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Inuit Art Auction Monday 18 November 2013

Waddingtons.ca


Inuit Art Auction Monday 18 November 2013 at 6:00 pm

On View Saturday 16 November from 11:00 am - 4:00 pm Sunday 17 November from 11:00 am - 4:00 pm Monday 18 November from 10:00 am - 12:00 Noon Preview and Auction to be held at Waddington’s 275 King Street East, 2nd Floor Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2 This auction is subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the back of this catalogue. All lots in the auction may be viewed online at InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca


Waddington’s

Leadership Team

Waddington’s is Canada’s most diverse and significant provider of fine art auction and appraisal services. Based on a rich legacy in the industry, Waddington’s actively seeks to redefine our business to ensure we remain fresh and reactive to what our clients are seeking. Through our appraisal, auction, private sale and downsizing expertise, we are pleased to provide a complete range of services.

Waddington’s leadership team brings together three of the industry’s best. The combination of their experience, knowledge of market trends and client networks builds on Waddington’s 160 year legacy of growth and dominance.

Waddington’s is Canada’s original auction house, with a history of conducting auctions since 1850. We are also an international auction house, providing access to world markets. Waddington’s is an innovative leader. We enjoy pushing the limits, exploring new territory and creating new partnerships. From the marathon auction of Maple Leaf Gardens, our partnership with the LCBO to auction fine wine, to the launch of Concrete Contemporary and our new Pop-Up Gallery series, we are driven to find what’s new, what’s exciting, and what you want to buy or sell.

Waddington’s by Department Asian Art Canadian Fine Art Contemporary Art Auctions and Projects Decorative Arts International Art Inuit Art Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics “Off the Wall” Art Transitions Philanthropy and Community

Duncan McLean, President, is Waddington’s corporate leader, responsible for strategic development and innovation realization. Under his direction Waddington’s strives to not only continuously evolve to meet the needs of our clients and address the demands of the market, but to push the boundaries, with integrity, creativity and passion. Mr. McLean has been involved in the auction industry for 35 years, as art specialist, appraiser, auctioneer and corporate leader. His knowledge base spans the diversity of Waddington’s offerings, with internationally-recognized expertise in Inuit Art. As Vice President Business Development, Stephen Ranger is focused on identifying new markets, new clients and new ways to do business. For example, Mr. Ranger launched Waddington’s Contemporary Art venture, Concrete Contemporary, to reach an exciting new sector of art enthusiasts and artists. Under Mr. Ranger’s guidance, new partnerships are also being created resulting in edgy new offerings like our Pop-Up Gallery series debuting in 2013. Mr.Ranger brings over 25 years of diverse experience as an auctioneer, appraiser and consultant in the art auction industry with specific expertise in Canadian Fine Art. Linda Rodeck, Vice President Fine Art, is one of Canada’s most trusted and respected Canadian Art specialists. Her impressive career of 25+ years includes leadership roles in the country’s most distinguished auction houses. Ms. Rodeck’s keen understanding of the market and her extensive network are invaluable in her role of sourcing the best works and providing the best service to our clients. As Vice President of Waddington’s Fine Art, Ms. Rodeck will play a critical role in developing new business leveraging her success in the Canadian art market.


Inuit Art

Canadian Fine Art

Waddington’s is internationally recognized as one of the leading authorities in marketing Inuit Art. No other auction house has been as intrinsically linked to the development of a market for this art form. Inuit Art is a proud part of our DNA. From our first landmark auction in 1978 of the William Eccles Collection, Waddington’s has offered thousands of works, set record prices, and expanded the market well beyond Canada’s borders.

Waddington’s has been a major force in the Canadian art sector for over five decades, beginning with our first auction of Canadian Fine Art held at the Queen Elizabeth Building at the CNE in 1967. Since that historic event, Waddington’s has offered some of the most important Canadian works, set record prices, and has been an integral part of driving the Canadian art market.

Our legacy of successful Inuit Art auctions, our ability to achieve continually increasing values and our creation of an international market have been key factors in validating Inuit art as a whole and establishing it as an integral part of the Canadian Art scene.

Duncan McLean Senior Specialist, Inuit Art

Christa Ouimet Specialist, Inuit Art

With the return of Linda Rodeck, one of Canada’s most respected art specialists, Waddington’s is proud to rename our Canadian Art division under the Waddington’s brand umbrella.

Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art


Waddington’s

Leadership Team

Waddington’s is Canada’s most diverse and significant provider of fine art auction and appraisal services. Based on a rich legacy in the industry, Waddington’s actively seeks to redefine our business to ensure we remain fresh and reactive to what our clients are seeking. Through our appraisal, auction, private sale and downsizing expertise, we are pleased to provide a complete range of services.

Waddington’s leadership team brings together three of the industry’s best. The combination of their experience, knowledge of market trends and client networks builds on Waddington’s 160 year legacy of growth and dominance.

Waddington’s is Canada’s original auction house, with a history of conducting auctions since 1850. We are also an international auction house, providing access to world markets. Waddington’s is an innovative leader. We enjoy pushing the limits, exploring new territory and creating new partnerships. From the marathon auction of Maple Leaf Gardens, our partnership with the LCBO to auction fine wine, to the launch of Concrete Contemporary and our new Pop-Up Gallery series, we are driven to find what’s new, what’s exciting, and what you want to buy or sell.

Waddington’s by Department Asian Art Canadian Fine Art Contemporary Art Auctions and Projects Decorative Arts International Art Inuit Art Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics “Off the Wall” Art Transitions Philanthropy and Community

Duncan McLean, President, is Waddington’s corporate leader, responsible for strategic development and innovation realization. Under his direction Waddington’s strives to not only continuously evolve to meet the needs of our clients and address the demands of the market, but to push the boundaries, with integrity, creativity and passion. Mr. McLean has been involved in the auction industry for 35 years, as art specialist, appraiser, auctioneer and corporate leader. His knowledge base spans the diversity of Waddington’s offerings, with internationally-recognized expertise in Inuit Art. As Vice President Business Development, Stephen Ranger is focused on identifying new markets, new clients and new ways to do business. For example, Mr. Ranger launched Waddington’s Contemporary Art venture, Concrete Contemporary, to reach an exciting new sector of art enthusiasts and artists. Under Mr. Ranger’s guidance, new partnerships are also being created resulting in edgy new offerings like our Pop-Up Gallery series debuting in 2013. Mr.Ranger brings over 25 years of diverse experience as an auctioneer, appraiser and consultant in the art auction industry with specific expertise in Canadian Fine Art. Linda Rodeck, Vice President Fine Art, is one of Canada’s most trusted and respected Canadian Art specialists. Her impressive career of 25+ years includes leadership roles in the country’s most distinguished auction houses. Ms. Rodeck’s keen understanding of the market and her extensive network are invaluable in her role of sourcing the best works and providing the best service to our clients. As Vice President of Waddington’s Fine Art, Ms. Rodeck will play a critical role in developing new business leveraging her success in the Canadian art market.


Inuit Art

Canadian Fine Art

Waddington’s is internationally recognized as one of the leading authorities in marketing Inuit Art. No other auction house has been as intrinsically linked to the development of a market for this art form. Inuit Art is a proud part of our DNA. From our first landmark auction in 1978 of the William Eccles Collection, Waddington’s has offered thousands of works, set record prices, and expanded the market well beyond Canada’s borders.

Waddington’s has been a major force in the Canadian art sector for over five decades, beginning with our first auction of Canadian Fine Art held at the Queen Elizabeth Building at the CNE in 1967. Since that historic event, Waddington’s has offered some of the most important Canadian works, set record prices, and has been an integral part of driving the Canadian art market.

Our legacy of successful Inuit Art auctions, our ability to achieve continually increasing values and our creation of an international market have been key factors in validating Inuit art as a whole and establishing it as an integral part of the Canadian Art scene.

Duncan McLean Senior Specialist, Inuit Art

Christa Ouimet Specialist, Inuit Art

With the return of Linda Rodeck, one of Canada’s most respected art specialists, Waddington’s is proud to rename our Canadian Art division under the Waddington’s brand umbrella.

Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art


Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects

Decorative Arts

Waddington’s launched its newest division, Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects (CCAP) in March 2012 with a vision and mandate to create a secondary market for contemporary Canadian art.

Decorative Arts at Waddington’s encompasses a broad and diverse variety of objects and the department's client database is one of our largest.  From ancient to modern, delicate to deadly, Waddington’s Decorative Arts department redefines the term, bringing much more than traditional silverware and porcelain figurines to market, and with remarkable success.

Concrete Contemporary Auctions merges the worlds of traditional auction and the retail gallery, where our relationships with artists, art dealers, curators and collectors result in exciting new sources of contemporary works. The auctions are tightly focused on Canadian contemporary art since 1980 with an emphasis on mid- and latecareer artists with exhibition history in the private and public sphere. An exciting initiative of CCAP is the launch of our Pop-Up Gallery series in 2013. These short-duration, single artist shows offer works by some of Canada’s most accomplished working artists. Led by one of Canada’s most plugged-in art experts, Stephen Ranger, CCAP is committed to exploring new ways to connect, expand and support the arts community.

Waddington’s reputation for developing new markets is well represented by our Decorative Arts department, as is our ability to present large collections – notable recent sales have included Contemporary Studio Glass, Scientific Instruments and Militaria. The department regularly offers auctions which include bronzes, items of Canadian Historical interest, ceramics, devotional works of art, glass, lighting, militaria, mirrors, objets de vertu, porcelain, scientific instruments, travel and exploration maps.

Bill Kime Senior Specialist, Decorative Arts

Stephen Ranger Senior Specialist, Contemporary Art

Sean Quinn Specialist, Decorative Arts


International Art

Asian Art

Waddington’s International Art department has expanded its scope to present auctions of fine art from around the world, with a focus on works from the United Kingdom, across Europe, Russia and the United States. A major element of Waddington’s legacy, our International Art auctions thrive on Canada’s cultural diversity. The combination of our expertise and that of our substantive network ensures the highest standards of authentication and research.

Waddington’s Asian Art department is Canada’s leader in serving the demands of the rapidly growing Asian market supported by our recognized and credible expertise. Our ability to achieve exceptional prices for works, including the Canadian record for the highest price for an Asian work of art, is based on our international reputation and network with the community.

Original works, photographs, prints and sculpture are offered in our live auctions and online auctions, attracting international clients.

Susan Robertson Senior Specialist, International Art

Specializing in jade, paintings, porcelain, religious works of art, textiles, woodblock and export wares, we present works from China, Japan, Korea, South East Asia, South Asia, Himalaya and others.

Anthony Wu Specialist, Asian Art


Jewellery, Watches and Numismatic

“Off the Wall” Art

Waddington’s has conducted auctions of Fine Jewellery and Numismatics for close to three decades. Highly respected expertise and in-depth knowledge of both domestic and international markets is the anchor of our ongoing success and the popularity of our auctions.

Our “Off The Wall” Art online auctions are a unique opportunity to showcase accessible art. Drawing from our International Art and Canadian Art divisions, “Off The Wall” Art auctions feature paintings, prints and sculpture.

Our auctions include unmounted gemstones, finely crafted pieces by many of the most desireable names in jewellery including Tiffany, Cartier, Gucci, Hermes, Van Cleef & Arpels, etc., fine watches, as well as antique pieces, coins and banknotes.

Donald McLean Senior Specialist, Jewellery, Watches and Numismatics

These monthly, online auctions are always an eclectic selection of affordable works – a great way to learn, enjoy art and start building a collection. Working closely with our other divisions, this auction has developed its own diverse and extensive network of clients.

Doug Payne Specialist, Fine Art


Transitions

Philanthropy and Community

Transitions is Waddington’s downsizing and estate management service, created specifically for clients going through a transition who require knowledgeable, qualified and professional advice.

Waddington's is committed to working within the community by contributing our time to charity fundraising events and appraisal clinics. We are honoured to work with countless museums, galleries, art organizations and fund raising events and contribute our time to over 20 events each year raising over $2,000,000 annually for the community.

Successful downsizing and estate planning require an accurate appraisal of tangible assets. Drawing on Waddington’s 160 years of experience across our diverse areas of specialties, Transitions helps clients make informed decisions to keep, gift, sell or donate. Our clients include fiduciaries, executors and beneficiaries responsible for settling estates, as well as private clients looking to downsize and turn their material encumbrances into a monetary resource. Transitions is an end-to-end solution to help you sort, value, sell and move on to the next stage.

Marcia Kim Manager

Ellie Muir Coordinator

In addition, the Concrete Contemporary Acquisition Fund each year funds 50% of the purchase price for a work of contemporary Canadian art for a public institution. In 2012/2013 we have supported the following organizations: Aids Committee of Toronto, SNAP Best Buddies Birdlife International Canadian Opera Company Casey House, Art with Heart Casey House, Snowball CAMH Unmasked Covenant House The Furniture Bank Integra Foundation Lake Ontario Waterkeepers OCAD University Metro Toronto Zoo Montreal Children’s Hospital Nyota School, Kenya Princess Margaret Hospital Robert McLaughlin Gallery Second Harvest, Toronto Taste Serve Canada St. Mary’s General Hospital, Kitchener St. Michaels Hospital, ARTGEMS The STOP Foodbank Toronto Symphony Orchestra The Varley Gallery Windsor Art Gallery Warchild Canada York University Fisher Fund


Inuit Art Lots 1–308


InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

The Dr. and Mrs. Philip H. Gray Collection of Inuit Art

Collecting Inuit Art A message from Iris Gray The Dr. and Mrs. Philip H. Gray Folkart Collection of Inuit Art presently contains in excess of 344 graphics, stone, bone, ivory carvings, and artifacts from Canada, Alaska, and Greenland. While the four traditional front doors for amassing significant collections of Canadian Inuit art were (1) being a professional artist oneself, as was George Swinton, (2) having contact with the northern Arctic, as did Jerry Twomey, (3) being a part of the dealer-distributorcurative network, as was William Eccles, and (4) having sufficient wealth to buy the attention and services of those in a position to grant them, as the Albrechts were able to do when they collected a representative set of prints and carvings, some of which are now in the Heard Museum in Phoenix. Since these front doors were not open to us, my late husband, Philip, sometimes whimsically referred to the Gray Collection as having been picked up at the back door. For the most part, the sculpture in the Gray Collection is as good as it is because Philip and I visited a staggering number of galleries, department stores, craft and gift shops in Canada and the United States, always on the alert for the treasure that might have slipped through the funnel of the dealer-distributor-curator network. For each piece of sculpture we bought we looked at literally thousands of unsatisfactory pieces.

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Occasionally other collectors sold us something they no longer wanted and could see that we did. Thus, in 1970, we acquired two carvings from Arctic Bay from a resident in Winnipeg, who had lived in that far northern community and had received them from the artist himself. George Swinton sold us a small head by Tiktak, which we would never have been able to acquire unless we had actually visited Rankin Inlet, or had known a dealer who would have contacted us upon receiving a shipment from that area, because Tiktak was much sought after by collectors. Or, we would be present in a gallery when major items for sale came back from a loan exhibition, as in the case of our acquisition of a ceramic by Kukshout, of Rankin Inlet, in 1975. After attending an exhibition at the Craft Guild of Manitoba in Winnipeg in 1969, we dropped in at the local Hudson’s Bay department store and encountered a clerk who knew of our interest in Inuit carvings. She had saved us a beautiful piece from Port Harrison, because she couldn’t think of anyone else who would appreciate it more. In 1978, Philip won a bid on an excellent carving at the William Eccles auction in Toronto, because apparently he alone remembered having seen it pictured in George Swinton’s 1972 edition of Sculpture of the Eskimo* (page 150). Swinton had been present at that auction and even he had not recalled that a photo of the carving was in his book, and that

it had been misidentified. When Philip arrived in Winnipeg in the autumn of 1968 as a visiting professor in the department of psychology at the University of Manitoba, there were old and unsold prints available from the distribution centers, if one could find a gallery willing to obtain them. Fleet Gallery graciously provided that service for us and we managed to buy several dozen prints, which a year or so later simply weren’t available. After our return to Montana, to get a new outstanding Cape Dorset print meant standing long hours in the October cold, in order to be first in line when the particular Alberta gallery featuring the latest edition of prints opened. When Philip decided to seriously collect Inuit art he felt the lack of a guide to the artist themselves, their age, their experience, what kind of work they did, and an indication of the meaning of their work to other collectors. Some artists were famous, and presumably anything from their hand would be worth collecting. But how could one be certain that this piece of sculpture in a gallery was by that famous Meeko and not by another Meeko who had no reputation at all? *Please note – The word “Eskimo” often is used incorrectly in identifying native peoples. This language reflects the time in which and by whom it was written. So, in 1974, Philip privately published his A Directory of Eskimo Artists in Sculpture and Print. The first edition of 250 copies sold out immediately to


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

the Canadian galleries and collectors, necessitating a second printing. Richard C. Crandall, in 2000, published Inuit Art: A History, in which he cited Philip on page 206: “It [Philip’s directory] was important for two reasons. First, it emphasized the concept that individuals made the art and that there were differences in the quality of the work they produced. Second, it provided collectors with an idea of how others had evaluated, by exhibitions or awards, the work of artists whose works might be in their collections or whose works they were considering buying.” In 2006, Duncan McLean of Waddington’s Auctioneers and Appraisers, of Toronto, wrote: “I remember the first Inuit artist/disc # reference I ever used was your original 1974 index. It came to me with my first collection, the William Eccles collection which formed my first auction in 1978.” When we moved to Montana in 1960, we fell in love with the western artists and made a brief start at collecting. However, we soon realized that we didn’t have a plausible art budget. But what type of art could we afford? Philip’s move to Canada as a visiting professor proved to be fortuitous. Our first encounter with Inuit art was in Winnipeg. The Winnipeg Art Gallery had mounted an exhibit of carvings in Manitoba’s Legislature Building to celebrate the Centennial of the Confederation of Canadian Provinces in 1967. Although Philip didn’t see the exhibit (a friend took me and our

children to see the exhibit and we were charmed by the stone carvings of arctic animals and birds and examples of the way of life in the Arctic), he was impressed with our enthusiastic descriptions of what we had seen. Later he went to the University of Manitoba’s bookstore and found a copy of James Houston’s book on prints and George Swinton’s on sculpture. I expressed an interest in the prints as a possible type of art we might be able to afford to decorate our walls. Philip purchased a few stone carvings to give our daughter and son for “show and tell”. Then he proceeded to educate himself about the print program, and discovered that printmaking by Canadian Inuits was started at Cape Dorset on Baffin Island by James Houston in 1957—the same artist who had got the world interested in Inuit soapstone carving nearly 10 years previously. By 1958 the first group of prints from Cape Dorset were produced, but not widely sold. However, in 1959 the procedure was standardized and commercialized and Inuit prints soon became a hot item for interior decorators. Prints were made in lots of 50 and the cut stone or stencil then destroyed. Ten years later the production of graphics included stonecuts, stencils, and etchings, with the stonecuts priced from as low as $30 to a high of $90. Thus, concluded Philip, the prints might be just the thing for us to decorate our walls. Of the artists involved in the program, a young woman and mother,

Kenojuak, had obtained an international reputation with her “Enchanted Owl”, released in 1960, and by 1969, her work was almost impossible to obtain, being sold out immediately upon release. Pitseolak, another woman artist, was more prolific and had a multitude of themes. Parr was ultra primitive and popular only with collectors, and Philip really liked him. In 1965, stonecut prints were on the market by Holman Island natives in the western Arctic. While the Dorset prints tended to be fanciful, the Holman prints tended to be symbolic. As Philip expressed it: “I’ve yet to see anything more poignant than Ekootak’s ‘Break of the Family’ where the man walks off with his hunting dog, the woman goes in the other direction with her oil lamp, the igloo lies in ruins, the children are a pile of broken pieces.” James Houston has written: “Eskimo prints and carvings are historical documents of a people without written records. Their prints are an important lasting contribution to the art of America, which establishes a strong human link between past and present. Viewing their prints may help us to know the Eskimo people, but more important their art may help them to go on knowing themselves in these changing times.” Our collection of carvings began to grow and tended to reflect the early ways of living and hunting—a diversification of animals and lifestyles of the hunter from the old world of the Arctic. The Inuit lived a hard life

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InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

and, if he failed to hunt successfully, his family starved. He treated the animal he hunted with respect— witness Abraham Pov’s carving “Freeing the Spirit”, thus ensuring he would be successful in hunting another seal in the future. As a psychologist Philip also developed a strong interest in the Inuit’s depiction of transformation in animals to humans or vice versa, and of animals to animals, such as the transformation of the owl to the bear. Although survival in the Arctic was difficult, the Inuit exhibited a great sense of humor in his art forms: the mother decanting her infant from her hood to prevent it from wetting her; the hunter faced with the decision to release the seal or lose his pants in the freezing cold; the hunter sticking out his tongue at the walrus, when the line to his catch breaks; the boy chasing the goose who winds up chasing him and catching him. The stone for the carvings which we own was primarily mined in the vicinity of the artist’s community. Many sources have since dried up and the stone imported from greater distances. The stone from Cape Dorset, Baker Lake, Port Harrison, Coppermine, the Belcher Islands, Lake Harbour, etc., is generally recognizable. Our collection of carvings and artifacts includes 166 pieces from 29 communities in the Canadian Arctic, one piece from Greenland and 20 pieces from Alaska. Our 157 graphics are representative of 10 communities, and 86 of them are framed and hanging on the walls of

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our home. The collection portrays the end of an era—an existence that could be brutal (a bear has captured the hunter’s arm holding his copper knife he intended to use in killing his prey, and the look of despair is clearly detailed on the hunter’s face); a spirit of intense energy (depictions of the hunter bending into the wind with his catch); a reverence for the artist’s ancestry (witness Kominerk’s portrayal of his grandfather). Philip collected pieces that literally “spoke” to him. Once he put his hand on the piece, it was ours. He admired the way the carver could contemplate a block of stone and then proceed to carve the image that emerged from the stone, taking advantage of the coloring and striations in the stone to enhance the image, as did Philip Kominerk when he carved his ptarmigan, revealing the bone structure in the bird. The Inuit of old knew his animals—their skeletal structure, how they moved on land or how they swam or flew. Even the functional pieces of the artist, such as a tightly woven waterproof basket, tools, games, dog whips, needle cases, snow beaters, and ashtrays, were decorated and pleasing to the eye. The hunt for a carving of a caribou or a muskox, or a seal, or a hawk, or a mother and child, or a drum dancer, or of a print by a particular artist became a part of every trip that our family took, whether traveling in Canada or the United States. But we also thrilled at the opportunity to see great exhibits in the museums, as

well, and, yes, even when we visited a gallery which contained exhibitions priced out of our reach. Our daughter and son shared in the adventure of the search and in the pleasure of living in a household surrounded by the imaginative efforts of the Inuit artist. Lots from this collection are listed below and indentified with a blue square in the catalogue. 13, 14, 15, 25, 31, 32, 35, 36, 38, 39, 44, 67, 76, 106, 114, 122, 125, 126, 128, 130, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 140, 141, 143, 144, 155, 156, 157, 158, 175, 176, 178, 180, 183, 191, 192, 200, 203, 205, 206, 210, 217, 221, 253, 254, 255, 258, 270, 272, 275, 278, 284, 286, 292 and 293.


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

The Zazelenchuk Collection of Inuit Art

A message from Mary Helen Zazelenchuk, Stanley’s daughter

arrival was announced on community

than ever. Most of the time that was

radio, and Mary Helen was astounded

true.

by the crowd that came to a reception

Stanley was fierce. He was always in a

Stanley Zazelenchuk: Inuit art collector, teacher, gardener, optimist.

in his honour. At the end of that trip,

hurry. He surged forward into life. He

he said, “Where else but here would

always wanted do more, see more,

Born Feb. 22, 1941, in Stornoway,

your dad be a hero?”

know more, have more, be more. He

Sask., died March 25, 2013, in Saint

It wasn’t a question that needed to be

didn’t die because his body gave out,

John of a stroke, aged 72.

asked. While Stanley didn’t suffer

but because there was so much work

Stanley was born on a farm in

fools gladly, his warmth and genuine

to be done elsewhere.

Saskatchewan, where he developed a

interest in other people’s lives meant

life-long love of nature. His mother

that he made many friends.

died of cancer when he was 17, and

In later years, he gardened

he’d still get choked up about it more

extensively. He took delight from his

than 50 years later.

more than 1,000 rosebushes and the

He considered becoming a wildlife

five-acre park around his house. He

officer, but instead turned to teaching.

drove his tractor every day, clearing

Seized by the adventurous spirit of

bush, grinding stumps and mowing.

the 1960s, he travelled to the

Once, upon meeting a new neighbour,

Canadian Arctic and taught there for

he chatted a few minutes before

13 years. He met his wife, Jean, in

declaring, “Well, there are two kinds

Kuujjuarapik, Que., in 1967, and

of people – those who stand around

married her a year later. Their

and talk and those who work; I know

daughter Mary Helen was born in

which kind I am,” and returned

1974.

unceremoniously to his weeding.

Stanley fell in love with the Arctic, the

That’s not to say he didn’t like to talk.

people and their artwork. His

He had a phenomenal memory for

experiences there would define the

names of both roses and people. He

rest of his life.

shared his passions for art and

He collected Inuit art compulsively,

gardening with whomever would

often hiding new purchases under the

listen, and prided himself on

bed so that his wife wouldn’t find out

remembering visitors to his gallery

about them. The family collection was

from years before.

shown at the Winnipeg Art Gallery in

He was an optimist, believing firmly

1978.

each year that mice would not come

At age 40, Stanley decided to change

into the basement or that the loose

careers, and opened an Inuit art

doorknob would fix itself. And while

gallery in New Brunswick, where his

that might have been avoidance, he

wife had family ties.

knew that every year was the year

In 2005, he visited Baker Lake

that things were going to be better

Lots from this collection are listed below and indentified with a green square in the catalogue. 2, 4, 6, 7, 92, 96, 112, 113, 145, 146, 148, 179, 181, 185, 187, 188, 189, 214, 215, 216, 222, 227, 228, 229, 296 and 297.

(Qamani’tuaq) with his daughter. His

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InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

1 OLASSIE AKULUKJUK (1951-), E6632, Pangnirtung BIRD WITH SPREAD WINGS wool weaving, signed in Roman, 40.5” x 38.5” — 102.9 x 97.8 cm. $400/600

2 ELIZABETH ANGRNAQQUAQ (1916-), W1-224, Baker Lake THE LAND felt, thread, embroidery floss, signed in syllabics, 9.5” x 39” — 24.1 x 99.1 cm. $400/600

3 IRENE AVAALAAQIAQ TIKTAALAAQ (1941-), E2-423, Baker Lake SEDNAS AND ANIMALS stroud, thread, embroidery floss, signed in syllabics, 51” x 29” — 129.5 x 73.7 cm. $1,500/2,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

4 MARY KUUTSIQ (1926-2011), E4-192, Baker Lake FOUR TOY BIRDS: MOTHER AND YOUNG fabric, polychrome embroidery, 9” x 11” x 3” — 22.9 x 27.9 x 7.6 cm.; 5” x 6.5” x 2” — 12.7 x 16.5 x 5.1 cm. Note: For similar works see, Crafts from Arctic Canada:An exhibition organized by the Canadian Eskimo Arts Council, page 28, 30, # 157, 158, 159 $400/600

5 UNIDENTIFIED, Baker Lake CAMP SCENE felt, thread, embroidery floss, c. 1970, 21” x 37” — 53.3 x 94 cm. $600/900

6 VICTORIA MAMNGUQSUALUK (1930-), E2-386, Baker Lake ARCTIC HARES stroud, thread, felt, signed in syllabics, 19.5” x 58” — 49.5 x 147.3 cm. $600/900

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InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

7 WINNIE TATYA (1931-), E2-312, Baker Lake FOLIAGE stroud, embroidery floss, signed in syllabics, 10.5” x 13” — 26.7 x 33 cm.; 11” x 27” — 27.9 x 68.6 cm. Note: “One might also draw attention to Winnie Tatya’s classically-organized compositions... all tightly embroidered with great and rewarding care.” Robert Kardosh, Works on Cloth, Imagery by artists of Baker Lake, Nunavut, Marion Scott Gallery, ex. cat. 2002, p. 10 $500/700

8 HELEN KALVAK (1901-1984), W2-423, Holman SPEARING CHAR stonecut and stencil, 1979, 33/50, unframed, 18.5” x 14.75” — 47 x 37.5 cm. $200/300

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

9 AGNES NANOGAK (1925-2001), W2-473, Holman THE EXHAUSTED RAVEN felt tip drawing; stencil, 1984, 35/50, unframed, 19” x 23.75 “ — 48.3 x 60.3 cm.; 19” x 26” — 48.3 x 66 cm. $400/600

Note: In the 1984 Holman annual graphics catalogue, the print is accompanied by an explanation that reads as follows, “The Raven was known to be a thief and, because of that, he had never been able to find a wife. One day the Raven asked some ducks swimming by if he could marry into their family. Knowing him to be a thief, the ducks said no. Later, some Canada geese came by and they agreed to let him marry a young goose from their flock. When the time came to migrate south, the Raven flew off with his new family. He could not fly as well as the geese, so, when he tried, he would fly on the back of his young wife. This greatly tired his wife and eventually she had to leave her husband behind because her family was by then far ahead. The Raven, now very tired indeed, saw nothing but sea for miles around. Suddenly, he saw a shape and dived towards it. When he came close he saw that it was a whale but by then he couldn’t stop and so he flew right down the blow-hole [sic]. Inside the whale it was nice and warm and there was much to eat, so the Raven happily stuffed himself. When the whale felt the Raven inside his stomach he said, “don’t touch THAT!”. [sic] The Raven obeyed the whale for a long time but finally his curiosity became to great and he touched “THAT”. The whale then died because it was his heart that the raven touched. Soon their was no food left for the Raven. The dead whale finally washed up on the shore and the Raven heard people shouting as they began to cut up the carcass. The Raven knew he was in danger so he flew out the blow-hole, so fast, that no one saw him. Later. in human form, he returned to the beach. He asked if anyone had seen anything coming out of the whale. One man replied that he had seen a dark flash. The Raven told people that the dark flash meant that the whale meat was bad , and that the would die if they ate it. Frightened by this warning, the people left. The Raven, returned to his bird form, remained behind and ate happily ever after. -Holman Annual Graphics Catalogue, 1970, Holman Eskimo Cooperative, NWT, pl. 18

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10 LUKE TUNGUAK “TUNUWAK”(1927-2008), E2-192, Baker Lake BIRD AND ANIMALS stonecut, 1965, proof 1 (1961 written on print), framed, sight, 9.75” x 15.5” — 24.8 x 39.4 cm. Note: From the Baker Lake experimental period. Tunuwak “emphasized that anyone could try out and did, and that they were given new designs to try at their own pace....William Noah thought Tunuwak was good, when he looked at the work I showed him, and wondered out loud why he didn’t continue in the program.” Sandra Buhai Barz, Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volume 3, Book 2: Print Documentation, 2004, p. 165 $400/600

11 THOMASSIAPIK SIVUARAPIK (1941-2009), E9-1462, Povungnituk HUNTERS WITH KAYAK stonecut, 1961, framed, 8.25” x 12.25” — 21 x 31.1 cm. Note: Part of the Povungnituk Experimental Collection, 1961. Of the thirty-five artists that debuted, twenty of them would not participate in the program again Thomassiapik included. Barz, Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volume 3, Book 2: Print Documentation, p. 31 $200/300

12 ANIRNIK OSHUITOQ (1902-1983), E7-965, Cape Dorset ANIMAL AND BIRD engraving, 1964, 28/50, framed, sight, 11.5” x 9.75” — 29.2 x 24.8 cm. $400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

13 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset FOUR WOMEN engraving, 1963, 42/50, unframed, 9.75” x 11.75” — 24.8 x 29.8 cm. Note: “In spite of the title of this print, the parkas worn by these four mysterious beings define them as men; there are no voluminous amautiq hoods, nor are there long, elegant skirt-tails and aprons, which every Eskimo woman wears. Beneath the short attire are not skirts but overpants worn by hunters. Without distracting details of any kind, this is the universal image of a group walking together. To Parr, technique is a subservient of subject, which is realized with near-absolute directness.” Patrick Furneaux and Leo Rosshandler, Ernst Roch, ed., Arts of the Eskimo: Prints, 1974, pp. 74-5 $800/1,200

14 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset UNTITLED etching, 1962, 32/50, unframed, 9.75” x 11.75” — 24.8 x 29.8 cm. $700/1,000

15 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset UNTITLED etching, 1962, 36/60, unframed, 9.75” x 11.75” — 24.8 x 29.8 cm. $1,000/1,500

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16 SHEOJUK ETIDLOOIE (1932-1999), E7-941, Cape Dorset KIINANQUAQ etching and aquatint, 1997, 12/50, unframed, 22.5" x 19.75" — 29.8 x 29.8 cm. $800/1,200

17 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (19272013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset RETURN OF THE LOONS lithograph, 1991, 44/50, framed, sight, 23.5” x 35” — 59.7 x 88.9 cm. $400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

18 SHEOJUK ETIDLOOIE (1932-1999), E7-941, Cape Dorset UPINNQUAQ lithograph, 1994, 44/50, framed, sight, 20.5” x 27.5” — 52.1 x 69.9 cm. $1,000/1,500

19 EFFIE ANGALI’TAAQ ARNALUAQ (1936-), E2-127, Baker Lake MOTHER OWL stonecut, 1965, 1/9, framed, sight, 15” x 22.5” — 38.1 x 57.2 cm. Note: From the Baker Lake experimental period. “Effie says she did image, but that ‘lino man’, she thinks Luke Tunuwak did the cutting and printing.” However the name PAUL UTATNAQ (1929-) “Uttanar E3276” is on the actual print. Barz, Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volume 3, Book 2: Print Documentation, 171 $400/600

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Small Wonders Lots 20–57

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

20 JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), E1-104, Arviat FIGURE

21 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat FIGURE

22 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat TWO MINIATURES

stone, 3.5” x 2” x 1.75” — 8.9 x 5.1 x 4.4 cm.

stone, 2.75” x 2” x 1” — 7 x 5.1 x 2.5 cm.

stone, 1” x 2” x 1.5” — 2.5 x 5.1 x 3.8 cm.; 2” x 1.75” x .75” — 5.1 x 4.4 x 1.9 cm.

$300/500 $400/600

$300/500

23 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat FAMILY stone, 4” x 3.25” x 1.25” — 10.2 x 8.3 x 3.2 cm.

24 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat FAMILY WITH INCISED IGLOO AND BIRD MOTIFS stone, 3.75” x 4” x 2” — 9.5 x 10.2 x 5.1 cm.

25 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat MOTHER AND CHILD stone, c. 1970, 3.5” x 4.75” x 1.75” — 8.9 x 12.1 x 4.4 cm. $300/500

$800/1,200 $600/900

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26 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1-436, Arviat ANIMAL

27 EVA TALOOKI ALIKTILUK (19271995), E1-75, Arviat MOTHER AND CHILD

28 MIRIAM MAREALIK QIYUK (1933-), E2-387, Baker Lake BIRDS ON A SEAL

stone, 4.75” x 1.75” x 3” — 12.1 x 4.4 x 7.6 cm.

stone, string, beads, 3.5” x 1.5” x 1.5” — 8.9 x 3.8 x 3.8 cm.

stone, signed in Roman, dated 1988, 1” x 5” x 1.5” — 2.5 x 12.7 x 3.8 cm.

$800/1,000

$200/300

$300/500

29 JOSIAH NUILAALIK (19282005), E2-385, Baker Lake BIRD SPIRIT

30 JOSIAH NUILAALIK (19282005), E2-385, Baker Lake SPIRIT FIGURE

31 DOMINIC KINGILIK (1939-1990), E2-121, Baker Lake HAWK

antler, 2.5” x 3.25” x 1” — 6.4 x 8.3 x 2.5 cm.

musk ox horn, stone, antler, 4.5” x 3” x 3.75” — 11.4 x 7.6 x 9.5 cm.

stone, signed in syllabics, 5” x 4” x 2.5” — 12.7 x 10.2 x 6.4 cm.

$600/900

$500/700

$300/500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

32 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-), E2-213, Baker Lake MUSK OX

33 DAVID IKUTAAQ (1929-1984), E2349, Baker Lake HUNTER

34 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-), E2-213, Baker Lake MAN AND FISH

stone, signed in syllabics, 3” x 4.75” x 1.5” — 7.6 x 12.1 x 3.8 cm.

stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 4.5” x 3” x 1.75” — 11.4 x 7.6 x 4.4 cm.

stone, 4.25” x 3.5” x 3.5” — 10.8 x 8.9 x 8.9 cm.

$300/500

$500/700

$600/900

35 KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK (1935-2010), E7-1168, Cape Dorset STANDING HARE

36 PITSIULA MICHAEL (1965-), E7-2211, Cape Dorset ARCTIC HARE

37 MANNUMI SHAQU (1917-2000), E7-824, Cape Dorset MOTHER WITH CHILD IN AMAUT

stone, c. 1970-1975, initials inscribed, 5” x 2.75” x 2.5” — 12.7 x 7 x 6.4 cm.

stone, 1983, signed in syllabics, 4” x 2.75” x 5” — 10.2 x 7 x 12.7 cm.

$400/600

$200/300

stone, signed in syllabics, 5.5” x 2” x 2” — 14 x 5.1 x 5.1 cm. $300/500

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38 DAVIDIALUK ALASUA AMITTU (1910-1976), E9-824, Povungnituk LOUSE stone, signed in Roman, 1” x 2” x 3.75” — 2.5 x 5.1 x 9.5 cm. Note: “Although insignificant in size, the common louse was a ubiquitous and not inconsiderable element in the traditional way of life, as seems to be indicated by its size and posture here.” Jean Blodgett, Eskimo Narrative, The Winnipeg Art Gallery. 1979, p. 13, pl.10

39 PEGGY EKAGINA (1919-1993), W2-290, Coppermine MUSK OX WOMAN WITH BRAIDS stone, c. 1974, 1.75” x 3.75” x 1” — 4.4 x 9.5 x 2.5 cm.

40 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit HEAD stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, 5” x 2.75” x 3” — 12.7 x 7 x 7.6 cm. $300/500

$1,000/1,500

$1,000/1,500

POLAR BEAR

42 DAVIE ATCHEALAK (19472006), E7-1182, Iqaluit FOX

43 THOMASSIE KUDLUK (19101989), E8-873, Kangirsuk WEASEL

stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, 2.5” x 6.5” x 2” — 6.4 x 16.5 x 5.1 cm.

stone, signed in Roman, 5” x 7” x 2.5” — 12.7 x 17.8 x 6.4 cm.

stone, inscribed with disc number, 2.25” x 6.25” x 1” — 5.7 x 15.9 x 2.5 cm.

$700/1,000

$600/900

$400/600

41 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

45 SILAS QAYAQJUAQ (1956-), E51324, Ottawa SPIRIT HELPING

46 SILAS QAYAQJUAQ (1956-), E5-1324, Ottawa DRUM DANCERS

stone, signed in syllabics, 2.75” x 6.5” x 2” — 7 x 16.5 x 5.1 cm.

stone, baleen, antler, signed in Roman and syllabics, 4.75” x 2.75” x 1.5” — 12.1 x 7 x 3.8 cm.

stone, baleen, ivory, signed in Roman and syllabics, dated 1999, 5.75” x 4” x 3” — 14.6 x 10.2 x 7.6 cm.

$400/600

$300/500

Exhibited: In the Shadow of the Midnight Sun: Sami and Inuit Art 2000-2005, curated by Jean Blodgett, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, 2007

44 MAGGIE KOWCHARLIE (1917-D), E9-1727, Kuujjuaraapik OWL AND BEAR TRANSFORMATION

$600/900

47 UNIDENTIFIED MOTHER WITH CHILD IN AMAUT OVER A FISHING HOLE

48 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), E2-290, Rankin Inlet STANDING WOMAN

49 MARK TUNGILIK (1913-1986), E3-320, Repulse Bay WOMAN WITH A HANDBAG

stone, ivory, sinew, c. 1950, 4.25” x 3.25” x 4.75” — 10.8 x 8.3 x 12.1 cm.

stone, 5.5” x 2.5” x 1” — 14 x 6.4 x 2.5 cm.

ivory, antler, signed in syllabics, 2” x 2” x 1” — 5.1 x 5.1 x 2.5 cm.

$300/500

$600/900

$600/900

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50 MARK TUNGILIK (1913-1986), E3-320, Repulse Bay PEOPLE

51 MANASIE AKPALIAPIK (1955-), E5-1155, Toronto SHAMAN

stone, ivory, .75” x 3.5” x .75” — 1.9 x 8.9 x 1.9 cm.

bone, stone, signed in syllabics, 6” x 6.5” x 3” — 15.2 x 16.5 x 7.6 cm.

$400/600

$500/700

52 BILL NASOGALUAK (1953-), W3-1258, Yellowknife POLAR BEAR

53 MARIA TOWETOAK BLIND BOY AND THE LOON antler, signed in Roman, 2.25” x 3” x 1” — 5.7 x 7.6 x 2.5 cm.

stone, signed in Roman, dated 2006, 3.5” x 6” x 2” — 8.9 x 15.2 x 5.1 cm.

Provenance: Snow Goose Gallery, Ottawa, ON, Private Collection, ON

$600/900 Note: The work depicts a portion of the Lumack Legend, in which a blind boy is mistreated by his mother and receives the assistance of a loon. The loon takes hold of the boy, suddenly diving into the lake. The loon instructs the boy to keep his eyes open as they go under water and when he emerges, the boy finds he can see. $600/900

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

54 MARIA TOWETOAK SEDNA’S DOG CHILD antler, signed in Roman, 2.5” x 3.5” x 1” — 6.4 x 8.9 x 2.5 cm.

Provenance: Snow Goose Gallery, Ottawa, ON, Private Collection, ON Note: At times fused with the story of the sea goddess, Sedna, the story of the girl who married a dog tells of a young girl that would not have a husband and came to marry a dog. After becoming pregnant, her father isolated her on a small, remote island. She bore a litter, some dog children and some human children. Knud Rasmussen, Report of the Fifth Thule Expedition, 1921-4, vol. VII, no. 1, 1929, Copenhagen, p. 63-6 $600/900

55 UNIDENTIFIED CARIBOU ivory, c. 1940, 3.5” x 6” x 1” — 8.9 x 15.2 x 2.5 cm. $600/900

56 UNIDENTIFIED SHAMAN FOX TRANSFORMATION stone, 1.75” x 4” x .75” — 4.4 x 10.2 x 1.9 cm. $150/250

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57 LUKE ANOWTALIK (1932-2006), E1-524, Arviat FOUR STANDING FIGURES coloured pencil drawing, unframed, 22.5” x 30” — 57.2 x 76.2 cm. $300/500

58 PUDLO PUDLAT (1916-1992), E7-899, Cape Dorset ANIMAL CHASING HUNTERS WITHOUT WEAPONS mixed media, signed in syllabics, c. 1975, unframed, 19” x 22” — 48.3 x 55.9 cm. $400/600

59 RUTH ANNAQTUUSI TULURIALIK (1934-), E2-16, Baker Lake CAMP SCENE coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 22.25” x 30” — 56.5 x 76.2 cm. $300/500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

60 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake HUMAN AND FISH COMPOSITION pastel drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 22.5” x 30” — 57.2 x 76.2 cm. $3,000/5,000

61 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake TRANSFORMATION COMPOSITION coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 22.25” x 30” — 56.5 x 76.2 cm. $3,000/5,000

62 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake BOATS AND PEOPLE coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 22” x 30” — 55.9 x 76.2 cm. $3,000/5,000

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63 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset CARIBOU AND WALRUS HUNT coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 20” x 20.5” — 50.8 x 52.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

64 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset WALRUS, POLAR BEARS AND HUNTER coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, unframed, 20” x 25.75” — 50.8 x 65.4 cm. $3,000/5,000

65 ANNIE POOTOOGOOK (1969-), Cape Dorset REMEMBERING ANCESTORS coloured pencil and graphite, c. 2005, signed in syllabics, framed, Sheet 25” x 20” — 62.5 x 50 cm. Note: “The three graves of Napachie Ashoona Pootoogook, Eegyvudluk Pootoogook, and Pitseolak Ashoona, Annie's mother, father, and grandmother, respectively, are flanked by brilliantly coloured composite flowers, their names inscribed in syllabics to the affixed crucifixes. Central in the image is the bust of a woman with her face obscured by her hands, her mouth rather widely parted. The figure is enclosed by an undulating contour that serves to create a sense of both literal and figurative detachment from what is below. Yellow lines beam from around the encircled figure and burial sites, conceivably borrowed from the contemporary artist’s own iconography where yellow denotes tenderness and warmth. This work is, perhaps, reflective of the artist's change to more emotionally preoccupied motifs following the death of her mother in 2002. Such very poignant subject matter is marvelously juxtaposed with the very simple medium and the artist's signature honest and uncomplicated style.” References from Kyra Vladykov Fisher, Guide to Cape Dorset Artists, 2008, p.170-172 $2,000/2,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

66 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset COMPOSITION stonecut, 1967, 12/50, unframed, 25" x 34" — 63.5 x 86.4 cm. $3,000/5,000

67 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset NIGHT HUNTER stonecut, 1969, 37/50, unframed, 24.25” x 34” — 83.8 x 62.2 cm. $3,000/5,000

68 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset OWLS, RAVENS AND DOGS stonecut, 1967, 46/50, unframed, 24.5” x 34” — 62.2 x 86.4 cm. $3,000/5,000

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69 JOSEPH POOTOOGOOK (18871958), E7-1166, Cape Dorset CARIBOU Note: From the experimental print making period in Cape Dorset. stonecut, 1958, 24/30, unframed, 6” x 7.75” — 15.2 x 19.7 cm. $5,000/7,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

70 NIVIAXIE (1908-1959), E7-1077, Cape Dorset THE ARCHER sealskin stencil, 1960, 39/50, unframed, 23.5” x 12.5” — 59.7 x 31.8 cm. $4,000/6,000

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71 SHEOUAK (1923-1961), E7-816, Cape Dorset POT SPIRITS stencil, 1960, 18/50, unframed, 12” x 19” — 30.5 x 48.3 cm. Note: “Traditionally, the Inuit believed that every object, be it animate or inanimate, had a spirit. This spiritual inhabitant, called by the same word that means human, was often visualized as a tiny human being or human face. Here, the artist animates her cooking utensils with their respective spirits.” Blodgett, Eskimo Narrative, p. 42, pl. 54 $5,000/7,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

72 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset GEESE, DOGS, AND WALRUS stonecut, 1963, 16/50, unframed, 22.5” x 20.5” — 57.2 x 52.1 cm. $4,000/6,000

73 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset GEESE, MAN AND ANIMALS stencil, 1963, 9/50, unframed, 24.5” x 24” — 62.2 x 61 cm. Note: “Parr’s art is distinguished by the absence of narrative; his production is essentially a catalogue of Arctic elements. In this print, the artist does not hesitate to present contradictions. The running geese are flightless; they are summer geese, yet the man is dressed in winter garb and is presumably seated on the snow.” Furneaux et al., Arts of the Eskimo: Prints, p. 76-77 $4,000/6,000

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74 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset MEN AND WALRUS stonecut, 1961, 43/50, unframed, 27” x 18” — 68.6 x 45.7 cm. Note: “Parr was an especially prolific artist, filling sketchbooks with his naive forms of people and animals. Here the rock-like form of the central walrus expresses its great weight. Parr’s textured black pencil or wax crayon translates well into the medium of the stonecut print.” The Inuit Print, exh. cat., from the National Museum of Man, Ottawa, ON, 1977, p. 76, pl. 24 $3,000/5,000

75 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset THREE MEN AND TWO DOGS stonecut, 1963, 16/50, framed, sight, 26.75” x 23.75” — 67.9 x 60.3 cm. $3,000/5,000

76 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset BIRDS AND ANIMALS stonecut, 1964, 8/50, unframed, 23.75” x 36.25” — 60.3 x 92.1 cm. $2,500/3,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

77 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset THE MORNING SUN sealskin stencil, 1961, 41/50, unframed, 19” x 25” — 48.3 x 63.5 cm. $3,000/5,000

78 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset FAMILY OF WHALES stencil, 1961, 27/50, unframed, 18” x 24.5” — 45.7 x 62.2 cm. $2,500/3,500

79 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset UNTITLED (KAYAKS, UMIAKS, 5 WHALES) stonecut, 1961, 19/40, unframed, 24.25” x 36” — 61.6 x 91.4 cm. Note: From Cape Dorset Revisited - A Collection of Previously Unreleased Prints, curated by Susan Gustavison, 1994, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, ON $2,500/3,000

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80 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset DRIVING MOULTING GEESE INTO PENS sealskin stencil, 1960, 30/30, unframed, 17” x 26” — 43.2 x 66 cm. $2,000/3,000

81 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset GIANT KILLING BEARS stonecut, 1961, 29/50, unframed, 11.25” x 16.25” — 28.6 x 41.3 cm. $1,000/1,500

82 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), E7-1057, Cape Dorset LUMIUK AND THE WHALES stonecut, 1961, 34/50, 11.25” x 14.75” — 28.6 x 37.5 cm. $1,000/1,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

83 AQJANGAJUK SHAA (1937-), E7-1065, Cape Dorset DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, signed in syllabics, 19.75” x 17.5” x 9.75” — 50.2 x 44.5 x 24.8 cm. $4,000/6,000

84 AQJANGAJUK SHAA (1937-), E7-1065, Cape Dorset POLAR BEAR TRANSFORMATION stone, 20.5” x 19” x 11” — 52.1 x 48.3 x 27.9 cm. $3,000/5,000

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85 AQJANGAJUK SHAA (1937-), E7-1065, Cape Dorset SWIMMING CARIBOU stone, antler, 28” x 24” x 28” — 71.1 x 61 x 71.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

86 KIAWAK ASHOONA (1933-), E7-1103, Cape Dorset POLAR BEAR AND YOUNG stone, 1967, 19” x 18” x 17” — 48.3 x 45.7 x 43.2 cm. $5,000/7,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

87 KIAWAK ASHOONA (1933-), E7-1103, Cape Dorset FALCON FAMILY stone, 1985, 12” x 17” x 8.25” — 30.5 x 43.2 x 21 cm. $4,000/6,000

88 KIAWAK ASHOONA (1933-), E71103, Cape Dorset GROWLING POLAR BEAR stone, ca. 1965, signed in syllabics with disc number, 10” x 18” x 10” — 25.4 x 45.7 x 25.4 cm. Provenance: Estate of Neil Kernaghan, Toronto Note: Please see, George Swinton, Sculpture of the Eskimo, p.185, pl. 453 $3,000/5,000

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89 OSUITOK IPEELEE (1923-2005), E7-1154, Cape Dorset HUNTER WITH HARPOON stone, hide, wood, ivory, 20” x 9” x 9” — 50.8 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm. $12,000/16,000

90 OSUITOK IPEELEE (1923-2005), E7-1154, Cape Dorset RECLINING CARIBOU stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 9.8” x 16.9” x 4.1” — 25 x 43 x 10.5 cm. $6,000/9,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

91 KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), E7-1101, Cape Dorset SEDNA AND HER ATTENDANT stone, signed in Roman, 23” x 17” x 9.5” — 58.4 x 43.2 x 24.1 cm. $4,000/6,000

92 KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK (1935-2010), E7-1168, Cape Dorset WIND SWEPT MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics, 8.5” x 13” x 8” — 21.6 x 33 x 20.3 cm. $3,000/5,000

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93 PAUTA SAILA (1916-2009), E7-990, Cape Dorset DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, 1973, signed in syllabics, 16” x 14” x 5” — 40.6 x 35.6 x 12.7 cm. $10,000/15,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

94 PAUTA SAILA (1916-2009), E7-990, Cape Dorset DANCING POLAR BEAR/SHAMAN stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 15.5” x 13” x 4” — 39.4 x 33 x 10.2 cm. Note: Measurements reflect height and depth without base. With 17.5” - 44.5 cm (H) and 8” - 20.3 cm (D) $15,000/20,000

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95 PAUTA SAILA (1916-2009), E7-990, Cape Dorset DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, ivory, signed in syllabics, 2003, 17.7” x 15” x 6.3” — 45 x 38 x 16 cm. $15,000/20,000

40


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

96 PAUTA SAILA (1916-2009), E7-990, Cape Dorset MUSK OX

Provenance: Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texax Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, November 2002, lot 270

stone, 17” x 23” x 12” — 43.2 x 58.4 x 30.5 cm. $8,000/12,000

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97 PITSEOLAK NIVIAQSI (1947-), E7-1081, Cape Dorset GIRL WITH BRAIDS stone, 13” x 17” x 8” — 33 x 43.2 x 20.3 cm. $3,000/5,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

98 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1-436, Arviat BIRD stone, c. 1968, signed in syllabics and disc number, 9” x 5.25” x 15.25” — 22.9 x 13.3 x 38.7 cm.

Note: “Indeed, even within an overall ‘Kivalliq aesthetic’ , Miki’s art stands out for its predeliction to abstraction and stylization. It is not surprising, therefore, that the greatest appreciation for him is found in an audience accustomed to the paradigm of modern European sculpture of the type produced by Constantin Brancusi or Henry Moore.” Norman Zepp, excerpt from Sanattiaqsimajut, Inuit Art from the Carleton University Art Gallery Collection, 2009, p. 83

$16,000/18,000

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99 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1-436, Arviat CARIBOU stone, c. 1968, signed in syllabics, 9” x 3.75” x 6.25” — 22.9 x 9.5 x 15.9 cm. $10,000/15,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

100 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1-436, Arviat DOG stone, ca. 1969, 9” x 7” x 1.5” — 22.9 x 17.8 x 3.8 cm. Provenance: Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, November 2006, lot 308, Private Collection Exhibited: Norman Zepp, Pure Vision, The Keewatin Spirit, exh. cat., Norman Mackenzie Art Gallery, Regina, SK, 1986, p. 66, pl. 8 Note: As noted by Norman Zepp on page 83 of Sanattiaqsimajut, “Such works have strong linear sense, as the eyes are led to the outer edges where the form is defined by a single sensitive line.” $5,000/7,000

101 JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), E1-104, Arviat FIGURE stone, 3.75” x 5.5” x 3.75” — 9.5 x 14 x 9.5 cm. $2,000/3,000

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102 ATTR: JOHNNY INUKPUK (19112007), E9-904, Inukjuak MOTHER HOLDING HER CHILDREN stone, ivory, soap, ca. 1950, 11” x 13” x 9” — 27.9 x 33 x 22.9 cm. $30,000/35,000

Note: For a similar piece see, George Swinton, Sculpture of the Eskimo, p. 17, pl. 19


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.


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103 ATTR: ISA SMILER (1921-1986), E9-706, Inukjuak MOTHER WITH CHILD IN HER AMAUT stone, ivory, soap inlay, ca. 1950, 12” x 9” x 9” — 30.5 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm. $15,000/20,000

Note: For a similar piece see, George Swinton, Sculpture of the Eskimo, p.82, pl. 111 Head of the mother figure is removable.


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.


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104 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-), E2-213, Baker Lake MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics, 11” x 16” x 7” — 27.9 x 40.6 x 17.8 cm. Provenance: Estate of Neil Kernaghan, Toronto $4,000/6,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

105 LUKE IKSIKTAARYUK (19091977), E2-45, Baker Lake SHAMAN TRANSFORMING

Provenance: The Isaacs Innuit Gallery of Eskimo Art, Toronto, ON, 1978, Private Collection, CA, USA

antler, 13.5” x 8.25” x 9” — 34.3 x 21 x 22.9 cm. $15,000/20,000

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106 LUKE IKSIKTAARYUK (19091977), E2-45, Baker Lake DRUM DANCE GATHERING antler, wood, membrane, sinew, c. 1970, 6” x 17.5” x 11.5” — 15.2 x 44.5 x 29.2 cm. $15,000/20,000

Note: “In Luke Iksiktaaryuk we return to an artist whose interest is in the life of the traditional community. Detail and motion are kept to a minimum in his figure groups which become skeletal, evocative visions of life as it was. They are frozen in time and space.” Helga Goetz, The People Within, exh. cat., Art Gallery of Ontario, 1976, The Art of Baker Lake, p. IV


107 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), E4-342, Gjoa Haven MOTHER AND CHILD stone, wood, antler, signed in sylllabics, 28.5” x 18.5” x 13” — 72.4 x 47 x 33 cm. $12,000/16,000

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108 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), E4-342, Gjoa Haven HUNTER AND BIRD antler, signed in syllabics, 16” x 15” x 12” — 40.6 x 38.1 x 30.5 cm. Est. $5,000/7,000

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109 NELSON TAKKIRUQ (1930-), E4-120, Gjoa Haven FIGURE WITH ULU AND WHALE stone, antler, musk ox horn, leather, signed in Roman and syllabics, dated 1995, 14.5” x 18” x 10” — 36.8 x 45.7 x 25.4 cm. $4,000/6,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

110 PHILIP KAMIKPAKITTUQ (1955-), E2-556, Gjoa Haven DRUM DANCER

Exhibited: Darlene Coward Wight, Art & Expression of the Netsilik, The Winnipeg Art Gallery, 2000, p.125

stone, bone, horn, signed in Roman, 1995, 13” x 10.5” x 4” — 33 x 26.7 x 10.2 cm. $4,000/6,000

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111 URIASH PUQIQNAK (1946-), E4-556, Gjoa Haven MOTHER AND CHILD stone, antler, hair, wood, metal, signed in syllabics and dated ‘96, 18” x 13” x 14” — 45.7 x 33 x 35.6 cm. $5,000/7,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

112 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), E2-290, Rankin Inlet FIGURE stone, 11.5” x 5” x 6” — 29.2 x 12.7 x 15.2 cm. $4,000/6,000

113 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), E2-290, Rankin Inlet MUSK OX stone, 8.75” x 13.25” x 3.5” — 22.2 x 33.7 x 8.9 cm. $4,000/6,000

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114 JOHN TIKTAK (1916-1981), E1-266, Rankin Inlet HEAD stone, c. 1970, signed in syllabics, 6” x 2.75” x 3” — 15.2 x 7 x 7.6 cm. Note: “Tiktak began carving after he suffered a serious hip injury while working in Kangiqsliniq (Ranklin) nickel mine. While he was recovering in hospital, a nurse told him that he could earn some money by carving, so that is what he did. In 1963, Tiktak committed himself to being a professional carver, working with a few specific images, including mother and child, single seated and standing figures, and heads. Tiktak’s work is further characterized by a complete absence of hands and by animated faces with features which, over the years have become more and more deeply incised.” Emily E. Auger, The Way of the Inuit Art: Aesthetics and History in and Beyond the Arctic, 2005, p. 116. $5,000/7,000

115 JOHN TIKTAK (1916-1981), E1-266, Rankin Inlet FACES stone, signed in syllabics, 9.5” x 5.25” x 2.5” — 24.1 x 13.3 x 6.4 cm. $3,000/5,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

116 CHARLIE UGYUK (1931-1998), E4-341, Spence Bay DEMON HOLDING YOUNG stone, musk ox horn, ivory, signed in syllabics, 22” x 11” x 14” — 55.9 x 27.9 x 35.6 cm. $20,000/30,000

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117 CHARLIE UGYUK (1931-1998), E4-341, Spence Bay FALCON WITH OUTSTRETCHED WINGS stone, signed in syllabics, 10.5” x 17” x 6” — 26.7 x 43.2 x 15.2 cm. $8,000/12,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

118 KAROO ASHEVAK (1940-1974), E4-196, Spence Bay SHAMAN’S FACE stone, bone, ivory, 6.5” x 6.5” x 3.5” — 16.5 x 16.5 x 8.9 cm. $8,000/12,000

119 KAROO ASHEVAK (1940-1974), E4-196, Spence Bay HUMAN HAND bone, 5” x 3.75” x 2” — 12.7 x 9.5 x 5.1 cm. Provenance: Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, November 2005, lot 354g, Mira Godard Collection of Inuit Art, Private Collection $3,000/5,000

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120 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit ALERT POLAR BEAR stone, 12.5” x 20” x 7” — 31.8 x 50.8 x 17.8 cm. $15,000/20,000

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Provenance: Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, April 1980, lot 430, Estate of Neil Kernaghan, Toronto


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

121 JOSIAH NUILAALIK (1928-2005), E2-385, Baker Lake POLAR BEAR/CARIBOU TRANSFORMATION,

Note: “When I first started carving, I was told to make human figures or animals. I carve more complicated pieces than this today by remembering legends and stories that I have heard from my grandparents, who raised me, and by using my imagination.” Marie Bouchard, An Inuit Perspective, Baker Lake Sculpture, 2000, p. 74

stone, ivory, 11” x 8” x 5.25” — 27.9 x 20.3 x 13.3 cm. $4,000/6,000

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122 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset CHILDREN CHASING DOGS

123 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset HUNTERS

124 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset SEAL HUNTER

stonecut, 1965, 15/50, unframed, 24.5” x 34” — 62.2 x 86.4 cm.

stonecut, 1969, 35/50, unframed, 24” x 36” — 61 x 91.4 cm.

stonecut, 1968, 47/50, unframed, 24.5” x 17.25” — 62.2 x 43.8 cm.

$2,500/3,500

$2,500/3,500

$2,500/3,500

125 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset WALRUS HUNT

126 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset WALRUS HUNTERS ON SEA ICE

127 PARR (1893-1969), E7-1022, Cape Dorset MAN AND WHALE

stonecut, 1964, 30/50, unframed, 24.25” x 36.25” — 61.6 x 92.1 cm.

stonecut, 1967, 22/50, unframed, 24.5” x 33.75” — 62.2 x 85.7 cm.

stonecut, 1962, 48/50, framed, sight, 9.5” x 22” — 24.1 x 55.9 cm.

$2,500/3,500

$2,500/3,500

$1,000/1,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

128 PAUTA SAILA (1916-2009), E7-990, Cape Dorset STARTLED OWL

129 PITALOOSIE SAILA (1942-), E7-1006, Cape Dorset ESKIMO LEADER

stonecut, 1965, 39/50, unframed, 25” x 37.5” — 63.5 x 95.3 cm.

stonecut, 1972, 19/50, unframed, 24.25” x 33.25” — 61.6 x 84.5 cm.

$800/1,200

$3,000/5,000

130 PITALOOSIE SAILA (1942-), E7-1006, Cape Dorset SHAMAN’S DANCE stonecut, 1969, 22/50, unframed, 17” x 24.5” — 43.2 x 62.2 cm. $400/600

Note: “The artist remembered the spinetingling experience of being confronted by a shaman performing. The magic elements, the antlers and the claws indicate a shaman; the streaming hair, the long dancing tassels and the traditional design on the boots indicate that she is a woman.” Furneaux et al., Arts of the Eskimo: Prints p. 114-5

Note: Image presented to Prime Minister Jean Chrétien 1974 by CAP; “The contemporary, Picasso-like image is of a powerful woman. She has tattoo marks under her nose as well as horizontal stripes around the tops of her boots indicating she is a female figure. The design on men’s boots would go straight down in a vertical line. The black area on the face represents shadow. Pitaloosie heard of some ‘boss women’ existing a long time ago and she finds the subject very interesting.” Personal Communication, June 1983, quoted in Arctic Vision: Art of the Canadian Inuit, exh. cat., Canadian Arctic Producers, 1984, p. 29

131 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (1904-1983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset PERILS OF THE SEA TRAVELLER stonecut, 1960, 49/50, unframed, 18.5” x 23” — 47 x 58.4 cm. $2,000/3,000

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132 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (1904-1983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset GIRL CHASED BY DOG

133 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (1904-1983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset THE LITTLE OWL

134 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (19041983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset YOUNG BEARS

stonecut, 1961, Proof 3/3, framed, 7.25” x 14.25” — 18.4 x 36.2 cm.

stonecut, 1967, 12/50, unframed, 17” x 24.5” — 43.2 x 62.2 cm.

stonecut and stencil, 1977, 12/50, unframed, 22” x 28” — 55.9 x 71.1 cm.

$500/700

$400/600

$400/600

135 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (19041983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset BELLOWING CARIBOU

136 PITSEOLAK ASHOONA (19041983), E7-1100, Cape Dorset OUR CAMP

137 PUDLAT POOTOOGOOK (19191985), E7-1173, Cape Dorset LARGE OWL

stonecut, 1973, 16/50, unframed, 24.25” x 17” — 61.6 x 43.2 cm.

stonecut, 1974, 1/50, unframed, 34” x 25” — 86.4 x 63.5 cm.

stonecut, 1964, 50/50, unframed, 24.25” x 34.75” — 61.6 x 88.3 cm.

$300/500

$300/500

$400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

138 PUDLO PUDLAT (1916-1992), E7-899, Cape Dorset COMPOSITION

139 PUDLO PUDLAT (1916-1992), E7-899, Cape Dorset FAMILY OF OWLS

stonecut, 1967, 23/50, unframed, 17” x 24.25” — 43.2 x 61.6 cm.

stonecut, 1990, 5/50, framed, sight, 21.25” x 27” — 54 x 68.6 cm.

$700/1,000

Note: The stone block from which the edition prints were created came from the slate of an abandoned pool table. Barz, Inuit Artists Print Workbook, p. 306 $600/900

140 PUDLO PUDLAT (1916-1992), E7-899, Cape Dorset GOOSE stonecut, 1972, 21/50, unframed, 24.5” x 17” — 62.2 x 43.2 cm.

141 SAGGIAK (1897-1980), E7-1190, Cape Dorset A HUNTER’S WEAPONS stonecut, 1965, 33/50, unframed, 16.5” x 24.5” — 41.9 x 62.2 cm. $400/600

$600/800

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142 SHARNI POOTOOGOOK (1922-), E7-1174, Cape Dorset BUNTINGS stonecut, 1964, 14/50, 20” x 24.5” — 50.8 x 62.2 cm. $1,000/2,000

143 SHARNI POOTOOGOOK (1922-), E7-1174, Cape Dorset WOMAN DRESSED IN CARIBOU CLOTHING stonecut and serigraph, 1965, 49/50, unframed, 23” x 16.5” — 58.4 x 41.9 cm. $400/600

144 SHOUYU POOTOOGOOK (1937-), E7-1019, Cape Dorset BIRDS FEEDING stonecut, 1969, 19/50, unframed, 17” x 24.25” — 43.2 x 61.6 cm. $400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

145 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), E2-290, Rankin Inlet MOTHER AND CHILD stone, 1974, signed in syllabics, 8” x 6.5” x 6” — 20.3 x 16.5 x 15.2 cm. $2,500/3,500

146 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), E2-290, Rankin Inlet HEAD stone, signed in syllabics, 5.25” x 5.75” x 3.5” — 13.3 x 14.6 x 8.9 cm. $1,500/2,500

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147 PIE KUKSHOUT (1911-1980), E2-302, Rankin Inlet FIGURE WITH CHILD stone, 11.5” x 10.5” x 5” — 29.2 x 26.7 x 12.7 cm. $2,500/3,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

148 PIERRE KARLIK (1931-), E3-145, Rankin Inlet RELIEF CARVED TOTEM ON SERPENT/SHAMAN BASE ivory, stone, 1979, signed in Roman and syllabics, 19” x 6.5” x 3” — 48.3 x 16.5 x 7.6 cm. $1,500/2,000

149 MARK TUNGILIK (1913-1986), E3320, Repulse Bay DRUM DANCER stone, antler, inscribed with disc number, 4.75” x 3.75” x 3.25” — 12.1 x 9.5 x 8.3 cm. $300/500

150 ANNIE IKILLUAQ SAVIAKJUK (1938-), E9-1197, Salluit SEATED WOMAN SCRAPING A SKIN stone, ivory, inscribed with disc number, 8.75” x 5.75” x 8” — 22.2 x 14.6 x 20.3 cm. Provenance: Collection of M. F. (Budd) Feheley, Private Collection, ON $3,000/5,000

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151 UNIDENTIFIED, Salluit WOMAN HOLDING QALLIK stone, c. 1950, 8.75” x 4.25” x 4.25” — 22.2 x 10.8 x 10.8 cm. Note: Clothing styles throughout the polar regions bear remarkable similarities. Here, the woman holds the qallik or pants. Traditionally, the main materials for the qallik were caribou and seal, sewn together with sinew. $1,000/2,000

152 UNIDENTIFIED, Salluit WOMAN HOLDING HER BRAIDS WITH CHILD IN AMAUT stone, c. 1950, 6.25” x 3” x 3.25” — 15.9 x 7.6 x 8.3 cm. $1,000/2,000

153 DANIEL QUMA ANGIJU (1929-1979), E9-952, Povungnituk HUNTER WITH SEAL stone, signed in Roman, inscribed with disc number, c. 1955, 10.25” x 5” x 7.75” — 26 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm. Note: This work is featured as the June 1960 frontispiece of the United Nations World Refugee Year newsletter. The pamphlet covered the story of “Operation Eskimo,” in which the people of Iqaluit presented their works to be auctioned in aid of the United Nations refugee rehabilitation programs. Subsequent to the sale, journalist Teddi Donovan spoke of the work in the May 6, 1960 Toronto Telegram, hailing this piece, “the evening’s classic carving.” $1,500/2,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

154 DAVIDIALUK ALASUA AMITTU (1910-1976), E9-824, Povungnituk HUNTER RESCUING THE IQALUNAPPAA stone, signed in Roman and in syllabics, 6.5” x 16” x 6” — 16.5 x 40.6 x 15.2 cm. Note: A possible explanation for the subject matter is the story of Iqalunappaa or the half-fish. According to a story recounted by Davidialuk, a man was gathering driftwood along the shoreline when he spotted an enormous creature that was half human, half fish. After helping the beached iqalunappaa, the sea maiden wished to express her gratitude and told the man she would place a gramophone, gun, and sewing machine on the shore at dawn. The man returned the next day to find the items on the shore with no sign of the half-fish. Story by Davidialuk, as retold in Zebedee Nungak & Eugene Arima, Eskimo Stories - Unikkaatuat, National Museums of Canada, Bulletin No. 235, Series No. 90, 1969, p. 53 $4,000/6,000

155 DAVIDIALUK ALASUA AMITTU (1910-1976), E9-824, Povungnituk WOMAN WHO MARRIED A DOG stone, signed in Roman, inscribed with disc number, c. 1974, 5.5” x 9.5” x 6” — 14 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm. $2,500/3,500

156 JOE TALIRUNILI (1893-1976), E9-818, Povungnituk CARIBOU stone, antler, signed in Roman and syllabics, 5.5” x 7” x 2” — 14 x 17.8 x 5.1 cm. $1,500/2,500

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157 JOE TALIRUNILI (1893-1976), E9818, Povungnituk OWL stone, signed in Roman, 4.5” x 3.5” x 2.25” — 11.4 x 8.9 x 5.7 cm. $1,000/1,500

158 JOE TALIRUNILI (1893-1976), E9-818, Povungnituk POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman, 3.75” x 5” x 2.25” — 9.5 x 12.7 x 5.7 cm. $800/1,200

159 JOE TALIRUNILI (1893-1976), E9-818, Povungnituk OWL stone, signed in Roman, inscribed with disc number, 6” x 3.75” x 6.5” — 15.2 x 9.5 x 16.5 cm. $700/1,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

160 PAULOSIE SIVUAK (1930-1986), E9-1493, Povungnituk THROAT SINGERS stone, signed in Roman, 10.25” x 9.5” x 5” — 26 x 24.1 x 12.7 cm. $1,000/2,000

161 DAVIE ATCHEALAK (1947-2006), E7-1182, Iqaluit DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, 1983, 15” x 11” x 8” — 38.1 x 27.9 x 20.3 cm. $4,000/6,000

162 DAVIE ATCHEALAK (1947-2006), E7-1182, Iqaluit DRUM DANCER stone, bone, antler, sinew, signed in Roman, 22” x 11” x 18” — 55.9 x 27.9 x 45.7 cm. $4,000/6,000

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163 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, dated 1971, 12.25” x 8” x 4.75” — 31.1 x 20.3 x 12.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

164 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit FOX stone, 5.25” x 13.25” x 3” — 13.3 x 33.7 x 7.6 cm. $3,000/5,000

165 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit MOTHER AND CHILD stone, signed in syllabics and Roman, 10.25” x 8” x 4.5” — 26 x 20.3 x 11.4 cm. $3,000/5,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

166 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit TWO ETCHED TUSKS ivory, stone, ink, dated 1972, signed in Roman and syllabics, 17” x 5” x 2.5” — 43.2 x 12.7 x 6.4 cm.; 16.25” x 5” x 2” — 41.3 x 12.7 x 5.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

167 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman with syllabics, 5.5” x 8” x 3” — 14 x 20.3 x 7.6 cm. $2,000/3,000

168 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), E5-846, Iqaluit POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, 4.5” x 10” x 3.5” — 11.4 x 25.4 x 8.9 cm. $1,500/2,500

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169 NUYALIAQ QIMIRPIK (1937-2007), E7-99, Lake Harbour PERCHED FALCON stone, signed in syllabics, 15.5” x 6” x 9” — 39.4 x 15.2 x 22.9 cm. $700/1,000

170 LUCASSIE IKKIDLUAK (1949-), E7-765, Lake Harbour RUNNING MUSK OX stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 12” x 19” x 7.75” — 30.5 x 48.3 x 19.7 cm. $4,000/6,000

171 SILAS QIYUK (1933-), E2-397, Baker Lake TRANSFORMATION stone, 2.75” x 10.25” x 3.75” — 7 x 26 x 9.5 cm. Note: For a similar piece see, Blodgett, Eskimo Narrative, p. 28, pl. 31 $400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

172 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-), E2-213, Baker Lake MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics, 9.5” x 5.25” x 15” — 24.1 x 13.3 x 38.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

173 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-), E2-213, Baker Lake SHAMAN TRANSFORMATION stone, 8” x 6.75” x 3” — 20.3 x 17.1 x 7.6 cm. $400/600

174 EFFIE ANGALI’TAAQ ARNALUAQ (1936-), E2-127, Baker Lake TRANSFORMATION stone, signed in Roman, 2.5” x 8.75” x 2.25” — 6.4 x 22.2 x 5.7 cm. $300/500

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175 GEORGE TATANIQ (1910-1991), E2-179, Baker Lake BIRD stone, disc number inscribed, 6.3” x 3.1” x 4.1” — 16 x 8 x 10.5 cm. $800/1,200

176 GEORGE TATANIQ (1910-1991), E2-179, Baker Lake HUNTER WITH PIPE AND KNIFE stone, bone, 6.25” x 3.75” x 2.75” — 15.9 x 9.5 x 7 cm. $1,500/2,500

177 JOSIAH NUILAALIK (1928-2005), E2-385, Baker Lake COMPOSITION stone, bone, ivory, 6” x 7” x 9” — 15.2 x 17.8 x 22.9 cm. $1,500/2,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

178 MARIE KUUNNUAQ (1933-1990), E2-126, Baker Lake HUNTER AND DOG WITH PACKS antler, sealskin, 8” x 9.75” x 4” — 20.3 x 24.8 x 10.2 cm. $400/600

179 MATHEW AQIGAAQ (1940-2010), E2-350, Baker Lake MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics, 9” x 13” x 5” — 22.9 x 33 x 12.7 cm. $1,500/2,500

180 PETER ASSIVAARYUK (1914-), E2-485, Baker Lake TWO CARIBOU antler, 8” x 10.75” x 6.5” — 20.3 x 27.3 x 16.5 cm. $1,500/2,000

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181 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake BIRD WITH OPPOSING FACE stone, 1976, signed in syllabics, 11” x 10” x 9” — 27.9 x 25.4 x 22.9 cm. $2,000/3,000

182 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake CARIBOU SHAMAN stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 10.75” x 3.75” x 3” — 27.3 x 9.5 x 7.6 cm. $1,000/1,500

183 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake RAVEN stone, wood base, 30” x 23” x 11” — 76.2 x 58.4 x 27.9 cm. $1,000/2,000

84


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

184 THOMAS SUVAARAQ (1935-), E2-184, Baker Lake WALRUS SHAMAN caribou antler, wolf fur, hide, c. 1980, 11” x 4.25” x 3.75” — 27.9 x 10.8 x 9.5 cm. $600/900

185 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake MOTHER AND CHILD stone, signed in syllabics, 6” x 5” x 3” — 15.2 x 12.7 x 7.6 cm. $400/600

186 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake MOTHER AND CHILD stone, signed in syllabics, 7.5” x 4.25” x 3.5” — 19.1 x 10.8 x 8.9 cm. $400/600

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187 THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941-), E2-236, Baker Lake BIRD stone, signed in syllabics, 4” x 5” x 5” — 10.2 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm. $300/500

188 TUNA IQULIQ (1935-), E2-167, Baker Lake MOTHER AND CHILD stone, 13.5” x 10” x 7” — 34.3 x 25.4 x 17.8 cm. $1,000/1,500

189 TUNA IQULIQ (1935-), E2-167, Baker Lake OWL stone, 12” x 7” x 12” — 30.5 x 17.8 x 30.5 cm. $800/1,200

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

190 TUNA IQULIQ (1935-), E2-167, Baker Lake BIRD stone, disc number inscribed, 7” x 5” x 3.75” — 17.8 x 12.7 x 9.5 cm. $400/600

191 VITAL MAKPAAQ (1922-1978), E2120, Baker Lake DRUM DANCER stone, bone, 1968, 6.3” x 2.8” x 4.3” — 16 x 7 x 11 cm. $800/1,200

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192 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake FIGURE IN STRIPED CLOTHING

193 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake FISH WOMAN

194 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake SINGING NORTHERN LIGHTS

stonecut and stencil, 1971, 35/48, unframed, 24.25” x 19.25” — 61.6 x 48.9 cm.

stencil, 1979, 35/55, unframed, 30” x 36.5” — 76.2 x 92.7 cm.

stonecut and stencil, 1985, Artist’s Proof, 2/5, unframed, 25.25” x 37” — 64.1 x 94 cm.

$2,500/3,500 $1,000/1,500

$2,500/3,500

195 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake I SEE CARIBOU

196 JESSIE OONARK (1906-1985), E2-384, Baker Lake ANGUTKOQ

197 LUKE ANGUHADLUQ (1895-1982), E2-294, Baker Lake MUSK OX

stonecut and stencil, 1972, 28/39, unframed, 11.75” x 14” — 29.8 x 35.6 cm.

serigraph, 1975, 21/50, unframed, 13” x 16” — 33 x 40.6 cm.

stonecut and stencil, 1977, 33/50, unframed, 25” x 37” — 63.5 x 94 cm.

$500/700

$1,000/1,500

$600/900

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

198 LUKE ANGUHADLUQ (18951982), E2-294, Baker Lake STRING GAME

199 EEGYVUDLUK POOTOOGOOK (1931-), E7-865, Cape Dorset RUNNING GOOSE

stonecut and stencil, 1972, 23/50, unframed, 12.25” x 19.25” — 31.1 x 48.9 cm.

sealskin stencil, 1960, 4/50, unframed, 13” x 21” — 33 x 53.3 cm. $2,000/3,000

$600/900

200 ELEESHUSHE PARR (1896-1975), E7-1023, Cape Dorset WOMAN WITH WATER PAIL stonecut, 1965, 26/50, unframed, 24.5” x 16.75” — 62.2 x 42.5 cm. Note: “The monumental forms of this fully dressed Eskimo female bring to mind many a powerful Eskimo sculpture. In this print, however, the rhythmic, sensitive handling of linear patterns delicately softens the impression of the mass.” Furneaux et al., Arts of the Eskimo: Prints, p. 92-3 $600/900

201 KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK (1935-2010), E7-1168, Cape Dorset OMINGMUNGJUAQ

202 KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK (1935-2010), E7-1168, Cape Dorset CARIBOU

203 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset FLOWER BIRD

stonecut, 1977, 131/200, unframed, 28.5” x 22.25” — 72.4 x 56.5 cm.

stonecut, 1977, 131/200, unframed, 28.5” x 22.25” — 72.4 x 56.5 cm.

stonecut, 1970, 18/50, unframed, 24” x 34” — 61 x 86.4 cm.

Note: One of six prints from a specially commissioned work and part of the 1977 Art of the Eskimos, a co-operative project between the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative and the International World Wildlife Fund.

Note: One of six prints from a specially commissioned work and part of the 1977 Art of the Eskimos, a co-operative project between the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative and the International World Wildlife Fund.

$1,500/2,500

$1,000/2,000

$400/600

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204 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (19272013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset OWL OF THE SEA

205 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (19272013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset WINTER OWLS

206 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (19272013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset SUMMER OWL

stonecut, 1977, 131/200, unframed, 22.25” x 28.5” — 56.5 x 72.4 cm.

stonecut, 1975, 26/50, unframed, 34” x 24.75” — 86.4 x 62.9 cm.

stonecut, 1975, 4/50, unframed, 34” x 24.75” — 86.4 x 62.9 cm.

Note: One of six prints from a specially commissioned work and part of the 1977 Art of the Eskimos, a co-operative project between the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative and the International World Wildlife Fund.

$1,500/2,500

Note: “and stencil” is written in error on the print. Barz, Inuit Artists Print Workbook, p. 240 $1,000/1,500

$1,500/2,000

207 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset RAVENS AND OWL

208 LISSIE SAGGIAK (1924-1989), E7-858, Cape Dorset BIG DOG

stonecut and stencil, 1979, 39/50, framed, 24” x 24” — 61 x 61 cm.

stonecut, 1963, 25/50, unframed, 19.75” x 20.5” — 50.2 x 52.1 cm.

$400/600

Note: “A dangerous-looking dog; his fur shining, ears pricked, alert, he bounces across the sheet, tension expressed in every line. The curious distortion of the dog’s head, the masklike, geometrical delineation of its features, plus the hypnotic eyes, combine to produce the menacing appearance.” Furneaux et al., Arts of the Eskimo: Prints, p. 70-71 $1,000/1,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

209 LUCY QINNUAYUAK (1915-1982), E7-1068, Cape Dorset SPIRIT BOAT stonecut, 1972, 19/50, unframed, 15.25” x 24.5” — 38.7 x 62.2 cm. Note: “Lucy Qinnuayuak is best known for her fanciful renditions of birds. This print, created more than twenty years into her artistic career, shows a group of bird spirits manning a boat complete with its own sovereign flag. Highlighting the important role that they play in Inuit life both culturally and spiritually, birds are often portrayed with human-like characteristics.” Excerpt from the collections catalogue of the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa, ON), cat. no. 39846 $600/900

210 LUCY QINNUAYUAK (1915-1982), E7-1068, Cape Dorset BIRD EATING BERRIES stonecut, 1968, 34/50, unframed, 17” x 24.5” — 43.2 x 62.2 cm. $500/700

211 MIKIGAK KINGWATSIAK (1943-), E7-917, Cape Dorset UGJUNGNUK stonecut, 1960, 42/50, unframed, 12.5” x 19” — 31.8 x 48.3 cm. $1,000/1,500

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212 NAPATCHIE POOTOOGOOK (1938-2002), E7-1104, Cape Dorset ESKIMO MOTHER FRIGHTENED BY DEMONS stonecut, 1961, 18/50, unframed, 20” x 29.25” — 50.8 x 74.3 cm. $1,500/2,000

213 ATTR: ABRAHAM ETUNGAT (1911-1999), E7-809, Cape Dorset OWL WITH SPREAD WINGS stone, c. 1970, 10.25” x 13” x 4” — 26 x 33 x 10.2 cm. Note: For a similar piece see, Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers auc. cat., Nov. 2005, lot 87 as well as May 2011, lot 202 $1,000/2,000

214 KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), E7-1101, Cape Dorset HUNTER’S THOUGHTS OF SEAL stone, signed in Roman, 33” x 10” x 5” — 83.8 x 25.4 x 12.7 cm. $2,500/3,500

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

215 KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK (1935-2010), E7-1168, Cape Dorset OWL stone, 11” x 7” x 11” — 27.9 x 17.8 x 27.9 cm. $1,000/2,000

216 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (1927-2013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset SWIMMING POLAR BEAR stone, 1971, signed in syllabics, 4” x 15” x 8” — 10.2 x 38.1 x 20.3 cm. $1,000/2,000

217 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK (19272013), E7-1035, Cape Dorset BASKING SEAL stone, c. 1970, 5.5” x 12.5” x 2.75” — 14 x 31.8 x 7 cm. $800/1,200

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218 KIAWAK ASHOONA (1933-), E7-1103, Cape Dorset STANDING MAN stone, 1983, signed in syllabics, 10.5” x 9” x 2.25” — 26.7 x 22.9 x 5.7 cm. $700/1,000

219 KINGWATSIAK JAW (1962-), E7-1970, Cape Dorset SWIMMING SEDNA WITH BRAIDED HAIR stone, signed in Roman, 7.5” x 14.5” x 3” — 19.1 x 36.8 x 7.6 cm. $500/700

220 KOOMWARTOK ASHOONA (1930-1984), E7-1102, Cape Dorset SEATED HUNTER WITH BEAR HEAD stone, signed in syllabics, 11.75” x 9” x 4” — 29.8 x 22.9 x 10.2 cm. $700/1,000

94


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

221 KOOMWARTOK ASHOONA (1930-1984), E7-1102, Cape Dorset SPIRIT BIRD stone, 1978, initial inscribed, 4.5” x 7” x 3” — 16 x 11 x 7.5 cm. $400/600

222 LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (1919-2000), E7-1055, Cape Dorset OPPOSING SEALS stone, 24” x 11” x 6” — 61 x 27.9 x 15.2 cm. $3,000/5,000

223 LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (19192000), E7-1055, Cape Dorset OWL stone, 1993, signed in syllabics, 11.75” x 6.75” x 11” — 29.8 x 17.1 x 27.9 cm. $2,500/3,500

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224 MANNUMI SHAQU (1917-2000), E7-824, Cape Dorset STANDING FIGURE stone, signed in syllabics, inscribed with disc number, 10.5” x 2.5” x 2.75” — 26.7 x 6.4 x 7 cm. $600/900

225 MAYUREAK ASHOONA (1946-), E7-818, Cape Dorset HUMAN BIRD TRANSFORMATION stone, 27.25” x 12” x 26” — 69.9 x 30.5 x 66 cm. $4,000/6,000

226 MAYUREAK ASHOONA (1946-), E7-818, Cape Dorset SEDNA AND FISH stone, 16.5” x 27” x 6.5” — 41.9 x 68.6 x 16.5 cm. $2,000/3,000

96


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

227 NUNA PARR (1949-), E7-764, Cape Dorset DANCING POLAR BEAR stone, 20.5” x 11” x 7” — 52.1 x 27.9 x 17.8 cm. $1,000/1,500

228 NUNA PARR (1949-), E7-764, Cape Dorset GOOSE stone, signed in Roman, 11” x 27” x 7” — 27.9 x 68.6 x 17.8 cm. $1,000/2,000

229 NUNA PARR (1949-), E7-764, Cape Dorset OWL stone, signed in Roman, 18” x 12” x 8” — 45.7 x 30.5 x 20.3 cm. $800/1,200

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230 OSUITOK IPEELEE (1923-2005), E7-1154, Cape Dorset RECLINING CARIBOU stone, signed in syllabics, 13” x 12” x 3” — 33 x 30.5 x 7.6 cm. $2,000/3,000

231 OVILU TUNNILLIE (1949-), E7-779, Cape Dorset FALCON stone, signed in syllabics, 12” x 10” x 22” — 30.5 x 25.4 x 55.9 cm. $1,500/2,000

232 PAULASSIE POOTOOGOOK (1927-2006), E7-1176, Cape Dorset SEDNA BRAIDING HER HAIR stone, signed in syllabics, 19.5” x 10” x 9.5” — 49.5 x 25.4 x 24.1 cm. $3,000/5,000

98


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

233 PITSEOLAK NIVIAQSI (1947-), E7-1081, Cape Dorset HAND WITH ULU stone, signed in syllabics, 14” x 11.5” x 4” — 35.6 x 29.2 x 10.2 cm. $2,500/3,000

234 UNIDENTIFIED, Cape Dorset BIRD stone, c. 1970, 7” x 8.25” x 11.25” — 17.8 x 21 x 28.6 cm. $300/500

235 UNIDENTIFIED FALCON WITH SPREAD WINGS bone, antler, 25.5” x 26.5” x 18” — 64.8 x 67.3 x 45.7 cm. $1,500/2,500

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236 PAULOOSIE AKITIRQ (1935-), E5-90, Arctic Bay COMPOSITION bone, 9” x 3.75” x 8” — 22.9 x 9.5 x 20.3 cm. $300/500

237 UNIDENTIFIED DOG TEAM PULLING KOMATIK skin, bone, stone, c. 1950, 5.25” x 29.5” x 9” — 13.3 x 74.9 x 22.9 cm. Provenance: Acquired from M. F. (Budd) Feheley, Private Collection, Montreal, QC Exhibited: Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C., Private Collection, Montreal, Qc Note: Measurements reflect dimensions with base $2,000/3,000

238 UNIDENTIFIED RECLINED NUDE CAUCASIAN WOMAN stone, c. 1960, 4.75” x 14” x 4” — 12.1 x 35.6 x 10.2 cm. Provenance: Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, November 2009, Lot 208, illustrated on p. 83, Private collection, Toronto Note: The artist explained to the previous collector he was depicting a “white woman” in this work. $1,500/2,500

100


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

239 UNIDENTIFIED CHESS SET stone, ivory, c. 1960, 4.75” x 14.25” x 14.25” — 12.1 x 36.2 x 36.2 cm. Note: Measurements reflect board with tallest piece. $2,500/3,500

240 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1-436, Arviat ANIMAL stone, signed in syllabics, 4.25” x 3.25” x 5.25” — 10.8 x 8.3 x 13.3 cm. $1,000/1,500

241 ANDY MIKI (1918-1983), E1436, Arviat ANIMAL stone, signed in syllabics, 5” x 1” x 4.75” — 12.7 x 2.5 x 12.1 cm. $1,000/1,500

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242 ELIZABETH NUTARALUK AULATJUT (1914-2002), E1-445, Arviat INUIT FAMILY stone, ivory, sinew, signed in syllabics, 7.25” x 6” x 4.25” — 18.4 x 15.2 x 10.8 cm. $1,000/1,500

243 EVA TALOOKI ALIKTILUK (19271995), E1-75, Arviat FIGURE stone, string, beads, 5.5” x 1.5” x 6” — 14 x 3.8 x 15.2 cm. $300/500

244 EVA TALOOKI ALIKTILUK (1927-1995), E1-75, Arviat FAMILY antler, 3.25” x .75” x .5” — 8.3 x 1.9 x 1.3 cm. Note: Measurements reflect that of the tallest figure $250/350

102


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

245 JACOB IRKOK (1937-2009), E1-271, Arviat SWIMMING CARIBOU antler, 3.5” x 11” x 1” — 8.9 x 27.9 x 2.5 cm. $300/500

246 JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), E1-104, Arviat FIGURE stone, 4.5” x 1” x 2.5” — 11.4 x 2.5 x 6.4 cm. $400/600

247 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat MOTHER AND CHILD stone, c. 1970, 6” x 6.75” x 4” — 15.2 x 17.1 x 10.2 cm. $1,500/2,000

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248 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), E1-135, Arviat FAMILY stone, 10.25” x 8” x 5” — 26 x 20.3 x 12.7 cm. $600/900

249 LUKE ANOWTALIK (1932-2006), E1-524, Arviat FAMILY stone, 12” x 14” x 7” — 30.5 x 35.6 x 17.8 cm. $2,000/3,000

250 LUKE ANOWTALIK (1932-2006), E1-524, Arviat DANCING INUK antler, 7.25” x 5” x 6” — 18.4 x 12.7 x 15.2 cm. $300/500

104


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

251 MARC ALIKASWA (1928-), E1-121, Arviat TRANSFORMATION stone, 2.75” x 8.75” x 2.5” — 7 x 22.2 x 6.4 cm. $300/500

252 PEGGY EKAGINA (1919-1993), W2-290, Coppermine TRANSFORMATION stone, signed in Roman, 2” x 2.5” x 6” — 5.1 x 6.4 x 15.2 cm. $800/1,200

253 SAM ANAVILOK (1936-1982), W2-235, AND MARTINA KLENGENBERG ANAVILOK (1937-), E4-46, Coppermine IGLOO INTERIOR SCENE WITH COUPLE EATING stone, copper, signed in Roman, 5.9” x 2.4” x 3.5” — 15 x 6 x 9 cm. $400/600

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254 KASUDLUAK WEETALUKTUK, Inukjuak CARIBOU stone, 1988, signed in syllabics, 9” x 8.5” x 5” — 22.9 x 21.6 x 12.7 cm. $400/600

255 AKEEAKTASHUK (1898-1954), E9-713, Inukjuak HUNTER SPEARING SEAL stone, wood, ivory, skin, 1952, 5” x 4.25” x 5.5” — 12.7 x 10.8 x 14 cm. $1,000/1,500

256 NOAH NOWRAKUDLUK (1916-), E9-1612, Inukjuak WALRUS stone, c. 1955, 8.5” x 16” x 8” — 21.6 x 40.6 x 20.3 cm. Provenance: Estate of Neil Kernaghan, Toronto $1,000/1,500

106


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

257 POSSIBLY LEVI NUNGAQ (1925-1999), E9-1762, Inukjuak TUSK DEPICTING A HUNTING SCENE stone, ivory, c. 1950, 18.5” x 1.75” x 2.5” — 47 x 4.4 x 6.4 cm. Note: The work bears a striking resemblance to the piece featured on the frontispiece of James Houston’s 1951 Eskimo Handicrafts. This pamphlet, written and illustrated by Houston, was published by Canadian Handicrafts Guild (Montreal, 1951). This was, arguably, the maiden introduction of Inuit art to the south, especially the United States of America. Of the intricately carved tusk, Houston writes, “The carved ivory tusk tells the story of the Eskimo hunter. When it is done with great cleverness it is a thing anyone would want...” $1,000/1,500

258 JOHNNY INUKPUK (1911-2007), E9-904, Inukjuak FATHER AND SON stone, c. 1970, 7.5” x 4” x 7.5” — 19.1 x 10.2 x 19.1 cm. $1,500/2,500

259 UNIDENTIFIED, Inukjuak ANIMAL TOTEM stone, 6.5” x 2.25” x 2.75” — 16.5 x 5.7 x 7 cm. $400/600

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260 UNIDENTIFIED, Inukjuak HUNTER WITH INSET FACE stone, c. 1955, 7” x 4.25” x 2.75” — 17.8 x 10.8 x 7 cm. $600/900

261 UNIDENTIFIED, Inukjuak STALKING HUNTER stone, ivory, c. 1960, 7.5” x 5” x 5” — 19.1 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm. $600/900

262 UNIDENTIFIED, Inukjuak WALRUS stone, ivory, c. 1955, 4.5” x 13” x 8” — 11.4 x 33 x 20.3 cm. $600/900

108


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

263 MAKUSIKALLA ALIQU QULLIALU (1930-1989), E9-1309, Akulivik HUNTER SPEARING POLAR BEAR stone, c. 1965, inscribed with disc number, 4.25” x 7” x 3.75” — 10.8 x 17.8 x 9.5 cm. $300/500

264 ILKOK OOPAKAK (1917-D), E6-346, Iqaluit HUNTING SCENE stone, sinew, ivory, signed in syllabics, inscribed with artist disc number, 10” x 14.5” x 7” — 25.4 x 36.8 x 17.8 cm. $600/900

265 MATIUSIE IYAITUK (1950-), E9-1939, Ivujivik LUMAAQ WITH HER ADOPTED WHALE BABY stone, 30” x 14” x 11” — 76.2 x 35.6 x 27.9 cm. $5,000/7,000

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266 LIPA PITSIULAK (1943-), E6-436, Pangnirtung THREE FACES INCISED ON BONE bone, 17.5” x 31.5” x 9.25” — 44.5 x 80 x 23.5 cm. $4,000/6,000

267 THOMASSIE KUDLUK (1910-1989), E8-873, Kangirsuk TWO FIGURES AND A BEAR stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1980, 1.5” x 5.75” x 4.5” — 3.8 x 14.6 x 11.4 cm. $400/600

268 THOMASSIE KUDLUK (1910-1989), E8-873, Kangirsuk PIPE SMOKING BEAR stone, signed in syllabics, 3.75” x 8.75” x 1.25” — 9.5 x 22.2 x 3.2 cm. $400/600

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

269 THOMASSIE KUDLUK (1910-1989), E8-873, Kangirsuk GRAZING CARIBOU stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1980, 3.5” x 5.75” x 1.25” — 8.9 x 14.6 x 3.2 cm. $300/500

270 THOMASSIE KUDLUK (1910-1989), E8-873, Kangirsuk HUNTER FLENSING SEAL stone, ivory, signed in syllabics and disc number, 4.7” x 4.5” x 2” — 11.9 x 11.4 x 5.1 cm. $300/500

271 POSSIBLY SARAH ABRAHAM (1934-), E8-204, Kuujjaq KNEELING HUNTER stone, ivory, signed in Roman and syllabics, 8.25” x 5.75” x 3” — 21 x 14.6 x 7.6 cm. $600/900

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272 ECHALOOK NUTARALUK (1941-), E9-1392, Povungnituk SEAL HUNTER IN DISTRESS stone, signed in Roman, 7.5” x 4.25” x 7.5” — 19.1 x 10.8 x 19.1 cm. $300/500

273 ISAH AJAGUTAINA TUKULA (1905-1977), E9-1432, Povungnituk HUNTER HAULING A SEAL stone, inscribed with disc number, 5.25” x 4” x 6” — 13.3 x 10.2 x 15.2 cm. $500/700

274 FRED IYAK TRIMBLE (1961-), Nanaimo MUSK OX stone, antler, signed in Roman, 8.5” x 12” x 8” — 21.6 x 30.5 x 20.3 cm. $800/1,200

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

275 ENOOK MANOMIE (1941-), E7-828, Iqaluit CARIBOU stone, ivory, c. 1960, 6.5” x 6.5” x 2” — 16.5 x 16.5 x 5.1 cm. $300/500

276 ADAM PUDLOO KILABUK (1942-), E6-418, Pangnirtung WRESTLING FIGURES stone, signed in Roman, 15” x 11.5” x 6.75” — 38.1 x 29.2 x 17.1 cm. $600/900

277 JOSEPHEE KAKEE (1911-1977), E6-50, Pangnirtung TREE WITH A BIRD PERCHED ON TOP bone, ivory, skin, antler, disc number inscribed, 18” x 5.75” x 5.5” — 45.7 x 14.6 x 14 cm. Provenance: Waddington’s Auctioneers & Appraisers, 1990, Private Collection $1,500/2,000

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278 ROBERT KUPTANA (1962-), Paulatuk SHAMAN THREATENING A PRIEST stone, wood, leather, bone, sinew, signed in syllabics, dated 1996, 7.25” x 6.75” x 3.5” — 18.4 x 17.1 x 8.9 cm. $600/900

279 NICK SIKKUARK (1943-), W1-209, Pelly Bay SHAMAN antler, muskox horn, signed in syllabics, 9.5” x 3.25” x 6.5” — 24.1 x 8.3 x 16.5 cm. $1,000/1,500

280 NICK SIKKUARK (1943-), W1-209, Pelly Bay BIRD SHAMAN antler, bone, signed in syllabics, 7” x 3.5” x 3.25” — 17.8 x 8.9 x 8.3 cm. $800/1,200

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281 NICK SIKKUARK (1943-), W1-209, Pelly Bay TWO NARWHALS ON BASE horn, antler, signed in syllabics, 5.75” x 12.25” x 5.5” — 14.6 x 31.1 x 14 cm. $800/1,200

282 EMILY PANGNERK ILLUITOK (1943-2012), E3-378, Pelly Bay CAMP SCENE stone, fur, ivory, horn, antler, skin, sinew, 7.75” x 32.25” x 15” — 19.7 x 81.9 x 38.1 cm. $2,500/3,500

283 MARTHA KOONOO (1939-), E5-808, Pond Inlet KNEELING MOTHER WITH CHILD stone, disc number inscribed, 7.25” x 4” x 6” — 18.4 x 10.2 x 15.2 cm. $400/600

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284 HAM EKAKEPALOOK KADLOO (1936-), E5-807, Pond Inlet OWL OVER DEAD HARE stone, bone, signed in Roman with disc number, 6.7” x 4.7” x 5.3” — 17 x 12 x 13.5 cm. $400/600

285 HAROLD PFEIFFER (1908–1998), Quebec City, QC STANDING INUK bronze, signed in Roman, 1/10, 9” x 4” x 3.75” — 22.9 x 10.2 x 9.5 cm. $300/500

Note: Harold Pfeiffer made his first trip north in 1954 on the patrol ship, C.D. Howe, as an x-ray assistant, liaison officer, and sculptor. This trip marked first of several tours to the north that would serve Pfeiffer in his art. Pfeiffer sought to capture some essence of the respect and delight he had for the northern peoples of Canada, Alaska, Greenland, and Siberia. His efforts toward realism and presenting Northern narratives are clear in this work. Here, perhaps, we see a standing figure heralding in the close of perlerorneq (literally ‘to feel the weight of life’). This traditional Greenland Inuit practice dictates that upon first seeing the sun, one must remove a mitt and hold their hand in the air. The more devout also smile with half their face. From Harold Pfeiffer & John A. Stevens, The Man Who Makes Heads With His Hands: The Art and Life of Harold Pfeiffer, Sculptor. Burnstown, ON: General Store Publishing, 1997 & Kobalenko, Jerry, The Horizontal Everest: Extreme Journeys on Ellesmere Island, BPS Books, 2010)

286 UNIDENTIFIED, Naparyarmiut, Alaska TWO WOVEN LIDDED CONTAINERS beach grass, 6” x 4” x 4” — 15.2 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm.; 7” x 4” x 4” — 17.8 x 10.2 x 10.2 cm. $600/900

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

287 UNIDENTIFIED, Alaska PARASOL HANDLE DECORATED WITH HANDS, FOX, WALRUS, POLAR BEAR ivory, ink, early 20th century, 11.5” x 2” x 1” — 29.2 x 5.1 x 2.5 cm. Note: Once gifted from the 1st Bishop of the Anglican Arctic Diocese. $1,000/1,500

288 UNIDENTIFIED, Northwest coast HAIDA TOTEM POLE argillite, 14.5” x 3” x 3” — 36.8 x 7.6 x 7.6 cm. $800/1,200

289 HERMAN COLLINSON, Skidegate Mission HAIDA TOTEM POLE argillite, dated ‘72, signed in Roman, 13.5” x 2.75” x 3.5” — 34.3 x 7 x 8.9 cm. Provenance: Estate of Neil Kernaghan, Toronto $1,500/2,000

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290 MOSES MEEKO (1920-1975), E9-22, Sanikiluaq HUNTER HARPOONING A WALRUS stone wood, ivory, sealskin, signed in Roman, inscribed with disc number, 5.5” x 4” x 5.75” — 14 x 10.2 x 14.6 cm. $300/500

291 UNIDENTIFIED, Sanikiluaq HUNTER AND POLAR BEAR stone, wood, 3.5” x 9.5” x 2” — 8.9 x 24.1 x 5.1 cm. $300/500

292 GEORGE EMIQUTAILAQ (1946-), E9-88, Sanikiluaq HUNTER CONFRONTING A DEMON stone, ivory, wood, signed in Roman with disc number, 8.7” x 4.3” x 3.1” — 22 x 11 x 8 cm. Provenance: Acquired from the William Eccles Collection. Note: For another image of this piece see, George Swinton, Sculpture of the Eskimo, George Swinton, page 150, p. 232 $1,000/2,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

293 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), E4-342, Gjoa Haven BIRD WITH WORM stone, ivory, signed in syllabics, 7.5” x 5.9” x 4.3” — 19 x 15 x 11 cm. $2,000/3,000

294 GIDEON QAUQJUAQ (1941-), E4-392, Spence Bay FACE bone, 10” x 5.75” x 3.5” — 25.4 x 14.6 x 8.9 cm. Note: Measurements without base, with: 13.75” x 5.75” x 4” — 34.9 x 14.6 x 10.2 cm. $800/1,200

295 JOE POODLAT (1951-), E4-563, Spence Bay SHAMAN bone, 16” x 10.25” x 11” — 40.6 x 26 x 27.9 cm. $800/1,200

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296 MAUDIE RACHEL OKITTUQ (1944-), E4-393, Spence Bay BIRD SPIRIT stone, 9” x 6.5” x 6.5” — 22.9 x 16.5 x 16.5 cm. $300/500

297 MAUDIE RACHEL OKITTUQ (1944-), E4-393, Spence Bay CREATURE stone, signed in syllabics, 3.5” x 9” x 5” — 8.9 x 22.9 x 12.7 cm. $200/400

298 SAMUEL NAHAULAITUQ (1923-1999), E4-288, Spence Bay POLAR BEAR WITH SEAL stone, pyroxene, signed in syllabics, 8” x 12” x 5” — 20.3 x 30.5 x 12.7 cm. $1,500/2,000

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

299 ABRAHAM APAKARK ANGHIK, W3-1119, Salt Spring Island LOON stone, beads, 4.75” x 21.25” x 5.5” — 12.1 x 54 x 14 cm. $700/1,000

300 UNIDENTIFIED RECLINING DOG bone, c. 1975, 6” x 11.5” x 5” — 15.2 x 29.2 x 12.7 cm. $300/500

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301 UNIDENTIFIED NECKLACE ivory, antler, string, height 21” — 53.3 cm. Note: largest pendant measures 1.25” x 1” x 0.4” — 3.2 x 2.5 x .9 cm. $300/500

302 UNIDENTIFIED HUNTER AND DOG WITH PACK bone, antler and baleen inset eyes, 9.75” x 11.25” x 3.5” — 24.8 x 28.6 x 8.9 cm. $400/600

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303 WAYU WOMAN WITH FISH AND HARE stone, 11” x 5.5” x 5” — 27.9 x 14 x 12.7 cm. $400/600

304 UNIDENTIFIED MOTHER AND CHILD stone, 7” x 3” x 5.5” — 17.8 x 7.6 x 14 cm. $400/600

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305 UNIDENTIFIED MOTHER WITH CHILD IN AMAUT stone, c. 1955, 7.25” x 4.25” x 1.5” — 18.4 x 10.8 x 3.8 cm. $400/600

306 UNIDENTFIED FACES bone, c. 1975, 19” x 7.5” x 7” — 48.3 x 19.1 x 17.8 cm. $600/900

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

307 UNIDENTIFIED HUNTER CONFRONTS A POLAR BEAR bone, 10.5” x 11.75” x 5.25” — 26.7 x 29.8 x 13.3 cm. $600/900

308 UNIDENTIFIED BUST OF AN INUK bone, 13.5” x 5.5” x 8.25” — 34.3 x 14 x 21 cm. $600/900

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InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

Index

A

C

KINGWATSIAK, MIKIGAK 211

ABRAHAM, SARAH 271

COLLINSON, HERMAN 289

KOONOO, MARTHA 283 KOWCHARLIE, MAGGIE 44

AKEEAKTASHUK 255 AKESUK, LATCHOLASSIE 222, 223

E

KUDLUK, THOMASSIE 43, 267, 268, 269,

AKITIRQ, PAULOOSIE  236

EKAGINA, PEGGY 39, 252

270

AKPALIAPIK, MANASIE   51

EMIQUTAILAQ, GEORGE 292

KUKSHOUT, PIE 147

AKULUKJUK, OLASSIE  1

ETIDLOOIE, SHEOJUK 16, 18

KUPTANA, ROBERT 278

ALIKASWA, MARC   251

ETUNGAT, ABRAHAM 213

KUUNNUAQ, MARIE 178

ALIKTILUK, EVA TALOOKI   27, 243, 244

EVALUARDJUK, HENRY 40, 41, 120, 163,

KUUTSIQ, MARY 4

AMITTU, DAVIDIALUK ALASUA  38, 154,

164, 165, 166, 167, 168

M

155 ANAVILOK, MARTINA

I

MAKPAAQ, VITAL 191

KLENGENBERG  253

IKKIDLUAK, LUCASSIE 170

MAMNGUQSUALUK, VICTORIA 6

ANAVILOK, SAM  253

IKSIKTAARYUK, LUKE 105, 106

MANOMIE, ENOOK 275

ANGIJU, DANIEL QUMA  153

IKUTAAQ, DAVID 33

MEEKO, MOSES 290

ANGRNAQQUAQ, ELIZABETH   2

ILLUITOK, EMILY PANGNERK 282

MICHAEL, PITSIULA 36

ANGUHADLUQ, LUKE  197, 198

INUKPUK, JOHNNY 102, 258

MIKI, ANDY 26, 98, 99, 100, 240, 241

ANOWTALIK, LUKE   57, 249, 250

IPEELEE, OSUITOK 89, 90, 230

AQIGAAQ, MATHEW  179

IQULIQ, TUNA 188, 189, 190

N

ARNALUAQ, EFFIE ANGALI'TAAQ  19, 174

IRKOK, JACOB 245

NAHAULAITUQ, SAMUEL 298

ARNASUNGAAQ, BARNABUS  32, 34,

IYAITUK, MATIUSIE 265

NANOGAK, AGNES 9 NASOGALUAK, BILL 52

104, 172, 173 ASHEVAK, KAROO  118, 119

J

NIVIAQSI, PITSEOLAK 97, 233

ASHEVAK, KENOJUAK  17, 66, 67, 68, 203,

JAW, KINGWATSIAK 219

NIVIAXIE 70 NOWRAKUDLUK, NOAH 256

204 205, 206, 207, 216, 217 ASHOONA, KAKA  91, 214

K

NUILAALIK, JOSIAH 29, 30, 121, 177

ASHOONA, KIAWAK  86, 87, 88, 218

KADLOO, HAM EKAKEPALOOK 284

NUNGAQ, LEVI 257

ASHOONA, KOOMWARTOK 220, 221

KAKEE, JOSEPHEE 277

NUTARALUK, ECHALOOK 272

ASHOONA, MAYUREAK 225, 226

KAMIKPAKITTUQ, PHILIP 110

ASHOONA, PITSEOLAK 131, 132, 133,

KARLIK, PIERRE 148

O

134, 135, 136

KAVIK, JOHN 48, 112, 113, 145, 146

OKITTUQ, MAUDIE RACHEL 296, 297

ASSIVAARYUK, PETER 180

KIAKSHUK 77, 78, 80, 81, 82, 79

OONARK, JESSIE 60, 61, 62, 194, 192,

ATCHEALAK, DAVIE 42, 161, 162

KILABUK, ADAM PUDLOO 276

193, 195, 196

AULATJUT, ELIZABETH NUTARALUK 242

KINGILIK, DOMINIC 31

OOPAKAK, ILKOK 264 OSHUITOQ, ANIRNIK 12

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Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

P

SAGGIAK, LISSIE 208

W

PANGNARK, JOHN 20, 101, 246

SAILA, PAUTA 93, 94, 95, 96, 128

WAYU,303

PARR 13, 14, 63, 64, 73, 74, 75, 76, 122,

SAILA, PITALOOSIE 129, 130

WEETALUKTUK, KASUDLUAK 254

123, 124, 125, 126, 127

SAVIAKJUK, ANNIE IKILLUAQ 150

PARR, ELEESHUSHE 200

SHAA, AQJANGAJUK 83, 84, 85

PARR, NUNA 227, 228, 229

SHAQU, MANNUMI 37, 224

PFEIFFER, HAROLD 285

SHEOUAK 71

PIQTOUKUN, DAVID RUBEN 299

SIKKUARK, NICK 279, 280, 281

PITSIULAK, LIPA 266

SIVUAK, PAULOSIE 160

POODLAT, JOE 295

SIVUARAPIK, THOMASSIAPIK 11

POOTOOGOOK, ANNIE 65

SIVURAQ, THOMAS 181, 182, 183, 185,

POOTOOGOOK, EEGYVUDLUK 199

186, 187

POOTOOGOOK, JOSEPH 69

SMILER, ISA 103

POOTOOGOOK, KANANGINAK 35, 92,

SUVAARAQ,THOMAS 184

201, 202, 215 POOTOOGOOK, NAPATCHIE 212

T

POOTOOGOOK, PAULASSIE 232

TAKKIRUQ, NELSON 109

POOTOOGOOK, PUDLAT 137

TALIRUNILI, JOE 156, 157, 158, 159

POOTOOGOOK, SHARNI 142, 143

TATANIQ, GEORGE 175, 176

POOTOOGOOK. SHOUYU 144

TATYA, WINNIE 7

PUDLAT, PUDLO 58, 138, 139, 140

TIKTAALAAQ, IRENE AVAALAAQIAQ 3

PUQIQNAK, URIASH 111

TIKTAK, JOHN 114, 115 TOWETOAK, MARIA 53, 54

Q

TRIMBLE, FRED IYAK 274

QAUQJUAQ, GIDEON 294

TUKULA, ISAH AJAGUTAINA 273

QAYAQJUAQ, SILAS 45, 46

TULURIALIK, RUTH ANNAQTUUSI 59

QIMIRPIK, NUYALIAQ 169

TUNGILIK, MARK 49, 50, 149

QINNUAYUAK, LUCY 209, 210

TUNGUAK, LUKE ”TUNUWAK" 10

QIYUK, MIRIAM MAREALIK 28

TUNNILLIE, OVILU 231

QIYUK, SILAS 171

TUTSWEETOK, LUCY TASSEOR 22, 23, 24,

QULLIALU, MAKUSIKALLA ALIQU 263

25, 247, 248

S

U

SAGGIAK 141

UGYUK, CHARLIE 116, 117 ULLULAQ, JUDAS 107, 108, 293

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InuitArt.Waddingtons.ca

Buying at Waddington’s

All lots will be offered and sold subject to the Conditions of Sale which appear in this catalogue as well as any Glossary and posted or oral announcement. By bidding at auction, bidders are bound by those Conditions and Glossary, as amended by any oral announcement or posted notices, which together form the contract of sale between the successful bidder (buyer), Waddington’s™ and the consignor (seller) of the lot. Descriptions or photographs of lots are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the Conditions of Sale.

inquire as to the condition of a lot before bidding. Condition reports are available upon request by phone, fax, email or in person. You are advised to make any requests well in advance of the sale.

Condition of Lots All of the items are to be considered, unless otherwise noted in the description, in good condition. The definition of “good” when used in reference to condition, describes an object as having had no major damage or repair but as with the nature of the material, may show minor surface wear, discolouration etc., which indicates the acceptable wear that the piece may acquire with age. If you are particular about minor flaws, you should examine the pieces in person or have our staff answer any questions before bidding. Sizes are approximate. It is the sole responsibility of the bidder to

Artfact Live! clients will be charged a buyer's premium of 23% of the successful bid price of each lot up to and including $50,000 and 18% on any amount in excess of $50,000 as part of the total purchase price.

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Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. Buyers Premium A premium of 20% of the successful bid price of each lot up to and including $50,000 and 15% on any amount in excess of $50,000 is paid by the buyer as part of the total purchase price.

A charge of 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applicable on the hammer price and buyer's premium, except for purchases exported from Canada. In the case where purchases are shipped out of the province of Ontario, the HST or GST is charged based on the tax status of that province.

Bidding To bid in person at the auction, you must register for a bidding number by showing identification acceptable to the Auctioneer upon entering the salesroom. Your number will identify you if you are the successful bidder. You will be responsible for all lots purchased on your bidding number. Banking information may be requested by Waddington’s™. You may submit an Absentee Bid Form if you are unable to attend the sale. Bidding by telephone, in limited circumstances, can be arranged prior to the sale. While we are pleased to offer absentee and telephone bidding as a service to our clients, and take great care in their commission, the Auctioneer will not be responsible for technical difficulties, errors or failure to execute bids. The Auctioneer may also execute bids on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. The reserve is the confidential minimum price the seller is willing to accept for his or her property, below which it will not be sold. Absentee Bidders All absentee and phone bidders are required to contact our offices at 416504-9100 to confirm whether they have been successful.

Payment Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made. ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN FUNDS


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

Selling at Waddington’s

Shipping: The Auctioneers will not undertake packing or shipping. The purchaser must designate and arrange for the services of an independent shipper and be responsible for all shipping, insurance expenses and any necessary export permits that may apply. The Auctioneers will, upon request, provide names of professional packers and shippers but will not be held responsible for the service or have any liability for providing this information. Reliable preauction estimates of shipping costs of lots offered in this sale may be obtained from: Pak Mail 905.470.6874 905.470.6875 416.293.8225 taurus@pakmailmarkham.ca www.pakmailmarkham.ca Removal of Purchases Purchases must be paid for within 48 hours of the date of the sale, and removed from premises within 10 days of the date of sale (see Conditions of Sale, conditions 8 to 15). Clients are advised that packing and/or handling of purchased lots by our employees or agents is undertaken solely as a courtesy for the convenience of clients.

Paintings, drawings, prints, furniture, jewellery and all forms of decorative arts and collectibles may be brought to our Toronto office where we can provide you with preliminary auction estimates and consignment procedures. Please visit our website at www.waddingtons.ca for details on our various departments and how to contact the specialists. We also accept mailed and emailed requests for advice on the marketability of objects. A photograph and phone number must accompany a full description of each item. Our specialists regularly travel to major Canadian cities to meet with prospective consignors. For further information, or to arrange an appointment, please contact our Toronto office.

Notice for our International Clients

Commission Rates Items selling for $7,501 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,500 15% Items selling for $251 to $2,500 20% Items selling for $250 or less 25% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item Insurance A 1% insurance charge, based on the hammer price of the property, will be applied to all accounts.

Restrictions exist regarding the export of species protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). The export and importation of items made of or containing whalebone, ivory, tortoise shell, seal skin, rhinoceros horn and other animal parts is strictly controlled or forbidden by most countries. Please review your country’s laws before shipping or purchasing pieces made of or containing these restricted items. Obtaining the appropriate permits is the responsibility of the client. All Narwhal Tusks must have a Marine Harvest Number or a Marine and Mammal Transport number to be sold at Waddington's. For more information please visit: www.cites.org

Property normally arrives at Waddington’s™ at least three months before the sale in order to allow our specialists time to research, catalogue, photograph and promote the items. Consignors will receive a contract to sign, setting forth terms and fees for our services.

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Conditions Of Sale

1. All lots are sold “AS IS”. Any description issued by the auctioneer of an article to be sold is subject to variation to be posted or announced verbally in the auction room prior to the time of sale. While the auctioneer has endeavoured not to mislead in the description issued, and the utmost care is taken to ensure the correct cataloguing of each item, such descriptions are purely statements of opinion and are not intended to constitute a representation to the prospective purchasers and no warranty of the correctness of such description is made. An opportunity for inspection of each article is offered prior to the time of sale. No sale will be set aside on account of lack of correspondence of the article with its description or its reproduction, if any, whether colour or black & white. Some lots are of an age and/or nature which preclude their being in pristine condition and some catalogue descriptions make reference to damage and/or restoration. The lack of such a reference does not imply that a lot is free from defects nor does any reference to certain defects imply the absence of others. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. It is the responsibility of prospective purchasers to inspect or have inspected each lot upon which they wish to bid, relying upon their own advisers, and to bid accordingly. 2. Each lot sold is subject to a premium of 18% of the successful bid price. 3. Unless exempted by law, the buyer is required to pay Harmonized Sales Tax on the total purchase price including the buyer’s premium. For international buyers, taxes are not applicable when purchases are shipped out of country. Items shipped out of Ontario, the buyer is required to pay taxes as per the tax status of that province, whether it HST or GST (Goods and Services Tax). 4. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot from

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sale at any time, to divide any lot or to combine any two or more lots at his sole discretion, all without notice. 5. The auctioneer has the right to refuse any bid and to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right not to accept and not to reject any bid. Without limitation, any bid which is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or which is merely a nominal or fractional advance over the previous bid may not be recognized. 6. Each lot may be subject to an unpublished reserve which may be changed at any time by agreement between the auctioneer and the consignor. The auctioneer may bid, or direct an employee to bid, on behalf of the consignor as agreed between them. In addition, the auctioneer may accept and submit absentee and telephone bids, to be executed by an employee of the auctioneer, pursuant to the instructions of prospective purchasers not in attendance at the sale. 7. The highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer for any lot shall be the buyer and such buyer shall forthwith assume full risk and responsibility for the lot and must comply with such other Conditions of Sale as may be applicable. If any dispute should arise between bidders the auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to designate the buyer or, at his option, to withdraw any disputed lot from the sale, or to re-offer it at the same or a subsequent sale. The auctioneer’s decision in all cases shall be final. 8. Immediately after the purchase of a lot, the buyer shall pay or undertake to the satisfaction of the auctioneer with respect to payment of the whole or any part of the purchase price requested by the auctioneer, failing which the auctioneer in his sole discretion may cancel the sale, with or without

re-offering the item for sale. 9. The buyer shall pay for all lots within 48 hours from the date of the sale, after which a late charge of 2% per month on the total invoice may be incurred or the auctioneer, in his sole discretion, may cancel the sale. The buyer shall not become the owner of the lot until paid for in full. Items must be removed within 10 days from the date of sale , after which storage charges may be incurred. 10. Each lot purchased, unless the sale is cancelled as above, shall be held by the auctioneer at his premises or at a public warehouse at the sole risk of the buyer until fully paid for and taken away. 11. Notwithstanding condition no. 1, if the buyer, prior to removal of a lot, makes arrangements satisfactory to the auctioneer for the inspection of such lot by a fully qualified person acceptable to the auctioneer to determine the genuineness or authenticity of the lot, to be carried out promptly following the sale of the lot, and if, but only if, within a period of 14 days following the sale a written opinion of such person is presented to the auctioneer to the effect that the lot is not genuine or authentic, accompanied by a written request by the buyer for rescission of the sale, then the sale of the lot will be rescinded and the sale price refunded to the buyer. 12. Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), and VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made.

13. In the event of failure to pay for or remove articles within the aforementioned time limit, the auctioneer, without limitation of the rights of the consignor and the auctioneer against the buyer, may resell any of the articles affected, and in such case the original buyer shall be responsible to the auctioneer and the consignor for: (a) any deficiency in price between the re-sale amount and the amount to have been paid by the original buyer; (b) any reasonable charge by the auctioneer for the storage of such articles until payment and removal by the subsequent buyer; and (c) the amount of commission which the auctioneer would have earned had payment been made in full by the original buyer. 14. It is the responsibility of the buyer to make all arrangements for insuring, packing and removing the property purchased and any assistance by the auctioneer or his servants, agents or contractors, in packing or removal shall be rendered as a courtesy and without any liability to them. 15. The auctioneer acts solely as agent for the consignor and makes no representation as to any attribute of, title to, or restriction affecting the articles consigned for sale. Without limitation, the buyer understands that any item bought may be affected by the provisions of the Cultural Property Export Act (Canada). 16. The auctioneer reserves the right to refuse admission to the sale or to refuse to recognize any or all bids from any particular person or persons at any auction.


Inuit Art Auction – Monday 18 November 2013 at 6 p.m.

Operational Sta

Specialist Departments

Asian Art

Monthly Fine Art

Anthony Wu 416 847 6185 aw@waddingtons.ca

Doug Payne 416 847 6180 dp@waddingtons.ca

Yvonne Li 416 847 6195 yl@waddingtons.ca

Silver, Glass & Ceramics

Canadian Fine Art

Bill Kime 416 847 6189 bk@waddingtons.ca

Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca

Shasha Liu Assistant sl@waddingtons.ca

Kristin Vance 416 504 5100 kv@waddingtons.ca

Sculpture, Decorations, Clocks & Lighting

Kathleen Killen Assistant kk@waddingtons.ca

Sean Quinn 416 847 6187 sq@waddingtons.ca

President Duncan McLean 416 847 6183 adm@waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca/Cobourg

Vice President Business Development Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca

General Manager Paul Needham 905 373 0501 pn@waddingtons.ca

Vice President Fine Art Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca General Manager Duane Smith 416 847 6172 das@waddingtons.ca Creative & Technical Manager Jamie Long 416 847 6188 jl@waddingtons.ca

Contemporary Art Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca International Art Susan Robertson 416 847 6179 sr@waddingtons.ca Emma Frank Assistant ef@waddingtons.ca

Queeny Xu Assistant qx@waddingtons.ca

9 Elgin Street East, Cobourg ON K9A 0A1

Absentee and Phone Bidding 905 373 1467 (Fax) Waddingtons.ca/Collingwood P. O. Box 554, Collingwood ON L9Y 4B2 Valerie Brown 705 445 8811 vb@waddingtons.ca Transitions.Waddingtons.ca Marcia Kim 416 847 6196 mk@waddingtons.ca

Accounts Manager Karen Sander 416 847 6173 ks@waddingtons.ca Ellda Pappada 416 504 9100 x6213 ep@waddingtons.ca Corporate Receptionist Kate Godin 416 504 9100 kg@waddingtons.ca

Inuit Art Christa Ouimet 416 847 6184 co@waddingtons.ca Nadine Di Monte Assistant nd@waddingtons.ca Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics Don P. McLean 416 847 6170 dpm@waddingtons.ca

Appraisal Co-ordinator Ellie Muir 416 847 6196 em@waddingtons.ca Building Manager Steve Sheppard 416 847 6186 ss@waddingtons.ca Client Services Andrew Brandt 416 504 9100 ext 6200 ab@waddingtons.ca

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Inuit Art Waddingtons.ca

275 King Street East, Second Floor Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2

Telephone: 416.504.9100 Fax: 416.504.0033 Toll Free: 1.877.504.5700

Profile for waddingtons

Inuit Art Auction | Nov. 18, 2013  

Inuit Art Auction | Nov. 18, 2013