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M O N M O U T H H E A LT H & LIFE ■

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MONMOUTH T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E from M O N M O U T H M E D I C A L C E N T E R

& life

health

May 2009 $3.95

Plus Tasty fare at Sea Girt’s Scarborough Fair

THE HOME ISSUE Find your design ‘time’

Health

link

A sea-inspired space in Brielle RUGS: Style underfoot

Balloons—for your sinuses?

Rx for wounds that won’t heal

Colorectal cancer: Are you at risk?


Art is an investment that rewards the heart and the mind.

F E AT U R I N G WO R K B Y D O Z E N S O F F I N E A RT I S T S TOLL-FREE: 1-888-800-3933 • LOCAL: 732-328-2255

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Contents

13

42

44

May 2009 4 Welcome letter

34

QUIZ: What’s your design era?

38

Well-dressed floors

6 Editor’s letter 13 Monmouth mix · Everything but the kitchen sink · Garden variety · “What I’m listening to ...” · Springtime sprucing · Accents happen

16 Flash

Captured moments around the county

18 Profile Double trouble With two family mem-

bers in crisis, a Wall Streeter gets twin lessons in gratitude.

38

We’ll tell you which time period suits you best and how to create that look in your own beloved abode.

Never mind neutrals—these eye-catching area rugs give your rooms instant panache and personality.

42 Escapes /

Designer resorts

Fashion icons make travel trendy.

44 Monmouth gourmet Comfort food Cozy environs and enjoyable food make for a pleasant evening at Sea Girt’s Scarborough Fair.

46 Where to eat Your Monmouth County dining guide

20 Health link · A balloon that clears sinuses · Walls that comfort kids · How prostate surgeons “wrote the book” · When wounds won’t heal · Goodbye, shoulder woes · Colorectal cancer: Are you at risk? · Family ties

30 At home /

Sea to believe

This nautical-themed model home offers up secrets for haute beach living. COVER IMAGE : R OBERT K ERN

50 Be there! A listing of local events you won’t want to miss

52 Shopping guide 54 What’s happening at Monmouth Medical Center

56 Faces of Monmouth Sweet success


6 months same as cash!* complimentary consultation | 800.229.2567 | californiaclosets.com Address Address

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Welcome LETTER

Medicine’s leaders IN 2003, MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER, ONE OF New Jersey’s largest academic medical centers, signed a prestigious new affiliation agreement with Drexel University College of Medicine, as it became known as a major regional medical campus for the school. But this was just the newest chapter in a long-standing association: This spring Monmouth Medical Center—Drexel’s largest major academic medical affiliate in New Jersey—will celebrate the 40th anniversary of its affiliation with the Philadelphia medical school. As a former surgeon who served as a clinical associate professor of surgery at the medical college, I know firsthand the long-term and very successful relationship with Drexel that dates to 1969. This strong relationship also is illustrated through the awards several Monmouth physicians have received in recent years from Drexel’s Student Government Association for excellence in clinical teaching. And in another medical education coup, internist Sara Wallach, M.D., vice chair and program director of internal medicine at Monmouth Medical Center, has been elected to a position on the Council of the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM). This is a wonderful honor for Dr. Wallach and another great national recognition of Monmouth’s status as a leading academic medical center. The APDIM is the premier national organization of program directors and is integral to the development of policies and procedures for graduate medical education, and to setting the standards for education of internal medicine residents in the United States. APDIM also has an important voice in interactions with The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which in 2004 granted Monmouth Medical Center national accreditation for an extended five-year period—rather than the standard four years—for upholding the highest academic standards in graduate medical education. As one of America’s teaching hospitals, Monmouth Medical Center is counted among the nation’s leading health care institutions that are the front-runners in medical research and technology. Monmouth’s dedication to the very best medical education is helping to ensure a continuity of highly educated, well-trained doctors are here to care for our community. Sincerely,

FRANK J. VOZOS, M.D., FACS Executive Director Monmouth Medical Center

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Trust the

Editor’s LETTER

Excellence of a Champagne Smile!

“Thank you, Dr. Champagne. I absolutely love my new smile – I only wish I had done it sooner!” “I can’t believe how easy you made it to get a beautiful smile.”

–LISA P RUMSON, NJ

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Interior delights IT’S NO EASY THING, CHOOSING A STYLE FOR your home. Just as many of us shudder looking back on outdated hairstyles and outfits, so do we often cringe recalling a particular floral sofa or way-too-metallic wallpaper we now regret. Having recently survived a modest home makeover myself, I know that the fear of choosing poorly while pondering fabric swatches and paint samples can drive you crazy—if you don’t have a proper vision. And that’s where we come in. In this, our home issue, we seek to provide guidance and inspiration in equal measure. For the former, turn to page 34, where you’ll find a visual quiz to help you pinpoint your design era of choice—plus tips on how to achieve that look for maximum impact throughout your house. As for inspiration, we offer a dose in “Well-dressed Floors,” page 38, where we spotlight eight eye-catching area rugs sure to give your room instant pop. And in “Sea to Believe,” we take you inside a model home on the Manasquan River, set up to entice buyers by showing the home’s bones to best effect. Learn some tricks for doing the same in your own living space on page 30. As this project shows, having a good design pro at the helm can be a key to executing a breathtaking redo—even on a modest budget. If you’ve been going it alone, you may want to consider a low-commitment consultation program we spotlight in Monmouth Mix, which starts on page 13. Called “Spruce It Up,” this offering from the New Jersey chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers is an easy starter step that lets you see what a design professional can do for you. Also in this section we profile an annual tour that reveals some stunning local gardens, a Neptune shop that sells chef-quality cookware and more. When you’re ready to step out of your home, consider a meal at the cozy Scarborough Fair in Sea Girt, which serves eclectic American fare in a converted 1800s farmhouse. Read the details in our review on page 44. Or opt for a dose of homey style abroad with the three destinations profiled in “Designer Resorts,” page 42, each of which is the vision of a different fashion icon. No matter where your journeys take you, may you and everyone in your home enjoy the blossoming season before us.

• FREE COSMETIC CONSULTATION ($125 VALUE)

732.972.0918

RITA GUARNA Editor in Chief

In Marlboro New Jersey

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Please enclose your check or money order payable to Wainscot Media. Your tickets will be mailed to you or waiting for you at the door! MAIL TO: THE BEST OF MONMOUTH MONMOUTH HEALTH & LIFE 110 SUMMIT AVENUE, MONTVALE, NJ 07645

4/8/09 10:36:38 AM


M AY 2 0 0 9

Monmouth Health & Life Staff

editor in chief RITA GUARNA

art director SARAH LECKIE

senior editor TIMOTHY KELLEY

managing editor JENNIFER CENICOLA

assistant editor KRISTIN COLELLA

art intern ALEXANDRIA PATE

group publisher EDWARD BURNS

executive vice president, sales & marketing JOEL EHRLICH

regional advertising director DOUG BARKER

regional advertising manager ROBERT SEIGEL

senior account executive SHAE MARCUS

director, internet and new media NIGEL EDELSHAIN

marketing director CHRISTOPHER KAEFER

production manager CHRISTINE HAMEL

advertising services manager THOMAS RAGUSA

senior art director, agency services KIJOO KIM

circulation director LAUREN MENA

editorial contributions: The editors invite letters, article ideas and other contributions from readers. Please write to Editor, Monmouth Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201-571-7003; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Any manuscript or artwork should be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope bearing adequate return postage. The magazine is not responsible for the return or loss of submissions.

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Saint Barnabas Health Care System Staff president & CEO RONALD J . DEL MAURO

executive director, monmouth medical center FRANK J . VOZOS , M . D ., FACS

vice president, marketing & public relations MICHAEL J . SLUSARZ

director of public relations and marketing DENNIS WILSON JR .

marketing & public relations KATHLEEN M . HORAN

MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER 300 Second Avenue, Long Branch, NJ 07740. For information, call 1-888-SBHS-123. Visit Saint Barnabas Health Care System on the Internet at www.saintbarnabas.com.

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advertising inquiries: Please contact Edward Burns at 201-782-5306 or edward.burns@wainscotmedia.com. subscription services: To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Monmouth Health & Life, Circulation Department, PO Box 1788, Land O Lakes, FL 34639; telephone 813-996-6579; e-mail lauren.mena@wainscotmedia.com.

Monmouth Health & Life is published six times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645, in association with Monmouth Medical Center. This is Volume 8, Issue 2. ©2009 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14.00 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a health care professional.

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How to treat his Prostate Cancer is a decision for both of you. With our robotic procedure you can immediately remove prostate cancer from your lives without the wait period and possible side effects associated with radiation seed implantation. Prostate cancer is a couple’s disease, not just a man’s. Consequently, more couples are coming to New Jersey Center for Prostate Cancer & Urology for state-of-the-art robotic prostatectomies. There is no need for multiple radiation treatments. You get the cancer removed immediately, with less pain, a shorter hospital stay, a reduced risk of incontinence and an increased likelihood of post-operative erectile function. Pioneers of this remarkable minimally invasive procedure in the tri-state area since 2001, the doctors of NJCPC&U perform this advanced surgery more than any other team in the state. To date, NJCPC&U doctors have completed over 1,750 of these successful robotic prostatectomies with a zero percent mortality rate. More experience makes for better outcomes. Call today if prostate cancer has impacted your lives.

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by Chris Burns

Monmouth MIX YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL TRENDS, TREASURES, PEOPLE & WELL-KEPT SECRETS

LEFT: SHUTTERSTOCK; RIGHT: DIANE GOOCH

Everything but the kitchen sink Aspiring culinary artisans can shop with the pros at JOHNSON’S RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT in Neptune (732-775-1660, www.johnsonsrestaurant.com). A family-owned supplier of top-shelf restaurant equipment for more than 28 years, Johnson’s opened its doors to the public four years ago. Owner Joe Marchese says his recipe for success is simple. “Our retail customers are looking for the same type of cookware they see their favorite chefs using on the food networks and cooking programs,” he reports. “It’s higherquality, with the durability that’s demanded in professional kitchens.” Grab a cart at the front door, because it’s easy to underestimate the number of “must-haves” inside. There is restaurant-grade cookware including the prestigious Lincoln Centurion line; country club–quality barware for party time; hard-to-find larger-size serveware for special occasions; plus a mountain of flatware, dinnerware and utensils. Gadget geeks will go gaga over the entire aisle of kitchen widgets, a section the owner says the trade tends to bypass. And there’s a sharp edge for every task among the more than 50 different knives. “Pros can do anything with the right knife,” says Marchese.

The Rumson yard of Diane and Michael Gooch are among the highlights of this year’s Two Rivers Garden Tour.

Garden variety Stop and smell the roses while lending support to Monmouth Medical Center’s Jacqueline M. Wilentz Comprehensive Breast Center at the TWO RIVERS GARDEN TOUR May 30 and 31 (732-923-6886, www.tworivershow.org). This year’s tour features the verdant vistas of some of the area’s most beautiful private gardens. Participating in the event’s 15th year are Rumson residents Michael and Diane Gooch, who welcome visitors to their West River Road estate; Fair Haven residents B.J. Thompson, Pat and Paul Pritchard, Sue Rastelli and Bill Grabowski, and Stevie and Todd Thompson; as well as Rumson’s Kim and Thomas Widener. The tour runs 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets cost $20 in advance and $25 the day of the event. Admission for Friday’s cocktail party, held at a private residence in Red Bank, is $125 in advance and $145 at the door.

MONMOUTH

H E A LT H & L I F E

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Monmouth MIX ‘What I’m listening to ...’ Rich Robinson, program director of Brookdale Public Radio (90.5 The Night), gets plenty of requests during his weekday on-air shift from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. But what are the DJ’s own favorites? “Having spent more than three decades in the music business, I’ve been lucky enough to hear an amazing amount of great music,” Robinson says. “From the incredible Asbury Park music scene back in the day to the newest releases from emerging artists like Ari Hest, it’s almost impossible to pick just 10 songs. But here are some things I’ve been listening to over the last few weeks.” 1.

“PARADISE CAFÉ,” Arc Angels, from Arc Angels

2.

“MY BABY,” Juliana Hatfield, from

How to Walk Away

Led Zeppelin 3.

“FLOAT,” Flogging Molly, from Float

4.

“WINDMILLS,” Ryebender, from

Hollow & Drifting

Springtime sprucing ’Have your home improvements hit a creative

wall? It may be time for some professional help. The New Jersey chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers is offering hesitant home-

5.

6.

“DEAD END DRIVING,” Ari Hest, from

owners an easy introduction to a design pro’s

Twelve Mondays

advice and input. The “SPRUCE IT UP!” program

“HIGHWAY,” The Fireman (aka Paul

McCartney), from Electric Arguments

(732-787-5981, spruceitup@njasid.org), running through June 30, offers a one- or two-hour consultation with an NJASID designer at a reduced

Stevie Wonder

7.

8.

“SOUND OF MUZAK,” Porcupine Tree,

rate of $150 per hour. (Clients are matched with

from In Absentia

an appropriate designer in their area after com-

“KITTY’S BACK,” Bruce Springsteen, from

The Wild, The Innocent & The E Street Shuffle 9.

“Many people fear that a designer will overpower their own tastes, but in fact it’s a collabo-

“DON’T YOU WORRY ’BOUT A THING,”

ration,” says Shelia Rich of Shelia Rich Interiors,

Stevie Wonder, from Innervisions

Monmouth Beach. “Consulting with a designer

10. “BABE I’M GONNA LEAVE YOU,”

Bruce Springsteen

pleting a brief questionnaire.)

Led Zeppelin, from Led Zeppelin

is a great way to pick up ideas, identify a design direction and avoid costly mistakes.”

Whether you’re starting from scratch or looking for that finishing touch, it’s worth a trip to ARCHITECTURAL ACCENTS in Long Branch (732-222-2844). “You have to look everywhere, from floor to ceiling—there’s a lot to miss,” says Robert Lefurge, vice president and chief designer of the eclectic showroom. A casual stroll through the fully appointed model kitchens, dens and baths is a revelation for redecorators and accent-piece prowlers. Just don’t miss the wine room with its six different stuccos, artisan cabinetry and recycled barn-beam ceiling. Lynn La Resca of Colts Neck knew she needed more space for entertaining, but it was Architectural Accents’ start-to-finish remodeling capability that made her kitchen makeover a smash. “Robert came up with ideas like a pocket door to separate the mud room and laundry room, a third sink and stools for the island, and a great bar-and-butler’s-pantry combination,” she says Upcoming special events include an open house on May 2 to preview AA’s new showroom designs and a cooking demonstration with representatives from Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances, May 21.

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Accents happen


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FLASH

1

LOCALS ARRIVED IN COLORFUL FINERY AS THE JERSEY COAST chapter of the American Red Cross held its annual Red Tie Gala at the PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel. At the Sheraton Eatontown, meanwhile, the LADACIN Network hosted the Rosebud Gala, featuring dinner, dancing, auctions and more. The group helps individuals with physical and developmental disabilities achieve independence. And finally, the FoodBank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties celebrated its 25th anniversary with a Humanitarian Gala, held at the Eagle Oaks Golf and Country Club in Farmingdale. The organization aims to offer food to as many needy families as possible, and serves approximately 70,000 people each year.

4 3

RED TIE GALA 1. Patrick Boyle, Jennifer Borenius and honoree Farley Boyle

2

2. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Unice, Mrs. and Mr. and Martin Gale

ROSEBUD GALA

5

3. Erika Pitchford 4. Allison and Katie Gervolino

HUMANITARIAN GALA

7

6

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6. Carol Stillwell, Audrey Lory and Gina Petillo 7. Ellen and Ken Marowitz

Think you belong in Flash? Send photos from your gala or charity event to Monmouth Health & Life, att: Flash editor, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; or e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Include your contact information, a short event description and names of all who appear. (Submissions are not guaranteed to appear and must meet the following image specs: 4x6 color prints or 300 dpi jpg, tif or eps files. Prints must be accompanied by an SASE in order to be returned.)

NOEL MARIE PHOTOGRAPHY; CHRISTOPHER BARTH; JOSEPH SHARP

5. Mike and Katie Militello, Bryan and Donna McMillen


123 Monmouth Road | West Long Branch, NJ 07764 | tel: 732.542.5050 | fax: 732.542.5149 | BranchesCatering.com

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Monmouth PROFILE

by David Levine

Double trouble WITH TWO FAMILY MEMBERS IN CRISIS, A WALL STREETER GETS TWIN LESSONS IN GRATITUDE

Peter Giordano and his wife, Ann-Marie Nielsen

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JERRY CASCIANO

SOMETIMES IT TAKES A CRISIS TO MAKE US appreciate a special place we’ve taken for granted. For Long Branch native Peter Giordano, it took two. Three years ago his sister, Karen Siegel, went into labor prematurely. Her daughter, Sydney, was born eight weeks early and had to spend a month in the neonatal intensive care unit at Monmouth Medical Center. About two weeks after the birth, Giordano’s stepfather, Michael Powers, had a cardiac stress test as part of a regular physical exam. The troubling results led his doctor to locate extensive blockages in his coronary arteries and tell him, as Giordano recalls, “Get your butt into the hospital now.” During the next two weeks, Powers underwent additional diagnostic testing at Monmouth Medical Center—and was hospitalized on the same floor as the neonatal intensive care unit where tiny Sydney Siegel was being cared for. “We spent way too much time walking that hallway between the two of them,” Giordano, 36, says with a laugh. He can smile because his stepfather recovered fully and his niece suffered no complications and is now a thriving preschooler. But the time he spent at the hospital during those weeks, and the care his family members received, touched him and his wife, Ann-Marie. The

events made them realize how important the medical center had been in their lives. Giordano, in fact, was born there. Though he now lives in Manhattan, where he works on Wall Street, he grew up in Ocean Township, and members of his family still live in the county, where his mother and sister have often participated in the hospital’s fundraising activities. Five years ago, just before the birth of his daughter, Avry, Giordano launched a fundraising event here that he calls “Links & Ponies.” And this year, proceeds from that event will go exclusively to the medical center. As its name implies, Links & Ponies is both a golf outing (at Royce Brook Golf Club in Hillsborough) and a day at the races (Monmouth Park Racetrack). At first, says Giordano, it included just him and some golfing buddies who “threw our own cash in a hat and gave it away.” Then he realized that many of his friends back home weren’t golfers, but did know their way around the track (as he did, having worked there as a waiter in high school). “I put two and two together, and Links & Ponies was born,” he says. The event now draws about 100 people to each day’s activities and has raised more than $70,000 for children’s charities. The take from this year’s Links & Ponies on June 5 and 6 will go to Monmouth’s Regional Newborn Center, where Giordano’s niece spent her first few weeks. As a Level III center, the highest level of neonatal care in New Jersey, the unit cares each year for more than 500 infants who are premature or have low birth weights, acute illnesses, congenital disorders or problems requiring surgery. The money will help fund an expanson of the newly named Hirair and Anna Hovnanian Foundation Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to increase the number of intensiveand intermediate-care bassinets from 23 to 31 and reconfigure the unit to accommodate updated medical equipment. “My wife jokes that my event is just an excuse to play golf and go to the track—and that’s partly true,” Giordano says. But it’s also a grateful remembrance of the anxious days he spent shuttling up and down a hallway in the building where he was born. ■


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Certified Divorce Financial Analyst™, has been providing comprehensive financial planning and investment advisory services for over 15 years. She is a member of the Association of Divorce Financial Planners, Institute of Certified Divorce Financial Analysts and the Jersey Shore Collaborative Law Group. She has been quoted in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine and has been a frequent guest on Good Day New York. For a private, no-obligation consultation, please call 800-995-HLFG or e-mail debra.fournier@hlfg.com.

2424 HIGHWAY 34 | MANASQUAN, NJ 08736 800-995-HLFG www.hlfg.com | debra.fournier@hlfg.com Securities, financial planning, and advisory services offered through LPL Financial: Member FINRA/SIPC.

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W H AT ’ S N E W I N M E D I C I N E A N D H O W Y O U C A N S TAY W E L L

A balloon that clears sinuses HOW SINUPLASTY REDUCES PAIN AND BLEEDING AND SPEEDS RECOVERY

The first line of treatment is usually antibiotics IF YOU’RE ONE OF THE 37 MILLION AMERIwith allergy medications to eliminate infection and/or cans diagnosed with sinusitis each year, you know the steroid nasal sprays to reduce swelling, and for most intense discomfort it can bring. But balloon sinupatients they bring relief. “If repeated trials of plasty, a catheter-based surgical procedure medications don’t resolve the problem, we offered at Monmouth Medical Center, has Sinusitis do a CT [computed tomography] scan to brightened the outlook for sinusitis sufferers. is responsible assess the anatomy of the sinuses and their “Balloon sinuplasty uses a catheter for an estimated connection to the nose,” says Dr. Prabhat. to open passageways between the nose 18 million to 22 He also performs an office procedure and the sinuses,” explains Vin Prabhat, million doctor called a nasal endoscopy, in which an endoM.D., an otolaryngologist—ear, nose and visits every year scope—a long, flexible tube connected to a throat specialist—at the hospital. “It uses an in the U.S. video camera—is inserted into the nasal pasinflatable balloon in a way similar to angiosage to allow examination. If he finds that sinus plasty, which opens blocked coronary arteries.” passages are indeed blocked, it may be time for surgery. Sinusitis is an inflammation or structural blockage Sinus operations once required surgeons to in the sinus cavities. These are hollow spaces connected to access the sinus cavities from the outside, through incithe nose that allow free exchange of air and mucus. sions in the gums or near the eyebrow. Then, in the “Sinuses help the nose warm, filter and humidify incom1980s, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was ing air and let particles in the air be processed by the body’s immune system,” explains Dr. Prabhat. When these openings become swollen or blocked, normal mucus drainage stops, and infection or inflammation can result.

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sinuplasty was introduced, that problem was developed, eliminating the need for external solved by using X-ray guidance. Today Dr. cuts. With this approach, surgeons can examPrabhat uses a catheter with a fiber-optic ine the sinuses and insert instruments through lighted tip. the nose to remove diseased bone and soft tis“If you pass this catheter tip into the sue, enlarging the openings. But FESS has sinus and turn the lights down in the operating drawbacks, including postoperative pain, room, you can see a light shining from inside swelling and bleeding. the sinus—just as a lighted flashlight is visiEnter balloon sinuplasty. Available in ble inside a tent,” says the doctor. “That conthis country since just December 2005, it’s firms that we’ve catheterized the correct sinus.” not a replacement for earlier surgical interVin Prabhat, M.D. When the catheter is in position, the ventions, but a new method that minimizes tissurgeon extends it with a 3- to 7-millimeter balloon into sue trauma. “Through the dilated opening created by the sinus opening. The balloon is then dilated, expandthe balloon, you can suction out fluid, remove a polyp or ing the natural opening in the sinus passage. irrigate a sinus with antibiotics—whichever you need to In many cases balloon sinuplasty makes unnecesdo,” says Dr. Prabhat. “The result is less bleeding, less sary the repeat or “revision” surgeries that would have pain, less swelling, less scar tissue and a quicker recovery.” been required with earlier methods. And it can be done Previously, sinus-surgery patients were out of safely in children; they’re often considered ineligible for work for as long as a week, with packing in the nose on surgery because of scarring and possible complications, both sides that made nasal breathing impossible. With but these are less likely with the newer technique. balloon sinuplasty, packing is often unnecessary, and Balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. People many patients return to work the next day. with severe scarring from previous surgery, for example, There are four sinuses: frontal, in the lower foreare not usually candidates. “But it’s very effective for head; ethmoid, alongside the upper part of the nose; people whose chronic sinus issues have been unresponsphenoid, deep behind the nose; and maxillary, in the sive to medical and allergic therapy and who have not cheeks. Balloon sinuplasty is less useful for ethmoid previously had sinus surgery,” says the doctor. sinuses, the doctor says, because they’re full of small aerPatient satisfaction with the procedure has been very ated cells like a honeycomb. But it improves access to the good, he says. And interest is huge, especially from people frontal sinuses, which are behind the forehead at the who have been hesitant about surgery because of pain. roof of the nose, linked to the nose by a narrow tunnel. “Balloon sinuplasty is fast becoming state-of-theWith standard FESS techniques, poor visualizaart,” says Dr. Prabhat. ■ tion can make accuracy hard to achieve. When balloon

SIGNS OF SINUSITIS Take the quick symptom census below. Checking three or more boxes means you may have sinusitis, and it’s worth checking with your doctor to find out for sure.

GETTY

❑ facial pressure or pain ❑ headache pain ❑ nasal congestion or a stuffy nose ❑ thick, yellow-green nasal discharge ❑ low fever (99–100 degrees) ❑ bad breath ❑ pain in the upper teeth Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery

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comfort kids A CHILD’S HOSPITAL STAY WILL NEVER BE ‘A DAY AT THE BEACH.’ BUT IT CAN LOOK LIKE ONE

A HOSPITAL IS A POTENTIALLY FRIGHTENING place, especially for children, and fear can have a negative effect on sick kids and their parents. But The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center has acted to replace fear with cheer. “I truly believe that how you feel about where you are can influence your ability to recover from serious illnesses,” says Meg Fisher, M.D., The Children’s 22

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Hospital’s medical director. It’s more than a hunch. The National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions reviewed 223 studies to produce a 2008 report called Evidence for Innovation. “A growing body of research shows that the physical design of health care settings unintentionally contributes to nega-


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tive outcomes,” it declared. “On the other hand, “Every day I see people thoughtful, evidence-based facility design can help bring the patient, staff and families into the smiling. The new design center of the health care experience, increase makes it easier patient safety and enhance the overall quality of care provided.” to fulfill our mission.” Putting this insight to work, The Childdepicting sandy scenes and people surfing and ren’s Hospital has recently given its pediatric Meg Fisher, M.D. swimming. The examination table in the treatinpatient unit a major cosmetic facelift. The ment room is covered with a raft and the floor looks like goal, says Dr. Fisher, was to create a more soothing, water. The hardwood floors are reminiscent of a ship’s child-friendly environment for ailing youngsters and deck. Even the privacy curtains have beach-themed dectheir families. orations, like flip-flops. Before the renovation, which was completed last “The whole idea is to feel as if you are at the October, the unit “looked like the typical hospital ward,” Shore,” says Dr. Fisher. she says. Now it resembles a beach. The designers Each of the patient rooms also received a new brought touches of the Jersey Shore to the patient rooms, flat-screen television and a recliner chair for parents the waiting area, the teen room and the playroom. These to sleep on if they stay overnight. And the recreation spaces are painted in bright primary colors, with murals rooms were completely renovated too. One, for younger children, has a full supply of toys along with many artsand-crafts materials. “Children get a lot by painting with Walls painted with beachy fingers or brushes,” says Dr. Fisher. “Art gives them an scenes evoking the Jersey outlet to express their frustration and pain.” A room for Shore cheer children and their families in the redesigned teenagers has been designed more in the style of a fampediatric unit at Monmouth ily rec room, with TVs, computers, a small basketball net Medical Center. and other age-appropriate diversions. However, the renovation was not just cosmetic. “We completely redesigned the nursing station to make it more functional,” says Dr. Fisher. “The nurses had a lot of input into where we put their computers, printers and monitors. We have to fit a lot of stuff in a small area. Now their workflow is more efficient.” Everyone loves the end result. “Every day when I walk into the ward I see people smiling,” she says. “That has to help the families. In fact, our scores on patientsatisfaction surveys have gone way up since we opened the new unit. It proves you can still comply with safety regulations, but look very different and make people feel less threatened. The new design makes it easier to fulfill our mission, which is to provide quality care in a familyfriendly way.” ■

To find out more about The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center or for a referral to a pediatrician or pediatric subspecialist, please call 1-888724-7123.

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HOW PROSTATE SURGEONS ‘wrote the book’ TWO NEW JERSEY UROLOGISTS HELP EDUCATE THE PROFESSION ON USING ROBOTS IN THE OPERATING ROOM

Michael P. Esposito, M.D.

Vincent J. Lanteri, M.D.

WHEN IT COMES TO DOING PROSTATE SURgery with robotic technology, Monmouth Medical Center urologists Michael P. Esposito, M.D., and Vincent J. Lanteri, M.D., are experts. They’ve performed more than 2,000 robotic prostatectomies (prostate removals), and they’re co-editors of a medical textbook, Urologic Robotic Surgery, published last year by Humana Press. They shared thoughts in a recent chat:

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COURTESY OF MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER

MONMOUTH HEALTH & LIFE: How did you come to create this textbook? DR. LANTERI: We were teaching other urologists to do these procedures and helping them operate on pigs. We figured, “Let’s write a book, what the heck?” MH&L: It’s not like trying to publish a novel. DR. ESPOSITO: That’s right. We knew that it could be published. And we asked experts around the country to write chapters. MH&L: You’ve told us in the past that the robot is only a tool, not a substitute for the surgeon. How does it help? DR. L: We work with delicate structures in a small space, and the robot gives us better access to them, and also smooths out the natural tremor of the human hand. It helps us achieve our three-part goal: to remove all the

cancer and allow the man a quick return to complete continence and the sexual potency he had before. MH&L: I understand the book has an extra feature. Dr. E: Yes, it comes with a DVD. You can see it a hundred times and still catch things you haven’t noticed before. MH&L: How did you get started with the robot? Dr. L: In 2001, we went to Paris for a week of special training in laparoscopic [minimally invasive] prostatectomy. It wasn’t robotic then, and it was hard as hell—no two ways about it. Then, early in 2002, the FDA approved the robot, the Da Vinci Surgical System, and a New Jersey hospital bought two of the first units. We started using one just for part of the surgery. Finally, we said, “We could modify the operation and do it all robotically.” MH&L: So you made that adaptation yourselves? Dr. E: Yes. That’s what makes us pioneers. MH&L: And you taught other doctors? Dr. L: Yes. Our lab became one of three teaching sites in the country for the manufacturer, Intuitive Surgical. MH&L: What’s next? Dr. L: Now we’re using a technique we call athermal noncautery—it’s too new even for our book. When there is bleeding from blood vessels that feed the nerves near the prostate, we let them bleed—within safe limits—and use suction rather than cauterizing them. New surgeons worry about bleeding, but we find that if we don’t cauterize near these nerves, it helps preserve sexual function. Dr. E: Also, we now use what’s called anterior urethropexy, in which a special “W” stitch fastens the urethra to the pubic bone, helping to restore continence more quickly. ■


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In a hyperbaric therapy session, the patient typically spends an hour to an hour and a half in a chamber with extra-high oxygen content.

When wounds won’t heal HYPERBARIC MEDICINE INCREASES THE BLOOD’S OXYGEN LEVELS TO HELP

COURTESY OF MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER

HEAL DAMAGED TISSUE

MOST SKIN WOUNDS HEAL AUTOMATICALLY, but some stubbornly resist healing—for example, some of those that result from cancer radiation treatments or chronic infections. Fortunately, a therapy called hyperbaric medicine now offers new hope for the successful treatment of such wounds. Martin Murphy knows. In 2006, the Toms River resident had a cancerous lesion removed from the skin of, as he puts it, “my butt.” He had squamous cell carcinoma, a common skin cancer that is usually treated successfully, as his was, by removing the lesion and then using radiation to kill any remaining cancer cells in the surrounding tissue. Although the radiation was successful in eradicating Murphy’s cancer, it also destroyed some of the healthy surrounding tissue, leaving him with an open wound that he had to keep bandaged for three years. Murphy, now 55, saw several doctors and plastic surgeons, none of whom could help. The reason, explains Catherine Hanlon, M.D., chairman of the Emergency Department and medical director of hyperbaric medicine at Monmouth Medical Center, was that radiation treatment often kills the blood vessels that feed the area surrounding where the tumor grew. As a result, new tissue can’t grow, and skin grafts don’t get the blood supply they need to take hold. Murphy needed help restoring the blood supply to the wound. And that’s where hyperbaric medicine came in. “Hyperbaric” means higher than atmospheric air pressure. Patients undergoing hyperbaric therapy sit or lie (depending on the wound site) in a fully enclosed chamber in which the air pressure is 2 to 2.5 times that of the air outdoors at sea level. The air is 100 percent oxygen, about five times the oxygen content of ordinary air. Spending 60 to 90 minutes—a typical session—in

the chamber can raise blood oxygen content significantly. “Normal oxygen content is measured at about 90 to 100 millimeters of pressure in the blood,” says Dr. Hanlon. “If you just breathe pure oxygen through a mask, you can get that up to 200 millimeters. But when you add the extra air pressure, you can drive oxygen content to 1,200 or 1,300 millimeters.” The extra oxygen helps regrow new blood vessels in the vascular bed, the area in which a skin graft will be implanted. “Without a healthy vascular bed, it’s like planting seeds in concrete,” Dr. Hanlon says. That’s why Murphy’s previous skin grafts failed. But after 40 90minute hyperbaric sessions (he went five days a week for eight weeks) his wound had improved enough to allow his plastic surgeon to apply a graft in December. Next came another 10 sessions of hyperbaric therapy to continue the healing process. The results have been “amazing,” says Murphy, who underwent one final operation on March 13. Since July he has been on medical leave from his job as a route salesman for a food manufacturer. “Driving a truck was tough,” he says. “I couldn’t sit for long.” But with his wound healing at last, he was scheduled to return to driving his route this May. “I can’t wait to get back to work,” he says. ■ To find out more about the Wound Treatment Center and hyperbaric oxygen therapy at Monmouth Medical Center, please call 1-888-724-7123.

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Link a dish-shaped part of the outer edge of the scapula into which the ball fits. The glenoid is like the concave surface of a golf tee, on which a golf ball sits and which it can slip off with relative ease. Because the bones provide little stability to the shoulder joint, it depends on surrounding soft tissues—mainly the ligaments, tendons and muscles known as the rotator cuff—to hold the ball in place. That instability is both good and bad: It makes the shoulder the body’s most movable joint, able to pivot in almost any direction. But it also makes the shoulder prone to injury. In the 1980s, says Silva, now a 46-year-old real estate broSteer clear of ker, shoulder surgery was seen as shoulder injuries an ordeal with uncertain results, To protect this flexible but vulnerable so he chose rehabilitation instead. joint, David Gentile, M.D., an orthoBut by last year, his shoulder had pedic surgeon at Monmouth Medical deteriorated. “I couldn’t even lift Center, suggests the following: my arm over my head anymore,” • Do strength and conditioning exercises he recalls. “I couldn’t sleep withFREEHOLD RESIDENT DAVID geared to the sport or movement you out pain, and I had to use my left Silva well remembers the moment perform regularly. hand to lift everything.” in 1985 that ended his baseball After a failed operation • Cross-train as well—do activities that procareer. A pitcher in the Philadelelsewhere, Silva found Dr. Genvide strengthening and aerobic benefit, phia Phillies minor-league system, tile. The doctor diagnosed a tear but put different stress on the shoulder. he was shagging fly balls in the called SLAP—superior labrum, • Stretch before physical activity and again outfield before a game. As he tried anterior (front) to posterior (back). afterward to cool down. to throw to home plate from deep (The labrum is a raised rim of • If you feel tired, stop. Don’t risk hurting center field, something went wrong. ligaments that helps hold the ball yourself. Rest and come back another day. “I felt an enormous amount in the socket.) of shocking pain,” he recalls, “as if You can treat most shoulder problems Last August, Dr. Gentile someone had stuck a knife inside yourself with “RICE”: rest, ice, compresrepaired Silva’s shoulder using my right shoulder and twisted it.” sion and elevation. Other treatments arthroscopy, a minimally invasive He had suffered a shoulder include exercise and anti-inflammatory approach that uses a scope medicines to reduce pain and swelling. In injury, just like thousands of other inserted into the joint through a some cases, when these methods don’t Americans do every year. As David small incision. This time surgery work, surgery is an option. Gentile, M.D., a Monmouth Medworked—and today Silva is playical Center orthopedic surgeon, ing fast-pitch softball. explains, the shoulder comprises three bones: the clavi“I can throw 86 miles an hour with no pain,” he cle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade) and the says. “I can bench-press 220 pounds, which I haven’t humerus (upper arm bone). The shoulder joint is of the done since I was in my 20s. I feel like a kid again!” ■ ball-and-socket type, though its “socket” is less complete For a referral to a Monmouth Medical Center orthothan that of the hip joint. The ball is the top, rounded pedic surgeon, please call 1-888-724-7123. portion of the upper arm bone; the socket-like glenoid is

Goodbye, shoulder woes

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Colorectal cancer: Are you at risk? AN AGGRESSIVE NEW SCREENING PROGRAM

SHUTTERSTOCK

CAN HELP YOU FIND OUT

COLORECTAL CANCER CLAIMED 45,000 AMERican lives last year, and many of those people didn’t need to die. Fortunately, a new multidisciplinary screening program at Monmouth Medical Center can now help people conquer this eminently beatable disease. We know that with screening techniques such as colonoscopy—a visual examination of an emptied colon with a scope—many incipient cancers can be spotted early enough for effective treatment, and many precanA genetic counselor then reviews the family history to cerous polyps (projecting buds of tissue in the colon) can determine the likelihood that hereditary factors play a be found and removed before they become malignant. part in that person’s cancer risk. That’s why a colonoscopy every 10 years or less is rec“We put people into one of three risk categories: ommended for all of us once we turn 50. average, increased or high,” says Dr. Arvanitis. Those in But did you know that a few of us face a special, the first two groups are advised about elevated risk? A hereditary condition screening and other cancer prevention called Lynch syndrome is thought to MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER strategies, based on American Cancer be responsible for 2 to 7 percent of the COLORECTAL SURGEONS: Society recommendations for diet, exerroughly 160,000 new colorectal cancer Michael Arvanitis, M.D. cise and colonoscopy. cases diagnosed each year. Lynch synRoy M. Dresner, D.O. People who are found to be at drome has been linked to variations in Glenn S. Parker, M.D. high risk may choose to undergo four specific genes that are involved Thomas R. Lake III, M.D. genetic counseling and a blood test to when DNA is copied as cells divide. look for Lynch syndrome and three For a referral, call 1-888-724-7123. People with the syndrome “tend to get other hereditary risk factors—services cancer earlier, in their 30s or 40s, and that are billed to their health insurer. have a 50 percent risk of passing it on to their children,” These patients are also admitted into the High-Risk says Michael Arvanitis, M.D., chief of colon and rectal Cancer Assessment Clinic, which offers colonoscopy and surgery at Monmouth. other screenings along with treatments, including For that reason, Dr. Arvanitis’ division, along surgery if needed. They also receive education about the with the Department of Gastroenterology and the Highdisease and lifelong follow-up from the clinic. ■ Risk Cancer Assessment Program at the Leon Hess Cancer Center, has started the Familial Colorectal Cancer How you can learn about Registry. “This is a multispecialty team approach to the your colorectal cancer risk assessment of family risk, genetic counseling and testing It starts with picking up the phone—or typing a and treatment of polyps and cancer,” says Dr. Arvanitis. quick e-mail. If you, a family member or friend are To his knowledge, it’s the only one of its kind in the state. interested in joining the Familial Colorectal Cancer The free program allows anyone to learn about Registry or want to schedule an appointment at his or her personal risks for the disease. The first step Monmouth Medical Center’s High-Risk Cancer involves completing a detailed family health history and Assessment Program, call 732-923-6576. a five-page family colorectal cancer risk evaluation form.

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MARK R. SCHWARTZ, M.D. GENERAL SURGEON IN 1980, MARK R. SCHWARTZ, M.D., came to Monmouth Medical Center as a student at Hahnemann University School of Medicine. He never left. He did his surgical residency here from 1983 to 1987, was chief resident from 1987 to 1988 and was part of the team of surgeons who performed one of the state’s first laparoscopic gallbladder removals here in 1990. “That was monumental,” recalls Dr. Schwartz, now 51. He has also been part of a revolution in breast surgery, as lumpectomy—removal of a tumor with surrounding tissue—has increasingly replaced full mastectomy. Each Friday, he sees patients in the Jacqueline M. Wilentz Comprehensive Breast Center. The son of an ob/gyn who practiced in the family’s Vineland home, Dr. Schwartz considered joining his father’s practice until a surgical rotation made him realize he enjoyed “fixing people.” The Ocean Township resident is a wildlife photographer whose work has been exhibited in the Guild of Creative Art in Shrewsbury. He and his wife, Joy, a nurse who manages his offices in Oakhurst and Brick, have a son, Jonathan, 22; and daughters Allison, 21; and Dana, 18.

MARC J. DEVITO, M.D. INTERNIST/PEDIATRICIAN A MEDICAL CAREER WAS always the goal for Marc J. DeVito, M.D., 35, but he faced a challenge in settling on a specialty and an approach. “I couldn’t choose between Eastern and Western medicine, or between pediatrics and internal medicine,” the Red Bank resident recalls, “so I decided to incorporate them all into my practice. After graduating from St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, he completed an internal medicine/pediatrics residency at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–New Jersey Medical School. Internal medicine/ pediatrics allows the physician to treat the whole family; Dr. DeVito is board-certified in both specialties. He opened a practice in Little Silver in 2008. Dr. DeVito also has a professionally important family tie: He has studied the Asian practice of shiatsu acupressure and plans to travel to South Korea to visit relatives of his wife, Sharon Hwang, M.D., to learn more about Eastern medicine. A saxophone and piano player in his spare time, he wrote a song that he sang at the opening ceremonies of the Special Olympics in Pennsylvania in 1995 and Nevada in 1996. ■

COURTESY OF MONMOUTH MEDICAL CENTER

SHADDY YOUNAN, M.D. INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGIST WHEN SHADDY YOUNAN, M.D., 35, needs advice about treating one of his patients, he can ask his father, George, or his twin brother, Zyad. The three cardiologists practice together, with a fourth associate, in Sayreville, Holmdel and Long Branch. George is a general cardiologist, Zyad an electrophysiologist and Shaddy an interventionalist. “We all get along,” says Dr. Younan, “and our working together is good for our patients, because we can expedite their treatment.” Born at Saint Michael’s Medical Center in Newark during his father’s cardiology fellowship, Shaddy graduated from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey–New Jersey Medical School, did his residency in internal medicine at Temple University Hospital and returned to Saint Michael’s for his cardiology fellowship. The Red Bank resident says he chose interventional cardiology because he enjoys the combination of office care, diagnostic imaging, acute-care medicine and procedures—such as angioplasty with stenting— that the field requires. When he isn’t working, Dr. Younan enjoys skiing and golf.


We’re the first in the region to perform minimally invasive gastric bypass.

We do it better. And we can prove it.

Monmouth Medical Center: The Regional Leader in Minimally Invasive Bariatric Surgery

Frank J. J. Borao, Borao, MD, MD, FACS FACS Frank Director Director Minimally Invasive Invasive Surgery Surgery and and Bariatric Bariatric Surgery Surgery Minimally Monmouth Medical Medical Center Center Monmouth

At Monmouth Medical Center, we know that it’s results that matter. That’s why we created the region’s first Bariatric Surgery Center—which has among the lowest complication rates in the nation. We’re one of the first in the state to perform laparoscopic gastric bypass. The fact is that we do it better. And we can prove it. We’re the only hospital in New Jersey performing minimally invasive total laparoscopic esophagectomy and we have one of the highest volumes of anti-reflux surgery in the state. We’re also the first in the region to perform cutting edge, minimally invasive surgery for the spleen, colon and stomach. Just a few of the reasons why we’ve earned the coveted Thompson 100 Top Hospitals Performance Leaders award.

• First in the region to perform laparoscopic gastric bypass. • Extensive experience in gastric bypass, Lap-band, sleeve gastrectomy, revisional procedures, anti-reflux and paraesophageal hernia repair. • First Bariatric Surgery Center in the region. • Among the lowest complication rates for Bariatric Surgery in the nation. • The only hospital in New Jersey to perform an endoscopic incisionless procedure for revisional weight loss surgery. • First in the region to perform laparoscopic solid organ (adrenal, kidney, spleen, liver) removal.

SAINT BARNABAS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

Monmouth Medical Center

Monmouth Medical Center

1-888-SBHS-123 • saintbarnabas.com

A national leader in delivering outstanding health care outcomes.

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Sea to

BELIEVE THIS NAUTICAL-THEMED MODEL HOME OFFERS UP SECRETS FOR HAUTE BEACH LIVING

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DESIGNING YOUR DREAM HOME is no easy feat, from finding that justright furniture to choosing a color palette that pops. Luckily, a glimpse inside a model home can provide ideas galore for fashioning your own abode. For the nautically inclined, this 2,200square-foot model unit for RiverVue at Hoffman’s Marina—an upscale 55-andover community in Brielle that boasts 18 townhouses on the Manasquan River minutes from the Atlantic—offers an ocean of inspiration. “We wanted to capture the feeling of casual living down at the Jersey Shore while still making it appeal to a sophisticated taste level,” says Sally Bacarella of Bacarella Interiors, Ocean Township, who was hired to design the space by RiverVue’s developer, Robertson Douglas Group. “It’s less cutesy than those ‘life is a beach’–themed houses and much more Ralph Laurenesque.” Despite that mature aesthetic, Bacarella says she was free to unleash her imagination. The only limitation: sticking to a moderate budget. “With a model home you don’t always have sky’s-the-limit funds, but you can still make something look opulent without it being crazy expensive,” says the designer. “It’s all how you put it together.” Bacarella began by establishing a color scheme, drawing inspiration from the hues of the sea. “It was a no-brainer to use mostly navy blues and whites— the combination is just about as classic as you can get and really evokes the water. We also used a lot of ivory, beige and other sandy colors,” she says. Optimizing views of the picturesque marina just outside was also a must. “Since we’re selling the views, all of the window treatments are very high to the “Tailored but not overly feminine” was the vision for the master bedroom, which features a luxurious bed and impressive views.

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ABOVE, a patterned tablecloth serves as a focal point in the dining room, which also features a nickel chandelier and glass-top table. LEFT, the classic white of the kitchen is punctuated by modern touches of stainless-steel appliances.

ceiling and there aren’t a lot of heavy blinds or drapes,” Bacarella says. In keeping with the theme, maritimeinspired furniture and accessories also adorn each space. For the great room, Bacarella set out to create a look that was “casual but chic, with a twist of sophistication that really captured the feeling of the sea,” she says. 32

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To that end, a “deep-ink ocean navy” dhurrie weave area rug featuring a Greek key border anchors the space atop a light oak floor. An ivory-colored English Lawson arm sofa and a thick limestone side table with an iron base both dress things up and provide a bit of stunning contrast. Bacarella also incorporated dark wood furniture throughout the room, including a large java-stained wall unit. “It blends so well with the blues and whites,” she says. Blue paisley-patterned pillows and window curtains add a touch of whimsy, while silver accessories help “capture the light and sparkle of the water,” the designer adds. Blue might reign in the great room, but white steals the show in the charming kitchen. “I wanted to make it light and airy and very Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard,” says Bacarella. That look is achieved through wooden Rutt cabinets painted white, Calcutta gold marble countertops and a white harlequin diamond backsplash. Yet throughout the space dashes of blue do appear, such as the navy blue-and-ivory striped peplum


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valance and dining chair cushions and the striking round braided rug featuring blue and white concentric circles. While a weathered brass chandelier and soft embroidered Schumacher curtains add to that classic feel, the designer says the room does have some “edgy contemporary moments”—for example, a stainless steel sink and appliances. Down the hall, the elegant dining room is “a place where friends can gather that’s not overly fussy,” says Bacarella. A glass-top table on iron legs makes the room seem larger, while a blue paisley-patterned woven tablecloth creates an eye-catching focal point. For seating, the designer mixed styles and textures. “There’s not much you can do with a dining room—it’s usually a table with six to 10 chairs—so choosing different types of seats adds interest,” she explains. Ivory tufted host and hostess chairs on mahogany legs flank the table, while a woven-raffia bench and two “biscuity beige” linen chairs on java-stained frames provide seating for guests. A shiny polished nickel chandelier and wall sconces add a modern touch, while paneled walls spruce up the perimeter. “Moldings are a great way to increase the value of your home—they break up what I call ‘the abyss of painted sheetrock’ and add character and charm,” the designer says. An ocean-inspired acrylic painting by

“Ralph Laurenesque” is how the designer describes the beachy-but-classic style used throughout the home, including the comfy great room, with its cushy sofa and bold blue rug.

Forked River–based artist Richard Davis and whimsical white sheers on cable wires complete the space. That nautical theme continues in the master bedroom, an inviting space suited to both sexes. “I always feel master bedrooms should be romantic and tailored but not overly feminine,” says Bacarella. A luxurious bed takes center stage with a deep-blue canopy, which makes the 8-foot ceilings appear higher. A soft cotton comforter and white basket-weave coverlet give the bed a cozy touch, while a navy velvet pillow and shams add a bit of opulence. Stunning river views are invited inside by a wall of windows, framed by dark blue drapes and soft sheers. “With sheers you can have privacy but still see the water and shimmer outside,” says Bacarella. Adding to that “beachy-casual” yet elegant feel are a grass cloth wall covering and sand-colored nylon carpeting. A model home must “strike a chord with people,” says the designer, and this unit’s nautical motif appears to meet that test. It’s unified without being cloying, and it makes the most of the home’s biggest asset: the Jersey Shore setting itself. ■ MONMOUTH

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QUIZ: What’s your design era? T H E PA S T I S A L I V E — I N Y O U R L I V I N G R O O M . C O N S C I O U S LY O R N O T, W E A L L D R AW O N T H E S T Y L E S O F D I F F E R E N T E R A S T O D E C I D E W H AT L O O K S W E L I K E I N I N T E R I O R DESIGN. BUT SOMETIMES WE NEED HELP IDENTIFYING, UNIFYING AND MAKING THE M O S T O F O U R P R E F E R E N C E S . T H AT ’ S W H AT T H I S Q U I Z I S F O R . S I M P LY P I C K Y O U R FAV O R I T E I M A G E I N E A C H O F T H E S E E I G H T S E C T I O N S — W E ’ L L T E L L Y O U W H I C H E R A S U I T S Y O U B E S T A N D H O W T O C R E AT E T H AT L O O K I N Y O U R O W N B E L O V E D A B O D E .

A. B.

D.

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A: KAREN MELVIN, B: LUCINDA SYMONS/REDCOVER.COM; C: SCOTT VAN DYKE, D: ERIC ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY

C.


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C.

B.

D.

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B.

A.

D.

C.

A.

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C.

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A: PETER RYMWID PHOTOGRAPHY, B: ARCHITECT DALE LUMPKIN, C: LOOK PHOTOGRAPHY/BEATEWORKS/CORBIS, D: ERIC ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY

Kitchens

D. C. B. A.

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A.

B.

C.

D.

Pendant lights

RESULTS MOSTLY “A”s: 19th-CENTURY TRADITIONAL You like a comfortable-but-formal setting, but that doesn’t mean you’re stuffy. After all, a number of lively styles—Regency, Victorian, American Empire— commingled during this era. Today’s interpretation allows for a refreshing, eclectic look that maintains a classic aesthetic. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Grand furniture with soft, smooth lines, modest curves and classical symmetry • A profusion of patterns, often florals and plaids • Materials such as marble, polished mahogany and rosewood and luxurious fabrics • Embellishments such as carvings, decorative accents and gilding • Rich, dark colors • An abundance of furniture and other decorative objects—lamps, figurines, elaborate draperies, urns, large patterned rugs, ornamental globes

A.

MOSTLY “B”s: ART DECO Elegance and industry converged in the ’20s and ’30s, creating spaces both exotic and opulent, grand and graceful. Those in search of a dash of glam need look no further than the splendid, look-at-me showpieces from this chic era. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Beveled mirrored surfaces • Motifs such as rays, “stepped” forms and curves • Bold, saturated colors • Light and dark woods together, wood inlays • Exotic pieces with Asian and African influences • Strong geometric patterns, plus stylized florals and figures • Materials such as ebony, lacquer, mother-of-pearl, metal and glass

B.

MOSTLY “C”s: 1950s AND ’60s Plastic and color don’t scare you. You are a risk-taker and love all things that pop! Clothing fashions of the time greatly influenced this design style, and it evokes the era: uninhibited, playful and just plain cool. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Fun colors such as aqua, yellow, red, blue and mint green • Futuristic-looking forms • Rounded, asymmetrical, parabolic shapes • Simple, Scandinavian-influenced shapes • Oversized florals • Bold pop art touches, with dashes of kitsch and humor • Materials such as plastic, acrylic, teak, plywood and chrome

C.

Mostly “D”s: TODAY You enjoy minimalist-inspired pieces thoughtfully enhanced with a few “wow” accents. You follow the style trends heralded in the latest design blogs and appreciate simple forms made with exquisite craftsmanship, as well as rooms that deftly balance shape, color and texture. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: • Crisp, clean lines with little embellishment • Items in basic geometric forms, often offset by one or two whimsically shaped decorative accents • Industrial finishes • Materials such as stainless steel, glass, slate, durable woods and reclaimed or sustainable materials • Natural textures and colors, accented with spots of bright color ■

D. Mirrors For product and photo information for the items shown, see page 52.


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Well-dressed floors NEVER MIND NEUTRALS—THESE EYE-CATCHING AREA RUGS GIVE YOUR ROOMS INSTANT PANACHE AND PERSONALITY

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FROM LEFT Who says stained glass is for lamps and windows alone? Get the look underfoot with the 100-knot Glass rug by Tibetano, $100 per square foot, made of wool with silk accents. It comes in custom colors and sizes up to 25 feet wide. From Odegard’s Artist collection, this striking black-and-white rug—modeled after a work by Belgian artist Narcisse Tordoir—is made of hand-spun, -knotted and -carded Himalayan wool, $11,200 for an 8-foot by 10-foot version. Nature and abstract art collide in the colorful Pokeweed Encounter rug by Amy Helfand, $11,200 for 7 feet by 10 feet, crafted of hand-knotted Tibetan wool and Chinese silk. Get a dose of the outdoors with Grass by Graviti Zone Rugs, $3,400 for an 8-foot 5-inch by 5-foot 6-inch rug, featuring darkgreen blades on a light-green background, made of hand-tufted New Zealand wool. continued


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FROM LEFT Inspired by the famed quilts of Gee’s Bend, Ala., this limited edition 8-foot 5-inch by 11-foot 8-inch rug from ABC Carpet & Home, $6,999, is handmade in Turkey with 100-percent wool textile fragments. The whimsical spirals of the Calabasas rug from Rug Art’s Botanic collection, $6,800 for 9 feet in diameter, were inspired by the blooms of the Mexican Hat wildflower. Sold to the trade only. Add a burst of color with the bright-orange Parqué rug by Alicia D. Keshishian, $106 per square foot, made of hand-carded and hand-spun Tibetan wool with silk accents. Custom colors and sizes available. Everything’s coming up Mums and Asters in this playful Tibetan wool offering from Kim Parker for The Rug Company, $6,125 for a 10-foot by 7-foot rug. ■ For stores that carry the product lines shown, see our shopping guide on page 52.

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ESCAPES by Kristin Colella

Designer resorts FASHION ICONS MAKE TRAVEL TRENDY The leading names in fashion are no longer content merely dressing you and your home—they’re now bringing their distinctive styles to a host of luxurious resorts around the globe. Here, a glimpse at three sumptuous hotels, each on a different continent, as conceptualized by a trio of beloved style maestros.

ROUND HILL HOTEL & VILLAS Montego Bay, Jamaica Set upon a former sugar plantation overlooking the bright Caribbean, this resort‘s 18th-century–inspired great house and 27 villas were renovated and designed by Ralph Lauren, who captured the island’s tropical temperament via luxuriously outfitted,

accented with bright punches of pink and blue. $410–$1,490

per night, double occupancy

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ROUND HILL PHOTO BY DAVE MASSEY

pristine-white rooms


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PALAZZO VERSACE Gold Coast, Australia Donatella Versace brings a hefty dash of Italian splendor to her striking Down Under hotel, from the golden columns and massive chandelier in the grand marble lobby to the warm, rich fabrics and classically elegant furnishings that adorn the 205 guest rooms.

$300–$2,800 per night, double occupancy

ARMANI HOTEL DUBAI Dubai, United Arab Emirates Slated to open later this year in the much-

COURTESY OF PALAZZO VERSACE; COURTESY OF ARMANI HOTEL DUBAI

ballyhooed Burj Dubai—set to become the world’s tallest building—this 160room cosmopolitan oasis from Giorgio Armani will be gracefully styled in urbane colors, superior materials and sophisticated furnishings, all overlooking the bustling new Downtown Burj Dubai district below.

Rates to be determined


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Monmouth GOURMET

by Amanda Prost

foil for the tender artichokes. The success of those starters unfortunately made the brie almondine that followed seem a bit lackluster. The individual round of cheese was sprinkled with almonds and surrounded by flatbread. The problem: a sweet—too sweet for our taste at this time—amaretto butter sauce, which overwhelmed the entire plate. But it was back to simple goodness when our entrées arrived. A generous serving of seared Chilean sea bass was perched on a pile of jasmine rice. A fennel broth contributed mild anise-flavored undertones to the dish, which was rounded out with sautéed spinach (fresh and not the slightest bit overdone) and frizzled carrots (colorfully crunchy and zesty). A hearty helping was also in store with the baby rack of lamb. Two meaty pieces nestled against a COZY—THAT’S THE FIRST IMPRESSION YOU pile of purple mashed potatoes, these elements linked get as you pull into the circular drive of the converted together with a flavorful merlot sauce. A pretty straight1800s farmhouse set amid a lush few acres of land. It’s forward preparation, to be sure—but talk about a comone that continues as you open the doors of Scarborough forting belly filler! Fair, with its dark wood and brick interior and curving Our bellies were perhaps too full for dessert, yet double staircases dotted with enticing seating alcoves. we persevered. After sampling the bread pudding and And it lasts right through your meal at the Sea Girt pecan pie, however, we decided we could have skipped restaurant as you’re served eclectic American fare that this final course. Both were fairly may not push the envelope but cernondescript, with the first being tainly entertains and comforts the S c a r b o r o u g h Fa i r more bread than pudding—and so, taste buds. 1414 Meetinghouse Road, Sea Girt; while tasty, it was too dense for this That’s how it was with our first 732-223-6658; www.scarboroughfair late in our eating adventure. The appetizer: veal sausage sautéed with restaurant.com pecan pie? A drizzling of chocolate mushroom and olives, all served over and caramel added little to the fairly a polenta cake. The woodsy porcinis Hours standard preparation. were a perfect complement to the DINNER: Tuesday through Friday, As we gazed up at the vaulted gamey chunks of meat, while the 11 a.m.–3 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, wood-beamed ceiling, we realized crustiness of the polenta helped sop 5–10 p.m.; Sunday, 3–9 p.m. what would have been the perup all the rich, hearty juices. fect dessert: the brie almondine. Even better were the shrimp What you should know And with that, we knew that next served atop artichoke hearts. The • Entrées range from $19 to $30 time we’d be able to sink back into jumbo crustaceans were cooked just • All major credit cards accepted total coziness. ■ right, their sea-salty freshness a good

Comfort food

• Private dining room available

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COURTESY OF SCARBOROUGH FAIR

• Reservations recommended


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ONE HOVCHILD PLAZA • 4000 ROUTE 66 • SUITE 125 • NEPTUNE, NJ 07753 732-918-2500 • WWW.FERTILITYNJ.COM

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where TO EAT If you’ve got a craving, there’s a dining establishmentin Monmouth County (or nearby) that will satisfy it. Turn to this listing next time you want a wonderful meal out.

A S B U R Y PA R K BISTRO OLÉ Latin-infused Spanish and Portuguese cuisine. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 230 Main St., Asbury Park · 732-897-0048 BRICKWALL TAVERN AND DINING ROOM American fare featuring a variety of steaks and salads. Major credit cards accepted. · 522 Cookman Ave., Asbury Park · 732-774-1264 CARMINE’S Italian favorites: Pasta, pizza and seafood. Major credit cards accepted. · 162 Main St., Asbury Park · 732-774-2222 JIMMY’S Italian cuisine featuring dishes like chicken scarpariello. Major credit cards accepted. · 1405 Asbury Ave., Asbury Park · 732-774-5051 LANGOSTA LOUNGE Vacation-inspired cuisine and libations. Major credit cards accepted. · 1000 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park · 732-455-3275 MARKET IN THE MIDDLE Innovative global cuisine with late-night tapas and wine bar. Major credit cards accepted. · 516 Cookman Ave., Asbury Park · 732-776-8886

accepted. · 270 Route 34 South, Colts Neck · 732-431-8755

burgers. Major credit cards accepted. · 33 West St., Monmouth Beach · 732-870-8999

I CAVALLINI Italian cuisine with seafood and pasta. Major credit cards accepted. · 29 Hwy. 34, Colts Neck · 732-431-2934

OAKHURST

FA I R H AV E N RAVEN & THE PEACH International fare featuring steak. Major credit cards accepted. · 740 River Rd., Fair Haven · 732-747-4666

FREEHOLD CAFÉ COLORÉ Unique Italian eatery. Try Veal Roberto. BYO. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 3333 Rt. 9 North, Freehold · 732-462-2233 THE GREYSTONE MANOR Continental cuisine featuring seafood and steaks. MC/V/ AMEX accepted. · 260 South St., Freehold · 732-431-1500 METROPOLITAN CAFÉ American cuisine with a Pacific Rim flair. · 8 East Main St., Freehold · 732-780-9400

HIGHLANDS

MOONSTRUCK American/Italian/ Mediterranean cuisine and cocktail lounge. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 517 Lake Ave., Asbury Park · 732-988-0123

BISTRO ON THE BAY Seafood and Italian cuisine featuring oysters, lobsters, clams and more. Major credit cards accepted except Diner’s Club. · 1 Willow St., Highlands · 732-872-1450

TAKA Stylish Japanese eatery. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 632 Mattison Ave., Asbury Park · 732-775-1020

CHILANGOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT Authentic Mexican fare. Major credit cards accepted. · 272 Bay Ave., Highlands · 732-708-0505

MIKE AND NELLIE’S Italian grill with entrées including prime steaks and seafood. BYO. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 1801 Hwy. 35, Oakhurst · 732-531-7251

RED BANK BIENVENUE Classic French cuisine featuring duck. BYO. Major credit cards accepted. · 7 East Front St., Red Bank · 732-936-0640 GAETANO’S Regional Italian Cuisine, featuring homemade pasta, ravioli, seafood, veal and chicken dishes. BYO. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 10 Wallace St., Red Bank · 732-741-1321 NICHOLAS New American cuisine featuring signature braised suckling pig. Major credit cards accepted. · 160 Rt. 35 South, Red Bank · 732-345-9977 RED American menu featuring seafood, sushi and steak. Major credit cards accepted. · 3 Broad St., Red Bank · 732-741-3232 TEAK Stylish restaurant featuring many flavors. Major credit cards accepted. · 64 Monmouth St., Red Bank · 732-747-5775

RUMSON

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS JULIA’S Elegant Italian and Mediterranean Dining. BYO. Major credit cards accepted. · 91 First Ave., Atlantic Highlands · 732-8721007

B AY H E A D GRENVILLE HOTEL & RESTAURANT American & French cuisine. BYO. Major credit cards accepted. · 345 Main Ave., Bay Head · 732-892-3100

BELMAR KLEIN’S Fresh fish, raw bar and sushi. Major credit cards accepted. · 708 River Rd., Belmar · 732-681-1177

DORIS & ED’S Contemporary American fare featuring seafood. Major credit cards accepted. · 348 Shore Dr., Highlands · 732-872-1565

KEYPORT

TRINITY RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE Inspired American fare. Major credit cards accepted. · 84 Broad Street, Keyport · 732-888-1998

THE QUAY Steak and seafood dishes with a location directly on the waterfront. MC/V/ AMEX accepted. · 280 Ocean Ave., Sea Bright · 732-741-7755 continued

L I T T L E S I LV E R

BRIELLE

LONG BRANCH

DUE AMICI Northern Italian with 10 nightly specials. Major credit cards accepted. · 420 Higgins Ave., Brielle · 732-528-0666

AVENUE Combining French and American traditions. Major credit cards accepted. · 23 Ocean Ave., Long Branch · 732-759-2900

MANASQUAN MAHOGANY GRILLE Creative grill cuisine, steaks and seafood. Major credit cards accepted. · 142 Main St., Manasquan · 732-292-1300

C O LT S N E C K

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MCLOONE’S RIVERSIDE New American cuisine featuring large lobsters. MC/V/AMEX accepted. · 816 Ocean Ave., Sea Bright · 732-842-2894 OCEAN AVENUE GRILL Modern, eclectic cuisine. Major credit cards accepted. · 1250 Ocean Ave., Sea Bright · 732-933-4400

RAY’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT AND MARKET Fresh seafood selection. No credit cards accepted. · 123–125 Markham Pl., Little Silver · 732-758-8166

GREEN MEADOWS RESTAURANT Continental cuisine featuring 1954 Steak. MC

SEA BRIGHT

DREW’S BAYSHORE BISTRO Cajuninfluenced fare. Major credit cards accepted. · 58 Broad Street, Keyport · 732-739-9219

MATISSE Ocean-front restaurant and catering. V/MC/AMEX accepted. · 1301 Ocean Ave., Belmar · 732-681-7680

SAND BAR RESTAURANT Seafood and American cuisine. House specialty: blackened mahi mahi bites. Major credit cards accepted. · 201 Union Ln. Brielle · 732-528-7750

SALT CREEK GRILLE American cuisine and seafood. Major credit cards accepted. · 4 Bingham Ave., Rumson · 732-933-9272

MONMOUTH BEACH SALLEE TEE’S GRILLE Pasta, seafood and


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Color by Rita Bustamante

Experience The Difference

where

Haircut by Cozmo

TO EAT c o n t i n u e d

Hairstyle & Makeup by Sarah Model Barbara D

SEA GIRT

Photo by Ed Kelly

FRATELLO’S RESTAURANT Italian fare featuring seafood. Major credit cards accepted. · 810 The Plaza, Sea Girt · 732-974-8833 SCARBOROUGH FAIR Eclectic American fare. Major credit cards accepted. · 1414 Meetinghouse Rd., Sea Girt · 732-223-6658

SHREWSBURY SAN REMO Italian cuisine. BYO. Major credit cards accepted. · 37 East Newman Spring Rd., Shrewsbury · 732-345-8200

SPRING LAKE BLACK TRUMPET New American cuisine featuring fresh seafood. BYO. MC/V/DC accepted. · 7 Atlantic Ave., Spring Lake · 732-449-4700

Z

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hair color & design studio

WHISPERS Modern American cuisine featuring seafood. BYO. Major credit cards accepted. · 200 Monmouth Ave., Spring Lake · 732-974-9755 ■

Visit us at our new location 22 East Main Street Freehold, NJ 07728

732.866.0099

WHERE TO EAT BY CUISINE

AMERICAN: Black Trumpet, Spring Lake • Brickwall Tavern and Dining Room, Asbury Park • Doris & Ed’s, Highlands • Drew’s Bayshore Bistro, Keyport • Mahogany Grille, Manasquan • Mcloone’s Riverside, Sea Bright • Matisse, Belmar • Metropolitan Café, Freehold • Nicholas, Red Bank • Ocean Avenue Grill, Sea Bright • Red, Red Bank • Sallee Tee’s Grille, Monmouth Beach • Salt Creek Grille, Rumson • Scarborough Fair, Sea Girt • Trinity Restaurant and Lounge, Keyport • Whispers, Spring Lake ASIAN: Taka, Asbury Park CONTINENTAL: The Greystone Manor, Freehold • Green Meadows Restaurant, Colts Neck • Raven & the Peach, Fair Haven FRENCH: Avenue, Long Branch • Bienvenue, Red Bank •

Grenville Hotel & Restaurant, Bay Head

ITALIAN: Café Coloré, Freehold • Carmine’s, Asbury Park • Due Amici, Brielle • Geatano’s, Red Bank • Fratello’s Restaurant, Sea Girt • I Cavallini, Colts Neck • Jimmy’s, Asbury Park • Mike and Nellie’s, Pakhurst • San Remo, Shrewsbury MEXICAN: Chilangos Mexican Restaurant, Highlands MULTI-ETHNIC: Bistro Olé, Asbury Park • Julia’s, Atlantic Highlands • Langosta Lounge, Asbury Park • Teak, Red Bank Market in the Middle, Asbury Park • Moonstruck, Asbury Park • Teak, Red Bank SEAFOOD: Bistro on the Bay, Highlands • Klein’s, Belmar •

Ray’s Seafood Restaurant and Market, Little Silver •

Sand Bar Restaurant, Brielle • The Quay, Sea Bright

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the BEST of 2009 MONMOUTH PARTY&EXPO

Presented by

Branches,

Monmouth Health & Life magazine and Monmouth Medical Center One night only! Thursday, June 25th V I P T I C K E T A D M I T T A N C E | 4:30 – 8:30 PM G E N E R A L A D M I T T A N C E | 6:30 – 8:30 PM

Tastings from the best restaurants! Tons of freebies & samples! Live entertainment! Win lots of prizes! TA S T E T H E B E S T

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3/6/09 11:44:10 AM 4/13/09 10:31:44 AM


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Be THERE M AY May 2 and 3—Journey back in time during A WEEKEND IN OLD MONMOUTH, a self-guided tour of county historical sites, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. FREE. Call 1-800-523-2587 or visit www.monmouthcountyparks.com for more information. May 17—Visit 11 of Spring Lake’s

qauint, historic inns—and meet a notable cookook author at each stop—at the third annual AUTHORS & INNS TOUR. Cost: $15. Call 732-449-2010 or visit www.historicinnsofspringlake.com for more information. May 17—Enjoy a day along the

waterfront with the SPOTLIGHT ON LYME 5K RUN/WALK, 9 a.m. at Pier Village in Long Branch, also featuring games, food and more. Fee: $30, $20 for children 13 and under. Visit www.lyme diseaseassociation.org/ Spotlight.html for more information. May 30—Laugh out

loud as 31 Broadway shows are acted out in 97 minutes during FORBIDDEN BROADWAY: 25TH ANNIVERSARY

DAVID GRISMAN QUINTET June 5—Experience “Dawg Music,” an innovative mix of swing, bluegrass,

Latin, jazz and gypsy sounds, 8 p.m. at the Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank. Tickets: $19.50 to $39.50. Call 732-842-9000 or visit countbasietheatre.org for more information. TOUR, 8 p.m. at Algonquin Arts in

Manasquan. Tickets: $45 for adults, $43 for seniors and students. Call 732-528-9211 or visit www.algonquin arts.org for more information. through May 31—Tour the STATELY HOMES BY-THE-SEA DESIGNER SHOW HOUSE at

Sheep’s Run (99 Rumson Road, Rumson), an H.T. Lindeberg– designed country house restored to its former glory by more than 50 interior designers and 12 landscape designers, benefiting Visiting Nurse Association of Central Jersey, Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $35 at the door; $30 for tickets purchased before April 28; $25 per person for groups; $20 for seniors. Call 732-

224-6791 or visit www.statelyhomes bythesea.com for more information.

JUNE June 5 to 9—Enjoy music, crafts, food and more at the 23rd annual RED BANK JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL at Marine Park in Red Bank. FREE. Call 732-933-1984 or visit www.redbankfestival.com for more information. June 13 and 14—Come hungry

to the NEW JERSEY SEAFOOD FESTIVAL, featuring live music, 45-plus seafood vendors, crafters and more, on Ocean Avenue between 5th and 6th Avenues in Belmar. FREE. Call 732-681-3700 or visit www.visitbelmarnj.com for more information. ■

MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND WINE AND DESSERTS May 9 and 10—Give Mom a day of delicious wine tasting and dessert sampling, 11 a.m.

to 5 p.m. at the Cream Ridge Winery in Cream Ridge. FREE. Call 609-259-9797 or visit www.creamridgewinery.com for more information.

Monmouth Health & Life, 110 Summit Avenue, Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201-782-5319; e-mail editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received four months in advance of the event and must include a phone number that will be published.

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Shopping GUIDE Craftsmanship • Functionality • Design

Well-dressed floors, pages 38–41 Tibetano, line available at Schwartz Design Showroom, Metuchen, 732-2050291; Marc Phillips, New York, 212-7524275; www.tibetano.com The Rug Company, line available at The Rug Company, New York, 212-274-0444; www.therugcompany.info ABC Carpet & Home, line available at ABC Carpet & Home, New York, 212473-3000, South Hackensack, 201-6413400; www.abchome.com Amy Helfand, 718-643-9577; www.amyhelfand.com Alicia D. Keshishian, 707-775-3494; www.adkcarpets.com Graviti Zone Rugs, +34 652 797 765; www.gravitizonerugs.com Odegard, line available at Odegard, New York, 212-545-0069; www.odegardinc.com

PLANTATION SHUTTERS and BLINDS LLC

To schedule your FREE consultation, contact us at (866) 215-4265 (732) 229-3630 www.MBShutters.com

Rug Art, line available at Holland and Sherry, New York, 212-355-6241; www.rug-art.net ■

Photo credits, QUIZ: What’s your design era? pages 34–37 Lamps: A, Akemi table lamp from Uttermost; B, Walnut and Nickel Deco Dome table lamp from Lamps Plus; C, Countess Retro Medley Giclee table lamp from Lamps Plus; D, Eclipse table lamp from Stonegate Designs Couches: A, Cromwell sofa from Edward Ferrell; B, Robert Scott CA, from Inside Art Deco: A Pictorial Tour of Deco Interiors From Their Origins to Today by Lucy D. Rosenfield, Schiffer Publishing (October 30, 2005); C, Retro Marshmellow sofa from Vintage Looks; D, CH103 sofa by Hans J. Wegner from Suite New York Side tables: A, Impero table from Lewis Mittman; B, Cosmo table from Lewis Mittman; C, Carrello Trolley by Azucena from Suite New York; D, Formstelle waitress table from Suite New York Chairs: A, Arosa dining arm chair from Lewis Mittman; B, Art Deco dining chair from Inside Art Deco: A Pictorial Tour of Deco Interiors From Their Origins to Today by Lucy D. Rosenfield, Schiffer Publishing (October 30, 2005); C, Arne Jacobsen Egg chair from Suite New York; D, Edit side chair by Philippe Cramer for Bernhardt Design Pendant lights: A, Sterling crystal chandelier from Schonbek; B, Deco inverted pendant from Meyda Tiffany; C, Classique pendant from Stonegate Designs; D, Caboche Collection suspension lamp by Patricia Urquiola and Eliana Gerotto from Suite New York Mirrors: A, antique gold-crackle traditional mirror from Bellacor; B, black and white mirror from Midnight Mirrors; C, Sunburst mirror from Baker Furniture; D, Cut-Twig wall mirror from West Elm ■

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What’s HAPPENING C H I L D B I R T H P R E PA R AT I O N / PA R E N T I N G Programs are held at Monmouth Medical Center, 300 Second Avenue, Long Branch. For fees and to register, call 732-923-6990 unless otherwise noted. ■

One-Day Preparation for Childbirth April 19, May

17, June 14, 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Two-Day Preparation for Childbirth (two-session program) May 2 and 9, June 6 and 13, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. ■ Preparation for Childbirth (five-session program) June 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30, 7:30–9:30 p.m. ■ Two-Day Marvelous Multiples May 31 and June 7, August 2 and 9, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. For those expecting twins, triplets or more. ■ Eisenberg Family Center Tours April 26, May 17, 31, June 28, 1:30 p.m. Free. (No children under age 14.) ■ Baby Fair June 11, 7–9 p.m. Free. For parents-to-be and those considering starting a family, featuring Eisenberg Family Center tours, refreshments and gifts. To register, call 1-888-SBHS-123. (No children under age 14.) ■ NEW: The Happiest Baby on the Block June 18, 7:30–9 p.m. Learn an extraordinary approach to keeping your baby happy. ■ Make Room for Baby April 25, May 16, June 20, 10–11 a.m. For siblings ages 3 to 5. ■ Becoming a Big Brother/Big Sister May 23, July 25, 10–11:30 a.m. For siblings age 6 and older. ■ Childbirth Update/VBAC May 13, July 8, 7:30–9:30 p.m. Refresher program including information on vaginal birth after cesarean. ■ Baby Care Basics (two-session program) April 18 and 25, 1–3 p.m. May 7 and 14, 7:30–9:30 p.m. ■ Breastfeeding Today June 4, 7–9:30 p.m. ■ Cesarean Birth Education April 22, June 17, 7:30– 9:30 p.m. ■ Grandparents Program May 11, July 13, 7–9 p.m. ■ Parenting Young Children Through S.T.E.P. (fivesession program) May 13, 20, 27, June 3 and 10, 7–9 p.m. Systematic Training for Effective Parenting from infancy to age 6. ■ Adoptive Parenting Two-session private program. ■ Gestational Diabetes Education Call the Center for Diabetes Education, 732-923-5025. Fee required. ■

at M o n m o u t h M e d i c a l C e n t e r

Monmouth Medical Center Community Health Fair

May 13, 11 a.m.–1 p.m., American Stroke Month and Cardiopulmonary Health Month, featuring free screenings of blood pressure, body composition and cholesterol (cholesterol limited to first 40 registrants) at the medical center’s ground floor lobby, 300 Second Avenue, Long Branch. Call 1-888-724-7123 for an appointment. ■ Free Child Car Seat Inspection May 21, June 18, July 16, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Long Branch Union Fire Company, 199 Union Avenue, Long Branch. Introduction to the World of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy June 8, 7:30 p.m. Spring Lake Public

Library, 1501 Third Avenue. Registration required; call 732-449-6654. ■ Diabetes Self-Management Series Four-session diabetes education program focusing on diet, nutrition, glucose monitoring, medications, meal plans, prevention/treatment of complications, dining out and exercise. For dates and times, call the Center for Diabetes Education at 732-923-5025. Fee required. S E N I O R H E A LT H Chronic Pain of the Neck and Back April 22, 1–3 p.m. Presented by Harris Bram, M.D., anesthesiology, Monmouth Medical Center. SCAN.* ■ Warning Signs of Heart Attacks and Strokes May 6, 1–3 p.m. Presented by The Primary Stroke Center, Monmouth Medical Center. SCAN.* ■

How to Combat Seasonal Allergy and Sinus Problems May 13, 1–3 p.m. Presented by Gary L.

Gross, M.D., allergy and immunology, Monmouth Medical Center. SCAN.* ■ The Essentials of Hearing May 20, 1–3 p.m. Presented by Alan B. Gertner, audiologist, Monmouth Medical Center. SCAN.* ■ Nature’s Healing Power June 3, 1–3 p.m. SCAN.* ■ Grandparenting in Today’s World June 10, 1–3 p.m. SCAN.* ■ Marlboro Township Senior Health and Wellness Day June 12, 8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Marlboro Recreation

SAFE KIDS Week Special Event May 2, 10 a.m.–

Center, 1996 Recreation Way. Registration required; call 732-617-0100. ■ Food’s Healing Properties June 22, 1–3 p.m. SCAN.* ■ Drumming for Health June 23, 1–3 p.m. SCAN.* ■ Sleeping Smart June 24, 1–3 p.m. Presented by Monmouth Medical Center’s Sleep Disorders Center. SCAN.* ■ Indigestion and Other Stomach Disorders June 25, 1–3 p.m. Presented by Gagan D. Beri, M.D., gastroenterology. SCAN.* ■ Healthy Feet as We Get Older June 26, 1:30–3 p.m. Presented by Frances C. Fittanto, podiatry. SCAN.*

2 p.m. Featuring safety demos, craft activities, free raffles and giveaways. Sponsored by Monmouth Medical Center’s SAFE KIDS chapter and The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center. Monmouth Mall near the food court, Routes 35 and 36, Eatontown.

*SCAN Learning Center (Senior Citizens Activities Network, age 50 and over) is located at Monmouth Mall, Eatontown. To register for programs, call 732-5421326. SCAN Membership is not required.

JUST FOR KIDS ■

Safe Sitter (one-session program) May 16, June 20,

9 a.m.–4 p.m. For 11- to 13-year-olds on responsible, creative and attentive babysitting. Call 1-888-SBHS123. $50/person. (Bring snack and bag lunch.) G E N E R A L H E A LT H ■

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Belmar NJ

the beach & beyond

2 3rd annual

Seafood NEW JERSEY

F E S T I V A L

Silver Lake Park

5th & Ocean Ave., Belmar

June 13 & 14, 2009 11am - 7pm

• Everything Jersey • New Jersey’s Top Restaurants • International Wines • Children’s Activity Tent • Live Music FREE ADMISSION FREE TROLLEY from Belmar Marina, Downtown, Belmar Train Station & Festival Sorry, no pets allowed

Presented by the     

"# $ $ %  &'$()*   +   ,-  #.      



     

Belmar Tourism Commission

www.visitbelmarnj.com or call 732-681-3700

 

                                   ! 

 



   

  

    

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For sponsor information please contact Spark Market Solutions: info@sparkmybiz.com

4/8/09 9:25:40 AM


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faces of MONMOUTH

Sweet success

R ed Bank mom Nancy Murphy helps children Katherine, 4, Michael, 6

(in red), and Matthew, 8, root through their loot following the town’s annual Easter Egg Hunt.

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CHRISTOPHER BARTH

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Monmouth Health & Life's May 2009 issue  

The Good Living Magazine from Monmouth Medical Center

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