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G O O D

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F R O M

T R I H E A LT H

S P R I N G 2 0 18 THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE

KEEPING XAVIER HEALTHY EDIBLE GARDENS ITALY’S LAKE COMO HEART SURGERY: FINDING QUALITY

T H E S C R E E N I N G YO U S H O U L D N ’ T AVO I D

THE BEST CARE FOR YOUR KIDS

RECIPIES: STIR IT UP!

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SPRING 2018 | $3.95 | TRIHEALTH.COM

C I N C I N N AT I H E A LT H & L I F E

CINCINNATI T H E

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CONTENTS

{ SPRING 2018 }

FEATURES 14

SEEKING THE BEST

Patients from near and far choose TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital for heart-valve surgery.

16

FROM COURTSIDE TO CLASSROOM How TriHealth helps keep Xavier University students healthy and in the game.

20

EDIBLE GARDEN

Mixing pretty and purposeful for better nutrition.

24

THE SCREENING YOU SHOULDN’T AVOID Today, colonoscopy is easier to prepare for and as critical as ever.

32

CHOOSING YOUR CHILD’S CARE

After-hours fever or Saturday soccer injury? How to get the best help.

I N E V ERY I S S UE

4 6 4 2 4 6

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

20 CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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{ SPRING 2018 }

CONTENTS

34 26 DEPARTMENTS 10

40

Our guide to new ideas, trends, tips and things we love in or near Hamilton County.

How friends can help keep your fitness on track.

LOCAL BUZZ

12

HEALTH NEWS

FARE WELL

44

GATHERINGS

Tips and insights you can use now.

Photos from recent events in Hamilton County.

26

48

Make quick and tasty meals with a wok and a few fresh ingredients.

A tasty treat, strawberries are also a nutritional powerhouse.

TASTES

40

POWER FOOD

34

ESCAPES

Answer the siren call of Lake Como, Italy’s fabled lakeside resort.

48 2

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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This proud moment sponsored by the #1 health care system in the greater Cincinnati region. + 1st disease-specific certification in Ohio for cardiac valve repair and replacement at TriHealth Good Samaritan Hospital* + 1st choice for cancer patients—no one diagnoses and cares for more cancer patients in Greater Cincinnati + 1st to receive The Joint Commission Gold Seal Award for advanced total joint replacement

Every day at TriHealth, we continue to break new barriers and find new and better ways to provide the best care for our patients. Because of our breakthrough treatments and procedures, we’re able to help them be there for all of life’s special moments. See why we’re the #1 health care system in the greater Cincinnati region. Visit TriHealth.com/best

Actor portrayal

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*The Joint Commission

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{ WELCOME LETTER }

SPRING CLEANING FOR YOUR HEALTH

Exceptional care from the court to the campus. Trust the team that Xavier trusts for health, wellness and everything in between. • Providing on-campus health care for all students • Broadening our sports medicine program and building a modern athletic center • Creating innovative programs to improve health care and lower costs • Developing highly marketable unique health care leadership experiences for students • Expanding employment opportunities for Xavier graduates To schedule an appointment or find a doctor, call 513 569 5400 or visit TriHealth.com

SPRINGTIME ALWAYS FEELS LIKE a time time for fresh starts. We clean our houses, straighten the garages, and spruce up our yards. For many of us, it is also a good time to start new healthy habits so we can continue to live life to the fullest. So I would encourage you to schedule a physical for you and your loved ones and make time for appropriate health screenings. At TriHealth, we believe healthcare is something that should be done with you, not to you. Our team of primary care physicians— the largest in the Greater Cincinnati area—will work with you and your family to manage your health and help you avoid health problems later in life. And because TriHealth is committed to caring for the entire family, we have a large network of exceptional pediatricians, who you can read more about on page 32. As for screenings, few routine screens save more lives than a simple colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S., and the second-leading cause of cancer death. In fact, my own father died of colon cancer diagnosed before screenings were recommended routinely. So if everyone aged 50 and older were screened regularly, the vast majority of colorectalcancer deaths could be prevented. Today’s colonoscopy is not the same as it was just a few years ago—the preparation has evolved to be much less discomforting. On page 24, learn what to expect from this critical screening and how, in many cases, the exam itself can be used to eliminate future cancer threats. Despite taking all recommended preventive measures, health problems sometimes still arise. In those moments, TriHealth has the leading experts who will collaborate with your primary care physicians to address whatever medical issues you may have. For example, I’m proud to share that TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital has been awarded national certification for Cardiac Valve Repair and Replacement. Good Samaritan Hospital is the first hospital in Ohio and only the third in the nation to receive this recognition. On page 14, read about valve repair from the perspective of a patient whose quality of life was dramatically improved by this advanced procedure. Before you clean out that closet, take control of your health with the help of your own personal physician, wherever they may practice. If you don’t have a personal physician, I invite you to visit TriHealth.com to select from the best in the region! Best wishes for a healthy and happy spring!

MARK C. CLEMENT TRIHEALTH PRESIDENT AND CEO

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT TRIHEALTH, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT TRIHEALTH.COM.

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Memories are the one gift you give to yourself.

Elevate your stay with an intimate place to belong beyond your hotel room. The Ritz-Carlton Club Level is an exclusive space with unique amenities and services where guests enjoy fine culinary presentations ideal for families and business travelers. ritzcarlton.com/resortsofnaples

NAPLES____________ NAPLES GOLF__________

2017 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

Š

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{ EDITOR’S NOTE }

READY FOR RENEWAL

Every stage. Every step. Every milestone. We provide the best care possible for every moment of your life. No matter where you are in your health care journey, TriHealth is committed to providing expertise, care and support unique to your needs. From obstetrics and gynecology to urology and reproductive endocrinology, our dedicated Women’s Services physicians are with you at every stage of your life.

SPRING BRINGS MANY welcome things—more sunshine, warmer weather and the year’s first flowers, to name a few. What better way to celebrate the season than to get busy outside? On page 20, we share inspiration for creating a garden that’s both pretty and purposeful. From flowering herbs to richly colored greens to bright red strawberries, produce-packed gardens delight the eye as well as the taste buds. Also in this issue, learn more about growing and storing strawberries in “Power Foods” on page 48. In springtime, many of us look to reenergize our fitness routines. So Cincinnati Health & Life looked for fresh ways to do just that. Turn to page 40 to read “Exercise: Don’t Go It Alone,” which examines the benefits of exercising with a partner. Whether you choose to walk, swim or take spin classes, having a regular fitness buddy has been shown to boost motivation and improve consistency. If you’re looking for a new workout resource, consider checking out the TriHealth Fitness & Health Pavilion, which offers 80 group fitness classes each week, two indoor pools and an expansive fitness floor with more than 250 pieces of equipment. Seeking renewal through travel? You’re sure to hear the call of Lake Como when you read our piece about Italy’s fabled resort area (page 34). From his base at the historic and luxurious Villa d’Este, our writer explores the area’s many charms, from the city of Como with its impressive cathedrals and Roman ruins to smaller towns that offer lovely gardens, quaint streets and quiet cafés. Thanks for sharing some of your day with us! Warm regards,

MARIA K. REGAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Discover women’s care as unique as you. Learn more at TriHealth.com/womens

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WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Cincinnati Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Cincinnati Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 4, Issue 1. © 2018 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Carl Olsen at 847.274.8970 or carl.olsen@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address, or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Cincinnati Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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{ LOCAL BUZZ }

PUTTING THE “FUN” IN FUNDRAISER TO STATE THE OBVIOUS, breast cancer is not fun. But that doesn’t mean women who are living with it aren’t entitled to a little levity. That’s exactly the purpose of the Karen Wellington Foundation for LIVING With Breast Cancer. KWF is about putting dates on the calendar to have fun now, whether that means a spa day with a sister, a beach vacation for two or a trip for the whole family to a cozy mountain cabin. Karen Wellington passed away from cancer in 2007, but not before she lived life as fully as she could. She had a dream to send families who are living with breast cancer—as many as possible and at least one family a year—on special vacations. Over the past 10 years, KWF has sent more than 400 women and their families on much-needed getaways, provided more than 150 spa days, and given other cherished gifts of fun. People donate airline miles, vacation homes, time-shares and cash to make these days of enjoyment available to families who need them most. On April 14, KWF is holding its largest FUNdraiser of the year, Karen’s Gift “Forever in Bloom” Celebration. It’s a big Cincinnati party, complete with open bar, heavy appetizers, dinner by the bite, an art auction and more. And yes, as you might guess, it’s incredibly FUN. Find out more about KWF and buy tickets (don’t dawdle—they sell out every year) at karenwellingtonfoundation.org.

MAY BRINGS...FLYING PIGS

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The growth of the Pig’s popularity mirrors the general running boom in the U.S., but it also has been helped by the steady addition of events over the years. In addition to the full 26.2-mile trek, there’s a half-marathon, a 10K, a 5K, relay races and kids’ events. In fact, the Flying Pig Marathon, always the first weekend in May, has turned into a kind of citywide party, with bands scattered throughout the course and swarms of volunteers and onlookers cheering participants. In celebration of the 20th anniversary, organizers are holding 20 Days on the Run, a festival that starts April 14 and features a variety of free community events along the course. See flyingpigmarathon.com for full details, including registration and volunteer information, plus the best places to cheer on runners.

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

T W E N T Y- S I X M I L E S is a whole lot of running, but as anyone who has participated in the Flying Pig Marathon over the last 20 years will tell you, it also can be a whole lot of fun. With the marathon such an entrenched part of Cincinnati culture now, it’s hard to believe the idea began two decades ago with a race route sketched out on a cocktail napkin. The first year, 6,500 runners came out for the Pig. At year 20, that number has grown to 40,000 participants, including people from all 50 states and 22 countries. We can’t forget about the 150,000 or so “street squealers”—the Pig’s affectionate term for spectators—who now grace the route. There’s an impressive element of generosity as well: Since 1999, participants have raised close to $16 million for various charities.

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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THE NIGHT SKY’S THE LIMIT G A Z I N G I N TO T H E N I G H T S K Y is romantic in theory, but unless you’re an amateur astronomer, it’s hard to know what you’re actually seeing. The Big Dipper may be easy to spot, but what about the other 87 constellations? (And technically, the beloved Big Dipper is an “asterism,” or part of a constellation—Ursa Major.) The beauty of a planetarium is that you recline back as the night sky appears before you, while a knowledgeable guide points out everything you might never see on your own. Haile Planetarium at Northern Kentucky University is on a mission to become the community’s go-to resource for learning about stars, planets, black holes, dark matter and other mysteries of the universe. Recently, they’ve been offering free hour-long shows one Monday a month at noon, and every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Each show has a theme (some are themed for younger children; others are recommended for 6th grade and up), and includes a full tour of the night sky. View the schedule at: inside.nku.edu/artsci/ departments/pget/ planetarium.

A NEW TAKE ON TEAMBUILDING YO U’ VE G OT A L I ST O F C LU E S and an hour to figure it all out—to “escape the room.” It’s not a video game or a virtual-reality exercise, but rather an interactive, real-life game. At the Escape the Room Challenge in West Chester, people willingly get locked in one of four mystery-themed rooms for an hour. With their team, they work to uncover clues and solve puzzles that will help them escape. You can go alone, or rent a whole room for a team-building challenge. The four different rooms vary in difficulty (Esmeralda’s Curse offers the greatest challenge), and each can accommodate a different number of people. The room-escape craze is still rather new to the U.S, having started in Japan and then spread to Europe before making its way here. It has become a popular activity for sports teams, corporate teams, and families—not to mention an interesting idea for a data night. Escape the Room runs $28/person, but reviewers suggest checking sites like Groupon for discounts. None of the rooms are frightening or inappropriate, so the game is suitable for families. Think you have it in the bag? Don’t be too confident! Fewer than 35 percent of groups actually escape. For more information, check escapetheroomchallenge.com.

READY TO HAGGLE? W H AT ’S YO U R P R I C E P O I N T for old skeleton keys? How about a sleek mid-century modern credenza, a gorgeously gaudy 1970s owl pendant, or a charming milk-glass vase? No matter what kind of treasure you’re looking for, you’re bound to discover it once Cincinnati’s fleamarket circuit heats up. There are finds to be had just about every weekend, whether you’re looking for one-of-a-kind handmade wares from local artisans or the missing gravy boat in your vintage Fiestaware collection. The tristate area is home to several rotating flea markets, including these, which are four of the largest: • The City Flea at Washington Park takes place the third Saturday of every month, May–October (thecityflea.com). This urban “curated” market, which features local products, vintage dealers, artists, food trucks and more, is about community, too, billing itself as a small-business incubator and city advocate. • The Oakley Fancy Flea (O.F.F.) Market runs the second Saturday of every month, May–September, in Oakley Square and other locations (theoffmarket.org). Shop, soak up local culture and enjoy specialty food and beverages in one of Cincinnati’s most charming older neighborhoods. • The Lawrenceburg Flea is the first Sunday of every month, May–October, at the Lawrenceburg Fairgrounds (queencityshows.com/tristate). It’s worth the drive to Indiana to check out the bounty of vendors displaying vintage wares and collectibles. • The Burlington Flea runs the third Sunday of every month, April–October, at the Boone County Fair Grounds (burlingtonantiqueshow.com). With more than 200 vendors, this Northern Kentucky gem continually gets included in roundups of the Midwest’s best flea markets. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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{ HEALTH NEWS }

BRING ON THE SAUCE Men who ate more than two servings of tomato sauce weekly had a lower risk of developing prostate cancer than those who ate less than a single monthly serving. It’s believed that certain substances in cooked tomatoes protect DNA strands from breaking. —American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

FISHING FOR DEPRESSION RX Folks who regularly eat fish have a 20 percent reduced risk of depression compared with those who ate little to none. The reason? Researchers theorize that the omega-3 fats may affect levels of neurotransmitters involved in depression. —Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

28%

The drop in cardiovascular disease risk when people ate 10 daily servings of produce rather than little to none. —Journal of Epidemiology

HEADACHE CAUSE?

If you suffer from frequent headaches, experts suggest getting tested for an underactive thyroid. While they’re unsure of the connection between the organ and the malady, researchers have found that you have a 41 percent increased risk of hypothyroidism if you suffer from headaches such as migraines. —University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

BELLY BULGE BEGONE

Waistline expanding? Add some color. Diets high in bright fruits and veggies (think berries and peppers), which are loaded with antioxidants, could help with your midsection. —BMJ

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THE EARLYBIRD DIET

Early risers eat fewer calories, less sugar and more protein than night owls. Scientists speculate that people have an easier time making healthy decisions in the morning, when the brain is fresher and willpower stonger. —Obesity

700

The number of new neural connections that are formed every second in the first few years of a baby’s life. These connections are made when we speak, smile, hug and sing to babies. —Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University

HYPERTENSION: A NEW HIGH Nearly half of Americans now have blood pressure above the normal range, based on new guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and 10 other groups. With the revised standards, which define high blood pressure as 130 over 80 (down from 140 over 90), doctors aim to identify affected patients earlier and help them bring blood pressure down through lifestyle changes, reducing the risk of future complications.

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

TAKING TEAMWORK TO HEART Good Samaritan’s heart-valve team provides world-class care, excellent outcomes and a feeling of family. J. Michael Smith, M.D., a cardiothoracic surgeon and Chief of Cardiac Surgery at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital, is quick to tell his patients, “This is not just about how good we are as surgeons, but how good the team is. The procedure is part of it, but this is about the total care you get from start to finish.” “It’s understood that we give everything we have for the team and for our patients,” says Jane Whalen, DNPc, MSN, APRN, CCRN, CCNS-CSC. “We communicate often and hold each other accountable.” LIKE FAMILY Heart-valve patients stay in the same room throughout their hospital stay, allowing them to forge bonds with the staff. Family members are welcome 24/7. The openness and calm confidence of the care team help to relieve patient fears. “We not only treat each other like family, we treat patients like they’re family, too,” says Nurse Manager Pam Smith, MSN, RN, CNML. “That’s our culture. Patients know we like each other and we enjoy what we’re doing. It makes them feel like they’re in the right place.” ALWAYS REACHING HIGHER Frequent thank-you notes and high scores on patient surveys could make the team complacent, but they’re constantly striving toward more perfect care. As Whalen explains, “No one person on the team believes he or she has all the answers. We consult each other.” The team effort pays off in results. Says Whalen, “It’s a good feeling to be part of making people whole again and making it possible for them to live life the way they want.”

14

Steve Jones, seen here with Nia, one of his three children, quickly resumed his active lifestyle following heart-valve surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital.

SEEKING THE BEST THE CRITICAL NATURE OF HEART-VALVE SURGERY MADE STEVE JONES PUT EXTRA EFFORT INTO SEARCHING OUT THE HIGHEST QUALITY CARE. EVENTUALLY, HE LEFT SINGAPORE FOR CINCINNATI TO GET IT. FOR STEVE JONES, a healthy father of three and consistent gym-goer, experiencing dizziness after cardio activity was surprising. Having no reason to suspect anything serious, he worked through this peculiarity, only to have it come up again months later. Steve, who was born in Northwest Wales in the United Kingdom, was living in Singapore with his family at the time. After a trip to Cambodia, he became ill with a bacterial gut infection and found himself in the hospital. When the doctors listened to his stomach, they heard something more—a problem with Steve’s heart.

UNAPPEALING ODDS Two cardiac specialists in Singapore confirmed that there was a tear in his mitral valve and said that he would need open-heart surgery. They gave him a one to three percent chance of not waking up after that surgery. Steve thought to himself: “Three in a hundred? Those are not good odds.” Additionally, the doctors said there was an 80 to 85 percent chance they could fix his valve, and that he would spend 10 days in the hospital after surgery, with an overall recovery period of three months. Steve felt that there had to be a better option.

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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LEFT: Trina Murtland, BSN, RN, CCRN; Linda Juengling, MSN, RN, NE-BC, Director, Critical Care; Jane Whalen, DNPc, MSN, APRN, CCRN, CCNS-CSC; Pam Smith, MSN, RN, CNML, Nurse Manager. RIGHT: J. Michael Smith, M.D., Chief of Cardiac Surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital.

During a trip to Cincinnati for business meetings, Steve heard from a former colleague about a fellow church member who happened to be a cardiothoracic surgeon—J. Michael Smith, M.D. Steve immediately met with Dr. Smith, Chief of Cardiac Surgery at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital, who handed him better statistics. Dr. Smith proposed robotic heart surgery, with a near-perfect survival rate and a 95 percent chance that Steve’s heart would be fixed. He would be out of the hospital after just four days, and his overall recovery would be less than three months.

BETTER RESULTS Steve understood the seriousness of the procedure, but was confident of the outcome under Dr. Smith and his team. “They were very clear, and very honest about what to expect,” he says. Steve and his family moved back to the U.S. in July 2016 and Steve had his operation late that month. He was up and walking by end of the first day

and out of the hospital after three and a half days. Only five days after surgery, Steve spent an hour on the treadmill. “It was an amazing experience,” he says. “Treatment both before and after was excellent. The communication was at the right level that I needed. I got great clarity and was left with no surprises.” Now, Steve is healthy, living in

Cincinnati with his family and working full time. He continues to hit the gym and play golf frequently. Reflecting on his experience, Steve is happy to share his story. “The team at Good Samaritan Hospital simplified a very difficult and complex procedure,” he says. “It was truly amazing and a story that needs to be told.”

BEST-IN-THE-NATION CARE The valve repair and replacement team at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital wins national recognition for quality. Last December, Good Samaritan Hospital was awarded “Cardiac Valve Repair and Replacement Disease Specific Certification” from The Joint Commission, an independent organization that accredits health-care programs based on demanding performance standards. “We’re thrilled to be the only hospital in Ohio and just the third hospital in the country to achieve such a prestigious certification from The Joint Commission,” says J. Michael Smith, M.D., Chief of Cardiac Surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. “This award is a shining example of all the good that comes from team-based care. The proof of our success is in our outcomes.” The hospital also has earned the highest rating of three stars from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons—a standard met by only 6 percent of cardiac surgery programs in the nation.

FOR MORE ABOUT THE TRIHEALTH HEART INSTITUTE, GO TO TRIHEALTH.COM/HEART. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

CARING FOR STUDENTS

FROM THE COURT TO THE CLASSROOM

TRIHEALTH PHYSICIANS HELP KEEP XAVIER UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, ATHLETES AND STAFF HEALTHY AND IN THE GAME.

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SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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The Cintas Center is home to Xavier University’s court sports: men’s and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball. When Musketeer athletes from any team need injury care, they turn to TriHealth’s expert orthopedic and sports-medicine physicians.

H U B A NEW HEALTH & WELLNESS CENTER

EMILY DIXON, D.O., was preparing dinner for her family on a recent Friday evening when her cellphone buzzed. It was the athletic trainer for the Xavier University men’s basketball team. One of the team’s starting players sustained an injury before an upcoming NCAA Big East conference game. Dr. Dixon, a TriHealth physician who is board-certified in family medicine and fellowship-trained in sports medicine, serves as one of the team physicians for Xavier Athletics. She left her husband in charge of kids and meal prep and headed for the Cintas Center. There, in the university’s athletic training room, she met the Xavier trainer and the 6’9” player—in obvious pain and struggling to walk. “He had been doing spine extensions in the weightlifting room and rotated his sacroiliac joint out of place,” says Dr. Dixon. The sacroiliac joint links the pelvis to the lower part of the spine. Utilizing her skill in osteopathic manipulative treatment, which includes the use of stretching, gentle pressure and resistance to confirm a diagnosis and resolve symptoms, Dr. Dixon was able to manipulate the athlete’s pelvis back in place. “He felt immediate relief and was able to play the next day,” she says. Dr. Dixon’s sports-medicine colleagues include Richard Okragly, M.D., of Bethesda Family Practice Center and Robert Burger, M.D., and Henry Stiene, M.D., of Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. Together, they are part of a much larger team of TriHealth specialists—ranging from orthopedic surgeons to primary care physicians to emergency medicine first responders— charged with the health of the Xavier community. For more than two decades, TriHealth clinicians have managed common and complex illnesses, treated orthopedic injuries, advocated for student mental-health concerns and

TriHealth and Xavier University broke ground December 11, 2017, on the Health United Building, known as the HUB and located on the Xavier campus. This co-branded, multipurpose facility will be home to the university’s health-and-wellness programs, including fitness and recreation, medical care and academics. TriHealth and Xavier will develop and deliver all services together, through a pioneering affiliation that puts them at the forefront of innovation in campus health care. HUB highlights: LOCATION: 1714 Cleneay Avenue, adjacent to campus in Norwood CONSTRUCTION: MSA Architects and Messer Construction STANDARDS: Built to meet LEED Gold standards and exceed ADA requirements PROJECTED COST: $54 million EXPECTED OPENING: August 2019 INSIDE: Four levels and 160,300 square feet

FITNESS/ RECREATION CENTER

HEALTH AND COUNSELING CENTER

104,400 SF

9,800 SF

•4  -lane recreation pool •3  fitness studios •3  basketball courts •2  -level fitness area • Café

• 10 exam rooms •7  counseling offices • Pharmacy • Wellness coordinator rooms

HEALTH SCIENCES ACADEMIC BUILDING 46,100 SF • 11 classrooms • 8 nursing labs •3  occupational therapy labs •2  sports studies labs

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THE TRIHEALTH-XAVIER COLLABORATION IS UNIQUELY FOCUSED, LIKE NO OTHER IN THE COUNTRY, ON CARING FOR THE WHOLE PERSON—MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT.” —MARK C. CLEMENT

TriHealth president and CEO Mark C. Clement and Xavier University mascot D’Artagnan, the Musketeer, break ground for the Health United Building (HUB), a $54 million campus health-and-wellness center being built jointly by the two organizations.

provided medical care at events big and small. They offer care on campus, at nearby offices and at TriHealth hospitals.

A UNIQUE BOND But the unique bond between TriHealth and Xavier extends beyond medical care. Last year, the two organizations announced a 10-year, exclusive affiliation to create a national model of excellence for collegiate health and wellness. “Our affiliation is the only one of its kind in the nation between a major health-care provider and a university that does not have a medical center,” says Michael Graham, S.J., president of the Jesuit university. “We are developing a bold vision for how health and wellness will be integrated into the fabric of campus life.” To make that level of integration possible, TriHealth and Xavier are jointly building a $54 million healthand-wellness center slated to open on the Emily Dixon, D.O. Xavier campus in Family and Sports Medicine

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September 2019. Within its four levels and 160,000 square feet, the Health United Building (HUB) will include: a fitness center with a pool, fitness studios, basketball courts and a café; a holistic health-and-wellness center with exam rooms, counseling offices and a pharmacy; and expansive academic space with classrooms and laboratories for nursing, occupational therapy and sports studies. TriHealth president and CEO Mark C. Clement, who completed both his undergraduate degree and his master’s degree in health administration at Xavier, describes the TriHealth-Xavier collaboration as “uniquely focused, like no other in the country, on caring for the whole person—mind, body and spirit.” Student Layne Downey, a sophomore majoring in exercise science at Xavier, says the university’s partnership with TriHealth enhances both her educational experience and her future prospects. She spoke at the groundbreaking, saying: “The HUB will provide opportunities for sports-studies majors as well as students in nursing, occupational therapy, health-services administration and radiologic technology.

We’ll have the chance to work hands-on in our classes and that means we’ll be better prepared for the job market.”

TAKING THE TEAM APPROACH Many on Xavier’s campus have felt the impact of TriHealth—some more profoundly than others. Dr. Dixon cared for a Xavier women’s basketball player experiencing fatigue and missing menstrual periods. A physical exam revealed a pelvic mass and imaging showed a large ovarian cyst. Dr. Dixon recruited gynecologists Amber Davidson, M.D., and Jessica Fischer, D.O., of TriHealth Women’s Services, who determined that surgery was necessary. The student’s situation became emergent en route from a conference game. She was brought to Good Samaritan Hospital’s Emergency Department and had surgery the next day. “Fortunately, the cyst was benign,” says Dr. Dixon, who educated the student about hormonal and reproductive health. “She was cleared to return to basketball and is now playing professionally in Europe.” TriHealth primary-care physician

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PROUD XAVIER ALUMNUS STEPHEN CLEVES, M.D., HAS AN OFFICE AT UNIVERSITY STATION. THERE, HE PROVIDES PRIMARY-CARE SERVICES TO FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS AND THE OCCASIONAL MASCOT.

TriHealth physician Stephen Cleves, M.D., gives a checkup to The Blue Blob, Xavier University’s second mascot.

Stephen Cleves, M.D., is a Xavier alumnus with an office at University Station on the grounds of his alma mater. There, he provides internal medicine services for faculty, staff and students. When a coach from a visiting Big East team became ill during a game, Dr. Cleves was called on by TriHealth’s Event Medicine team. He arranged transport to a TriHealth hospital and remained with the coach until it was safe for him to travel home.

TENDING HEALTH AT EVENTS From blisters and minor skin lacerations to more serious medical issues such as dehydration and cardiac arrest, TriHealth’s Event Medicine team is ever present at Xavier. Doug Harris, director of the program for 20 years, says he’s on call 24/7—to the extent that when he’s out of the country, he makes sure his cellphone has international service. Harris needs to be ready at a moment’s notice to coordinate onsite emergency medical care for student athletes and spectators. “We have an outstanding team of critical care nurses, paramedics and emergency medicine physicians at

varsity and club sporting events as well as concerts, graduation and other crowd venues,” says Harris. “We’re able to quickly assess and treat problems.” In severe cases, like the recent appendicitis of a varsity athlete, the medical team stabilizes the individual and transports him or her to the closest TriHealth facility. “Other universities don’t have a program of this caliber,” confirms Harris. “Ours is all-encompassing. It gives parents comfort to know help is nearby—whether kids are on the playing field or in the stands. There’s no reason to call 911. We’ve got 911 right here.” Whether it’s responding to a campuswide illness, treating student-athlete concussions and injuries, expanding health-science academic opportunities or building a revolutionary health-andwellness facility, TriHealth and Xavier have a strong bond and a shared calling. “Our partnership,” says Clement, “combines our strengths and not-forprofit missions to advance education, health care and the community. This affiliation touches lives and transforms people, not only on campus but throughout the region and nation.”

TOGETHER FOR BETTER In 2017, TriHealth and Xavier University deepened a longstanding and mutual commitment to the health, wellness and education of students, faculty and staff through a formal affiliation agreement. The two institutions also broke ground on a unique facility they are building together, the Health United Building (HUB), which will provide space for their joint health-and-wellness programs right on campus. Overall, the TriHealth-Xavier affiliation: • Increases the availability of affordable, quality primary care for students, faculty and staff and offers programs to promote healthy lifestyles •F  osters the growth of Xavier’s nationally ranked athletic program through an expanded, worldclass sports-medicine team •C  reates new learning, training, research and employment opportunities for students in health-science concentrations

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We all multitask. Why shouldn't our gardens? Use the ideas on these pages to hatch your next backyard plot. Here, lettuces, collard greens and Swiss chard coexist happily with tasty (and nutritious!) nasturtiums.

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{ HOME }

EDIBLE GARDEN FROM BACKYARD TO TABLE: MIXING PRETTY AND PURPOSEFUL

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Top: Using sticks or bamboo poles to build a traditional support system for runner beans adds visual interest to the garden. Right: Potted herbs you grew yourself make thoughtful gifts for friends and family.

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Above, top left: Shake things up a little at the dinner table with fresh rainbow carrots. Though taste and nutrients vary slightly, all colors are packed with health-promoting phytochemicals. Top right: A metal pergola supporting fig-leaf gourds makes this passage both intriguing and functional. Bottom left: Fresh tomatoes taste better than storebought, are less expensive and more nutritious, to boot. Bottom right: Raised beds work well in smaller spaces and can be built on top of existing cement or pavers, making it easy to plant an edible garden just about anywhere.

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THE SCREENING YOU SHOULDN’T AVOID TODAY, COLONOSCOPY’S UNPLEASANT REPUTATION IS, FOR THE MOST PART, UNDESERVED—AND IT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE.

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THE 50TH BIRTHDAY. It’s quite a milestone—one that should be heartily celebrated with friends and family. But that festive feeling can be tinged with just a little apprehension. In the back of our minds, we know: It’s time for that first screening for colorectal cancer. That was the case for Liberty-Township resident Susan Joa, Ph.D., a scientist for Procter & Gamble. She turned 50 in January 2016, yet put off having a colonoscopy until October of that year, when she began having stomach cramps. “They found two polyps, one cancerous and one precancerous, and I ended up having surgery to remove part of my colon,” Susan says. “If I could do it all over again, I would’ve gotten it done in January. When you wait, something could be there and you don’t even know about it.” Preparation for a colonoscopy can be quite a comedown from birthday cake, but it doesn’t have to be the stressful experience you may have heard about from a friend or family member.

A DANGEROUS DISEASE Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., but when colorectal cancer is detected at an early stage, the five-year survival rate is 90 percent. That rate goes down drastically if the cancer spreads outside the colon or rectum. “Without screening, colorectal cancer can be a silent killer,” says Robert Isfort, M.D., a gastroenterologist at the TriHealth Digestive Institute. “People generally don’t show any symptoms until it’s too late, or until the cancer has progressed and they require invasive treatments like surgery and chemotherapy.” Colorectal cancer begins as a polyp, which can develop into cancer over a period of about 10 years. Screening gives doctors a chance to find and remove polyps before they become cancerous, and to excise small cancers before the situation becomes critical. If these polyps are discovered early, they can actually be removed quickly and easily during the colonoscopy itself. “When we detect and remove these polyps, we ensure they cannot go on to become cancer,” says Dr. Isfort. In order to detect

RISK FACTORS FOR COLORECTAL CANCER • Being overweight or obese • Physical inactivity • Diet high in red and processed meats • Smoking • Heavy alcohol use • Age • Family history • Inherited gene mutation • Type 2 diabetes • Inflammatory bowel disease

polyps, doctors need to get a clear view, which means the colon has to be emptied. While that used to mean drinking a large amount of unpleasant liquid in a short time frame the night before the procedure, today the process is far easier.

THE SCOOP ON PREPARATION Now, you can drink about half of the bowelclearing liquid the night before, and the remaining dose about six hours prior to the colonoscopy. Planning to be home during this time will, of course, ensure you’re as comfortable as possible. A few days before the procedure, you’ll be asked to start eating a low-fiber diet free of grains, nuts, seeds, dried fruits and raw fruits and vegetables. The day before, you’ll be restricted to clear liquids, such as broth, black coffee or tea, and clear juice. For the exam itself, you should ask a friend or relative for a ride home afterward as you’ll likely still be under the influence of a sedative. “After going through it, I realized a colonoscopy isn’t anything to worry about,” says Susan. “The preparation is like going on a cleanse for a couple days, and you’re sedated for the procedure itself. All in all, it

was a lot easier than I expected.” Having a colonoscopy every 10 years starting at age 50 is the standard for colorectal cancer screening, though some people may need to start as early as 40 if they have a family history of colon cancer or other risk factors. There are also other screening options. CT colonoscopy uses X-rays and computer imagery to give doctors a picture of the colon and is usually done every five years. Another choice is flexible sigmoidoscopy, which allows doctors to check the inner lining of the rectum and the lower colon. There are even highly sensitive home-test kits that can detect unseen blood in the stool and require no bowel preparation, but they must be done once a year. Talk to your doctor about the best screening option for you based on your health history, symptoms and risk level. “I tell my patients the best form of screening is one they’re most comfortable with,” says Dr. Isfort. “But colonoscopy definitely offers the most complete look, so we don’t need to do it as often as these other methods. Colonoscopy is a routine procedure with very low risk, and it’s a highly effective way to prevent one of the most common cancers in the country.”

Robert Isfort, M.D., is a gastroenterologist at the TriHealth Digestive Institute.

FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL 513 794 5600. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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{ TASTES }

STIR IT UP! A WOK AND A FEW FRESH INGREDIENTS ARE ALL YOU NEED TO MAKE QUICK, HEALTHY AND SUPER-TASTY MEALS.

PINEAPPLE CHICKEN SERVES: 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

 oz. boneless chicken thighs, sliced 9 into ½-in. cubes n  pinch of sea salt n  pinch of ground black pepper n  1 Tbs. cornstarch n  1 Tbs. canola oil n  2 dried chiles, whole n 1 Tbs. Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry n  ½ small pineapple, sliced into ½-in. cubes n  ½ red pepper, seeded and sliced into ½-in. cubes n  small handful of roasted cashews (optional) n  1 scallion, finely sliced n  fresh cilantro leaves, to garnish

Put the chicken in a bowl and season with the salt and pepper. Add the cornstarch and mix well. Whisk together all the ingredients for the sauce in a small bowl, then set aside.

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FOR THE SAUCE ½ cup pineapple juice n  1 Tbs. low-sodium light soy sauce n  1 Tbs. cornstarch n  juice of 1 lime n  1 tsp. honey n  ¼ tsp. Sriracha chili sauce

Heat a wok over high heat and when the wok starts to smoke, add the canola oil. Add the chiles and fry for a few seconds to release their aroma, then add the chicken pieces and stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes. As the chicken starts to turn opaque, add the Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes until the chicken is cooked through. Add the pineapple and red pepper pieces and cook for less than 30 seconds. Then pour in the sauce, bring to a boil and boil until the sauce has reduced, is slightly sticky and has a thicker consistency.

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Add the cashew nuts (if using), followed by the scallion and cook for 20 seconds. Stir together well, then transfer to a serving plate, garnish with fresh cilantro and serve immediately.

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{ TASTES }

RADISH IN BLACK VINEGAR WITH CRABMEAT AND BLACK SESAME SEEDS SERVES: 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

 tsp. canola oil 1 n  10 oz. radish leaves n  1 ¾ cup radishes, cut into ¼-in. slices n  1 Tbs. Chinkiang black rice vinegar or balsamic vinegar n  pinch of superfine sugar n  7 oz. fresh white crabmeat n  1 Tbs. black sesame seeds, to garnish n  pinch of dried chili flakes, to garnish

Heat a wok over high heat until smoking and add the canola oil, then add the radish leaves and sliced radishes. Toss for 10 seconds, then drizzle 2 tablespoons cold water around the edge of the wok to create some steam to help cook the radishes. Season immediately with the vinegar and sugar and toss through.

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Spoon the radish onto serving plates, then top with the fresh crabmeat and garnish with the sesame seeds and chili flakes.

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{ TASTES }

CHINESE WOK-FRIED SCALLION SALSA VERDE WITH KALE AND EGG NOODLES SERVES: 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

 ½ cups sliced curly kale 1 n  7 oz. dried Chinese egg noodles n  1 tsp. toasted sesame oil n  2 Tbs. canola oil n  pinch of salt n  knob of fresh ginger, peeled and grated n 1 red chile, seeded and finely chopped n 1 pinch of dried chili flakes n  2 scallions, finely chopped n  ¼ cup cold vegetable stock n  1 Tbs. low-sodium light soy sauce

Pour 4¼ cups cold water into a pan and bring to a boil. Add the kale and blanch for 30 seconds, then drain and remove. Cook the noodles according to the package instructions, then run them under the cold tap, drain and drizzle with the toasted sesame oil.

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Heat a wok over high heat until smoking and add the canola oil. Add the salt and let it dissolve in the hot oil, then add the ginger, fresh chile, dried chili and scallions in quick succession to explode their flavors in the wok. Add the vegetable stock and stir-fry over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add the kale and cooked egg noodles and toss all the ingredients well to warm through. Season with the light soy sauce and give it one final toss, then transfer to serving plates and eat immediately.

Reprinted with permission from Stir Crazy by Ching-He Huang, Kyle Books, Great Britain. Photography by Tamin Jones. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication may be made without written permission from the publisher.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

Questions about where to go for care? “It’s always appropriate to call your pediatrician’s office,” says Joseph M. Bailey, M.D., TriHealth System Chief for Pediatrics, seen here with a patient.

CHOOSING THE BEST CARE FOR YOUR ....... CHiLD WHEN YOUR CHILD IS SICK OR INJURED, YOU WANT TIMELY ACCESS TO EXCELLENT MEDICAL CARE. TRIHEALTH’S NETWORK HAS YOU COVERED.

YOU KNOW THE DRILL: Your daughter wakes up with a sore throat; she’s spiking a fever. Your first instinct is, of course, to ensure that she gets the best health care available from an excellent doctor as soon as possible. But what’s the best way to make that happen? To help parents access the highest quality pediatric care when and where they need it, TriHealth has created a highly organized and integrated system. The TriHealth network consists of more than 50 pediatric physicians in 13 office locations throughout Greater Cincinnati. In addition, six hospitals and three Priority Care centers support emergency and urgent care. The goal? To make it easy for you to utilize the right medical resources for your child while keeping your medical costs down.

QUALITY CARE AT ALL HOURS “There are physicians in our system available for our patients 24/7,” says Joseph M. Bailey, M.D., TriHealth system

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chief for pediatrics. “We offer what I consider some of the finest pediatric care in the city. We care for patients from birth to age 21 and address everything from well-child care to illnesses, developmental issues, sports injuries, psychological issues and medical emergencies.” Like many parents, you’ve probably debated whether you need to take your sick child to his or her pediatrician, to an urgent care center or to the hospital. TriHealth’s experienced health-care professionals can take the guesswork away. “It’s always appropriate to make a phone call to your pediatrician’s office,” says Dr. Bailey. “His or her staff can really help you by offering triage information over the phone, and by recommending whether your child should be brought into the office or should instead be seen in the emergency room.” Keeping your child’s overall care within the TriHealth system offers many benefits. One key advantage: Having all electronic medical records in one place.

“Continuity of care is very important,” explains Dr. Bailey, pointing out the ease with which TriHealth pediatricians and subspecialists can share notes and communicate. “In addition,” he says, “by keeping your child’s care within our system, we can offer faster turnaround time on testing—you get quicker results on blood tests, hearing tests and more. Because of this, decisions can be made regarding your child’s care much sooner and in a more efficient manner.”

AVOIDING SURPRISE COSTS Making sure your child is seen exclusively by one system of providers can help you avoid surprise extra costs, too. A recent Yale University study found that receiving out-of-network care in an emergency room, for example, can mean unforeseen charges for hundreds of dollars or more. The ordering of repeat tests is another expense that can be avoided by keeping all your child’s care in one system. “From a financial standpoint,

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TRIHEALTH CARES FOR KIDS Explore our pediatric care map to view TriHealth medical resources—from hospital ERs to primary care offices—near you.

TriHealth Hospitals (& Emergency) Bethesda Arrow Springs Bethesda Butler Hospital Bethesda North Hospital Good Samaritan Hospital Good Samaritan Western Ridge

PC

McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth TriHealth Evendale Hospital

Urgent Care Locations PC

PC

TriHealth Priority Care

TriHealth Outpatient Surgery Bethesda Minimally Invasive Surgery Center Bethesda Orthopedic Surgery Center Bethesda Surgery Center TriHealth Surgery Center Anderson TriHealth Surgery Center West

Physician Practices (Multi-specialty)

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Good Samaritan Glenway TriHealth Anderson TriHealth Kenwood TriHealth Liberty Way* PC

Orthopedic and Sports Medicine TriHealth Orthopedic & Sports Institute

TriHealth Physician Partners TriHealth Group Health TriHealth Pediatrics TriHealth Primary Care

* Coming soon

maintaining care within TriHealth can help control costs,” says Dr. Bailey. Another benefit of single-system care: Consultations are seamless. TriHealth physicians can quickly consult on a patient’s diagnosis and treatment. They know each other and have developed relationships that make it easy to work together and communicate clearly. “Staying in the system helps with quality control of care,” says Dr. Bailey. “When a patient is in my office, I can just walk down the hall to consult with a subspecialist or colleague and say, ‘I think you need to see my patient.’ It’s that simple. Within the TriHealth system, I know the doctors I’m referring my patients to, and I know my patients will get quality care from these physicians.”

,

URGENT CARE SERVICES & TREATMENTS If you or your child have an urgent care need and don’t have a physician, or if your physician recommends urgent care, TriHealth Priority Care centers are open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Saturday–Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Reserve your spot and check wait times at TriHealth.com/PriorityCare. Available services include: • Broken bones/fracture evaluation

• Lab testing for these conditions on site

• Cough, cold, asthma, flu

• Minor burn care

• Flu shots when in season (nasal spray vaccine not offered)

• Minor sports- and work-related injuries

• Infections such as strep, urinary, skin, respiratory/lung

• Splinting of injuries

• On-site X-rays • Wound care/stitches

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{ ESCAPES }

THE SIREN CALL OF

LAKE COMO EXPLORE ITALY’S FABLED LAKESIDE RESORT WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S GRANDEST HOTELS, THE VILLA D’ESTE, AS YOUR BASE CAMP. TEXT BY EVERETT POTTER

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Some 25 acres of manicured gardens filled with succulents, jasmine and azaleas surround Villa d’Este.

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IN A WORLD WHERE the term “luxury” seems to be losing its meaning, there are still a handful of hotels where it applies. Villa d’Este, dramatically set on the southwestern shore of Lake Como in northern Italy’s Lombardy region, is one. This remarkably youthful dowager has superb Renaissance architecture and a staff that rivals that of any other hotel in the world. What I find remarkable about Villa d’Este is that its history is deep and authentic, not recreated. It was built in 1568 by Cardinal Tolomeo Gallio as his own residence, back in the days when the church had not only all of the power but all of the money as well. It changed private hands several times over the centuries, in 1873 becoming a hotel, a retreat for well-to-do Victorians. Hollywood came calling in 1925 in the person of a young Alfred Hitchcock, who made his first film, The Pleasure Garden, on its grounds. It’s an apt title for a place where I felt like a guest at a private villa, with a staff that anticipated my every need. I found Villa d’Este full of guests seeking old-world glamour, knowing they wouldn’t be bothered but assured that they would be artfully cared for. A veritable redoubt for the rich, it has the feel of old money—though not all the money here is old. Just this past August, both Bruce Springsteen and Robert De Niro were in residence, and it’s not uncommon to spot the lake’s most famous residents, George and Amal Clooney, dining at The Grill. The interior is a riot of marble, lush fabrics and antique furniture, the hallways festooned with portraits and sculptures. The spacious guest rooms and their tall windows are edged with silk brocade drapes and have extraordinary lakeside views that also take in the 25 acres of gardens Villa d’Este is set on. This stage set, utilizing regal gold, royal blue and deep red, is complemented by acres of manicured gardens filled with azaleas, jasmine and succulents. CONTINUED

This page, top: Guest rooms in Villa d’Este, which feature silk brocade drapes, are swathed in deep red, regal gold and royal blue. Bottom: Villa d’Este was built in 1568 by Cardinal Tolomeo Gallio as his very own residence. It became a hotel in 1873. Opposite page: The villa’s hallways are filled with dramatic accents, including chandeliers, portraits and sculptures.

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I would stroll the pebbled paths through the gardens in the morning, and then take an excursion on the lake, which is crisscrossed by ferries. I like the city of Como itself, a short distance away, mildly bustling and filled with shops and glimmers of Roman ruins, as well as one of the country’s most impressive cathedrals. But I love the smaller towns on the lake, places like Varenna, with its steep medieval stairs and the lovely garden of Villa Monastero. Each day, by the time the hot sun began to slide behind the mountains toward Switzerland, I was back at the hotel. Leisure is the major pursuit at Villa d’Este. There is a floating swimming pool in Lake Como, surrounded by deck chairs that always seem to be occupied by readers and avid sunbathers. In the evening, these same guests can be found in elegant dress on the terrace, which overlooks the lake and is served by tuxedoed waiters bearing aperitivos, olives and arancini while a pianist plays softly in the background. This nightly social gathering is de rigueur, the essence of your stay at Villa d’Este. You can dine off the property, but you probably won’t, with the Michelin-starred Veranda on the premises. I donned the requisite jacket and tie to sit in a regal blue and yellow room that overlooks the lake, dining on a classic Veal Milanese while enjoying arguably the best views of the water. The Grill is the more casual choice. You can play tennis or squash here, enjoy the gym or head for the spa. Frankly, I never did any of those things. Instead, I looked forward to a daily in-room breakfast with a lake view, the leisurely consumption of a novel and the chance to enjoy a lifestyle redolent of the 19th century. In my book, if the term “luxury” survives, this is pretty much its definition. This page, top: The lavish gardens of Villa Monastero hug the lakeside. Bottom: A floating swimming pool at Villa d’Este is a favorite of sun-worshipping guests. Opposite page: In the charming village of Como, winding streets snake down to the waterfront.

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EXERCISE:

Don’t Go It Alone RESEARCH SHOWS THAT SOCIAL SUPPORT FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS CAN HELP YOU KEEP YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE ON TRACK. WE’VE ALL BEEN THERE—those days when your get-up-and-go went elsewhere, leaving you with a long list of possible excuses not to exercise, from “I have more important things to get done today” to “It’s raining” or “Skipping one day won’t hurt.” But getting off track on your fitness routine can impact your health. Regular exercise reduces your risk for a host of diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease and cancer (see sidebar).

HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two hours and 30 minutes of aerobic activity that’s of at least moderate intensity (for example, brisk walking) per week. That’s about the amount of time you might spend watching just one movie. Another way to break it down is 30 minutes of activity five days a week. But you can exercise in increments as small as 10 minutes each, if that works better for you, and still reap health benefits. Recommended in addition to aerobic activity: two or more days a week of muscle-strengthening activities that work all the major muscle groups.

TEAM UP FOR SUCCESS Fortunately, research shows there’s a reliable way to help ensure that you exercise consistently: Get yourself some social and emotional support. When you exercise with a family member or close friend, you’re more likely to stick to your fitness commitment.

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If you can’t exercise together, just talking about your fitness activities, successes and challenges can help you stay the course. Even having someone to complain to when you don’t feel like heading to the gym or out for a walk is beneficial. Once you’ve started exercising consistently, practical support also can help. For example, teaming up with someone who is willing to give you a ride to the gym when you need it, or who remembers your fitness-accessory wish list when your birthday rolls around.

POTENTIAL PITFALLS Studies have found that it’s equally important to avoid negative support—those friends or family members who repeatedly remind you that you may injure yourself, for example. Another important caveat: Don’t let a spouse or anyone else take away your autonomy by telling you when to exercise or what you should be doing. Studies show that when people feel pressured to be physically active, they avoid it. Instead, set a plan that will work for you and ask others to support your chosen approach.

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PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH Regular, moderate exercise is one of the best things you can do to protect your health. The many benefits of consistent physical activity include reduced risk of: • Obesity • Cardiovascular disease • Type 2 diabetes • Cancer (some types) • Osteoporosis • Depression • Falls as you age

GET FIT WITH TRIHEALTH The TriHealth Fitness & Health Pavilion offers more than 80 group fitness classes each week in two beautiful, spacious studios and two indoor pools, as well as a 10,000-square-foot fitness floor with more than 250 pieces of cardiovascular, strength and flexibility equipment. For more information, visit TriHealth.com/ FitnessPavilion or call 513 985 0900.

CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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{ WHERE TO EAT }

AMERICAN

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL The city’s oldest bar, featuring traditional American comfort food and a wide beer selection, 210 E. 8th St., 513.421.6234 BJ’S RESTAURANT AND BREWHOUSE Handcrafted burgers and deep-dish pizzas with beers brewed on-site, 11700 Princeton Pike, Unit J1A, 513.671.1805 CHARLEY’S STEAKERY Serving quality Philly steaks for more than 25 years, Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.1626 THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY Inventive American cuisine with an extensive dessert menu focusing on cheesecake, Liberty Center, 7612 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.755.2761 THE EAGLE FOOD AND BEER HALL Southern comfort food and beer hall, 1342 Vine St., 513.802.5007 FLIP SIDE BURGER & BAR Burger, shake and craft beer concept featuring Ohio grass-fed beef and free-range chicken, Liberty Center, 7622 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.777.6328 THE GOLDEN LAMB Comfort food that may just be worth the half-hour trek to Lebanon, 27 S. Broadway, 513.932.5065 HOLY GRAIL TAVERN & GRILLE Lively sports bar with casual fare and drink menu, 161 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.621.2222 INCLINE PUBLIC HOUSE Upscale pub food including NYC-style pizzas served against a stunning view of the city, 2601 W. 8th St., 513.251.3000

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J. AUSTIN’S RIVERBANK CAFE Southern-style specialties like grilled catfish and shrimp po-boys, 102 Main St., Hamilton, 513.795.7640

THE PRESIDENTS ROOM Eclectic menu that blends contemporary American, Italian and German flavors, 812 Race St., 513.721.2260

KRUEGER’S TAVERN Contemporary American bar food with a European influence, 1211 Vine St., 513.834.8670

RED ROOST TAVERN Contemporary American fare with organic, farmto-table ingredients, 151 W. 5th St., 513.579.1234

MELT ECLECTIC CAFE Vegetarian restaurant specializing in sandwiches and meat substitutes, 4165 Hamilton Ave., 513.681.6358 METROPOLE Contemporary dishes cooked in a wood-burning fireplace, 609 Walnut St., 513.578.6660 MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET Specializing in off-the-boat-fresh fish, 9456 Water Front Dr., West Chester, 513.779.5292 NORTHSTAR CAFE Hearty, healthy American fare with a renowned brunch service, Liberty Center, 7610 Sloan Way, Liberty Township, 513.759.0033 ORCHIDS AT PALM COURT Contemporary American food at Hilton’s well-established fine-dining restaurant, 35 W. Fifth St., 513.421.9100 THE ORIGINAL MONTGOMERY INN Cincy staple well-known for its BBQ ribs, 9440 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.791.3482 PALACE RESTAURANT Inventive finedining establishment located inside the historic Cincinnatian Hotel, 601 Vine St., 513.381.3000 PAXTON’S GRILL Relaxed, friendly spot housed in one of Loveland’s oldest buildings, 126 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland, 513.583.1717 PIES & PINTS Authentic craft pizza and beer establishment featuring bar food, Liberty Center, 7621 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.755.7437

RICK’S TAVERN & GRILLE Friendly neighborhood drinkery serving up pub grub amid 50 flat-screen TVs, 5955 Boymel Dr., Fairfield, 513.874.1992 THE RUSTY BUCKET Relaxed, family-friendly neighborhood tavern, Liberty Center, 7524 Bales St., Liberty Township, 513.463.2600 SALAZAR Casual contemporary American fare with farm-inspired lunch and dinner menus, 1401 Republic St., 513.621.7000 SENATE RESTAURANT Casual contemporary American eatery specializing in upscale hot dogs, 1212 Vine St., 513.421.2020 SKYLINE CHILI It’s a Cincy staple, famous for its chili served as Cheese Coneys and 3-Ways, multiple locations including 10792 Montgomery Rd., 513.489.4404 SLATTS Relaxed neighborhood pub with plenty of plasma TVs for watching the game, 4858 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.2223 STONE CREEK DINING COMPANY A varied menu of sandwiches, salads, seafood and steaks, multiple locations including 9386 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.489.1444 and 6200 Muhlhauser Rd., West Chester, 513.942.2100

TANO BISTRO & CATERING Contemporary bistro in historic Loveland, featuring fresh ingredients and a menu that changes with the seasons, 204 W. Loveland Ave., 513.683.8266 TERRY’S TURF CLUB Laid-back burger joint with large portions and vegetarian options, 4618 Eastern Ave., 513.533.4222 TOM + CHEE Specializes in tomato soup and grilled cheese, multiple locations including 9328 Union Centre Blvd., West Chester, 513.860.0638 THE WILDFLOWER CAFE Farmto-table fare served in a converted century-old farmhouse, 207 E. Main St., Mason, 513.492.7514

BBQ

MIDWEST BEST BBQ & CREAMERY BBQ joint and ice cream parlor launched by the popular local BBQ sauce and rub company, 7832 Glendale-Milford Rd., Camp Dennison, 513.965.9000 MONTGOMERY INN BOATHOUSE Ribs, burgers and other BBQ specialties, 925 Riverside Dr., 513.721.7427 SMOQ Southern BBQ soul food cooked low and slow, including ribs, brisket and pulled pork, 275 Pictoria Dr., Springdale, 513.671.7667

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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FRENCH

JEAN-ROBERT’S TABLE Exquisite French cuisine with a weekly changing lunch menu, 713 Vine St., 513.621.4777 TASTE OF BELGIUM Waffles and crepes (both sweet and savory) at this local favorite, multiple locations including 1133 Vine St., 513.381.4607

GREEK/ MEDITERRANEAN

ABIGAIL STREET Inventive cuisine with cheese menu and wine on tap in a trendy but casual setting, 1214 Vine St., 513.421.4040 DURUM GRILL Small, casual gyro eatery loved by the locals, 4764 Cornell Rd., 513.489.4777 PALOMINO Offering a mix of Mediterranean and contemporary American cuisine with a view of Fountain Square, 505 Vine St., 513.381.1300 PHOENICIAN TAVERNA Mediterranean cuisine in a trendy but casual setting, 7944 S. Mason Montgomery Rd., Mason, 513.770.0027 RAYA’S LEBANESE Mediterranean food, specializing in kabobs and gyros, 801 Elm St., 513.421.0049 ZULA Eclectic menu of Greek tapas dishes and extensive wine and craft beer lists, 1400 Race St., 513.744.9852

ITALIAN

BOCA French and Italian dishes, NYCstyle pizzas and a gluten-free menu, 114 E. 6th St., 513.542.2022 BRIO TUSCAN GRILLE Serving high-quality steaks, housemade pasta and flatbreads prepared in an authentic Italian oven, Liberty Center, 7600 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.759.4500

BRAVO CUCINA ITALIANA Upscalecasual chain serving Italian classics with a twist amid Roman-ruin decor, multiple locations including 5045 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, 513.234.7900, and 9436 Waterfront Dr., West Chester, 513.759.9398 NICOLA’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine featuring fresh pastas and an extensive wine list, 1420 Sycamore St., 513.721.6200 PITRELLI’S A true mom-and-pop dining experience with cuisine from several regions of Italy, 404 2nd Ave., Mason, 513.770.0122 PRIMAVISTA Traditional Italian entrees with wine menu and a view of the city, 810 Matson Pl., 513.251.6467 SOTTO Trendy Italian restaurant serving small plates and handmade pastas, 118 E. 6th St., 513.977.6886 VIA VITE Casual dining of stonefired pizza and fresh pastas with alfresco courtyard seating, 520 Vine St., 513.721.8483

MEXICAN

BAKERSFIELD Authentic Mexican street food with extensive tequila and whiskey menus, 1213 Vine St., 513.579.0446 CHUY’S Eclectic Tex-Mex eatery featuring handmade tortillas, 7980 Hosbrook Rd., 513.793.2489 EL PUEBLO Authentic Mexican fare made from secret family recipes, 4270 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.4405 JEFFERSON SOCIAL Upscale Mexican fare with extensive cocktail weekend, 101 E. Freedom Way, 513.381.2623 MAZUNTE TAQUERIA MEXICANA Casual Mexican eatery with trendy, festive decor, 5207 Madison Rd., 513.785.0000

NADA Trendy Mexican cantina serving creative cocktails and modern twists on traditional south-of-the-border favorites, 600 Walnut St., 513.721.6232 QDOBA Casual Mexican grill featuring fresh, handcrafted meals, 2721 Edmonson Rd., 513.351.2269; Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.0486; Mason, 5030 Deerfield Blvd., 513.770.0301; Blue Ash, 9749 Kenwood Rd., 513.984.2629; Florence, 7683 Mall Rd., Florence, KY, 859.647.0296

PIZZA

DELICIO COALFIRED PIZZA An artisan pizzeria that fuses rustic Italian traditions with the smoky flavors of the U.S. Southwest, 9321 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.834.5460; Xavier, 3701 Montgomery Rd., 513.834.5460 DEWEY’S PIZZA Specialty pizza pies with seasonal menu, multiple locations including 7663 Cox Ln., West Chester, 513.759.6777 GOODFELLAS PIZZERIA Pizzeria with large slices and late-night hours, 1211 Main St., 513.381.3625 LAROSA’S PIZZERIA Casual pizza joint serving the area for more than 60 years, multiple locations RICHARDS PIZZA Local chain serving up pies since 1955, multiple locations including the original at 417 Main St., Hamilton, 513.894.3296 SBARRO Casual eatery serving up New York-style pizza and pastas, Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 512.443.8300

ASIAN PARADISE Asian fusion restaurant and lounge offering popular happy-hour specials, 9521 Fields Ertel Rd., Loveland, 513.239.8881 BIBIBOP Healthy Korean meals that include quality proteins, vegetables, gluten-free grains and Asian sauces, Liberty Center, 7616 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.310.6615 FUSIAN Sushi bar with create-your-own rolls, fresh juices and healthy side dishes, 600 Vine St., 513.421.7646

KONA GRILL Innovative exotic entrees, award-winning sushi and fresh fish, 7524 Gibson St., Liberty Center Mall, Liberty Township, 513.322.5860 MANGO TREE THAI & SUSHI Casual eatery serving fresh, authentic Thai cuisine and sushi, 7229 Wooster Pike, 513.271.0809 QUÁN HAPA Asian fusion and gastropub with trendy setting, 1331 Vine St., 513.421.7826

BISTRO ON ELM Located within the Millennium Hotel Cincinnati, this bright spot offers steaks, seafood and pasta, 150 W. 5th St., 513.352.2189 CARLO & JOHNNY Another winner from Jeff Ruby serving prime steaks, seafood options and bountiful sides in an elegant space that was once a stagecoach stop, 9769 Montgomery Rd., 513.936.8600 CELESTIAL STEAKHOUSE Upscale steak house and seafood restaurant with an impressive view, 1071 Celestial St., 513.241.4455 JAG’S STEAK & SEAFOOD Surf and turf is served in the dining room or the high-energy piano bar, 5980 West Chester Rd., West Chester Township, 513.860.5353 JEFF RUBY’S STEAKHOUSE Reservations highly recommended at this high-end steak house, 700 Walnut St., Ste. 206, 513.784.1200 MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Steak house and seafood with extensive bar menu and tapas options, 21 E. 5th St., 513.721.9339 MOERLEIN LAGER HOUSE Fine-dining establishment and artifact-adorned beer bar with a wonderful view of the river, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.421.2337 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Popular steak house and seafood restaurant overlooking Fountain Square, 441 Vine St., 513.621.3111 PARKERS BLUE ASH TAVERN Elegantly rustic restaurant known for its prime rib and awardwinning wine list, 4200 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.891.8300

SUSHI/ASIAN FARE

KAZE Trendy sushi and Japanese gastropub featuring a beer garden, 1400 Vine St., 513.898.7991

STEAK HOUSE

THE PRECINCT The original Jeff Ruby’s location features fine steaks and seafood in a turn-ofthe-century setting, 311 Delta Ave., 513.321.5454 PRIME 47 Upscale menu featuring prime cuts and a wine vault, 580 Walnut St., 513.579.0720 RODIZIO GRILL Brazilian steakhouse serving succulent meats and authentic sides, Liberty Center, 7630 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.777.4777 TONY’S OF CINCINNATI Huge portions of prime beef and the freshest seafood (salad and potato included) are the hallmarks of this steak house from Tony Ricci, 12110 Montgomery Rd., 513.677.1993

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{ GATHERINGS }

EXCEEDING EXPECTATIONS 1

THE GOOD SAMARITANS’ 34TH ANNUAL GALA SURPASSED ITS GOALS FOR BOTH FUNDRAISING AND FUN! MORE THAN 720 GUESTS attended The Good Samaritans’ 34th Annual Gala, Illusions—Expect the Unexpected. The gala, held at the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati, surpassed its goal, raising $556,000 to benefit Behavioral Health Services at TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital. Funds will be used to enhance and expand drug and alcohol treatment programs, and also will support the Good Samaritan Free Health Center and the Medical Education Research Fund. Attendees enjoyed cocktails and a gourmet dinner, featuring live entertainment. After dinner, guests donned capes, masks and light-up 44

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accessories to dance the night away. In addition, they were treated to a wine-bottle ring toss, a craftbeer tasting and a green-screen photography booth, which helped guests capture memories of this mesmerizing evening! The entire cost of the event was underwritten by our generous donors. Corporate sponsors included Bricker & Eckler, Fifth Third Bank, Phillips Supply Co., SC Ministry Foundation and Seven Hills Anesthesia. The Good Samaritans is a dedicated volunteer organization of Good Samaritan Hospital Foundation and includes members with ties to the medical and business communities. This year’s Gala Chairwoman was Holly Mouch and her Co-Chairwomen were Felicia Burger and Mary Beth Schmidt. They worked diligently with other Gala committee volunteers and with physician champion, Dallas Auvil M.D.

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1. Dr. Sabino Baluyot, Dr. Nina Baluyot, Gina Saba, Peter Saba, Dr. Steve Perez, Catherine Perez, Molly Donath, Dr. Alex Donath, Judy Donath 2. Tim Pohlman, Jody Pohlman, Dan Fales, Mary Ann Remke, Jack Kuntz, Nancy Gall, Valarie Zummo, Mark Zummo

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3. Seated L to R: Kelly Schiller, Robert Schiller, Rich Rafferty, Mary Rafferty, Candice Taggart, Robert Caress. Standing L to R:  Jim Shanahan, Anne Shanahan, Carol Butler, Patrick Rogers, Elizabeth Rogers, Kim Harper-Gage 4. Mary Beth Schmidt, Gala Co-Chair; Holly Mouch, Gala Chair; Felicia Burger, Gala Co-Chair; Mark Clement, President and CEO, TriHealth, Inc. 5. C  arlos Crump, Nicole Crump, Ashley Easterling, Jamie Easterling

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{ BE THERE }

Taste of Cincinnati May 26–28

Now–June 17

April 6–8

April 16

Each year, the Krohn Conservatory celebrates butterflies by letting thousands of them loose in a selected landscape. This year's show, BUTTERFLIES OF MADAGASCAR, will transport visitors to that exotic African country, with its majestic baobab trees and brightly colored flowers and plants, including bidens, celosia, salvia and ipomoea— in short, butterfly heaven. Open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entry fees: $7 for adults; $4 for children ages 5–17. Children 4 and younger are free. For group reservations: krohn.cincyregister.com/ 2018butterflyshow

Children and adults alike will be enthralled by the CINCINNATI BALLET FAMILY SERIES: BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. This new annual event will feature the Cincinnati Ballet Second Company and students from the Ballet's Otto M. Budig Academy. Of course, the dancing iteself is the main attraction, but dazzling costumes and a narrator will help to further engage youngsters who may be attending their first ballet. Performances are at the Aronoff Center, and will include a sensory-friendly performance April 8 at 10:30 a.m. Tickets start at $20. Learn more at cballet.org/family-series/

If you’re a news junkie with a penchant for keeping up with global affairs, you already know who Martha Raddatz is from her television appearances on shows like ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir, Nightline and Washington Week. In her talk, WHAT IN THE WORLD: GLOBAL HOT SPOTS AND U.S. POLICY, Raddatz will share what she’s learned in the course of her many overseas experiences, including being embedded with U.S. forces on several missions. Contact the Memorial Hall Box Office at 513.977.8838 or see the event listing at memorialhallotr.com

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CINCINNATI USA REGIONAL CHAMBER | SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Taste of Cincinnati May 26–28

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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May 12 Put on your evening best and head to the Duke Energy Center for the CINCINNATIAN OF THE YEAR GALA, one of the city’s top fundraising social occasions. The Southwest Ohio chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation puts on the event, which has been held annually for the past 33 years. Money raised from the gala helps fund research to end type 1 diabetes. This year’s theme: Carnivale for the Cure. Enjoy cocktails, a gourmet dinner and a silent auction while honoring the 2018 recipient, Rich Boehne, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of The E.W. Scripps Company. Learn more at jdrf-cincinnati.ejoinme.org/MyEvents/CincinnatianoftheYearGala2018

CINCINNATI USA REGIONAL CHAMBER | SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

April 18 A premier Cincinnati social event that has raised more than $2.5 million to support programs and services at Bethesda North Hospital since 2002, the BETHESDA LYCEUM hosts a variety of speakers who are expert in topics ranging from politics to art to science. This year’s guest is J.D. Vance, author of the #1 New York Times best seller Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis. In addition to hearing from Vance about his memoir, named a Book of the Year for 2016 by The Economist, attendees will be treated to a lively reception and dinner. Money raised will help build a new Comprehensive Cancer Care Center, designed to provide exceptional patient care by integrating cancer services and bringing them together under one roof. For more information, call 513.865.1621 or go to bethesdafoundation.com

April 29

May 26–28

June 1–3

Sure, exercise is important for your own health. But you can multiply the return on your sweat investment by walking in the MARCH OF DIMES MARCH FOR BABIES, which raises money to improve the health of infants and mothers locally and across the country. This 3-mile walk helps fund educational programs for parents, as well as research to support healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. The walk starts at Freedom Way and finishes at Sawyer Point (you can catch a shuttle back). Learn more at marchforbabies.org

Cincinnati is a proud foodie town, and nowhere is that more obvious than at TASTE OF CINCINNATI—a 40-year tradition in the Queen City! Restaurants, food trucks and bakeries all will be ready to wow with culinary delights. If that’s not enough, Findlay Market is hosting a large booth featuring more than a dozen food vendors. And there’s plenty of entertainment—45 live music performances between five stages. Also not to be missed: Vibrant Veggie Races, in which local media celebrities compete to build and race the fastest veggie-fueled vehicle. The festival takes place along Fifth Street in Downtown Cincinnati. For details, see tasteofcincinnati.com

Do you frequently go bunburying? Chances are, you do—even if you don’t know it! To “bunbury” is to invent an excuse to get out of doing something boring. A three-day music celebration on the banks of the Ohio River, the BUNBURY MUSIC FESTIVAL is your excuse to get out of those tedious weekend errands, and instead enjoy great music from top alternative bands. This year, you can catch performances on two main stages and two side stages. The lineup includes (drumroll, please): Jack White, the Chainsmokers, Blink-182, Incubus, Foster the People, Lecrae, the Dropkick Murphys and many more. Find answers to all your questions and see ticket information at bunburyfestival.com

Butterflies of Madagascar Now–June 17

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{ POWER FOOD }

STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER

WELL-KNOWN AS A COLORFUL TASTE TREAT, THIS FRUIT IS ALSO A NUTRITIONAL POWERHOUSE RICH IN VITAMIN C. DID YOU KNOW? Strawberries are the only fruit with seeds on the outside, a distinction that means they are not classified by botanists as true berries, which house their seeds on the inside. Indeed, the seeds—the average strawberry sports 200—are actually each considered a separate fruit. The U.S. is the world’s top producer of strawberries, and 94 percent of American households consume the fruit.

POWER UP A Harvard study of women ages 25 to 42 found that those who ate three or more servings of strawberries and blueberries weekly were less likely to have a heart attack. One reason: Both fruits have a high concentration of anthocyanin, a flavonoid that may help improve blood flow to the heart and reduce plaque. Strawberries

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are also known to contain powerful antioxidants, and they’re a significant source of both fiber and vitamin C. Because foods rich in vitamin C help the body absorb iron, pair strawberries with iron-rich foods such as spinach and dried fruit.

GROW · BUY · STORE Strawberry harvesting season in Ohio runs from June through October (depending on the variety). If you like gardening— and the luxury of fresh strawberries—you might want to try planting your own patch. Specific requirements differ by variety, but in general strawberries grow best in loose, fertile, somewhat-acidic soil in a location with full sun. Strawberry plants sprout lots of runners that will form new plants if left unchecked. Cut these runners, and you’ll have a higher berry yield. Strawberries

spoil quickly—pick them the day they ripen and use within three days. At the store, look for bright red berries. Refrigerate, either in a single layer in a dish lined with paper towel or in a colander, and hold off washing until you’re ready to use. To clean, put strawberries in a colander and rinse with cold water, or wash each one gently with a damp cloth or paper towel. You should cut away the leaves and the portion surrounding them because that area can be difficult to clean—but do so after washing because this can change berry texture and flavor. Finally, whenever possible, dietitians recommend choosing strawberries that are certified organic. The Environmental Working Group ranks strawberries No. 1 on its “Dirty Dozen” list of fruits and vegetables with the largest amounts of pesticide residue.

80%

103

1

53%

of U.S. strawberries are grown in California as a perennial crop

distinct species of strawberry plants exist

strawberry museum in the world—it’s in Wépion, Belgium

of 7–9 year olds say that strawberries are their favorite fruit

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Cincinnati Health & Life: Spring 18  

The Good Living Magazine From TRIHEALTH

Cincinnati Health & Life: Spring 18  

The Good Living Magazine From TRIHEALTH