Page 1

C E N T R A L J E R S E Y H E A LT H & L I F E

CENTRAL JERSEY

T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

SPRING 2017 | $3.95 CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

S P R I N G 2 0 17 T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

STYLE GUIDE

T H E FA S H I O N I S S U E

SPRING’S NEW COLORS & TEXTURES HOTTEST HEELS, FLATS & WEDGES GRAB THESE BAGS

ADVANCES IN PATIENT CARE Cover.0417.CEN.2.indd 2

3/23/17 3:23 PM


©2017 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated. NJ Lic.#13VH01080100, PA Lic.#PA049653

Experience the before and after

B E R NAR DSVI LLE NORTH FI E LD

CRAN B U RY

R I DG EWOOD

FAI R FI E LD

S

MT. LAU R E L

TH E MALL AT SHORT H I LLS

NJ071_Gallery_Sp Blogger_18x10.8_0217.indd 1

CaliClosets_SP_0417.indd 2

3/21/17 9:53 AM


See more stories #CCBeforeAfter

californiaclosets.com 8 0 0 . 2 74 . 6 7 5 4

2/3/17 10:19 AM

CaliClosets_SP_0417.indd 3

3/21/17 9:53 AM


Contents SPRING 2017

I N E V ERY I S S UE

7 1 0 4 4 4 6

34

FEATURES 16

20

22

The Saint Peter’s Foundation helps fund advances in patient care.

Warm weather’s return revives concerns about Zika virus and other insect-borne illnesses.

Meet a doctor who fancies ballet and a cardiologistturned-radio host.

THE MONEY BEHIND THE MEDICINE

19

TRE ATING CANCER AND SAVING HE ARTS A novel program at Saint Peter’s University Hospital helps protect breast cancer patients from cardiovascular damage.

2

DON’T BE BUGGED THIS SUMMER

21

GIVING BACK IS PART OF FIRM’S DNA

FACES OF SAINT PE TER’S

28

WHAT A FEELIN’

Check out this season’s flirty fashion trends featuring new colors and textures.

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

34

PLE ASE HOLD

These bags are perfect for stashing your stuff and still looking stylish.

36

STEP IT UP

Elevate your look with the season’s newest heels, flats and wedges.

Saint Peter’s will honor WithumSmith+Brown with prestigious award for community service.

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

TOC.0417.CEN.1.indd 2

3/27/17 11:38 AM


NO INSURANCE OR HIGH DEDUCTIBLES? PAYMENT OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Adult and Pediatric Trauma Plastic Surgery • Adult

and Pediatric Cuts (lacerations) anywhere on the body • Face, Nose and Jaw Fractures • Hand Injuries, Finger Injuries, Nerve and Tendon Cuts • Micro-Vascular and Micro-Neurosurgery • Dogbites, Industrial Injuries, Workers’ Compensation

You might be surprised how difficult it is to find a qualified and experienced Trauma Plastic Surgeon in case of an emergency. Take a photo of this ad, we hope you never need it... but if you do we’ll be happy to help. Atlantic Surgical Associates, PA

Boris Volshteyn, MD

107 Monmouth Road Suite 102, West Long Branch, NJ 07764 2 Lincoln Hwy Suite 508, Edison, NJ 08820 PLASTICSURGERYNEWYORKNEWJERSEY.COM

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Microsurgery Fellowship

Chief of Plastic Surgery, Meadowlands Medical Center

16 years of experience

732-641-3350

003_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 1

3/27/17 2:17 PM


Contents SPRING

38

26

DEPARTMENTS 14

27

Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in central New Jersey.

From lapis to crystals, you’ll want to rock these raw stones to add a wow factor to your accessories.

LOCAL BUZZ

24

JEWELRY BOX

GATHERINGS

38

25

Score major points with your family and friends when you serve these easy mini sandwiches at your next party.

Photos from recent charity and social events.

HOME FRONT

TASTES

Spruce up your home with a splash of Greenery. Pantone’s Color of the Year will surely liven any place.

26

BEAUTY

Time for a touch up? Skip the same old hairdo hues and try one of these new shades.

4

27

25

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

TOC.0417.CEN.1.indd 4

3/23/17 3:23 PM


Custom Decks & Porches Expertly crafted for function and fun

HOME IMPROVEMENTS, LLC. NJ HIC 13VH07609600

732.955.6321 www.LegendsBuilt.com

VISIT OUR SHOWROOM

399 Spotswood-Englishtown Rd., Suite 2 Monroe Township, NJ 08831 (BY APPOINTMENT ONLY)

New Jersey Realtors® We’ve shown our true colors for 100 years. New Jersey Realtors® is comprised of 48,000 members who’ve pledged to serve their clients with knowledge, experience, and responsibility. It’s this higher standard that separates a Realtor® from any other real estate agent.

njrealtor.com/truecolors

005_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 9

3/21/17 11:06 AM


Beautifully Designed and Installed Shower Enclosures Exercise/Ballet Mirrors Custom Fitted Mirrored Walls Elegant Glass Table Tops Call for FREE Estimate

COME SEE US AT EITHER OF OUR BEAUTIFUL SHOWROOMS: NESHANIC STATION

908-292-8102

843 ROUTE 202 SOUTH NESHANIC STATION, NJ 08853

LAWRENCEVILLE

609-450-3587

1811 PRINCETON AVENUE LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 08648

NJ HIL#12VH083785

006_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 2

www.GlassCastle.com

3/21/17 11:06 AM


SPH-1779 cjhl Guess Ad 3.875x10.875_SPH-1779 cjh&l Guess Ad 3.875x10.875 3/2/1

WELCOME LETTER

EXPANDING OUR MISSION S A I N T PE T ER’S H E A LT H CA R E SYST EM I S A G R OW I N G enterprise that benefits from the continuing community support that has been so important since its founding nearly 110 years ago. That is where the Saint Peter’s Foundation—and its caring donors—play a critical role in Saint Peter’s success. This edition of Central Jersey Health & Life magazine explores that all-important process of life-saving charity. It also shows our readers how they may play a part. Please turn to “Inside Look” (page 16) to learn about the Foundation’s purpose and goals, and how its mission is helping our region’s residents live healthier and safer lives through the establishment of vital clinical programs. The goodwill of our donors is especially important for Saint Peter’s, since we are a non-profit organization. However, despite our not-for-profit status, we are no less aggressive in attempting to expand our healing mission to the communities we serve. Several major projects to aid our community are on tap this year, for example, including the construction of an ultra-modern simulation center for the training of our area’s physicians, and the building of two new and larger operating rooms to handle our ever-increasing volume of surgeries. The “It is better to give” narrative doesn’t end there. The annual Saint Peter’s Gala—slotted on the calendar for Saturday, May 6—is the healthcare system’s ultimate fundraising event of the year. As such it annually honors key individuals and corporate entities who have contributed mightily to Saint Peter’s the institution. This year’s honorees are the certified public accounting firm of WithumSmith+Brown (“Up Close,” page 21), along with Debra Day-Salvatore, M.D., chair, Department of Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, and Dinesh Singal, M.D., director of the Cardio Metabolic Institute in Somerset. (Both are featured in “Faces of Saint Peter’s,” page 22.) Please read about the unique achievements of each. There is more, of course, to be found in this edition. Saint Peter’s has launched a novel program that addresses the recently recognized clinical relationship between cancer treatment and cardiac disease (“Tech Savvy,” page 19). And as spring re-emerges, so, too, does the threat of the Zika virus (“Seasonal Health,” page 20). Speaking of warmer weather, there is also plenty of food, decorating, fashion and related seasonal advice within these pages. Enjoy the magazine. And please think of Saint Peter’s for your healthcare needs.

Guess

what these countries have in common. Belarus Brazil Canada Germany Israel Lebanon Malaysia Mexico Netherlands Qatar South Africa Spain Trinidad United Kingdom United States

LESLIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE P R E S IDE N T A ND IN T E R I M C E O S A IN T P E T E R’S HE A LT H CA R E SYST E M

Turn the page and find out.

Welcome.0417.CEN.1.indd1 1 007_CJHL_SPRING17.indd

3/27/172:17 11:48 3/27/17 PMAM


SPH-1779 International Spread 16.75x10.875_SPH-1779 International Spread 16.75x10.875 3/2/17 12:31 PM Page 1

Saint Peter’s. Treating children f

When it comes to a child’s health, we have no boundaries. From all over the United States and across the world, kids are receiving their care at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital for specialized treatment of cancers, blood disorders, and neurological and orthopedic conditions.

008_009_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 2

Our world-renowned pediatric specialists keep current on the most advanced proven technologies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Because when it comes to a child’s health, our hospital has no boundaries.

3/21/17 10:58 AM

To o


n from all over the world.

.

s e

To learn more, call 732.565.KIDS (5437) or visit saintpetershcs.com/icjhl 254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 732.565.KIDS (5437) â– saintpetershcs.com

008_009_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 3

3/21/17 10:58 AM


EDITOR’S NOTE

FASHION FORWARD Union County Performing Arts Center, Rahway, N.J.

Live accompaniment by:

THERE’S A REASON WE titled this month’s fashion feature “What a feelin’”. What you wear affects your mood and certainly your confidence too! Typically in spring, we think about bright hues to break free of the winter doldrums. But in pulling this year’s new crop of clothes, we also focused on texture and fabric, and it turns out the choices are as varied as your many moods. Turn to page 28 for a peek. Meanwhile, what makes you feel your best? Is a great pair of high heels? (There’s also a lot to be said for the season’s new wedges that add height.) Or if you prefer stepping out in stylish flats, we found those too. See page 36. And in the season of rebirth, you can also update your look by trying a new haircolor. Check out the hues on page 26 for a little inspiration. Or look like a rock star when you wear a piece of jewelry (each featuring a raw stone) found on page 27. Springtime is also when we start to think about breathing new life into our living space. On page 25, we show you how to spruce up your home with a splash of “Greenery,” Pantone’s color of the year. Meteorologists promise a beautiful spring, and we promise you’ll love the issue. Enjoy!

RITA GUARNA EDITOR IN CHIEF EDITOR@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE SPONSORS: Performance Sponsor:

Official Print Sponsor:

Official Radio Sponsor:

TICKETS: ARBALLET.ORG | MCCARTER.ORG | UCPAC.ORG Editors.0417.CEN.1.indd 2 2 010_CJHL_SPRING17.indd

3/23/17 3:28 3:27 PM PM 3/23/17


JOIN OUR

ONLINE COMMUNITY! LIKE US ON FACEBOOK  CentralJerseyHealthandLife FOLLOW US ON TWITTER  @CentralNJH&L VIEW OUR BOARDS ON PINTEREST  HealthandLife SEE OUR PHOTOS ON INSTAGRAM  @HealthnLife

LEARN MORE ABOUT SPECIAL OFFERS, CONTESTS AND NEWS!

011_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 1

3/21/17 11:32 AM


CENTRAL JERSEY RITA GUARNA

SHAE MARCUS

SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

ART DIRECTOR

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PRESIDENT AND INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

ED I T O R I A L

ADVERTISING

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

MONICA DELLI SANTI

PETER CONNOLLY

EDITORIAL INTERN

DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROGRAMS

SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING

L AUR A A . DOWDEN

MICHELLE L A Z Z AROT TI

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS

ED ITOR I N C H I EF STEPHEN M. VITARBO

DARIUS AMOS

DANIELLE GALLO

LI Z DONOVAN, DAVID LE VINE, MARI S A S ANDOR A , TRUDY WAL Z ART

ART ASSISTANT

Y VONNE MARKI PRODUCTION

PUB LI S HER JODI BRUKER

LES LIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE

PHIL HARTMAN

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

MARKETING ASSOCIATE RICHARD IURILLI

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER

PRESIDENT, MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF

JACQUELYNN FI SCHER

CHRISTOPHER KOL AS A, M. D.

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR, AGENCY SERVICES

PRODUCTION/ART ASSISTANT

CONTROLLER AGNES ALVES

SAINT PETER’S HEALTH AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES CORPORATION

ACCOUNTANT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

CHRI STINE HAMEL

AL ANNA GIANNANTONIO

KI JOO KIM

MEGAN FRANK

STE VEN S. RADIN, ESQ.

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CATHERINE ROS ARIO

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT & CE O

BE SOCIAL

Join our online community! LIKE us on Facebook: CentralJerseyHealthandLife FOLLOW us on Twitter: @CentralNJHandL VIEW our boards on Pinterest: HealthandLife SEE our photos on Instagram: @HealthnLife

MARK DOWDEN S EN I O R V I CE P RESIDENTS S HAE MARCUS CARL OLSEN VICE PRESIDENTS NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA CHRI STINE HAMEL

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Central Jersey Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. CENTRAL JERSEY HEALTH & LIFE is published 3 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 11, Issue 1. © 2017 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Central Jersey: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Central Jersey Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

Masthead.0417.CEN.1.indd 1

3/27/17 11:39 AM


Sales & Installation

Tile Kitchens Baths Additions Kitchen Cabinets Design

KITCHEN & BATH RENOVATIONS 2 CONVENIENT KITCHEN SHOWROOMS

732-922-2020

353 HWY 35 EATONTOWN, NJ

Call For An Estimate

331 SOUTH AVE. GARWOOD, NJ

WWW.ALFANORENOVATIONS.COM

HIC REG / LIC / INSURED / LIC. #13VH06520300

START YOUR FREE* SUBSCRIPTION TODAY! *FREE TO RESIDENTS OF MIDDLESEX COUNTY. S I G N U P AT

HEALTHANDLIFEMAGS.COM/CENTRALJERSEY

013_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 9

3/21/17 11:07 AM


LOCALBUZZ CENTRAL JERSEY NEWS

REVIEWS

TIPS

TRENDS

editor’s pick

That’s the Spirit The next time you fancy a stiff drink, consider turning it into a day-long experience at a local distillery. Sourland Mountain Spirits Distillery, one of the first farm distilleries in New Jersey since prohibition, opened this March on Double Brook Farm in Hopewell. The craft distillery offers handcrafted gin and vodka, as well as souvenirs, tastings and half-hour tours running from noon–4 p.m. The founder of the distillery, Ray Disch, had the idea for it shortly after craft distilling became legal in New Jersey in 2013. The Double Brook Farm property also boasts the Troon Brewing Company and the Brick Farm Tavern & Bar, so visitors can enjoy a meal, cocktails and beer in addition to a tour of the distillery. Sourland Mountain Spirits, 130 Hopewell-Rocky Hill Rd., Hopewell, 609.333.8575; sourlandspirits.com

National Soft Pretzel Month Few food scents rival chestnuts roasting on an open fire, but the aroma of a hot soft pretzel comes close. Perhaps the two are in a knotted tie! Be sure to get your fix of this doughy, delicious delight in April, National Soft Pretzel Month. They’re easy to find in Central Jersey. You can visit an Auntie Ann’s Soft Pretzels at Menlo Park Mall in Edison or at Bridgewater Commons in Bridgewater. If you prefer the Philly Pretzel Factory, they’re plentiful in the area, with locations in Edison, Westfield, Trenton and Skillman. Of course, you’ll likely spot a vendor or two at a ballpark, carnival or fair. Most pretzel makers will even let you watch as they flip, twist and tie the treats before they’re baked. The only dilemma: Will you eat it plain, with mustard or another dipping sauce? Enjoy!

14

THIS MAKES PERFECT SCENTS

Isn’t it a shame that the perfume you searched high and low for wears off in a matter of hours? Yes, we know all about the laws of evaporation, but it would be ideal if the perfect scent could last longer. We’ve found a solution: FragranceLock is an unscented finishing spray that’s applied after you spritz on your favorite perfume or cologne. When the spray dries, it creates a breathable net of sorts that “locks” the fragrance against the skin and slows the evaporation rate. The result is a scent that lasts more than twice as long. “It really works,” reports Central Jersey Health & Life Editor in Chief Rita Guarna. “No more will I lament my scent not lasting.”

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Buzz.0417.CEN.1.indd 14

3/27/17 3:36 PM


Get linked in Ready to get into the swing of spring? Golf enthusiasts can tee off at a wealth of public courses available to players in Central Jersey. “I know I’m not a pro golfer,” says Brian Summa, 36, of Westfield, “but I love being outside and bonding with friends on the course.” Take a look at the list below. How many have you played? Union County: Ash Brook (Scotch Plains), Galloping Hill (Kenilworth) Middlesex County: Tamarack (East Brunswick), The Meadows (Plainsboro), Raritan Landing (Piscataway) Somerset County: Warrenbrook (Warren), Green Knoll (Bridgewater), Quail Brook and Spooky Brook (Somerset) and Neshanic Valley (Neshanic Station), Hunterdon County: Heron Glen (Ringoes), Beaver Brook (Annandale), High Bridge Hills (High Bridge) Mercer County: Mercer Oaks West & East (West Windsor), Mountain View (Ewing), Princeton Country Club (Princeton)

Book it!

Let’s face it, technology has transformed the way we read. (We’re looking at you, smartphones, tablets and e-readers!) Vanishing are paper books and periodicals, and disappearing with them are the big-name stores that raised previous generations of bookworms. But Central Jersey is home to a handful of independent bookstores that have bucked that trend. Here are some of our favorites: The Town Book Store (270 E. Broad St., Westfield, 908.233.3535; townbookstore.com). This town fixture has been in business since 1934 (it’s now across the street from its original location) and offers a well-curated selection of books, plus frequent author appearances and a friendly staff. The Cranbury Bookworm (79 N. Main Street, Cranbury, 609.655.1063; cranburybookworm.com). This used bookstore, in business since 1974, moved into a turn-of-the-century general store in 2013 and is the same eclectic treasure-trove that it was in its many years in an old Victorian home down the street. You can’t go in wanting anything specific, but you’re

Culinary Corner

Italian fare with a modern twist—that’s the goal of Piattino, a Mendham favorite that recently opened a second location in Summit, across the street from the Summit train station. Italian favorites like Neapolitan-style pizzas and sandizzas (their version of a panini) baked in a stone-fired oven are served alongside dishes like Bianco Truffled Carbonara (orchiettte, pancetta, sweet peas in a truffle-infused cream sauce with parmigiano reggiano) and Seafood Fregola (jumbo shrimp, lobster tail, charred fennel, roasted tomato and lobster broth). Hankering for a cocktail? Cozy up to the large bar where drinks are infused with house-made simple syrups, fresh fruit and herbs, or choose from the extensive wine list, handed to you on an iPad. The “do-it-yourself” charcuterie and cheese board makes for a fun night out with friends, and in the warmer months would be perfect to enjoy with that glass of wine on the outdoor patio. The latest offering from the 40 North Restaurant Group, Piattino has been busy since it opened in January and is clearly a welcome addition to the Summit dining scene. Piattino, 67 Union Place, Summit, 908.219.4801; piattinonj.com

sure to walk out with something wonderful. The Cloak & Dagger (349 Nassau St., Princeton, 609.688.9840; thecloakanddagger. com) Love mysteries? Don’t miss this bookstore in a 100-year-old home that primarily stocks new mystery paperbacks. They also carry mystery audiobooks, gifts and collectibles. As the website says, “It would be a crime not to check it out!” The Bookworm (99 Claremont Rd., Bernardsville, 908.766.4599; bookwormbernardsville.com). Cozy charm, new and used books, knowledgeable staff who will swiftly order anything they don’t have— you can’t go wrong in this gem of a bookstore in Bernardsville. The Clinton Book Shop (12 E. Main St., Clinton, 908.735.8811; clintonbookshop.com) This book shop in downtown Clinton has been around for almost 50 years and features helpful booksellers, Rob and Harvey, plus author visits and even organized book clubs where members receive a 20 percent discount on their club purchase. CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Buzz.0417.CEN.1.indd 15

|

SPRING 2017

15

3/23/17 3:25 PM


INGOODHEALTH

Clockwise, from top right, James Choma, chief development officer and executive director of Saint Peter’s Foundation; Stephanie Medianka, grants manager; Emily Lyssikatos, associate executive director; Alyssa Collevechio, stewardship coordinator; and Michael Loch, director of annual giving.

16

JOHN JOHN O’BOYLE O’BOYLE

PAT I E N T C A R E AT S A I N T P E T E R’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 16

3/27/17 11:39 AM


INSIDE LOOK

The money behind the medicine

JOHN JOHN O’BOYLE O’BOYLE

THE SAINT PETER’S FOUNDATION HELPS FUND ADVANCES IN PATIENT CARE.

HE ALTH CARE IS E XPENSIVE. ALL hospitals rely on donations from their community to help fund new construction, purchase big-ticket technology, and otherwise offset the high costs of providing exceptional care. For a not-for-profit provider such as Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, those donations are especially important. Thankfully, Saint Peter’s Foundation extends a helping hand in numerous ways. Established in 1981, Saint Peter’s Foundation is the philanthropic arm of the Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. It builds on the system’s Catholic ministry and tradition of compassionate care by cultivating and distributing resources to advance the delivery of healthcare services. “The foundation is an integral part of our mission,” says Leslie D. Hirsch, FACHE, president and interim CEO of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. “As a not-for-profit, the hospital relies on the goodwill of individuals and institutions to support its mission.” The foundation is charged with encouraging that goodwill. In recent years, the foundation has worked to better integrate itself with the stated needs of the system, Hirsch says. “It has aligned its purposes with the greater strategic goals of the institution,” he says. “There is a real synergy between the operational needs of the healthcare system and the fundraising mechanism that is in place.” The foundation is led by its own board, composed of members of the community. “The board itself is reflective of the generosity of the community that Saint Peter’s has been blessed with for more than a century,” Hirsch says. He credits James Choma, chief devel-

opment officer and executive director of Saint Peter’s Foundation, with improving that synergy. “Under Jim, the foundation has become more sophisticated in its operations,” Hirsch says. “The number of staff involved has increased and their roles have been better defined. They have a sophisticated methodology to assess needs and set realistic goals, and then they go out and work very diligently to raise money to meet those goals.” The goals for 2017 are ambitious. The system has identified two specific needs for which the foundation will try to raise funds:

“THE BOARD ITSELF IS REFLECTIVE OF THE GENEROSITY OF THE COMMUNITY THAT SAINT PETER’S HAS BEEN BLESSED WITH FOR OVER A CENTURY.” —LESLIE D. HIRSCH

THE SIMULATION CENTER FOR INTER-PROFESSIONAL LEARNING. Saint Peter’s recently began construction on this state-of-the-

art center for professional advancement. Medical education has made significant advances over the past decade with the use of simulation technologies, which allow providers to learn and practice procedures on lifelike mannequins to obtain skills and confidence through a simulated environment. In addition, simulation scenarios can be created to teach bedside medicine. The ultimate goal of a simulation center is to promote the development of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. It can be structured to meet the educational needs of all healthcare staff. The Simulation Center will have three separate and distinct platforms. 1. The Institute for Bedside Medicine (IBM). The institute will improve medical interviewing, a core clinical skill that is the most important single source of diagnostic data and the means through which providers elicit a patient’s partnership and participation in the process of care. The goal of the IBM is to promote, teach, evaluate, and certify clinical skills at every level, from medical students to residents to practicing physicians. 2. The Institute for Technical Simulation (ITS). Simulation, whether it involves the use of patients or high-fidelity simulation technology, has emerged as an essential component of all levels of medical education and assessment. The ITS will use state-of-the-art equipment to teach and evaluate the procedural skills of a healthcare worker. All sessions occurring in the center can be viewed, recorded and replayed for learning purposes. 3. The Medical Library for Healthcare Providers and Patients. The medical

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 17

|

SPRING 2017

17

3/27/17 11:39 AM


INSIDE LOOK

library will provide a full range of information services to the Saint Peter’s community: hospital employees and affiliated physicians, patients and their families, and the public. Professional medical librarians will staff the library, which will offer myriad traditional and online resources. Patients will be able to access authenticated information about their illnesses and procedures, and watch a video about the experience they are about to have. The foundation’s goal is to raise $1.8 million for construction, Choma says. “We are also looking for a major naming donor,” he adds, which will require a $5 million, multiyear commitment. “We want a state-of-the-art center and, if we can, to partner with a naming donor to then roll out more programs and technology,” he says.

TWO NEW OPERATING ROOMS (OR). As both the number and the complexity of surgery options offered at Saint Peter’s has increased rapidly, the hospital needs new, larger operating rooms to handle the volume and the new technology. For instance, Saint Peter’s specializes in a type of scoliosis surgery that is less invasive, shortening the recovery time from six months to six weeks. Only a handful of surgeons in the world are able to perform this procedure and, as a result, “We have people coming here for this from all over world,” Choma says. There is also need for a new pediatric orthopedic OR at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “These surgical specialists are hard to come by,” he says. “Saint Peter’s has them and they need more room to practice. These new ORs will need about $5 million in foundation support,” Choma says. Where does all that money come from? “We solicit different groups—individuals, corporations and foundations,” says Emily Lyssikatos, associate executive director of Saint Peter’s Foundation. “Some gifts come as a grant. We also solicit community groups that come together, like a school, to host a benefit to donate things like toys for the holidays.” The foundation supports about 50 individual and group

THE GIFT OF GIVING Saint Peter’s Foundation, by the numbers: n Between 2,400 and 2,800 donors annually. n Raised between $3.1 million and $5 million in support annually over the past three years. n Raised just more than $5 million in 2016. n Proceeds from the four major fundraising events grossed $677,000 last year.

events during the holidays and about 150 over the entire year. It also hosts four major fundraising events annually: the spring Saint Peter’s Gala, two golf outings and, new last year, a fall children’s fashion show to benefit the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Donations come from staff members as well. “Our staff gives back in many ways, particularly in local walks and other events, and also in our employee fundraising campaign,” she says. The campaign is held during the month of November to coincide with “Giving Tuesday” in the United States, a one-day national movement celebrated on the Tuesday fol-

lowing Thanksgiving to focus on charitable giving. In 2014, its first year, more than 700 Saint Peter’s employees donated in excess of $630,000, far beyond the goal of $500,000, which went to the expansion of the Saint Peter’s University Hospital Emergency Department. Fundraising, as anyone who has done it knows, can be tough. Lyssikatos gets inspiration from the hospital itself. “Amazing things go on here every day,” she says. “I go to the NICU or walk around the hospital and I realize we are here to help staff take better care of patients. That is what our foundation’s purpose is ultimately about.”

JOHN O’BOYLE

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE SAINT PETER’S FOUNDATION, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8542.

TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

18

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 18

3/27/17 11:40 AM


TECH SAVVY

Treating cancer and saving hearts A NOVEL PROGRAM HELPS PROTECT BREAST CANCER PATIENTS FROM CARDIOVASCULAR DAMAGE TREATING CANCER IS A DIFFICULT TASK, not least because the treatments themselves are so unhealthy. Many chemotherapies, for example, put cancer patients at risk for developing heart disease. In fact, with many forms of cancer, the risk of death from a cardiovascular cause exceeds that of tumor recurrence. In response, Saint Peter’s University Hospital recently launched a new cardio-oncology program designed to protect the cardiovascular health of patients undergoing surgical, radiation or chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. Saint Peter’s is the first hospital in central New Jersey to create a center dedicated to the

cardiac imaging of cancer patients. In this program, patients undergoing therapy at Saint Peter’s Breast Center will have advanced echocardiograms using a new software called strain imaging. The echocardiograms will be offered at the Women’s Imaging Center, located in the same suite as the breast center in the Center for Ambulatory Resources (CARES) next to the hospital. The field of cardio-oncology entails partnership among oncologists, cardiologists and primary care providers in the treatment of cancer patients. “We believe that with advanced technology, early detection and

JOHN O’BOYLE

Artist Cindy Muglia, who created original artwork for the cardio-oncology waiting room, is seen with David Jacob, M.D., chief of cardiology at Saint Peter’s University Hospital.

patient education we can lower this risk and help protect many hearts,” says Nidhi Kumar, M.D., a cardiologist and medical director of women’s health at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Another hallmark of this program centers around wellness. “Our goal is to treat the whole patient, not just the cancer,” she says. To that end, Saint Peter’s created a special environment where these tests will take place to promote wellness and inspire healing. “Our goal was to offer our patients more just than another waiting room, as waiting rooms are often impersonal, uncomfortable and at times anxiety provoking,” Dr. Kumar says. “Instead we created a space to promote healing through art.” Patients can use art supplies to create their own artwork while they wait. Medical professionals are beginning to recognize the role that art plays in the healing process. “Studies have found that patients can explore the meaning of their disease, gain greater insight and express their feelings in a symbolic manner through art therapy,” she says. Saint Peter’s also added more comfortable furniture with an emphasis on beauty and design. “The ultimate goal is to give patients an experience that inspires and uplifts them to help them heal,” she says. “Saint Peter’s is known for its dedication to finding the best treatments for women— we are a women and children’s hospital,” says Scarlett Szymanski, director of ambulatory oncology, radiology, cardiology and the breast center. “Now we are the first in Central Jersey to have this advanced technology. That’s huge. We always strive to do the best for our patients, and with this technology we are able to go in earlier and maybe prevent long-term side effects from oncology drugs.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 19

|

SPRING 2017

19

3/27/17 3:36 PM


SEASONAL HEALTH

DON’T BE BUGGED this summer

WARM WEATHER’S RETURN REVIVES CONCERNS ABOUT ZIKA VIRUS AND OTHER INSECT-BORNE ILLNESSES. it easier to spot tiny ticks should they stick on clothing. Insect repellant containing DEET (the chemical N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide) also helps, though DEET should not be applied to children. Finally, do a thorough body inspection after any time spent in tick-friendly areas. “Ticks need to be embedded for long periods, 36 to 48 hours sometimes, before they transmit disease,” says Peter Wenger, M.D., pediatric infectious disease specialist at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “So if you spot them crawling around, you have time to get rid of them.” Check children, too, behind the ears and under hair, Dr. Alcid adds. “Ticks are tiny. They can be mistaken for a mole, so know your moles to differentiate them from ticks.” The same measures apply to mosquito prevention, along with avoiding brightly colored clothing, which mosquitoes find attractive, and scented perfumes and body washes, which they consider delicious. Also try to prevent the bugs from breeding on your property by removing any standing water from rain gutters and barrels, old tires, buckets, toys, bird baths, or any other container where mosquitoes lay their eggs. When indoors, keep windows and doors closed or securely screened.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

20

JOHN O’BOYLE

THE ADVENT OF WARM WEATHER BRINGS MANY WELCOME treats. But insects aren’t one of them. More than just annoying, mosquitoes and ticks carry bugs of their own, like the viruses and bacteria that cause Zika, West Nile, Lyme and other diseases. According to David Alcid, M.D., adult infectious disease specialist at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, ticks in our neck of the woods carry four potentially serious diseases: Lyme, babesiosis, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis. Zika, West Nile and a form of encephalitis are the primary mosquito-borne illnesses. Symptoms for these range from none at all to flu-like. Complications, however, can be long-lasting and in some cases potentially fatal. But don’t let that keep you locked indoors all summer. “People shouldn’t be fearful,” Dr. Alcid says. “There are ways to defend against these things, so there is no reason to be afraid. Just know what you’re doing and you should be fine.” Prevention is job one. While it is not possible to guarantee full protection, it is relatively easy to keep bug bites at a minimum. With ticks, that means avoiding the grassy and wooded areas in which they live. When you do venture into the woods, wear long pants tucked into your shoes, long-sleeve shirts and hats to keep skin covered. Light colors are recommended because they make

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 20

3/27/17 11:40 AM


UP CLOSE

Giving back is part of firm’s DNA SAINT PETER’S TO HONOR WITHUMSMITH+BROWN WITH PRESTIGIOUS AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE. LIKE MOST COMPANIES, THE ACCOUNTING FIRM WithumSmith+Brown, Certified Public Accountants and Consultants, strives to follow a set of core values. For Withum, as it is known, there are three such values: commitment to clients, commitment to staff and commitment to community. Giving back “is part of our DNA,” says Bill Hagaman, managing partner and CEO of Withum. One of the many beneficiaries of the company’s support has been Saint Peter’s University Hospital—over the years, Withum has given a total of $223,250 to the Saint Peter’s Foundation. Saint Peter’s will offer its thanks and honor Withum with the prestigious Bishop’s Award at the annual Spring Gala on May 6. Withum made its first gift to Saint Peter’s in 1988 and it has been a generous donor throughout the years, supporting Saint Peter’s Foundation events through sponsorships, memorial gifts and capital project pledges. It recently pledged $50,000 toward the new Emergency Department at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Commitment to the community has been part of the firm since Fred Withum founded it in 1974, Hagaman says. “I started here in 1980 and after I passed my CPA exam the first thing Fred asked me was ‘what are you doing for the community?’ I try to pass that down to the rest of our people,” he says. The company promotes a “Withum Week of Caring” during the Thanksgiving holiday, when all staff are encouraged to take time away from the office and give back or volunteer in their community. The Withum Community Outreach Group helps unite team members with various nonprofit organizations throughout the states in which they practice to volunteer and promote the mission of both Withum and the nonprofits they support. Jim Hannan, a partner at Withum, was a long-time member of the Foundation board. “The firm was already supportive of Saint Peter’s when I joined [in 2001], so there was a common denomi-

WithumSmith+Brown’s Bill Hagaman and Jim Hannon.

nator between our family and the firm,” Hannan says. “It was a nobrainer to get involved at a higher level. Personally, I feel blessed to be associated with a firm that doesn’t focus just on the bottom line but also on the communities in which we live.” “Withum should be the showcase as a company committed to social responsibility,” adds James Choma, chief development officer and executive director of Saint Peter’s Foundation. “We are fortunate to be a recipient of their charitable support. At the gala, we want to thank the companies that support us.” Hagaman’s response is: “Withum is humbled by the honor. Receiving the Bishop’s Award is a reflection of the many kindhearted, generous team members of our firm who support great charitable organizations like Saint Peter’s Foundation. On behalf of the entire Withum partner group, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. We are grateful to be associated with Saint Peter’s.”

WithumSmith+Brown’s Commitment to Communities

JOHN O’BOYLE

“Our team members are strongly encouraged to engage in philanthropic endeavors which positively impact the not-forprofits and charitable organizations within their communities. Giving back nurtures a better understanding of their mission, and a stronger sense of compassion toward the people and communities which they serve.” —WithumSmith+Brown

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8542 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 21

|

SPRING 2017

21

3/27/17 11:40 AM


FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Debra Day-Salvatore, M.D. MEDICAL GENETICS AND GENOMIC MEDICINE

BUSY DOCTORS NEED TO STAY ON THEIR TOES and few are better trained for that than DebraLynn Day-Salvatore, M.D., chair of the Department of Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. She has been a ballet dancer since age 4 and she still dances in her at-home studio. Dr. Day-Salvatore grew up in West New York, and attended Harvard University and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. She completed her residency at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and earned a Ph.D. from NYU’s Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Science. She and her husband, Francis Paul Salvatore Sr., M.D., a retired ob/gyn, live in Princeton. Dr. Day-Salvatore has been selected as one of the physician honorees for this year’s Saint Peter’s Spring Gala. WHAT DOES THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL GENETICS AND GENOMIC MEDICINE PROVIDE FOR PATIENTS?

We offer comprehensive genetics services, including evaluation, diagnosis, management, treatment, counseling and emotional support for patients of all ages with rare diseases and known or suspected genetic conditions. These can include birth defects, chromosome abnormalities, autism, cancer, metabolic disorders, hearing impairments, genetic bone disorders, and diseases of the heart, lungs, brain, kidneys, muscles, eyes, skin, and gastrointenstinal tract—virtually any medical condition can be genetically influenced. I receive referrals from many sources. We have an excellent collaborative relationship with all specialists and generalists in pediatric and adult medicine. TELL US ABOUT YOUR INTEREST IN DANCE.

I have been dancing for decades. I started with ballet and tap, and I dabbled in Latin ballroom along the way. But I always go back to ballet—it instills discipline and remains one of my artistic outlets. WHY DID YOU BUILD A STUDIO IN YOUR HOME?

— DEBRA DAY-SALVATORE, M.D.

22

DO YOU PERFORM?

Many years ago I did. I am way past my prime as a dancer. I no longer dance for an audience—today, I dance for me. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BALLET?

I always loved The Nutcracker. It is filled with magic and hope for the future. And, unlike most fairy tales, it features a heroine rescuing her prince … on Christmas Eve no less—what could be better than that?

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

I STARTED WITH BALLET AND TAP, AND I ALSO LEARNED LATIN BALLROOM DANCING. BUT I ALWAYS GO BACK TO BALLET—IT TEACHES DISCIPLINE AND IT’S AN ARTISTIC EXPRESSION.

It was difficult to dance while I was in medical school and residency, so when my husband and I purchased a house, we renovated part of the basement into a dance studio so I can go any time, day or night, and work out. It allows me to relax and clears my head. That’s my time.

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 22

3/27/17 3:36 PM


Dinesh Singal, M.D. CARDIOLOGIST

DINESH SINGAL, M.D., FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR of the Cardio Metabolic Institute in Somerset, a member of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System’s Physician Associates network, moonlights as the co-host of a biweekly, one-hour radio show that broadcasts to the regional South Asian population on all sorts of medical topics. Dr. Singal, who grew up and attended medical school in India, did his residency at Lincoln Hospital in New York, his cardiology fellowship at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago and an interventional cardiology fellowship at the University of Rochester. He and his wife, Renu Singal, a reference librarian, have two adult children. Dr. Singal has been selected as one of the physician honorees for this year’s Saint Peter’s Spring Gala. DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BE A DOCTOR?

In high school in India you had to decide at a very young age what career path to take. We joke that in India there are doctors, engineers, accountants and then everyone else. My father told me that I would never go hungry if I became a doctor because I would always have a job. I was only 15 at the time. I studied hard and was accepted at the premier medical school in India. HOW DID YOU GET YOUR START ON RADIO?

The station reached out to me to start a medical show about 15 years ago. It started as a half-hour cardiology show. It caught on and was eventually expanded to an hour. I asked Dr. Meena Murthy, an endocrinologist with Saint Peter’s, to join me as cohost. It has morphed over time into a broad-based medical show with guests from other specialties, who discuss a subject and answer questions from callers. WHAT MAKES THE SHOW APPEALING FOR YOU TO DO?

I learn so much from others in areas of medicine I don’t know. And there have been instances where people called and said they learned something that helped change their lives dramatically. Most people listen in their car, and people have told me they come home and sit in the car until the program is finished. It is a nice feeling when people tell you they enjoy the program and benefit from it. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE PROGRAM AT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/HEARTBEATRADIOSHOW AND LISTEN TO PAST PROGRAMS AT HEARTBEATRADIOSHOW.COM.

BOHM-MARRAZZO PHOTOGRAPHY

IT IS A NICE FEELING WHEN PEOPLE TELL YOU THEY ENJOY THE PROGRAM. — DINESH SINGAL, M.D. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

IGH.0417.CEN.1.indd 23

|

SPRING 2017

23

3/27/17 11:41 AM


GATHERINGS AT SAINT PETER’S MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL Northwestern Mutual recently donated $40,000 to The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital in support of a full-time dedicated pediatric oncology child life specialist. The pediatric oncology specialist works with pediatric oncology patients in any part of the hospital, whether they enter through the emergency department or are an inpatient or an outpatient. Child life specialists are pediatric healthcare professionals who work with children and families in hospitals and other settings to help them cope with the challenges of hospitalization, illness and disability. Pictured, from left, are: Karen Kastenbaum, APN, pediatric hematologyoncology; Nibal Zaghloul, M.D., division chief, pediatric hematology-oncology; Leslie Hirsch, president and interim CEO of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System; Joseph Savino, managing partner, Northwestern Mutual– Princeton; Joanne Savino, chief marketing officer/strategy manager, Northwestern Mutual–Princeton; Lauren Kane, BS, CCLS, child life specialist; and James Choma, chief development officer and executive director of Saint Peter’s Foundation.

A DAY IN DENIM TO BATTLE RARE DISEASES All students at St. Matthias School in Franklin Township wore blue jeans and raised $2,436.19 through their individual donations at “Jeans for Genes Day” on Friday, Feb. 24. Those funds were donated toward research efforts at the Saint Peter’s University Hospital Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine program. Students heard from Kristen Ondy, a licensed genetics counselor at Saint Peter’s, and Andrea Siering, a registered dietician at the hospital, who explained the life-saving importance of genetics testing and treatment. Saint Peter’s operates one of the most comprehensive clinical genetic services in the Northeast, having treated more than 34,000 individual patients since 1992. Services include evaluation, diagnosis, management, treatment, counseling, and emotional support for more than 2,000 different conditions. Pictured, from left, are: St. Matthias School Principal Sister Jean Laurich, SSJ; Student Council President Sebastien Rateau; Vice President Jaren Buliyat; Secretary Ava Abreu; Treasurer Ariana Borromeo, and Saint Peter’s counselors Ondy and Siering.

MIND OVER MATTER Sleep expert Carol Ash, M.D., addresses the audience at a March 1 fundraiser for Elijah’s Promise Soup Kitchen in New Brunswick that was sponsored by Saint Peter’s University Hospital and The Wellness Project, a collection of physicians and healthcare experts who have banded together to promote holistic healing and its benefits as an approach to well-being. More than 200 people attended the three-hour event held in the Sister Marie de Pazzi Conference Center at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. Speakers covered topics including the use of “flow” (a new way of meditation), how certain cutting-edge technologies can enable health and wellness, holistic approaches to strengthening the body, and the significance of dreams for overall mental and physical health. FOR INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS SPONSORED BY SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM, GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM/COMMUNITY-CALENDAR.

24

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

SPUHgather.0417.CEN.1.indd 24

3/27/17 3:37 PM


HOME FRONT HOUSE OF TROY SCATCHARD STONEWARE TABLE L AMP Aura Lighting, Green Brook, 732.529.6877

CYNTHIA ROWLEY FOR HOOKER FURNITURE LIVING ROOM SHERIDAN T WO-DOOR CHEST Thomasville Home Furnishings, Woodbridge, 732.726.0200

GREEN SCENE

SAY HELLO TO PANTONE’S COLOR OF THE YEAR: GREENERY. LET THE SPRUCING BEGIN.

KITCHENAID ARTISAN SERIES 5-QUART STAND MIXER Adam’s T V and Appliances, Middlesex, 732.968.1300

SAFAVIEH L ARGE TRADITIONAL RUG S. K. Hamrah Carpet & Rug Co., Plainfield, 908.756.8000

FURNITURE OF AMERICA NOL A ROUND FAUX LEATHER OTTOMAN All Brands Furniture, North Brunswick, 732.543.2150

SLICK ACCENT TABLE JCPenney, Woodbridge, 732.636.6000

JONATHAN ADLER ZEBRA POP THROW PILLOW jonathanadler.com SLUB VELVET MINA SETTEE Anthropologie, North Brunswick, 732.565.9870 CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Homefront.0417.CEN1.indd 25

|

SPRING 2017

25

3/21/17 9:02 AM


BEAUTY

’DOS TO DYE FOR TIME FOR A TOUCH UP? SKIP THE SAME OLD HUE AND TRY ONE OF THESE NEW SHADES.

EXTRA PLATINUM BLONDE Bored with blonde? Lighten up your look even more by going extra platinum blonde— or almost white—with your color. It’s bold, it’s edgy, and it’s whitehot now. No wonder celebrities like Taylor Swift and Kylie Jenner were dyeing to try it.

THE NEW GRAY Going gray is no longer something to fear. In fact, it’s something to try! The hashtag #grannyhair on Instagram has more than 200,000 posts by women who have dyed their hair gray, and celebs like Cara Delevingne and Pink have tried the trend.

‘BRONDE’ Not blonde and not brunette, bronde is something in between—something very flattering and low maintenance, say color experts. The light and dark tones highlight the face and give hair more dimension so it looks thicker (like Gisele’s). Sign us up!

THE ALMOST BLACK BRUNETTE Want to be the fairest of them all? Embrace this dramatic look. The almost black brunette works on light skin (for that Snow White effect) as well as tan and has been spotted on celebs like Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid.

26

TIGER EYE BALAYAGE Balayage (painting highlights onto hair to create a natural, blended effect) is nothing new, but here’s an update: the tiger eye, named after the stone with bronze, gold and dark brown stripes. Celebs like Rihanna are loving their warmed-up locks.

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Beauty.0417.CEN1.indd 26

3/23/17 3:28 PM


JEWELRY BOX DIL AMANI ROSE CUT NATURAL DIAMOND CRYSTAL GOLD NECKL ACE dilamani.com

DABAKAROV CUSHION AMA ZONITE NECKL ACE IN 14KT YELLOW WITH DIAMONDS Alders Jewelers, Westfield, 908.233.4760 KATIE DIAMOND TATUM RING katiediamondjewelry.com

ROCK IT!

FROM LAPIS TO CRYSTALS, THESE RAW STONES ADD A WOW FACTOR TO YOUR ACCESSORIES.

DENDRITIC AGATE CUFF ludovica.com

TANYA FARAH ‘JOJO’S ENDLESS SUMMER’ BRACELET tanyafarah.com

KENDRA SCOTT ‘ELLE’ DROP EARRINGS IN CHEVRON AMETHYST Nordstrom, Menlo Park, 732.603.5000 MICHAEL ARAM ROCK L APIS TRIPLET RING Hamilton Jewelers, Princeton, 609.683.4200

L AUREN K EMERALD, MOONSTONE AND BOULDER OPAL ‘GEMMA’ EARRINGS laurenk.com

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

JewelryBox.0417.CEN1.indd 27

|

SPRING 2017

27

3/21/17 9:02 AM


' n i l e e

f a t a h w OH THE JOY OF SHOPPING FOR SPRING'S FLIRTY NEW COLORS AND TEXTURES. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN SPRINGSTON

28

Gray lace dress by Baccio Couture.

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 28

3/21/17 9:04 AM


' n Pink leather jacket by Rebecca Taylor and lace skirt by Alexis.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 29

|

SPRING 2017

29

3/21/17 9:04 AM


Blue and black lace top by Plenty by Tracy Reese, white pants by Salon and python skin clutch by Blu & Baker.

30

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 30

3/21/17 9:04 AM


Coral lace dress by Baccio Couture, white scarf by Love Quotes.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 31

|

SPRING 2017

31

3/21/17 9:04 AM


White cut out dress by Nicole Miller.

32

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 32

3/21/17 9:05 AM


Navy printed velvet jacket by Rebecca Taylor, white leather pants by Lamarque and crystal and sterling silver bracelet by Giavan.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Fashion.0417.CEN2.indd 33

|

SPRING 2017

33

3/21/17 9:05 AM


HAND BAGS

PLEASE HOLD

FIND THE PERFECT BAG TO STASH YOUR STUFF AND STILL LOOK STYLISH.

PROENZA SCHOULER PS1+ TINY LEATHER FL AP FRONT HANDBAG proenzaschouler.com

34

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Bags.0417.CEN1.indd 34

3/21/17 9:05 AM


STEVE MADDEN COGNAC SATCHEL BAG Steve Madden, Elizabeth, 908.351.5038

KATE SPADE CAMERON STREET FLORAL MARGOT BAG Kate Spade, Elizabeth, 908.558.0760

STELL A MCCARTNEY WHITE FAL ABELL A BOX ALTER CROC MINI BAG Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000

KENDALL + KYLIE ‘SLOANE’ MINI BACKPACK PacSun, Elizabeth, 908.352.8772

MILLY ESSEX FRINGE SMALL DRAWSTRING BAG Zoë, Princeton, 609.497.1019

STUART WEITZMAN EASTSDCROSSBODY Bloomingdale’s, Bridgewater, 908.762.2400

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Bags.0417.CEN1.indd 35

|

SPRING 2017

35

3/21/17 9:05 AM


SHOES

STEP IT UP ELEVATE YOUR LOOK WITH THE SEASON’S NEWEST HEELS, FLATS AND WEDGES.

PHILLIP LIM KYOTO ANKLE-KNOTTED SANDAL 31philliplim.com

36

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Shoes.0417.CEN.indd 36

3/21/17 9:06 AM


RACHEL ZOE ‘RIVI’ TRI-STRAP STUDDED LEATHER SANDALS shoprachelzoe.com

JEFFREY CAMPBELL ‘LINDSAY’ JEWELED ANKLE STRAP HEELS Urban Outfitters, Westfield, 908.928.9861

STEVE MADDEN ROSE SUEDE SNAPP SHOE Steve Madden, Elizabeth, 908.351.5038

GIANVITO ROSSI ‘CRISSY’ BL ACK LEATHER AND SUEDE HEEL CoCo Pari, Red Bank, 732.212.8111

VINCE CAMUTO WINOL A L ACE-UP CUTOUT SANDAL Vince Camuto, Elizabeth, 908-354-0384

CAL AXINI CUERO WEDGE SANDAL http://nomadista.co

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Shoes.0417.CEN.indd 37

|

SPRING 2017

37

3/21/17 9:06 AM


Reprinted with permission from Sandwiched by Tanya Schroeder. © 2015 Cedar Fort Publishing.

TASTES

38

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 38

3/23/17 3:30 PM


LET IT SLIDE

EASY TO MAKE AND EVEN EASIER TO EAT, MINI SANDWICHES ARE SURE TO DISAPPEAR AT YOUR NEXT PARTY. JUST BE SURE TO PREPARE ENOUGH FOR ALL YOUR HUNGRY GUESTS!

CHERRY BARBECUE TURKEY SANDWICHES INGREDIENTS

Reprinted with permission from Sandwiched by Tanya Schroeder. © 2015 Cedar Fort Publishing.

n 1  2 mini sandwich rolls

TURKEY n 1 Tbs. olive oil n 2 cloves of garlic, chopped n 1 small shallot, diced n ½ cup ketchup n ¼ cup cherry preserves n ¼ cup brown sugar n 2 Tbs. apple cider vinegar n ¼ tsp. salt n ½ tsp. ancho chile powder n ½ tsp. cumin n 1 (20 oz.) package turkey tenderloins ONION RINGS 2 cups flour 4 tsp. salt 2 tsp. pepper 2 large onions, sliced into rings n 1½ cups vegetable oil n n n n

RANCH SAUCE n 2 Tbs. plain Greek yogurt n 4 Tbs. buttermilk n 1 Tbs. ranch seasoning mix

Yield: 12 sandwiches

DIRECTIONS To prepare the cherry barbecue sauce, combine olive oil, garlic and shallots in a small saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat until shallots begin to soften, about 2–3 minutes. Stir in ketchup, cherry preserves and remaining ingredients (through cumin). Reduce heat to low, and continue to stir. Cook until sauce begins to thicken (about 20 minutes). Place turkey in a slow cooker. Pour sauce over turkey. Cover and cook on high for 2 hours. Remove turkey and shred with two forks. Place shredded turkey back into slow cooker, turning to coat each piece with the cherry sauce. Keep warm. To prepare the onion rings, combine flour, salt and pepper in a large resealable plastic bag. Add onions and toss to coat each piece. Heat oil in a large, deep pan until oil reaches 365°F. Add onions and fry just until they are golden (3–4 minutes). Be sure to only add a few onion rings at a time, taking care not to crowd your pan. Remove onions and place on a baking sheet lined with a paper towel. Repeat with remaining onions. For the ranch sauce, combine yogurt, buttermilk and ranch seasoning in a bowl. Divide turkey and onions among each sandwich roll. Drizzle ranch sauce over onions. Serve.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 39

|

SPRING 2017

39

3/21/17 9:08 AM


TASTES

40

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 40

3/23/17 3:30 PM


CHICKEN PARMESAN SLIDERS Yield: 12 sandwiches

INGREDIENTS CHICKEN SLIDERS n 2 lbs. ground chicken n 2 tsp. dried basil n 1 tsp. dried oregano n ½ tsp. dried thyme n ½ tsp. garlic powder n 2 Tbs. fresh parsley n ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese n ½ cup Italian-style breadcrumbs n 12 slices fresh mozzarella cheese n 12 whole-wheat slider rolls SAUCE 1 tsp. olive oil 2 cloves of garlic, minced ½ tsp. red pepper flakes ½ tsp. dried basil 14 oz. crushed tomatoes 2 Tbs. tomato paste ¼ tsp. salt 2 Tbs. fresh basil, finely chopped

n n n n n n n n

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400°F. In a bowl, combine chicken, herbs, parsley, Parmesan cheese and breadcrumbs. Mix by hand until blended. Shape chicken mixture into 12 patties. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, turning once. Top each slider with a mozzarella slice. Bake for an additional 3 minutes or until cheese is bubbly and melted. Meanwhile, heat a saucepan over medium heat. Heat oil, add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Stir in red pepper flakes and dried basil. Heat for an additional minute. Reduce heat and stir in crushed tomatoes and tomato paste. Add salt. Continue to heat on low until warm. When sliders are ready and cheese has melted, place one slider on each roll. Divide sauce among each slider. Sprinkle fresh basil over sliders just before serving.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 41

|

SPRING 2017

41

3/27/17 11:42 AM


TASTES

42

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 42

3/23/17 3:30 PM


GREEK MEATBALL SLIDERS Yield: 12 sandwiches

INGREDIENTS n 1  2 slider buns

MEATBALLS 1 tsp. olive oil ¼ cup chopped onions 1 clove of garlic, minced 2 slices of white bread, crusts removed n ¼ cup milk n 1 lb. lean ground beef n 1 tsp. dried oregano n ½ tsp. dried thyme n ½ tsp. salt n 1 egg, lightly beaten n n n n

TZATZIKI SAUCE n 4 Tbs. plain Greek yogurt n 1 Tbs. lemon juice n 2 Tbs. seedless cucumber, peeled and finely grated n 1 clove of garlic, minced n 1/2 tsp. garlic

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 425°F. Heat olive oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add onions and garlic, and cook until onions have softened and become translucent (about 5 minutes). Remove from heat and let cool. Place bread in a small bowl and cover with milk. In a large bowl, combine ground beef, oregano, thyme and salt. Add egg. Squeeze milk from bread slices with your hands and add to ground beef mixture. Add cooled onions and garlic as well. Mix beef by hand until egg and bread have been incorporated. Using a small cookie scoop or your hands, shape meat mixture into 12 equal pieces. Try to get all 12 meatballs as uniform as possible. Place meatballs on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake for 18–22 minutes. Remove meatballs from oven and let cool. To prepare the sauce, combine all the ingredients in a bowl; stir.

TOPPINGS n 1 cup spinach leaves, loosely packed n ¼ cup sliced red onions n 3 oz. crumbled feta cheese n 12 roma tomatoes, sliced n 1/3 cup black olives, pitted and sliced

To assemble sliders, divide spinach equally among the bottoms of 12 slider buns, along with red onions and ½ tablespoon of feta. Place one meatball over feta cheese. Drizzle tzatziki sauce over each slider. Top each slider with one slice of tomato and a teaspoon of olives. Serve.

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

Tastes.0417.CEN1.indd 43

|

SPRING 2017

43

3/27/17 11:42 AM


WHERETOEAT F I N E

C A S UA L

FA M I LY

Christopher’s in New Brunswick

AVENEL

EAST BRUNSWICK

CARTERET

WASABI HOUSE Fresh sushi and authentic Japanese dishes in a friendly, relaxed environment, 77 Tices Ln., 732.254.9988

JULIAN’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

EDISON

D’ITALIA RESTAURANT Italian fare, specializing in pizza, 1500 St. Georges Ave., 732.574.1120 CHATEAU MADRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692

GUSTO GRILL Traditional American food, 1050 Route 18 North, 732.651.2737

modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

HIGHL AND PARK

APOSTO PIZZERIA Mediterranean grill and pizzeria, 76 Raritan Ave., 732.745.9011 MIDORI SUSHI Japanese fusion with a sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.4745

PAD THAI Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

THE CRANBURY INN Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595

LOUCÁS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580

PITHARI TAVERNA Greek cuisine with seafood fare, 28 Woodbridge Ave., 732.572.0616

CRANBURY PIZZA Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930

MEEMAH Casual Chinese and Malaysian cuisine, Hwy. 27 at Parsonage Rd., 732.906.2223

HILLSBOROUGH

ZINNA’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

MING Asian fusion cuisine with vegetarian options, 1655-195 Oak Tree Rd., 732.549.5051

CRANFORD

PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038

CRANBURY

PAIRINGS Globally inspired menu combined with local and sustainable practices, 10 Walnut Ave., 908.276.4026

SKYLARK FINE DINER & LOUNGE Upscale diner with creative cocktails, 17 Wooding Ave., 732.777.7878

DAY TON

FORDS

LA TAVERNA Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

VILLA BORGHESE Traditional Italian fare with

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830

44

MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Upscale interpretations of American classics, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025

BIG HEADS GRILL & BAR Grill favorites mixed with pub fare, 315 Route 206 #502, 908.281.0268 LEE’S SUSHI Premiere Japanese cuisine in a casual atmosphere, 438 Route 206 #5, 908.829.3140

ISELIN

CASA GIUSEPPE Italian fine dining, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111 URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

JAMESBURG

FIDDLEHEADS American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

WTE.0417.CEN.2.indd 44

3/23/17 3:31 PM


PER TUTTI Italian cuisine, private dining, BYO, 49 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.4900

FRESCO Seafood and steak grill, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616

JUST Contemporar y American and French fare, 2280 Route 9 South, 732.707.4800

KENDALL PARK

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

THE PINE TAVERN Imaginative A merican cui s ine with Continental flavors, 151 Route 34, 732.727.5060

SHOGUN 27 Hibachi steakhouse with a sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

SENS ASIAN CUISINE Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South, 732.355.1919

KENILWORTH

MONROE

PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian and American Continental fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

KINGSTON

LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

DUSAL’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eater y, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711

TAORMINA Authentic Italian fare featuring an extensive wine list, 482 Kenilworth Blvd., 908.497.1717 ENO TERRA Italian cuisine featuring seafood, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list, 4484 Route 27, 609.497.1777 OSTERIA PROCACCINI Quaint Italian restaurant serving pizza, sandwiches and salads with organic and local produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

METUCHEN

ANTONIO’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA Traditional Italian pizzeria, 453 Main St., 732.603.0008 THE METUCHEN INN American fare in an upscale setting, 424 Middlesex Ave., 732.494.6444

PIERRE’S Fine international dining with an awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219

GARVEY’S Family-friendly American eater y, 405 Spotswood Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311

MONTGOMERY

GENTEEL’S TRATTORIA & PIZZERIA Italian cuisine featuring a variety of pastas, pizza, sandwiches, soups and salads, 1378 Route 206, 609.252.0880 TIGER’S TALE Bar and grill menu with sliders

and extensive dinner specials, 1290 Route 206, 609.924.0262

NEW BRUNSWICK

CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban cuisine, 85 Bayard St., 732.846.2620

PERTH AMBOY

THE BARGE Water front restaurant and cocktail lounge featuring steak and seafood dishes in generous portions, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000 PORTUGUESE MANOR Traditional Portuguese featuring sangria, 310 Elm St., 732.826.2233

PISCATAWAY

AL DENTE RISTORANTE Traditional Italian eater y, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220 CHAND PALACE Family-friendly Indian restaurant featuring an all-vegetarian menu, 1296 Centennial Ave., 732.465.1474 MIDORI Authentic Japanese and hibachi dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

PL AINSBORO

THE ORCHID Glatt kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

CATHERINE LOMBARDI Italian with locally sourced ingredients, 3 Livingston Ave., 732.296.9463

MIDDLESEX

CHRISTOPHER’S American seafood and steak fare, 10 Livingston Ave., 732.214.2200

CROWN OF INDIA Authentic Indian cuisine, 660 Plainsboro Rd., 609.275.5707

CLYDZ Contemporar y American cuisine with extensive martini selection, 55 Paterson St., 732.846.6521

EAST Asian fusion fare with a bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

DELTA’S RESTAURANT Southern cuisine with live music and specialty drinks, 19 Dennis St., 732.249.1551

PRINCETON

CARPACCIO RISTORANTE Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242 VINCENZO’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine, 665 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.7777

MILLTOWN

FRANCESCO PIZZERIA & RESTAURANT Casual Italian eater y and pizzeria, 23 N. Main St., 732.214.9222

Delta’s Restaurant in New Brunswick

DUE MARI Modern Italian food featuring fresh local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600

ELEMENTS American restaurant ser ving local steak and seafood, and a new bar bites menu, 66 Witherspoon St., 609.924.0078

EVELYN’S Lebanese food with vegetarian options, 45 Easton Ave., 732.246.8792

MAIN STREET BISTRO & BAR Euro-American bistro fare, 301 N. Harrison St., 609.921.2779

THE FROG AND THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

TERESA CAFFE Simple Italian-inspired fare incorporating many fresh ingredients grown at nearby Canal Farm, 23 Palmer Sq. East, 609.921.1974

GLO ULTRA LOUNGE AND TEQUILA BAR Upscale pub food and a bar with more than 200 tequilas, 367 George St., 732.261.4044 HARVEST MOON BREWERY & CAFÉ American pub fare, 392 George St., 732.249.6666 MIKE’S COURTSIDE SPORTS BAR & GRILL Traditional pub fare, 1 Elm Row, 732.455.8511 THE OLD BAY New Orleans–style restaurant with Cajun and French Creole dishes, 7 Church St., 732.246.3111

WITHERSPOON GRILL Steakhouse dining featuring all-natural Angus beef and locally sourced poultr y, 57 Witherspoon St., 609.924.6011

ROSELLE PARK

VINHUS Portuguese fare with formal dining or casual bar and lounge, 157 E. Westfield Ave., 908.259.5907

SOUTH AMBOY

OLD MAN RAFFERT Y’S Casual American eater y, 106 Albany St., 732.846.6153

BLUE MOON Contemporar y American and pub fare, 114 S. Broadway, 732.525.0014

PANICO’S Classic Italian entrees and sandwiches, with specialty pizzas at its sister location across the street (94 Church St.), 103 Church St., 732.545.6100

COSTA VERDE Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

RESTAURANT 2FIFT Y4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773

SOUTH PL AINFIELD

STAGE LEFT Upscale American fare with an extensive wine list, 5 Livingston Ave., 732.828.4444 STEAKHOUSE 85 Premium steaks ser ved in various portion sizes to fit a wide range of budgets, 85 Church St., 732.247.8585 TUMULT Y’S Upscale pub food, featuring steaks and seafood, 361 George St., 732.545.6205

NORTH BRUNSWICK

ARTHUR’S STEAK HOUSE & PUB Traditional American steakhouse, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117 ISTANBUL RESTAURANT & PATISSERIE Turkish and Mediterranean fare boasting freshly baked pides and lahmajouns, 1000 Aaron Rd., 732.940.1122

OLD BRIDGE

BIG ED’S BARBECUE American barbecue, 305 Route 34, 732.583.2626

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

WTE.0417.CEN.2.indd 45

CASA ROSARIA’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE Classic Italian food, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009

FLANAGAN’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818 KIMCHI HANA Traditional, authentic Korean BBQ restaurant where dishes are grilled at the table, 6101 Hadley Rd., 908.755.0777

SOUTH RIVER

KRAKOWIAK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0441 RIA-MAR Traditional Portuguese, Spanish and American fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

WOODBRIDGE

CHRIS MICHAEL’S STEAKHOUSE Steak and seafood restaurant, featuring a sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355 J.J. BITTING BREWING CO. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929 MULBERRY STREET RESTAURANT Italian seafood eater y with exceptional steak and chop specials, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

|

SPRING 2017

45

3/23/17 3:31 PM


BE THERE A P R I L

M AY

J U N E

Outdoor Market, Craft and Vendor Show in Dunellen, May 6-7

APRIL 22–23 Green thumbs and

planet-lovers alike will be converging at the Leonard J. Buck Garden in Far Hills for the SPRING PLANT SALE AND EARTH DAY CELEBRATION, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. on Saturday and 12–5 p.m. on Sunday. Select from perennials, ferns and woody plants; take a guided tour of the magnificent rock garden, and be inspired by related gardening lectures. Admission: FREE. Dig up more info at somersetcountyparks.org.

APRIL 28–MAY 14 Make your reservations for BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S, Richard Greenberg’s stage adaptation of the romantic comedy directed by Blake Edwards and written by George Axelrod. Follow Holly Golightly’s mischief-making in this production at the Somerset Valley Playhouse in Hillsborough. Admission: $20 for adults; $18 for seniors and students $18. For more information, see svptheatre.org. APRIL 30 Budding paleontologists, heed pre-historic Australia’s call to EARTH’S DINOSAUR ZOO LIVE at the State Theatre in New Brunswick. Interact with life-like dinosaurs and other creations said to be so realistic, you may want to run and hide! But, have no fear—they are only the handiwork of a team of skilled performers and puppeteers. Shows are at 2 and 5 p.m. Get your tickets at statetheatrenj.org MAY 5–6 Love makes the world go

46

round—and drives the 20th anniversary touring production of RENT, following the trials and tribulations of seven artists, which is making a stop at the State Theatre in New Brunswick. Shows are at 8 p.m. Friday and 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday. Visit statetheatrenj.org for more information.

MAY 6–7 Nothing shouts “spring!” quite like the OUTDOOR MARKET, CRAFT AND VENDOR SHOW, an annual event presented by the Dunellen American Legion Post 119 and Boy Scout Troop 119 in downtown Dunellen. Peruse the goods on display in a shady grove that’s easy to get to, has plenty of parking and will have plenty of vendors to sate appetites with BBQ and more. The fun starts at 9 a.m. and wraps up at 5 p.m. MAY 12–14 The advisory “Please bring your own garden cart” says it all. That’s because the SPRING FLOWER FAIR at Rutgers Gardens in New Brunswick has everything your landscape might want, from trees and shrubs to fruits and vegetables. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Check out rutgersgardens.rutgers.edu/springflowerfair. MAY 20 Tchaikovsky and Mahler are on

the bill at 7 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church in Westfield, waging a BATTLE OF THE TITANS! under the direction of David Wroe and featuring special guest virtuoso Sophia Bacelar. The performance is one of two

Strawberry Festival in Helmetta, June 3-4

that will conclude the New Jersey Festival Orchestra’s 2016-2017 season. Tickets are $15–$76. Visit njfestivalorchestra.org.

MAY 26–28, JUNE 2–4 Ariel surfaces again in the Yardley Players production of DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID at the Kelsey Theatre at Mercer County Community College in West Windsor. Sing along with her, Prince Eric, Flounder the Fish and company to such memorable tunes as “Under the Sea,” “Kiss the Girl” and “Part of Your World.” Shows are at 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $20. Get yours at kelseyatmccc.org. JUNE 3-4 If you’re seeing red, it must be that time again—fruit ripening on the vine for St. George’s annual STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL in Helmetta, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event celebrates everything strawberry, whether in a smoothie, sliced on shortcake or dipped in chocolate. The fun-filled day also features a Kids Zone with face painting and a bouncy castle, and for adults, crafts and artisan goods. For more information, visit stgeorgeshelmetta.org. Send event listings to: Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email us at editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Calendar at centraljerseyhealthandlife.com.

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

BeThere.0417.CEN1.indd 46

3/27/17 11:43 AM


Working with BigFish Digital “ Solutions has helped us bring all our digital needs under one umbrella. This has improved our local visibility, branding and web traffic. It’s nice to have a digital company you trust and know will get the job done.” Barry and Stuart Segel Mr. Sid Fine Men’s Clothing

bigfish

Find out how you too can benefit from the latest digital marketing techniques designed specifically for local businesses. Contact Shae Marcus, 856-797-2227, shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com

BIGFISH DIGITAL SOLUTIONS | A DIVISION OF WAINSCOT MEDIA

BIGFISH DIGITAL SOLUTIONS | A DIVISION OF WAINSCOT MEDIA 047_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 1

3/21/17 11:10 AM


POWER FOOD

Chard your course MEET YOUR MATCH, KALE. THIS LEAFY UNDERDOG IS READY TO GO THE DISTANCE. IN THE ARENA OF SUPERFOODS, LEAFY greens are the crowd favorites, offering a low-calorie, low-fat source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. But with spinach and kale stealing the spotlight, one nutritional all-star is often overlooked. Part of the goosefoot family of vegetables, along with spinach and beets, chard goes by many names, including Swiss chard, spinach beet and silverbeet, to name a few. But no matter what you call it, there’s no doubt it touts plenty of health benefits.

POWER UP Worried about weight? Simply washing your dishes after dinner will be enough to burn off the calories you take in from a serving of raw chard—one cup has only 7 calories (about the same as raw spinach), and a cup of cooked chard has approximately 35 calories (that’s about 5 minutes of light jogging, if you’re counting). It’s also lacking in fat (less than 1 gram in 1

48

cup cooked) and sugar (2 grams), leaving room for more of the good stuff, including about 700 percent of the recommended intake of vitamin K, which supports bone and blood health. It delivers a substantial amount of vitamin A, which promotes eye health and boosts immune function, and it’s a significant source of vitamin C, fiber, iron, magnesium and potassium. Chard is also believed to be beneficial to those with diabetes because it contains an antioxidant called syringic acid that studies have shown may help to regulate glucose levels.

BUY/STORE/SERVE Available in green, red and rainbow varieties, chard can be purchased at most supermarkets, usually alongside kale and other leafy greens. Look for crisp stems and healthy leaves that aren’t wilted or brown. Store chard by wrapping it in a dry paper towel, placing it in a plastic bag that is left unsealed, and keeping the bag in the

refrigerator. Depending on freshness, it will last from several days to as long as a week. Chard has the same culinary flexibility as its cousin spinach: as a salad base, in a frittata, sautéed with garlic, or simply braised or steamed. To prepare chard, wash it well in cold water, taking care to remove any grit, and cut the leaves away from the stems (the stems can be cooked separately in soups or a stir-fry).

DID YOU KNOW? What exactly is in a name? In the case of this vegetable, a lot of confusion. Often called Swiss chard, it’s actually believed to have originated in Italy and is a staple in Mediterranean diets. In fact, no one is quite sure where the “Swiss” part comes from. Some believe “chard” originated from the French word carde or the Latin word carduus, both referring to an artichoke thistle plant. In South Africa, it is simply called “spinach.”—LIZ DONOVAN

SPRING 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

Powerfood.0417.CEN.indd 48

3/21/17 9:14 AM


ARE YOU READY FOR MOTHER NATURE’S MOOD SWINGS?

CALL ABOUT OUR SPRING TUNE UP SPECIAL 732.865.4453 | CENTRALJERSEYGENERATORS.COM

FACTORY AUTHORIZED TECHNICIANS SALES | SERVICE | REPAIR | MAINTENANCE 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE •

COMPLETE SYSTEM SALES

COMPLETE GENERATOR MAINTENANCE

START-UP

SERVICE AGREEMENTS

WE OFFER A VARIETY OF SIZES TO SUIT YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS.

C3_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 1

3/21/17 11:09 AM


C4_CJHL_SPRING17.indd 2

3/21/17 11:09 AM

Central Jersey Health & Life: Spring 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from Saint Peter's Healthcare System

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you