streamlined shopping experience. We keep this top-of-mind when we are in market.

MR: Have there been any challenges in the business that you’ve learned valuable lessons from?

Carlo: It takes a lot for guys to try new brands, new products, and new trends. Finding that new brand that checks with our customer immediately is the most rewarding.

MR: Has the recent downturn in brick & mortar stores (and retail in general) had any impact on East Dane?

Carlo: We’re not focused on our competitors—we’re focused on our customers. There are many players in the space, but we are obsessed with providing our current and potential customers with the best East Dane product experience possible.

MR: What are you guys focusing on when thinking about the future?

Carlo: Getting closer to our customer. Putting marketing and branding initiatives in place to get in front of our customer. Make sure that we grow our presence on the platforms that we know our customer is on – be where the customer is. From a buying perspective, we are really interested in continuing to iterate on the amazing roster of brands that we stock. We are constantly looking to develop exclusive capsules and partnerships with new and up-and-coming brands to make East Dane the best destination for men’s shopping. Additionally, our focus is to continue to improve our site experience for our global customer.

MR: Best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Carlo: “Think outside of the box and don’t be afraid.”

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The Forum Group

CONGRATULATES this year’s MR Award honorees

Thanks for your contributions TO A VIBRANT MENSWEAR INDUSTRY

Andrisen Morton | Garys | Hubert White | Kilgore Trout Larrimors | Maloufs | Mitchell Stores | Oak Hall Rodes | Rubensteins | Stanley Korshak

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2019 MR RETAIL VISION AWARD

SNEAKY SUCCESS One of this country’s most influential streetwear retailers on making it big. By Stephen Garner

Famous for its hidden-in-plain-sight entrance, this Boston-based contemporary retailer is covertly located behind an entrance disguised as a convenience store, known colloquially in some parts of the Northeast as a bodega. Having just opened a second location in downtown Los Angeles last year (with hopes of opening more stores soon), the now bi-coastal aperture of all things streetwear and sneakers is making its mark among a younger generation looking for unique fashion. Pairing its distinctive merchandise mix with a successful e-commerce site and unique in-store experience, Bodega sets the standard for what makes a store cool. But co-founder Oliver Mak will be the first to tell you that it took him and his team about six years to realize what industry they were really in. “We started out as some weird clubhouse for lost children who got to do creative projects,” says Mak. “Reporting, planning, inventory management, we didn’t know how to do any of that. Plus, most of us are anti-authoritarian, so we didn’t have a mentor to guide us. It has been an interesting ride.” Having known little of what it actually takes to run a thriving retail store, the Bodega team has grown to more than 70 employees to date who cover everything from content creation and buying and planning to e-commerce and product development for its own private label. The road to success wasn’t easy though, especially given the state of retail. “The business has definitely changed a lot since we first started in 2006,” co-founder Dan Natola says. “When we opened, social media didn’t

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exist and online retailing was just starting to kick off, so for us, in terms of business, it’s about keeping that mom-and-pop culture in the front of the store but that corporate energy in the backend, while still making the business scalable.” Natola says, “We have to constantly make sure that the product is well curated and culturally relevant to our customer, while bridging that gap between streetwear and contemporary, and also have a global perspective. We have plans to open in Asia and also domestically where the demand and need are. Retail is more complex than it used to be, to say the least. We’re at the point where, to be a player in this industry, you have to get into new competitive markets before someone does and then prevents you from buying the brands that you want for your store. I would say having a calculated plan is our biggest thing right now.” And the stress the retail industry puts on small specialty stores doesn’t go unnoticed by the team. “I feel for the independent stores out there that are trying to make it, because online shopping really f*cked it up for a lot of retailing,” says Natola. “Now people will come to your store to look at something then try to find it online for a better price. Trying to build that sort of rapport with customers and loyalty is tough nowadays. With people our age (early 40's), it’s easier because we have one foot in the analog age, but kids nowadays are all on social media. It’s a different set of challenges. It’s all happening so fast, and you have to be able to pivot and make changes to your business in order to stay relevant.” Staying relevant is the challenge that all retailers face today, and Bodega has its head on its shoulders when scoping out what actually will matter for its audience in Boston and LA, as well as online. The team didn’t subscribe to the super-logoed brands that were very popular in 2018 and instead brought in its own versions of “digestible” streetwear that people would want to wear. Natola notes that for his market, he sees a lot more workwear references creeping back into popularity—mix-

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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2019 MR RETAIL VISION AWARD

ing traditional mens' sportswear details in a contemporary, interesting way. On both coasts, Bodega’s owners have put a lot of thought into which brands should sit alongside their popular private label goods; Kapital, Wacko Maria, Engineered Garments, Carhartt WIP and Needles have been among their top sellers. While the store is primarily menswear-oriented, it does carry womenswear. As for the product mix, it is 60/30/10 footwear/apparel/accessories across the board. Interestingly, the Bodega gents cited they do most of their buying in Paris and in Tokyo. “How crazy is that,” declares Mak. “For our world, New York, which had a huge influence in streetwear culture, is no longer relevant. All of the influential brands in this market have shifted to showing in Paris and Tokyo. There is some business still left in New York, but it is fleeting. What happened? We just visit now to see our friends and to get the energy that the city always has going on.” As for its online business, Mak has just two words: “It’s booming!” He goes on to say, “Web keeps on growing exponentially; we’ve had crazy growth year-over-year over the last four years because we keep investing in it. The success of online is about being strong on the tech side of things. But we always want more out of the technology we are using. If Google or Amazon could build a platform that could service mid-to-largersized independent stores, that would be a huge business for them. Full service would be incredible. I know Shopify is trying to do it, but it’s not happening fast enough. One click checkout, would be awesome, for example. But our business is tough, too. Because we have so much hype product that our site gets hammered by bots and all these other weird variables, it slows the site down.” But for now, Bodega will continue to scour the globe to find the coolest wares it can get its hands on, while focusing on building its creative content and activations that helped make the store a community hub since the beginning. As Natola beautifully summed up our time together, “At this point we have no choice but to make it now.”

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Randa congratulates its portfolio company on being recognized as the Emerging Brand of the Year.

A special thanks to this year’s recipient of Department Store Fashion Ambassador Durand Guion for your outstanding partnership.

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2019 MR ITALIAN MEN'S STYLE AMBASSADOR


DOING IT HER WAY Italian Men’s Style Ambassador Gil Szczesny on speed, hugging and family. By Karen Alberg Grossman moved with him to the U.S. in 1970. She took a job at Gimbels Herald Square as temporary Christmas help; they asked her to stay so she went through their executive training program, learning retailing and fashion from the ground up. From there, she did showroom sales for a French jewelry designer, had a daughter (her beloved Chiara), worked for a French raincoat company and, in 1994, took an Italian Trade Commission job that was advertised in WWD. “My job is to help Italian companies come into the States, to give them ideas to promote Italian fashion, to help them with pricing, marketing, in-store events, whatever’s needed,” she explains. “And to support the U.S. trade shows. I love all of it, and the companies I work with seem to appreciate my efforts, mostly because I’m honest: I tell it like it is, even if they don’t want to hear it. I believe most people need guidance; nobody knows it all. So I give them advice on how to reach their goals.” Asked how she’d describe herself to someone who doesn’t know her, Szczesny doesn’t hesitate. “I’m honest—I don’t lie. I’m intuitive and I read people well (it’s a Scorpio trait). And I’m a hugger and like to express my feelings for people I care about,” she says. “I also love speed: I have friends who hold onto their seats when they ride with me because I drive really fast. I guess you’d say I’m a risk taker and a bit of a rebel. I choose to live on the edge but not go over it. I truly like who I am but if I could change one thing, I’d learn to be a little less giving, that it’s sometimes OK to receive something back.” On the topic of style, she describes her own (the bold eyewear, the platinum hair, the fabulous clothes and accessories) as unique and eclectic. “I like to be different: I don’t follow rules; whatever the fashion, I go a different way. Maybe this reflects my insecurities, I don’t know. Believe it or not, I’m actually quite shy.” On Italian style, Szczesny claims she can

“I choose to live on the edge but not go over it.” 

—Gil Szczesny, Italian Trade Agency (ITA)

always distinguish Italians strolling the streets of Manhattan. “I pick them out immediately, even if they’re wearing jeans. It’s the sweater tied around the shoulders, the hands clasped behind the back, a certain way of walking; it’s hard to explain. But Italian style is recognizable and difficult to learn. You have to be born with it. You either have it or you don’t.” Asked about mentors, Szczesny mentions Jack Mitchell (“because he wrote the book that describes how I live”) and Lizette Chin, president of men’s at UBM. “She’s an incredible woman, my role model since I started working with her on the trade shows in 2008. She’s a thoughtful leader, with an innate ability to express her ideas. I’ve learned so much from her, most importantly how to be gentle and tough at the same time. She continues to inspire me.” Claiming no regrets in life, Szczesny views all of her choices (even those that haven’t worked out so perfectly) as learning experiences. “I don’t like negative people; I stay away from them. I believe life should be fun so it’s always been my mission to make it so.” Her fun in life these days, in addition to friends, food, wine, work and travel, is centered around her life partner Bernie, her beautiful daughter Chiara, her son-in-law Seth and her two energetic grandsons—Owen (age 5) and Dylan (2). (No surprise to his grandma, Owen wants to grow up to be a Formula One driver!) “So proud of my mom for getting the recognition she deserves for her hard work, dedication and commitment to Italian fashion, all the while staying humble and always a bit edgy,” Chiara wrote on her Facebook page. “I can only hope to one day be as much of an influencer as she is to so many, not just in fashion, but by simply being an amazing human being.”

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

Some people seem to float through life spreading their joie de vivre to those around them. Gil Szczesny is clearly one of these enchanting souls. Her energy, determination and inner light are ever apparent in both her smile and the sparkle in her eyes. Whatever she’s doing, she radiates joy. (Just don’t even think about crossing her.) As an emissary of the Italian Trade Agency (ITA) for the past quarter century, Szczesny is one of the savviest, most charismatic fashion ambassadors around. In addition to her unique personal style, she understands branding, marketing and retailing better than most, and her generous spirit means she’s always willing to share her expertise and ideas. She’s brought countless Italian brands to America over the years, helping them fine-tune their product to grow their business in the States; she’s also helped scores of American retailers cultivate a made-in-Italy business in their stores. Yet she takes little credit for any of this. “It’s not me, it’s the people I work with,” she says of Maurizio Forte, trade commissioner and her colleagues Alessandro Greco and Stefania Milella of the Italian Trade Agency. (And beyond doubt, the support the Italian government gives to Italian manufacturers to promote and distribute their products abroad is truly remarkable.) But no one has the innate ability to connect with people—all types of people—like Szczesny. Both opinionated and diplomatic, she is also a star negotiator. Szczesny grew up in Italy near Verona, a strong-willed child with a mischievous streak. Sent to a Catholic boarding school (where she became an atheist), she dreamed of becoming a flight attendant so she studied in London and Paris. Perfectly fluent in English, French and her native Italian, she went to Milan for the interview. While the airlines loved her spirit, language skills and intrinsic charm, a few centimeters in height precluded her getting the job. She then married an American military man who was stationed in Vicenza and

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2019 MR INFLUENCER OF THE YEAR

UNDER THE INFLUENCE

Johannes Huebl on modeling, family values, and how to elevate your style. By Karen Alberg Grossman He’s handsome, intelligent, talented (and married to beautiful socialite/entrepreneur Olivia Palermo). He’s been featured in ads for major brands including Hugo Boss, Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger and Donna Karan. He’s been photographed by world-renowned fashion photographers Peter Lindbergh, Mario Testino, Patrick Demarchelier and more. But don’t let his celebrity status fool you: Model/business consultant/photographer/designer Johannes Huebl is amazingly humble, with none of the affectation today’s "beautiful people" so often exude. Although he doesn’t mind being called an influencer, it’s not a role he set out to play. “I never think of myself as an influencer,” he confides. “I’m flattered that people take inspiration from what I wear, and I guess it’s nice to have fans and photographers waiting to

start in front of a camera and a coveted trip to London. “You can imagine my excitement leaving the structured conservative academic environment of boarding school for the freedom of a big city. I still vividly recall the thrill of staying in a hotel with a minibar. I also modeled a bit in college after my mandatory one-year military service (which in Germany is more about learning life skills and discipline than how to drive a tank. I actually studied computers…). At that point in my life, I loved travel and adventure and knew I wanted to do something creative with my life. But I didn’t have the courage to tell this to my parents so I continued to study business and economics….” Because of his frequent modeling stints, Huebl was 26 when he graduated university. He'd already visited America, England, Sweden, Italy, France, South Africa and Japan and shares some wonderful stories from his early years of modeling in different cultures. Like his disappointment on his first trip to Plano, Texas, only to discover it was a JCPenney pants shoot where he'd be photographed from the waist down. And how he tried to look shorter for castings in Japan (where they use chopsticks to eliminate wrinkles in the clothing). And his apprehension the first time he met iconic photographer Mario Testino in Paris. “I knew he was famous and I was a bit nervous about my accent so I introduced myself with just one word: Johannes. "‘No need to call me Your Highness,'” Testino retorted. “'Mario is just fine.'” As fate would have it, a recruiter from Wilhelmina Models ultimately lured Huebl to NYC, even taking care of his visa. He was 27 when he moved to Brooklyn Heights (with all his possessions crammed into two small suitcases) to do full-time modeling and attend requisite film screenings and society events. A few years later, at one of those screenings,

“When I started modeling, people at home advised me that fashion is superficial, not something to be celebrated.” see you. But there are certain responsibilities that go with the job that I take pretty seriously. And I’m still a bit uncomfortable that random people—my mom’s best friend in Germany, my former classmates, our cleaning lady—can view how I dress every day.” Coming from a small city in Germany (Hannover, population 500,000) with both parents (and grandparents) physicians, Huebl rarely thought about fashion. Growing up, Huebl recalls, focusing on one's appearance was widely frowned upon. “When I started modeling, people were quick to remind me that fashion is superficial, not something to be celebrated. Fortunately, Americans love fashion and are more supportive. I guess that’s why I live here….” Despite this lack of encouragement, Huebl entered and won a modeling contest sponsored by British GQ while attending boarding school in Dublin. This gave him his

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2019 MR INFLUENCER OF THE YEAR

he met his beautiful wife, Olivia Palermo, then a 21-year-old student, now a successful entrepreneur. They’ve been together for 11 years and recently celebrated their anniversary in Mustique, “a small private Caribbean island where no one is remotely interested in what you wear. It was so nice!” Huebl describes himself as open, friendly, liberal, curious and passionate about life. “I can sometimes be a bit stubborn but I’m a good husband and a caring friend with very conventional values like courtesy, respect, treating people well… values that come from my parents.” He also credits his two brothers (the older a philosophy professor, the younger a neurologist) for sharing a healthy perspective on life. For his fashion sensibility, Huebl credits J. Crew. “I grew up with that casual prep look— an oxford shirt, a classic cashmere sweater—so that’s still my foundation. But I think my advantage now is an ability to pick out the one or two important trends from a vast runway collection—the exact right shade of military green, for example. I’m told I have a knack for putting together well-composed outfits that look modern but still elegant. I’m always delighted when women tag their husbands or boyfriends in my posts. I’ve realized over time what my audience is asking for, and I try to give them helpful information. I also try to respond to as many of their direct messages as possible. But social media occupies only about 15 percent of my time. I’m hired by six to 10 companies monthly to wear their products but unlike many influencers, I have no team of professional photographers following me around. I try to post once a day

(and on Sundays, a photo with my wife), but my photos are generally taken by doormen, tourists or anonymous passersby. I’ve been photographed by enough professional photographers over the years; these days, I'd rather be behind the camera.” And in fact, Huebl is quite the photographer: He's shot covers and editorials for Elle Spain, Harpers Bazaar Mexico, Lifestyle Magazine Brazil, Grazia Qatar and other international publications as well as campaigns for Piaget, Chadstone Australia, Pikolinos and more. His current consulting projects include menswear ambassador for CDFA, global ambassador for Saunders & Long’s skin care launch, a collaboration with Santoni Italy, an editorial feature with The Rake for Omega

HUEBL’S TOP STYLE TIPS

■ The easiest way to stand out is to wear clothes that are well cut, clothes that fit. Simple alterations—the length of your trousers and sleeves—can totally transform your look. ■ Develop a signature style reflecting who you are and what looks best on you. Always be true to yourself. ■ Add interesting accessories like a scarf, pocket square or knitted tie. ■ Change up your footwear. Wearing monk-straps instead of regular lace-ups is a subtle difference with major impact. ■ Layering is another easy way of changing up a style. ■ Avoid trends and fads. Be comfortable in your own skin. ■ Imagine your best self, and live it. watches, with many others lined up. And as if this weren’t enough, he's launching his own menswear collection. “My dream is to develop my own brand—a modern interpretation of elegant menswear broken down into wearable components. I’m inspired by both British and Italian tailoring: modern pleated pants, shawl collars, military influences…. Personally, I wear a lot of cardigans these days and tailored pieces from Isaia, Cucinelli, Santoni and Thom Sweeney, my fabulous custom tailor on West Broadway. An important component of my collection will be well-fitting pants: Trousers are where a lot of men make mistakes, which becomes apparent when they remove their suit jacket.” At 41, Huebl feels he's at a wonderful stage of life, combining his fashion and business interests with wellness, family, friends, philanthropy and travel. He spends 25-30 minutes a day in meditation, balanced by an early morning stretching session at his local Equinox gym. Concerned about the environment, he works toward minimizing his personal carbon footprint. Wanting to give back, he donated prints of his photographs to a UN fundraiser supporting the Maasai tribe of Kenya and Tanzania. Yes, he was named 2018 Style Influencer of the Year by GQ Germany but that’s not his primary focus. “Style is not how you dress but how you live,” he maintains, a philosophy that should inspire us all.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO A TRUE VISIONARY LEADER

DURAND GUION

FOR RECEIVING THE PRESTIGIOUS

DEPARTMENT STORE FASHION AMBASSADOR

WE APPLAUD YOUR TALENT, COMMITMENT AND FASHION SAVVY.

PERY.COM

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BY THE NUMBERS

SMARTY PANTS To sell more in spring 2020, it’s less about showing the latest

models and more about encouraging customers to build a pants wardrobe. By Karen Alberg Grossman The men’s casual pant business has been a bright spot, with better specialty stores reporting 5 to 15 percent gains in both casual pants and denim for spring/summer 2019. That said, we still recommend caution for spring 2020, suggesting planned increases will stay in the 5- to 10-percent range. To make this goal more easily attainable, the menswear market is offering a plethora of saleable pant options for spring/ summer, including plenty of new colors, fabrics and models.

Here are MR’s recommended breakdowns for better specialty stores. Please note these are guidelines only: We suggest that retailers project conservatively, especially the new stuff. On the other hand, if you don’t make strong enough fashion statements, why even bother? If you want to play it safe and still making a statement, partner with fashion vendors with in-stock programs so you can fill in as you sell, thereby reducing the risk without losing sales.

SPRING 2020 RECOMMENDATIONS CASUAL PANT VOLUME BY MODEL: Solid five-pocket slim or regular fit Flatfront slant pocket chino model* Drawstring/jogger looks Pleated** styles Patterned/novelty styles Cropped styles

35% 40% 7% 8% 7% 3%

(High waisted cropped voluminous styles: not yet!)

TOTAL100% *in some models, new proportions are looser on top. **short single pleats that are more like tiny darts.

OTD RETAIL PRICEPOINTS ON PANTS: Under $100 20% $100-25055% Over $250 25% TOTAL  100%

PANTS FABRIC BREAKDOWN: All cotton 10% Cotton/stretch25% Linen5% Wool/wool blends 25% Denim35% TOTAL  100% # of men’s casual pant brands in store # of men’s denim pant brands in store 

10 9

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A Big Congratulations to Durand Guion for his accomplishments and Best Wishes to all the 2019 MR Award Honorees

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FASHION

TAILORED WITH A TWIST

Because more and more men are seeking to stand out from the pack style-wise, they are searching for the next cool look or trend. These dapper gents are at the top of their game, donning suits in interesting colorways and double-breasted models in slightly slouchy silhouettes. Say that three times fast. By Stephen Garner Photography by Balthier Corfi Grooming by Gil Aldrin

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E MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

On Left: Pants by PT TORINO On Right: Suit by TODD SNYDER; Shirt by ISSEY MIYAKE; Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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FASHION

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On Left: CARLOS CAMPOS On Right: Jacket and Shirt by MISSONI; Pants by BRUNELLO CUCINELLI; Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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FASHION

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MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

On Left: Suits by DAVID HART; Sweater by BOGLIOLI On Right: Suits and Shirts by MSGM; Shoes by CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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FASHION

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On Left: Full look by BOSS On Right: Shirts and Trousers by FENDI; Necklace by GEMME NUMMARIE; Shoes by SCARPE DI BIANCO and SANTONI

MR MAGAZINE | JULY 2019

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ACCESSORIES

EXTRA, EXTRA!

The final touches—shoes, bags, hats and shades—are often overlooked when it comes to retailing. But accessories can serve as easy add-ons. By Stephen Garner Photography by Zach Alston Grooming by Natasha Leibel

THE DRESS SHOES Clockwise from top: Christian Louboutin, Santoni, Scarpe di Bianco, Fratelli Rossetti

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CONGRATULATES

DURAND GUION

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ACCESSORIES

THE EYEWEAR Clockwise from top left: Ermenegildo Zegna, Prada, Barton Perreira, Versace, Tom Ford, Kenzo Jackets: Brunello Cucinelli and Triple RRR

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The CTDA has been the bespoke industry leader since 1880. Lean on us to be your training headquarters. Join us for this unique educational offering this summer for measuring and styling of bespoke garments and advanced fabric knowledge. SUMMER EDUCATION CLASSES: JULY 20 & 21 Place: London NYC Hotel, New York City Class schedule: www.ctda.com/education

The CTDA is your source for custom tailors and designers, trade suppliers, educational training and networking with experts in the field of custom clothing. DESIGNER FORUM NEW YORK July 20-22nd London NYC Hotel 151 West 54th Street, New York City CHICAGO COLLECTIVE August 4-6th theMart, Chicago 222 W. Merchandise Mart Plaza, Chicago

Learn about Membership at www.ctda.com

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ACCESSORIES

THE BAGS Clockwise from top left: Fendi, Christian Louboutin, Dooney & Bourke, Il Bisonte Jacket by Dsquared2

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ACCESSORIES

THE HAT Hat by Fendi Jacket by Boglioli

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JULY 22–24, 2019 NEW YORK CITY

21+ PRODUCT CATEGORIES ACTIVEWEAR OUTERWEAR/COATS POLO SHIRTS/SHIRTING SUITING

apparelsourcingshow.com

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RETAILING

CREATING THE EXPERIENCE

In-store tech takes customer service to the next level.

By Laurie Schechter

Experiential retail is a ubiquitous phrase inspiring both promise and panic. But fear not: Successful experiential retail is no different from what exceptional retail has always been. The roots of both, and the future of retail overall, lie in giving the customer something more. According to market research company NPD Group, experiential retail refers to a store where “stuff happens in addition to selling, and shoppers do things besides buying.” Customers benefit on some level—be it entertaining, enlightening, soothing, nourishing, beautifying or educating—in a memorable way. Brands and retailers already in experiential retail have executed in DNA-specific ways. Experiential elements can be natural extensions of the merchandise. For example, outdoor retailer REI makes available rock climbing walls for customers to test gear as well as in-house and in-the-field kayaking, hiking, and rock climbing courses. Athletic apparel retailer Lululemon offers instore yoga classes. DSW now provides nail bar services, and the mattress retailer Casper hosts “sleep-before-you-buy” sessions. Other retailers springboard from their core values, fundamentally re-imagining retail at the same time. Nordstrom Local, a wholly different service-centered concept that carries no merchandise, was introduced as a one-off in Los Angeles two years ago. Envisioned as a “neighborhood hub,” the uncharacteristically small footprint store centers around buy-online-pick-up-in-store (BOPIS), personal styling and tailoring services alongside manicure-pedicure stations and espresso, wine and juice options. The success of the concept spawned two more LA locations with two New York City ones in the works. “Showrooming” is another level of experiential retail blending product and service, online and in-store. Bonobos, an innovator of the approach, moved from online into local brick-and-mortar showrooms called Bonobos Guideshops. They carry every garment available in each size, color, fit or fabric. Customers try on their selections with the help of a personal guide, who then places the order for delivery to the buyer’s home. Target has set up an interactive showroom experience in its San Francisco location call Open House. Here the retailer sells only smart home devices in a space that also offers learning and interaction with product creators. According to U.S. census data for the first quarter of 2019, 90 percent of consumers, as comfortable as they are with online, still shop in traditional stores. Retailers like Nordstrom, DSW and others are taking advantage, maximizing customer preferences and the path to purchase at the same time easing the pain of

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RETAILING

returns while remaining channel agnostic. All along the customer journey, they cater to shoppers’ interests and enrich their interaction.

Men’s: A Ripe Opportunity

First Insight came out with an eye-opening report, “The Rise of the New Male Power Shopper,” earlier this year. The report indicated that on almost every front—online and traditional retail channels, in the mass market, off-price, new specialty brand, discount and luxury sectors—men’s shopping frequency surpassed women. Moreover, men are using technology for purchasing and researching prices more than women, the study found. Men's brands already staked in experiential retail reflect some of the trends found in First Insight’s report. Several have established a kind of future-past, old-world-meets-new technology strategy. Alton Lane showrooms, for example, employ 3D body scanners for taking measurements while their customers can sip bourbon or have a spot of tea. Tommy Hilfiger’s London flagship outfits fitting rooms with touchscreen smart mirrors allowing shoppers to navigate styles and sizes which sales associates then bring them. Nordstrom opened its first-ever men's store, located in New York City, with a liquor license and a life-size screen to digitally present the shopper his suit in exact specifications before he orders. New York City is home to many retailers offering haircuts as well as shopping—J. Crew, Barneys Downtown, Saks Fifth Avenue among them.

What Defines Experience?

How a retailer presents the experience varies by store. If a retailer has the funds and inclination to build skateboard parks in store, like Vans for example, or add music events, it should be because customer insights indicate this as a traffic driver or else because it fosters community. Classes and educational programs such as styling labs can also build community, credibility and authenticity around brands, and showcase the all-important human interaction so unique to in-store. Plugging into customer culture, cares and concerns, including societal ones like diversity and inclusivity, is vital today to a retailer's success. Customer appeal can come from a single special event. In 2018, the National Retail Federation (NRF) found that 60 percent of millennial men had a great interest in retail experiences and events. Among all shoppers surveyed for its 2018/2019 Winter Consumer View report, the NRF found that 82 percent attended a retailer event in the 12 months prior, while 58 percent expressed interest in going to a retailer event in the future. What events were of most interest? The report noted 87 percent were for early/exclusive access to items or a sale, 81 percent for a party, 80 percent for a product demonstration or tutorial, 71 percent for a game or competition. The NRF concluded 69 percent of men were interested in interacting with an expert or a brand ambassador; the same percentage was attracted by pop-up shops. A good way to provide customers with a personalized experience and retailers with information is by first learning what customers want. Gathering consumer insights via data collection, customer surveys, social media monitoring, sales data or the old-fashioned way—good communication between knowledgeable sales staff and customers—will go a long way.

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Congratulations to this year ’s honorees, and

A SPECIAL THANK YOU to

DURAND GUION

for your creativity and partnership!

From your friends at

JOIN OUR ONLINE COMMUNITY! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK ❯❯ @MRMAGONLINE SEE OUR PHOTOS ON INSTAGRAM ❯❯ @MRMAGONLINE

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RETAILING

Experience is Everything

Physical stores remain crucial players. KPMG’s Global Retail Trends 2019 found the top reason consumers prefer to shop in-store is to see, feel and experience the product in person. According to Google, 61% of consumers prefer shopping with brands that have a physical location rather than ones with an online presence only, and 80% went in-store when they wanted or needed something immediately. KPMG identified millennials to be twice as likely as other groups to want instant gratification, opting to go in-store to get their merchandise instead of buying online and waiting for delivery. Additionally, today’s customer expects more individual services to be part of their retail experiences. The top three the NRF found: quality customer service, free shipping and the ability to shop online. The rising popularity of BOPIS is one way to meet this expectation and close the divide between digital and physical retail.

reason: 70 percent of guys use in-store tablets to research pricing. At the end of the day, what is experiential retail but exceptional customer service? The goal, McKinsey and Company opined in a recent article on retail practice, is “to give customers memorable—even delightful—moments as they shop.” Entertain, educate and enlighten your customers. Listen to them to deliver the value, service and ease of shopping they desire.

Experiential Crossing the Digital Divide

Technology is a critical component to enhancing the customer experience. Smart mirrors are just a toe in the water of the future of augmented reality (AR), what the forecasting agency The Future Laboratory has dubbed “programmable reality,” where the product will be transformed and customized through digital attributes. In the meantime, customers currently can use virtual reality (VR) headsets to view whole collections that can’t fit in-store and AR to try on outfits in mirrors. In addition, 360 views and 3D renderings enrich product images online. Technology is also capable of providing consistency across retail platforms and streamlining the customer journey. A recent consumer survey by BRP Consulting reveals that 96 percent of consumers find that ease of checkout influences their choice of where to shop.Technology can link across platforms, include customer information, shopping history, purchasing behavior and even product suggestions. This advancement not only eliminates friction points but encourages a personalized experience for the customer. Tablets in the retail space facilitate mobile checkout and assist in back-of-house stock checks. Moreover, using “Endless Aisle,” tablets enable shoppers to search limitless online inventory and customize their choices. Men using smart speakers has increased 113 percent over last year. The

EXPERIENTIAL RETAIL IS NOT NEW

Lest one think experiential retail is some 21st-century creation based on millennials’ preference for experience over things, one has only to go back in history to see that customer experience was the raison d'être for every marketplace from the ancient Greek Agora to the modern mall. The first post-WWII malls referenced themselves as town squares; in the ’50s and ’60s, some malls had meeting rooms, auditoriums, and even ice rinks. But go back to 1865: the Great American Tea Company set up a coffee-roasting plant in New York City's Greenwich Village, inspired by the live animals and entertainment at PT Barnum’s American Museum nearby. The idea was to convey an experience of China and tea, enticing customers with roasting smells and a retail decor eliciting China, done up in Vermillion and gold leaf, Chinese wall hangings, oriental lanterns, and a pagoda cashier station. The company, later renamed Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, went on as A&P to become the largest retailer in the world. The American retail revolutionary and ex-pat Harry Gordon Selfridge, founder of Selfridges in London, can perhaps take credit for experiential retail as we think of it today. His rags-to-riches retail career in Chicago, which saw him rise from stock boy to partner at Marshall Field’s followed by the establishment of the store that became Carson, Pirie, Scott, was a preamble to his retail-as-theater concept at Selfridges. The five-story emporium attracted 1 million people in its first week in 1909. With more than 100 departments, the first women’s toilets, “a tea room, a barber shop, a hair salon, a library, a post office, sumptuous ladies’ and gentlemen's cloakrooms, a rifle range, a nursing station and a concierge who could book West End show tickets or a passage to New York,” Selfridges paved the path to modern retail innovation. These then ground-breaking concepts—openly presenting merchandise in displays and moving the cosmetics to near the ground floor entrance—are standard retail practice today.

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LAST LOOK

THROUGH ROSECOLORED GLASSES

Italy was filled with shades of washed pink from luxury brands eager to brighten things up next spring. Don’t be afraid to dip your toes in the color pond this season; believe it or not, more men are looking to stand out from the sea of navy and gray. By Stephen Garner

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Mens Tailored Clothing

Offering Both Custom Made/Stock Program

Luxury Fashion Classic Richard Harris will be participating at MRKET this July in New York. Chicago Collective Show Booth number 2113 August 2019

Inquiries:

info@richardharrisusa.com 1-516-743-9696

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Adrian Clay dances in a suit made with Estrato fabric, hand-stitched by Sant’Andrea Milano

www.saintandrews.it

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Profile for Wainscot Media

MR: July 2019  

The Awards Issue

MR: July 2019  

The Awards Issue