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The Prime Directive:

CommunityBrand Action Plan Vulcan Alberta December, 2011


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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Table of Contents

Table of Contents Introduction and Scope of Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Rules of Branding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Brand Promise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 The Vulcan Brand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Benefits of Tourism Alberta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Action Plan Steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Recommendation #1 Develop a strong brand leadership team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Recommendation #2 Submit Brand Direction to CBS for Approval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Recommendation #3 Create a Town of Vulcan-specific Brand Standards Manual or Style Guide. . . . . 41

Recommendation #4 Spread the word about the brand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Recommendation #5 Develop the Downtown Master Development Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Recommendation #6 Option the property for the proposed exhibition centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Recommendation #7 Hire graphic design expertise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Recommendation #8 The BridgeBrand and poster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Recommendation #9 Bookmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Recommendation #10 Redevelop all advertising and promotional literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Recommendation #11 Secure a site for a model “home of the future”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Recommendation #12 Develop the Exhibition Centre conceptual plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Recommendation #13 Replace the audio/video technology in the Trek Station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Recommendation #14 Develop a new website for Vulcan Tourism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Recommendation #15 Develop the “BridgeBrand” poster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Recommendation #16 Downtown retail façade improvements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Recommendation #17 Implement the county-wide wayfinding system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Recommendation #18 Technical assistance for downtown retailers/property owners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Recommendation #19 Star Trek Walk of Fame frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Recommendation #20 Hire recruiter, sales professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Recommendation #21 Develop the recruitment database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Table of Contents

Recommendation #22 Begin the recruitment effort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Recommendation #23 Begin bringing new technologies into the school system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Recommendation #24 Create lighted gateways into downtown Vulcan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Recommendation #25 Develop the Trompe L’oeil Wall Mural Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Recommendation #26 Install Free Broadband Wireless along Main Street in downtown . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

Recommendation #27 Street lighting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Recommendation #28 Install “Bridgebrand” pole banners on the new streetlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Recommendation #29 Make adjustments to the Wayfinding System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Recommendation #30 Repaint the Trek Station with Star Trek symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Recommendation #31 QR posts along Main Street. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Recommendation #32 Install a MUZAK sound system downtown along Main Street. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Recommendation #33 Begin gradual use of new marketing identities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Recommendation #34 Begin booking the Exhibition Centre and recruiting events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Recommendation #35 Begin the social media marketing effort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Social Media marketing plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

2013 Major Initiatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

2014 Major Initiatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

2015 Major Initiatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

2012 To-Do List by Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Supplemental Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

Social Media marketing plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Possible funding options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

The Downtown Idea Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

Community stakeholder interviews. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Interview Summaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

Mural information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133

Sample ordinance for sidewalk dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Vulcan questionnaire results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Introduction & Scope of Work

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Introduction & Scope of Work

Introduction Think of this as a roadmap. The destination is clear: Vulcan - the most technologically advanced small town in Canada with an easy going rural community lifestyle that is ideally suited for innovators, entrepreneurs and families, free from the distractions and pressures of the city. It’s out there somewhere in your future. You told us what it looks like. It’s a town with good jobs that children will want to fill when they grow up and visitors will want to move here for. It has an excellent school system. Its healthcare facilities and services are among the best in Canada for a town of its size. The environment is clean and green. It is a progressive community that is built on core values of hard work, decency and respect. In fact, it’s the kind of town and lifestyle most people, including investors, would actively consider for their new home. These are the basic building blocks for economic and social development. The challenge is, how do you get to your destination? Vulcan has some hidden advantages for the journey. 1. Good people with the ability and desire to work tirelessly to build their community. 2. The Alberta Grid Network with high speed broadband access available to the community. 3. The Vulcan-Star Trek brand that provides the broad marketing veneer for promoting the development through technology of each of the building blocks and the community as a whole. 6

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

No other small rural community in Canada has this combination of advantages. This plan capitalizes on them. There are more than 30 separate recommendations that are practical action steps along the road map. Each of them plays off of Vulcan’s unique advantages in some way and stands in marked contrast to competitive efforts like the Lethbridge Technology Commercialization Centre, or Tecconnect, or the federal/provincial/education partnership Tecterra. The strategy is to move away from the retro 1960s Star Trek theme to the “new” Star Trek franchise that features future technologies and characters and caters to a younger generation. It’s to reinforce and play up the value of Vulcan, the Star Trek Capital of Canada theme and then marry it to the new Vulcan, the Small Town Technology Capital of Canada theme. It’s creating facilities and supporting business opportunities that make Vulcan the destination of choice for all things tech-oriented in terms of education, work, healthcare, home and the environment - in a small town application. And it’s “living” the brand community-wide in all regards. We believe this plan has the potential to attract significant public and private support. •

Public support is likely because the comprehensive development of Vulcan through technology can be presented as a demonstration model and test bed for the economic rejuvenation of hundreds and hundreds of rural communities throughout Canada that are in economic and often social distress. We believe a strong case can

be built for support from Alberta and Ottawa in using Vulcan to build a template for that growth and then replicating it elsewhere. •

Private support is likely because implementation of the plan promises a labor pool and technology capabilities where cost-effective services can be provided as well as a lifestyle attractive to employees and their families.

Finally, tourism is an especially important piece of this plan. Without growth in tourism, the business model for many of the plan’s component parts will suffer. The goal is to make Vulcan a multi-day destination for visitors and the steps to accomplish that are detailed in the plan. More visitors means the business model works for more and more restaurants, retail shops, entertainment and related activities. And among those visitors are prospective entrepreneurs who will open or relocate their businesses in Vulcan. Make no mistake; tourism will be the front door to non-tourism economic development in the community. Successfully reaching the destination will not be easy. Nor will it be quick. But it will be reached if everyone follows the map and sticks to the plan. Project History In 2010 Vulcan hired Destination Development International (DDI) to produce a Community Assessment. The Community Assessment is the first step necessary in a branding process and it included: (1) a distance marketing assessment where two secret shoppers planned a trip to the area and reviewed the town’s marketing effort, including website, brochures,


Introduction & Scope of Work

guides, and other marketing materials; and (2) a multiday on-site assessment where DDI looked at Vulcan’s attractions and amenities, signage, wayfinding, overall appeal, downtown, visitor information, operating hours, beautification, business mix, and branding focus. The findings of these assessments were presented to the Vulcan community in a public presentation, followed up by a Findings and Suggestions report. Following the assessment, Vulcan saw that producing a Branding, Development and Marketing Action Plan would help them to achieve their goals of attracting visitors and more businesses, reinvigorating downtown, and creating a community in which residents enjoy spending their time and money. Scope of Work The primary goal of this project was to develop a comprehensive vision or “brand” for Vulcan that maximizes its current assets and amenities, while providing recommendations for the development of “product” and the steps necessary to support the brand vision. The recommended brand direction will enable Vulcan to stand out from the other communities in the area, making it more attractive for local residents, visitors and investors. As the title of the plan implies, it includes the brand direction – what you want to be known for; product development – what you need to do or create so you “own” the brand; and marketing – how to tell the world.

Destination Development International (DDI) to perform the following scope of work to produce the Branding, Development and Marketing Action Plan: Meetings with Local Stakeholders DDI met with stakeholders who will play a role in the effort, learning more about local concerns, direction, opportunities, organizations, and businesses. Establishment of an introductory “Brand Development Committee,” or steering committee, to be DDI’s partners in the plan development process. Community Branding Forum Two members of DDI’s staff visited Vulcan conducting community outreach for education, feedback, brainstorming, and researching and analyzing all of the information and input that was received. A public meeting was held to educate the public about the basics of branding, and to solicit the values, vision, and needs of the stakeholders and the community at large. Brand Identification Upon return to their office, the DDI team reviewed all the research, reviews, interview summaries, demographic and psychographic research, market data, community input, and on-site evaluations. Additional research was conducted as feasibility testing was undertaken. Through the results of this analysis and through brainstorming and discussion, Vulcan’s most feasible brand was identified.

In order to achieve these objectives, Vulcan hired Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Introduction and Scope of Work

DDI looked for existing resources that would create the most economical pathway to developing a “product” that could become THE brand for Vulcan. Which assets have the potential to deliver the greatest return on investment? Every branding effort requires product development, so DDI looked for brand ideas that would leverage current assets. Each promising brand concept – each suggestion received from members of the community – was measured against the DDI feasibility test. Product Development Recommendations A community’s brand is a promise of what people will experience while there. The community must deliver on that promise with the product in place that brings the brand to life. The DDI team generated the product development initiatives that will reinforce and contribute to the growth of the brand.

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Marketing Recommendations DDI then developed recommendations for marketing Vulcan, getting the word out about what Vulcan has to offer. Graphic identify concepts, tag lines and key marketing messages, as well as Internet recommendations, public relations initiatives and advertising possibilities were addressed. The resulting draft Branding, Development and Marketing Action Plan is designed to provide Vulcan with the vision and steps needed to successfully brand the community with its unique theme, to attract visitors and new businesses, engage local residents, increase spending and enable local businesses to prosper, and increase the local tax base, as well as to increase community pride and enjoyment of the city.


The Vision

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Executive Summary

The Vision The Prime Directive: A Plan for Vulcan, Alberta to Live Long and Prosper What is the image that comes to mind when you hear the word Vulcan? If you live in Vulcan and Vulcan County chances are it’s a bittersweet collection of thoughts. On the one hand it’s a peaceful place with good neighbors and caring people, easy to navigate around and blessed with some decent schools, health care and other public services. The setting on the Canadian prairie is serene and beautiful. It’s a great place to raise a family. The downside is the scarcity of jobs and a shortage of retail options for both basic and non-essential goods. There’s little in the way of restaurants, entertainment, and “things to do.” The ranks of vacant store fronts in the downtown core tell a story of a community that is teetering on the edge, where children grow up and leave home to find jobs and never return. The future does not look bright. If you live elsewhere, perhaps in Alberta, British Columbia or Saskatchewan your image of Vulcan is more one dimensional - if you have any image at all. Vulcan to outsiders immediately brings to mind Star Trek, and movies and the TV series with images of technology and space exploration to cultures we can’t even fathom. It is name association by accident. Some also may recall that Vulcan is a small agricultural community on the Canadian prairie but there will be no other distinguishing characteristics beyond Star Trek. 10

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

The reality is Vulcan is a compilation of both sets of images. A town of just under 2,000 people in a large county of less than 4,000 souls in total, it has limited potential for growth outside of its agricultural base. But, the accident of its name provides a huge advantage that sets it apart from all other destinations and offers the possibility of expanded awareness, recognition and growth.

The Vulcan Branding, Development and Marketing Action Plan is built on the promise that Vulcan will become “the most technologically advanced small town in Canada.” The perception, the tie to technology will become a reality. The building process begins now. Each recommendation in the plan supports the brand promise. Once delivered, Vulcan will earn its tagline: All Science. No Fiction.

Call it the “Star Trek effect.” Used correctly it can be the engine that delivers the vision that Vulcan has for its future. In 2011 residents painted this picture of their town in 10 years:

The goals of this effort are:

It’s a town with good jobs that children will want to fill when they grow up and visitors will want to move here for. It has an excellent school system. Its health care facilities and services are among the best in Canada for a town of its size. The environment is clean and green. It is a progressive community that is built on core values of hard work, decency and respect. In fact, it’s the kind of town and lifestyle most people, including investors, would actively consider for their new home. Like it or not, Vulcan is cloaked in the Star Trek image. There is no escape. The “Star Trek effect” ties technology to Vulcan. At present, there is little about Vulcan to back up that tie, that perception. But by bringing the practical application of technology to Vulcan in the home, in education, in health care, through the environment and at work, economic development and jobs will come. Investment will come. Visitors will come.

1. Reposition Vulcan based on its new theme and attract more visitors. 2. Attract new technology businesses and investment The strategy is to position Vulcan as an incubator, a test bed for the development of practical technology applications appropriate for small towns across Canada. Vulcan will be the beta test and demonstration project for all aspects of life in rural communities. Out of Vulcan will emerge the template for rural economic development that will be replicated in small communities from BC to PEI. In the process Vulcan will grow as a center for rural technology research and development. Of course there are pitfalls along the way in utilizing the “Star Trek effect.” For a large percentage of Canadians Star Trek connotes a 1960s and 1970s kind of future that has long been surpassed by the reality of modern technology. Vulcan needs to capitalize on its title as the Official Star Trek Capital of Canada but update that connection by focusing on more recent and future Star Trek films and technology that today’s


Executive Summary

younger market can relate to. That shift in focus will broaden the market for tourism, attracting a younger demographic.

Coming soon - the most technologically advanced small town in Canada. Welcome to Vulcan

Tourism growth is important in and of itself. It will bring more income into the community and that will translate into more and better jobs. But tourism is also the front door to economic development. Today’s tourists become tomorrow’s new residents, investors and business owners. That’s why the experience visitors have when they come to Vulcan is so important. If the promise of the brand is delivered, they will come back, perhaps next time to live, to work and to invest.

The Future is coming to Vulcan. It’s All Science. No Fiction

Stardate 68466.2 Thursday January 01 2015 00:00:00

Vulcan - The Star Trek Capital of Canada

The Future is coming to Vulcan. It’s All Science. No Fiction

Vulcan + Technology + You: Purely Logical Coming Soon

Vulcan + Technology: Purely Logical Coming Soon

Vulcan + You: Purely Logical

Technology in HealthCare: Starts Here Vulcan

Technology at Home: Starts Here Vulcan

Technology at Work: Starts Here Vulcan

Technology in Learning: Starts Here Vulcan

Technology in the Environment: Starts Here Vulcan

The plan addresses key elements of life in the community and how they can be enhanced through technology. It also pays special attention to the visitor experience, whether for business or pleasure. The plan does not downplay Star Trek. To the contrary, it enhances and updates the connection and provides more opportunities for visitors to live the Star Trek experience. The plan divides the branding effort and its messaging into two phases: 1. Repositioning and BridgeBrand effort. In this phase technology is introduced into the new brand promise but delivery of the promise is qualified. The new direction is unveiled but the message clearly indicates that delivery is a work in progress, a goal not yet fully achieved. This phase will be implemented internally and externally in a range of physical and electronic applications, using messages like:

2. Brand Delivery. Phase one (Repositioning and BridgeBrand) will gradually morph into the Brand Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Executive Summary

Delivery phase as more and more products and services are in place that validate the brand promise. Not everything will be implemented when lines like “coming soon,” “the future is coming” and “starts here” disappear but key elements like the Technology Exhibition Centre, the hotels, and the Technology Campus will be operational and the downtown along Centre Street will be transformed. At this point the messages will be:

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Vulcan: the most technologically advanced small town in Canada

Vulcan: All Science. No Fiction

Stardate 68466.2 Thursday January 01 2015 00:00:00 Vulcan: the Future is Now. All Science. No Fiction

Vulcan + Technology + You: Purely Logical

Vulcan + Technology: Purely Logical

Vulcan + You: Purely Logical

Technology in HealthCare Vulcan

Technology at Home Vulcan

Technology at Work Vulcan

Technology in Learning Vulcan

Technology in the Environment Vulcan

In both phases of the branding effort, Vulcan will be referred to as “The Star Trek Capital of Canada.” It is a claim that nobody else can make. Vulcan owns it. In a Nutshell This is an economic development plan that uses tourism as its vehicle. The Star Trek connection is the draw, that unique selling proposition, but in this case the draw also provides the theme for non-tourism economic growth - technology. And not just any technology, but technology that focuses on practical applications for small rural communities. It is a unique competitive position. In the pages that follow more than 30 tangible product and marketing recommendations are listed. Each plays a part in building and delivering the new brand promise over the next three to five years. Happy Reading!


Executive Summary

The Rules of Branding To compete and stand out from other places, towns must be known for something specific –something that differentiates them from everyone else. That one thing that puts them on the map and entices people to visit, move there, or establish a business there. These are the rules used in developing the Branding, Development and Marketing Action Plan for Vulcan. 1. Logos and Slogans Logos and slogan are not brands. They are marketing messages used to support and reinforce the brand. They are a “brand mark” –not the brand. They make up 2% of a brand, yet get 98% of the attention. 2. Perceptions A brand is a perception. It’s what people think of your community, not what you say you are. 3. Public Relations You build your brand using public relations. Advertising is used to maintain your “ownership” position. Brands are built through word of mouth, what people read about you or see on the news. These perceptions may not be accurate, or fair, but they are indeed your brand. Often branding requires a “rebranding” or “repositioning effort.” 4. Ownership Brands are about ownership. With any brand, you need to drive your stake in the ground telling the world that you own it. 5. Product Brands are built on product, not just marketing.

6. Promise A brand is a promise. That you will live up to the perception we have of you. That your community will fulfill our expectations. When we get there, what we envisioned must, in fact, be the reality. 7. Singularity You cannot be all things to all people and win. Period. If your slogan can apply to anyone, anywhere, then toss it. In this age of specialization you must jettison the generic. You must promote that one thing that sets you apart from everyone else. 8. Feasibility You build your brand on feasibility. Which one of dozens of brand direction ideas will accomplish your goal? A focus on feasibility enables you to cut through the haze – and the politics. 9. Public Consent You cannot do branding by public consent. Ever. You will always end up with a watered down, generic, feel-good logo and slogan – the “something for everyone” all-things-to-all-people mediocre and ultimately failed branding attempt. This is why you build your brand on feasibility – which brand idea will result in importing the most cash (increasing the tax base) into the community? 10. Top Down You cannot win with a top-down approach. Brands are about being known for something specific. You will never get everyone to agree

since the focus must be narrow. The business community and its organization must take the lead and come to the city for help. Elected officials can’t be in charge because they were elected to be all things to all people and brands are not something for everyone. 11. Focus Groups You never, ever use focus groups. This is branding by public consent. 12. Foundation The most successful branding efforts are based on a foundation already found in the community. This can include a great school system, recreational facilities (different or better than what can be found elsewhere in the market), culture, heritage, food and a host other things. 13. Killers There are only three killers of any branding effort: 1. Local Politics. This is a problem with membership organization as well as your elected officials who are elected to be all things to all people. Brands aren’t. This is why brands start as grassroots efforts, championed by the business community. 2. Lack of Champions. Every single successful branding effort, whether public or private, must have champions, and/or “pioneers” – those who will take some hits along the way, but will tirelessly champion the cause. A brand without champions will die.

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Executive Summary

3. Lack of Money. This includes both public and private investment. Brands are built on private investment far more than public funds. If you can get elected officials to understand they are there to support the brand where appropriate, and if the business community will champion the cause, and if private industry will invest in it, you will succeed.

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


The Brand Promise

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Brand Promise

The Brand Promise Concept Branding is a perception people have of you, your business, your product or your community. More important, it is a promise that you are what people perceive you to be. You must deliver on the promise if your brand is to have credibility. When people mention Vulcan, what is the first thing that comes to mind? What are their perceptions? What is the feeling they have when they hear the name of your community? The branding portion of the Vulcan Branding, Development & Marketing Action Plan is built around creating a unique and truthful view of Vulcan; unique so that it stands out among destinations in Alberta and rural Canada, and truthful in delivering on the brand promise. It is important to note that a brand must be earned. You must deliver on the promise. The recommendations in this plan have been carefully developed to reinforce the primary brand message and outline the tasks needed over the next five to seven years to deliver on that message.

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Brand Promise

Vulcan Brand Promise Visioning Statement for the Future: For people who treasure a lovely small town community that combines rural values, good neighbors and the beauty of the Canadian prairie with a passion for technology befitting its title as the Official Star Trek Capital of Canada, Vulcan has emerged as the most technologically advanced small town in Canada by embracing the practical uses of technology in everyday life and serving as a test bed for technology in research, innovation, education, business incubation and the development of new applications that have special value to hundreds of small communities across Canada. The small town family lifestyle is ideal for those wishing to exercise their creativity and ingenuity in the pursuit and development of practical technology far from the distractions and pressures of city life.

Vulcan’s Brand Promise – Short Version Vulcan, the most technologically advanced small town in Canada with an easy going rural community lifestyle is ideally suited for innovators, entrepreneurs and families free from the distractions and pressures of the city.

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

The Vulcan Logos Economic Development Logo

Quality of Life/Town of Vulcan

Tourism (closing tagline)

Alternate Vulcan “Bug” Logo Tourism’s closing tagline “Resistance is Futile!” illustrates the futility of resisting the Town of Vulcan’s appeal. It is a “must visit” destination for Star Trek fans and all those interested in science and technology and their impact on our future lives.

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan Business Development Society Logos Positive 4-Color Logo

Reverse 4-Color Logo

1-Color Logo

Starfleet Academy Logo

Logos may also appear without the tagline taglines are optional.

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan Marketing Concepts

The new science of agriculture.

Sector Level: 5

Vector Base: Alpha

Power Level: 6.83 >

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Helping you live long, so you can prosper.

OLD WORLD: MEET BRAVE NEW WORLD

TECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE

For anyone thinking agriculture is old school, guess again. Perhaps its time you paid a visit to Vulcan, Alberta where you’ll see the flip side of farm machinery and crop fields. This is the place where new technologies are developed, tested, and put to use in one of Canada’s largest industries. Learn more at www.AllScienceNoFiction.com.

Doctor’s, medical facilities managers, and medical industry suppliers are flocking to little Vulcan, Alberta. Why? For some it may be because this town is the official Star Trek Capital of Canada. But for most it’s because they want to see, first hand, brand new state-of-the-art medical tools, techniques, and technologies being developed and used in a small rural-hospital environment. Being on the cutting edge has made Vulcan the most technologically advanced small town in Canada.

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca

Sector Level: 5 Power Level: 6.83 >

Vector Base: Alpha

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca


The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan Marketing Concepts

Our technology is out of this world.

THE CANADARM2 ROBOTIC ARM You don’t have to go beyond Alberta’s borders to see incredible space technology put into real-world situations. And if you’d like to see it in person, just pay a visit to Vulcan’s Technology Centre where you can see prototypes of the Robotic Arm AND as well as a life-sized Klingon Bird of Prey. Just an hour from Calgary you’ll witness, first hand, the latest in space technology. Prepare to be assimilated. Sector Level: 5 Power Level: 4.371 >

Vector Base: Alpha

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan Marketing Concepts

We view education a little differently here.

TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION Located in the official Star Trek Capital of Canada, just an hour from Calgary, you’ll find the most technologically advanced small town in Canada. And that technology starts in pre-school and plays a tremendous role in developing extraordinary young talent using the latest in technology: digital books, tests, and interactive games, video SmartBoard’s and hands-on Kinetic educational experiences. Come see for yourself. Sector Level: 5 Power Level: 4.371 >

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Vector Base: Alpha

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca


The Vulcan Brand

Vulcan Marketing Concepts

Our agricultural ideas are changing the world.

BIO AND ALTERNATIVE ENERGY Just an hour from Calgary, you’ll find the most technologically advanced small town in Canada. This is where you can plug your electric car into one of the town’s free charging stations, grab a cup of coffee at an outdoor café and hop onto the town’s incredibly fast fibre network, on your way to that high-definition video conference call to Bejing. This is the place bio and alternative energy sources are developed, taught, and put to use. Sector Level: 5 Power Level: 4.371 >

Vector Base: Alpha

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The TheVulcan VulcanBrand Brand

Vulcan Marketing Concepts

Home is where the techology is.

THE HOME OF THE FUTURE Transport yourself to Vulcan, just an hour from Calgary, and into the model home of the future. Here you’ll see how you can reduce your carbon footprint to near zero, will see astounding new technologies – most not even in production yet – and the very latest in technologies: in water usage, space-age appliances, incredible home furnishings, and windows that need no blinds yet can block out all the light whenever you need some shut eye. Sector Level: 5 Power Level: 4.371 >

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Vector Base: Alpha

Diagnosis Filter: X2-5166

Vulcan Business Development Society Website:

www.vulcanbusiness.ca


The Vulcan Brand

Bridge-Brand Concepts Tourism Bridge Poster Tourism Bridge Ad

STARDATE: 68447.3 RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Set course for

Vulcan, Alberta THE OFFICIAL

STAR TREK CAPITAL OF CANADA • See Leonard Nimoy's adopted Vulcan home town and his incredible art • Witness, first hand, emerging technologies coming from Vulcan • Purchase official Star Trek merchandise • Take your photo with a dozen Star Trek icons and murals • Drink Romulan Ale and sample out-of-this-world cuisine • Get tips on how YOU can live long and prosper • Witness the future of home, health, education and the environment • Walk through sets and props used in the Star Trek series and films • Learn key phrases in Klingon and use them around town • Visit the Walk of Star Trek Stars • Visit with in-character aliens from throughout space

ALL SCIENCE. NO FICTION. The prime directive is changing in Vulcan. Between right now and Stardate 68447.3 [Thursday January 1 2015 00:00:01] you will

RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

see Vulcan transported into the future as the most technologically advanced small town in Canada. This is the place where new ideas and technologies are discovered, fostered and developed for home, health, education,

JUST ONE HOUR SOUTH OF CALGARY.

jobs, and the environment - all with a single goal in mind: to help you live long and prosper. It’s logical that this would only

www.StarTrekCapital.com

take place in the official Star Trek Capital of Canada: Vulcan, Alberta. Resistance is futile.

STARDATE68447.COM

TM & © 2011 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related markes and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved TM & © 2011 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related markes and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

Brochure Concepts

12

Bookmark Concepts

ACTIVITIES GUIDE FOR VULCAN, ALBERTA Sector Level: ED-108.67 | Delta Screen

www.visitvulcan.ca

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


The Vulcan Brand

no fiction.

all science.

STARDATE 68447.COM

live long & prosper

Pole Banner Concepts

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

Website Concept/Economic Development

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


The Vulcan Brand

Retail Blade Sign Concepts

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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The Vulcan Brand

Business Paper Concepts

Vulcan Tourism Box 360 Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0 403-599-3883 www.vulcan.ab.ca

Vulcan Tourism Box 360 Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0 403-599-3883 www.vulcan.ab.ca

Deborah A. Wilson Administrator email@vulcan.ab.ca

Box 360 | Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0 | 403-599-3883 | www.visitvulcan.ab.ca

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Benefits of Tourism Alberta

Benefits of Tourism When people think of tourism, they often think of trips to popular and iconic destinations – Disney Parks, the Grand Canyon, trips to the Capital. But communities of all sizes can benefit from enhancing their tourism industry. A concerted effort to attract visitors benefits not only the businesses directly involved, but the community as a whole. Tourism brings in more cash, creates jobs and is the front door to all your economic development activities, as well as enhancing a sense of community pride. Tourism is an import industry. Visitors come and spend money, bringing new cash into the community. The goal of every business, and every community, is to bring in more cash than goes out. Tourism helps achieve this positive cash flow for local businesses and the community as a whole. The majority of tourism related businesses are small, and often family owned, providing numerous opportunities for entrepreneurs as well as jobs for young people and other entry-level workers. Tourism not only creates jobs that are directly the result of visitors, but visitors also create more demand for goods produced in the community, such as food, fuel, clothing, and other products. The additional staffing needed to meet these needs also creates demand for more jobs for residents in all areas of the local economy. Tourism can literally save a community from becoming a ghost town. There are more ghost towns in the making today than there were 100, even 200 years ago. Communities were once built on the basis of a natural resource or transportation hub. Those

days are over. Many communities are losing their core industries and looking to diversify in order to survive. Tourism can help. Visitors bring in much needed cash from outside the community and can help bolster the local economy. Tourism is the front door to all your economic development activities. Anyone wanting to move, relocate or open a business, or invest in your community will come calling as a visitor first. Their impression of your community will either open the door to the possibility of investing in your community, or slam it shut. There are also intangibles, things that don’t show up on a balance sheet, but often have a more profound impact on the community. Once a community sets its sights on attracting more visitors, the place naturally becomes more appealing to local residents. Beautification efforts, new attractions and better amenities don’t just benefit visitors. Development and community improvement creates a community people are invested in, a place where locals want to spend time. The community looks better, it has more to offer, and the first people to trickle back in will be the people who already live there. The sense of community pride that develops may not be measurable, but it will be substantial and make an extraordinary difference in the health and vitality of the community. Vibrant, exciting communities, where locals want to hang out, are exactly the type of place visitors want to spend time in as well. The benefits of tourism are far reaching, touching not just travel businesses, but the community as a whole.

A community focused on attracting visitors will become a place locals love, brimming with activity and vibrancy. Tourism brings in more cash, helps both travel related and ancillary businesses, and opens the door to further economic development. Improvement and investment compound, creating community pride, opportunity, and a place that entices both visitors and the locals who are its lifeblood. Examples: Coos County, New Hampshire Coos County, located in the northern reaches of New Hampshire, is known for a shrinking timber industry and the shutting down of several of its key factories. As many residents were losing their jobs, Coos County retained DDI to develop a focus to help revitalize the communities in the region. With three of only five remaining Grand Resorts in New England, DDI recommended the county become the Land of Grand Resorts, and Grand Adventure. Spectacular mountain vistas, crystalline lakes, grand adventures unlike anywhere else, along with the elegant Grand Resorts provide visitors a place of ease and modern comfort after a day in the great outdoors. The area already possesses the groundwork for the brand. DDI’s recommendations concentrated on enhancing the visitor experience and bringing the focus to life. A comprehensive wayfinding system, downtown beautification and enhancements, and grand adventure packages will be developed to create a first class visitor experience. Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Benefits of Tourism Alberta

After recently beginning implementation of the plan, Coos County is already seeing results. They have seen a more than 50% increase in hotel rooms and meals sales in 2010 as compared with 2008, while the rest of New Hampshire has seen an increase of less than 15%. Chautauqua County, New York Chautauqua County is located in western New York State about an hour and a half southeast of Buffalo in a largely rural area. Based on the famous Chautauqua Institution, they are working to develop their brand as “The World’s Learning Center.” Each community is providing learning opportunities and people from throughout the Northeast can sign up for classes that range from downhill ski school, to golf camps, to culinary classes, interior design, rowing, quilting, set and costume design, and the list goes on. Dunkirk, on the shores of Lake Erie has a company offering classes in blue water sailing. Most of the learning opportunities are produced by local professionals and businesses. Virtually all of the educational classes are hands on experiences. They are in the second year of developing the program so DDI doesn’t have hard numbers, but according to local officials it has really put the area on the map and their increase in tourism spending is far outpacing the rest of the state. Ashland, Oregon A town of 22,000 residents in southern Oregon, Ashland is 300 miles from its two major markets of 34

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Sacramento to the south and Portland to the north. The town is home to the famous Oregon Shakespeare Festival, which produces 11 productions a year - less than half are Shakespeare - and the season runs nine months of the year, six days a week. A full 97% of the 2,200 seats (in three theaters) are sold out. The town receives approximately 460,000 visitors a year but the average stay is four nights. THAT is successful tourism. Additionally, more than 80% return every year or every other year since the productions change. Guests can also take back stage tours, work in costume shops, etc. It’s so successful that the festival budget is $75 million a year and employs 500 people - more than 350 are full time year round. Eighty-eight percent of the attendees are coming from 300 miles or further away. Downtown has 100% occupancy with a waiting list. This is an incredible success story about a former timber town that lost much of its core industry.

more events than any other hobby organization in the U.S., and they also have an extraordinarily high per-capita spending ratio - meaning they spend a lot of money as they travel around with their horses. In Washington, equestrian folks host more than 440 events a year. It’s a year round industry and creates a whole host of business opportunities: boarding, grooming, veterinary medicine, saddle shops, feed and supplies, leather shops, western wear, etc. The city will be adding to the mix all kinds of learning opportunities like calf roping, trail riding, and college students come out to learn - first hand - how to host and produce events while learning about the equine industry. While this is not “interactive” from a true visitors perspective, it is interactive for every person who comes into town with their horse (or horses) in tow.

DDI is now working with El Dorado, Arkansas, a town of 20,000 in south central Arkansas, which is in the process of raising $40 million (90% private) to duplicate the Ashland, Oregon brand - but doing it in one fell swoop as opposed to taking decades to develop. They are in the first phases of putting it all together.

St. Albert, Alberta

Enumclaw, Washington As “Washington’s Equestrian Capital,” Enumclaw, a town of 20,000 located at the base of Mt. Rainier about an hour and a half from Seattle, is in the process of converting the King County Fairgrounds into a major equestrian park. The equine industry hosts

A bedroom community of 60,000 residents just 20 minutes from Edmonton, St. Albert has become the province’s “Botanic arts city.” In just one year they have seen incredible response to their brand with visitors coming from Calgary (3.5 hours south) to spend time in this city, which really had little in the way of tourism prior to this effort. Leveraging the fame of the now deceased Lois Hole, a famous gardener in western Canada, her children have carried on her legacy, and because St. Albert tapped into gardening as a brand focus, the family spent an estimated $130 million and created The Enjoy Centre - the biggest outdoor living center and nursery in Canada. The Enjoy Centre is a year round facility that includes dozens of classes,


Benefits of Tourism Alberta

several restaurants, and is home to a healthy and green living focus. It hosts dozens of events on a year round basis. Virtually every local organization has tapped into the brand, new businesses are popping up in St. Albert around the brand. Their farmers market is one of the biggest in the region and is an incredible draw - restaurant chefs pick produce and goods from the market each day (wearing the chef’s hat) for that evening’s menu. The town is beginning to host all kinds of events around the “Cultivate Life” theme - Cultivate the Chef in You; Cultivate the Athlete in You; Cultivate the Musician in You. Very successful, and just in the beginning stages.

and business leaders make the pilgrimage to Jonesborough for the story telling experience. Even retail shops bring in story tellers to pull visitors inside, making the experience fun and engaging.

Jonesborough, Tennessee Located in Northeastern Tennessee, this town of 5,000 residents (and the oldest town in Tennessee) had challenges achieving any success with “the oldest town” brand because it’s static. With a few great champions on board, the town has become the “The World’s Storytelling Capital.” Home to the best event we at DDI have ever attended, the National Story Telling Festival, which draws 10,000 people from all around the world, the town has really embraced this brand direction. An $11 million International Storytelling Center was developed and includes an intimate 90 seat theater where you can hear story tellers daily during the summer months. They have storytellers throughout downtown during the peak seasons, and now groups are coming to Jonesborough to learn the art of story telling: religious, fraternal, and government folks, educators

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Action Plan Steps

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

37


Recommendations

Recommendation #1 Develop a strong brand leadership team

The success of this branding plan effort depends on the passion and commitment of the Brand Leadership Team. They MUST be 100% enthusiastically behind the brand. Without champions no branding effort can succeed. We’ve said over and over that there are only three killers of this type of endeavor: i. Local Politics ii. Lack of Champions iii. Lack of Money In truth, if you have great champions, they will fight through the politics and will find the money. Always. And nearly every successful effort started with no money, but great passion. Many rural communities in Alberta have become outstanding destinations because they had great champions. Think Canmore’s new Multiplex now under construction, Vermilion’s Regional Centre, Drumheller’s Royal Tyrell Museum. Even attractions such as the Head Smashed In Buffalo Jump started because of a very small group of champions. The BLT should include no more than 13 individuals. The bigger the group, the less likely you’ll be to actually get things done. We recommend that the BLT include representatives from the hospital, schools, economic development, the chamber of commerce, the county, downtown property owners and businesses, the town of Vulcan, tech. businesses, Digital Alberta, provincial organizations, and a local resident interested in working hard to develop the brand, providing that the people fit the qualifications and requirements (below). 38

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Here are the responsibilities of the BLT members: 1. They must be doers, not just directors. This means they should be willing to commit two hours a week to making things happen – actually getting their hands dirty. This goes beyond just attending meetings. 2. They must be enthusiastic about the brand direction. They need to be 100% supportive of the brand direction and be willing to champion the cause. They are the voice and champions for the brand. 3. They should be good public speakers. Each BLT member should do at least two public speaking engagements a year. Their job is to “sell” the brand to the community, generating buy-in and enthusiasm for the direction. They need to be able to empower people to join in the branding effort. 4. They need to be generally well thought-of or respected in the community and cannot be politically divisive. 5. They should have credibility among other stakeholder organizations and the public. 6. They must be willing to take a few “hits” along the way. Not everyone in the community will be supportive of the brand direction, so the BLT members need to acknowledge that you cannot do branding by public consent – you will never get everyone to agree on a brand, unless it is so generic that it is ineffective as a brand.

7. They are also the “brand police” or “brand cops.” This means they protect the brand and its graphics from unauthorized use, and approve marketing materials where the brand tag line and graphics are being used. They provide approvals based on each use. When other organizations create marketing materials, there should be continuity so that all Vulcan marketing fits within the brand. These organizations would submit draft marketing materials to the BLT for review and feedback and approvals. 8. They are also the steering committee for future brand-related consulting services, working with the town, county and other organizations. 9. They are charged with implementing this plan and keeping it on track. Yes, they will push assignments given to various organizations to make sure things are, in fact, happening. 10. Their primary function is to get as many people and organizations on the same page and pulling in the same direction. If they can do this, the entire process becomes fun. Then peer pressure keeps the effort moving forward. 11. At least half of the BLT members should be represent the private sector. Of those, at least half should be downtown property owners, not just tenants. Property owners are crucial to helping the effort succeed. While the recommendation calls for no more than 13 members, this is not a hard fast rule. Just remember


Recommendations

that the larger the committee, the harder it is to cutto-the-chase to make things happen. But even if the committee has more than13 members, this does not mean other champions can’t be involved, attend meetings, provide input and ideas, etc. In fact, we want lots of enthusiasm and participation. When it comes to voting on specific projects, or selecting vendors for upcoming projects, or approving brand-specific graphic design and marketing materials, this should be relegated to the official members of the BLT. The BLT’s role in the success of Vulcan’s brand cannot be overstated. Therefore, establishment of some rules for the organization are essential. Some ground rules might include: • Number and frequency of meetings. The BLT would meet every two weeks for the remainder of 2011 and during winter and spring of 2012. During summer of 2012 they should meet monthly and then a minimum of once a month through 2013. • Assignments: – One person should take minutes and act as the BLT’s Secretary. – One should organize and remind members of meeting times and dates. – Another should be charged with setting up the speaking engagement calendar. Coming up with a list of organizations, then contacting

them with times during the year they’d like to see what’s happening. This person would hand out assignments to fellow members, such as which event they would individually speak at. – A BLT member should be charged with the PowerPoint and graphics so that everyone is “singing from the same hymnal.” Having a unified message is very important. – One should work with the City or other funding organizations to set up times to review proposals, requests for qualifications, and to set up meetings for interviews or the selection process. – The “BLT Chief of Police” should be the lead “Brand Cop” gathering marketing pieces created by partnering organizations and materials generated using a brand style guide, and then presenting them to the BLT for approval. • Should a BLT member not make at least 60% of the meetings and not play an active role in the brand development process, they should be replaced by a new champion who will be an active participant. • Generally, BLT members would serve for two years, and then among themselves, would invite new members to come in as needed. So the entire BLT is not changed over at the two-year mark, there will be some natural attrition. What you don’t want is the BLT to think at the two-year mark they

are done. This could result in the disbandment of the BLT. So the two-year rule is simply a general rule. Some champions would stay for the long haul and as long as the enthusiasm doesn’t wane, bring them on! With a strong implementation program, once the brand starts moving and projects reach fruition, it will take on a life of its own and gain its own head of steam. Generally, the idea is to have the BLT work itself out of a job after five years. Once again, this is not a steadfast rule, but at some point, perhaps, another organization will take on the role of brand cop, another take on product development, and another will take on specific assignments. It’s important to point out that branding is never done. You cannot rest on your laurels. If you are the best, people will be gunning for you. A good example is Napa Valley, California. How many wine regions, in California alone, are trying to topple Napa as the wine capital? Even Disneyland, with all its success, didn’t stop development – they spent a fortune developing California Adventure and now it is being redeveloped once again. Winners can never rest on their laurels, so this is not something you start and then walk away from. There will always be a need for brand cops, messaging, and promotion. COST: None TIMELINE: December 2011 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Development Committee Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

39


Recommendations

Recommendation #2 Create a PDF package showing the brand direction and submit to CBS for approval of Star Trek Brand Graphics

This “sales effort” is SO important that we recommend someone physically make the trip to CBS and pitch the brand and the use of the brand graphics. Having been in this industry for nearly 30 years, and having worked with major corporate sponsors on projects such as this, we recognize that nothing can replace a one-on-one presentation and meeting. Otherwise you’re likely to receive a flat agreement or rejection without an opportunity for compromise. We recommend that you do NOT send them the plan. They have no interest in reading through a 200-page plan. This is why an in-person visit is imperative. Follow up with phone call explaining the brand and the product that backs it up. Get permission to use key phrases:

2. “Resistance is Futile” to attract visitors (making Vulcan irresistible) 3. “Live Long and Prosper” for quality of life COST: None (DDI already did this) TIMELINE: January 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

40

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

erta

lb Vulcan, A

1. “All Science. No Fiction” for economic development purposes

r 2011

Septembe

pts

gn Conce

g & Desi

d Brandin Propose


Recommendations

Recommendation #3 Create a Town of Vulcan-specific Brand Standards and Practices Manual or Style Guide

This would be far more in depth than the Countywide Style Guide and will incorporate all the requirements that come from meetings with CBS, including their approval process. The Brand Style Guide will contain graphic design standards for logo identity and slogan use. Continuity and consistency are critical when developing a strong branding program that can create top-of-mind awareness. The logo and branding design should give the community an easily recognizable identity – a symbol and message that represents the community and the experiences it has to offer. Whenever the logo is used, it should bring to mind images of enjoying that community. Repetition helps reinforce the viewer’s perception, but consistency is the only way to ensure logo and brand recognition. That is why the Style Guide is a detailed document, providing specific instructions on how to use the graphics.

The BLT will be responsible for overseeing proper use of the graphic identity. The Style Guide will provide the official guidance for how to use Vulcan’s graphic identity. This would be used by every local organization including the hospital, school district, Town of Vulcan, Vulcan County, VBDS, Chamber of Commerce, and Vulcan Tourism. All materials, once designed, would be approved by the Brand Leadership Team to make sure partnering organizations are adhering to the Manual. COST: $15,000 TIMELINE: As soon as approvals are secured by CBS. The Style Guide would be presented to them for approval before being put into use locally. TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Leadership Team working with Vulcan Business Development Society.

In addition to proper use of the graphic identities, examples of wrong usage of the logo need to be defined. Combining the logo with other logos or branding elements should not be permitted.

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

41


Recommendations

Recommendation #4 Spread the word The Brand Leadership Team should set up a schedule of speaking engagements to showcase what Vulcan is going to accomplish. This should include both local organizations and provincial, national partners, possible sponsors, and funding agencies:

The goal is to tell everyone you know that Vulcan is taking this brand direction to an entirely new level in every sense of the word. This will also include CBS and would be something they can get behind, be proud of and support.

Local:

Develop a list of the organizations you’d like to present the plan to. Don’t think small or local! The goal is to make Vulcan worth the investment or special trip from anywhere in Canada – and beyond. Think of ANYONE and everyone who can become sponsors, funding sources, or developers (like hotels).

• School board, hospital board, Rotary, Kiwanis and other local auxiliary organizations. You need everyone possible on board. • Town of Vulcan, Vulcan County, regional economic development and tourism agencies. • Travel Alberta, other provincial agencies and organizations, regional (Western Canada) agencies. Provincial & national: • Federal and provincial organizations – government agencies, non-profit organizations with a focus on new jobs and technology, universities (they can also play a role), tourism agencies, economic development conferences and agencies, corporations (like the company that made the robotic arm for the International Space Station, the company in Alberta that makes the SmartBoards, etc.) All of these folks might contribute time, expertise, money or products to the cause.

42

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Then set up times to speak to them. Pass out assignments. Whoever does this MUST be ultraenthusiastic and a true sales professional. If you need to, contract with an outsider to carry this message. You have ONE chance to make a good first impression and to close the sale. COST: $3,500 for the year to cover hotel stays, meals, transportation TIMELINE: 2012, 2013. The first engagements can take place as soon as March or April of 2012. TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Leadership Team with funding from a grant? Vulcan Business Development Society? Town of Vulcan?


Recommendations

Recommendation #5 Develop the Downtown Master Development Plan

As soon as funding is available, issue an RFQ for professional urban planning expertise for a Downtown Master Development Plan. The downtown development plan is a conceptual plan produced by a professional urban planning team that shows what downtown Vulcan will look like in 10 and then perhaps 20 years. The plan would focus on Centre Street, from Highway 23 to 4th Avenue North, as the initial “showcase” district. The plan would also designate substantial acreage in the county that would be pre-zoned for the development of technology-focused research and development interests including a possible Technology Campus that over time could become a campus of likeminded businesses.

Façade improvements along Centre Street’s two core blocks.

A clearly defined gateway into downtown close to the railroad tracks.

Other gateways into downtown.

Site for a model home of the future.

Repurposing of the existing Trek Center

Pedestrian access from Highway 23 into and throughout the downtown core.

• Street and façade lighting. • Connections between these facilities and downtown (pedestrian-friendly)

• Parking areas • Improvements to downtown (sidewalk dining, façade improvements) • A major amphitheater accommodating 1,500 people. It should have a shade covering that can be removed during the winter months (see photographic examples). COST: $30,000 to $40,000 TIMELINE: January, 2012 (or as soon as funding is available; to be completed by June of 2012) TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Town of Vulcan

Key component parts of the downtown development plan would include: •

The location of two hotels west of Highway 23 and adjacent to the downtown core area, indicating pedestrian access to other properties in the “showcase” district.

The location of a large scale indoor exhibition centre with outdoor display/exhibit space for agriculture and large-scale tech shows. One of the hotels should be a conference-quality hotel adjacent to the exhibit centre.

The location of a Technology Campus for new small technology businesses and demonstration projects. Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #6 Develop and encourage downtown outdoor dining along Centre Street Develop portable decking for outdoor dining along Centre Street during the warm weather months, taking the place of the parking space immediately in front of dining establishments. Portable decking with tables, chairs, umbrellas and planters provides a great place to gather and spend time together. Whether it’s for coffee, dining or a glass of wine, this space provides critical outdoor “third places” for people in their 20s, 30s and 40s. “Third places” are where this generation goes after work and home to socialize. Portable decking would enhance the ambiance and livability of the entire downtown area and attract visitors and residents to shop as well as sit on the deck and people watch. Restaurants and cafes would put the portable wooden decking in place at the onset of warm weather and leave it up until the cold weather arrives in the fall. There is currently ample parking within one to two blocks of Centre Street so the seasonal loss of spaces immediately in front of participating restaurants and establishments will not be a deterrent to patrons. On the contrary, the availability of decking should be a significant draw. An excellent case history of how portable outdoor dining works can be found in Nelson, BC. Suggestion: Develop a new themed restaurant - 10 Forward from Star Trek – Next Generation. Work with university students for the design and fabrication of displays, lighting, tables, chairs, and general layout. Work with mural artists to create trompe l’oeil murals on the walls using scenes shot in 10 Forward as models (available on DVD). 44

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Here are shown a few examples of outdoor dining. During the season, these create natural gathering places. Note that they don’t have to be expensive, or expansive. The top right two photos were taken in Barrie, Ontario where the dining took up the sidewalk, so walkways were created to route pedestrian traffic around the dining area. Consider doing the same in Vulcan. The bottom right photo and top left photo on the opposite page were taken in Canmore, . The examples on the opposite page, clockwise: Nelson, British Columbia, Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Decks are stored during the winter months.


Recommendations

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #7

Recommendation #8

Option the property for the proposed exhibition centre/hotel development location

Hire graphic design expertise

Work with a commercial real estate professional to “option” the property for the location to develop the exhibition centre and first hotel, which should be adjacent. This will hold the price firm. Option it through 2012 with a right of first refusal (120 days).

The highest quality, professional appearance of Vulcan graphics must be top priority. All the graphics must be what CBS would LOVE to have their name attached to. They must be professional, modern, and elegant. This is critical to convincingly portray the Star Trek brand and the science and technology theme – anything less and the image falls flat. It is very important for Vulcan to hire high quality, professional graphic design expertise to produce all the graphics for the branding effort. While of course, there is talent in Vulcan, the importance of hiring the most professional expertise must outweigh the desire to hire locally. The previous examples of graphic materials from past efforts produced in Vulcan were not quite the quality needed for this effort – review the “before and after” concepts included in this plan.

COST: None TIMELINE: by June of 2012 or as soon as a preferable site has been identified. The longer you wait, or as the word gets out, the higher the property cost will be. TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Town of Vulcan or Vulcan Business Development Society (VBDS)

Brands are built on first impressions. This company – or person – needs to have world-class credentials, not someone who just knows how to use Adobe InDesign. Those first impressions will almost always be visual: ads, social media, billboards, marketing materials, and website. Whoever you hire should be producing all of the graphics for the Town, the County, hospital, schools, tourism and economic development. Continuity is critical to any branding effort. Hire the very best, then negotiate the fee with them. It can be on a flat-fee basis, on a monthly retainer, or on an hourly basis. Our recommendation is a monthly retainer based on a flat fee. 46

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Their responsibilities will include: • Design of pole banners, print ads, brochures, brand posters, bookmarks, fliers, and marketing pieces used to recruit vendors, suppliers, sponsors for the Exhibition Centre, model home, and hotel developers • Work with CBS on approvals • Work with local businesses and offer classes for them to make sure they also “raise the bar” creating a contemporary look to their marketing efforts • Create all the marketing materials for Vulcan Business Development Society, Vulcan Tourism, Chamber of Commerce, Vulcan County, the Hospital, School District, etc. COST: Plan on $60,000 for 2012 or $5,000 a month. This should be a partnership effort. Perhaps Vulcan Tourism would pitch in $10,000 a year ($800 a month), VBDS $15,000 per year, the Town of Vulcan $6,000 a year ($500 a month), etc. There will be tremendous savings in a “bulk buy” situation like this. AND you will have the continuity needed to successfully implement the brand. TIMELINE: January 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Leadership Team


Recommendations

Recommendation #9 The BridgeBrand and poster

The Brand Promise for Vulcan cannot be delivered overnight. It could take as much as twenty years for the brand promise to be fully realized through full development of the all the recommendations in this plan. Product takes time to grow. However, it won’t take nearly that many years before Vulcan will deliver on the promise to a great enough degree for it to be credible. The promise states: Vulcan, the most technologically advanced small town in Canada, with an easy going rural community lifestyle, is ideally suited for innovators, entrepreneurs and families, free from the distractions and pressures of the city. The tag line that supports that promise is: All Science. No Fiction. In the interim a BidgeBrand will be needed to bridge the gap between the present and Vulcan’s as-yet undelivered promise for the future. The BridgeBrand communicates the direction in which Vulcan is moving without suggesting that the final promise has already been achieved. Communication during the transitional period requires messaging that indicates direction and movement but doesn’t over-promise results. Recommended messages and how they could be used include: 1. Overall BridgeBrand message: The future is coming to Vulcan. It’s All Science. No Fiction. This

– A third qualifier that indicates process rather than completion would be the use of ads, collateral materials and pole banners around town that highlight the five pillars around which the brand is being crafted. The qualifier (starts here) implies activity that is not yet complete.

would be used as a lead for print and electronic promotion to attract business investment and as a tag line in other applications. Where appropriate, as with Star Trek events and audiences, the following also could be added to indicate when the promised “future” for Vulcan will actually arrive:

Stardate 68466.2 Thursday January 01, 2015 00:00:00.

2. BridgeBrand Iteration: Vulcan + You = Simply Logical. This BridgeBrand iteration does not directly speak to the future vision (technology) for Vulcan but it implies a partnership that is ongoing. It would always be used in conjunction with other messages that indicate that achieving the vision is a work in progress. For example: – With the development of new projects such as hotels, additional retail, a public/private Exhibition Centre, the Model Home of the Future, and showcasing new products, the BridgeBrand would be featured prominently in promotion and communication, but the new project could be positioned with the qualifier - Coming soon. This qualifier would be especially effective if portrayed as movie trailers and on posters in a movie format. – A second more general qualifier would be to refer to Vulcan in copy as … “the up and coming most technologically advanced small town in Canada.” This clearly indicates a work in progress.

• Technology in Health - starts here

• Technology at Home - starts here

• Technology at Work – starts here

• Innovation in Learning – starts here

• Environmental Innovation – starts here

Each ad, collateral or pole banner could showcase one or all five of the pillars. Under the BridgeBrand, businesses and entities that fit under one of the pillars should be heavily promoted, so long as they deliver on the promise of changing the world around them. One of the first graphic design assignments will be the creation, printing, framing and placement of the BridgeBrand poster showcasing “Stardate: 68447.3,” which is January 1, 2013. This is a teaser that should be placed throughout Vulcan and even in other offices (think Travel Alberta) to let people know that a major change is underway in Vulcan. The poster will build anticipation and educate local residents about what’s coming: the new “Prime Directive.” Once designed, print 300 of them, mount 50 of them on foam core, add a matte around each, and have them framed. They must be first-class quality, Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

STARDATE: 68447.3 RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

and they will become a collector’s item. Have them hung in the county offices, town hall, library, local restaurants, the school, hospital and other frequent high-traffic areas (post office, etc.) Then hand-deliver and hang ten or so in provincial offices and areas outside of Vulcan to help spread the word. Frame additional posters on an as-needed basis. You can also sell 200 of them as a “Collector’s Series” which will recoup the printing and framing costs. The posters should be 24” x 38” in size – a standard poster size. Be sure you send several to CBS to hang in their offices. COST: $2,000 including printing, mounting, framing of 50, printing of 250. This cost can be offset by sales of 200 posters at $15 each for a total of $3,000 in revenues. Actual bid including shipping: $872 for 250 posters from www.gotprint.com. This could generate a couple of thousand dollars in revenues.

ALL SCIENCE. NO FICTION. The prime directive is changing in Vulcan.

TIMELINE: March of 2012

Between right now and Stardate 68447.3 [Thursday January 1 2015 00:00:01] you will see Vulcan transported into the future as the most technologically advanced small town

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

in Canada. This is the place where new ideas and technologies are discovered, fostered and developed for home, health, education, jobs, and the environment - all with a single goal in mind: to help you live long and prosper. It’s logical that this would only take place in the official Star Trek Capital of Canada: Vulcan, Alberta. Resistance is futile.

STARDATE68447.COM TM & © 2011 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related markes and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Recommendations

Recommendation #10 Bookmarks

Develop six different “Did you know…” bookmarks. Print 2,000 of each design. These should be 2 inches x 8 inches, in full color on one side with a varnish so they really stand out. They would be printed on coated (one side) gloss card stock (5 to 7 pt. paper) and one color on the back. The front would showcase a photo or art, and the back would feature quick facts about Canadian space exploration, Star Trek trivia, or other “fun facts” that have to do with science fiction or real-life technologies. These will be collector bookmarks and will be give-away, brand-building tools. The front can feature the words “All Science. No Fiction.” For real-life facts, while Star Trek trivia might use the words “Resistance is Futile” or “Live Long and Prosper.” The back will feature the trivia or a “Did you know…” fact, and at the bottom would be the Vulcan, Alberta website address and identity. The Brand Leadership Team would be charged with developing six great teasers each year, perhaps involving the community in a competition for input. Examples might include: •

Did you know … Vulcan County is the western gateway into the famed Canadian Badlands? Travel though time from the earth’s prehistoric past to Vulcan’s science fiction future. Visit www. timetravelalberta.com to discover what point ears, pointy arrows, and pointy teeth have in common.

Planet Vulcan vs. Vulcan County. As far as we know, a planet Vulcan does not exist. However, in the mid 1800s a French astronomer was certain he discovered another planet between Mercury and the Sun. He named it Vulcan, after the blacksmith of the Gods. In the Star Trek universe, the planet Vulcan is located in the triple-star system, 40 Eridani. While Mr. Spock’s home planet is fictional, the triple-star system, 40 Eridani, in which it is supposedly located, is real! 40 Eridani is about 16 light years from Earth, the 8th nearest star visible to the naked eye.

Did You Know? 1. The Skylab astronauts grew 3.8 - 5.7 centimeters due to spinal lengthening and straightening because of zero gravity in space. 2. A bolt of lightening is about 30,000 degrees Celcius; six times hotter than the surface of the sun. 3. The first electronic digital computer called the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator - was developed in 1946 and contained over 18,000 vacuum tubes.

COST from actual bids: $270 for six different bookmarks with 2,500 of each at www.gotprint.net. A very inexpensive brand-building tool. TIMELINE: Spring 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism and BLT

Every year another six bookmarks would be developed and given away. Over time these will become collector items. They should also be distributed throughout North America at Star Trek conventions, convincing attendees to make the pilgrimage to Vulcan, Did You Know? Did You Know? Alberta. To prepare for his role as Captain James Kirk, Chris Pine watched classic episodes and read encyclopedias about the Star Trek universe. However, his research was rudimentary, as he wanted his performance to be original and not an imitation of William Shatner. He based his performance on Tom Cruise’s Maverick and Harrison Ford’s Han Solo and Indiana Jones, heroes who Pine felt possessed the archetypal hero qualities Kirk has (humour, arrogance, decisiveness).

The first electronic digital computer - called the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator - was developed in 1946 and contained over 18,000 vacuum tubes.

StarTrekCapital.com

Over time 5,000 of each bookmark would be printed, and eventually (2014) 10,000 of each would be printed.

StarTrekCapital.com StarTrekCapital.com

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #11 Redevelop all advertising and promotional literature

Every brand requires continuity in look, feel and messaging to be successful. This is especially important when trying to attract potential partners, sponsors and developers who will need to have confidence in the project or program at hand.

COST: per project, per organization. TIMELINE: Effective January 1, 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: The Brand Leadership Team working with all local organizations.

The Town of Vulcan, Vulcan County and other local organizations including schools, the hospital, economic development and tourism should have a similar look and feel, even down to internal memos, newsletters and even utility billings. A Brand Style Guide for Vulcan and Vulcan County will need to be created and used by all organizations so that Vulcan “looks” and “feels” like its brand promise – “the most technologically advanced small town in Canada.”

STARDATE: 06-12-11 6:00 - 11:00PM

17th Annual Galaxyfest Banquet

Suggestion: Redesign the Vulcan Communicator masthead and interior layout into more of an advertorial format rather than articles and traditional ads. The layout should be modernized with a more futuristic layout and look in keeping with the Star Trek (tourism) and technology (economic development) direction of the community. In the plan we included many before and after concepts for print advertising, invitations, posters, and brochures ALL of which should follow the new look and feel of the brand. This should be done immediately and should be applied by all efforts that promote Vulcan as a place to live, work or play.

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Entertainment: Much VideoDance Tickets: $35.00 until 06-06 Purchase at Trek Station Limited seating - book today! Door prizes

For more information, contact us! Phone: 403.485.2994 Email:

Before After

info@vulcantourism.com


Recommendations

Recommendation #11 Redevelop all advertising and promotional literature

With any branding effort, continuity is absolutely critical. Virtually all of the marketing materials, even for local events, should be redeveloped along this theme. The Style Guide, once developed, should be used for all entities to help reinforce and solidify your brand ownership position.

WINE & CHEESE PARTY Date: Saturday, February 26, 2011 Time: 7:00- 10:00pm Place: Vulcan Tourism & Trek Station 115 Centre Street East Vulcan, AB

Grand announcement of the 2011 Galaxyfest Guest will be made! Tourism recognition awards given throughout the evening include: • Trendsetter

• Foundation Builder

• Community Leader

• Local Hero

• Terrific Trekkie

• Innovation

Tickets are $20 each and include one free drink ticket.

Before

www.vulcantourism.com

After

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Want to study

Wind Energy? VIP and Lethbridge College are offering this Video

Conference course FREE to anyone who is interested in Want to learn? learning more about Wind Energy.

WIND ENERGY TOPICS INCLUDE:

• What causes the wind • Wind Power

VIP and Lethbridge College are offering this Video Conference • Local Winds course FREE to anyone who is • Surface Winds interested in learning more about Wind Energy. • Global Winds • Wind Measurement

• and more

TOPICS INCLUDE: What causes the wind Wind Power Wind Measurement Local Winds Surface Winds Global Winds and more

DATES and LOCATIONS December 2, 3, 7, 8, 14, 15, 2009 January 4, 7, 11, 14, 19 2010 1:00 - 3:30pm each day & Locations Lethbridge CollegeDates, Rural Times Training Centre (Room 123), CCHS Vulcan December

2-3, 7-8, 14-15, 2011

4, 7,Pasolli 11, 14, 19, 2011 For more informationJanuary call Alan - 403-485-4147 - alan@vulcanbusiness.ca 1:00 - 3:30pm each day Partners in Innovation:

Partners in Innovation:

Want to learn?

Lethbridge College Rural Training Centre (room 123) For more information call Alan Pasolli 403-485-4147

WIND ENERGY

Before

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

After

Vulcan Business VIP and Lethbridge College are Development Society offering this Video Conference course FREE to anyone who is interested in learning more about Wind Energy.

TOPICS INCLUDE: What causes the wind Wind Power Wind Measurement Local Winds


Recommendations

ISSUE 1 | SPRING 2011

Photo Courtesy of Name Here

Dear Ratepayers of Vulcan County

Inside This Issue

In an effort to keep quiam incius doluptati ut volum re voluptasimus rehendis nihil maion restotat at volum quaspedio. Ut et as eostium laccabo rroviderum nonserio vellabor moluptis reicidellit moluptas iur, occabore, nobit aut dolles conem volores ex es di sus sitiantem debis nectem quidend itinveriatet hictotatem faccus, ut faccumqui omnis et aligend eliciendicia que nonsend anditat emperiat eaquaec torrum.

Snow Plowing. . . . . . . . . . . . . Transfer Station Hours . . . . . . Development Permits . . . . . . . Contribute to History . . . . . . . Prairie Shelterbelt . . . . . . . . . . Patrol Division. . . . . . . . . . . . . New Campground . . . . . . . . .

2 2 3 3 4 4 4

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David Schneider Before

Kayaking Twin Valley Dam

Vulcan County Council Meetings If you wish to attend any of the Vulcan County Council meetings, the question period takes place at 11am on the second meeting of the month. 2011 Dates

Any member of the public can attend any council meeting, provided the council doors are open.

After Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Driving Your

WHO ARE WE? We are forward thinking individuals who will raise funds beyond that of basic government funding to supplement local health needs. OUR VISION: We believe the highest quality health care available is the RIGHT of every citizen of Vulcan County. OUR MISSION: The Vulcan County Health and Wellness Foundation is a non profit organization charged with the task of raising funds to enable and enhance quality Healthcare and Wellness in the towns and villages of Vulcan, Carmangay, Champion, Lomond, Milo, Arrowwood, and Mossleigh and all County rural residents.

Vulcan County Health and Wellness Foundation “Let us put you in the driver’s seat as we journey through life”

For more information about the foundation or to donate contact:

Before

Vulcan County Health and Wellness Foundation Box 299 Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0

WHAT CAN YOU DO? Ask Questions. Find out what challenges face our local health care future. Think about how you might build a local legacy for the future healthcare of your loved ones. Learn how donating to the Health and Wellness Foundation will not only benefit this charity but how creative philanthropy can make your money work for you as well.

After

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

403-485-3303 VCHWF@albertahealthservices.ca

Destiny Vulcan County Health and Wellness Foundation


Recommendations

4

Vulcan Communicator

SUMMER 2011

Vulcan Communicator

SUMMER 2011

Ready, Set March!

Vulcan: CSI Come, Share, Imagine!

It’s Parade Time Again

Garrett Want will be taking Vulcan by storm for the Spock Days weekend as he lends his stories impersonations quaectur?

Before

Garrett Want will be taking Vulcan by storm for the Spock Days weekend as he lends his stories impersonations quaectur?

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eat all weekend in Vulcan.

Uga. Pel et laborem vel exped quis eaquos doles evelisciunt.

Aperfer rovide nimillaccus acculpa velenihit, sa doluptat right here.

Ferion recat. Ecustru mquidis minulla boritemporis et rereptaqui nam hillandit que exceat praeper iandit anihitios restiam, eum dolorep taspienis dolestrum

Torepuditas maximi, to quo blacilit eni unt pelestiae audaes et aliquo temporis ex es et escim quae od que nem sin ped ullorem porerum vellab in et lantur?

Quisin nonsequ ameniet pore nonsequiduci dolor aspe porepre icatia volupta featuring memorabilia. Occullaut recupta quidebis venda eictemo lestini sitibus dolupta cullat aut qui dolum esequam faccusanim as aut exped ea dolupta tiandelibus ra nobis ipsande right here.

AD SPACE

After

5

Nequis erunt eos pratur, sit as ium utatin ratur? Mustiuntur adis aut pre iditas que minvelesci corem dunt et veri comnis quamus sit qui ulparum quissun dionem eos aut volesti omnis voluptur?

Nequis erunt eos pratur, sit as ium utatin ratur? Mustiuntur adis aut pre iditas que minvelesci corem dunt et veri comnis quamus sit qui ulparum quissun dionem eos aut volesti omnis voluptur now. For more information on our program visit our website at www.address.com.

The Ee-Chlyas get a seat of honor in the Spock Days parade. This and many other interesting and unique things can be found in the annual Vulcan parade in July.

AD SPACE

anihitios restiam, eum dolorep taspienis dolestrum eat all weekend in Vulcan. Aperfer rovide nimillaccus acculpa velenihit, sa doluptat right here.

Uga. Pel et laborem vel exped quis eaquos doles evelisciunt.

Torepuditas maximi, to quo blacilit eni unt pelestiae audaes et aliquo temporis ex es et escim quae od que nem sin ped ullorem porerum vellab in et lantur? Quisin nonsequ ameniet pore nonsequiduci dolor aspe porepre icatia volupta featuring memorabilia.

Ferion recat. Ecustru mquidis minulla boritemporis et rereptaqui nam hillandit que exceat praeper iandit

Occullaut recupta quidebis venda eictemo lestini sitibus dolupta cullat aut qui dolum esequam fac-

AD SPACE

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Before

06.10-11.2012

After

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011


Recommendations

Recommendation #12

Secure a site for a model “home of the future”

The ideal site will come as part of the Master Planning process. Ideally, the location would be on the site just south of the Trek Station. The site needs to come into public ownership. The site needs to encompass approximately 20,000 square feet to accommodate a footprint of 2,000 square feet plus a 900 square foot “garage” that would be used to showcase sponsor goods and services. The additional square footage would be used for landscaping, solar panels and to display sustainable landscapes, as well as to accommodate limited parking. The goal will be to have people walk from the exhibition centre to the model home, Trek Station and downtown to make the entire experience pedestrianaccessible. COST: To be determined TIMELINE: January to August 2012 (closing on the property by August, if at all possible) TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society

The final model “home of the future” will be: Construction of the most technologically advanced home in Canada as a showcase of the future. Locate the home on the two empty lots on Centre Street between the Trek Station and the railroad tracks. The lots are 125 ft. x 150 ft. each with a total of approximately 40,000 square feet (this is more than necessary – the Master Planning process will guide final outcome). The land should be publicly purchased if funding is available for development of the model home. A secondary use would be for a new mid-price hotel, again if funding is available for development. The project would showcase all aspects of the home, not just interiors. The focus would be on new construction techniques and new emerging materials including recycled products, energy and waste systems, conservation, landscapes and the exterior. Everything would be tied to seasons. Vulcan, like much of interior Canada and central North America, has extreme seasonal changes so the model home can showcase its advantages by season.

Recruit one of the province’s best-known architects to design the home pro bono. Then recruit one of the province’s largest builders to build it at cost. Then before it is built, recruit partners who will showcase their technologies in the home in exchange for promotion of the product and project. Partners might include Corning, Sony, LG, Samsung, Apple, Microsoft, GE and numerous other companies. A video by Corning is an excellent example of what the model home of the future in Vulcan might look like. Go to YouTube and search for the video titled “A Day Made of Glass” from Corning. This is a perfect example of how the model home should contain. The home would be open to the public with interpretive signs throughout, a general descriptive brochure and then product placement/sponsor handouts in front of products where appropriate. The home would be a designated stop on the QR Code system with its own post.

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #13 Develop the Exhibition Centre conceptual plan

Issue a Request for Qualifications for professional services for creation of a conceptual plan for the Exhibition Centre. This could be done by the same firm as the one preparing the Master Plan, but here we want architectural expertise that would include: Final square footage (exhibit space, breakout conference spaces, warming kitchen, storage, upper floor balcony incubator office spaces, 35 foot ceilings with ceiling-mounted displays (Starship Enterprise), IMAX sized screen at one end, etc. The goal is to obtain an approximate cost of the facility and a conceptual plan that can be used to secure federal and provincial funding. It would include a marketing piece complete with floorplans and renderings, including specifics and including the kinds of events that would take place in the Centre. a. Print 500 copies, in full color b. These will be used to market the facility, not just for funding, but also to attract a partnering hotel property (approximately 120 rooms, full-service property). c. This piece would also be used to market conventions, events, and exhibitions, which are often booked a year in advance.

COST: $15,000 TIMELINE: June of 2012

Modern exterior

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society working with the Town of Vulcan and Vulcan County.

State of the art A/V gear including a large IMAXcapable screen (65’ wide by 37’ tall) with state-ofthe-art 7.1 surround sound and a 3D projector that could show still images rotating in slidesshow fashion that would fit the theme of the show when video content is not available to fit the theme

Ceiling heights 30+ feet with themed displays and lights below the displays

Upper level Tech Incubator offices wrapping around three sides of the interior to provide short term space for new tech-based start-ups

The Exhibition Centre Description: 60,000 square foot building that can host large scale events and trade shows. Situated between or next to at least one of the two new hotels, the Star Trek Federation Building exhibition centre is one of the major projects that will be necessary to validate the brand and make Vulcan an overnight destination. Promotion of the facility would focus on Star Trek Federation Building which sets Vulcan apart from every other town that is home to a civic center, exhibition hall, technology centre, etc. Eventually “exhibition centre” will become unnecessary as a description of the facility’s functionality. The first step is to contract with an architectural firm for feasibility and conceptual design. Key elements include: •

• 58

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

electric and communications for displays

Approximately 40,000 square feet of exhibit space and 20,000 square feet of common areas, gallery space, restrooms, warming kitchen and storage Slab polished concrete floor with plug-ins for

A themed environment for the Star Trek Federation Building should be considered in designing the interior of the facility – perhaps something along the lines of an International Space Station. One option would be the exact dimensions of Star Trek’s Enterprise which is round and 417 feet in diameter. An example of theming (an entire store) as an International Space Station is Fry’s in Webster, Texas. Visit http://foamworks.com/retail/webster/webster. html. There are a number of Canadian companies that can perhaps do this work for Vulcan: •

http://rockhavencreations.com (Ontario)


Recommendations

Recommendation #13 (cont.) Develop the Exhibition Centre conceptual plan

http://www.bigbuzzdesigns.com (Vancouver)

http://www.3dsercies.com (Burnaby, BC)

http://www.imaginationcorporation.com (Chilliwack, BC)

http://www.orcacreatie.ca (Vancouver)

Another resource is the Themed Entertainment Association at http://teaconnect.org. Selling naming rights in exchange for either a part of the annual debt service or a subsidy is a priority for funding the project but StarFleet Academy would remain in the name. For example, for an estimated $5 million or $150,000 a year the facility could be named the “Viterra Star Trek Federation Exhibition Centre.”

Furniture surface that charges mobile devices wirelessly. Perfect for the high tech Home of the Future. Could also be used in local cafes and restaurants in Vulcan. http:// powerkiss.com

• Attachable tablet that adds digital date to cemetery headstones. Even grave markers can be high-tech. Enhance the memory of loved ones. www.personalrosettastone.com

Suggestion: Display novel new technology ideas on a rotating basis in the exhibition centre and model Home of the Future. Showcase the range of new ideas that can impact all aspects of our lives. Change out ideas every six months to a year. For example: •

Color e-book reader for kids. Great high tech gadget for the home and school. Does not require Internet access. http://en.ebookincolor. com/

Windows that collects solar energy. Very modern and very green. www.peerplus.nl/default/index/ index/language/2

The Exhibition Centre in Vermilion is shown here and is a good model to follow. However, we envision the Exhibition Centre in Vulcan to look along the lines of the VBDS building but much, much larger: more of a box than this example. Vermilion is more than a two hour drive from Edmonton, yet took the initiative to create this space, which is a terrific addition for the community. Most of the funding came from federal and provincial sources. Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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These photos were taken in a Fry’s Electronics store in Webster, Texas (near NASA and Houston). Many of these foam models hang above the lights in “space.” Even the black ceiling is painted with stars making the displays very lifelike. Imagine a display with the Starship Enterprise, or a Vulcan Bird of Prey hanging above the lights. A replica of the Canadian robotic arm, which was manufactured in Alberta. At one end of the Exhibition Centre would be a giant IMAX screen.

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Recommendations

Recommendation #14 Replace the audio/video technology in the Trek Station

Installation of the new AV system would be a highly effective way to reach visitors with the Vulcan technology brand message and information when they walk into the Trek Station. The content would be broader than just Star Trek. It also could be changed out and freshened at little cost. In addition, it would be shown on a rotating basis every day during all hours of operation, which would ensure that visitors would be exposed to it whenever they entered the facility.

Purchase a 7.1 surround sound system with a 15 inch sub-woofer so that the Trek Station can help visitors “live” the Star Trek experience.

Recommended content includes:

NOTE: This is even more important than having an actor come up. 2012 is the “getting ready year” and every dollar available needs to be invested in product development. This, alone, will make the Trek Station THE place to hang out.

Short films of between three and 20 minutes showcasing new technologies

Star Trek clips and episodes

Star Trek specials

Programmed television specials and shows that showcase technology

The possibility of Vulcan events and other community information

DDI will donate a 120-inch cinema display screen to replace the tube television in the Trek Station. Purchase a used or refurbished Epson or similar, high lumen output 1080p projector that can fill the screen and provide a strong bright, ultra high-definition picture. Work with a local fabricator to create a way to mount the screen and projector in the Trek Station.

COST: $6,000 including shipping of the screen and purchase of a projector, sound system, and installation mounting gear. TIMELINE: April 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

This is NOT just where Star Trek movies are played, but will show specials on new technologies, Discovery Channel shows on space exploration, anything that has to do with technology, Star Trek and/or Vulcan. Eventually the Trek Station will be a museum paying tribute to the original Star Trek and major video will be featured in the Exhibition Centre. The Trek Station will play original Star Trek television episodes and initial movies.

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Recommendations

Recommendation #14

Recommendation #15

Develop a new website for Vulcan Tourism

Redevelop the Vulcan Business Development Society website

Using a WordPress template, redevelop the website so it fits the new theme, is very modern and would be something CBS would be proud to be associated with. That means starting fresh. The website should be designed by the professional graphic design company or firm hired in the previous recommendation. Use lots of professional photography to show people having fun.

Like the tourism website, redevelop the site using a WordPress template and making sure it’s first class – worthy of a major urban area. After all, these are the people who will invest millions into Vulcan. The website bar needs to be raised considerably in terms of look, feel, and content. This is the primary site where potential investors will look. It needs to be not just a resource for information, but a major “sales site” in terms of potential. The new Vulcan brand should be showcased on this site right down to identities and the “future of Vulcan” so they can see what they are buying into.

COST: $500 including hosting, the WordPress template ($80), additional widgets. This does not include graphic design expertise, which is already covered under a separate budget item. TIMELINE: Spring, summer 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

Purchase key words such as “hotel development opportunities Alberta” and others so that people will be able to find Vulcan without knowing about Vulcan directly. Use professional photography, renderings, etc. to entice potential business interests.

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COST: $500 plus graphic design time, writing, content management. TIMELINE: Spring 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society


Recommendations

Recommendation #16

Recommendation #17

Downtown retail façade improvements

Implement the county-wide wayfinding system

Downtown property owners and merchants need to get together and come up with a funding mechanism for some façade improvements that would include:

Remember: Curb appeal can account for 70% of firsttime sales at restaurants, retail shops, lodging facilities, and golf courses.

Adding 20 to 30 benches in front of retail shops (against the façade facing out).

COST: Depends on available funding, but plan on $50,000 to $70,000.

Adding 60 to 100 terra-cotta pots, one flanking each end of every bench, and along the facades up and down Main Street and side streets. These should be larger pots (approximately 24” top opening, and 30” tall).

TIMELINE: Late spring, summer 2012

These should be planted with evergreens so that they have some appeal year round. Restaurants should be encouraged to offer outdoor dining, in season, and the town should permit the loss of two parking spaces in front of a restaurant to allow for the building and placement of a seating deck in that space, or to route pedestrians around sidewalk dining areas (see examples in the Downtown Idea Book included as part of this plan). New retail blade signs should also be developed and professionally printed/silk screened.

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Chamber of Commerce working with local property owners and businesses. Town of Vulcan ordinance changes or approvals, if necessary, for blade signs, outdoor dining, sidewalk dining, business improvement district approval. Note: See Downtown Idea Book examples in the Supplemental Information section of this plan.

Begin to implement the county-wide wayfinding system beginning with county gateways. The wayfinding system is very important, particularly once the recruitment effort begins. Hundreds of potential investors, agencies, foundations, developers, sponsors, suppliers and vendors will be making the pilgrimage to Vulcan over the next year to see if it’s a place in which they would want to invest. Their experience begins with the gateways and continues with the wayfinding system. It’s critically important to have this in place and to begin removal of the “little green martian” signs placed throughout Vulcan. Create an implementation schedule and an annual budget so the system can be developed over a series of years, as funding becomes available. COST: Varying from $650 per sign to approximately $20,000 per gateway TIMELINE: Summer 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan County & individual communities

This can be accomplished by creating a Business Improvement District, or simply by pooling the necessary resources – but it needs to be done as a group – NOT individually. Start with the three primary blocks along Main and one block east and west of Main through downtown. It can expand from there over time or as funding allows. Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #18 Technical assistance for downtown retailers/property owners

Seek assistance from the University of Alberta or any school that offers architectural studies and degrees, landscape architecture, or similar degrees where downtown Vulcan can be used as a “real life” case study with options for façade improvements, working with property owners and local merchants. Contact colleges and universities and see if any will offer this. Offer them some funds – enough to cover transportation and other incidental costs.

A mechanism and/or resource for providing technical assistance to local businesses, particularly on Centre Street, will not only help Vulcan’s brand grow, it will help those businesses thrive and be more successful. The service should provide advice and resource information on business systems and procedures as well as marketing guidance. Other services that are helpful, besides those listed above, are:

• Blade signage

• Point of Sales systems and apps for restaurants that run on iPads and other tablet devices that show seating charts, take orders and wirelessly send them to a screen in the kitchen, and can even act as a cash register – bringing it to the customer at their table.

• Exterior display options

The idea is NOT to make downtown too futuristic, but to make it modern, and in keeping with the technology theme. Included should be:

• Window coverings and displays • Awnings and other façade materials, including color schemes. • Window and door casings

• Outdoor dining (in season) • Lighting Creating architectural renderings of Main Street (three blocks) would be ideal. If colleges and universities show no interest, contact architectural organizations and/or societies and see if a retired or semi-retired architect with expertise in commercial architectural would donate some time to do this. 64

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Provide guidance on redevelopment of blade signs for street-front stores and restaurants to create an image of continuity and project a more modern, upscale look. Provide guidance on façade improvements, store layouts and window displays. This would require removing the 1960s Star Trek themed posters and cut-outs.

Some sites to look at that illustrate resources available include: •

http://www.isispos.com (Ontario)

http://acclaimpos.com (Florida)

http://poslavu.com (Albuquerque, New Mexico)

http://revelsystems.com (San Francisco)

Suggestion: Encourage businesses that capitalize on the Star Trek theme. Go beyond just the name and do more than skin deep “Star Trek Lite.” Set criteria such as: •

Exterior signage needs to be modern if not futuristic.

Interior needs to showcase decorations, art and murals from Star Trek franchise as if you walked onto a Star Trek set.

Curb appeal must be strong in order to draw people inside.

COST: $15,000 to cover costs TIMELINE: March through June 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society working with the Chamber of Commerce, local property owners and the Town of Vulcan


Recommendations

Recommendation #19 Star Trek Walk of Fame frame

The Star Trek Walk of Fame is a high profile reminder of Vulcan’s connection to the Star Trek theme. It also will serve as a connector to the community’s new brand, tying together Star Trek movie/TV fiction with the promise of real life exploration and growth through technology. Enhance the Star Trek Walk of Fame using the Vulcan identity as a basis. Contact a metal shop that can develop a brass Star Trek emblem that would be used each time someone is inducted into the walk of fame. It should be approximately 24 inch square. Here’s the plan: A concrete saw would cut out a 36 inch square in the sidewalk, down Main Street, every 10 feet. Do NOT go down the side streets during the initial five years of this program. Other means will be used to pull visitors down these streets. You need the critical mass of stars together.

Next to each 36” square would be a 4 foot tall shiny round aluminum post (4” – 5” in diameter) that would have silk screened on the post a QR Code, the actor/writer/producer’s name, the series, name of the character and a photo. The post would have an aqueous coating to keep ice and graffiti from sticking to it and to make sure the QR Code doesn’t wear off. COST: Obtain a cost to purchase ten of these. Best guess: $4,000 ($400 each). The reason for 10: to obtain a good price and to cover the offset cost of creating the die that the emblem will be cast in. Perhaps the vendor that produces the plaque can also do this. TIMELINE: First half of 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

The brass frame would be set in the center of the 36 inch cut-out, and colored black concrete filled around the outside of the frame. Then the plaque would be cemented into the core area and filled with a goldcolored concrete. Within each sidewalk square would be the actor/ writer/producer’s name, hand-print, the series they were involved with, and the character’s name or role in the show.

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Recommendation #20 Hire recruiter, sales professional

This will be perhaps the most important position in bringing this entire plan to fruition. This position should be a contracted position, and should be the province’s best sales person. They will be charged with the following tasks:

This person would also be your primary spokesperson is convincing potential funders to invest or donate to Vulcan’s cause. Meeting people like Paul Allen (cofounder of Microsoft who’s development company is Vulcan Development).

• Recruiting a major sponsor for the Exhibition Centre selling naming rights.

This would be a two to three-year full-time job, on a contract basis. It would be a one-year-at-a-time renewable contract to make sure they deliver. They do NOT need to be located in Vulcan. In fact, Calgary might be a better fit since some of this will require flights and meetings in the major metro areas.

• Recruit two new hotels: One a full-service 120-room property, and the other a 70 to 80 room limitedservice hotel. These MUST be conference-quality hotels; i.e. a Holiday Inn Express, a Ramada, or better. A Super 8 will not work. • Recruit an architect, builder and suppliers for the model home. Many of these sponsors and projects will be on a national scale and should include companies such as Corning, Hewlitt-Packard, Honeywell, and dozens of others. The recruiter will attend the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas (held each January) to seek out potential sponsors and suppliers who will donate money, goods, or expertise to the model home. They will recruit sponsors and suppliers within the Exhibition Centre. For instance, would IMAX donate the large screen? Would Sony donate a knock-yoursocks-off sound system? Would Epson supply a stateof-the-art 3D projector?

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It’s quite possible that this person could make this a career move: once the Exhibition Centre becomes a reality, they could also market it for conferences, conventions, trade shows, technology showcases and exhibitions, special events, etc. At that point they should live in Vulcan. This should NOT be an “executive director” type to run an organization. This is just like a business opportunity. This person should see the position in that light because after 2012 they will need to make their own way in terms of funding and organization. The better they do, the more money they can make and the larger their support staff can be. There is tremendous potential with this position. All in all, you are looking for a super-sharp go-getter with a strong sales background, business recruitment experience, a can-do attitude, and good organizational skills. This person should be enthusiastic about Vulcan and Vulcan’s potential development with the brand.

The following are desirable skills and traits to look for when hiring the person to fill this position: • Excellent track record in commercial real estate sales • Well-spoken with excellent written communication skills • Experience dealing with and negotiating with small business/investors/sponsors • Understands local real estate markets and industries • Possesses contacts in development and business industries • Understands public/private finance, land use, zoning, other issues to be addressed during recruitment process • Self-motivated, a leader, results-oriented • Understands commercial finance, incentive programs, sponsorships, etc. One of the first people the recruiter should contact would be Microsoft Cofounder Paul Allen, who founded his development company, Vulcan, Inc. whose mission is to “Create and advance a variety of world-class endeavors and high impact initiatives that change and improve the way we live, learn, do business and experience the world.” This mission is a perfect tie to the Vulcan brand direction and with Paul Allen’s love of Star Trek. He is perhaps an excellent partner for some of the initiatives outlined in this plan.


Recommendations

Recommendation #21 Develop the recruitment database

For example, perhaps the Star Trek exhibition centre could become the “Paul Allen Innovation Centre” or the” Vulcan Innovation Centre”. Perhaps the Alberta Institute for Advanced Technology (recommendation #30) could become the Paul Allen Technology Campus. Naming rights are just one way to create a legacy project and fund the project.

The very first job of the recruiter is to develop a comprehensive database of possible funding opportunities:

Suggestion: In exchange for providing sponsorship/ partnership funding, the following promotional considerations should be provided:

Naming rights candidates for the Exhibition Centre

Foundations that may fund specific projects

Corporate partners and sponsors

Model home vendors and suppliers (from architectural and engineering right down to toiletries and supplies)

Name in the exhibition centre on posters.

Name tagged onto Pole Banners throughout town.

Government funding partners (federal and provincial)

Name on the website.

Name included in promotion/information materials for tourism and economic development events.

Development interests starting with hotel chains (Holiday Inn, Hilton, Marriott, Ramada, Best Western and others)

Name in Visitor Guides

Name in model Home of the Future.

COST: $100,000 a year (perhaps funding would come from grants). This includes taxes, etc. since they would be a sub-contractor. Remember: You get what you pay for. You want the best and they will be pulling millions of dollars into Vulcan. TIMELINE: Starting in August of 2012

The recruiter will also put together a presentation tailored to each audience (or individual) and will also work with the graphic design professional on marketing materials needed to begin the recruitment effort. COST: Included in the contract TIMELINE: Immediately upon hire TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Recruiter working for the Brand Leadership Team

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Leadership Team Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendation #22 Begin the recruitment effort

The “anchor tenant” of this branding plan is the Exhibition Centre, and so this is recruitment priority number one. It is the facility that will make Vulcan an overnight visitor destination, attracting hotel development, and, since overnight visitors spend three times that of day visitors, and will help local businesses become much more successful, allowing them to further invest in their properties, further increasing values and economic success. Along with the Exhibition Centre, the recruitment would start with hotel development. Once again, this is NOT a Super 8 Motel project. In fact, that project would hurt the possibility of making Vulcan a convention and trade show destination. On the other hand, a Ramada, like the one in Camrose, would be good. In fact, the owner of that property should be recruited into Vulcan. Go take a look at this hotel and imagine having it in Vulcan. Two properties will be required, one in 2012 and one by 2015. The first would be an 80 - 100 room limited service hotel that offers breakfast. Other examples besides the Ramada discussed above would be Best Western, Marriott Courtyard, Holiday Inn Express, and Hampton Inn among others. The second hotel would be a 120 room full-service, extended stay property along the lines of Homestead Suites, Crossland, Extended Stay-America and StudioPLUS Deluxe Studios. The full service hotel 68

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should provide approximately 12,000 square feet of meeting space where conferences, banquets, speaker, and breakout sessions could be hosted. Large events requiring trade show exhibition space would be held at the exhibition centre. The new hotels do not have to be futuristic or space themed but they should be modern in every other respect in order to be consistent with the Vulcan brand. There should be flat-panel televisions in every room. There should be super-fast broadband Internet services and amenities need to be the most up to date for hotels in their price category. We recommend that a list of (1) “basic” and (2) “recommended” services and amenities be created for use in recruiting hotel development. Third on the list would be the model home, along with other vendors, sponsors, and suppliers.


Recommendations

Recommendation #23 Begin bringing new technologies into the school system

Delivering the Vulcan brand promise - the most technologically advanced small town in Canada - starts with schools, from the moment children enter pre-school through high-school and beyond. Fortunately Vulcan schools already have a solid base on which to build.

But to fully realize the Vulcan brand promise in the future, the following enhancements are recommended: •

Already in place and functioning are: •

iPads loaned to all students on the first day of school (parents pay an insurance fee in case of damage or theft) with virtual textbooks and workbooks, reading and homework assignments. Structural enhancements to the school’s Cultural Recreation Centre that would complement the Fine Arts program and allow for more appropriate and frequent access by community use groups. Enhancements include new theatre type seating, a new 15 x 20 foot screen with the ability to be seen through both sides of the projection, and a new high ANSI Lumen projector.

Projectors and smart boards or airliners as well as sound systems in every classroom.

Wireless broadband Internet access throughout the entire school

A fully functional video conference suite

A 30 computer lab with N-Computing technology allowing 4 access locations from 1 computer.

18 computers in the library and 3 laptop carts which store 50 laptop computers.

18 computers in the CTS lab equipped with video capability for higher end publishing packages including Adobe Premiere

All machines have Microsoft Office 2010 and are equipped with Windows 7 and network access by MacIntosh/Linux systems

A message board in and for the community where the latest events of the school can be posted by citizens.

A daily menu and calorie counter in the common lunch area to help students make informed decisions on their healthy choices.

Access (with parental permission) to outside computers/iPods/Androids

Networked message board in a common area within the school with announcements on academics, sports and other information. Allow access to input from multiple locations.

A lab with projector, video camera and computer for the analysis of the physics of movement in physical education classes to record movement

and analyze information to improve certain techniques. •

Specific classes and courses that use and teach technology.

Foster partnership programs where the school can be the “test site” for emerging technologies and teaching methods.

A Vulcan technology blog and monthly e-newsletter for reviewing exploration, testing and implementation of new technology at the school. Both vehicles would become models for rural communities across Canada.

Guest speakers either live or via video conference from Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple and other tech companies. This is especially important in high schools where these can be used as career track opportunities.

Games like SimCity and others as teaching opportunities.

Working with partners and/or sponsors, upgrade school facilities in the area of wind or solar energy, waste management and classroom lighting to create an outstanding learning environment.

SmartBoards in every room

OnLine teaching, guest speakers and celebrities who already donate time to educate kids, but could now do it without making a special trip to Vulcan (via Telepresence, etc.) Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendation #24 Create lighted gateways into downtown Vulcan

School books on iPads (already developed and used in other areas.) Imagine each child having an iPad loaded with interactive educational tools, most of which have already been developed.

Even the lighting in the schools could be LED, non-direct lighting now being placed in office and other commercial buildings saving money, and making it less fatiguing for students.

Even virtual golf and other games could be included along with other tech-special physical education programs.

Finally, we recommend development of an elective class available to students and the community at large that examines the theories that emerged from the Star Trek series and have subsequently become reality and are now at the forefront of new technology. The recruiter may be able to assist in finding sponsors, vendors and suppliers that can help bring new technologies into the school system. The school should have a person dedicated, full time, to researching new technologies and then working with the recruiter to test and bring some of them to Vulcan. If Vulcan is considered THE most desirable place to raise a family because of its cutting-edge technologies and relatively low cost of living, it will help boost the local economy and help Vulcan stave off being a retirement community without a foundation of young families. 70

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Lighted gateways into Vulcan will create an entrance into the town that will attract attention and create a sense of arrival that will draw people into the downtown core area. It will also help cement the technology brand focus. Visitors already pass through Vulcan, and the lighted gateways will make a statement about the town, enhancing its appeal, value, sense of worth, and attraction. The posts are approximately $1,500 each. There would be three on each side of the street, for a total cost of $9,000, plus another $6,000 or so for running power to each. The additional $5,000 noted below is for shipping and buffer as this is an approximate cost. One of the jobs of the recruiter would be to see if the manufacturer would donate these, or reduce the cost, since we’ll need similar lighting in and around the Exhibition Centre, down Main Street (for QR codes at each Walk of Fame star), etc. so the theme can be carried out throughout town. Another option is to have these sponsored. For instance, a name could be on the translucent casing (possibly CBS and Star Trek). Only the entranceway posts would include multicolored LED lighting. All others would be a single color. COST: Approximately $20,000 TIMELINE: Summer 2012 (or as funding becomes available) TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Chamber of Commerce working with the Town of Vulcan.


Recommendations

In the examples shown here (opposite page, this page left), the posts are placed on both sides of the street in Bothell, Washington, a suburb of Seattle. The posts light up at dusk and change colors approximately every 20 seconds or so creating a stunning futuristic effect. The idea is to use a “gateway� like this to pull visitors into downtown Vulcan, increasing spending locally. The example (below) is an example of the placement in downtown Vulcan. While shown here on the north side of the intersection, we recommend that these be placed on the south side and that the existing street lighting be replaced.

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Recommendation #25 Develop a Trompe L’oeil Wall Mural Program

Trompe l’oeil is French for “fool the eye,” and it is used in creating realistic murals. Vulcan should have more visual Star Trek offerings than the Enterprise at the entrance, the Trek Station, and the mural on the side of the pharmacy. The more you have to offer, the further people will come and the longer they will stay. Additionally, there are more than 15 buildings that would be excellent candidates for wall murals that could really gain some national attention. Wall murals serve three purposes in Vulcan. They draw attention away from unsightly buildings and streetscapes. They can showcase attractive and pleasing works of art. They can help support the brand by telling a “story.” We recommend a mix of 12 to 20 murals that include a “story” depicting a scene or visual element of the latest Star Trek movie or a classic scene from one of the television series. Each mural should be at least 3 meters high by 10 meters wide For Star Trek themed murals we recommend that they tell a story from an iconic scene in a Star Trek movie or series episode rather than show actors and characters alone. True fans will recall these iconic scenes instantly and the mural will be photographed. This adds to the technology focus for Vulcan and reinforces the Star Trek Capital of Canada brand position which needs to be fostered and continually developed. An excellent example for one such mural is the iconic scene from the movie Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home where a cloaked Klingon space ship hovers over a 72

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fishing boat in San Francisco Bay. The fishermen are about to harpoon a whale, but the harpoon hits the invisible space ship, which then becomes visible. Wall murals of iconic scenes like this – but the latest movies, not just the original set movies – create another reason to visit Vulcan.

COST: $100,000 (through grants and/or foundation funds for public art, economic enhancement) This is $40,000 a year in 2012, $40,000 in 2013 and $20,000 for 2014 – providing a total of 10 incredible murals in downtown Vulcan – far beyond the quality of any in town currently.

We also recommend a variety of trompe l’oeil (French for “fool the eye”) architectural murals with architectural themes that fit into the local environment, both man-made and natural.

TIMELINE: One every other month beginning in May of 2012

Develop a mural master plan with a list of prospective spaces for murals with special emphasis on Centre Street and downtown cross streets. Prioritize the spaces. Develop a list of mural topics and assign specific topics to specific spaces. Research local art capabilities as well as regional art schools and assess talent. Explore creative arrangements with art schools that provide mural services free or at minimal cost on an intern basis.

Here’s the process:

Suggestion: Review Tobias Richter’s Star Trek Movie USS Enterprise Wallpapers at http://trekmovie. com/2009/02/23/first-look-at-tobias-richters-ussenterprise-wallpapers/ While these are computer wallpapers they would be excellent murals that could be placed around Vulcan inside offices and public buildings, on exterior surface and even on ceilings. A retailer with one of these on a wall would entice people into the shop.

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Brand Leadership Team

Inventory the possible candidates in downtown Vulcan. Many photos are included in the plan. Photograph the buildings so that potential mural artists can view the buildings and come up with initial concepts. Create a list of mural artists – especially those that specialize in Star Trek. Our favorite: The Light Works (www.thelightworks.com). We use many of their images as computer screen wallpapers in our office. Contact each and see if they would “donate” their time if you provided airfare, lodging (in High River or Lethbridge until you get good accommodations), supplies, meals and other costs such as rental car. In exchange, you’ll promote their work through Social Media, in every brochure, on local websites, and on each mural. You’ll do everything you can to promote them since they are doing this for Vulcan. In fact, you might even give the artist a star on the Walk of Fame.


Recommendations

Every time a mural is done, it would be a press event showcasing the mural across the country. Doing four of these a year would keep the brand and the focus in the public eye. The plan would call for the first one to be completed in June of 2012, the next one in August, and the last one for 2012 in October. In future years the first one would be completed in April or May. An alternative is to have a “tiled” mural approach, where thousands of artists come in (including visitors) and paint a square foot of the mural, along the lines of a “paint by number” set. Visitors pay to paint their square, and they can paint as many as they’d like to buy. Materials are supplied and the outline is already on the wall. This makes it experiential and visitors will use social media (Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, etc.) to promote “their” art. It’s a great way to raise money and create “ownership” of the brand among visitors. IMPORTANT: These would ALL be Star Trek or future-themed murals and MUST be the quality you’ll see on TheLightWorks website or better. Think: “If CBS saw this, would they be impressed?” The murals you’ll see on The Light Works website are world-class and,

alone, would make Vulcan worth a special trip. NOTE: The Light Works produced a five-minute HD animation for the opening ceremony of the 2009 Federation Convention, Europe’s largest science fiction convention. The movie incorporated the two main ships of the last Star Trek movie – the USS Kelvin and the USS Enterprise. This could be shown in the Trek Station and in the Exhibition Centre, once built. QR codes (Quick Response) would be placed at each mural so visitors can get immediate information on the particular mural, the artist, and the story it conveys.

Here you can see the process. The two photos above were taken during the process, starting with a flat concrete-block wall. Bottom left: The finished trompe l’oeil mural.

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Before

After

Before

After

In these examples you can see the current look of Vulcan buildings along with concepts of how they could look after being muralized. Each of these would be a photo opportunity and would appear in YouTube videos, Flickr, Instagram, Facebook and other social media outlets furthering ownership of the brand. Above: Pincher Creek, Alberta.

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Recommendations

After

Before

Far left photos: a non-descript brick building before (top) and during the process (bottom). Top right: The finished trompe l’oeil mural.

Bottom photo: This mural is in Pincher Creek, Alberta.

During

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Recommendations

Recommendation #26 Install Free Broadband Wireless along Main Street in downtown

Free wifi is becoming increasingly common in cities across the country. Cities wanting to bring more business to their downtown areas are finding that offering free broadband can be an excellent way to add value. There are two basic models that cities are following. One model involves the city buying, setting up, and maintaining the wireless network and providing the service to a blanket area for free. Anyone in the vicinity can pick up the signal and use the free internet access, whether they are on a park bench, in a coffee shop, or sometimes even at home, if they live in the hot spot area. In this model, the city owns and operates the system, and pays for the equipment and monthly internet access fees. Many cities are utilizing a portal site, which loads automatically when a user hooks up to the network. This site is where the user logs on to the system, and can also find information about the network, troubleshooting tips, etc. Some cities, like Long Beach, CA, are using this site to sell advertising to local businesses, helping to offset the monthly costs of the WiFi system. Another model involves the city, or a non-profit corporation as in the case of Austin, TX, coordinating and managing the network, while individual venues pay for their own equipment and monthly fees. In this model, the city does not own the entire network per se, but acts as a centralized channel to promote 76

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

and coordinate the city’s free wifi system. Austin, TX is a great example of a city that is using wifi very successfully. Austin Wireless, Inc. is a non-profit corporation set up to improve the quality and availability of free public WiFi in Austin and the surrounding areas. They promote the managed network, coordinate the installation of hot spots, monitor the network, and coordinate support to the venues and users. The venues, such as restaurants, coffee shops, etc. pay for installation of the necessary equipment and pay a monthly fee for broadband access. They in turn, provide wifi free to their customers. The cost for equipment and installation is around $385 and they pay less than $30 per month for the internet access. Some businesses are eligible for free installation from volunteers on weekends and companies that demonstrate financial need may be eligible for equipment donations. They currently have 70,000 registered users who combine for 20,000 connections per month. They consider their model to be extremely successful, calling it “economy-proof, politics-proof and hypeproof�. They have found that since starting the wifi program in downtown Austin, business at cafes and restaurants has been boosted during off-peak hours, the time when these businesses want to increase their

customers. If one hour of usage roughly translates into a cup of coffee, bagel, beer or sandwich, then in 2004 the 115,463 hours represent about $500,000 of revenue pumped into businesses providing free wifi. Spokane, WA is an example of a city using the first model; the city set up a wireless network over a 100-block area, creating a hot zone where any user can log into the network for free. They provide up to 2 hours per day for free and subscription plans are planned for users who want more time on a regular basis. The system in Spokane cost approximately $75,000 to install in 2004. Adding wifi, using the model that is appropriate for the location, can be a great way to add value for locals and visitors. Internet usage continues to grow and people appreciate easy access to their email, the Internet, etc. Offering free Internet access is a way to make downtown more appealing. Fully capitalize on the presence of the Alberta Grid Broadband Network by making access to the grid free or low cost for five years for qualifying techbased businesses and organizations as an incentive to locate in Vulcan. Set clear guidelines indicating how to qualify for the incentive. Secure grants or rural development funding from the provincial government to cover the cost of this subsidized access based on the concept of a demonstration model to be analyzed and assessed for possible expansion to other rural communities in the province to foster economic development and job growth.


Recommendations

Recommendation #27 Street lighting

Consider ad-driven log-ons to offset monthly costs. COST: $40,000 TIMELINE: Fall of 2012 or as funding is secured TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society

One of the priorities for the Town of Vulcan is to replace the antiquated (and failing) light standards on Main Street. We have offered some ideas on designs that are modern and use LED lighting that can change colors adding to the ambiance for downtown, and are brighter with bulbs that last about 25,000 hours, using a fraction of the power the current utility poles use. They should help invigorate downtown in terms of safety and ambiance, and will support the branding and technology effort as well. This would be a good project for the Recruiter to get involved in, perhaps saving some money and time in packaging new street lighting along with gateway lighting and QR code posts. COST: Cost for replacing city street lighting is beyond the scope of work for this branding project, but we will attempt to get an approximate figure. This should be a grant eligible expense. The town should look for grant opportunities for this effort. TIMELINE: Fall of 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Town of Vulcan

Calgary walkway lighting

One of the recommendations in this plan is to use QR codes throughout town and at the Trek Station so that visitor information is available 24 hours a day. Because cell service is spotty (at best) in Vulcan, having wifi is imperative and important.

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Recommendations

These two photos were taken in Calgary and really showcase a modern look. Imagine similar lighted posts up and down Centre Street in Vulcan. They would be visible from the highway and a lure into downtown Vulcan. These would also help light up the Walk of Fame stars. QR codes would also be added to the posts as well.

Calgary

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Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Top photo: At an intersection in Bothell uses these posts. The LED lighting shines up on a flat aluminum surface. The lights change colors every 20 seconds, adding a very modern eyecatching look.


Recommendations

Recommendation #28 Install “Bridgebrand” pole banners on the new streetlights TIMELINE: Fall of 2012

no fiction.

TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism, Brand Leadership Team

all science.

Stardate 68447.com

COST: $4,000. Some of these could be sponsored by local businesses with a “hanging logo” just beneath the pole banner. Only do this if funding is not available to have these non-advertising based.

live long & prosper

Pole banners are an excellent brand building tool. They can also be used for wayfinding, events promotion, seasonal celebrations, beautification, and ambiance. We recommend pole banners using the “Stardate” to showcase a “new beginning” or renaissance of sorts for Vulcan. These will illustrate the modern look to the brand, acting as a teaser to bring people back to see the changes taking place in Vulcan.

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Recommendations

Recommendation #29

Recommendation #30

Make adjustments to the Wayfinding System

Repaint the Trek Station with Star Trek symbols

Once the Master Development Plan has been completed, some alterations to the Wayfinding System, already designed, may need to take place. This is the time to make those alterations, so that when the Exhibition Centre, model home, and hotels come into Vulcan the signage system can easily be altered, amended, implemented.

We developed a concept for adding Star Trek related symbols to the Trek Station to give it a little more appeal and help update its look. This could be done by the mural artists (who may also have other ideas that could be considered) who would be commissioned to do the murals throughout town. In fact, consider the Trek Station to be their first project!

COST: $3,500

COST: $10,000 (supplies, scaffoldings, lodging and meals – time would be donated by the mural artist).

TIMELINE: September 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Business Development Society

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TIMELINE: Summer 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism


Recommendations

Recommendation #31 QR posts along Main Street

The vendor/supplier that will be fabricating and installing the downtown gateway lighted posts would be the same vendor that would develop the lighted QR posts along Main Street. Each of these would be about 42” tall (1 meter) and would include directional LED lighting that would light up each of the Walk of Fame stars. It would also add ambient sidewalk lighting, making it a pleasure to walk downtown after hours and after dark. Some of these are already being used in Calgary. Additionally, the top of the post would be angled at 45º and have a QR code stenciled on the top. The QR code, when activated with a smart-phone, would open up a web page on the smart-phone giving details about the actor or celebrity featured along the walk of fame. Additional lighted posts would be placed at the Trek Station with the QR code showcasing things to do. Additional posts would be placed at some key visitor locations throughout the town to provide information on that attraction or other visitor information. Some recommended initial location of QR posts: includes: •

Vulcan Starship FX6-1995-A (visitor information center)

Vulcan and District Museum

Vulcan Hotel

Town Bell

Vulcan Advocate Newspaper

Memorial Cenotaph and Elks Memorial Park

Original grain elevator site (Nine in a Line)

Hazel Cameron Elementary School Monument

• Spock’s bust COST: To be determined, but approximately $600 - $800 per post. NOTE: Power will need to be run down Main Street to each of these posts. Operational costs are minimal since they include low-energy consumption LED lighting (which can change colors) with lights lasting approximately 25,000 hours. OPTION: It is possible that each post could be sponsored by a local business or a national firm. The sponsorship could be silk screened down the side of the post (see concept rendering). This could offset the cost of each post. We’d rather not do this, but if this is what it takes to get them done, then by all means, look for sponsors. A QR code could be placed on the post next to their logo.

Sample QR Post Designs Concepts. The example, to the right, shows a possible sponsorship opportunity where the sponsor would be silk screened over a lighted panel. The white area above it provides ambient lighting and just above that is a “button” that would actually be a spotlight shining on the Walk of Fame star. The QR code is placed on the top panel along with the star’s name.

Garrett Wang Ensign Harry Kim

Scan this QR Code with your SmartPhone for information on the artist.

TIMELINE: Fall/Winter 2012 or as funding allows TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Town of Vulcan, Brand Leadership Team

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Recommendations

Recommendation #32 Install a MUZAK sound system downtown along Main Street

Enhance the ambiance of downtown for visitors and residents alike by piping music into the core downtown area south of the railroad tracks along Centre Street from the Trek Station to 4th Avenue. Music would be programmed to change with the change of colors in the new VAIO LED street lights. Lights and music would change every 10 minutes or so, changing the entire dynamic and ambiance of downtown as the buildings and streetscapes change colors. Work with Muzak to provide music that would be seasonally appropriate and reflective of holidays. Provide special themed music and even soundtracks for specific events such as Spock Days, car shows, etc. The music could be 60’s music for a car show; coffee house rock (a mix of low key/acoustic music) for other times; winter holiday music in December; Star Trek themes for Spock Days; etc. Music provides yet another reason for visitors and residents to venture beyond the railroad tracks into downtown and enjoy the vibrant new atmosphere of shopping, outdoor cafes, wall mural art, the Star Trek Walk of Fame and more. The Muzak system will add tremendous ambiance down Main Street and can change per season, or per the event. The corner lighted posts and QR code posts, which can all change colors, can be timed to the music so they work in concert together. Muzak works with downtowns to create an outdoor sound system that helps provide a special ambiance 82

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for downtown visitors. Each sound system is specially customized to fit each downtown’s needs. After contacting Muzak via their online contact form, their regional office closest to you responds within 1-2 business days. They now have offices in Canada. Free of charge, they can visit your downtown for an assessment. They look at various factors such as location, climate, your downtown’s layout etc. in order to determine the type of speakers, the optimal wiring of the system, etc. From there they provide you with the cost and will work with your budget. Here is the link to contact them: http://www.muzak.com/contact/sales COST: Work with Muzak for a free estimate ($20,000 to $60,000) TIMELINE: Fall of 2012 or early 2013 as funding dictates TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Chamber of Commerce, BLT


Recommendations

Recommendation #33

Recommendation #34

Begin gradual use of new marketing identities

Begin booking the Exhibition Centre and recruiting events

Include identities for VBDS, the Town of Vulcan, Vulcan and Area Chamber of Commerce, Vulcan County, the schools and hospital, as well as others. Not all have to be Star Trek themed, but they should all be very modern with a technology focus and complementary color schemes. The graphic design firm hired will work with local organizations to develop and fine-tune their business cabinets: letterhead, business cards, envelopes, labels and other materials.

Most conference, exhibitions and trade shows are booked a year in advance. For Vulcan, the sales effort should begin 14 to 18 months prior to opening. Initial marketing materials will use artist renderings and floor plans, but the marketing effort should begin well in advance.

COST: No cost beyond current expenses. As current business cards, letterheads and other business cabinet materials run out, they will simply be replaced with the new look and brand. This way there is no waste and no additional cost. The transition should take about a year or so to accommodate fully.

• Website specific to the Exhibition Centre (or a portal from Vulcan Tourism).

TIMELINE: Late 2012 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: All local participating organizations

Included in this will be creation of some key marketing materials:

• A Conference & Trade Show Guide, which would be a folder with floor plans, amenities, local resources for catering, A/V equipment, rental and equipment costs, calendar, and general information about the Centre and Vulcan. • The Conference & Trade Show Guide would be available online so that only 500, or so, would need to be printed. The sales effort will begin by developing a database of provincial organizations and agencies that could utilize the facility, then outreach to event organizers, meeting planners, and corporations that move conferences and conventions around the province. The secondary market would include technology focused events, trade shows, forums, and conferences in Western Canada. As noted earlier, this could be a transitional job for the Recruiter, or a sales professional could be hired to be

the Director of Marketing for the Exhibition Centre, depending on budgets and timing needs. Much of the use will come from locally produced technology fairs, employment fairs, showcases, and educational science fairs. So a part of this effort will not only include marketing the facility, but also working with organizations to produce events locally. Research and review existing province-wide (Western Canada) trade shows and events that are consistent with the Vulcan “All Science. No Fiction” brand promise and book these events into the exhibition centre. In addition, produce events under the Star Trek umbrella brand wherever appropriate and possible. These Vulcan produced events will have special value in validating the brand and establishing Vulcan as the “official site” of the Star Trek Federation Building and Starfleet Academy. There should be 14 to 20 outside events a year. Targeted outside existing events should focus primarily but not exclusively on: •

Home shows featuring the latest technological advances for living

Healthcare technology shows

Education technology shows and special events

Agri-tech shows

Alternative energy and environmental technology shows Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

Recommendation #34 (cont.) Begin booking the Exhibition Centre and recruiting events

Technology employment job fairs

Science fairs

Future tech showcases and demonstrations

Star Trek convention and trade show (www. startrekexhibition.com)

In addition to attracting existing shows and events, Vulcan should consider producing the following events, all under the Star Trek brand. •

Star Trek Federation Screenings. Screenings of tech-based movies and television specials that can be promoted to specialty groups via social media marketing. These also could be a strong draw for residents throughout the county.

Annual Starfleet Academy Technology Outreach Fair. Partner with educational institutions and technology companies to produce an annual forum for technology outreach organizations to showcase their products and services to teachers and provide technology teaching resources that teachers can use in the classroom. Schedule sessions for communication and idea sharing between teachers and technology companies.

Starfleet Academy Technology Fairs for Kids. Kids come to learn how to use technology and how it’s already in use through one day “TechCamp” and “iCamp” events. Work with Alberta Education and the Minister of Education to develop several curriculum tracks (Aviation, Robotics,

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Communications, etc.) that establish Vulcan as the technology leader for kids not just in Alberta but as a model to emulate across rural Canada. Note: this focus will serve to make Vulcan a very desirable community for young families to relocate to and will put the community “on the map.”

Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

Starfleet Academy Workshop Series. A rural technology development workshop series in partnership with universities, public secondary education and government education authorities to develop and host a series of one and two day think tanks, forums and workshops at the college and secondary school level and for the business community that focus on the practical application of modern technology in support of development and growth in rural communities. Focus would be on educating and inspiring rural communities on the importance of their direct involvement in local enterprise, investment and development execution. Series would teach about advocacy, networking, mobilizing ideas and capital, tax credits for local investment, marketing and promotion, and more. Starfleet Academy Summer Technology Enrichment Program. Develop a two week program in Vulcan for gifted high school students in Alberta who would be taught a special technology and entrepreneurship curriculum on the Technology Campus while participating in a job shadow program with area companies

and organizations focusing on their technology applications. •

Annual Starfleet Academy New Technology Ventures Competition. A technology business ideas competition for early-stage technology entrepreneurs, produced by Vulcan but supported by the provincial government. The competition would be open to everyone in Alberta and entries would be accepted from a person, a team or a business. The competition would welcome technology/business ideas from all sectors but would place special emphasis on submissions that were of significant value to rural communities.

Other ideas include: •

Starfleet’s Spock Days - expand the activities of the current Spock Days to include an array of lectures, classes, “cadet training”, accreditation exams, competitions such as costume contests, “weapons training,” games and social events and meals to extend the event to several days and nights. Explore a partnership with International Star Trek Fan Association, Inc. that could establish an on-site presence and “academy” year round. http://sfi.org)

Starfleet’s Team Building Exhibition

Starfleet’s Technology Showcase

Starfleet Academy’s Technology Job Fair

Starfleet Academy’s Home Innovation Showcase


Recommendations

Starfleet’s 5K Challenge (a 5K run fundraising event)

Starfleet’s Vulcan Rod Run (a classic car event)

StarFleet Academy’s Space Camp (a partnership with Space Camp to replicate a portion of the Orlando/Huntsville experiences for several one week camps each summer).

COST: Included in Recruiter position above TIMELINE: 14 to 18 months prior to opening Exhibition Centre TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Recruiter position or Sales position, Vulcan Tourism

In addition, even non-science, non-technology events would be invited to Vulcan as a Starfleet experience. For example, Travel Alberta events could be hosted in Vulcan and themed as “Travel Alberta’s Star Fleet Academy.” Hosting Harley-Davidson or classic car shows could be themed “The HOG StarFleet Rally” to play on the theme. Note: The majority of these events should be invited into Vulcan - they are not produced locally. They are produced by outside organizations, and Vulcan acts as host. However, recruiting and inviting these events, planning for these activities, and organizing some events will require some increase in staff and resources, which will need to be allocated. Note: Building a menu of Starfleet Academy and external events brings more than just visitor revenue into the community for hotels, restaurants and retailers. It also fosters the growth of service businesses such as event production companies, audio/visual/staging equipment rentals, catering services, technology retailers, etc.

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Recommendations

Recommendation #35 Begin the social media marketing effort

As with all brands you MUST “deliver on the promise.” The best brand-building vehicle is social media, but we don’t want to roll out the new brand direction and supporting graphics until some of the product is in place. Currently Vulcan is somewhat of a disappointment due to the fact there is little in the way of activities, lodging, and other amenities and activities tied to the brand. As things are developed, social media will be the method used to “tell the world” about what’s happening in Vulcan. As the Exhibition Centre is built, having a full-time tourism employee dedicated to online initiatives will be important. This includes website updates, social media management, search optimization, and pay per click initiatives, reciprocal links, etc. The detailed Social Media Marketing Plan is located in the Supplemental Information section of this plan. COST: $40,000 a year (part time position gradually growing into a full-time job) TIMELINE: Late 2012 or early 2013 TASK RESPONSIBILITY: Vulcan Tourism

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Recommendations

Actions To Take The Following Years 2013 major initiatives: Recommendation #1 Model Home Development Begin development of the model home of the future (an 18-month process including fixtures and furnishings) Details include: Construct the most technologically advanced home in Canada as a showcase of the future. Locate the home on the two empty lots on Centre Street between the Trek Station and the railroad tracks. The lots are 125 ft. x 150 ft. each with a total of approximately 40,000 square feet. The land should be publicly purchased if funding is available for development of the model home. A secondary use would be for a new mid-price hotel, again if funding is available for development. The project would showcase all aspects of the home, not just interiors. The focus would be on new construction techniques and new emerging materials including recycled products, energy and waste systems, conservation, landscapes and the exterior. Everything would be tied to seasons. Vulcan, like much of interior Canada and central North America, has extreme seasonal changes so the model home can showcase its advantages by season. Recruit one of the province’s best-known architects to design the home pro bono. Then recruit one of the province’s largest builders to build it at cost. Then before it is built, recruit partners who will showcase their technologies in the home in exchange for promotion of the product and project. Partners might

include Corning, Sony, LG, Samsung, Apple, Microsoft, GE and numerous other companies. A video by Corning is an excellent example of what the model home of the future in Vulcan might look like (name/link). The home would be open to the public with interpretive signs throughout, a general descriptive brochure and then product placement/sponsor handouts in front of products where appropriate. The home would be a designated stop on the QR Code system with its own post. • Begin architectural and engineering for the Exhibition Centre. Construction could begin in the fall of 2013 if funding is in place. • Continuation of the mural program (four per year through 2014). • Begin major façade improvements along Main Street. • Develop the monthly “technology update” e-newsletter, which would go out the first of each month beginning in January.

Recommendation #2 Vulcan Technology Update Establish The Vulcan Technology Update, a monthly e-newsletter for posting information on the use of new technology by local business, government, organizations and associations. Every time new technology is used, the news would be forwarded to Economic Development/Vulcan Business Development Society for distribution to the community

on the e-newsletter, on blogs and using other communications resources. The primary focus of content would be on technologies for home, health, education, business, and the environment – the five “pillars” of the branding effort. The purpose of this communication is to heighten awareness of technology throughout all sectors of the community so others can see it and learn how these applications work. By making Vulcan the betasite for trying new ideas, the community will always be on the cutting edge of new methods, equipment and ideas. Distribution of the e-newsletter to target audiences outside of the community will also serve to reinforce the technology brand for the community and build interest in possible engagement, including partnerships and sponsorships.

Recommendation #3 Activities Guide Design, write and print “Engage! The Vulcan Activities Guide.” This is a 4” x 9” standard rack brochure. Print 10,000 copies to be distributed regionally at Visitor Information Centers throughout British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. This would also be available online. This activities guide should promote the new Vulcan brand and activities, focusing on the specific activities, events, shops, dining, lodging, and new features in Vulcan that make Vulcan a unique place to visit and spend time in. Include lots of professional photography. Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Recommendations

2013 major initiatives (cont.): Recommendation #4 Smartphone/Tablet App Development

Recommendation #6 Expand technology in healthcare and wellness.

Begin an app development that will showcase Star Trek trivia, coming events, local restaurants and retail shops, “Did you know…” technology tidbits and trivia (real-life). Details:

The brand promise calls Vulcan “the most technologically advanced small town in Canada”. The promise is based on five pillars: education, home, work, environment, and health. Delivery of that promise rests on all five pillars, but three of them – education, home and work – depend heavily on first-rate health care and wellness services if the community is to attract visitors, teachers, businesses, investment, and the families who will need to move to Vulcan to fill new jobs.

Develop an application for use on Apple’s iPhone and iPad gear, on Android, and on other SmartPhone and tablet computers that would include: •

Map of Vulcan

GPS maps that would guide visitors on walking or even driving tours of Vulcan and the surrounding area.

Camera for use at QR Code posts

The application would facilitate exploration and the dissemination of information on the community to visitors while reinforcing Vulcan’s technology brand.

Additional upgrading of the capabilities of the hospital and health care services using technology will be necessary. These upgrades will make the hospital and community more attractive to needed doctors, nurses and staff. Visitors and residents will benefit from enhanced services and capabilities. Recommended improvements include: •

A fully functional Electronic Health Record system that interfaces with other facilities in the province

Palm devices or smart phones with medical apps for nurses on duty to use as ready references

Cardiac telemetry capabilities, not just bedside monitoring

Recommendation #5 Pole Banners

Digital radiography

Ceiling lifts in patient rooms

Begin adding new pole banners downtown, and along the highway. Samples are included in the plan.

Multifunctional phones for unit clerks

Key card entries and security cameras inside and out

Consider contacting the folks that developed Star Trek PADD (Personal Access Display Device) and work with them to develop a similar add that would focus on Vulcan along with trivia, but would also include places to eat, places to shop, mural locations, info on each of the Walk of Fame celebrities, etc.

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Major capital improvements may also be required in the near future for a separate Long Term Care Wing to augment the Acute Care Wing and Emergency Room. As the community grows under the new plan, additional space will also be needed for Outpatient Treatment and Physical Therapy facilities including kitchen, bathrooms and offices. In addition to hospital and healthcare services upgrades, it is recommended that the current wellness facilities in Vulcan be expanded and promoted to visitors and residents. These include jogging trails and other recreational venues such as swimming, boating, golf and both low and high impact sports activities.

Recommendation #7 Cell Phone Expansion Work with mobile communication businesses to provide cell towers in Vulcan County. Cell service is currently very poor for every carrier and as the community becomes a stronger destination, this will be an imperative need – particularly since the brand revolves around technology. It should be the new 4G service. Aggressively pursue becoming one of the first communities in Alberta to receive and develop 4G and new cell networks. Work with Telus or Rogers to create the first regional rural 4G area in the province – or even in Western Canada – in exchange for marketing and promotional considerations.


Recommendations

2014 major initiatives Recommendation #1 Development of the Exhibition Centre Recommendation #2 Development of the partnering hotel (or two) Recommendation #3 Completion of the model home of the future Recommendation #4 Repurpose Trek Station Move Vulcan Tourism to the Exhibition Centre and re-purpose the existing Trek Station to a museum showcasing the original Star Trek series and followup television series. The Exhibition Centre would focus on the current Star Trek franchise and future technologies.

Develop a major amphitheater that can seat approximately 1,500 people. This would host celebrities being inducted into the Walk of Fame, technology speakers, concerts, theater in the round, etc. The amphitheater should be within walking distance of the Exhibition Centre and hotel, downtown. An amphitheater will provide Vulcan with the opportunity to hold concerts and performances, attracting visitors and drawing residents from throughout the area to town. It will give people an

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Naming rights for the amphitheater would be one option for financing construction.

THE VERY BEST OF VULCAN, ALBERTA Sector Level: ED-108.67 | Delta Screen

Recommendation #6 The Best of Brochure Design, write and print “Boldy Go! The Very Best of Vulcan, Alberta” 4” x 9” rack brochure. This would showcase your four best restaurants, for best retail shops, and top six to 12 “must see” sites and mustdo activities in Vulcan County. Print 10,000 copies and these would be distributed locally in each hotel room/B&B, at local retail shops, in the Trek Station and Exhibition Centre, when built. These would also be available online. Details: Develop a 4” x 9” rack brochure that features the best places to eat, best shops (no chains) and best activities along with a map of downtown Vulcan and a map of the county showing the other partnering town. No lodging facilities would be included. This way the brochure can be placed in each hotel room. It also would be distributed at visitor information centers between Calgary, Southwest Alberta and Lethbridge, as well as at other destination cities including Drumheller and Banff.

TM & © 2011 CBS Studios Inc. STAR TREK and related markes and logos are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved

Recommendation #5 Develop Amphitheatre

opportunity to connect with the arts in a beautiful setting and will provide much needed entertainment options. Functions from concerts and theatrical productions to festivals, wedding ceremonies and family reunions could book the space. It also could be the site for important Star Trek events during Spock Days.

StarTrekCapital.com

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Recommendations

2014 major initiatives (cont.): This could be a public/private partnership project where each business pays a portion of the printing cost.

Recommendation #7 Develop a series of brand posters (27” x 40”) that showcase:

Criteria for selection as “the best” would need to include:

The New Science of Agriculture

Helping you live long, so you can prosper

Our technology is out of this world

We view education a little differently here

Our agricultural ideas are changing the world

Home is where the technology is

Samples are included in the plan. These would be printed, mounted, matted, and framed and hung in series throughout the Exhibition Centre, in the VBDS offices and conference rooms, in Town Hall, the schools, hospital and everywhere in Vulcan showcasing how all-encompassing the branding effort is. You might have a wall 30’ long that would have all of these posters (think of a gallery) on display.

Good curb appeal

Open six days a week

Unique to the community: no chain or franchise stores or restaurants

Attractions must be not-to-be-missed landmarks and activities and they need to be open consistent hours and days

All need to be highly regarded by someone other than themselves. They should have high approval ratings (at least 90%) by organizations like TripAdvisor, Yelp or in regional print publications.

• Once the Exhibition Centre opens, it would include a retail store where visitors can rent or purchase tablet computers, which would include maps of Vulcan showcasing sites, restaurants, retail shops, etc., and would also include a camera to be used with local QR codes around town, and would also feature already available Star Trek-related apps.

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Recommendation #8 Implement New Look Begin print advertising using the new graphics to promote tourism, to book the Exhibition Centre, to attract business development and investment, and to create brand recognition beyond just Star Trek.

Recommendation #9 Public Art Program Begin a public art program that would focus on technology. It does not, and should not, all be Star Trek themed. It can include the Space Station Robotic Arm and other space exploration or scientific artifacts that are fun, educational, and have a focus on the future – not the past. Art would be placed at strategic high visibility locations throughout the community. Develop a master plan for locations, general themes and suggested materials (primarily sculpture but of all types). Each piece of art would identify the artist and the medium. A contest is recommended in order to generate as many submissions as possible with five winners to be selected. Each submission would provide a detailed design and cost estimate. Each winner would be provided with a stipend of up to $2,000 to cover the cost of materials. Completed art works and the artists would be unveiled in a public relations event utilizing social media for promotion. An excellent example of public art with a technology theme can be found at: http://newsfeed.kosmograd. com/kosmograd/2007/05/the_virtual_ble.html The public art program is separate from the wall mural program but the two should be coordinated so that much of the high visibility public area of Vulcan (primarily downtown) displays either public art or murals.


Recommendations

2015 major initiatives College, University of Alberta and other academic institutions on the one hand and public and private sector organizations on the other. It also could be the site for ongoing education like Vulcan County Adult Learning.

Recommendation #1 Begin development process for a Technology Campus The ideal site for the Starfleet Academy Technology Campus would be connected to or immediately adjacent to the new Exhibition Centre and within walking distance of hotels, restaurants and other new amenities. If sufficient acreage is not available in this location it is recommended that the Technology Campus be located on the immediate periphery of the town to accommodate growth of the Campus in future years. Of critical importance is access to the Alberta Internet Grid. Walking and bicycle access as well as public transportation to the downtown area would be a plus. The Technology Campus would provide the location and services for like-minded organizations interested and engaged in the research, development and commercialization of practical new technologies that have special value to small rural communities. By developing a critical mass of talent and facilities with a common focus the Technology Campus could be the single most important component in the long term economic development of Vulcan. Recommended tenets of the Technology Campus would include: •

Academic partnerships for research in technology education and technology development. These could include partnerships between Lethbridge

Start up technology companies that have moved beyond the initial “incubator phase” that is housed in the Star Trek Federation exhibition centre.

Established, larger companies interested in locating their new research and development efforts on small town rural applications in the Technology Center.

Provincial and Federal field offices interested in observing and engaging in research and development of applications with potential value to small town rural communities throughout Canada. These offices might also study social issues such as the impact of this new technology and the traditional culture and quality of life of small town rural Canada.

Alberta Institute for Advanced Technology Research Station (preferred location is within the Starfleet Academy exhibition centre).

Demonstration projects showing new technology applications. These could be open to the public and might include new energy applications like a solar panel farm, wind farm, and waste-to-energy alternatives among others.

A tenant land lease or acquisition strategy should

be developed that provides maximum incentives to locate on the Campus. An overall land use plan including design controls should be created and enforced but Vulcan need not become involved in the actual development and construction process beyond site work. Suggestion: Explore a partnership with the Kootenay Association for Science & Technology (KAST) in British Columbia as a possible “sister city.” KAST’s objective is to foster a culture that values science, technology, innovation and entrepreneurship as activities vital to maintaining and enhancing the competitiveness of their region, primarily through education, mentoring and providing resources on-line. A similar endeavor for Alberta based in Vulcan might be an effective mechanism for economic development.

Recommendation #2 Develop the Alberta Institute for Advanced Technology (AIAT) Research Station Work with the province and Ottawa on the development of a new Alberta Institute for Advanced Technology (AIAT) Research Station. The Institute’s mission would be to conduct commercially-oriented innovative research - filling the key gap in the innovative ecosystem. As suggested in the May 2011 report Shaping Alberta’s Future produced by the (Alberta) Premier’s council for Economic Strategy, AIAT programs would be designed to attract entrepreneurial scientists and post graduates to design, conduct and utilize research to create new Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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products, processes, services and companies based on technology for the economic development and diversification of Alberta and Canada. The special focus of the AIAT Research Station would be the commercialization of technology applications for rural Canadian development. Vulcan not only would house the AIAT Research Station but it also would serve as a test bed and demonstration model for many of these applications including studying how applications and development modules work best under a public/private/academic organization. Locating the AIAT Research Station in Vulcan is logical: •

Vulcan’s rural location is a logical test bed for rural technology applications. Because 199 of every 200 towns in Canada are rural, applications that benefit the country’s rural communities should come from a rural community like Vulcan.

Developing the AIAT Research Station will require a partnership between government, industry and educational institutions. The existing and excellent relationship with Lethbridge College in particular will need to be expanded significantly along with partnerships with other colleges and universities. The optimum location for the AIAT Research Station would be connected to, or immediately adjacent to the new Starfleet Academy (exhibition centre) and hotels. The land should be designated the Technology Campus along with the name of a major sponsor securing naming rights.

Recommendation #3 Advance the development of the Southern Alberta Energy from Waste Alliance (SAEWA)

Vulcan is away from the distractions of urban centers.

AIAT Research Station would be less expensive to build and to maintain in Vulcan.

AIAT Research Station would be a perfect tie to the new Vulcan brand (All Science. No Fiction.), and the Star Trek theme.

High speed fiber communication is already in place.

Develop the first regional facility that takes waste and converts it into energy. This project ties into the brand direction, the Technology Campus (recommendation #27), and would make Vulcan a showcase community and a destination for communities throughout the country. As the first “demonstration project” tenant of the Technology Campus, SAEWA provides confidence and momentum for other tenants to secure space. It positions the Campus as a production and education center where people can study and learn what it takes to develop, operate, and fund such a facility.

Vulcan is already working on being the prototype for rural communities across Canada in terms of home, education, health, environment and jobs.

SAEWA is a coalition of waste management jurisdictions engaged in researching and implementing technological applications for

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recovering energy from waste materials. HDR/AECOM was retained to explore the potential to develop a waste management program. They have completed Phase I showing there are large enough quantities of feedstock waste with adequate heating value in the region and they are now on Phase II, investigating which technologies are best suited to the region.


Supplemental Information

2012 Initiatives List by Organization

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2012 initiatives listed by organization TOWN OF VULCAN

VULCAN TOURISM

VULCAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

January – April:

January - April

- Downtown retail technical assistance

- Downtown development master plan

- PDF of brand graphics to CBS – work with them on approvals – GO THERE and make the pitch in person. You need to “sell them.”

- Retail façade improvements, beautification (creating a downtown organization with some funding in place)

- BridgeBrand Poster: printing, mounting, framing, sales

- Gateway posts into downtown (working with the Town, BLT)

- Bookmarks – design, printing, distribution

- Development of a MUZAK sound system downtown

March – June: - Website redevelopment

- Begin use of the new brand identity in business cabinet

- Frames for Walk of Fame

VULCAN COUNTY

July – October:

- Implement the wayfinding system starting with county gateways

- Option Exhibition Centre site (Town? County? VBDS?) May – September: - Replace street poles downtown along Main Street - Add lighted QR posts along Main Street - Begin use of new brand identity in business cabinet October – December: - Begin marketing the Exhibition Centre (if the Town owns it) VULCAN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY

- Put new video technology into the Trek Station - Pole banners in downtown (working with BLT)

- Begin use of the new brand identity in business cabinet

October – December:

HOSPITAL

- Begin use of new brand identity in business cabinet - Full time Internet, social media manager

- Begin use of the new brand identity in business cabinet

- Exhibition Centre concept plan & cost evaluation

BRAND LEADERSHIP TEAM

SCHOOL SYSTEM

- Redevelop the website

January - April

July – December:

- Make sure you have the right champions in place

- Work with recruiter in obtaining new technologies in the schools

- Free wi-fi throughout downtown Vulcan (not just hot spots)

- Set up a schedule of possible speaking engagements

- Alterations to the Wayfinding System

- Plan and implement a speaking schedule

- Begin use of new brand identity in business cabinet

- Develop a funding partnership for graphic design expertise and contract with them for 2012. This can be renewed annually.

January – April: - Creation of a Brand Standards & Practices Manual (Style Guide) - Secure site for model home March – June:

- Muralize the Trek Station exterior

- Find the recruiter, develop a contract, find the funding - Begin development of the mural program 94

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RECRUITER (Working under the direction of the BLT) - Develop the database of contacts - Put together the dog and pony show - Work with graphic designer for appropriate marketing pieces - Begin use of new brand identity in business cabinet


Supplemental Information

Supplemental Information

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Social Media Marketing Plan SECTION I: VULCAN The community of Vulcan, Alberta is focused on becoming well-known for being the most technologically advanced small town in Canada, one that embraces practical uses of technology in everyday life and is a test bed for technology in research, innovation, education, business and new applications that have value for small communities across Canada, befitting its title as the Official Star Trek Capital of Canada. The social media campaign is designed to support Vulcan’s overall social media objectives: 1. Targeting local residents, technology and investment stake holders, and potential tourists. 2. Engaging directly with local, and area-wide, residents via social media environments. 3. Developing content and encouraging target audiences to share this content with their peers. 4. Encouraging potential consumers, and technology industry businesses and investors to visit Local Attractions According to Wikipedia, the following attracts both local and tourism dollars to the Vulcan area, as well as the immediate surrounding areas: The town’s name has brought some attention that has helped it become a tourist attraction. In the Star Trek television and feature film series it is the name of the home-world of the Vulcans. 96

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Capitalizing on this coincidence, the town has built a Star Trek-themed tourist station (the Tourism and Trek Station), which provides tourist information, displays Star Trek memorabilia, provides unique photo opportunities, and allows visitors to participate in The Vulcan Space Adventure virtual reality game. Nearby, a replica of the starship Enterprise from Star Trek V has been mounted on a pedestal which includes writing from Trek alien languages like Klingon. The town has also created space-themed murals and signs, and hosts an annual communitywide Star Trek convention. Social media campaigns should strive to connect with and include any community activities and events, promoted by the above groups and/or entities, which are directly, or indirectly, related to the greater Vulcan area. Conventions & Sporting Events Wikipedia also mentions the following as part of the description of Vulcan. Spock Days. This convention attracts hundreds of Star Trek fans from around the world. Since 1990, Vulcan has hosted the annual Vulcan Tinman Triathlon, which takes place at the beginning of June. This sprint-distance triathlon attracts nearly 1,000 participants. There are classes for adults of all ages and skill levels as well as for teams and children.

As with the local attractions above, a greater synergy can be created by linking the social media strategy of the Vulcan community, with the social media efforts of the local conventions, festivals, and sporting events. Demographics (2006) The 2006 census showed a population of 1,940 residents in the city of Vulcan, representing a 10.1% increase over the population in 2001. The population of the county, which is also named Vulcan, was 3,718 in 2006. The median age of the population is 49.5 years old, with 83.2% of the population over the age of 15. (www.city-data.com/canada/Vulcan-Town.html ) In addition, the mean household income was $64,832. These demographics will, in part, set the tone and determine the channels, of the social media messages.


Recommendations

SECTION II: VISION, OPPORTUNITIES AND OBJECTIVES The overarching vision is to make Vulcan, Alberta well known for being the most technologically advanced small town in Canada; one that embraces practical uses of technology in everyday life, and is a test bed for technology in research, innovation, education, business and new applications that have value for small communities across Canada, befitting its title as the Official Star Trek Capital of Canada. As a lovely small town on the Canadian prairie, Vulcan embraces its family lifestyle and emphasis on creative technologies. Community Growth Opportunities to Explore With a new branding effort in process, Vulcan is developing its foundation in becoming a technology center, offering a perfect environment for the pursuit of new, emerging technologies within the following five areas: home, health, education, jobs, and the environment. Vulcan is the home to the Trek Station, which features Star Trek displays and information. When the latest Star Trek movie was released, Leonard Nimoy visited Vulcan and claimed it to be “Spock’s home”. The new branding effort will incorporate the Star Trek theme, but updated and with a scientific, technology focus. The new tagline reflects that change: “Vulcan, Alberta – All Science, No Fiction.” Recommendations for the new brand will include the development of facilities to bring that technology

brand to life, such as a new technology incubator, research station, a new exhibition center, additional Star Trek displays, a new hotel, among other things.

page positions in the search engines. The following primary keywords were identified as the first targets for high search engine rankings.

To that end, the following community goals have been identified:

Primary Keywords

1. Attract new technology businesses and investment

2. Star Trek

2. Revitalize the downtown core with beautification and building facades in keeping with the future technological theme

5. Trek Station

3. Reposition Vulcan based on its new theme and attract more visitors The following social media objectives have been identified to strengthen and reinforce the above community goals: 1. Reposition Vulcan as the most technologically advanced small town in Canada 2. Attract more visitors, both locally, nationally, and internationally

1. Alberta technology

3. Spock Days

6. Canada technology 7. Emerging technology 8. Starfleet Academy “Secondary Keywords” are the top keywords that are currently being entered by search engine users when they are looking for information relating to Vulcan, Alberta. Social media postings should periodically include these keywords as a way to both maintain high search engine rankings and attract the core audiences. The following secondary keywords were identified in the keyword analysis:

SECTION III: RESEARCH ANALYSIS

Secondary Keywords

A keyword analysis was conducted to determine the primary and secondary keywords to target for attracting search engine users to the social media campaigns surrounding the greater Vulcan, Alberta community.

1. Travel in Alberta

“Primary Keywords” are those keywords that the social media campaign will attempt to dominate with first

5. Alberta tourist

2. Travel Alberta 3. Technology in education 4. Vulcan tourism

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Social Media Marketing Plan (cont.) 6. Trek tourism

2. Residents of Canada and the U.S

7. Canada technology jobs

Desired Action by Target Audience

Both the primary and secondary keywords above should be used throughout any social media postings and on all of the social media platforms.

The primary and secondary audiences of the social media campaigns will be targeted in an effort to have them take the following desired actions: 1) Bring technology businesses to the Vulcan community, and; 2) visit Vulcan, Alberta.

Competing Communities As the community of Vulcan positions itself as a destination of choice for both local and tourist dollars, and the broader technology industry, it will have to reposition alternative choices which are competing for those same dollars. The following competing cities have been identified, and should be targeted for repositioning in the social media campaigns: 1. Edmonton, Alberta 2. Calgary, Alberta

SECTION IV: MESSAGE & AUDIENCE The following audiences have been identified, and should be targeted, with relevant social media messages: Primary Target Audience

The goals are to have the reader interact with the social media postings, help “spread the word” throughout their peer groups about what Vulcan has to offer, and make plans to visit (aimed at local residents and tourists) and/or relocate (aimed at technology-based industries) to the Vulcan area.

The new branding effort for Vulcan will focus on a more modern, technologically advanced image of Star Trek, as well as a home for emerging practical technologies. A new, forward thinking, tagline has been proposed for Vulcan: “All Science. No Fiction”

2. Visitors of all ages from Calgary and Edmonton

The overall technology based social media message should focus on the idea that Vulcan is the best place to locate your technology business – small town advantages with a creative, innovative atmosphere.

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Each social media platform will have its own message tone, and each should be used as a means of driving traffic back to a home blog or web site. •

Blog - If a blog is created to focus on the Vulcan community, it should be used to introduce visitors to the general area and all of the changes happening there. This is THE on-line place for establishing and strengthening the brand. The blog should also be used as a focal point around which the other social media sites would send online traffic.

Twitter – The Twitter account should be used to keep users informed on the latest news, events, and activities, including conventions, festivals, and new attractions.

Facebook – The Facebook page should be used to showcase the Vulcan area. Because of the space afforded to Facebook pages, this page can show a more in-depth, or “real life” side of the community. Facebook is a good place to profile the people, places and events happening in the general area; i.e. the “people behind the scenes”, and the activities in which they are involved. Facebook is

Currently, Vulcan is known for its Star Trek theme, and as a rural farming community.

Overall Message Tone

1. Residents of Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan

Platform Specific Tone

Branding Message

1. Technology businesses from across Canada

Secondary Target Audience

The overall local and tourist based social media message should focus on the idea that Vulcan is a fun, unique place to visit and see the technology of the future. Additionally, the messages should aim at attracting Star Trek fans as the home of “Spock” as well as being the town that embraces future technologies.


Recommendations

also a great platform for linking to photos, videos, and other multi-media channels. •

Google+ – Google+ is not yet ready for community pages. However, once these pages become available (projected in the next couple of months), a Google+ page should be set-up to showcase the Vulcan area in much the same way as the Facebook page is used to do so currently. YouTube – YouTube should be used to host videos that feature activities, entertainment, events and everything else that is happening in the Vulcan area. Another great use of You Tube would be to feature a series of videos that showcase the building and grand opening of new attractions, technology centers, emerging and/ or innovative technologies and the like. Links to these videos should be placed throughout the other social media sites. Book Marking sites – Due to the focus on attracting technology-based industries, on-going technology-related postings should be made to sites like Technorati.com, a social book marking site that is focused on technology news and events. (http://technorati.com/ )

SECTION V: SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

organic growth to increase traffic, engage with on-line communities, and improve search engine rankings.

Social Media Metrics A set of specific social media metrics should be established, and then measured on a periodic basis. These metrics should include, but are not necessarily limited to: •

Traffic to the web site or blog for the previous month

Total number of Twitter followers; total number of Twitter mentions for the previous month

Total number Facebook likes /fans

Total number of YouTube views (per video)

Measurement and periodic review of these social media metrics will help focus the social media strategy and allow for adjustments to that strategy (if necessary) over time.

Response – Promptly respond to questions or comments from users.

Broadcasting – Post relevant content, across all channels, a minimum of thirty (30) times per month, with the purpose of encouraging users to engage with the various Vulcan events and activities, as well as the home web site or blog.

Specific activities from within the above activity areas should include: Listening Ongoing keyword research Conversation Monitoring Reputation Monitoring Competitor Monitoring

Social Media Activities to Achieve Goals

Broadcasting

The following four activity areas will form the foundation of the social media campaign:

Re-tweeting

Posting content

Listening –monitoring the conversations occurring within the social media channels relating to the greater Vulcan community.

Responding to questions

Building Community –Engage users on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and other relevant social media platforms. The goal will be to utilize

Twitter follow campaign

Building Community Facebook/Google+ Pages Publishing videos on YouTube Development of a web site/blog

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Social Media Marketing Plan (cont.) Content Social Media postings Postings on web site or blog Comment postings Press Release distribution

Content Schedule: Publish a 300+ word post on the blog 1-2 times per week. Facebook Page Posts – Action Steps 1.

Place a Facebook button (link) on all other Vulcan social media sites and encourage readers to visit the Facebook page and “Like” the page.

2.

Place a Facebook logo on all other marketing and promotional materials and encourage readers to visit the Facebook page.

3.

Use the Facebook page to showcase news, events, conventions, and activities in the Vulcan area; include pictures, videos, and other multimedia.

Social Media Action Plans/Content Schedules The following action steps and content schedules are recommended to optimize the social media campaign, maximize traffic, and increase search engine rankings: Optimized Blog Posts – Action Steps 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

Develop a keyword optimized blog to create a focal point for the overall social media campaign. Create an opt-in form on the blog to capture names and email addresses for creating two (or more) email lists – one for technology-related industries and the other for the local/tourism traffic. Focus on both technology driven events and activities, and local/tourist attractions, events, and news. Promote events, activities, and news events to the email list through use of an email campaign (this can be automated with an autoresponder). Set-up accounts on the social book marking sites (e.g., Digg, Reddit, etc.) and bookmark each blog post on these sites.

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4. 5.

6. 7.

Actively seek out related Facebook pages and “Like” them. Post comments on these other Facebook pages and encourage readers to stop by the Vulcan page and “Like” back. Consider hosting contests and community events through the Facebook page. Promote the home web site and/or blog on Facebook.

Content Schedule: Post on the Vulcan Facebook page on a daily basis. Twitter Tweets/Re-Tweets – Action Steps 1.

Tweet about any upcoming events, activities, and breaking news.

2.

Place a Twitter button (link) on all other Vulcan social media sites and encourage readers to follow on Twitter.

3.

Place a Twitter logo on all other marketing and promotional materials and encourage readers to follow on Twitter.

4.

Invite those other members to follow you back.

5.

Employ the use of “hashtags” (#) on Twitter to quickly promote specific events or activities in the downtown area.

6.

Use Twitter to drive traffic back to Facebook and (if employed) the Vulcan blog.

7.

Use twitter to position Vulcan as the “most technologically advanced small town in Canada.”

8.

Set-up a monitoring system (e.g. Tweet Deck) to follow Vulcan-related tweets and mentions.

Content Schedule: Tweet on Twitter on a daily basis. YouTube Videos – Action Steps 1.

Develop a video shooting calendar of upcoming events and activities.

2.

Create a YouTube account and a “Vulcan, Alberta” channel.

3.

Shoot, edit and publish relevant videos to YouTube.com.

4.

Post links of the videos on the other social media sites.


Recommendations

Content Schedule: Publish videos on YouTube as the videos become available. Aim for a minimum of 1-video to be published each month.

Content Schedule: Keyword-optimize and publish press releases according to the existing press release schedule. If no schedule currently exists, then aim for monthly press release distribution.

Comments/Answers in the Social Community – Action Steps

Google Alerts – Action Steps

1.

1.

Set-up a Google account.

2.

Create free Google Alerts to track relevant keywords (Google will aggregate blog posts, forum posts, and any news items that contain these keywords).

2.

Using a search engine (e.g. Google or Bing), identify technology-related blogs, forums, and social media sites. Follow the posts on these sites and offer comments where appropriate.

3.

Make sure to have a link pointing back to the home web site, blog, or Facebook page.

4.

Monitor the home social media sites and respond in a timely manner to any comments, questions, or concerns that arise.

5.

Position Vulcan as the “most technologically advanced small town in Canada.”

Content Schedule: Offer comments and/or answers on other web sites on a weekly basis. Answer questions, comments, or concerns from users on a daily basis. Optimized Press Releases – Action Steps 1.

Keyword optimize any press releases for search engine ranking.

2.

Distribute the press release through on-line press release channels.

3.

Link the press releases with the home web site, blog and/or social media sites.

3.

Review these keyword-related posts to both keep abreast of the Vulcan-related discussions, and to find content sources for blog posts and social media postings.

Content Schedule: Review the Google Alerts on a daily basis and create content as needed. Book Marking Sites – Action Steps 1.

Set-up free accounts on technology-related social book marking sites (e.g. Technorati.com)

2.

Use these sites to post technology-related news, events and activities.

Content Schedule: Post-up on the book marking sites on a weekly basis. Social Media Content Sourcing

1. Vulcan Business Development 2. Vulcan Tourism 3. Vulcan Chamber of Commerce 4. Google Alerts (see above) Also seek out technology-related news items, event calendars, press releases, and other information from local businesses and technology-related industry sources. Use of Banners, Posters, Artwork and QR Codes Proposed advertisements, pole banners, logos, and posters will be created which reinforce the transition of Vulcan into “the most technologically advanced small town in Canada”. Images from these promotional pieces, along with any adopted tag lines (e.g. “All science – no fiction”) should be used liberally through the social media sites to both increase awareness and help establish the new branding. As these new images and messages are introduced into the community, they should also be promoted throughout the on-line social media platforms. Some of these images might also lend themselves as profile pictures on platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. The use of QR Codes will also reinforce the “technology-focused” theme and bring a new excitement to the tourist trade. These codes should be promoted via the social media channels.

Content for the social media postings can come from a variety of sources, including, but not necessarily limited to: Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Social Media Marketing Plan (cont.) SECTION VI: SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION To effectively implement the above social media strategy, it will be necessary to dedicate one, or more, people to the following tasks:

by Google, and is named Google Analytics. Among other things, Google Analytics will measure volume and sources of traffic, keywords used, and trends over time. A Google Analytics report should initially be run once a week, and then, once a baseline has been established, once a month.

Vulcan Blog

Back Link Network

If it is determined to publish a Vulcan blog, then it is recommended to post to that blog two to four times per week.

Back links (i.e. external links pointing back to a web site or blog) are the single most important factor for establishing, and maintaining, high search engine rankings. As such, developing a back link network should be a high priority for any web site or blog. While this should be viewed as an ongoing activity, the time involved can be as little as an hour or two per week.

Search Engine Optimization Each social media page should be search engine optimized to increase the likelihood of front page rankings in the major search engines. Once the initial optimization has been completed, maintenance optimization can take place on a monthly basis. Develop Listening Campaign It is recommended that a social media listening campaign be set-up to keep abreast of discussions, concerns, questions, and general mentions within the social media sites. This listening campaign should focus on relevant keywords (e.g. “Alberta technology” or “Galaxyfest”). Listening to relevant discussions should occur on a daily basis. Set-Up Analytics Package An analytics package should be installed on any web site, or blog, that is being used for this social media campaign. A very good, and free, package is offered 102

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SECTION VII: SOCIAL MEDIA REPORTING To monitor the progress of the social media plan implementation and execution, it is recommended to identify and report on key marketing and social media metrics, and then adjust the social media strategies (if needed) based upon the data analysis. Analytics and Key Metrics Reporting Using the data gathered from an installed analytics package, set-up reports on key metrics that will focus on traffic (sources and quantity), opt-in sign-ups (from the blog or other social media platforms), conversion rates, and other critical measures. You will also want reports on the total number of back links pointing to the home web site or blog.

Press Release Distribution

Social Media Metrics Reporting

Assuming that press releases are part of a larger Public Relations and/or Marketing campaign, these press releases should be optimized and distributed via online channels as well.

It is also recommended that you establish a report on the quantity of postings and back links throughout the social media network, per the schedule identified in the Social Media Strategy Implementation section, above.


Supplemental Information

Possible Funding Options Western Diversification Program Primary goal of the WDP is to strengthen the western Canadian innovation system, improve western Canada’s business climate, increase economic activity, and increase economic research in the areas of innovation, business development and community economic development. They make investments in initiatives that enhance and strengthen the economy of western Canada. For more information: www. wd.gc.ca

Alberta Culture & Community Spirit Heritage Preservation Partnership Program ATPR – Tourism Investment Symposium Business Development Bank of Canada (Lender/ Investor) Government of Canada – Canada Business Canadian Heritage (Federal Government Program) Farm Credit Canada, AgriSpirit Fund

Community Adjustment Fund National economic stimulus initiative supports projects that create jobs and maintain employment in and around communities that have experienced job losses and lack employment opportunities. Lethbridge received $4,170,000 through the Community Adjustment Fund as part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan for investment in the Technology Commercialization Centre. For more information: www.wd.gc.ca/eng/11269.asp

Industry Canada – Marquis Tourism Events Program Western Economic Diversification Canada – Community Futures Development Corporations and Community Futures Rural Diversification Initiative Alberta Lottery Fund – Community Facility Enhancement Program and Community Initiatives Program Municipal Affairs – Municipal Sustainability Initiative

Building Canada Fund

Rural Alberta’s Development Fund

This national program operates through two components:

Sponsorship/Naming rights

• The Major Infrastructure Component, for larger strategic projects of national and regional significance. • The Communities Component for projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000. For more information: www.buildingcanada-chantierscanada.gc.ca

Sales of bricks/pavers/plaques on new projects Community capital campaign Private donations

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Downtown Idea Book The examples on the following pages were taken in various small towns. Every example shown here could easily be replicated in Vulcan. Remember that 70% of first time sales can come from curb appeal. So, what are you doing to pull people in your door? Ellicottville, New York (photo this page) encourages businesses to add tables and chairs to their exterior spaces and each merchant hangs baskets. Notice that the window baskets are up high enough to allow for snow removal during the winter months.

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Supplemental Information

This florist, in Blaine, Washington, said putting out these displays each morning saved her business. With these her shop would look like the one next door - nondescript and uninviting. On both of these pages note the perpendicular (blade) signs.

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Downtown Idea Book This photo, taken in Grass Valley, California was taken in February. The merchant has a heated “air curtain� just inside the door that keeps cold air out and warm air in. Grass Valley is located in the Sierra Nevada mountains east of Sacramento. All the flowers you see here are silk. Does it make you want to go in? Remember that women account for 80% of all retail spending - so make sure your shop is inviting as was done here.

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Supplemental Information

Left: Taken in Pendleton, Oregon, this merchant used half-barrels reclaimed from a local winery and they are replanted three times a year with spring kale and winter-oriented annuals, summer annuals (shown), and then fall color - keeping them working for the merchant year round. Top: Nevada City, California is a mountain town with a fair amount of annual snowfall. In this case they used evergreen shrubs, which reduces costs and keeps the buildings looking green year round. Benches should ALWAYS be flanked with planters. Notice the wall sconce pots.

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Downtown Idea Book The photos shown on the opposite page and below are in Fredericksburg, Texas a town of 12,000 residents. In this example all of the merchants pitched in and they purchased a truck load of mis-matched, discontinued pots and planters, then worked with a local scout troup and school kids to fill and plant the pots. This was a fund raiser for the school and scout program, and also eliminated vandalism since they had ownership in the program. Notice that most of the plants are evergreen. Marshall, Texas (right) put out bales of hay and scarecrows in October to fit the fall season and still make downtown attractive.

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Downtown Idea Book In Kalamazoo, Michigan they took a half-block area, demolished a building and built Arcadia Creek Festival Place (photos this page). The stage is 20’ x 50’ and the vinyl covering can easily be removed during windy periods or during heavy snowfalls. The open space has become a popular spot for their farmers market, car and motorcycle shows, arts events, concerts, theatre, and a variety of other showcase activities. Vulcan should also look for a space where this type of development can be facilitated. And it should be in the heart of downtown Vulcan, if at all possible. Opposite: This outdoor dining deck is in Nelson, British Columbia. Restaurants are encouraged to create outdoor seating areas, like this. This was taken in late October as the restaurant owner was preparing to put it in storage for the winter. They did lose two parking spaces, but without complaints.

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Downtown Idea Book This page: This gathering area may seem familiar. It’s in Lethbridge and shows how central gathering places are important in any downtown setting. Something like this would be ideal for Vulcan, perhaps next to the hotel and/or Exhibition Centre. Opposite page, left: In Alliston, Ontario the merchants pooled their resources and purchased these decorative blade signs, creating continuity while effectively marketing their individual businesses. Opposite page, right: Notice the mix of blade signs and evergreen shrubs shown here in Gig Harbor, Washington.

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Downtown Idea Book This page: Leavenworth, Washington is a Bavarianthemed town in the Cascade Mountains. Notice the hanging baskets and use of blade signs. The hanging baskets change by season. Opposite page left: Also in Leavenworth, you can see three benches, each flanked with half-barrels. These can work year round if planted with evergreen shrubs. Opposite page right: Taken in Digby, Nova Scotia, this merchant put out two small benches, then added potted plants on each. Each evening she simply puts them inside. Doesn’t it make you want to check it out? Notice the nice blade sign. NOTE: We had no idea what “Bluefin” was so make sure you always promote what it is you sell, or will pull us in the door, BEFORE you promote the name of the business.

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Downtown Idea Book The three examples on this page and the opposite page were taken in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. Note the combination of hanging baskets, blade signs, window baskets, and colorful buildings. In Vulcan the idea is NOT to make downtown futuristic, but inviting. Consider adding color to the buildings! Mahone Bay has done such an outstanding job with its beautification efforts that it is now more of a draw than nearby Lunenburg, which is a world heritage site. There’s simply no reason why the merchants in Vulcan can’t implement some of the ideas shown on these pages. People are drawn to, and in, inviting, beautiful spaces.

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Downtown Idea Book This page left: These raised planters in Bracebridge, Ontario allow for winter snow removal and include perennial plantings, adding a lot of color and making downtown inviting. This page right: The Dog Shop in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. Opposite page: This was also taken in Bracebridge and shows that you can incorporate outdoor dining even where sidewalks are not overly wide. Note the hanging baskets.

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Downtown Idea Book Photos this page: Taken in Bracebridge, Ontario (The Muskoka area near Huntsville), this florist does a nice job of placing a decorative shelf unit outside her shop each morning, then adding flower to it. Every day it changes a bit always getting attention - and a lot of compliments. The top arrangement is silk. Imagine what her shop would like like if the plantings were removed.

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Taken in Canmore, this merchant places a single basket (above) to a stool, then adds a white-board display showing daily specials. She pays attention to the writing on the board to make it easy to read and attractive. A great teaser! Just down the street (right) this merchant does an outstanding job with a combination of evergreen shrubs and annual color.

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Downtown Idea Book Photos both pages: Taken in El Dorado, Arkansas, the merchants have done an excellent job softening the facades with rows of baskets and planters. Also note the awnings. These would be ideal in downtown Vulcan as well. They add so much ambiance, are easy to clean, help shelter sidewalks and exterior displays and planters, can also house lighting (see photos). They do not all have to be the same as you can see in the photo below. In these examples, the awnings are steep so that snow can’t stick or pile up on them. Also note the colored sidewalks in the far right photo on the opposite page. Also also note the October/fall pumpkins and flowers at the bakery (below and left photo on opposite page). Does it look inviting?

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Downtown Idea Book In Leavenworth, Washington (this page) the city added half barrels down the outer edge of the sidewalk and the local Rotary and Kiwanis clubs maintain them. Even in the winter they place evergreens in the planters, which are then used in reforestation projects the following spring and replaced by new annual color. Opposite page: Another El Dorado, Arkansas example showcasing facade-side planters. NOTE: Benches should always be placed against the facade, facing out - not curbside as shown in this photograph.

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Downtown Idea Book On the previous page you saw a photo of the curbside half-barrels full of annual color in Leavenworth. Here they are during the fall with deciduous branches during the transition from summer color to fall color. Then these are replaced with evergreens. Opposite page, left: This is a planter in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Placing these at your downtown intersections will add dramatic color and will greatly beautify downtown. The plants here are all perennials. Opposite page, right: Taken in Waterton National Park, this merchant uses silk flowers mixed with real flowers, and also uses a colorful OPEN banner, and places a trunk outside the door enticing potential shoppers to “take a peak� at what the store has to offer.

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Downtown Idea Book This page, below: Taken in Hubbards, Nova Scotia, this restaurant added a trellis and arbor over the seating area making it a popular gathering spot. This page, right: Taken in one of Nova Scotia’s smaller communities, this merchant placed a large pot on each side of the door, which certainly softens the otherwise rather drab storefront. Now imagine if there was a bench on each side of the door next to each planter and then one more planter on the opposite ends of the bench. In the foreground the pot would hide the utility meter. Opposite page: Extraordinarily inviting. This is in Nantucket, Massachusetts.

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Community Stakeholder Interviews •

What is your perception of Vulcan today?

What would you like Vulcan to look like (your vision) in the future?

What do you see as the greatest opportunities/ possibilities for achieving that vision?

What do you see as the greatest challenges against achieving that vision?

Session #2 Town/County Representatives, Development Officers (9 participants)

What resources/infrastructure is needed to achieve that vision?

Session #3 Economic Development/Tourism (4 participants)

Following are interview session highlights summarizing the observations of all stakeholders.

Session #4 Service Organizations (5 participants)

Summary

On March 29, 2011 five separate one-hour interview sessions were conducted with a total of 34 influential citizens of the Town of Vulcan. Each session addressed one or more important segments of the community: Session #1 Chamber of Commerce Business Owners (8 participants)

Session #5 Other Organizations/Residents (8 participants) Participants were identified and invited by Leslie Warren, Economic Development Officer, Vulcan Business Development Society. Leslie attended every session. Each interview session was conducted in an informal, conversational setting with a series of questions offered for discussion. Questions included but were not exclusive to…

If money were no object, what would you do?

Without exception, stakeholders consider the economic future of the town in jeopardy as young people leave the community in search of jobs, the population shrinks and businesses struggle and close. Vacant storefronts broadcast a depressing story. Stakeholders characterize many businesses as “just hanging on”. Farming, the historic mainstay of the economy has declining numbers of people as the next generation of farm owners decides the work is too hard and major investment in equipment is too expensive for the return. As children leave home, these smaller farms are sold and consolidated into larger farms with fewer people remaining in the community.

Taxes are considered high compared to most Alberta communities of similar size as the tax base has shrunk with the departure of businesses and people. Nevertheless, stakeholders are fiercely proud of the quality of life in Vulcan. Those who have stayed and those who have moved there talk of the town as peaceful, safe, courteous and friendly - a good place to raise a family where neighbors know and look out for one another. The school system is considered good and the hospital is a definite plus though there is great concern about the town’s ability to continue to attract medical professionals. Recreation facilities for ice hockey, curling, ball fields, a golf course, pool and hiking/biking trails are considered positive assets for the community. On the other hand, the absence of a movie theater and a lakefront recreation is considered a negative. A shortage of shopping, dining and retail options prompts many residents to drive to Lethbridge or Calgary for entertainment, resulting in a leakage of spending in Vulcan. The quality of life and hospital are attracting retirees from Calgary, Lethbridge and elsewhere where life is perceived as hectic and unsafe. Some young families also come to Vulcan for the same reasons plus the school system but they are outnumbered by those who leave, primarily for jobs. The community is pleased with Galaxy Fest, Moonlight Madness, Tin Man Triathlon and Rodeo Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Interview Summaries but they recognize many more events are needed to sustain tourism. The visitor infrastructure of Vulcan is greatly lacking in the quality and quantity of accommodations and dining necessary to build and sustain visitors. Many feel the Star Trek theme is tired and dated and express disappointment in the results. However, most blame the lack of success on the absence of investment and implementation of a cohesive plan to capitalize on what they say is a unique identity (Vulcan=Star Trek) and hook with the potential to put their community on the map throughout Canada and the United States. There is a lack of political consensus within the Town Council on whether to support a development plan that uses Star Trek as a brand. Any development plan developed and implemented for the community will have to track results closely. Political leadership will need to see things happen quickly. The fiber optic cable that the Alberta Provincial government recently brought to Vulcan is seen as a major opportunity for economic development in the community. Currently however connections are cost prohibitive for most local organizations and businesses. Stakeholders expressed enthusiasm for connecting an updated Star Trek brand that only Vulcan can own to economic development that is centered on science, education and technology. 132

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Examples offered included local educational facilities in partnership with Lethbridge College and University of Alberta to examine renewable energy (solar, wind, bio-waste), new technologies with nonrenewable energy resources, space technology and agriculture among others. Facility usage ranged from classroom to research to training, and from school/business expos, congresses and events to interpretive center attractions for visitors. Companion technology/ business incubators also were suggested. The common elements were science, education and technology that capitalize on fiber optic cable connectivity and Vulcan’s small town quality of life, all under the umbrella of a high tech Star Trek brand. The borrowing capacity of Vulcan is extremely low. Partnerships and sponsorships will be necessary to implement a development plan. Surrounding small communities in Vulcan County will need to be connected to the plan so they can benefit from increased visitors and provide political support. It was suggested that step number one would be to identify and develop a single unique product or service that each could offer and promote for side trips from visitors to Vulcan.

Conclusion Stakeholders showed a remarkable consensus of opinion, love, angst and vision for their community. Almost everyone was passionate about Vulcan. They gave every indication that a well-conceived plan that was practical would receive their full support. Expectations were high but the people of Vulcan are nothing if not realists. They believe this may be their last best chance.


Supplemental Information

Mural Information A Case History of Chemainus, BC: A mural town In the early 1980s, Chemainus was a small town with a big problem. Like many small communities, they relied heavily on a single industry for survival and the mill that provided the mainstay of their economic success was closing. They faced the very real possibility of becoming the next ghost town. In 1981 the community was a beneficiary of a province-wide redevelopment fund, which allowed them to begin a downtown revitalization project. Their tired-looking main street was transformed with flower boxes, new benches, improved public space and better parking. However, the boost was short lived when the mill closed in 1983 and the town faced a larger problem – how to keep their community alive.

coming from private, corporate, federal, provincial and municipal investors. Today there are over three-dozen murals gracing the walls of the downtown, many depicting the town’s history. Since that beginning, Chemainus has attracted more than 100 new businesses, a $3.5 million dinner theater and hosts 350,000-450,000 visitors per year. To the town’s relief, the mill did reopen in 1985 after work was done to modernize the facilities. But the town proved that through the ingenuity, creativity and hard work of its citizens, they could survive even the worst of times.

Chemainus did much more than survive; in the face of difficulty they managed to thrive, turning their town into much more than a simple mill town. It is a beautiful outdoor art gallery attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.

As it turns out they were already on the right track and the answer lay in the core of the community: the downtown. The beautification of downtown continued and soon became much more. Resident and businessman Karl Schutz and then-Mayor Graham Bruce championed the idea of a mural project and the Festival of Murals Society was launched. The project began with just five murals in the summer of 1982 but the fledgling project soon had Chemainus on the map. In 1983 the town received the prestigious New York Downtown Revitalization Award for its redevelopment efforts. And there was more to come. Over the years, more than a quarter of a million dollars has been invested in the murals, Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Sample Ordinance for Sidewalk Dining within the Downtown Area Only temporary structures are allowed in sidewalk rights-of-way. The city should adopt an ordinance permitting restaurants to operate sidewalk cafés in the downtown district, thereby improving its downtown dining ambience. The following Sidewalk Café Guidelines stipulate design standards, as well as rules and regulations that apply to restaurants wanting to provide sidewalk dining. 1. Space and Clearance Sidewalk cafés are permitted only on sidewalks with a minimum width of 10 feet from the property line to the curb face. The area designated for the sidewalk café shall be considered an extension of the franchise, therefore the location of the sidewalk café must be directly in front of the franchise. In the interest of public safety, if a traffic lane occurs adjacent to the sidewalk, a sidewalk café will be permitted only if the minimum sidewalk width is 15 feet. Sidewalk cafés must maintain a clear pedestrian path of at least five feet at all times. On sidewalks with an adjacent traffic lane, the clear pedestrian path must be 10 feet wide. This clear area must be free of any obstructions such as trees, parking meters, and utility poles to allow adequate pedestrian passage. Sidewalk cafés shall not interfere with any utilities or other facilities such as telephone poles, fire hydrants, parking meters, mailboxes, or signs located on the sidewalk and in the public right-of-way. Sidewalk cafés may not impinge on required clear distances for maneuvering around entrances or

exits. The outdoor dining area must be accessible to disabled patrons and employees. When a sidewalk café is located at a street corner, vision clearance requirements shall be in accordance with city ordinance. These regulations may also apply if a sidewalk café is adjacent to an alley or driveway. 2. Furniture and Other Elements Tables, chairs, umbrellas, awnings, and any other elements associated with a sidewalk café must be of quality design, workmanship, and materials to ensure the safety and convenience of patrons as well as to enhance the visual and aesthetic character of the streetscape and adjacent neighborhood. All sidewalk café elements will be reviewed as part of the sidewalk café permitting process. Sidewalk café tables and chairs must be placed inside the area designated for sidewalk dining only. Table size should be kept to a minimum to avoid crowding. Appropriate density of tables and chairs will be reviewed. Permanent structures are not permitted in sidewalk cafés. Elements cannot be attached permanently to sidewalks or public rights-of-way. The permit holder is responsible for the restoration of the sidewalk or public right-of-way if any damage is caused by the sidewalk café. Temporary physical barricades to separate sidewalk cafés from pedestrian traffic are allowed if they are constructed of finished quality materials including wrought iron chains, rope stanchions, picket fencing, planters, etc. Physical barriers are required if liquor is sold at a sidewalk café. No signs shall be placed on

barricades. Paper products for the consumption of food or beverages are not permitted. 3. Overhead Structures Umbrellas and other temporary overhead structures are subject to approval during the sidewalk café permitting process. No portion of any umbrella shall be less than seven feet above the sidewalk. Umbrellas and overhead structures cannot interfere with street trees, must be weather resistant, and designed to be secure during windy conditions. Awnings, either permanent or temporary, are subject to approval during the sidewalk café permitting process. Awnings shall have no support posts located within the public right-of-way, and no portion of an awning shall be less than eight feet above the sidewalk. 4. Signage Menus are restricted to a maximum size of 9x12 inches. A sign must be posted in a visible location at every sidewalk café that states: “It is unlawful to consume alcoholic beverages not purchased at the permit holder’s establishment or sidewalk café or to remove alcoholic beverages from the sidewalk café.” 5. Lighting Lighting for sidewalk cafés is subject to approval during the sidewalk café permitting process. Lighting must complement the existing building and sidewalk café design and shall not cause a glare to

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Sample Ordinance for Sidewalk Dining (cont.) passing pedestrians or vehicles. Electrical wires are not permitted within the sidewalk café. Acceptable tabletop lighting includes candles and low-wattage battery-operated fixtures. Additional lighting may be attached to the adjacent franchise provided that approval is obtained from the city. 6. Outdoor Heaters, Fans and Coolers Outdoor heaters, fans and coolers for sidewalk cafés are subject to approval during the sidewalk café permitting process. 7. Vending Machines, Carts Vending machines, carts, or other objects for sale are prohibited. 8. Service and Use All services provided to sidewalk café patrons as well as all patron activity (waiting, sitting, dining, etc.) must occur within the designated sidewalk café area and not impinge on pedestrian traffic at any time. No alcoholic beverages may be stored or mixed in the sidewalk café. Equipment necessary for dispensing any other items is subject to review during the sidewalk café permitting process. The franchise must provide supervision of the sidewalk café to ensure that operations and the conduct of patrons are in compliance with this document at all times. 9. Insurance Requirements Every sidewalk café permit holder must furnish a certificate of insurance proving commercial insurance 136

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coverage of at least $1,000,000 for bodily injury, death, disability, and property damage liability. The policy shall provide for 30 days’ prior written notice to the city if coverage is substantially changed, cancelled, or not renewed. The city shall be named as an additional insured on a primary, noncontributory basis for any liability arising directly or indirectly from the operation of a sidewalk café. The permit holder shall indemnify, defend, and hold the city harmless from any loss that results directly or indirectly from the permit issuance or operation of the sidewalk café. If alcoholic beverages are served at the sidewalk café, the permit holder shall provide proof of liquor liability insurance for the sidewalk café with limits not less than $1,000,000 in such type as shall be acceptable to the city. Each permit holder shall maintain the insurance coverage required during the permit period. The certificate(s) of insurance shall be presented to the zoning administrator prior to the issuance of a permit. Failure of the permit holder to maintain the insurance required by this document shall result in the revocation of the sidewalk café permit.


Supplemental Information

Sidewalk cafe - Rules and Regulations 1. A sidewalk café permit is valid for one year from the date of issuance. 2. Sidewalk cafés shall not operate earlier than 7:00 a.m. or later than 11:00 p.m. unless the hours of the franchise are more restricted, in which case the more restrictive hours apply. 3. All sidewalk café employees must comply with all requirements and standards for a retail food establishment. a) Patrons must wear shoes and shirts at all times. b) All sidewalk cafés must have an opening for ingress and egress at all times. c) At all times, sidewalk cafés must adhere to size, design, and other requirements approved by the city. d) Strict adherence to hours of operation, approved layout, and clear space for pedestrians is mandatory. 4. All areas within and surrounding a sidewalk café must be maintained in a clean, neat, and sanitary condition and policed routinely by permit holder to ensure removal of all wrappings, litter, and debris. Daily sanitary cleaning is required. Sidewalks within and adjacent to a sidewalk café must be washed down on a daily basis. The permit holder shall not wash garbage cans or other containers on the sidewalks. All cleaning must be performed in accordance with city regulations. 5. Sidewalk cafés are prohibited from playing

amplified music, whether live or recorded. No speakers, microphones, televisions, or other audio or video devices are permitted. 6. The operation of the sidewalk café must be clearly incidental to the associated franchise. The seating capacity of the sidewalk café cannot exceed 50 percent of the establishment’s interior seating capacity. 7. Sidewalk café tables, chairs, and other elements must be removed immediately after the close of daily operations. Stacking or storing of tables, chairs, heaters, or any other element in the public right-of-way is prohibited. 8. City code enforcement officers will monitor sidewalk cafés after permits have been issued and cafés are in operation. Any violations of the provisions of these rules and regulations, or any deviation from approved plans will result in citations being issued and/or permit being revoked. 9. Any permit holder, or his or her employees, who violate or resist enforcement of any provisions of this document may be subject to immediate permit revocation by the city and subject to a fine provided that each day that such violation continues shall be deemed a separate and distinct offense. The fines shall be in addition to any expenses incurred for restoration or repair of the public right-of-way, which shall be the responsibility of the permit holder.

current city business license. 11. Permit holders shall be required to abide by all federal, state, and local laws. 12. If a permit is issued, the permit holder is required to pay an annual rental fee in the form of certified funds in the amount of $__________ per square foot.

Permit In order to receive a permit for a sidewalk café on a public right-of-way, the applicant must demonstrate that the provisions of these guidelines will be met. Documentation demonstrating compliance with these guidelines must accompany the application in order to receive a permit. A sidewalk café permit will not be issued until the zoning administrator and fire marshal have conducted a site inspection of the proposed sidewalk café and all elements to be placed therein to ensure that the sidewalk café is in compliance. The city will send an invoice to renew the sidewalk café permit annually. If the permit is not renewed or does not conform to the original conditions of the permit, a new permit may be required.

10. Permit holders shall be required to maintain a Vulcan, Alberta - October 2011

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Sidewalk Café Application Form Name of Franchise _________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________ Owner/Proprietor _________________________________________________________ Owner/Proprietor Address __________________________________________________ Owner/Proprietor Phone _____________________ Mobile ________________________ Anticipated period of use each year ___________________________________________ Proposed hours of operation ________________________________________________ Total area of public right-of-way to be used for sidewalk café (in square feet)___________ Will liquor be sold or consumed in the sidewalk café? ____ Yes ____ No Application must include both a site plan and seating plan with the following information:

SITE PLAN

SEATING PLAN

____ 3 copies (8.5x11)

____ 3copies (8.5x11)

____ Legible

____ Legible

____ Scale

____ Scale

____ North arrow

____ North arrow

____ Name, address of franchise ____Width of sidewalk adjacent to café ____ Name of adjoining streets, alley ____ Size of area proposed for café ____ Width of sidewalk adjacent to café ____ Shows building entries and exits ____ Location of existing improvements ____ Location, number of tables and chairs (utility poles, parking meters, etc.) ____ Location and dimensions of sidewalk area proposed for café and sidewalk width remaining for public access (min. 5 feet) ____ Location and dimensions of any proposed improvements associated with sidewalk café (awnings, planters, barricades, etc.)

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Supplemental Information

Vulcan Questionnaire Results

These results are a combination of online and written questionnaires 1. Where do you live? Location

2. What is your age? Amount

Percentage

Within the town limits of Vulcan

55

67%

More than 15km from the Town of Vulcan

19

Within 5km of the Town of Vulcan

Amount

Percentage

46-60

33

40.2%

23.1%

31-45

19

23.1%

3

3.6%

Over 60

18

21.9%

Between 5 and 10km of the Town of Vulcan

3

3.6%

18-30

11

13.4%

Between 10 and 15km of the Town of Vulcan

2

2.4%

Under 18

1

1.2%

3. When friends and family visit you, which of the following most closely represents where you take them while they’re visiting? Location

Number of responses out of 100 people

We stay at home

30

Other parks in the area, such as Lake McGregor Recreational Area, Wyndham Carseland Provincial Park or another park

23

Downtown Vulcan

13

Trek Station

11

Banff, Jasper, Waterton National Parks (Rocky Mountain areas)

11

Little Bow

10

Golf Course

8

Calgary

8

Drumheller

5

A village in the area i.e. Milo, Champion, Arrowwood, or another village

1

Age Range

4. What is your gender? Gender

Amount

Percentage

Female

47

58%

Male

34

42%

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Vulcan Questionnaire Results

These results are a combination of online and written questionnaires 5. Where do YOU go to “hangout” on weekends or during evening hours (other than home)? Location

Number of responses out of 100 people

6. What are your two favorite restaurants in Vulcan County? (they do not have to be in the town of Vulcan) Restaurant

Number of responses out of 100 people

Another city/downtown

30

Aspen crossing

31

Places in Vulcan

21

Subway

16

Recreational areas biking, hiking, etc.

14

Trish’s Tasty Treats

14

Lethbridge

12

Royal Cafe

12

Calgary

11

New Club

12

Golf course

4

Vulcan Hotel

8

A nearby village

3

Mossleigh Outpost

7

Curling

3

Legion

6

Lake

3

A&W

4

Milo Cafe

4

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Supplemental Information

7. What are your two favorite retail shops in Vulcan County? (they do not have to be in the town of Vulcan)

8. What is your perception of downtown Vulcan? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

Number of responses out of 100 people

o

Star trek

o

There are too many vacant buildings

Market Street

31

o

Old, quiet town

Home Hardware

19

o

Everything is closed after 6pm

Flowers & Fancy

17

o

Nothing to do, boring, nothing interesting, dead

Furniture Villa

13

Aspen Crossing

12

o

Dying town, struggling

Sarini

9

UFA

9

Fashion Shop

8

Shop

9. What could or should be done in Vulcan that would get you to spend more time there? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

o

Something to do (Activities)

• Theatre

• Bowling Alley

• Targeting younger people

o

More shopping, restaurants, variety, hotel

o

More business, fill the empty buildings

o

Indoor swimming

o Beautification

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Vulcan Questionnaire Results

These results are a combination of online and written questionnaires 10. What do you think the Town of Vulcan should be known for? What image would you like people in the Calgary area to have of Vulcan? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

o

Clean, friendly small town

o

A nice place to visit/getaway

o

Star Trek

o

Recreation, lifestyle

o

Good shopping and restaurants

o

Thriving rural, agricultural community

11. What do you think the biggest challenges, or negatives, are about Vulcan? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

o

High taxes

o

Lack of young families

o

Not everyone likes the Star Trek theme

o

Lack of jobs, industry, new businesses

o

Lack of retail stores, restaurants

o

Supporting local business

o

Lack of activities

o

Lack of vision

o

Clashing ideas within leadership

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12. How does your home community fit into the whole region of Vulcan County? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

o

Largest town in the county

o

The main draw

o

Hub for the region, core of the county

o

Major retailer for farmers


Supplemental Information

13. How do you feel your community can partner with the county and other communities in the county to market and promote ourselves? The following describe the main themes of the responses: o

Many of the responses simply gave a call to action. They want to see all of the towns in the community work together

o

Do a 100 mile food thing like done in the Red Deer region. Locally grown, long lunch idea where you would have lunch for the community with food grown in the area.

o

Milo, Vulcan, and Champion could be like a “lake corridor”, There are probably 100 km of shoreline in the area with little to nothing on it. And Vulcan is a major center more or less in the middle of it.

o

Connect mcgregor and travers reservoirs to create a lake that can be travelled by boat from Champion to Milo. Then develop the tourism and building side of things

o

Regional governance. This would create economies of scale. Regional cooperation in place competition. i.e. Acceptance of the fact the some municipalities within region are primarily residential where other municipalities may need to focus more on industrial, recreational, or tourism etc... initiatives.

o

Each town could have their own planet theme

o

Milo – Neptune small car races

Carmangay – horse riding under the CPR trestle

Champion – spooky hotel tour which was taken over by aliens

14. Anything else you’d like to say or suggest for Vulcan? The following describe the main themes of the responses:

o

Vulcan County needs more venues, accommodations activities, etc

o

Desire to start making changes asap

o

Need to energize the community with younger people

o

Overall positive feelings of living in Vulcan

o

Clean up and beautify the town

Surrounding towns could adopt a specialty (crafts, antiques) that Vulcan town area could publicize and encourage.

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Destination Development, Inc. 6840 Fort Dent Way, Suite 360 Seattle, WA 98188 206-241-4770 Voice 206-241-4750 Fax TheTeam@dditeam.com www.destinationdevelopment.com Copyright Š 2011 Destination Development, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, micro-filming, recording, or otherwise without written permission form Destination Development, Inc. Any reference to other firms, consultants, or organizations are for informational purposes and assistance only. DDI does not represent or make any representations regarding other firms, consultants or organizations mentioned in this document.


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