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JANUARY 2019 | $3.95 | BERGENMAG.COM | VOLUME 19 ISSUE 1

VOLUME 19 ISSUE 1 | JANUARY 2019

HEALTH & LIFE | FOOD & FASHION | HOME & HAPPENINGS

THE HEALTH & FITNESS ISSUE

52

WAYS TO GET HEALTHIER & HAPPIER!

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EASY APPOINTMENTS. Book Online Join the thousands of patients who have made their Valley Medical Group primary and walk-in care appointments online. We are here for you when you need us, and we offer lower copays than other centers in the area. Evening and weekend appointments are available. Call or book online now.

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All 10 of our Primary and Walk-in Care Centers are now accepting online, real-time appointments.

WALK-IN CARE HOURS*

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WAYNE | 973-706-0238 1578 Rt. 23 North, Suite 100 Wayne, NJ 07470

TEANECK | 201-836-7664 780 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666

85 Chestnut Ridge Road Montvale, NJ 07645

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CONTENTS

{ JANUARY 2019 }

MOVING RIGHT ALONG

Avoid the winter blahs with these safe, fun ideas for staying active indoors.

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Features Orthopedic Injuries | 36

52 Tips For a Better You | 42

Most of us experience injuries from time to time. Should you seek medical care? This guide will help you decide.

Boost your health and well-being in the new year by trying small but significant changes—one for every week of 2019.

8 Tips for Safe Shoveling | 40

A Broadway Tale | 52

Follow these simple steps you can take to avoid injury and accidents as you clear snow this winter.

Upper Saddle River’s Joe Barbara recalls the bumps (and bruises) on his road to the bright lights of the Great White Way.

The Winning Coach Speaks | 54

Augie Hoffmann of Montvale’s Saint Joseph Regional High School discusses his football team’s 2018 state title—and his own playing days. BERGENMAG.COM

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IN EVERY ISSUE 6 Editor’s Note 34 Health News 72 Be There 76 Where to Eat

JANUARY 2019

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Bergen County premier full service S A L O N A N D SPA . e x te ns ions | e yel ashe s | sk inc are | w axing | nai ls br idal s er v ices available

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CONTENTS

Departments Bergen Buzz | 15 Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in the county.

For Men Only | 22

Look out for these nine fashion phenomena when warm weather returns.

Style Watch | 26

You’ll look sporty yet sophisticated with these “active” fashion finds.

Jewelry Box | 28

Watches with the mechanics exposed are the skeletons you’ll want to have in your closet.

Home Front | 30

These tiny tables prove the smallest pieces can pack the most punch.

Talk of the Town | 32

From a rich history to fine dining, Wyckoff offers the best of all worlds.

Escapes | 56

Five readers tell of the life-changing trips they’ve planned for the new year.

Tastes | 58

Less daylight and colder temps can lead to the winter blues. Beat them (and get a little taste of home) with these twists on comfort food classics.

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Power Food | 64

Tangy citrus clementines, ripest in the dead of winter, are bursting with vitamins and nutrients.

Spirits | 69

This wintry hybrid cocktail combines the sweet and savory flavor of chai tea with the oaky taste of bourbon.

Gatherings | 70

Whether it’s at a private concert or grandopening event, Bergenites are always showing up to support their friends and neighbors.

Restaurant Review | 74

When Georgia’s on your mind, new Fair Lawn eatery Shoti Bread House will hit the spot.

A Bergen Moment | 80

There’s a long road ahead for a bicyclist at Palisades Interstate Park. BERGENMAG.COM

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Ginger STORES Women, Children & Home

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Face it: After a month of feasting and frivolity, January can feel a bit lackluster. We make stern resolutions to lose weight, exercise more, make more time to meditate—and the list goes on and on. We at BERGEN don’t subscribe to such bullying tactics. We’re not here to chastise you but to inform, support and encourage you. That’s why we’ve reimagined our “52 Tips for a Better You,” as the article takes a kinder, gentler approach to your well-being. For example, we encourage you to take a well-deserved break from work. Waldwick therapist Jill Pantaleo notes that more than half of employees don’t use its full allotment of vacation days, despite the correlation between time away from the office and improved heart health. Even a staycation, she says, can help both physically and emotionally. Turn to page 42 for more helpful hints and advice from Bergen County experts. A trio of health stories touch on ways to care for your body now and throughout the year. You don’t have to be a weekend warrior to pull a muscle or sprain an ankle, so flip to “Orthopedic Injuries: When to Seek Care” on page 36 to learn ways to avoid and treat certain aches and pains. If you still clear snow from your driveway the old-fashioned way, you’ll want to remember the points listed in “8 Tips for Safe Shoveling” (page 40). Do you avoid the outdoors entirely during winter? We have six easy indoor activities that will ensure you don’t become sedentary this season. Check out “Moving Right Along!” on page 38. Speaking of staying active, BERGEN this month chatted with two guys who are always on the go. Upper Saddle River’s Joe Barbara is a true road warrior—he’s on a national tour with the cast of A Bronx Tale but manages his schedule to spend time with his wife and kids and be a caregiver for his ailing mother. Read more about him in “A Broadway Tale” on page 52. In “A Winning Coach” on page 54, Augie Hoffmann, a Mahwah resident and head coach of the state champion Saint Joseph Regional High School football team, shares some of his most memorable moments on the field and tells us whether the Green Knights are better with him as a player or coach. What else will you find in this issue? Five Bergenites share their 2019 travel plans with us on page 56. (Remember, a vacation will do you good!) On page 58, we provide three recipes that put a delicious spin on classic comfort foods. And on page 64, read about clementines, the tiny citrus fruit that delivers a hefty vitamin C-packed punch. Whatever your personal focus this month (and year), here’s wishing you a happy and healthy 2019.

Rita Guarna Editor in Chief editor@wainscotmedia.com

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Blackened Cod with Grilled Pineapple, Avocado Dressing & Brown Rice

Grilled Chicken with Warm Vegetables & Quinoa

General Tso’s Cauliflower

Kale Salad

Clean Eating

In a perfect world, we would grow our own vegetables, prepare every dish from scratch and our meal presentation would look like something out of a magazine. The reality is we are busier than ever, but still want to nourish ourselves and families with homemade, healthy and convenient meals.

Our Gourmet to Go meals are complete, balanced and designed to make your life easier. We’ve answered your demands and created some new gourmet healthy recipes you will look forward to adding to your diet! All of our Gourmet to Go meals labeled “Clean Eating” offer lean proteins, good carbs and colorful veggies. Try our Kale Salad, General Tso’s Cauliflower, Grilled Chicken with Warm Vegetables & Quinoa or the Blackened Cod with Grilled Pineapple, Avocado Dressing & Brown Rice. Remember… You don’t have to sacrifice quality or taste to eat healthy! The Market Basket chefs use only the finest ingredients and gourmet methods – while taking pride in creating new experiences for their customers. -Heather Campnile MS RD, The Market Basket Nutritionist Meet Our Dietitian Heather Campanile, M.S., R.D.

As a Registered Dietitian, Heather understands how a nutritious diet can dramatically improve your health and body composition. Clients benefit from Heather’s knowledge and expertise which can be tailored to any dietary needs or lifestyle. With a diverse client list that includes adults, children and over 75 professional athletes, Heather ensures her clients reach their diet and fitness goals. Campanile studied nutrition at Hunter College in New York City before completing her Master of Science degree in Nutrition Education and Food Science from Montclair State University, where she is currently an Adjunct Professor.

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KRAME CENTER

for Contemplative Studies and Mindful Living at Ramapo College

Editor in Chief RITA GUARNA Creative Director STEPHEN M. VITARBO

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Senior Editor DARIA MEOLI

MBSR Teacher Training

Senior Associate Editor DARIUS AMOS

Introduction to Mindfulness & Meditation

Lifestyle Editor HALEY LONGMAN

Weekly Meditation Sessions

Contributing Editors LESLIE GARISTO PFAFF, STEPHEN GARNER, DONNA ROLANDO

Learning to Meditate Retreat

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Half-Day and Five-Day Silent Retreats

ART

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Programs for K-12 Educators, Businesses, Organizations and more…

PRODUCTION

Director of Production and Circulation CHRISTINE HAMEL Graphic Designer, Ad Services VIOLETA MULAJ

www.ramapo.edu/kramecenter

BE SOCIAL Join our online community! LIKE us on Facebook: BergenMag FOLLOW us on Twitter: @BergenMag SEE our photos on Instagram: @BergenMagNJ VIEW our boards on Pinterest: HealthandLife SEND YOUR FEEDBACK AND IDEAS TO: Editor, BERGEN, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. BERGEN assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. BERGEN is published 11 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 19, Issue 1. © 2019 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Bergen County: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional.

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Publisher THOMAS FLANNERY Associate Publisher MARY MASCIALE ADVERTISING

Senior Account Executives MARY LIMA, MAURA HUNTER TEMPLETON Account Executives BRIDGET JULIANO, PEARL LISS Director, Special Programs LAURA A. DOWDEN MARKETING, DIGITAL & OPERATIONS

Director of Marketing and Digital Media NIGEL EDELSHAIN Associate Editor/Marketing Associate GIANA BRUCELLA Advertising Services Director JACQUELYNN FISCHER Controller AGNES ALVES Senior Staff Accountant MEGAN FRANK Manager, Office Services and Information Technology CATHERINE ROSARIO PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

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VEIN SPECIALISTS Dr. James Geuder is a board certified vascular surgeon with over 25 years of experience treating vascular and vein problems in Bergen County. At The Vein Center of Oradell, Dr. Geuder personally examines, educates and treats all patients. The Vein Center of Oradell has an ICAVL-approved vascular lab, and they became the first vein center in New Jersey to be certified by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission. Nurse Patty Galitsis, R.N. has many years of experience with vein problems and is certified in fitting compression hose. Castle Connolly and New York Magazine consistently include Dr. Geuder on their “Best Doctor” list and he also has the Patients Choice Award which is based on patients’ experience. The Vein Center of Oradell makes every effort to offer patients the most comfortable and friendly environment as they receive the best medical care.

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ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Thomas Flannery at 201.571.2252 or thomas.flannery@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to BERGEN, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.VEINCENTEROFORADELL.COM

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How can I plan for disabled beneficiaries? Are my IRAs safe? Do I need special planning for them? 140 E. Ridgewood Avenue, Suite 415, Paramus, NJ 07652 Phone: 201-890-2775 | Web: www.williselderlaw.com

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WHAT YOU CAN FIND ON BERGENMAG.COM RIGHT NOW

TIME TO

VOTE Online voting for the 2019 Readers’ Choice Poll opens January 10th! Visit BergenMag.com/bestinvoting and let us know your favorite burger joint, deli, day spa and more! The results will be revealed in our September 2019 issue.

BROADWAY AT BERGENPAC Did you miss the “When Broadway Goes Dark, Van Dyk Goes Live” benefit concert at bergenPAC? Turn to Gatherings on page 70 to see images from the event, then visit bergenmag.com/vandyk to see even more photos of the people and Broadway stars who made the event a success.

BEST OF THE BEST It’s that time again! Choose your favorite bakery, day spa, sushi spot, sports bar and more in the 2019 Best In Bergen Readers’ Choice Awards. Cast your ballots at BergenMag.com/ bestinvoting beginning Jan. 10. Then stay tuned for more info on BergenFest, where we’ll celebrate the winners!

2019 THEST IN BE GEN BERDERS’ REA OICE CH RDS AWA

WIN THIS! Looking to make healthy changes in 2019? In Anticancer Living, authors Lorenzo Cohen and Alison Jefferies use evidencebased information and cancer patient stories to explain how you can transform your life and health by making six fundamental changes. Visit bergenmag.com/anticancer to win a copy of the book and make a healthy change.

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

DRINK YOUR GREENS!

Did you make a pledge to eat healthier this year? Do you want to cut the calories, consume less meat or boost your intake of fruits and veggies? Here’s an idea: Start drinking your greens! On National Green Juice Day, Jan. 26, head to one of Bergen’s many juice bars for a delicious and nutritious handpressed beverage. OK, we won’t tell if the juice you order isn’t actually the color of money, but whatever hue your juice is, it’s the thought (and the ingredients) that counts! Here are a few of our favorite places for a drink: Beets Juice Bar, 21 Hawthorne Ave., Park Ridge, 201.746.6047, beetsjuicebar.com. Have this sip: Focus Pocus (carrot, beet, apple, lemon, ginger root and kale). Juice Journey Café, 1 Main St., Edgewater, 201.313.5842, juicejourney.com. Have this sip: Cool as a Cucumber (cucumber, green apple, pineapple and mint). The Market Place, 21 Brownstone Way, Englewood, 201.568.1968, tmpnj.com. Have this sip: Green Life (mint, kale, wheatgrass, green apple, celery and lemon). Nectar Café, 175 Rock Rd., Glen Rock, 201.857.0825, nectarcafenj. com. Have this sip: Letting Go (pineapple, pear, aloe vera). Super Juice Nation, 127 Vervalen St., Closter, 201.564.7343; 637 Wyckoff Ave., Wyckoff, 201.485.8856, superjuicenation.com. Have this sip: Hydrotonic (pineapple, spinach, parsley, lime, orange and coconut water).

DID YOU KNOW? Fresh winter greens like broccoli, kale, spinach and Brussels sprouts are available at year-round farm markets, including Ramsey Farmers’ Market, Abma’s Farm in Wyckoff and DePiero’s Farm Stand in Montvale. BERGENMAG.COM

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

Going to the movies and making posters wasn’t enough for 7-year-old Katie Sheridan— those were the only activities the Paramus youngster did as a member of the local Girl Scout troop before she left. “She wasn’t even there long enough to sell cookies,” quips Stacey Sheridan, Katie’s mom. But Katie didn’t leave scouting altogether: She simply moved on to the Cub Scouts. In October 2017, the Boy Scouts of America lifted a “boys only” rule for its Cub Scout program and opened enrollment to all kids ages 7 to 10. Since then, approximately 56,000 girls have become Cubs, including Katie, who became the first female member of Paramus Pack 245 last year. Today, about 10 girls have joined the pack, which is open to all girls and boys from every Bergen County town. So why did Katie make the switch? She says she wanted to enjoy the same adventures that her 8-year-old brother, Jimmy, experienced with his den, including camping, hiking and fishing. She’s done all of that as well as constructed her own mini sailboat for a regatta and built bottle rockets. “I love doing all the fun activities,” she says. “At our last meeting, we did science—and it was the best!” She’s also become an ace at selling snacks and popcorn, a required task to qualify for a scouting scholarship. As for the Girl Scout cookies that Katie never sold, mother Stacey says the family isn’t missing out: “We absolutely love Girl Scout cookies in our house and buy them from our neighbors and family members.”

PET PEEVES DURING A

Group Exercise Class You’ve driven to class, claimed your spot, and now you’re ready to get your sweat on—but how are you supposed to concentrate with ringing cell phones, chatty patrons or someone sweating a little too close to you? BERGEN readers share what grinds their gears during a group fitness class. “There’s nothing worse than people checking their cellphones during a class. When you are in class, the last thing you want to see and hear are cellphones. It throws everyone off!” —Dawn Anderson, Oakland “Weekend classes are hard to get into. It annoys me when people reserve a spot in a full class with a waitlist but don’t bother to show up or cancel. It’s frustrating to be on the waitlist and find out later that the class had open spots.” —Christine Becker, Wyckoff

“I don’t understand why people feel the need to set up right next to me when I’m the first person in class and there is plenty of space in the room. I end up spending the rest of the class angry and crammed in a corner.” —Ryan O’Rourke, Northvale

KUDOS

Her voice is heard

You might not be comfortable with the sound of your own voice (who hasn’t thought that once in their life?), but thousands of youngsters and their parents are thankful Kirrilee Berger embraces hers. The 19-year-old Teaneck resident, who’s held several roles on Broadway and TV—including the CBS All Access drama One Dollar—is now the voice of “Poppy,” the head of the kitchen in Nickelodeon’s new animated (and educational) series Butterbean’s Café. In the show, Berger’s character and her friends take pride in serving up healthy snacks and treats to their neighborhood, Puddlebrook. .

BERGENMAG.COM

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“It’s really frustrating when people hold up the class—either by showing up late or taking forever to set up their equipment— causing everyone to wait and the class to end late.” —Daniel Thompson, Fair Lawn

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Photo at left: Zandy Manhold; bottom right: Kathy Hutchins/shutterstock.com

GIRLS WILL BE GIRLS

JANUARY 2019

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WHERE OUR TEAM BELIEVES IN

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

BRIGHT LIKE A DIAMOND What were you doing when you were 27 years old? If you’re lucky, you had a blossoming career like Mark Shami, a Fort Lee resident and Rutherford native who has been named to Forbes’ prestigious “30 Under 30” list for Art & Style. Shami’s the founder and CEO of The M Jewelers, a 5-year-old NYC-based firm that sells gold and silver nameplate and monogrammed jewelry. The company, which reported more than $5 million in revenue last year, also sells an exclusive line through Urban Outfitters and created special pieces for Nike and Live Nation. Jewelry actually runs in the family. Shami and his twin sister, Kelly, launched an eponymous collection of custom nameplate necklaces, some of which have been spotted on A-listers like Beyoncé and Ariana Grande. Their father was also in the business: He previously owned a jewelry store on 47th Street in New York. “The jewelry is simple yet elegant,” notes Emerson resident Megan Stapleton, who received her first piece from The M Jewelers last month. “I put one of the necklaces on my wish list, and I’m so happy that I got it!”

WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD

GET GOING GET ROWING Deadlift form spot on? Top cadence in the cycling studio? Free climb walls with ease? Whether you’re part of the fitness elite or simply kicking off a new resolution, make 2019 the year you take up rowing. These indoor classes aren’t just trending now, they’re quickly becoming a fixture in regular training routines—the low-impact workouts engage the entire body, burn more calories and work up a bigger sweat than indoor cycling, running and other aerobic exercises. A 30-minute row session, for example, can burn up to 300 calories. “It was one of the best workouts when I first tried it at a Crossfit gym a few years ago,” notes Denis Coburn of Westwood. “It’s great that it’s moving into more gyms now so everyone can give it a try.” Genuine Self Wellness (107 Pleasant Ave., Upper Saddle River, 917.363.0640) and Life Time Athletic (10 Van Riper Rd., Montvale, 201.746.4700), among others, offer rowing classes for all ages and abilities. Get on the boat because this workout isn’t sinking!

Shirt from Charles Tyrwhitt

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Photo at top left: Adair Smith; bottom right: Shutterstock

The holidays are long gone but there’s still plenty of shopping to do—for yourself! n Guys, if you think you have what it takes to be the next James Bond, you first better look the part. Charles Tyrwhitt, the British clothier, is now open at Westfield Garden State Plaza, offering timeless menswear pieces—from suits and shirts to socks and shoes—that are luxe and sophisticated enough for 007’s closet. But for a look that’s a little less Bond yet just as fashionable, UNTUCKit has an assortment of men’s and women’s tops meant to be worn untucked, of course. The company’s new store at Garden State Plaza is now open. n In Hackensack, Barnes & Noble has unveiled a prototype store in The Shops at Riverside.What’s in a prototype store, you ask? B&N has moved from its former two-floor space at the mall into a more intimate location. It replaced customer service counters with self-service kiosks, created kid-friendly areas and installed lower-profile bookcases, among other features. “The lounge area is my favorite part,” says Lodi’s Mitch Rivera, who works at one of the mall’s restaurants. “It’s a nice place to unwind before or after my shift.”

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Robotic Joint Replacement 9 x 10_875 Bergen.qxp 12/11/18 10:46 AM Page 1

ROBOTIC SURG E RY WITH VERY

HUMAN BE NEFITS CONSIDERING JOINT REPLACEMENT?

Orthopedic surgeons at The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, New Jersey, are now offering patients an innovative option for partial knee, total knee and hip replacement surgery: A ROBOTIC APPROACH. The Mako Robotic-Arm-Assisted Surgical System is giving Valley’s orthopedic surgeons greater precision in placing and aligning an implant. This often means less pain and faster recovery for patients. And Valley is the first hospital in Bergen County to offer this approach.

FIRST IN BERGEN COUNTY

It’s robotic surgery with very human benefits.

I S M A KO R I G H T F O R YO U ? Find out by calling Amanda Kelly, Valley’s Orthopedics Nurse Navigator, at 201-251-3317.

ValleyHealth.com/Orthopedics

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{ BERGEN BUZZ }

CULINARY CORNER

Men and women who embrace the barre method of exercise (yes, fellas, you can do it too), rejoice! Bergen County’s second Pure Barre studio is now open in Park Ridge, offering 45- to 50-minute classes where participants use a ballet barre to assist them through a series of low-impact isometric movements. The workouts, which are done in small intimate sessions, improve overall strength and balance and are proven to result in long and lean muscle tone—without the bulk. “I’ve taken a few classes at the Pure Barre,” says Melinda Kaufman of Ridgewood. “The workouts might look simple, and in essence the movements are all doable for anyone, but you don’t realize how much muscle power you’re using. Believe me, you’ll work your core like you’ve never before!” Pure Barre, 141A Kinderkamack Rd., Park Ridge, 201.746.9288, purebarre.com

IT’S SHOW TIME How does one turn a hobby of ranting about politics, current events, sports and pop culture into a career in showbiz? Joel Martinez, pictured, has the answer. The 35-year-old Bronx-born Fair Lawn resident is better known as The Kid Mero, and he’s one half of the duo (along with Daniel Baker aka Desus Nice) who are set to star in Showtime’s first weekly latenight talk show Desus & Mero. Here’s how they got there: Mero and Desus were highly active on Twitter, each using the social media platform to go off on just about anything. The two finally teamed up in 2013 for a podcast called “Desus vs. Mero,” in which the two sat behind a desk made of stacked milk crates and cardboard. Their brash humor and style caught on and grabbed a lot of attention, and they eventually landed an evening TV show on Viceland and a second podcast, “Bodega Boys.” When their program on Viceland ended, Showtime came knocking. The show is scheduled to debut Feb. 21 and will air at 11 p.m. every Thursday.

Ruth’s Chris Steak House, 83 W. Spring Valley Ave., Maywood, 551.258.0013, ruthschris.com

GET WRAPPED UP Bubbakoo’s Burritos started as a small joint down the Shore 10 years ago but it has since expanded into a multi-location operation across the state, including a new spot in Oakland. Chalk up the eatery’s success to its made-to-order burritos and bowls, each of which are made with fresh, high-quality ingredients and assorted flavors. “It’s a staple at the beach,” says River Vale resident and frequent shore visitor Kevin Sheehan. “Now that there’s a Bubbakoo’s in Bergen, I don’t have to wait for summer to get one of their burritos.” Bubbakoo’s Burritos, 350 Ramapo Valley Rd., Oakland, 201.644.7944, bubbakoos.com

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FRENCH DELIGHT If all you know about French cuisine are croissants and baguettes or quiches and onion soups, stop by Brasserie Bonjour for a better introduction. The menu here is filled with classic French dishes with an American twist, a combo that’s sure to please any palate. Order either a sweet or savory crepe (breakfast and brunch items are available any time of day) or fall to the temptation of larger plates such as a croque madame sandwich with duck egg or a cepe rubbed ribeye. “The area has a lot of places to get a burger, sushi, pizza or Chinese food,” notes Renato Villegas of River Edge, “so it’s nice to have options. A French restaurant is a welcome addition to Bergen.” Brasserie Bonjour, 2 Hilliard Ave., Edgewater, 201.969.8444, brasseriebonjour.com

SHAKE IT UP Healthy eating has never looked so good! Loaded with fresh ingredients like berries and granola, acaí bowls are nutritious treats that can be eaten any time of the day—not just for breakfast! Bowl Shake, which opened in November, is giving Cliffside Park residents a chance to enjoy this tasty treat, which is just like ice cream, but without the guilt. Stop by for a classic or protein bowl (chia pitaya bowl, anyone?), or go for a fresh juice if you want to drink your nutrients. Bowl Shake, 674 Anderson Ave., Cliffside Park, 201.917.5515, bowlshake.com

Photo at top left: Pure Barre; bottom left: Kathy Hutchins/shutterstock.com; bottom right: Bubbakoo’s Burritos

BARRE essentials

STEAK YOUR CLAIM Ruth Fertel once said she never liked the name of the restaurant chain she founded, but the business managed to work around it. Good thing. Ruth’s Chris Steak House, now open at the Bergen Town Center, is known today for its USDA prime steaks and chops, each served on a sizzling hot plate (500 degrees, so heed your server’s warning). The restaurant also boasts an award-winning wine list—with more than 200 varieties—that will pair perfectly with your meal. “There are two names I think about when I want steak,” says meat lover Avi Jensen of Hackensack. “There’s Peter Luger and Ruth’s Chris. Thankfully, one of them is right in our backyard now.”

JANUARY 2019

12/12/18 4:16 PM


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{ FOR MEN ONLY }

SNEAK PEEK AT SPRING 2019

Look for these nine fashion phenomena when the warm weather returns. Can we really forecast what will be hot in menswear come spring and summer? Not perfectly, but fashion intel offers tantalizing hints. We visited the fashion capitals of Europe—Milan, Florence, London and Paris— and brought back some trends to expect:

1

DOUBLE-BREASTED SUITS Yes, what’s old is new again. This classic appears in a plethora of offerings heading into spring 2019. While the traditional models are available, designers also are starting to push a new one-and-a-half breasted jacket that has more of a shape and appears less boxy. And if you’re looking for a trendier version, there also are a variety of oversized suits being introduced.

2

A RIOT OF COLOR Designers throughout Europe have been showing various shades of light blues, pinks, oranges, reds and yellows in their collections. You’ll have a chance to step out of your navy, black and gray wardrobe to embrace these wonderful hues, due to arrive stateside this spring. You needn’t wear head-to-toe pink; a pop of red or baby blue will definitely help you stand out from the crowd.

3

OVER-THE-KNEE SHORTS We live in an age of oversized, roomy silhouettes, so it’s only natural for our shorts to follow suit. While a looser short allows for more “breathing room” in the summer heat, it also makes for a great look to pair with sandals and a resort shirt. Search for styles that are a bit high-waisted and fit just below the knee. Otherwise you’ll just look like a typical sloppy tourist, and we don’t want that.

4

SMALL SUNGLASSES In a trend that recalls The Matrix, sunglasses are shrinking—and not just for women. Often done in a rose-colored glass, these lenses are barely big enough to cover your eyeballs. But even if you’re squinting, you’ll look sharp as a knife.

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C H I LT O N MEDICAL CENTER ONE OF THE SAFEST HOSPITALS IN THE COUNTRY IS RIGHT HERE IN THE COMMUNITY

“A” is the highest grade given by the Leapfrog Group, an organization dedicated to patient safety. What’s more, Chilton Medical Center was voted #1 mid-size hospital by New Jersey doctors three years in a row. Atlantic Health System is proud to bring our best to the communities we serve. Source: The Leapfrog Group, a national patient safety group

To learn more visit atlantichealth.org/chilton

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{ FOR MEN ONLY }

5

RELAXED TROUSERS This trend has been sneaking back on the runways and into the streets since 2015. You can style trousers with a tucked-in shirt or a polo for a Riviera vibe, or layer them with a doublebreasted blazer and a T-shirt for more of a ’90s attitude. Look for pants that have a higher waist and a carrot leg, which flatter multiple body shapes.

6

7

FANNY PACKS We can’t escape this polarizing accessory: an unapologetically useful, but not always aesthetically pleasing “tourist” bag. Whether you call it a fanny pack, a bum bag or a waist pack, this carryall is back from the grave in a big way. Clip it around your waist—or emulate early adopters who wear this shape across their chests. (Yes, you may have to feature it across your body or under your armpit to reach peak-level coolness.)

8

STATEMENT STRIPES Stripes are everywhere. Far from the classic pinstripe, next season’s stripes are thick, bright and bold. They’ve been spotted on everything from tops and jackets to suits and trousers. If you’d like to try this look, opt for one eye-catching striped piece at a time. You say you’re a veteran style risk-taker? Go for a suit with a thick, bold stripe from head to toe.

9

CAMP-COLLAR SHIRTS With the collar overlapping the lapels, these shirts brilliantly take a tailored ensemble down a notch. Whether you’re drawn to a vibrant pattern or a subdued one, camp-collar shirts have a natural affinity for any jacket in your closet.

GET THE LOOKS

You can find these styles and more at Bergen County’s best men’s specialty stores. Here are five of our favorite: Bendini 39 N. Dean St., Englewood, 201.569.6935 Monte Carlo 123 Westwood Ave., Westwood, 201.594.9777 Papillon 162 Westwood Ave., Westwood, 201.263.9000 Sal Lauretta for Men 621 Godwin Ave., Midland Park, 201.444.1666 Vero Uomo 26 E. Palisade Ave., Englewood, 201.894.1424

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SUITS THAT LIVE LARGE The suit of spring 2019 promises to be a tad oversized and a bit dramatic, often in technical performance fabrics. It will range in color from the typical navy to bold neon hues. We’ve seen this oversized trend happening across clothing categories for a few seasons now, and tailoring departments are freshening up accordingly.

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{ STYLE WATCH }

KORAL PHOSPHENES PLEXUS CROP TOP Reform, Cresskill, 201.399.7619

MARONIE BRUSHED LEOPARD JOGGER Femmebot, Ridgewood, 201.857.3720

FENDI ROCKOKO KNIT SNEAKER Nordstrom, Paramus, 201.843.1122

At Your Leisure

ATHLETA BARRE STIRRUP MIDNIGHT GARDEN TIGHT Athleta, Woodcliff Lake, 201.391.1086

You’ll look sporty yet sophisticated with these “active” fashion finds.

K-DEER TOTE BAG IN JODY STRIPE K-Deer, Westwood, 201.497.3333

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VICTORIA’S SECRET LACE-UP HOODIE Victoria’s Secret, Paramus, 201.368.0456 BERGENMAG.COM

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JANUARY 2019

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You’ll feel it the moment you meet us. Primary care is fundamental to good health. As a primary care physician, Dr. Diane Schwartz feels

fortunate to get to know her patients over time, building relationships that can span decades. She understands her patients’ support networks — the family members, friends and community groups

that are so critical to maintaining a healthy life. Dr. Schwartz works with the people closest to her patients to deliver the best, most personalized care possible.

Experience the feeling of belonging that can only come from a healthcare team who really knows you, and knows how to care for you.

To find an Englewood Health physician, call 844-336-3669 or visit englewoodhealthphysicians.org

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{ JEWELRY BOX }

RADO TRUE OPEN HEART CERAMIC WATCH Nordstrom, Paramus, 201.843.1122

GUCCI VINTAGE WEB WATCH Bloomingdale’s, Hackensack, 201.457.2000

CARTIER BALLON BLEU DE CARTIER FLYING TOURBILLON WATCH Hartgers Jewelers, Wyckoff, 201.891.0044

Bare Bones Watches with the mechanics exposed are the skeletons you’ll want to have in your closet.

PIAGET ALTIPLANO WATCH Cosmos, Fort Lee, 201.592.9211

HUBLOT ONE CLICK BLUE WITH SAPPHIRE AND DIAMONDS The Timepiece Collection, Englewood, 877.678.8463

INVICTA SPECIALTY ANALOG DISPLAY MECHANICAL WATCH Invicta, Paramus, 201.845.4809

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JANUARY 2019

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Don’t just optimize your website. Optimize your entire online presence with BigFish.

bigfish DIGITAL MARKETING FOR LOCAL PONDS

BigFish is an integrated, digital local marketing system involving more than 300 steps. We create videos for your business. We write and publish articles about you online. We do reputation marketing of your business. And we optimize everything for Google—all for a price that’s less than many businesses pay for traditional SEO. If you need more traffic to your website and more calls and visits to your store or office, contact Shae Marcus about BigFish, (856) 797-2227, shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com

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{ HOME FRONT }

PETRIFIED WOOD PULL-UP TABLE Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, Paramus, 201.639.0370

OMBRELLE END TABLE Roche Bobois, Paramus, 201.882.1007

A Side Note

LEGEND ACCENT TABLE Z Gallerie, Paramus, 201.389.0151

These tiny tables prove the smallest pieces can pack the most punch.

THEODORE ALEXANDER BEAL ACCENT TABLE Safavieh Home Furnishings, Paramus, 201.291.0200

BERNHARDT LIVING ROOM END TABLE The Loft Home Furnishings, Paramus, 201.228.1200

EMIL END TABLE Safavieh Home Furnishings, Paramus, 201.291.0200

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{ TALK OF THE TOWN }

WELCOME TO

Wyckoff

n ESTABLISHED:

1926

From a rich history to fine dining, the township offers the best of all worlds.

n POPULATION:

17,221

n WEBSITE:

WYCKOFF-NJ.COM There’s more to Wyckoff than the Jonas Brothers. Originally inhabited by the Lenape Indians until the first Dutch settlers arrived in the 1600s, Wyckoff today features a mix of residential neighborhoods and business areas. With tree-lined streets, good schools, bustling shopping centers, low taxes (when compared with other Bergen municipalities) and an easy commute to New York City, it’s no wonder many families move into and stay in town.

ALL ABOARD!

Built circa 1870, the Wyckoff train stop on Main Street was constructed as a way to boost business. After train service ceased, the building became the PTO Economy Shop in 1966, which is still run and staffed entirely by local parents and volunteers.

ON THE MOVE

DINING OUT Wyckoff’s dining scene is varied, with offerings like The Brick House, known for steaks and seafood, and Aldo’s, which serves traditional Italian cuisine. But there’s also Cafe Amici for salads, Blue Moon Cafe for Mexican and T.S. Ma for Chinese. Craving sweets? Palermo’s Bakery hits the spot.

In 1901, fire chief and local carpenter Daniel Depew built his family’s historic home and barn on Franklin Avenue. While the house was torn down in the early 2000s, the barn was preserved and moved to nearby J.A. McFaul Environmental Center in 2006.

Roughly 30 percent of Wyckoff was comprised of farms and pastures by 1940 but after World War II, when the town became less rural and more residential, the amount of farmland dropped drastically. Today, only two farms remain—Abma’s and Goffle Road Poultry Farm—but both are still family-run and thriving.

HOME, SWEET HOME

Thinking about buying or selling a house here? The median home value in Wyckoff is $693,900, down 3.6 percent over the past year. Home values are expected to increase 2.5 percent within the next year, according to Zillow.

FAMOUS WYCKOFF FACES Several notable people and celebrities have once called the township home. From left, there’s former New York Yankee Bucky Dent and New England Patriots’ wide receiver Chris Hogan. Actress Tara Reid and musician siblings Kevin, Joe and Nick Jonas hail from here, as does TV news personality Steve Doocy.

Wyckoff train stop: Wyckoff Historical Society; house: Jerrye & Roy Klotz, MD; brown barn: The Barn Original; Bucky Dent/Peter Roan; Chris Hogan/eltiempo10; Tara Reid: Ga Fullner/Shutterstock. com; Kevin & Joe Jonas: Lev Radin/shutterstock.com; Nick Jonas: Ron Adar/shutterstock.com

BARN AGAIN

The Barn started as a dairy barn when it was built in 1876, but it turned into a tearoom with food, live music and a dance floor by 1929. It’s known today as The Barn Original, an unsuspecting eatery nestled amongst trees in a quiet residential neighborhood that plates burgers, fries and ribs.

FARM CITY

DID YOU KNOW? The jury is still out on exactly how Wyckoff got its name, but there are two theories: One, that Wyckoff is a derivation of the Lenape word “wickoff” meaning high ground; or two, it came from the Dutch translation for “Garden City.” BERGENMAG.COM

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{ HEALTH NEWS }

PICK THE RIGHT PROTEIN

People who used nuts and seeds to satisfy their protein intake were 40 percent less likely to develop heart disease than those in a control group, according to a recent study. So skip the meat when you can.



—International Journal of Epidemiology

45

The age at which adults should get their first screening for colorectal cancer. This is five years sooner than previous guidelines suggested.

37 The percentage

of adults who take prescription medications—including certain heart and blood pressure meds— experiencing depression as a side effect. Risk of depression increases when patients take multiple medications.

—University of Illinois at Chicago

—American Cancer Society

SWEAT YOUR WAY TO SLEEP

Folks who worked out four times a week for at least half an hour not only fell asleep more than 10 minutes earlier than people who didn’t exercise, they also slept more than 40 minutes longer.—JAMA

TAKE A (WINDOW) SEAT

40

The percentage of female college athletes who have concussions versus their male counterparts who play comparable sports.

You’re less likely to catch a cold by booking a window seat on an airplane. Researchers found that travelers sitting in aisle seats were more likely to pick up a bug than their seat neighbors.



TIP TO STAY FOCUSED

—Michigan State University

10 The number

of years the HPV vaccine can protect against the virus’s four most dangerous strains.

*

“This increased risk for women athletes may be due to females having weak neck muscle strength, therefore having less control of head movements allowing the brain to be jarred inside of the skull more easily. Hormonal differences between genders may play a role as well.” —Felicia Gliksman, D.O., MPH, Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital, Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center BERGENMAG.COM

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—Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

34

—The Journal of Pediatrics JANUARY 2019

—Compiled by Paul Rance Jr.

12/12/18 4:18 PM


Welcome to our new home...

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JOIN US IN

2019 For advertising information, call Tom Flannery, Publisher, at 201.571.2252

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ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES: WHEN TO SEEK CARE Most of us experience everyday injuries from time to time. Should you seek medical care? This guide will help you decide. Even the most coordinated among us will likely experience injury at various times in our lives: an overzealous serve on the tennis court; a simple trip over an unnoticed obstacle; aching knees from…who knows what. Most often, these types of common injuries can be treated at home with rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE), and maybe an over-the-counter pain reliever. In some situations, however, it’s important to see an orthopedic doctor—a specialist who treats injuries and diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, nerves and tendons. Why? Because some conditions can get much worse if not treated quickly and properly. In the knee, one such condition is an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms can include hearing a “pop” during the injury, immediate inability to continue activity, knee swelling in the first 24 hours and knee instability. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s best to see a doctor as soon as possible. Hip problems are also common and can lead to serious complications if not treated. Always consult your physician for medical

advice, but a general rule is to seek your doctor’s help for hip pain that comes on suddenly or is the result of a fall. Other red flags include hip pain that occurs at night or when resting; swelling, redness or warmth around the joint; not being able to put weight on the hip; and not being able to move the leg or hip. Eighty percent of people will experience back pain in their lifetime. Most cases resolve themselves with a day or two of rest, application of heat or cold to the painful area and over-the-counter pain medication. However, see a doctor if you have tingling or numbness, if the pain is the result of a fall or injury, or if the pain is severe and doesn’t improve with rest. In addition, seek medical care if back pain occurs with unintended weight loss, with fever, with swelling or redness on the back, or down one or both legs. Not every injury or pain requires a trip to the doctor, but in the situations outlined above, getting prompt treatment can mean the difference between a quick recovery and a lifelong problem. As always, these are guidelines, not rules.

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

Make an appointment if you experience: • Chronic pain—anything lasting longer than 12 weeks • More limited range of motion • Instability while walking or standing • Difficulty performing everyday activities, such as walking the dog or using stairs • A soft-tissue injury, like a sprain or twisted ankle, that doesn’t improve despite applying RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation)

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{ HEALTH }

THE AGE FACTOR

One way to avoid orthopedic injuries is to maintain strength and flexibility as you age. In addition, stretching your muscles before playing a sport is crucial to help avoid any injury.”

—Michael Kelly, M.D., chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, and chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center

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After age 40, people are more likely to experience an orthopedic injury. These are most common: • Tennis elbow—Weak grip strength and pain or burning sensation outside the elbow • Stress fractures—Minor hairline fractures caused by impact and overuse, common in runners • Lower-back pain—Caused by obesity, arthritis, loss of bone density and a sedentary lifestyle • Rotator-cuff tears—Sore shoulder or limited mobility caused by normal wear and tear in athletes and as people age • Meniscus and ACL tears—Pain in the knee that can be caused by everyday activities like hiking, kneeling or walking down stairs

JANUARY 2019

12/12/18 8:50 AM


{ FITNESS }

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JANUARY 2019

12/11/18 8:53 AM


MOVING RIGHT ALONG! Avoid the winter blahs with these safe, fun ideas for staying active indoors.

TAI CHI Although it’s one of the martial arts, Tai Chi is a wonderfully gentle exercise that can improve your lower-body strength, coordination and balance, helping you to prevent falls. To get started, you can order a DVD for beginners or attend a class at a local studio, such as Body & Brain Yoga/Tai Chi in Ramsey. Seniors can attend free workshops at Valley Health in Ridgewood.

With the days much shorter and nights much colder this time of year, it’s very easy to become sedentary. Nevertheless, it’s important to stay active during the winter season, especially for seniors, as inactivity can take a toll on both physical health and emotional well-being. Consider these ideas to keep moving indoors, some at home and others nearby. MALL WALKING As a service to their local communities, many indoor shopping malls open their doors early to allow area residents the opportunity to walk in a safe, monitored, climate-controlled environment. Garden State Plaza, for example, opens at 6 a.m. every day, while The Shops at Riverside allows walkers inside beginning at 8:45 a.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Try the “buddy system” and commit to meeting a friend there once a week and enjoy a coffee or tea afterward.

YOGA A discipline that combines breath control, meditation and stretching, yoga is practiced by many people of all ages who want to improve overall health and flexibility and reduce stress. BEFORE YOU BEGIN • Be sure to clear any new exercise or workout plans with your doctor. • Choose activities you enjoy so you’re more likely to stick with them. • Start slowly. Increase the amount of time you spend doing an activity by five to 10 minutes at a time each session. • Find a buddy. Get a relative or friend to join you and try to commit to a regular schedule.

EXERGAMING Popular systems like the Wii Fit and PlayStation Move combine the fun of video games with required physical participation to get you up off the couch and in motion, playing along with what’s happening on-screen. DANCING Whether you’re an old pro or a newbie needing lessons, dancing is one of the most fun and social ways of staying active indoors. It offers an aerobic workout while also honing your stability and balance. And from swing to salsa, there’s a genre to suit nearly every taste.

ALWAYS STAY SAFE • Have proper footwear that supports your feet and ankles and has soles that provide good traction. • Be sure to warm up before you undertake any prolonged period of physical exertion. • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water while doing your activities. • Don’t push it. If you’re running a fever, have a cold or upset stomach, or just don’t feel well, give yourself a break for the day. “Listen” to your body. • Exercise might tire you out a little bit, but it should never be painful. Stop at the first sign of pain.

SWIMMING Swimming is one of the best forms of exercise. It’s aerobic, low-impact, go-at-your-own-pace and (if you’d like it to be) social. Check to see if your local community center or YMCA offers discounted passes for seniors.

No matter your fitness level, health condition or age, yoga increases energy, mobility and strength as it opens pathways for mental calm and spiritual connection. Finding the right class and instructor is key, especially if you have physical limitations or are brand new to it.” —Chaya Spencer, certified Anusara yoga teacher, Shree Yoga, Saddle River

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{ SEASONAL HEALTH }

8 TIPS

FOR SAFE SHOVELING Simple steps you can take to avoid injury and accidents as you clear snow this winter.

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It may not seem so, but shoveling snow is technically an aerobic workout—it’s quite vigorous and can place stress on the heart and body. “Shoveling snow can actually pose a serious cardiac health risk to some of us,” warns George Becker, M.D., medical director of The Valley Hospital Emergency Department in Ridgewood. But with a little preparation, you can help protect your health and safety when shoveling in even the worst of winter conditions. Before the next storm hits, read up on these tips from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons on how to reduce injury while shoveling—but be sure to get the go-ahead from your doctor first if you don’t exercise on a regular basis, have a medical condition or are middle-aged or older.

PLAN AHEAD:

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WARM UP Before you begin, warm up your muscles with light exercise for about 10 minutes. Dr. Becker also advises not to “eat a heavy meal or drink alcoholic beverages prior to or soon after shoveling.”

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DRESS THE PART A warm, water-resistant coat, thick socks, insulated gloves and a hat are obvious necessities when shoveling, but don’t forget sensible footwear. Wear shoes or boots with slip-resistant soles to prevent falling. Dress in layers so you can remove clothing as you warm up.

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START EARLY You have the best chance of avoiding injury by shoveling frequently during a storm and shortly after it falls, as fresh, powdery snow is lighter and easier to move than when it’s wet.

BE SAFE:

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USE THE PROPER EQUIPMENT Choose a small shovel that’s comfortable for your height and strength. Proper positioning is key; place your hands on the tool grip to increase your leverage.

WATCH FOR SIGNS OF FROSTBITE Frostbite is most common on the fingers, toes, nose, ears, cheeks and chin. Because of skin numbness, you may not realize you have frostbite until someone else points it out. Signs and symptoms of frostbite include: •C  old skin and a prickling feeling • Numbness •R  ed, white, bluish-white or grayish-yellow skin •H  ard or waxy-looking skin •C  lumsiness due to joint and muscle stiffness •B  listering after rewarming Seek medical attention if you experience: •W  hite or pale skin, numbness or blisters • I ncreased pain, swelling, redness or discharge in the frostbitten area • Fever •N  ew, unexplained symptoms

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PUSH, DON’T LIFT Push snow rather than lift it to avoid strain on your body. If you must lift, do it properly; squat with your legs apart, knees bent and back straight. Lift from your legs, not your waist.

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ADOPT THE PROPER TECHNIQUE Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Don’t overload your shovel, and don’t dump loads of snow over your shoulder or to the side, as this requires a twisting motion that will put tension on your back.

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CLEAR YOUR VIEW Adjust your hat or scarf so it doesn’t obstruct your sight of the area that you are clearing and be sure you have a full view. Be on the lookout for ice patches and uneven surfaces.

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PACE YOURSELF Prevent dehydration by drinking plenty of water and “take frequent rest breaks during shoveling,” Dr. Becker recommends. Stretch when you’re done to help prevent muscle soreness. If you experience chest pain, shortness of breath, or other signs of a heart attack, stop the activity and seek emergency care. “You might also break out in a cold sweat, feel short of breath, nauseated, lightheaded, or uncomfortable pressure, squeezing or fullness in the center of your chest,” adds Dr. Becker. “Every minute is crucial when experiencing a heart attack,” so seek help at the first sign of symptoms.

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52 TIPS

FOR A BETTER YOU Boost your health and well-being in the new year by trying small but significant changes— one for every week of 2019. By Leslie Garisto Pfaff In January the year ahead is all possibility, and every week an opportunity to find a new way to maximize health, well-being and good times. Here we’ve made that a little easier, with 52 simple suggestions designed to help you feel good, do good and be your very best self. Continued...

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1 WARM UP BEFORE YOU WORK OUT.

While some studies have questioned the benefit of stretching before exercise, warming up is a proven way to improve your workout and avoid injury. Michael Blauner, an in-home personal trainer in Bergen County, is a fan of the dynamic warmup, which he describes as “movements that are easier, lighter versions of the movements you’re about to vigorously engage in.” They work, he says, because “they get the appropriate muscles activated and engaged.”

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Don’t sweat the sunscreen. Recent reports that zinc oxide nanoparticles—a common ingredient in some of the most potent sunscreens—might be toxic appear to have been debunked by an Australian study published in November. So guard your skin by slathering on that SPF without fear—and repeat often, per product directions.

and being confronted with the worstcase scenario? A New York University study of online videos on prostate cancer, for instance, found that 77 percent contained misinformation and 19 percent recommended untested treatments. So if you have a serious question about your health, ask a real live doc.

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Sleep heavy. For a better night’s sleep, try a weighted blanket. Designed to mimic the feeling of being swaddled, the blankets appear to ease anxiety, according to several recent studies. That could lead to longer, deeper sleep.

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Get a blood-pressure check. Lowering high blood pressure can help you avoid cardiovascular diseases like stroke and heart attack—especially if you follow the American Heart Association’s new guidelines, which define healthy blood pressure as 130/80 and below, revised downward from the old standard of 140/90. If you have mild hypertension, cutting back on salt, becoming more active and/or losing weight may bring your BP in line with the new recommendations.

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Go low on gluten. Cutting out all gluten—an umbrella term for the proteins found in wheat—is essential for those with celiac disease. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found that the rest of us may benefit from cutting back—rather than cutting out—gluten, a move that can improve gut bacteria, banish bloating and even help us lose a few pounds.

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Tweak your fats and carbs. For a healthy diet, which should you cut: fat or carbs? Actually, you’ll do just fine if you continue to eat both, according to researchers at Harvard and Boston Children’s Hospital. The trick, they discovered, is replacing saturated and trans fats with unsaturated fats and ditching refined carbohydrates for whole grains and unstarchy vegetables.

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Take un-selfies. A recent study indicated that excessive selfie-posting could alienate online friends. Instead of focusing on yourself, point your camera outward at the world around you. You’ll find that documenting its wonders is also a way to appreciate them.

11 CLEAN YOUR

SHOWERHEAD.

It’s the spot in your bathroom you’re most likely to overlook on cleaning day, but a recent study found that it can harbor microbes that have been implicated in lung infections. Wash it every other week with a household cleaner containing ammonia.

7

Break up with Dr. Google. Is there anything scarier than looking up your symptom online

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Work out like a warrior. A ninja warrior, that is. The highly successful reality show American Ninja Warrior is bringing its brand of over-thetop obstacle courses to gyms across the country. Northvale’s High Exposure climbing center, for example, offers a constantly changing series of Ninja-inspired obstacles—from warped walls to devil steps—for kids and adults at every level of fitness.

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Donate love. Giving in any form is good for us, but giving love is especially gratifying. Consider interacting with premature babies in a maternity ward, delivering food (and good cheer) to shut-ins, and caring for shelter animals. To find out how your kind heart can do the most good, contact the Bergen Volunteer Center (bergenvolunteers.org).

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Invest in organic fruits and veggies. Proponents of an organic diet have long proposed that it can reduce the cancer risk posed by pesticides, and a new study from the Sorbonne in Paris supports that idea. Researchers found that eating more organics significantly lowered the risk of breast cancer and lymphomas. If you can’t go all-organic, aim to replace the foods highest in pesticides, like apples, grapes, strawberries and spinach.

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13 CLEAR YOUR

SINUSES WITH EUCALYPTUS OIL. According to the website Medical News Today, products containing menthol don’t actually treat congestion. Eucalyptus oil, on the other hand, is a true decongestant. Pour a little on a tissue and keep it near your head at night, or mix it with hot water and inhale the vapor.

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Let the sunshine in. Sunlight naturally lifts the spirit, and it can make your house healthier too. University of Oregon researchers found that bacteria were more likely to reproduce in dark rooms than in those flooded with UV light.

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Breathe through your nose. It could help boost your memory, according to a new Swedish study. If you’re chronically congested, see an allergist or ear, nose and throat specialist. And for nighttime congestion, try using nasal strips like Breathe Right, which help increase air flow through the nose.

16

Brush with bamboo. Americans consign 25,000 tons worth of nonrecylable plastic toothbrushes to landfills annually. Bamboo brushes, on the other hand, are biodegradable and, unlike plastic brushes, antimicrobial as well, adding another layer of protection against the germs that can cause bad breath and gum disease.

21

Fuel happiness with flower power. Rutgers researcher Jeannette HavilandJones proved that just looking at flowers makes us happier. To immerse yourself in joy-boosting blooms, join a garden club (there are branches of the Garden Clubs of New Jersey in Demarest, Ho-Ho-Kus, Saddle River, Tenafly and Wyckoff) or visit a public garden (Ridgewood’s James Rose Center, for instance).

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Knead your feet. A foot massage is bliss not just for your aching feet but for your whole overburdened body. Most professional foot rubs come with a relatively low price tag— $35 an hour, for example, like at Thai Foot Massage in Waldwick (thaifootspanj.com).

Roll on brighter skin. If you don’t have time for a daily facial, a jade facial roller might be the next best thing. Researchers at Tokyo Healthcare University recently revealed that massaging your face daily for 10 or more minutes with a facial roller improves the dilation of blood vessels long term, which can lead to brighter, healthier-looking skin. Stash a tube of zinc oxide in the kitchen. For those inevitable cooking nicks and burns, nothing beats zinc oxide for its healing properties. A number of clinical trials have shown that the white stuff famous for shielding noses can also protect the rest of your skin against infection and speed healing in the process.

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Take yourself out for a meal. If you’re hungry for something more elegant than Chinese

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takeout but can’t find a dinner companion, there’s no longer a reason to stay in. According to Waitrose, the British food retailer, the taboo against dining out solo is rapidly disappearing. Just ask the folks at Amsterdam’s Eenmaal (“one meal”), an upscale restaurant devoted entirely to single diners.

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Break out the board games. There’s a reason old-fashioned board games are experiencing a major resurgence: Unlike video games, which are often played solo, analog classics like Clue and Monopoly require you to share the fun with others. And as you probably recall, they’re a blast to play.

Store food safely. Plastic storage containers can leach toxins into food when heated or if the food you’re saving is acidic. So store tomato sauce, pickles and other acid-rich foods in glass, metal or ceramic. To find the safest plastic, check the recycling number on the container and opt for 1, 2, 4 or 5.

Try some vegan seafood. No, it’s not an oxymoron. The folks at Whole Foods say we’ll see lots more sea vegetables on the shelves this year, in everything from kelp jerky to a tuna substitute made from algae. Ocean veggies are excellent low-calorie sources of fiber, antioxidants and a variety of vitamins and minerals.

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Forage a farmers market. It’s the best way to find super-fresh, locally sourced produce, including items that may not have reached the shelves at your neighborhood supermarket—such as ground cherries, dandelion greens and wild mushrooms. The market in Ramsey (ramseyfarmersmarket.org) is huge, but there are great farmers markets in Paramus, Westwood and Ridgewood too. (For a complete list, go to nfmd.org/nj.)

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26 LEARN A NEW SKILL. Have you always wanted to play the guitar, bake a perfect pie crust or arrange flowers like a pro? There’s nothing more satisfying than pursuing a passion—except acing it. Check out online tutorials or classes at Bergen County Community College (bergen.edu) and at retailers like The Guitar Center, Kings Supermarkets and Stone Mill Gardens.

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27 FOSTER A PET.

We may never feel more fully human than when we’re interacting with an animal. If you’re not ready to commit, fostering—caring for a dog or cat in your home until forever owners are found—offers similar benefits. “Fostering enriches two lives,” says Noreen Delaney, founder of Happy Tails Pet Rescue in Paramus (happytailsrescuenj.com), “that of the pet you save and your own.”

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Use your vacation days! More than half of us don’t, even though research has shown a correlation between vacations and well-being, not to mention improved heart health. “Most people today are chronically overscheduled and under-rested,” says Waldwick therapist Jill Pantaleo, LCSW, “and vacations offer an opportunity to recharge physical and emotional batteries in a far less stressful environment.” She notes that “staycations” afford the same benefits “without the increased stress of the demands of travel.”

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Dare to negotiate. It’s surprising how many goods and services have negotiable prices, among them appliances, electronics, mattresses, furniture, tires, cable and satellite radio subscriptions, credit-card fees and services, such as landscaping and personal training. It never hurts to ask, “Is this your best price?”

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33 PAINT A

STATEMENT WALL.

Nothing lifts your spirits like a change of color, and with a special wall of a different hue that makes a statement you can create that change in an afternoon. Try Behr’s 2019 color of the year, Blueprint, a blue tempered with just enough gray to evoke a misty lakeside morning.

“Write away” your worries. So-called “expressive” writing— writing about what troubles you—can help vanquish your troubles, according to a Harvard University study. That’s because writing helps you focus your thoughts and break the cycle of worry. Psychologists suggest writing daily until you’ve gained perspective—and relief.

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For better sex, exercise. Need a compelling reason to work out? A 2018 University of Texas study found that women who exercised for at least 30 minutes a day experienced more satisfying lovemaking and a stronger libido. Researchers also determined that moderate exercise before sex boosted pleasure, possibly by increasing blood flow.

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Eat green, red and yellow. A Harvard study found that a diet high in leafy greens and red-and-yellow fruits and vegetables protected against memory loss. So the next time you’re at the market, don’t forget to shop the rainbow.

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Get e-organized. Try a to-do list app like Wunderlist or Todoist to boost organization and fight procrastination.

Invest in close relationships. Harvard psychologists studied the university’s Class of 1980 to determine who among them was happiest and why. They found that the most satisfied alums were those who carefully tended their closest relationships. Instead of taking your besties for granted, take the time to talk, lend a hand and give some love.

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Take a break from sitting. Until those cool-looking pedal desks make it to market, be sure to get up and get moving every 20 minutes (kids too!). According to a study published in The Annals of Internal Medicine, it just might extend your life.

Kick off your shoes. Before the advent of pavement and hardwood floors, human beings went barefoot, and it’s still the best way to avoid foot problems like bunions and hammertoes. It also promotes better balance—and keeps your floors cleaner!

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Eat mindfully. An outgrowth of mindful meditation, mindful eating is a way to focus purposefully on your meal without distractions like work or TV. “Eating mindfully,” says Ridgewood nutritionist Sara Cowlan, “allows us to fully experience the joy of eating and feeling satisfied, and to follow our internal cues to know when we’ve had enough.” To learn more, try the Mindful Eating Tracker app or go to Mindful. org (mindful. org/what-ismindful-eating).

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Give a gift, just because. A surprise gift has a powerful impact for the recipient and the giver. In fact, research out of the University of British Columbia found that spending money on others served up greater satisfaction than spending it on oneself. Short on cash? Lending a hand with a necessary task delivers a similar sense of satisfaction.

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Give (and get) more hugs. In every one of the world’s cultures, hugs are a way to soothe emotional pain and bring people closer— which is why researchers at Carnegie-Mellon University weren’t surprised to find that hugs can help improve relationships when offered after an argument. (Weirdly, they also seem to ward off colds.)

Get into a kayak. Kayaking builds upper-body and core strength, offers a great cardiovascular workout and gets you up close and personal with nature (and your kayaking buddy). Hackensack Riverkeeper leads paddling expeditions of the Meadowlands, the Hackensack River and Overpeck Lake, as well as moonlight paddles at Laurel Hill Park (hackensackriverkeeper.org).

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Reach new heights. Taking in a spectacular aerial view can help put everyday stresses in perspective. Check out the dazzling water vistas at Ramapo Reservation or the bird’s-eye view of the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge from Nyack’s Hook Mountain.

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Raise your voice in song. Singing releases feel-good endorphins, which makes it a natural stress-slayer. Sure, you can do it in the shower, but it’s even more fun with friends. Great area karaoke spots include Volume Up in Edgewater and Rodeo and The Grand Wine Bar, both in Palisades Park.

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Give your feet a vinegar bath. Seriously—vinegar’s antimicrobial properties fight foot odor, athlete’s foot and toenail fungus. In a large basin, create a soak of one part vinegar to two parts water, then immerse your tired tootsies for 10 to 20 minutes.

40 ADOPT

A PLANT.

House plants are more than just this year’s hip home accessory. Research has shown that exposure to green, growing things can make us happier. And plants also help filter indoor air. If you’re convinced you have a brown thumb, choose toughto-kill plants like philodendron, snake plants and aloe.

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Question your doctor. Doctor visits can be stressful and short (17.4 minutes on average, according to the National Institutes of Health), which is why we often forget to ask important questions. Make a list of concerns before you go, including basic questions like “Why are you prescribing that?” and “What does that mean?”

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To make more friends, question first impressions. Your gut may tell you that the person you just met isn’t someone you’d care to know better, but according to a new University of Texas study, your gut could be way off. The study found that we tend to ascribe personality traits based on body type: Men with broad shoulders are extroverted; overweight people are careless; and so on. The takeaway: To make more friends, don’t jump to (possibly erroneous) conclusions.

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Relax with ASMR. It stands for autonomous sensory meridian response—that wonderful tingle you get from a scalp massage or a gentle tickle up and down your inner arm—and research shows that it can induce relaxation and even help you fall asleep. Check out YouTube for ASMR videos (which often involve whispering, a major tingle inducer).

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Switch to dark roast. Canadian researchers recently woke up to the fact that coffee can protect against Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. It’s not caffeine that perks up the protection but phenylindanes, produced during the roasting process. And the longer the beans are roasted, the higher they are in phenylindanes. Espresso never looked so smart.

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Kick a habit. If you’re longing to stop (fill in the blank: biting your nails, bingeing on junk food, wasting time on social media, etc.), experts recommend tackling one habit at a time, substituting a good habit for the one you’d like to ditch, and giving yourself sufficient time—it takes at least three weeks to break a habit. For some tech cheerleading, try an app like HabitBull or HabitForge.

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Get CO-savvy. You may already know you need a carbon monoxide detector. But are you aware of how many you ought to have and where they should be placed? At least one for every floor you spend time in, plus one for each bedroom, placed just outside bedrooms and near—but not on—the ceiling. For more CO safety tips, visit the National Fire Prevention Association’s website, nfpa.org.

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52 PUMP (A LITTLE) IRON. Doctors have long touted the bonebuilding benefits of weight training, but a new study out of St. George’s University in Grenada indicates that it may pump up your heart as well. In fact, working out with weights for just an hour a week appears to reduce heart disease more effectively than such cardiovascular activities as running and swimming.

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Clockwise from top: Joe Barbara, left, who plays Sonny in A Bronx Tale, sings a number on stage with Frankie Leoni; Barbara lives with his family and mother, Peggy, in Upper Saddle River; fellow cast members such as Richard H. Blake are like family when the show is on tour; now 51, Barbara has enjoyed a career on stage and TV.

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{ CURTAIN CALL }

A BROADWAY TALE Upper Saddle River’s Joe Barbara recalls the bumps (and bruises) on his road to the Great White Way. By Darius Amos

Before all else, Joe Barbara is a family man. He listened to his parents while growing up in Florida and, as he moved from New York to Las Vegas and finally to Upper Saddle River, the stage and television star always put family first—including his mother as well as his wife and their 8-, 13- and 15-year-old boys. But you wouldn’t have guessed that by the way he naturally became a greaser and womanizer in Grease! Or how he portrayed a mob boss in the Las Vegas production of Jersey Boys. Or even how his voice is heard in one of the most controversial video games ever made. And now Barbara is starring as mobster Sonny LoSpecchio in A Bronx Tale, which is on a national tour following a two-year run on Broadway. That’s acting, he says. In a recent chat with BERGEN, Barbara shared how he worked behind the scenes before moving into the spotlight and how he continues to juggle a demanding work schedule with family time. When did the acting bug first bite? In my third-grade Christmas play, my character was supposed to reach into a bowl for a piece of candy. Well, my teacher, who directed the play, forgot to take the cellophane wrap off the bowl, so I struggled a lot to get that candy. But I realized the audience was laughing and loving it, so I got into the moment too and played it up. Did you always want to be an actor from that point? I thought about studying acting when I went to college at Syracuse, but my dad told me I needed something else to fall back on. He filmed everything when I was growing up, so he introduced me to filmmaking— that’s why I studied TV and film production. And your first job in the business was actually behind the camera. I started with Entertainment Tonight. I was driving the van, carrying lights and charging batteries. I got a good workout and I was around many film and TV sets. When did you get your first acting gig? I was living in Fort Lee when I got a role with a theater company in Brooklyn. The

cool thing is that when I later auditioned for Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding, some of the casting folks knew me because they were part of casting with the Brooklyn company. I was part of a special group at Tony n’ Tina’s. What did you learn from that time that really stuck with you? A couple of guys who ended up on The Sopranos helped me. Anthony Patellis told me I really had to know who I was as an actor, know the roles you are shooting for and know what you’re good at. And Dan Grimaldi yelled at me if he noticed I was trying too hard: “You’re 9 feet tall—just stand there!” Do you take a different approach when acting on stage versus on screen? On stage, you always have to stay healthy because if you have a cold, a twisted ankle or something in the back of your throat, it’ll affect what you’re doing. But you’re barking up the wrong tree if you think about the acting differences. The minute you start thinking “this is big” or “this is small,” you’re focusing on the wrong thing. Is your part in A Bronx Tale a dream role? I was doing Jersey Boys in Vegas when I was asked to understudy the role of Sonny for the show at the Paper Mill Playhouse in Millburn. Would I leave a principal role to be an understudy? Alan Menken’s doing the music, Jerry Zaks is the director, Chazz Palminteri wrote the story, Robert De Niro directed the movie. Yeah, I wanted to be a part of it and work with those guys. Did your family move with you from Las Vegas when you landed the part? My wife and kids stayed in Vegas when I started A Bronx Tale, but I brought my mother with me because she was getting sick. I was able to take care of her in my apartment in New York City. Soon after the show moved to Broadway, they offered me a contract to play Sonny. That’s when I decided to move my family to Bergen. How are you caring for your mother now? My mom has Alzheimer’s, and when I started seeing that she couldn’t do simple things, it was very difficult to understand that it was part of the disease. I wasn’t thinking, “Oh, wow, Mom is sick,” I was BERGENMAG.COM

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asking, “Why can’t she do these things anymore?” It can be an isolating situation, to see a loved one live with Alzheimer’s. But I’ve connected with Alzheimer’s New Jersey—thank goodness for them. You meet people at ANJ who are going through the same thing, and they’re always available to talk to. How demanding is your schedule? On Broadway, we work six days a week, and you don’t want to do anything on your day off. When the rest of the world is free, we are the ones who are working. That means we miss a lot of events, back-toschool nights, award ceremonies, Christmas parties. And being on the road can be isolating. You’re not with your family, and you’re in your hotel room a lot of the time. Sometimes I’ll go out with the cast, but I’m low-key most of the time. How do you spend your free time? I spend most of it keeping up with the kids’ sports schedules. My middle son plays football with Northern Highlands and my oldest son is on the Don Bosco crew team, so I’m at Overpeck Park a lot. Do you have any favorite Bergen locales? We have a lot of family get-togethers at our homes, but we also like to go after games to Allendale Bar and Grill. With so many hours spent on stage, something is bound to go wrong. Can you recall any goofs or blunders? There are several fight scenes in A Bronx Tale, but actual contact isn’t supposed to be made. During one performance, I got punched in the face and had a detached retina. The show went on, but later I would be out for about two months. You have a very memorable voice. Have you used it for anything other than stage? I once voiced a character for a video game. They told me the name of the game was Frozen, but it would probably change. So I finished all the lines, and life went on. Right before the game’s release, they told me its name: Grand Theft Auto IV. Because of some of the things in the game, I don’t let my sons play it. They’re cool with that, though. I hear there’s a cleaner version online, so perhaps I’ll let them try it. Maybe.

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Augie Hoffmann, who resides in Mahwah with his wife and their two sons, often brings his team to Peppercorns in Park Ridge and Davey’s Pub in Montvale. “Tommy Davey is a St. Joe’s grad,” he says. “They treat us really well when we go in.”

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{ A CHAT WITH }

A WINNING COACH

Augie Hoffmann of Montvale’s Saint Joseph Regional High School discusses his football team’s 2018 state title—and his own playing days. By Haley Longman

When Saint Joseph Regional High School won the state Non-Public Group 4 high school football championship last November, the glory belonged—of course—to the players. But it was also a sweet moment for the coach: Park Ridge native August Hoffmann, 37, who has a two-decades-long history with the all-boys Roman Catholic private school in Montvale. He played for its Green Knights as a student himself before graduating in 1999, and is now in his 10th year of coaching there. In between, Hoffmann played football at Boston College and was signed by the New Orleans Saints. He returned “home” to the St. Joe’s football family in 2009 and has since helped maintain the Knights’ reputation as a top-tier high school football team in Bergen County—culminating in that state title win against longtime rival Bergen Catholic. Recently BERGEN caught up with Hoffmann for a conversation. How did it feel to return to St. Joe’s as coach after playing in college and in the NFL? It’s been an interesting trip. I wasn’t planning to come back; I was trying to get into public school [coaching] when I first got done playing. But when I talked to athletics director and head coach Tony Karcich about getting a job, he said, “Why don’t you want to come here? You’ve pretty much done everything there is to do here.” I wanted to forge my own path and he was basically like, “Absolutely not.” He made me the head freshman coach and had me teaching sophomore and senior English, and it’s been great ever since. I’m out of the classroom now and focused on football and fundraising efforts for the school and the program. Do you ever get the itch to play again? I don’t miss being on the field—I’m kind of beat up these days. I loved playing. It was great; I got to see different parts of the U.S. and play in Europe. But this job gives me the ability to still be in that locker room, have that family outside of my own family, and make an impact in the players’ lives. Besides the tactics of the game, what do you try to instill in these teens? Everybody is looking forward to college, but they really need to stop and enjoy this part of their lives. I feel my time at St. Joe’s formed me into the man I am. Don’t look past that and rush into college. Enjoy this. It goes fast. And it doesn’t get any easier!

What have you learned from them? You can’t coach every kid the same. We have kids from all different backgrounds— single-parent households, two-parent households. I have a player whose parents both passed away. Everybody’s normal is different, and you need to understand where each one is coming from. What have been some of your most memorable moments? This year was a really trying year for the program. We have had three deaths in the St. Joe’s football family. One of our coaches, Lenny Davis, passed away—he was here 19 years, I think. One of my players lost his father unexpectedly. And then Frank Coccaro—my offensive line coach who has been my friend since high school—his father passed away the afternoon of the championship game. Those three tragedies had the ability to ruin our team. For the guys to be able to fight through and still be state champs was a really special thing. When was the last time St. Joe’s won a title like this? We were ranked No. 1 in the state in 2016, but we have not had a win of this magnitude in a long time. I was talking to one of our alumni who graduated in ’84 and he said, “I think this might be one of the biggest wins—if not the biggest win—in school history.” The last time we played Bergen Catholic in the finals in the No. 1 spot was in 1998, in my senior year, when BERGENMAG.COM

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we lost. If you’re a St. Joe’s kid, you have to beat Bergen Catholic. The whole league is great—we play [Don] Bosco, Paramus Catholic and St. Peter’s. But there’s just something about Bergen Catholic. Would you say the Green Knights are better with you as a coach or with you as a player? [Laughs.] We won a lot of games when I was in high school; I think we only lost two games in my three years on varsity. I got to play under a legend, Tony Karcich, who won more games than anybody in North Jersey. But to be a part of coaching these kids is awesome. Let’s make it a tie. What’s next for the Green Knights? We start our strength and conditioning program this month, and that’ll take us right up until May. When May hits and the weather gets nicer, we add Saturdays to the training schedule and get the guys outside running a little more. It’s a full slate until August, when camp starts. There are no breaks. That’s why it’s hard being a high school athlete these days; the stakes have gotten high and they train all year round. What is your goal for 2019? To always put our boys in a situation to be successful. The biggest piece of the puzzle for us is making sure the program is in good hands, the kids have a great experience and our seniors can make their dreams come to fruition when they’re done playing here. [Editor’s note: Some of Hoffmann’s team members will be off to play football at Harvard, Notre Dame, West Point and other prestigious universities next year.] Do you aspire to coach college football? The one thing I’ve learned, especially with this year’s circumstances, is that I’m not looking ahead for anything. St. Joe’s is my home. It’s been great to me and my family. I love it here and I don’t have any plans of leaving. I want to keep the culture going strong and drive us into the next 10, 15 years.

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{ ESCAPES }

‘WHERE I’M TRAVELING’ Five readers tell of the life-changing trips they’ve planned for the new year.

A trip can be a great memory-maker, whether it’s a family vacation, a volunteer mission or a return “home” to visit relatives or trace one’s roots. Here, five Bergenites explain the journeys they plan for 2019. Their destinations are all exciting places, but—for reasons close to the heart—what they hope to find goes beyond what’s on any map.

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HAWAII— FEBRUARY

“I’m going to Oahu, Hawaii, in February with my husband and our soon-to-be-4-year-old son. We lived there while my husband did two tours of duty in the Navy, and our son was born there. We left in 2015 and it’ll be our first time back. We’re planning to visit our former neighbors and co-workers, eat at our favorite restaurants for ‘ono grindz,’ see the turtles nesting and big wave surfing on the North Shore, hike a few trails, catch a fire knife performance, do some stand-up paddleboarding, walk around Chinatown, tour the Dole Plantation and visit the Bishop Museum to teach our son about Hawaiian history.” —Mariya Thompson, Leonia

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IRELAND— MARCH

“I am taking my niece to Ireland in March as a college graduation gift. (My sister is coming too.) We were always told we are part Irish, so we plan to explore our heritage. We will attend a medieval banquet at a castle in Shannon, sample traditional Irish cuisine in towns we discover on our drive there and learn about the traditions and history in tours we have booked such as Cliffs of Moher, Ring of Kerry, Blarney Castle and Giant’s Causeway with Game of Thrones sites. Being in Dublin on St. Patrick’s Day will be the cherry on top!” —Lee Ann Mandoyan, Harrington Park

AFRICA— JUNE

“My husband, my 4½-year-old daughter and I love the outdoors and spend a lot of our free time and vacations doing adventurous things. I’m an active member of a group called Women Who Hike, which is organizing a hiking trip to Mt. Kilimanjaro in June to raise money for an organization called Flying Kites Kenya. While I don’t think my husband and daughter are coming along on the trip, my plan is to involve them in the fundraising aspect as well as to include them in the training that will be required before I climb the tallest freestanding mountain in the world. Our journey will leave some time for fun too, as we’ll hike in Aberdare National Park and then travel from Kenya to Arusha, Tanzania; the trip there is considered a ‘mini-safari’ with excellent opportunities to view wildlife.” —Carolyn Montrose Dub, Haworth

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CHINA— JULY

“I am a pediatric speech language pathologist and work primarily with kids on the autism spectrum. I always wanted to go on a professional volunteer mission, and Global Autism Project’s July trip to Shangcheng District Special Education Resource Center in Hangzhou, China, seemed the perfect opportunity for me. I and others on the mission will be working with local staff to train them in the best educational approaches and therapy for students on the autism spectrum. We will be working with locals in their environment, so that in itself is very exciting—a chance to see the real China, not the tourist version of it. The trip will be mostly work, but will also include some sightseeing excursions.” —Julia Kogan, Glen Rock

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RUSSIA— AUGUST

“I will be heading to Kursk, Russia, in August with my 1-year-old son to visit friends and family. I was born and raised in Russia before coming to the United States when I was 20. I plan to stay in Kursk for a few weeks, then trek the ‘Golden Ring,’ a multi-day pilgrimage outside of Moscow that brings visitors to historic monasteries and sacred sites. Nearing the end of my trip, I will visit a friend in St. Petersburg and make one last stop at the Hermitage Museum and Peterhof Palace, where Russia’s last tsar, Nicholas II, spent his final days.” —Nadya Gigante, Fair Lawn

JANUARY 2019

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FEEL-GOOD FOOD

Less daylight and colder temps can lead to the winter blues. Beat them (and get a little taste of home) with these unique twists on comfort food classics.

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{ TASTES }

GUINNESS & BLACKBERRY BEEF STEW Yields: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

n 2¼ lb. beef chuck steak, diced n 2 tbsp. all-purpose flour n sunflower or olive oil, for cooking n 1 14.9 oz. can Guinness stout n 1 cup plus 1 Tbs. beef stock n 1 red onion, coarsely chopped n 3 parsnips, diced n 3 carrots, diced n 1 1 ⁄3 cups blackberries n 3 dried bay leaves n sea salt flakes and coarsely ground black pepper to taste For the relish: n 1 red onion, finely sliced n 1 1 ⁄3 cups blackberries, halved n ¼ cup plus 1 tbsp. red wine vinegar n 1 tbsp. superfine sugar

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 325°F. Put the steak into a bowl and add the flour and a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Toss together with your hands until the beef is evenly coated. In a Dutch oven, heat a generous glug of oil. Once the oil is hot (it will shimmer gently), add the beef and cook, turning once, until colored. You’ll need to do this in at least two batches; if you overcrowd the pan, the meat will braise rather than brown and you won’t achieve the desired color or depth of flavor. Once all of the meat has been browned, return it to the pan with the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, then cover with the lid and cook in the oven for 2-3 hours, until the meat is tender and flaking. Meanwhile, make the relish. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients, then let sit at room temperature until needed. Serve the stew with some of the relish spooned over it.

Blackberries are incredible sources of vitamin C, which bolsters your immune system. They also have a wide range of antioxidant polyphenols that help protect your cells from damage. Berries in general are full of water and fiber to keep you satiated. One caution: Blackberries are high in vitamin K, so they may promote unwanted blood clotting for those taking blood thinners.” —Kelsey Peoples, registered dietitian, nutritionist and owner, The Peoples Plate, Ramsey

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{ TASTES }

CRAB & SRIRACHA MAC ‘N’ CHEESE Yields: 6 servings

INGREDIENTS n 3½ cups dry macaroni n 7 Tbs. butter n ¾ cup plus 1 Tbs. all-

purpose flour n 2 cups plus 2 Tbs. milk n 2 cups plus 2 Tbs. chicken stock n 1 1 ⁄3 cups finely shredded Gruyère cheese n 1 1 ⁄3 cups finely shredded sharp cheddar n 1 Tbs. whole grain mustard n 6 Tbs. sriracha sauce, plus more to serve n 1 tsp. cayenne pepper n 10½ oz. lump crabmeat n 2 Tbs. chopped flat-leaf parsley n s cant ½ cup panko bread crumbs n fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Cook the macaroni according to the package directions, then drain and set aside. In a large saucepan, heat the butter over medium-high heat until it melts, then stir in the flour using a wooden spoon to make a very thick paste. Let the paste cook until browned slightly, 1 minute. Beat in a ladleful of milk—it will get quickly absorbed, so repeat. When you’ve added all the milk, switch to a wire whisk and add the stock, a bit at a time, whisking to avoid any lumps. As soon as the liquids are incorporated, add the cheeses, reserving some to sprinkle on top, along with the mustard, sriracha and cayenne pepper. Reduce the heat to a simmer for 10 minutes, then season to taste, remembering that when you add the pasta the seasoning will be diluted, so overseason. Add the crabmeat, parsley and macaroni to the sauce and combine well, then transfer to a medium-size roasting dish or pan. Sprinkle over the reserved cheese and the bread crumbs and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until hot and bubbling.

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Add protein and fiber to this dish by using Ezekiel bread instead of panko bread crumbs. And since pasta lacks many (key) nutrients, top the dish with yeast, which will add protein and fiber, as well as B vitamins.”

—Azi Ahmadi, registered dietitian, nutritionist and certified diabetes educator, Ridgewood

JANUARY 2019

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{ TASTES }

ONION SOUP WITH AN ÉPOISSES & CARAWAY CRUST Yields: 2-4 servings

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE CROUTONS: n 1 French baguette, torn into chunks n 1 Tbs. garlic oil (or olive oil, if you prefer) n 1 Tbs. caraway seeds n 5½ oz. Époisses cheese, chilled n 3½ oz. Comté cheese, shredded FOR THE SOUP: n 1 Tbs. olive oil n 7 Tbs. unsalted butter n 18 oz. pink onions, finely sliced n 2 Tbs. all-purpose flour n ¾ cup dry white wine n 4¼ cups beef stock n 1 Tbs. onion chutney or relish (optional, but recommended) n fine sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400°F. MAKE THE CROUTONS: Place the torn baguette onto a baking sheet and toss with the garlic oil and caraway seeds. Bake for 5-10 minutes, or until dry and crispy. MAKE THE SOUP: In a large pot, heat the olive oil and butter over high heat. When the butter has melted, add the onions and cook until they are starting to color around the edges, 10 minutes or so. Once they are gently browned, reduce the heat to low and cook slowly for up to 40 minutes. The onions should caramelize deeply, and smell strong and sweet. When the onions are caramelized, add the flour and stir to coat the onions. Increase the heat to high, wait a minute for the pan to get hot, then pour in the wine and let bubble and evaporate almost entirely. Add the stock and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes, partially covered. Stir in the chutney or relish, if using, and salt and pepper to taste.

Onions are high in soluble fiber, which helps keep you full, eliminates cholesterol in your gastrointestinal tract and acts as fuel for the beneficial bacteria in your gut. Like most non-starchy vegetables, onions are low in calories but high in micronutrients; they’re a great source of vitamin C, biotin and B vitamins.” —Kelsey Peoples, registered dietitian, nutritionist and owner, The Peoples Plate, Ramsey

Preheat the broiler. Divide the soup among serving bowls—make sure they’re heatproof—then scatter the croutons over the top. Slice the Époisses into fairly thin slices (do so quickly before it starts to melt) and lay them on top of the croutons. Scatter over the Comté and broil until the cheese has melted and burned a little at the edges.

All recipes and photos are reprinted with permission from Comfort: Food to Soothe the Soul by John Whaite. Photos by Helen Cathcart © Kyle Books.

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{ POWER FOOD }

Darling Clementines These tangy citrus charmers, ripest in the dead of winter, are bursting with vitamins and nutrients.

If you’re still recovering from the heaviness of holiday eating, bright, cheery clementines are just the thing. Sweeter than navel oranges and less seedy than tangerines, clementines are a derivative of mandarins and are distinguished by their oval shape and glossy skins. These skins can be removed in one fell swoop to reveal small separated segments, making clementines an easy (and fun), pop-in-yourmouth snack. But it’s not just their undeniable convenience, sweet aroma or citrusy flavor that get us—these little guys happen to be nutritional powerhouses too. POWER UP “Christmas oranges,” nicknamed as such because they’re in season during the winter months and are traditional stocking stuffers, are packed with vitamin C, which supports the immune system and makes skin more youthful-looking, among other benefits. In fact, just one clementine boasts 36 milligrams of the stuff, which is 60 percent of the

recommended daily value. Clementines also contain 1.3 grams of fiber, which aids digestion, as well as 130 milligrams of potassium, which can help prevent headaches, hypertension, tooth decay and a plethora of other ailments. Need more convincing? Clementines are recommended in pregnancy, as the fruit’s high folate content supposedly helps prevent neural tube defects in fetuses (and encourages normal brain function in adults too). All of this packed into just 35 calories each! BUY/STORE/SERVE Clementines are sold from December to March or April. When purchasing yours, choose fruit that are firm, and only buy as many as you’ll need because they don’t last very long. Store them in a basket or bowl on the counter, not

in a fridge or in a plastic bag, and just grab and go. Clementines, of course, can be eaten on their own as a healthy snack, or you can toss them in an Asian-style salad, atop yogurt or oatmeal, or mix them into a smoothie or shake. But don’t throw out those peels just yet. Zest or candy the peels to add a citrusy kick to baked treats, or extract oil from the peel. Clementine oil is often used in aromatherapy, as it’s shown to be a powerful antioxidant and stress reliever that promotes clearheadedness and more restful sleep. Is it a coincidence then that clementines are at their peak in January, when we need all of that great stuff the most? Happy New Year indeed. —Haley Longman

DID YOU KNOW? Legend has it that the natural hybrid of clementines was discovered in West Algeria in the 1900s in the garden of the orphanage of Marie-Clément, for whom the fruit was formally named in 1902. BERGENMAG.COM

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12/11/18 8:50 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS TO WATCH

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H E A LTH CA R E P R OS TO WATC H

Professional Hearing Aid Center 681 Main St., Hackensack, NJ 201.343.1980 | professionalhearingaids.net Mark Salvesen, BC-HIS, Founder of Professional Hearing Aid Center along with Peggy Stanlick, BC-HIS have been serving the community proudly for over 30 years. “We are very fortunate to do what we love,” says Salvesen. “At the end of every day, we are helping people improve their lives.” Stanlick concurs, “Each person is unique and individualized care is our primary focus.” Salvesen is proud to be one of the only family owned and operated Hearing Centers in the County and extremely proud to welcome his daughter, Tara, into the practice representing the 3rd generation of the family helping people to hear better. Professional Hearing Aid Center remains dedicated to providing our community with cutting edge technology and an award winning professional staff. Your hearing is important; let us help you on your journey to better hearing.

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H E A LTH CA R E P R OS TO WATC H

Lori Nuzzi, DC. Nuzzi Chiropractic Lifestyle Wellness Center 12 Goffle Rd., Midland Park, NJ 07432 201.447.2570 | Nuzzichiro.com Dr. Lori Nuzzi has always pushed the creative envelope in delivering health care. Early in her career she became disenchanted with the traditional model of micromanaging health issues and asked, “Why are we treating pain and not the whole person?” This question led Dr. Nuzzi to pioneer a center focused on lifestyle modification and patient education. She’s completed advanced certifications in functional movement and complex biomechanics. For over 25 years, Dr. Nuzzi and her exceptional team have provided chiropractic care, massage therapy, sport-specific rehabilitation, exercise therapy, weight loss and nutritional therapies to maximize clinical outcomes. Call for an appointment and take control of your health.

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H E A LTH CA R E P R OS TO WATC H

Rolando Cibischino, D.M.D. 71 Summit Ave., Hackensack, NJ 201.342.7742 | smilebeautification.com Dr. Rolando Cibischino has provided exemplary family, cosmetic and restorative dentistry in his Hackensack practice for over 27 years. His goal is to connect with patients and become part of their healthcare team. Dr. “C,” as he’s known in the community, strongly believes in continuing education. As a TMJ specialist, he’s completed an advanced Orofacial Pain Continuum at the Louisiana State University to better treat oral facial pain contributing to sleep disorders, TMD/ TMJ and other types of pain. In addition to his distinguished education, Dr. Cibischino teaches at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center. Meet Dr. Cibischino and you’ll know why generations of patients return to him for dental care.

ADVERTISE IN REACH BERGEN COUNTY’S MOST AFFLUENT RESIDENTS. These are consumers with the most buying power, giving you the best potential for growing your business.

CONTACT

THOMAS FLANNERY, Publisher

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201.571.2252

Thomas.Flannery@wainscotmedia.com

BERGENMAG.COM

MAGAZINE

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{ SPIRITS }

Tea Time

This wintry hybrid cocktail combines the sweet and savory flavors of chai tea with the oaky taste of bourbon. Add a shot of honey to the tea bags and hot water and let it steep. This will make the drink more like a hot toddy and sweeten it up. ” —Lynn Dunado, head bartender, Dog House Saloon & Grill, Washington Township

SMOKED MAPLE BOURBON CHAI TEA Serves 1

INGREDIENTS

Recipe courtesy of thekitchn.com

n6 oz. steaming hot water n2 chai tea bags n3 oz. Knob Creek Maple Bourbon n1 oz. half-and-half ncinnamon stick for garnish

DIRECTIONS

Pour the steaming water over the chai tea bags in a heatproof mug. Let steep for 3 minutes, then remove the tea bags. Add the maple bourbon and half-and-half and stir to combine. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

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{ ON THE TOWN }

Gatherings

Whether it’s at a private concert or grand-opening event, Bergenites are always showing up and supporting their friends and neighbors.

1 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF BERGEN COUNTY Ahead of the grand opening of Ruth’s Chris Steak House at the Outlets at Bergen Town Center, restaurant team members raised $7,000 during rehearsal dinners. All proceeds were donated to Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County. 1 Jacey Raimondo, Brian Nelson, Richard LaBarbiera, Adrian Febre 2 Jacey Raimondo, Israel “Izzy” Jimenez, David Gurwicz

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Ridgewood-based West Bergen Mental Healthcare held its annual Fall Night of Fine Dining fundraiser at the Indian Trail Club in Franklin Lakes. At the event, the organization presented its Distinguished Service Award to Ridgewood residents Betty and Quentin Wiest. 3 Michael J. Tozzoli, Matthew J. Murphy, Quentin and Betty Wiest, Douglas J. Cronk

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Ruth’s Chris Steak House (1,2), Sal Benedetto Photography (3), Darius Amos (4-7), BMI Public Relations (8), Jeremy Lebled (9-12)

WEST BERGEN MENTAL HEALTHCARE

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4

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ALEX’S LEMONADE STAND Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar recently donated $44,590 to Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer. More than $11,000 of the total sum was fundraised by the restaurant chain’s New Jersey locations, which include Garfield, Hackensack, Northvale and Paramus. The foundation, which raises money for childhood cancer research, has received approximately $10 million from Applebee’s since 2005. 8 John Antosiewicz, Liz Scott, Rachel Gaida

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ALZHEIMER’S AWARENESS

Ruth’s Chris Steak House (1,2), Sal Benedetto Photography (3), Darius Amos (4-7), BMI Public Relations (8), Jeremy Lebled (9-12)

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Van Dyk Health Care, a Ridgewoodbased organization, hosted “When Broadway Goes Dark, Van Dyk Goes Live” at bergenPAC. The benefit concert featured performances by Broadway stars Major Attaway, Catherine Brunell, Natalie Cortez and James Moye. Proceeds from the event were earmarked for Alzheimer’s disease research and awareness. 4 Caitlin, Dan and Colette Cummings 5 Catherine Brunell, Natalie Cortez 6 Shelley Steiner, Elaine Winter, Ken Zaentz 7 Sharon and Richard Goldberg

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BERGEN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Music legend John Fogerty recently helped bergenPAC celebrate its Fall Gala. The Englewoodbased nonprofit organization honored Wilmington Trust and M&T Bank’s Fernando Garip for his longtime support of bergenPAC’s educational and outreach initiatives. 9 Frank Huttle, Fernando Garip, Dominic Roncace; 10 Diane Niedzialek, Sam Passow, Tori Greig; 11 Alex Diaz, Mark Quilez; 12 Stephen Borg, John Fogerty.

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{ ON THE TOWN }

Be There

From classic rock and comedy shows to flea markets and chili cook-offs, there’s something for everyone this month in Bergen County. JAN 10 & 27 Attention, budding photographers: There’s much more to your DSLR camera than the auto setting. Bergen County Camera in Westwood is hosting a PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS (6:30–7:30 p.m. on the 10th, 11 a.m.–12 p.m. on the 27th), where participants can learn about the features of their camera and improve their skills. Admission is FREE for those who purchased a camera from the store in December, and $25 for all others. For more information, visit eventbrite.com.

Jan. 16 PAINTING CERAMIC MUGS AT THE MAHWAH LIBRARY

JAN 12 The trees may be bare but that doesn’t mean you can’t add some greenery to your home! Stop by PLANT NITE at Miller’s Ale House in Paramus and create your own Zen or Winter Woodland garden in a black ceramic planter. The event, for ages 21 and older, begins at 1 p.m., but attendees are encouraged to arrive at least 15 minutes early. Tickets: $55. Visit plantnite.com for more info. JAN 12 You’ll want to add the All Seasons Chamber Players to your next playlist after listening to the group perform its BACH TO BLUES concert at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Harrington Park at 5 p.m. There is a $10 suggested donation at the door. For more information, visit allseasonschamberplayers.org. JAN 14 If you’d like to get creative with colors, head to The Mason Jar in Mahwah for PAINT NITE, from 7–9 p.m. The theme of this createyour-own-masterpiece session is “A Northern Winter,” so order a hot drink, get inspired by the frosty temperatures and paint a beautiful snowy landscape. Tickets: $45. Visit paintnite.com for more info. JAN 16 Baby, it’s cold outside so head indoors to the Mahwah Library for a session of PAINTING CERAMIC MUGS. The event, led by Sorin Lungu from Creatively Yours, takes place from 6:30–8:30 p.m. and is open to all adults who want to decorate a mug pretty enough to hold their hot cocoa. Tickets are $15, and pre-registration is required. For more details, visit mahwahlibrary.com JAN 16 You may think you know The Lion King, Beauty and the Beast and Frozen, but see how much of a fan you really are at DISNEY MOVIE TRIVIA NIGHT, 8–9:30 p.m. at Tommy Fox’s Public House in Bergenfield. Prizes will be awarded to the individuals and teams that correctly answer the most questions related to Disney’s classic animated films. Admission is FREE, but reservations are required. Visit eventbrite.com for more info. JAN 19 Enjoy a night of rock and raffles at A ROYAL NIGHT OF CLASSIC ROCK, 7–9:30 p.m.

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classical pianist PAUL VAN NESS will perform a concert at West Side Presbyterian Church in Ridgewood, 3 p.m. Over the years, Van Ness has showed mastery of works by Beethoven, Ravel, Rachmaninoff and more. Admission: FREE. For more details, head to westsideconcerts.org.

JAN 20 Looking for a unique item for a gift or to keep for yourself? Head to the ELKS LODGE FLEA MARKET in Hasbrouck Heights from 8 a.m.–5 p.m. where you will find beautiful, original pieces. More than 30 vendors will be selling new, used and rare collectibles. Visit njvendors. com for more information. Jan. 27 CHOCOLATE EXPO PARAMUS

at Ridgefield Memorial High School. The lineup of local musicians includes Hidden Figures Band, Al Egizi of the cover band TAXI, Mark Caccioppoli and David Polemeni. The event also will feature raffles to benefit the Ridgefield Memorial High School music programs. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Text 201.887.6707 or 201.233.3274 for advance tickets.

JAN 20 New Jersey native and renowned

JAN 26 It’s never too early to think about the spread at your Super Bowl party. Stop by the Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford and watch contestants square off in the HOMESTYLE CHILI & SALSA COOK-OFF. The cooking begins at 3:30 p.m., and visitors can begin sampling plates at 8 p.m. Admission: FREE for guests, $20–$35 for competitors. Go to thebigm.com for more information. JAN 26 Enjoy a night of networking, discussion and entertainment at the WOMEN FOR PROGRESS ANNUAL GALA, from 7–11 p.m. at the Indian Trail Country Club in Franklin Lakes. Tickets are $150, which includes dinner, drinks, dancing, raffles and a celebration of the organization’s two years of activism and education.

Check out womenforprogress.org for more information.

JAN 26 Everyone can use a good laugh, and comedian GEORGE LOPEZ is here to help. As part of his “The Wall” world tour, the funnyman and TV star will deliver his unique brand of comedy at bergenPAC in Englewood at 8 p.m. Admission starts at $59. For tickets and more information, visit bergenpac.org. JAN 27 Planning a big bash isn’t easy, so head to the Park Ridge Marriott for THE CELEBRATE PARTY SHOWCASE. From 12–4 p.m., meet with more than 100 specialists for ideas, resources and venue suggestions for all celebrations— you can plan your next party in one afternoon! Admission: FREE. Visit celebrateshowcase.com for details. JAN 27 Get a jump on your Valentine’s Day shopping at the CHOCOLATE EXPO PARAMUS, 10 a.m.–7 p.m. at Garden State Plaza. Attendees will have the chance to taste and purchase sweet and savory chocolates, baked goods, cheeses, sodas, hard ciders, coffee, tea and more. This chocolate fest is sure to satisfy any sweet tooth. Admission: FREE. Get more info at thechocolateexpo.com. Send event listings to: BERGEN, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email us at editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Community Calendar at bergenmag.com.

Jan. 20 PAUL VAN NESS AT WEST SIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, RIDGEWOOD

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RESTAURANT REVIEW:

Shoti Bread House

When Georgia’s on your mind, this new Fair Lawn eatery will hit the spot.

Photos by Darius Amos

I’ve had a few regrets but none bigger than what I ate during my one and only trip to Georgia—the country, that is, not the peachy American state. My three friends and I traveled there for winter break during our sophomore year of college (about seven years after the fall of the Soviet Union). It was a great experience soaking up the atmosphere in and around Tbilisi, the capital city, but we refused to open our wallets when it came to dining. While out, we had an endless number of McToasts with bacon (no upcharge for the bacon!), while at home (we stayed with a friend’s parents), the choice was eggs or boiled hot dogs. I saw the recent opening of Shoti Bread House, a new Georgian restaurant in Fair Lawn, as my chance at redemption for those bad dining choices. Shoti is BYOB, but my friend and I instead ordered two bottles of Zandukeli cream lemonade, a refreshing Georgian soda that tastes like a fresh-baked lemon bar. You won’t find U.S.-made soft drinks here—all beverages, including bottled water, are from Georgia. Though Shoti’s menu includes salads and vegetarian options, many Georgian dishes are heavy on carbs and protein—those with weight-loss-focused resolutions, you’ve been warned. We ordered three plates to start, each of which was hearty enough to be a meal. Soko kecze with cheese features about eight to 10 plump champignon mushrooms smothered in semi-firm Sulguni cheese, which reminded us of a brinier mozzarella. Our second app was khinkali, six oversized dumplings filled with a mix of seasoned ground pork and broth. It’s customary to pick up each dumpling by hand, poke a hole in it to drink the broth and then eat the rest. Because each piece was piping hot, we used our forks instead of hands, but followed the rest of the instructions. And we were told you can’t have a Georgian meal without khachapuri, a yeast bread stuffed with cheese. We ordered the Adjaruli version, which is a boat-shaped bread filled with a pool of melted cheese and topped with an egg yolk. The “boat” is meant to be ripped and dipped into the cheese-yolk mix. Some say Adjaruli khachapuri is better than pizza. I won’t open that debate. Entrees at Shoti’s range from grilled chicken kebabs to porkstuffed grape leaves. My friend ordered one of the country’s most popular stews, chakapuli, which consists of lamb, tarragon, green plums and Georgian seasoning. If you crave lamb’s distinct flavor, this is the dish for you—all others should think twice. Chashushuli, a savory tomato-based stew, was more up my alley. The stew is a perfect blend of tender veal chunks and tomato and herb flavors. Whether eaten by the spoonful or when soaked up by bread, it’s equally filling and delectable. Filled with carbs and protein, we passed on the Napoleons, eclairs and pastries on the dessert menu and polished off our cream sodas to end the night. While I still regret my dining choices when I traveled to Georgia, I’m thankful to have had the chance to finally try its cuisine. I’m looking forward to my return visit—to the country and to Shoti. —Darius Amos Shoti Bread House, 14-29 River Rd., Fair Lawn, 201.272.1900, shoti-bread-house. business.site

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Where To Eat

Getting three squares a day has never been easier—Bergen County is home to a selection of restaurants diverse enough to satisfy all of your cravings.

ALLENDALE MASA 81 W. Allendale Ave. 201.934.6616 masasushiandgrill.com MEZZALUNA BISTRO 97 W. Allendale Ave. 201.327.6556 SAVINI 168 W. Crescent Ave. 201.760.3700 savinirestaurant.com

ALPINE KIKU 385 Rte. 9W 201.767.6322

BERGENFIELD BAMBOO GRILL 54 S. Washington Ave. 201.384.5951 bamboo-grill.com

CHAPALA GRILL 52 S. Washington Ave. 201.387.2107 chapalamexicangrill.com

GIANNA’S 843 Washington Ave. 201.460.7997 giannas.biz

WAGON WHEEL 16 S. Front St. 201.384.9464

IL VILLAGGIO 651 Rte. 17 N. 201.935.7733 ilvillaggio.com

BOGOTA 101 PUB 101 Queen Anne Rd. 201.343.9802 LUKA’S 10 River Rd. 201.440.2996 lukasitaliancuisine.com

CARLSTADT BIGGIE’S 430 Rte. 17 S. 201.933.4000 biggies.com

CLOSTER

MASSAMAN THAI CUISINE 312 Hackensack St. 201.559.1424 massamanthaicuisine.com

CLIFFSIDE PARK AVO’S GRILL 720 Anderson Ave., Ste. 4, 201.945.9038 orderavos.com

DELVINA RESTAURANT 172 Piermont Rd. 201.816.0239 delvinarestaurant.com

IL MULINO 132 Veterans Plz. 201.384.7767 ilmulinodumont.com

EAST RUTHERFORD

FARMHOUSE CAFÉ & EATERY 15 E. Madison Ave. 201.266.8931 farmhousecafenj.com

ANNABELLA’S HOUSE OF MOZZARELLA 900 Paterson Plank Rd. 201.804.0303 annabellasmozz.com

THE HILL 252 Schraalenburgh Rd. 201.899.4700 thehillcloster.com

DEMAREST YASOU MYKONOS 134 Hardenburgh Ave. 201.768.8500 yasoumykonos.com

CAFFE CAPRI 119 Park Ave. 201.460.1039 caffecapri restaurant.com

DUMONT

EDGEWATER

SEAR HOUSE 411 Piermont Rd. 201.292.4612 searhouse.com

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CRESSKILL

AZÚCAR CUBAN CUISINE 171 Schraalenburgh Rd. 201.660.7977 azucarcubancuisine.com

LOCALE CAFÉ & BAR 208 Piermont Rd. 201.750.3233 locale208closter.com

RUDY’S 591 Anderson Ave. 201.943.9252 rudyscliffsidenj.com

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T & THAI 644 Anderson Ave. 201.941.0099 tnthai.com

FOSCHINI’S 21 E. Madison Ave. 201.387.9998 foschinis.com

CAFÉ ARCHETYPUS 266 River Rd. 201.941.0609 archetypus.com

This page: Photo courtesy of River Palm Terrace; opposite page: Ho-Ho-Kus Inn/Nadya Furnari

The River Palm Terrace, Edgewater, Fair Lawn, Mahwah

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HAVEN 2 Main St. 201.943.1900 havenedgewater.com

THE TWISTED ELM 435 River Dr. 201.791.3705 twistedelm.com

MEI SUSHI 14-20 Plaza Rd. North 201.398.9882 meisushi.com

SUSHI COCORO 856 Franklin Ave. 201.560.1333 sushicocoro.com

IZZY’S PIZZERIA 86 The Promenade City Place 201.795.2600 izzyspizzeria.com

EMERSON

OCEANOS 2-27 Saddle River Rd. 201.796.0546 oceanosrestaurant.com

GARFIELD

JACK’S LOBSTER SHACK 1040 River Rd. 201.224.2808 jackslobstershack.com KINARA 880 River Rd. 201.313.0555 kinararestaurant.com LE JARDIN 1257 River Rd. 201.224.9898 lejardinnj.com ORAMA 595 River Rd. 201.945.2020 orama.com PIER 115 115 River Rd. 201.313.2155 pier115bar andgrill.com REBECCA’S 236 Old River Rd. 201.943.8808 rebeccasedgewater.com

This page: Photo courtesy of River Palm Terrace; opposite page: Ho-Ho-Kus Inn/Nadya Furnari

THE RIVER PALM TERRACE 1416 River Rd. 201.224.2013 riverpalm.com ROBERTO’S II 936 River Rd. 201.224.2524 robertosii.com THAT FONDUE PLACE 934 River Rd. 201.224.2524 thatfondueplace.com

ELMWOOD PARK ELMWOOD PARK DINER 375 Market St. 201.796.6641 epdiner.com ROYAL WARSAW 871 River Dr. 201.794.9277 royalwarsaw.com TAVERNA MYKONOS 238 Broadway 201.703.9200 tavernamykonos.com

FRANCO’S PIZZA 207 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.265.8111 francospizza restaurant.com PIMAAN THAI 79 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.967.0440 pimaanthai.com

ENGLEWOOD AKAI LOUNGE 11 N. Dean St. 201.541.0086 akailounge.com BAUMGART’S CAFÉ 45 E. Palisade Ave. 201.569.6267 baumgartscafe.com CASSIE’S 18 S. Dean St. 201.541.6760 cassiespizzeria.com DARUMA 45 N. Dean St. 201.567.9600 darumaenglewood.com EMMA 34 E. Palisade Ave. 201.227.6103 emma34.com RED, WHITE & PASTA 21 E. Palisade Ave. 201.731.3223 redwhiteandpasta.com

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS CAFÉ ITALIANO 14 Sylvan Ave. 201.461.5041 cafeitaliano.net

RIVARA’S RESTAURANT 6-18 Maple Ave. 201.797.4878 rivaras.com THE RIVER PALM TERRACE 41-11 Rte. 4 201.703.3500 riverpalm.com

FAIRVIEW NOCHES DE COLOMBIA 172 Broad Ave. 201.840.8428 nochesdecolombia.com PATSY’S 344 Bergen Blvd. 201.943.0627

FORT LEE CAFFÉ MILANO 2117 Rte. 4 E. 201.461.0466 CITY PERCH 2023 Hudson St. 201.582.7101 cityperch.com G.W. GRILL 2139 Hudson Ter. 201.947.2440 gwgrill.com IN NAPOLI 116 Main St. 201.947.2500 inapoli.com LOUI LOUI 210 Main St. 201.461.7080 louiloui.com

CLIFF’S STEAKHOUSE 18 Sylvan Ave. 201.944.0233 cliffssteakhouse.com

MOOD FOOD 1224 Anderson Ave. 201.313.8278 moodfood.life

GRISSINI 484 Sylvan Ave. 201.568.3535 grissinirestaurant.com

PRIME & BEYOND 501 Main St. 201.461.0033 primeandbeyond.com

FAIR LAWN

FRANKLIN LAKES

DAVIA 6-09 Fair Lawn Ave. 201.797.6767

THE CHEF’S TABLE 754 Franklin Ave. 201.891.6644

KIMCHI MAMA 7-09 Fair Lawn Ave. 201.703.2905

GOLDEN DYNASTY 825 Franklin Ave. 201.891.6644 goldendynastynj.com

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Ho-Ho-Kus Inn, Ho-Ho-Kus

GOODFELLAS 661 Midland Ave. 973.478.4000 goodfellasristorante. com LA CAMBUSA 517 River Dr. 973.272.8739 cambusanj.com LA FORTALEZA 361 Midland Ave. 973.928.4470 lafortalezamexrestaurant.com

GLEN ROCK THE GLEN ROCK INN 222 Rock Rd. 201.445.2362 glenrockinn.com

WHITE MANNA 358 River St. 201.342.0914

HARRINGTON PARK

NECTAR CAFE 175 Rock Rd. 201.857.0825 nectarcafenj.com

DINO’S RESTAURANT 12 Tappan Rd. 201.767.4245 dinoshp.com

ROCCA 203 Rock Rd. 201.670.4945 roccanj.com

ORIGINAL PRESTO’S PIZZA 90 La Roche Ave. 201.750.1077 originalpresto.com

HACKENSACK HOUSTON’S 1 Riverside Sq., #181 201.488.5667 houstons.com

HASBROUCK HEIGHTS

MATSU SUSHI & GRILL 140 Broadway 201.722.9388 matsunj.com NINO’S PIZZA 456 Broadway 201.497.6900 ninospizzaonline.com OSSO BUCO 343 Broadway 201.664.1600 ossobucogrill.com

HO-HO-KUS

BENDIX DINER 464 Rte. 17 201.288.0143

ALBERT’S CAFE AMICI 4 Sycamore Ave. 201.389.6377 albertscafeamici.com

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 1 Riverside Sq., #274 201.487.1303 mortons.com/hackensack

BENSI 459 Rte. 17 S. 201.727.9525 bensihh.com

ALT EATS CAFÉ 622 N. Maple Ave. 201.444.1300 alteatscafe.com

THE OCEANAIRE 175 Riverside Sq. 201.343.8862 theoceanaire.com

IVY INN 268 Terrace Ave. 201.393.7699 ivyinn.com

THE PICCO TAVERN 160 Prospect Ave. 201.880.8750 piccotavern.com

HAWORTH

HO-HO-KUS INN & TAVERN 1 E. Franklin Tpk. 201.445.4115 hohokusinn.com

POITIN STILL 774 Main St. 201.487.0660 SOLARI’S 61 S. River St. 201.487.1969 solarisrestaurant.net STONY HILL INN 231 Polifly Rd. 201.342.4085 stonyhillinn.com

ALESSANDRO’S 157 Terrace St. 201.385.8544 alessandrosnj.com

ST. EVE’S 611 N. Maple Ave. 201.857.4717 stevesnj.com

ANDIAMO 23 Hardenburgh Ave. 201.384.1551 andiamorestaurant.net

LEONIA

TERRACE STREET CAFÉ 149 Terrace St. 201.338.4720 terracestreetcafe. wixsite.com

HILLSDALE THE CORNERSTONE 84 Broadway 201.666.8688 thecornerstonenj.com

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DANTE’S PLACE 373 Broad Ave. 201.592.9071 dantesplace.com FONTANA DI TREVI 248 Fort Lee Rd. 201.242.9040 fontanaditrevirestaurant. com MIGA RESTAURANT 344 Broad Ave. 201.592.9071

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LITTLE FERRY SEGOVIA STEAKHOUSE & SEAFOOD 217 Main St. 201.814.1100 segoviasteakhouse.com

LODI REBAR & KITCHEN 132 Essex St. 201.368.8181 rebarnj.com SERGIO’S MISSIONE 2 N. Mercer St. 973.778.4545 sergiosmissione.com

LYNDHURST ANGELO’S 263 Ridge Rd. 201.939.1922 LEE’S HAWAIIAN ISLANDER 768 Stuyvesant Ave. 201.939.3777 MICHAEL’S RIVERSIDE 528 Riverside Ave. 201.939.6333 michaelsriverside.com

MAHWAH MASON JAR 219 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.529.2302 masonjar.com NAGOYA 1007 MacArthur Blvd. 201.818.9933 nagoyacuisine.com

THE RIVER PALM TERRACE 209 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.529.1111 riverpalm.com SANGRIA 1033 MacArthur Blvd. 201.962.3310 sangriamahwah.com STATELINE DINER 375 Rte. 17 201.529.3353 statelinediner.com

MAYWOOD ANGELO’S 245 Maywood Ave. 201.845.4278

MIDLAND PARK ARTURO’S 41 Central Ave. 201.444.2466 arturos.co FIONA’S RISTORANTE 118 Godwin Ave. 210.857.5800 fionasristorante.com

MONTVALE BELLISSIMO 12 S. Kinderkamack Rd. 201.746.6669 bellissimonj.com HEARTH & TAP CO. 125 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.307.6300 hearthandtap.com

MOONACHIE BAZZARELLI 117 Moonachie Rd. 201.641.4010 bazzarellirestaurant.com

BISTRO 107 107 Moonachie Rd. 201.440.3339 bistro107nj.com LA HAVANA 59 110 Moonachie Ave. 201.964.9515 lahavana59.com PROVA 94 Moonachie Ave. 201.939.8500 provanow.com SEGOVIA 150 Moonachie Rd. 201.641.4266 segoviarestaurant.com

NEW MILFORD CASUAL HABANA CAFÉ 200 Main St. 201.576.0400 casualhabanacafe.com SANZARI’S 105 Old New Bridge Rd. 201.692.7700 sanzaris.com SECTION 201 704 River Rd. 201.262.5600 section201.com

NORTHVALE THE GREEK VILLAGE 254 Livingston St. 201.750.8570 greekvillagenj.com MADELEINE’S PETIT PARIS 416 Tappan Rd. 201.767.0063 madeleinespetitparis.com

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TASTE OF SPAIN 493 Tappan Rd. 201.767.8904 tasteofspain restaurant.com

NORWOOD CHOK DEE THAI KITCHEN 561 Livingston St. 201.750.8880 chokdeethaikitchen.com COUSINS PIZZA 450 Livingston St. 201.767.4300 cousinsnorwoodnj.com DIMORA 100 Piermont Rd. 201.750.5000 dimorarestaurant.com RAGAZZI 530 Livingston St. 201.660.7950 ragazzirestaurant lounge.com WILD WASABI 460 Livingston St. 201.767.1300 gowildwasabi.com

OAKLAND CAFÉ L’AMORE 455 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.337.5558 cafelamore.com PORTOBELLO 175 Ramapo Valley Rd. 201.337.8990 portobellonj.com W’S GRILL 20 Elm St. 201.651.0005 wsgrilloakland.com

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HOSHITORI 216 Old Tappan Rd. 201.666.6544

PEPPERCORNS 176 Colony Ave. 201.391.2818 peppercornsparkridge.com

VICOLO RISTORANTE 216 Old Tappan Rd. 201.497.8777 vicoloristorante.com

YUKI HANA 131 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.391.3230 yukihanaparkridge.net

ORADELL

RAMSEY

ESTI’S CAFE 680 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.322.6362 estiscafe.com

ANTHONY’S COAL FIRED PIZZA 984 Rte. 17 201.818.2625 acfp.com

RED APPLE RESTAURANT 235 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.986.1800 redappleoradell.com

CAFÉ PANACHE 130 E. Main St. 201.934.0030 cafepanachenj.com

OCEAN SUSHI 619 Oradell Ave. 201.986.1113 oceansushioradell.com

GAO THAI KITCHEN 63 W. Main St. 201.962.2691 gaothaikitchen.com

PALISADES PARK

GIOVANNA’S CAFÉ 19 E. Main St. 201.825.5835 giovannascafe.com

MESON MADRID 343 Bergen Blvd. 201.947.1038 mesonmadrid.com SO MOON NAN JIP 238 Broad Ave. 201.944.3998 TO SOK CHON 138 W. Central Blvd. 201.482.0910

PARAMUS CHAKRA 144 Rte. 4 E. 201.556.1530 chakrarestaurant.com KIKU 365 Rte. 17 S. 201.265.7200 MANTRA 275 Rte. 4 W. 201.342.8868 mantranj.com

PARK RIDGE ESTY STREET 86 Spring Valley Rd. 201.307.1515 estystreet.com GREEK CORNER GRILL 99 Park Ave. 201.476.1400 greekcornergrill.com THE PARK STEAKHOUSE 151 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.930.1300 theparksteakhouse.com

THE SHANNON ROSE 1200 Rte. 17 201.962.7602 theshannonrose.com VARKA ESTIATORIO 30 N. Spruce St. 201.995.9333 varkarestaurant.com

RIDGEFIELD CAFÉ TIVOLI 533 Shaler Blvd. 201.941.5561 cafetivoli.com TUTTO A MODO MIO 482 Bergen Blvd. 201.313.9690 tuttoamodomio.com

RIDGEFIELD PARK LUIGI’S RESTAURANT 54 Mt. Vernon St. 201.641.9869 luigisridgefieldpark.com MK VALENCIA 228 Main St. 201.373.0228 mkvalenciarestaurant.com SPARTA TAVERNA 206 Main St. 201.296.0095 spartataverna.com THAI PALACE 218 E. Main St. 201.441.9119 thaipalaceteaneck.com

Photos, this page: William Schaffner; opposite page, courtesy of Cafe Matisse

OLD TAPPAN Meson Madrid in Palisades Park

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RIDGEWOOD A MANO 24 Franklin Ave. 201.493.2000 amanopizza.com BAMBOO HOUSE 28 S. Broad St. 201.447.3111 BAUMGART’S CAFÉ 158 Franklin Ave. 201.612.5688 baumgartscafe.com

LISA’S 28 Oak St. 201.251.8686 lisasmediterranean cuisine.net PARK WEST TAVERN 30 Oak St. 201.445.5400 parkwesttavern.com PEARL RESTAURANT 17 S. Broad St. 201.857.5100 pearlridgewood.com

CAFÉ 37 37 S. Broad St. 201.857.0437 café-37.com

RAYMOND’S 101 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.445.5125

FINCA 20 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.444.1199 fincanj.com

ROOTS STEAKHOUSE 17 Chestnut St. 201.444.1922 rootsteakhouse.com

FROM SCRATCH 44 E. Ridgewood Ave. 201.857.5188 fromscratch ridgewood.com

RIVER EDGE

KAILASH 22 Oak St. 201.251.9693

FUKI SUSHI 828 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.225.0160 fukisushi4u.com

KUMO 55 Franklin Ave. 201.251.9693 kumo55.com LA LANTERNA CAFÉ & GRILL 29 W. Ridgewood Ave. 201.444.5520 lalanternaof ridgewood.com LE BON CHOIX 11 Godwin Ave. 201.689.0400 lebonchoixcafe.com

A TASTE OF GREECE 935 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.967.0029 atasteofgreecenj.com

GREEN PAPAYA 110 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.678.1888 greenpapayanj.com ISTANBLUE 645 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.262.4400 istanblueriveredge.net SANDUCCI’S 620 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.599.0600 sanduccis.com

Photos, this page: William Schaffner; opposite page, courtesy of Cafe Matisse

Cafe Matisse, Rutherford

RIVER VALE

SADDLE BROOK

ARMANDO’S TUSCAN GRILL 688 Westwood Ave. 201.722.5820 armandostuscangrill.com

MATSUYA 490 Market St. 201.843.5811 matsuyasteakhouse.com QUE PASTA 326 Market St. 201.712.1900 qpitalian.com

CRECCO’S CAFÉ 649 Westwood Ave. 201.664.7200 creccoscafe.com

SADDLE BROOK DINER 30 Market St. 201.843.5929 saddlebrookdiner.com

ROCHELLE PARK BUCCO’S 60 Essex St. 201.226.1030 buccosristorante.com

THE GOLDEN PUB 335 Market St. 201.843.9210 thegoldenpub.com

DD THAI CUISINE 184 W. Passaic St. 201.880.8227 ddthaicuisine.com

SADDLE RIVER THE SADDLE RIVER INN 2 Barnstable Ct. 201.825.4016 saddleriverinn.com

THE DOG AND CASK 55 Rte. 17 South 201.845.5101 thedogandcask.com

SOUTH HACKENSACK

NANNI 53 W. Passaic St. 201.843.1250 nanni.com

I GEMELLI RISTORANTE 268 Huyler St. 201.487.4220 igemelliristorante.com

WOODSTONE PIZZA BAR AND GRILL 352 W. Passaic St. 201.845.7600 woodstonepizza barandgrill.com

TEANECK

RUTHERFORD CAFÉ MATISSE 167 Park Ave. 201.935.2995 cafematisse.com FINCH’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 801 Rutherford Ave. 201.231.3141

LIMONCELLO 32 Franklin Tpke. 201.652.5573 limoncellonj.com MOSHI MOSHI 137 Franklin Tpke. 201.444.1130 sushimoshi.com THE VILLAGE GRILLE 71 Crescent Ave. 201.670.8200 villagegrillewaldwick.com

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP

CASA DEL SOLE 115 Broadway 201.391.5671 casadelsole.biz

WOOD-RIDGE ANGELONI’S AT THE WOODRIDGE INN 191 Valley Blvd. 201.939.1234 JUSTIN’S 269 Hackensack St. 201.933.4276 justinsristoranteii.com

DOG HOUSE SALOON & GRILL 270 Pascack Rd. 201.722.1820

3 CHICAS MEXICAN KITCHEN 637 Wyckoff Ave. 201.848.4700 3chicas.com

ROSE RESTAURANT 1150 Teaneck Rd. 201.569.3600 rosepersian restaurant.com

LILI’S BISTRO 251 Pascack Rd. 201.664.5454 lilisbistronj.com

CAFÉ ANGELIQUE 1 Piermont Rd. 201.541.1010 cafeangeliquenyc.com KINARA 10 Jay St. 201.399.7788 kinaracuisineofindia.com PALMER’S CROSSING 145 Dean Dr. 201.567.4800 palmerscrossing restaurant.com SAYOLA RESTAURANT 50 Prospect Ter. 201.871.2182 sayolarestaurant.com

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CIRCOLO 53 Franklin Tpke. 201.882.1818 circolo.info

WOODCLIFF LAKE BLUE MOON MEXICAN CAFÉ 42 Kinderkamack Rd. 201.782.9500 bluemoonmexican café.com

AMARONE 63 Cedar Ln. 201.833.1897 amaroneristorante.net

THE VILLAGE GOURMET 75 Park Ave. 201.438.9404 villagerestaurantgroup. com

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THE IRON HORSE 20 Washington Ave. 201.666.9682 theironhorse.com

ANDREA’S 20 E. Prospect St. 201.670.0275 andreasrestaurant nj.com

MARTINI GRILL 187 Hackensack St. 201.939.2000

AXIA TAVERNA 18 Piermont Rd. 201.569.5999 axiataverna.com

BERGENMAG.COM

WALDWICK

BACARI GRILL 800 Ridgewood Rd. 201.358.6330 bacarigrill.com

PAISANO’S 132 Park Ave. 201.935.5755 paisanos.com

VOLARES 7 Station Square 201.935.6606 volaresrestaurant.com

MEZZA 20 Jefferson Ave. 201.722.8822 mezzawestwood.com

AL’S CHARCOAL PIT 540 Cedar Ln. 201.530.7786

TENAFLY

TRATTORIA GIOTTO 15 Park Ave. 201.528.7142 trattoriagiotto.com

SIMPLY VIETNAMESE 1 Hollywood Ave. 201.568.7770 simplyvietnamese.info

PHO MIU 255 Pascack Rd. 201.497.3915 WING LEE KITCHEN 301 Pascack Rd. 201.358.0702 wingleekitchen.com

WESTWOOD BACI ITALIAN GRILL 36 Jefferson Ave. 201.722.1900 baciwestwood.com BOP N SUSHI 441 Broadway 201.722.8687 bopnsushi.com CAFFÉ ANELLO 11 Madison Ave. 201.786.8137 caffeanello.com

WYCKOFF

ALDO’S 640 Wyckoff Ave. 201.891.2618 aldosofwyckoff.com THE BARN ORIGINAL 359 Sicomac Ave. 201.848.0108 thebarnoriginal.com THE BRICK HOUSE 179 Godwin Ave. 201.848.1211 thebrickhousewyckoff. com SAKURA 371 Franklin Ave. 201.848.6988 sakurawyckoff.com T.S. MA 637 Wyckoff Ave. 201.891.8878 tsmachinesecuisine.com

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For our complete list of dining options, visit the “Where to Eat” section at bergenmag.com.

JANUARY 2019

12/12/18 4:25 PM


{ A BERGEN MOMENT }

Photo courtesy of Brian Sullivan

“On a recent ride, my cycling group decided to try some of the hiking trails in Palisades Interstate Park in Fort Lee, which I would not encourage others to do. We had to clamber up a rock retaining wall on the last trail—it was a funny coincidence the path ended at a sign that is a well-known landmark for cyclists.” —Brian Sullivan, Jersey City

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BERGEN Magazine Volume 19, Issue 1 (ISSN# 2573-8151 and USPS 025-351) is published 11 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. Postmaster: Send address changes to Subscription Department, Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. Periodicals postage paid at Montvale, N.J., and additional mailing offices.

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Send us your Bergen Moment! Email your photo and a short description to editor@wainscotmedia.com.

JANUARY 2019

12/11/18 1:39 PM


Exercise your power.

Design your own future. You can’t predict the future, but you can create a plan that offers a lifelong security net for your finances, your care, and your ability to maintain control of your own life. The security net is Life Care, and it’s one of the many unique benefits offered at The Vista, a new Continuing Care Retirement Community coming to northern New Jersey. With Life Care you’re assured an on-site continuum of care and receive only the level of support you need at the appropriate time. You’ll pay predictable monthly fees and enjoy financial security, protection from rising health-care costs, and potential tax advantages.

Start owning your future. We can help. For a free planning guide, call (201) 904-4300 today. All architectural renderings are conceptual and subject to change.

CEDAR HILL PLAZA 525 Cedar Hill Avenue | Wyckoff, NJ 07481 (201) 904-4300 | TheVista.org Anticipated completion late 2020

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12/14/18 11:11 AM


VCHW Collage Ad_Bergen_9 x 10_875.qxp_NEW Collage 11/19/18 2:00 PM Page 1

SPECIAL NEW YE AR’S DISCOUNT!

Join Valley Health LifeStyles by January 31 and receive $50 off the enrollment fee and a special gift!

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Valley Health LifeStyles is a world-class fitness program

See our membership team today!

designed to help you maintain the healthy lifestyle that’s right for you. Start the new year right – join today! The LifeStyles fitness center includes: ◗ The medical fitness difference: qualified staff, physician oversight, safe and meaningful outcomes ◗ Six-lane lap pool, warm-water therapy, whirlpool and saunas

Valley Health LifeStyles 1400 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah   201-389-0839 M – F: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sat.: 8 a.m. – noon

ValleyHealthLifeStyles.com

◗ Sports performance training and walking/running track ◗ Rock climbing wall, group exercise studios, gymnasium and state-of-the-art fitness equipment ◗ KidStyles fitness program and babysitting services

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12/12/18 12:37 PM

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Bergen: January 2019  

Bergen: January 2019