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#941 / OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013 VUEWEEKLY.COM

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ISSUE: 941 OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013 COVER DESIGN: SHAWNA IWANIUK

LISTINGS

ARTS / 18 FILM / 22 MUSIC / 30 EVENTS / 33 CLASSIFIED / 34 ADULT / 36

FRONT

5

"The younger members were struggling with that a little bit and trying to regain their balance."

DISH

9

"Contrary to popular belief, trick-or-treating wasn't invented by candy companies or retail stores."

ARTS

13

"Undoubtedly, most of the world knows about the Taj Mahal."

FILM

19

"12 Years a Slave is about as close to compulsory viewing as any movie can be."

MUSIC

23

"Did everybody want Jeff to be there? Of course we do. But if it had to be a certain way, and this is the way it had to be, at least people were already used to seeing Gary"

VUEWEEKLY #200, 11230 - 119 STREET, EDMONTON, AB T5G 2X3 | T: 780.426.1996 F: 780.426.2889 FOUNDING EDITOR / PUBLISHER .................................................................................. RON GARTH PRESIDENT ROBERT W DOULL .......................................................................................rwdoull@vueweekly.com PUBLISHER / SALES & MARKETING MANAGER ROB LIGHTFOOT.................................................................................................. rob@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER / MANAGING EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................... eden@vueweekly.com NEWS EDITOR REBECCA MEDEL ....................................................................................... rebecca@vueweekly.com ARTS & FILM EDITOR PAUL BLINOV .................................................................................................... paul@vueweekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS Ricardo Acuña, Kathleen Bell, Chelsea Boos, Lee Boyes, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Gwynne Dyer, Brian Gibson, Fish Griwkowsky, Brenda Kerber, Josh Marcellin, Jordyn Marcellus, Fawnda Mithrush, Mel Priestley, Dan Savage, Mike Winters

DISTRIBUTION Terry Anderson, Shane Bennett, Jason Dublanko, John Fagan Aaron Getz, Beverley Phillips, Justin Shaw, Choi Chung Shui, Parker Thiessen, Wally Yanish

MUSIC EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................. eden@vueweekly.com DISH EDITOR / STAFF WRITER MEAGHAN BAXTER ................................................................................. meaghan@vueweekly.com LISTINGS GLENYS SWITZER ....................................................................................... listings@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION MANAGER CHARLIE BIDDISCOMBE .............................................................................charlie@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION SHAWNA IWANIUK ..................................................................................... shawna@vueweekly.com GENERAL MANAGER/ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE ANDY COOKSON ...................................................................................... acookson@vueweekly.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE JAMES JARVIS ................................................................................................... jjarvis@vueweekly.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MICHAEL GARTH ..........................................................................................michael@vueweekly.com

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013 CLIENT CREATED

TELUS July 11, 2013

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APPROVALS ART DIRECTOR/DESIGNER:


FRONT VUEPOINT

PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

A devastating silence How sexy-exciting is it to have political scandal unfolding in Canada, right everybody? One that has faces and names and direct accusations, not just some untraceable Pierre Poutine—with a penchant for burner cellphones—drifting in and out of the news cycles. But as the various parts of government debate who did more wrong in terms of the unfolding Senate scandal, a different sort of affront to the Canadian people has quietly been taking place. It started last week, when Conservative MPs Scott Reid and Andrew Saxton put forward near-identical motions in different committees to limit the abilities of two categories of MP—members in parties that have less than 12 elected representatives, or MPs who sit independently (there are four of them)—to put forward amendments to legislation at the report stage. That effectively means the Green Party, the Bloc Québécois and the scatter of independent MPs sitting will lose one of their few (and thus) important ways to participate effectively in the parliamentary process. If this passes, these MPs will be limited to the opportunity to submit any amendments 48 hours prior to the start of a bill's consideration. But that offers no guarantees any of those amendments will actually be used or considered. Yes, this motion would currently effect only a total of nine elected MPs. But as Green Party leader Elizabeth May pointed out in a press-release response, our entire form of democracy is founded on the principles of every member of parliament being elected as equals, regardless of how big or small (or non-existent) the party they belong to. It's worth noting a similar idea came up last year, when Government House Leader Peter Van Loan proposed to the Speaker that amendments coming from small-party MPs and independents hinge on a small trial vote on just one of their proposed amendments. If that one amendment was defeated, the rest were not even to be entertained. The Speaker ruled against it then, citing House of Commons Procedure and Practice: "It remains true that parliamentary procedure is intended to ensure that there is a balance between the government's need to get its business through the House, and the opposition's responsibility to debate that business without completely immobilizing the proceedings of the House." And yet here we see the Conservative government is still trying to strip a layer of debate from the democratic process. That's what this comes down to: our system of government isn't meant to be streamlined into massive omnibus bills that pass without alteration because of a majority government that votes down party lines (be it this Conservative one or any other). The whole process is meant to rely on discussion and amendment, a back-and-forth that allows for as much representation of all Canadians as possible. Independent and small-party voices are part of what Canadians want heard in government, however small, and to further reduce their ability to be heard is to devastate the process with silence. V

NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NEWS // WATER SUPPLY

Alberta running dry

Activist warns oil sands, cattle and agriculture threatening water supply

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We need governments to reconnect to their responsibility to water, which means we need to be angry that the Harper government has gutted the Fisheries Act, they've gutted the Navigable Waters Protection Act and they've gutted the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. Basically energy industries and mining companies are free to do whatever they want—99 percent of our lakes and rivers are no longer protected from pipes carrying the dirtiest bitumen, chemicalladen bitumen or fracked oil under, around or over them. We need to understand that will have ramifications for our water systems for many years. And we also need to ask the opposition parties what they would do about this legislation, would they re-enact it, would they reinstate the teeth in these laws? And people need to love their water. Appreciate the fact you live in a country that has clean water coming out of the tap. This water is our water. It belongs to all of us, it belongs to the ecosystem, it belongs to future generations, it belongs to other species and it's our lifeblood.

ater. In Alberta, we take it for granted. Turn the tap, there it is: clean, fresh and unlimited. But what if the very things that define Alberta—oil, beef, farms—could be destroying our finite and shrinking water supply? That's what Ottawabased author and water activist Maude Barlow warns in her new bestselling book Blue Future.. This is her 16th book and her third on the threats facing water. Barlow, national chairperson for the Council of Canadians, was Senior Advisor on Water to the president of the United Nations General Assembly in 2008 to 2009 and helped get clean water and sanitation recognized as a human right at the UN. Vue spoke to Barlow on the phone while she was in Saskatoon, taking a break from her book tour to attend the Council of Canadians' AGM. Vue Weekly: Reading Blue Future, I was surprised to learn about the extent of Alberta's water insecurity. What's going on? Maude Barlow: Alberta is probably going to become the first water have-not province in Canada. First of all, there's not as much water as some provinces have. Secondly, a lot of the water you have is dependent on glaciers that are melting—the Bow River is totally glacier dependent. Then you have the destruction of so much water and contamination of so [many] water supplies in the tar sands and that whole region—the millions of litres of toxins that are flowing into the local water systems on a regular basis. Then we have agribusiness, which is using a huge amount of water. With only two percent of renewable water sources in Canada, Alberta is using almost two-thirds of [Canada's] water for commodities that require irrigation. So really you're sucking up water in Alberta far faster than it can be replenished. Albertans really need to look very seriously at not only their current water crisis, but the demands being placed on their water by agreements like the [Canada-EU Trade Agreement] which is going to open up 70   000 tonnes more beef exports to Europe every year. Beef is very water intensive, and this is water consumption, the water is not returned. This is a very important distinction, the water is not returned to the watershed in agricultural production. So the water used to produce beef cattle, when the meat or live cattle are exported, the water goes with them. It's important for people to understand that if you're going to dramatically increase beef exports out of the province, you're going to be exporting water faster and faster. VW: If left unchecked, what could Alberta's water future look like? MB: Alberta could run out of water. Alberta

is heading for the kind of crisis ... where there just isn't enough water for the demand. I always marvel at governments, how they promote a certain kind of agricultural growth and exports and they subsidize certain agricultural practices. They promote these trade agreements that promote more exports, more stuff, more water abuse—and they're not talking to water experts, not even asking the question about what's the impact of water. If people started to understand that A) we don't have the water for this, B) if the demand grows and these foreign corporations can claim ownership of this water, which they can under these trade agreements, then C) they can claim compensation like American companies can under NAFTA, if we even try to bring in regulations on our water. I think people would stop and ask a whole lot of heavy, serious questions about these trades and investment agreements. VW: So what can the average person do if they want to fight for water rights and water justice? MB: They should learn as much as they can about water and reconnect with water. I think one of the disconnects happened, for all of us, when ... we just turn on these taps in our homes and our business and this liquid stuff comes out and we don't think about it. The first thing that people need to do is reconnect, understand that water is not a resource for our pleasure, profit and convenience. I often quote Martin Luther King Jr, who said legislation may not change the heart, but it will restrain the heartless. We need the rule of law.

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

VW: You write that Canada under Stephen Harper has been a threat to global water rights. MB: Yes, Canada is a really negative force in the world. It’s no surprise that Stephen Harper does not like or promote the UN. Year after year he refuses to go to the official UN opening every fall. That’s just appalling for Canada to snub the UN that way. The Harper government led the fight against the human right to water and sanitation at the UN, which we won in spite of the government, but it really is embarrassing. We had this really wonderful project called GEMS (Global Environmental Monitoring System) where Canada was monitoring something like 300 lakes and water systems around the world for the United Nations to provide background data on freshwater lakes and how they’re doing. And the government also walked away from the Experimental Lakes Area, which has thankfully been picked up by an independent organization. But the federal government walked away from its many-year commitment. This is an area of northwestern Ontario where they have done experiments on what makes water sick and what makes it well again and it has been absolutely incredibly important in terms of understanding mercury poisoning and how acid rain works. That’s really important information, not just for Canada’s water, but for the global water system, so it’s a real tragedy. JOSH MARCELLIN

JOSH@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Read the full interview at vueweekly.com

FRONT 5


FRONT NEWS // COLD LAKE

Oil off a duck's back

Cold Lake oil-spill cleanup continues as animals returned to wild

Beavers at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton // Kim Blomme

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he trouble began on May 20. Two underground leaks at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited Primrose site at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range began pushing bitumen emulsion out of the ground, and that wasn't the end of it. A third leak was reported on June 8, but it wasn't until June 27 that the Alberta Energy Regulator issued a press release regarding any of the leaks—done so in response to a fourth leak at the Primrose site which had affected a small body of water. The leaks were reported nine weeks after the first one began. The AER has said the first three were small in comparison to the final one, and there had been no public impact at that point. However, no one could say for certain what had caused the incidents—provincial and federal investigations are currently ongoing. The leaks have also raised questions regarding the safety of in-situ, or steam-assisted, oil-sands technology where high-temperature steam is injected into the ground at high pressure for several weeks, liquifying the bitumen and allowing it to flow up through the injection well once pressure is released. As of late September, an estimated 1.5 million litres of bitumen had spilled throughout the area and clean-up efforts by CNRL are ongoing. Despite the company's efforts, the surrounding environment has been damaged and wildlife has been affected. On September 24, Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development issued an environmental protection order requiring CNRL to partially drain the small, shallow lake (approximately 53 hectares) where bitumen had leaked in order to identify one point of seepage. The drainage will be temporary, with the leak ideally being stopped and cleaned up, and the lake returned to its previous state in the spring. The unnamed water body contains no fish and is not connected to any other bodies of water,

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but according to CNRL, this option was least environmentally impactful and provided the best approach to containment. This will also allow any drilling that needs to be done to occur when the ground is frozen, which will also cause less damage. In addition, an enforcement order from AESRD was issued on October 21, which "requires the cleanup, remediation and reclamation of the three surface bitumen release sites." Under the enforcement order, CNRL will be required to investigate the impact of the leak on subsurface groundwater. "What we know is that bitumen is rising to the surface and it would have transected an aquifer. We need to know if, during that transfer to the surface, it's contaminated the groundwater," says AESRD spokesperson Jessica Potter, adding at this point the

tal legislation, AESRD has the opportunity to determine if it wants to proceed with potential prosecution. "It's required under law that any spill must be cleaned up and the affected ground remediated," Potter says. "So in this case we will continue to oversee the remediation recovery effort. We do expect it to be a bit of a longer term because it is a sizable incident, but our role is to ensure it continues in a timely and effective and approved manner." CNRL is required to begin restoration work on the water body no later than April 1, 2014. Aside from the impact to the environment, the spill has killed more than 100 animals, including beavers, birds, amphibians and other small mammals. The Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton has been involved since June, taking in wildlife at its facility as well as working from

There were a lot of people on site and they were definitely concentrating on trying to mitigate the damage and trying to do whatever they could to make sure more animals didn’t come on. potential impacts cannot be speculated. "Groundwater moves quite slowly, so what we're doing is telling the company to initiate a groundwater monitoring program close to the fissures so we can see if there has been contamination and how far that contamination may have moved. By doing it sooner we're able to delineate impact, if there is impact." Potter notes that part of the enforcement order is to not only find the underlying cause of the releases, but to fully understand what the potential impacts have been. All of the information gathered feeds into AESRD's investigation and if it is found there has been contravention of the Environmental Protection Act, the Water Act or other environmen-

a stabilization unit across from the CNRL site. "There were a lot of people on site and they were definitely concentrating on trying to mitigate the damage and trying to do whatever they could to make sure more animals didn't come on," says Kim Blomme, a registered animal health technologist with the organization. "You only have a limited amount of control on that, so with the birds you can try different kinds of hazing and deterrents, but with some of the other animals people had to be watchful. Were there deer coming out? Were there bears coming out?" As of October 10, the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society had admitted 135 animals, with 113 being released. Musk-

rats accounted for the majority, with 62 being released back into the wild. "They are a semi-aquatic mammal so they are in the water and on the land and they can move from one body of water to another," Blomme says. A family of beavers was also affected by the leaks. Like muskrats, they are a semi-aquatic mammal that has a specific territory and will not simply pick up and leave. Blomme adds that beavers are not animals that are accustomed to being in captivity, and in order to ensure their safety, they had to be provided with housing that would not pose a hazard to them. "For example, a beaver's natural defence is to slap its tail. If it slaps its tail against a concrete floor too many times it's going to hurt it; it's going to damage the tail and that alone could prevent it from being releasable," Blomme says. "So sod had to be brought in. We brought in a great big pool for them to be able to get in and out of the water ... we just had to make sure we provided them, in a very artificial circumstance, something that would make them as comfortable as possible until we made alternative arrangements." A similar approach was taken with the muskrats, but in their case it was imperative to provide housing they would not chew out of. "They don't know we're trying to help them, so they're trying to get out," Blomme says. "We found these ferret cages that worked really well for the muskrats and kept them safe." The muskrats, on average, were at the facility for eight to 10 days, while the beavers required more care. Blomme says they were in worse shape when they arrived and were in a fragile state due to members of the family being lost. "The younger members were struggling with that a little bit and trying to regain their balance, not in a physical sense, but an emotional and physi-

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

cal sense," Blomme notes. The beavers have since been relocated to a pond on private land just south of the city. The animals are equipped with radio transmitters and are currently being monitored to ensure they are adapting properly. So far they've built a lodge, are catching food and behaving as they should for this time of year. However, cleaning an oiled animal is no easy task. Before being washed, each animal is weighed and a body condition score is taken to assess their degree of dehydration and nutritional status. Once they are deemed fit for washing, the mammals in particular must be sedated to prevent biting—a process conducted under veterinary care. Animals' coats are then pretreated with mineral oil to break up the bitumen before being washed with soapy water. Once the process is complete the animal is constantly monitored to ensure its body temperature remains regulated. "Once they've woken up they go back into their home environment that we've created for them and then you're monitoring them to make sure they're eating and drinking again," Blomme explains. As clean-up efforts continue, Blomme says a potential hazard for the animals in the area is loss of habitat. It is also unknown what effect there has been on animals that were lightly covered with oil and subsequently licked it off or ones that were not salvaged. "We're viewing this as very much a collaborative effort between industry, government regulators and ourselves," she adds. "We are in possession of the permits that allow us to care for wildlife, so we do have to work very much together on these different aspects of it and if each of us are able to do those things we can have a very positive result in the end." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


DYERSTRAIGHT

POLITICALINTERFERENCE

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Moderately Wildrose

The downfall of the NSA

Rumours that Wildrose becoming moderate, grossly exaggerated

Tapping the phones of its allies does not look good on the US Politicians and government officials rarely tell outright lies; the cost of being caught in a lie is too high. Instead, they make carefully worded statements that seem to address the issue, but avoid the truth. Like, for example, Caitlin Hayden, the White House spokesperson who replied on October 24 to German Chancellor Angela Merkel's angry protest at the tapping of her mobile phone by the US National Security Agency. "The United States is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of Chancellor Merkel," she said. Yes, but has the US been listening to Merkel's mobile phone calls from 2002 until the day before yesterday? "Beyond that, I'm not in a position to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity." By October 27, the argument had moved on. The question now was: did President Barack Obama know the chancellor's phone was bugged? (The German tabloid Bild am Sonntag reported that General Keith Alexander, head of the NSA, told Obama about it in 2010. Obama allegedly said the surveillance should continue, as "He did not trust her.") Now it was the turn of NSA spokesperson Vanee Vines to deny the truth. "[General] Alexander did not discuss with President Obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving German Chancellor Merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving Chancellor Merkel," she said. But she carefully avoided saying that Obama had not been told at all. The ridiculous thing about these meticulously crafted pseudo-denials is they leave a truth-shaped hole for everyone to see. Of course the United States has been listening to Merkel's phone calls since 2002 and of course Obama knew about it. It would have been quite easy to deny those facts if they were not true. The NSA is completely out of control. Its German outpost was brazenly located on the fourth floor of the US embassy in Berlin and leaked documents published by Der Spiegel say the NSA maintains similar operations in 80 other US embassies and consulates around the world. The Guardian, also relying on documents provided by whistle-blower Edward Snowden, reported recently that a total of 35 national leaders have been targeted by the NSA. We know the German, Brazilian and Mexican leaders were bugged, but it's almost certain the leaders of France, Spain and Italy; Egypt, Israel

RICARDO ACUÑA // RICARDO@VUEWEEKLY.COM

and Saudi Arabia; and Japan, India and Indonesia were also targeted. Not to mention Russia and China. The 4.9 million (!) Americans with access to classified information include 480 000 civilian contractors with the same “top secret” security clearance as Snowden. Even if all the military and public servants could be trusted to keep the NSA’s guilty secret forever (unlikely) and only one in a hundred of the contractors was outraged by it, then there were still 4800 potential whistle-blowers waiting to blow. If Snowden hadn’t, somebody else would have. When the astounding scale and scope of the agency's operations finally came out, it was bound to create intense pressure on Washington to rein in the NSA. The agency can deflect the domestic pressure, to some extent, by insisting that it's all being done to keep Americans safe from terrorism, but it can't persuade the president of South Korea or the prime minister of Bangladesh that she was being bugged because she was a terrorist suspect. The NSA's worst abuse has been its violation of the privacy of hundreds of millions of private citizens at home and abroad, but it's the pressure from furious foreign leaders that will finally force the US government to act. "Trust in our ally the USA has been shattered," said German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich on Sunday. "If the Americans have tapped mobile phones in Germany, then they have broken German law on German soil." This will end up in the German courts and probably in those of many other countries as well (and Snowden may well end up being granted asylum in Germany). To rebuild its relations with its key allies, the White House is going to have to radically curb the NSA's powers. Good. We don't have to listen to the spooks and their allies telling us that since the new communications technologies make total surveillance possible, it is therefore inevitable. "If it can be done, it will be done" is a counsel of despair. Most of the NSA's ever-expanding activities over the past 10 years have served no legitimate purpose and it's high time it was forced to obey both the letter and the spirit of the law. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries

The framing of last weekend's Wildrose Party convention by media pundits and the party itself has been nothing short of perplexing. Somehow we are supposed to believe the series of new policies adopted and old policies rejected makes the party more moderate and electable. But should it really be newsworthy in 2013 for the members of a major provincial party to adopt policies acknowledging human-made climate change and human rights? It should be noted that right up until the convention, Wildrose leader Danielle Smith refused to take a position on those issues because she did not know where the party's members stood. In this day and age human-made climate change and universal human rights should be assumed and the fact that the Wildrose Party has made such a big deal out of this should be a strong signal to folks that they are anything but moderate and reasonable at their core. It is also very telling that party officials and members have made clear that all of their decisions at the convention were driven by a desire to improve the party's electability. The climate-change policy in particular seemed in its framing to be more about market access and trade than about any genuine concern for the environment and impacts on communities. So what happens to their support for greenhouse gas reductions and human rights once the party is elected and the pipelines are built? Do they then drop the electoral and economic pragmatism and return to their original value base?

system. They believe core government services like health care and education should not be focused on serving the public interest, but should rather be privatized so they can be focused on generating profits for the corporate sector. And they believe social and community services are not the collective responsibility of our entire province, but should be provided exclusively by charities and churches as they were in Dickens' England. Their fundamentalist views on government finance would see them pass laws forbidding the government from incurring debt or running deficits and they would similarly hamstring the government by requiring a provincial referendum before the tax regime could be changed. This would completely eliminate the government's ability to respond to emergencies or economic fluctuations through any means other than cutting spending on essential services. This is how at the end of the Klein years we had a $7-billion infrastructure deficit, crumbling public buildings and schools and hospitals that were bursting at the seams due to overcrowding.

If you can read past the rhetoric of accountability and responsible financial management, it becomes clear that the Wildrose's economic platform is virtually identical to the economic principles espoused by the Tea Party Republicans south of the border. These are policies that are miles to right of the values expressed time and again by Albertans in polls and surveys—values that favour the public interest over corporate interests, well-funded public services and fair and just taxation. So while it's arguably admirable that the Wildrose Party has entered the 21st century with its policies on climate change and human rights, neither of those comes close to addressing the extremist nature of the party as a whole. It's the party's fundamentalist neoliberal economic policies that make it extremist and dangerous, and until those are addressed, they have no business presenting themselves as moderate or ready for power. V Ricardo Acuña is the executive director of the Parkland Institute, a non-partisan, public policy research institute housed at the University of Alberta.

What is most perplexing of all is the apparent belief by the mainstream media that the lake of fire, the climatechange denial and the Alberta firewall are the only things that branded the Wildrose Party as extremists. Have these folks not looked at the party's economic and social development policies? This is a party that draws most of its policies directly from the reports and rantings of the Fraser Institute—an unabashedly ultra-conservative think tank with a long history of questionable research practices and methodologies. A quick scan through their media releases on their website is enough to see the degree to which the party is more than happy to provide an echo chamber for the most extreme rightwing policy institute in the country. The fact that Smith herself received her core political and ideological training at the Fraser Institute shows how deeply the institute's extremist views run in the party. They believe that Alberta, the lowesttaxed jurisdiction in Canada, is collecting too much in taxes and they would rather see the government scrap the programs and services that Albertans depend on than see the government reform its current critically flawed tax

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

FRONT 7


YOU CAN HELP SAVE WILDLIFE!

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Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


DISH

DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FEATURE // HALLOWEEN

The origins of

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'T

rick or treat, smell my feet, give me something good to eat!" Trick-or-treating is a major Halloween tradition—most of us who grew up here will remember donning a costume and heading out onto the frigid streets to score a sack of goodies as kids. But while it seems like trick-or-treating has been around forever, it's actually a relatively recent phenomenon. Contrary to popular belief, trickor-treating wasn't invented by candy companies or retail stores— though Halloween does rank as the No  2 retail holiday behind Christmas. Around the turn of the 20th century, Halloween celebrations were adult affairs. Left without supervision and nothing to do, pranking became a pastime of the season, culminating in the "Black Hallowe'en" of 1933 in which a number of major American cities experienced an unprecedented degree of prank-related property damage like broken windows and arson. In response to this, cities began creating organized Halloween events such as trails of terror (a precursor to the haunted house) and houseto-house parties in which groups of kids would visit each others' homes to play games and have treats. By the '50s this tradition had evolved

into trick-or-treating as we know it today. Interestingly, while most sources place trick-or-treating as a distinctively American tradition, the first known mention of it in print is a story in the Lethbridge Herald in 1927; obviously this custom had spread to Alberta quite early. Trick-or-treating has connections to other practices on events and holidays in late October and early November as well, which involve leaving food out for the dead—often one's ancestors, but also as a tribute or supplication to the hungry spirits who are thought to wander the earth this time of year. Mexico's Día de los Muertos and the Celtic/ pagan holiday Samhain are probably the best-known contemporary examples of this custom. Trick-ortreating also resembles other types of door-to-door rituals, such as wassailing/carolling at Christmas, guising (dressing as a beggar) at Thanksgiving, mumming (performing in costume for food or money) or begging "a penny for the Guy" on Guy Fawkes Night (November 5).

Some have suggested that trick-

or-treating has endured for purely capitalistic reasons: because it

Open at 8am every Saturday.

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

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trains future consumers. Before you dismiss this as overly cynical, consider the increasing numbers of trick-or-treaters who forego going door-to-door in favour of heading to the nearest shopping mall. "We had our first formal trickor-treating event in 1984, so it's our 30th year," says Anna Alfonso of West Edmonton Mall, which hosted more than 2000 trick-ortreaters last year. Alfonso notes

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the number increases every year, and doesn't include the hundreds of other children who don't check in at the centre stage before commencing their annual candy haul. "It's warm, it's safe and it's fun," says Alfonso, who recalls trick-ortreating at WEM when she was young. "That's really why we started it in 1984 and the reason why we continue to do it today." Those of us who recall squishing snowsuits underneath costumes on particularly frosty Halloween nights can understand the appeal of trick-or-treating indoors. The safety factor is also a huge draw for parents: not only does it keep kids from wandering in the dark streets, but those (debunked) urban legends about razor blades and poison in Halloween candy persist; accepting candy from stores in a mall

feels safer than getting it from your neighbours—and isn't that a rather sad comment on society? More than 80 percent of the retailers at West Edmonton Mall participate in trick-or-treating, and WEM has expanded its Halloween activities since 2010, now hosting various spooky events in Galaxy Land during the two weekends leading up to October 31. But despite the ever-increasing number of trick-or-treaters who visit WEM, Alfonso is confident that classic door-to-door trick-or-treating isn't going anywhere. "I think that's still great for older kids," she says. "There's still that sense of adventure and excitement in being outside—it's just two different audiences." MEL PRIESTLEY

MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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Pieces of candy corn are meant to mimic the appearance of real corn with its yellow and orange colouring, but each one is approximately three times the size of a real corn kernel.

Once a year won't hurt

There's basically no nutritional value to these treats. The primary ingredients consist of corn syrup, sugar, wax, artificial colours and binders.

Corn for every occasion

A Thanksgiving variation of candy corn exists as well. The wide end is chocolate brown as opposed to yellow but maintains the orange center and white tip. Reindeer corn has also been made for Christmas—just guess which colours those are—as well as Cupid corn for Valentines day. As of this year, s’more and pumpkin spice varieties were added to the list.

Original recipe

The treats were originally made by hand, combining sugar, corn syrup, carnauba wax and water. Marshmallows added softness to the mixture while the addition of fondant assisted with texture. The final step involved heating the mixture and pouring it into moulds. V

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


VENI, VIDI, VINO

MEL PRIESTLEY // MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Vine vampires

The tiny creatures that could be wine's downfall There's a plague of beasts attacking vineyards around the world; decades ago these monsters decimated the world's wine industry, and from time to time they still rear their ugly little heads. I'm talking about phylloxera, the vicious sap-sucking creatures that spell inescapable death to grapevines. Phylloxera is one of the great evils of the wine world (far worse than your drunken friend who al-

the cure: realizing their native vines were untouched by the disease that toppled their European counterparts, vintners grafted the European vines onto American rootstock and created a "Frankenvine" that is immune to phylloxera but still produces the desired Vitis vinifera grapes. Look closely at the base of any vine in any vineyard around the world and you'll be able to see this graft line.

This microscopic aphid feeds on the roots of grapevines, causing deformations and fungal infections that cut off the flow of water and nutrients to the vine, eventually killing it ways seems to finish off the bottle before you get a second glass). This microscopic aphid feeds on the roots of grapevines, causing deformations and fungal infections that cut off the flow of water and nutrients to the vine, eventually killing it. Once established, phylloxera spreads extremely rapidly and causes almost total destruction— this is where its original name, Phylloxera vastatrix (the destroyer) comes from; the insect's official scientific name is Dactylosphaera vitifoliae, though phylloxera persists as its most common moniker. Phylloxera fundamentally changed the face of the modern wine industry. All of the world's fine wines are made from one species of grape, the European Vitis vinifera. However, there are several other grapevine species throughout the world, and in the 1860s vintners shipped native American vines to southern France for experimentation—and phylloxera hitched a ride. While American grapevines are tolerant of the insect, Vitis vinifera vines are definitely not. Within two decades, European vine growers watched helplessly as their vineyards mysteriously yellowed, shriveled and died; estimates put the losses between three-quarters to over 90 percent. Many producers declared that it was the end of wine. Dozens of remedies were tried and the French government offered a huge reward to anyone who could come up with a solution, but the answer didn't arrive until California also fell victim to the same plague. The first Californian vintners began planting European vines for their superior quality, which opened the door to phylloxera but also yielded

scourge of phylloxera seems to have been vanquished, it's certainly possible that the bug could mutate again and wreak havoc on the world's wine industry once more. Given the rampant popularity and pervasiveness of wine, such an outbreak would be more devastating than ever before. Even if this doesn't happen (and let's really hope it doesn't), I predict it's only a matter of time before we see a phylloxera movie. Just look at pop culture: is a film about "Vine Vampires" or "Wine Zombies" really so hard to imagine? V

That wasn't the end of phylloxera, however, as a new mutation called biotype B (which sounds straight out of a zombie movie, doesn't it?) emerged in California's Napa Valley in 1983. The cause was a certain type of hybrid rootstock, AxR1, which had a vinifera parent and was therefore susceptible to this new form of phylloxera. Because the majority of Californian vines were grafted onto AxR1, vintners were once again forced to rip up their vineyards and replant with a different, truly phylloxeraimmune rootstock. While t h e

... and so it begins

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: I DON’T GET IT, A PODCAST ABOUT CONTEMPORARY DANCE IN EDMONTON, NOW AVAILABLE AT VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // DANCE

O

f the many things that the Taj to play Shah Jahan, and Canadian star Mahal is known for—say, its Lisa Ray (Water) in the role of Jahseat on the Seven Wonders of the anara. An avid theatre-goer in ToronModern World list, or its existence to, Pada knew a proper narrative was as a tribute of an emperor to his key, and so signed up lauded Alberta beloved wife—the majestic building playwright John Murrell to write has more stories to tell, some as epic the script. TAJ premiered in 2011 as a commission of the Luminato Festiand dazzling as the structure itself. The seeds for TAJ, the multidis- val, and is now making its way across ciplinary dance-theatre telling of Canada with the original headlining a lesser known side of the famed cast and a company of 10 professionmausoleum's story, were planted al kathak dancers from India. five years ago while Lata Pada was studying the 17th-century Mu- Pada, whose company in Toronto ghal empire. The artistic director primarily focuses on South Asian dance of the clasof Sampradaya sical bharatanatyDance Creations, Wed, Nov 6 (7:30 pm) am style, notes Pada was inter- TAJ the traditionally ested in stories Festival Place (Sherwood Park), flowing, kathak surrounding em- $24.75 – $35 style of Indian peror Shah Jahdance was most an—the one who built the Taj as an opulent resting appropriate for TAJ because kathak place for his late wife, Mumtaz. But would have been performed in the it wasn't the love story between Mughal court at the time. "Kathak movement is strongly rooted emperor and wife that hooked Pada; she found the relationship in rhythmic structures," she says, exbetween Shah Jahan and his daugh- plaining that the dancers' quick, light steps also articulate and replicate the ter, Jahanara, more interesting. "Undoubtedly, most of the world percussive syllables in the music. Also knows about the Taj Mahal, yet if characteristic of kathak dance are its you ask anyone they only know it long, flowing costumes and whirling as a monument of love. There is so turns, called chakkars. "It's a form much more behind it, behind the that's very interesting because it is actual place there was a canvas both lyrical and poetic while it is also of human drama that carried out," very strong and rhythmic." "When you see Italian opera that Pada says. "I thought that the character of Jahanara was an intriguing is centuries old, or you see Shakeone. She had great ambition, great spearean drama, they're still very intellect and political savvy, and I relevant to audiences today, so I was felt that was what I wanted to be really inspired to tell the story, but I wanted to be sure that I wouldn't represented." Joining with legendary 82-year- go into a clichéd way of representing old kathak choreographer Kumudini the Taj Mahal," Pada adds. "It is truly Lakhia, Pada set out to produce a a production that marries many distale of proportions no less epic than ciplines; it brings in theatre, spoken the Taj itself. Following a kind of "go word, dance and projections into a big or go home" mentality, Pada cast multilayered, evocative story." famed Bollywood star (and well- FAWNDA MITHRUSH known Octopussy villain) Kabir Bedi FAWNDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Beyond the wonder TAJ explores a lesser-known tale behind its majestic namesake

Drama and dance play out in TAJ // Mansa & Sid Sawant

PREVUE // DANCE

Spontaneous Combustion N

ow in its 29th season, Mile Zero Hosted by Piet Defraeye, acts at Dance kicks off the year with the Spontaneous Combustion range from first installment of its well-loved Sa- improvised film using loop projeclon series, this time in the theme of tions by Lindsay McIntyre, micro"Spontaneous Combustion." The eight narrative antics with Tim Mikula and short presentaBen Gorodetsky of Rapid Fire Theatre, tions for the Sa- Sat, Nov 2 (8 pm) lon are curated to L'Uni Theatre, a Chinese lantern highlight improvi- $15 – $20 dance by Amy sation in its purest Kubanek, fire play (and most fiery) forms. with Vibe Tribe Gypsy Circus and St The theme is fitting, considering Crispin's Improv ensemble, and a literMZD's artistic director Gerry Morita ature-inspired dance piece by Morita has titled the season Vanishing Acts and Lin Snelling. Pigeon Breeders will to emphasize the ephemeral, tem- play an improvised musical set, while porary nature of movement perfor- Vipers WITHOUT Vapours perform a mance itself. Dance happens—and is sound composition. Also on the docket is Calgary's gone just as quickly. Kind of like fire and improv, right? Rosanna Terracciano, whose move-

ment work explores the intersection of traditional flamenco practice and contemporary dance. She began experimenting with the forms in 2003 (initiating her practice with a Radiohead track, no less), and for the Salon, hers is a "Choose Your Own Adventure"-type presentation. Using flamenco dance signatures and the audience's help, Terracciano plans to build a contemporary-meets-flamenco piece on the spot. "It's like a game in front of the audience," she says. "I'm basically coming in with five pieces that will be put together like a jigsaw puzzle to make a dance, and I'm relying on the audience to dictate the order of those pieces and what music that will

match each part of the dance." Though flamenco has room to improvise, it's not quite the same as what she's trying here, she notes. "I thought it would be really interesting to take this idea into flamenco because there are a lot of rules in flamenco for what happens when, what music you use for what," she explains. "[In flamenco] a lot of things are choreographed, but it's like structured improv; the dance completely relies on what happens with the singer. ... There's structure in the form of the song, and within that structure you can improvise. You kind of know, say, that you have this many counts to play around,

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

but based on what the singer chooses to do, [he] can stretch out a phrase or make things shorter, so you really have to listen to them." Though she admits that she's trying something pretty "out there," the music she'll supply is strictly flamenco-style. "When I create pieces where I'm really playing with flamenco, there has to be something that takes me back through flamenco, so in this it's the music that will keep me there. Ultimately whatever happens when the song comes on it's still a traditional flamenco song," she says. "No Radiohead." FAWNDA MITHRUSH

FAWNDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARTS 13


ARTS PREVUE // DANCE

PREVUE // THEATRE

Sleeping Beauty

Pains of Youth

A darkened fairy tale // John Hall

M

ats Ek's Sleeping Beauty began with a chance encounter far from fairy tale.

The choreographer was in Zürich, Switzerland, and found himself approached by a desperate young girl.

"[She] came asking for a little money because she had to buy food," Gradimir Pankov says, relating the choreographer's tale. "He realized she was actually dependent on narcotics. And he thought, 'This is a Sleeping Beauty: she's sleeping, and lost completely.'" Given that beginning, Ek's ballet interpretation of Sleeping Beauty—originally crafted in Hamburg in 1996, and being presented now by Pankov's company, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal, coming to town courtesy of Alberta Ballet— has more in common with a gritty modern-day drama than the more universal Disney spin. As a pas-

The perils of your 20s in the '20s

sionate, petulant teen, Princess Aurora The choreographer's more theescapes from her boring, middle class atrical take on ballet, Pankov parents only to find herself ensnared in notes, stems from his pre-dance a dark, druggy underworld. Her pinprick days: he'd studied theatre and is a heroin needle; her spiral a more psy- worked with legendary direcchological and darkened one than most tor Ingmar Bergman in Sweden, interpretations of the story (there's even which left an indelible impression a 'parental guidance' tag on the produc- on his future ballets. tion, something pretty rare for ballet). "His approach is to do something that In that, this Sleeping Beauty is a more is beyond the dance," he adds. "You cantheatrical, actorly not dance his piectake on ballet than es if you are not a Wed, Nov 6 – Thu, the art form's more good actor." Nov 7 (7:30 pm) traditional leanings, Which was a Choreographed by Mats Ek an approach Ek's tricky approach Jubilee Auditorium, for the dancers, spent the past few $29 – $95 decades exploring at least the first time Ek worked to great acclaim. "[Ek] has different thoughts about with Les Grands Ballets. But given what dance theatre should look like, and this is Ek's third piece with the comwhat should be on the stage, connected pany, most of the company's corps with our modern time," Pankov notes. have acclimatized themselves to his distinct style of rule-breaking. "They have been very comfortable with that," Pankov says, "and they have been open to learn something else, than to do choreographical phrases that are based on the beauty of the lines, et cetera, et cetera. He's somebody who learns the classic [method] and knows it very well. But he'll break on purpose from the lines, and all [his] choreography looks different than everybody else. You realize his signature everywhere." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

// Ed Ellis

T

he plight of the future generation: existence. They're wrestling with much has been made of it, from failed love affairs and people repeople who think Millennials are jecting them and ultimately suicide just a bunch of lazy, entitled brats to becomes an option that is seriously those with serious concerns over the considered." prospects of a generation in which Uplifting it may not be, but these opportunity definitely isn't knocking. "I've been hearing studies and re- are issues that every person must ports that this generation, the twen- face at some point. McCaw also tysomethings of now, are probably stresses that, despite the play's setting at the outone of the first set of a globally generations in a Until Sat, Nov 9 (7:30 pm; Thu, very long time who Nov 7 matinee at 12:30 pm) momentous time, will most likely not Directed by Kim McCaw Pains of Youth is be as financially Timms Centre for the Arts, a fundamentally personal story. well-off as their $11 – $22 "It's not an acaparents' generation," says Kim Mcdemic conversation at all," he exCaw, University of Alberta drama professor and director plains. "These are people dealing with of Studio Theatre's upcoming produc- how you live—we're not talking about philosophical or political discourse. tion of Pains of Youth. The story may occur in a very spe- This is just a group of people trying cific setting (a medical students' to figure out why isn't she in love with rooming house in 1920s Vienna), but me anymore, why should I keep going, Ferdinand Bruckner's 1923 play has what's the purpose of living—why not surprising resonance for a contem- just shoot yourself at 17. "It's a very sophisticated, complex porary audience—which is precisely why McCaw chose it for his students. play, and so very demanding of acting "It looks at a group of young medi- students to employ all of the training cal students just on the edge of fin- they've been receiving over the past ishing their studies and entering into couple of years," he continues. "And I the adult world," he says. "There's a think that we may be a bit surprised kind of despair that they are feeling by some of the choices; it's not what as well; they don't see a particularly you would expect." bright future, other than a series MEL PRIESTLEY of disappointments and bourgeois MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

A COMMISSION OF THE 2011 LUMINATO FESTIVAL

14 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


PREVUE // THEATRE

2 Pianos 4 Hands

Grew up in St.Albert? Go home on your terms. Plenty of space. And it’s all yours. They won't be Bach again

'W

e sometimes joke and say it's our first else," Greenblatt adds. "You can't write a play farewell tour, kind of like the Stones that is universal. But you can write it that's true to your own experience, and that's what or The Who." Richard Greenblatt is speaking over the communicates to everybody else's life." phone in between rehearsals of the Citadel's newest production, a show that Greenblatt The initial impetus for the show came from and his creative partner, Ted Dykstra, wrote the pair's realization that although they grew and first performed over 17 years ago. 2 Pi- up on opposite ends of the country (Dykstra anos 4 Hands has been labelled one of the in St Albert and Greenblatt in Montréal), they had strikingly similar experimost successful Canadian ences learning the piano. plays ever—no faint praise, Until Sat, Nov 17 (7:30 pm; 1:30 "We had these almost kind but admittedly well- pm Sunday matinee) of parallel existences as kids," founded given the show's Created and directed by Richard Greenblatt notes. "We even remarkable uptake on Greenblatt & Ted Dykstra played a lot of the same stages around the globe, Citadel Theatre, $35 – $88.20 repertoire. We each had one its translation into several major teacher for our whole languages and its continual mountings and remountings. Although this is 10-year career as kids, who was and remains very the last run for Greenblatt and Dykstra, the close to us. We had similar fights, and similar exshow will continue to be staged by perform- periences in competitions and exams." Over the show's history both Greenblatt ers who can achieve a curious mix of acting and Dykstra became fathers, and suddenly chops and serious piano skills. There's something about 2 Pianos 4 Hands found themselves on the other end of the that speaks to people. On the surface it is student-parent/teacher relationship—they deceptively simple: as the title suggests, the each joke (rather ruefully) that their kids performance consists of a duo tickling the can't stand having them around during pracivories on a pair of pianos, weaving together tice. But above all, with their children and with their show, they strive to promote the their stories with some video projections. "I think people see themselves in the show, celebration of music as a whole. "It's the thing I have to tell myself if and even if they didn't take piano," says Dykstra, also on the phone with Greenblatt. "Everyone when I practise with my kids: to lay off them can relate to the pursuit of excellence, and to and let them have fun and discover their own loving something and then coming to terms musicianship," Greenblatt says. "It's not just with the fact that you might not be the best about drilling it and making sure their fingers can play the passage; it's also about the music in the world at it." "The old adage with art is that the more spe- in all of our souls." cific you are and true you are to that specific- Mel Priestley ity, the more it actually relates to everybody Mel@vueweekly.com

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ARTS 15


ARTS PREVUE // PUPPET THEATRE

Albert's Afraid

Spooky spectres

'H

onestly, I think we were Boyd says of the kid-friendly tale. "I afraid to do a public show," don't even remember the last two says puppeteer Brendan James months. It's been crazy. I've never Boyd of the Odd-Lot Puppetry done a show in this short of time, Company. "We were frightened to ever. And it's a small team. The produce something bigger, branch build team should be about 10 peoout and actually take more creative ple, and three of us built the show." endeavours." In the past, Odd-Lot was a compa- But when the library asked, Boyd ny that could only be seen at cor- described it as a "sign from the pupporate gigs or special events, but pet gods." Not only does puppetry this Halloween season they're tak- lend itself to spooky characters ing a scary step out of their com- like werewolves and skeletons, fort zone with a but it was also an debut public peropportunity for Fri, Nov 1 (7 pm); Odd-Lot to start formance in EdSat, Nov 2 (Noon & 2 pm) building a name monton, entitled Directed by Brendan James Boyd and a repertoire, Albert's Afraid. Old Strathcona With 67 props with puppets Performing Arts Centre, and puppets and built from mate$9 rials that would four puppeteers, last for longer the black-light musical stars an anxious bat that must than one run. conquer his fear of the dark in order "Putting yourself out there as to save his little sister who has wan- a creator and an artist A) is hard dered away from home. Featuring a and B) trying to do children's thewerewolf that's afraid of change, a atre and have people take you sebanshee that's afraid of being alone riously is really hard," Boyd conand a wise skeleton that knows it's tinues. "That's our struggle. That's OK to fall apart every once in a our fear—is being labelled as that while, Albert's Afraid materialized children's puppet troupe who does when for Fort McMurray Public Li- birthday parties when really we are brary called up Boyd to see if they trying to create interesting and exwould do a Halloween show. citing pieces of work that inspire "We wrote, recorded, produced, imagination." built all the puppets—all that KATHLEEN BELL stuff in just under two months," KATHLEEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

16 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


PREVUE // VISUAL ARTS

PREVUE // THEATRE

The Intellection of Carrie Lady Spider House O

Haunted (art)house

F

or all of the high-art acclaim and late-night Refinery party, dubbed the conceptual praise Geoffrey Farm- Funhouse and being interpreted by er has found in the visual arts world Edmonton artist Kristine Nutting.) over the years, the first exhibition he ever made, as a child—one that, even To explore that sort of art-space, today, he keeps coming back to—was Farmer enlisted 10 other artists, ones he either knew (and knew a haunted house. would get his par"It was the first ticular sensibility) time I can remember Until Tue, Jan 14 or admired, to creactively imagining Curated by Geoffrey Farmer ate the content of what a viewer might Art Gallery of Alberta his layout. He estabexperience and lished five "zones" working through Sat, Nov 16 (9 pm) to structure it, the process of what Funhouse Refinery including one overwas in my mind and arching one: the air then creating it into physical form," he explains, via email, and sound of the room to offer some from his Vancouver home. "For exam- unity in the exhibition experience. "This is where Hannah Rickards’ ple, I remember making a set of stairs out of books and pieces of wood that piece,  'Thunder'  is played," Farmer stopped abruptly to a mattress, that says. "This piece takes the recordwould then catch your fall. When we ing of a single clap of thunder and tested it out using each other as test stretches it out to seven minutes. subjects, it didn’t work out the way I Then this was transcribed into a muhad imagined. It worked in my mind sical score for six instruments, perbut in reality it had a different effect. formed, recorded and then reduced back to eight seconds." It was really dangerous." Farmer acknowledges finding particLess dangerous, but drawn from same world, is The Intellection of Lady ular inspiration in Fort Edmonton Park, Spider House, Farmer's current exhibi- our long-standing ode to the past. "I found Fort Edmonton Park in retion in the Art Gallery of Alberta. The title is a homage to American artist searching the history of the formation Bruce Conner’s 1959 work Spider Lady of the city of Edmonton in preparing House. It is, effectively, haunted art- for the exhibition," he explains. "I was house: there aren't any jump scares to curious about it as a site and physical spike your adrenaline, but, under low structure relating to history and time. light and strange thunderclaps, wan- It is set up so that you walk through it dering through it leads you on a cer- in chronological order to create a certain, destabilizing tour of Edmonton tain effect. Particular narratives are history: there are references to Black actively or unconsciously repressed. I Friday, our anti-rat policies, some par- thought there were some similarities ticularly effective projection work, and to haunted house structures, especially in terms of colonialism." more that speckle the space. (Lady Spider House will also serve PAUL BLINOV as inspiration for the AGA's next PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

vercoming a bad reputation and then suddenly there's 45 is a difficult thing to do—for minutes of CGI." people, for restaurants and especially for Broadway shows. Few There was plenty of interest in productions have attained such remounting Carrie over the years a level of notoriety as Carrie: The (chiefly as campy mockery), but Musical, the the creative stage adaptateam of writer tion of Stephen Until Sat, Nov 9 (7:30 pm; 2 pm Lawrence Cohen, King's 1974 novel matinee Sun, Nov 3) lyricist Dean which debuted Directed by Jim Guedo Pitchford and on Broadway in John L. Haar Theatre, composer Mi1988 and ran for $16.75 – $25 chael Gore kept only five nights; it far from the scathing reviews stage. Last year caused the financial backers to saw the release of the rights to an withdraw and cancel the show— overhauled version of the script, despite the fact that the entire run causing a rash of revivals to crop was already sold out. up—in fact, a Grant MacEwan "It was more production-based alumnus just staged a production versus content," says Jim Guedo, at this year's Fringe Festival. chair of the Grant MacEwan The"The irony is that the performatre Arts program and director ers in that original production, of the students' current pro- on a nightly basis in that limduction of Carrie. "It's the same ited run—they got standing thing, especially in this day and ovations," Guedo says. "There age, with Hollywood—where is something even at that point you see something that started about the material that connectoff as a clever little indie idea ed with people."

Guedo felt that Carrie offered his students—both the cast of 18 and the much larger behind-thescenes team—a good showcase for the skills they've been building in the program. He also notes that the story is particularly accessible for a younger crowd. "Regardless of the horrific, dark parts of the material, ultimately Carrie is about an outsider trying to fit in," Guedo says. "Unfortunately we're living in a world where bullying is even more present in our society. The clichéd statement 'you never leave high school'—well, it's true. The battleground changes but it's still the same thing. "Stephen King, in my mind, as the original instigator of all this, has the ability to tap into something," he continues. "Good horror is timeless, meaning every generation can connect with the material because there's still something primal about it." MEL PRIESTLEY

MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Christmas World around  the

November  13  -­‐  17,  2013

Chateau  Louis  Conference  Centre 11727  Kingsway,  Edmonton  AB Vinok’s  beloved  classic  has  become   the  traditional  Christmas  season   start  for  many  Edmontonians  for   fourteen  years  now.  Don’t  miss   your  chance  to  indulge  in  this   decadent  dinner  and  dessert  buffet   and  unforgettable  show  that  will   lift  your  spirits  into  the  holiday   season  and  beyond!

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

christmas.vinok.ca 780.454.3739 Wednesday,  November  13 Thursday,  November  14 Buffet  5:30  pm,  Show  7  pm  ($70) Friday,  November  15 Saturday,  November  16 Buffet  6  pm,  Show  7:30  pm  ($75) Sunday,  November  17 Buffet  11:30  am,  Show  1  pm  ($75) Children  12  &  under  $39 all  prices+  GST,    includes  gratuity

ARTS 17


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

Oct 31

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 12310 Jasper

Ave, 780.482.2854 • TERRA INCOGNITA: Works by Ernestine Tahedl; until Oct 31 • THE ROAR AND THE SILENCE: Watercolour landscapes by Jerry Heine; Nov 1-15; Artist opening: Nov 1, 6-9pm; artist in attendance: Nov 2, 1-5pm

CAFÉ PICHILINGUE–Red Deer • Artworks by Harvey Brink; Nov 1-30; First Fri reception: Nov 1

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTAS (CAVA)

DANCE

• 9103-95 Ave, 780.461.3427 • Artworks by Louise Halvorsen, Béatrice Lefevre, Curtis Johnson, and Yardley Jones; until Nov 5 • Artworks by Claude Boocock, Valerie Solash, Rollande Brodeur, Deborah Lenihan, Fondation Jean Gauthier; Nov 8-20; opening: Nov 8, 7pm

ALBERTA BALLET • Jubilee Auditorium • albertaballet.

CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51

com • Sleeping Beauty: Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal – Alberta Premiere; parental guidance strongly advised; choreography by Mats Ek; music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky; set/costume by Peder Freiij • Nov 6-7, 7:30pm • Tickets at box office:78O.428.6839

Ave, Stony Plain, 780.963.9573 • SEA THINGS: Pottery by Cheryl Anderson, Holly Rolls, and Lynnette; through

Dance Creations–TAJ: featuring Bollywood luminary Kabir Bedi and Canada’s acclaimed international star Lisa Ray multi-media, dance-theatre Canada-India collaboration production • Nov 6, 8pm • $39.75$ (24.75 students/senior

CAPITOL THEATRE • Fort Edmonton • King Kong (1933) • Oct 31, 7:3pm

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Library Theatre, Stanley A. Milner Library Bsmt, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • Black Book (14A, Netherlands, 2006); in Dutch with English subtitles; Nov 6, 6:30pm • Buying Sex (STC, Canada, 2013); Nov 13, 6:30pm EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum

Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave, 780.439.5285 • The Russians Are Coming! The Russians Are Coming (1966, colour, PG) • Nov 4, 8pm • $6 (adult)/$5 (senior)/$5 (student)/$3 (12 and under)

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427 • NATURAL POWER: Works by Barbara Hull Chan; Until Nov 27

GALLERY 7 • Bookstore on Perron, 7 Perron St, St

Albert • CORNUCOPIA: Paintings by Marina Bazos; until Nov 25

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.944.5383 • Edmonton Stamp Club: Display; until Oct 31 • Display Cases: Edmonton Potters' Guild: until Oct 31; VESSELS OF PURPOSE: Clay figurines by Corwin Cherwonka; Nov 1-3

Nov 16th

BRIAN WEBB DANCE • Festival Place • Sampradaya

FILM

FRONT GALLERY • 12312 Jasper Ave, 780.488.2952 • URBAN REFLECTIONS: Artworks by Ira Hoffecker • Until Nov 7

Saturday

EBDA BALLROOM DANCE • Senior Lions Recreational Centre, 11113-111 Ave, 780.893.6828 • Nov 2, 8pm

MILE ZERO DANCE • L'UniTheatre, 8627-91 St • Salon series: Spontaneous Combustion: A curated event featuring purely improvised works by various artists • Nov 2, 8pm • $20/$15 (MZD member)

FAB GALLERY • 1-1 Fine Arts Bldg, 89 Ave, 112 St, 780.492.2081 • Works by Agata Derda (MFA Printmaking) and Sarah Oneschuk (MFA Printmaking), final visual presentation for Master of Fine Arts-Printmaking • Nov 5-30 • Arist Opening: Nov 7, 7-10pm

at 8:00pm

King Kong The 8th Wonder of the world Re-live the 1933 world premiere of this classic film! Meet the cast including

Fay Wray and King Kong

EDMONTON MOVIE CLUB • Garneau Theatre, 8712-

109 St, 780.246.1140 • Celebration of Lights: Dance, food and movie, Arrambam (Tamil with English Subtitles) • Nov 3, 3-7pm • $20 (event)/$20 (movie)/$30 (event and movie)/$10 (Kids 3-10 to attend both the events)

FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner Library

Centennial Rm, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • The Great Gatsby (2013, PG); Nov 1, 2pm • The Last of The Mohicans (1997, 14A); Nov 8, 2pm

A re d ca rp et af fa ir !

METRO CINEMA • Metro Cinema at the Garneau, 8712-109 St, 780.425.9212 • Our Man in Tehran;

Amnesty International (Edmonton and U of A chapters) host the screening on Nov 1, 7pm • Nov 1-4, Nov 6

HALLOWE'EN AT METRO CINEMA • Metro Cinema •

ALBERTA AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTRE • 9210-

118 Ave, 780.426.5642 • “FIRED UP” FOR CHRISTMAS: Edmonton Potters’ Guild: 61st Annual Pottery Show & Sale • Nov 9, 10am-3pm; info: edmontonpottersguild. wordpress.com

ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE •

Get your tickets now on our website

CHRISTMAS

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-106 St, 780.488.6611 • Feature Gallery: POTWORKS: Showing the contemporary state of the ancient tradition of pottery; until Dec 24 • Discovery Gallery: FAIRY TALES, FOLKLORE, AND MYTHCOMMUNICATIONS... PART II: Calgary artist Shona Rae's sculptural rings; until Nov 30; artist reception: Nov 2, 2-4pm • Discovery Gallery: ILLUSIONS, REVELATIONS, TRANSFORMATIONS: A journey in seven stages by Edmonton fibre artist Diane Krys; until Nov 30; artist reception: Nov 2, 2-4pm

Lunch & Dinner at Johnson's Cafe

December

16 th-21 nd

ARCHIVES SOCIETY OF ALBERTA • 913 Ash St,

Sherwood Park, 780.467.8189 • REMEMBRANCE DAY EXHIBIT: Until Nov 18

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St,

St Albert, 780.460.4310 • ROOM: Amanda McCavour's installations of spaces she has lived in; until Nov 2 • INVISIBLE CITIES: Daniel Evans examines the imaginative potential of urban environments; Nov 7-30; opening: Nov 8, 7-9pm • Preschool Picasso: Magical Monoprints: for ages 3-5yrs; Nov 9, 10:30-11:30am; $8

BEARCLAW GALLERY • 10403-124 St, 780.482.1204 • RECONNECTING: New works by Alex Janvier; until

18 ARTS

Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park, 780.449.4443 • artstrathcona.com • Artwork and gifts made by members of the Art Society of Strathcona County artists

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.9935 • multicentre.org • Parkland Potter’s Guild: Fifth Biennial Exhibition; until Nov 22

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5 St Anne

St, St Albert, 780.459.1528 • LACE UP: CANADA’S PASSION FOR SKATING: Travelling exhibit by the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec • Until Nov 3

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave,

780.432.0240 • WHAT’S YOUR HANG UP?: Craft by Edmonton Calligraphic Society Members; until Nov 15 • All in a Day's Dream: Works by Kristina Sobstad; until Nov 15

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS • 9225-118 Ave • REFLECTING 96TH STREET: Mustard Seed Artists present Views Of An Inner City Locale In Transition; until Nov 1 • CHIMERIUM: HYBRIDS FROM NINA'S STUDIOS: Works by the NHCA Collective; curated by Sherri Chaba; Nov 5-Dec 20 • Jane Siberry: Celebrating the Three Queens Trilogy; Nov 8; $125 (incl wine) at tixonthesquare.ca PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave, 780.455.7479 • Works by Amy Claire Huestis and Robert Wiseman; Nov 2-19; artist reception: Nov 2, 2-4pm PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555 Roper Rd, 780.427.1750 • VICTORY ON THE FIELD EXHIBIT: Exploring the effects of the First and Second World Wars on sports in Alberta; until Jan 31; free Pro's Art GAllery • 17971-106A Ave • Mon-Sat

10am-1:30pm; Wed 2-5:30pm; Mon-Fri 6:30-9pm; Closed Thu • GENE PROKOP AND FRIENDS: Artworks by Gene Prokop with works by Zhaoming Wu, Robert Johnson, Sherri McGraw and Gregg Kreutz, and Monte Carlo car artist, Alfredo de la Maria (Argentina), and artists from the Ukraine and Russia • Until Dec 20

RED PIANO • Bourbon Street, WEM, 780.486.7722 •

Paintings and Pianos: works by Maria Pace-Wynters, Jennie Vegt, Denise Lefebvre, Sandra Kunz • Nov 7, 7pm (door); dueling pianos at 8pm

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave,

780.453.9100 • CHOP SUEY ON THE PRAIRIES: Until Apr 27, 2014 • MILTON AND CHEADLE PLATES: Jun 24-Dec 9 • Orientation Gallery: 20TH ANNIVERSARY– TIME TRAVELLERS EXHIBITION; until Nov 11 • Feature Gallery: Pattern Wizardry. Nov 9-Mar 9

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • scottgallery.

com • Paintings by Marianne Watchel • Nov 2-23 • Opening: Nov 2, 1-5pm

-Artists, 10123-121 St, 780.423.1492 • snapartists. com • Main Gallery: NATURAL, POLITICAL, POETIC AND UNPREDICTABLE–MIRRORED LINES AND CURVES: Printing objects by Klavs Weiss (Denmark) • Community Gallery: THE FACES WE KNOW AND LOVE: Works by SNAP artist in residence, Megan Stein • Both shows: until Nov 9

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.422.6223 • Manning Hall (main level public space): NOW YOU SEE IT: A giant word search puzzle by Megan Morman • WATER INTO ART: British watercolours from the V&A, 1750-1950; until Nov 24 • LADY SPIDER HOUSE: Until Jan 12, 2014 • ANGAKKUQ: BETWEEN TWO WORLDS; until Feb 16 • Daphnis & Chloé: Chagall; until Feb 16, 2014 • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30, 2014 • RBC New Works Gallery: ISACHSEN, 1948-1978: Works by Aaron Munson and David Hoffos; until Nov 24 • International Curator Series: Ledcor Theatre: Paul O’Neill; Nov 3, 2pm; $15/$10 (member)

LOFT GALLERY • A.J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta Print

Byzantium: until Oct 31

Spruce Grove Art Gallery, Spruce Grove Library, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.0664 • REMINISCENCE OF THE SUBCONSCIOUS: Works by Erik Cheung; until Nov 7 • Fireplace Room: Red Deer College High School Award Winners from High School Show in Spring; Nov 1

LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St, 780.423.5353 • ProjEx Room: ELSEWHERE: Paintings by Kristen Keegan; until Nov 2 • Main Space: LES CORPS: Photographic based portraits by Christophe Jivraj; until Nov 2 • Lecture: Curator Art Talk with Paul O'Neill, who is leading a transitory public art project in the Quarters with Latitude53; Nov 3, 2pm • UNRAVELING THE DIS/ABLED: Performance by Brooke Leifso; Nov 1, 7:30pm, followed by artist talk; Nov 2, 7:30pm • Fine Art of Schmoozy: Schmoozy is your future: art auction, music and more; Nov 9, 8pm

STEPPES GALLERIES • 1253, 1259-91 St, 780.965.2534 • PRISMATIKA–ILLUSIONS OF THE UNIVERSE: Artists from Canada, Croatia, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Poland, Ukraine, and the US • Oct 26-Dec 7 STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY@501 •

501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • LANDMARKS ON THE STUDIO WALL: Art by Robert Dmytruk, Les Graff, and Paddy Lamb • Nov 1-Dec 20 • Artists opening: Nov 1, 7pm

THE STUDIO • 11739-94 St • Works by Glen Ronald,

Bliss Robinson, Debra Milne and guest artists • Until Dec 31, 12-5pm

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • telusworldofscienceedmonton.com • HARRY POTTER: THE EXHIBITION: Peer into the wizard’s world in an interactive exhibit featuring hundreds of authentic props and costumes from the Harry Potter films; Nov 23-Mar 9, 2014; tickets start: $14 U OF A MUSEUMS • Human Ecology Gallery: Main

WWW.FORTEDMONTONPARK.CA

Fl, 116 St, 89 Ave: THE RE-BIRTH OF VENUS: Fashion & The Venus Kallipygos: Explores the influence of art on fashion through the study of Venus Kallipygos, and its pervasive influence on dress • Until Mar 2, 2014

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St, Oct • CELEBRATE THE SEASON: pottery, handmade decorations; Nov 1-Dec 24; Open house: Nov 15 and Dec 7; Proceeds to local Christmas charity

• Gallery: THE SEVENTH KINGDOM: Mixed media artwork

DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St, 780.686.4211 • dc3artprojects.com • OUR FAMILIES: The Impact of Contemporary Family on Art; works by Paul Freeman, Francois Morelli (w/son Didier), Tammy Salzl • Until Nov 16; open: Thu-Fri 6-9pm; Sat 11am-6pm

Main Gallery: THE QUIET REBUILD: Alexis Marie Chute • Front Room: Yael Brotman; Until Nov 29; Artist Talks:

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St, 780.760.1278 • APPROACHING RIVER CITY: Meghan Dauphineé; Nov 1-23; artist reception: Nov 7, 5-8pm

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper

Ave • Open: Thu-Fri 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • SANAUNGUABIK: Traditions and transformations in Inuit art, featuring prints, sculpture, textile, and video art; until Dec 21 • POP GOES CANADIANA: Painting, print, and sculpture by Charles Pachter; Nov 1-30

by Lori Kieser on the walls

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • Brotman 7pm, Chute 7:30pm

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY • Strathcona Place

Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave, 780.433.5807 • OIL ON CANVAS: By Dawn Dlashinsky • Nov 1-27 • Reception: Nov 6, 6:30-8:30pm

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St, 780.990.1161

• ROCKY MOUNTIAN LAKES: Tatjana Mirkov Popovicki; until Nov 12 • AWAKENING: Paintings by Works by Shirley Elias • EMBRACING COLOUR: Paintings by Jana Milne: Nov 1-20; artist opening with Shirley and Jana; Nov 2, 1-4pm

780.421.1731 • Keith Harder; until Nov 30

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.460.5990 • WILDLIFE GALORE: Vicki Armstrong, Carol Johnson, Heather Howard, Carla Beerens; through Oct • CURIOSITY: Works by Society of Western Canadian Artists; through Nov; Nov 2, 1-4pm WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave,

780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • ALBERTA LANDSCAPE: RETURNING HOME: Richard Cole's paintings; until Oct 31 • Paintings by W.H. WEBB; Nov 2-14

LITERARY BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ • 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 • Story Slam 2nd Wed each month @ the Chair: Share your story, sign-up at 7pm; 7-10pm • $5 (suggested, donations go to winners)

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE • 9351-118 Ave • Prose Creative Writing Group • Every Tue, 7-9pm

KOFFEE CAFÉ • 6120-28 Ave, 780.863.4522 • Glass Door Coffee House Reading Series: Monthly readings with new headliner • Last Thu each month, 7-9pm

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St, 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@gmail.com STRATHCONA COUNTY LIBRARY–Sherwood Park • 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • NaNoW-

riMo: Writer in Residence, Natasha Deen presents writing games • Nov 5, 7-8:30pm; register online, in person or call 780.410.8600

UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave, 780.422.8174 • strollofpoets.com • The Poets’ Haven Reading Series: presented by the Stroll of Poets Society • Allison Akgungor, Michale Lang, Adriana Davies, Gereen Anderson, Aalyssa Atley, Rusti L Lehay, Door Host, Audrey Brooks, Mic Host; Nov 4, 7pm • $5

THEATRE THE 11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • An Improvised Musical • Every Fri through Oct to Dec 13, 11pm; starts again Jan 10 (check Varscona's cal ALADDIN AND THE MAGIC LAMP • Alberta Opera

• Until Nov 3

BODY AWARENESS • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • Shadow Theatre's witty and moving domestic comedy of image, ideology and intimacy by Annie Baker, starring Coralie Cairns, Paul Cowling, Caleb Ellsworth-Clark, Stephanie Wolfe; directed by Valerie Planche • Nov 6-24 • $23-$27 (adult)/$21-$24 (student/seniors) at TIX on the Square DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • varsconatheatre.com • Live improvised soap opera • Runs Every Mon, 7:30pm Until May 26, 2014 CARRIE, THE MUSICAL • John L. Haar Theatre, Centre for the Arts, 10045-156 St • Presented by MacEwan, music by Michael Gore, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, book by Laurence D. Cohen, based on the Novel by Stephen King • Until Nov 9, 7:30pm; 2pm mat on Nov 3 • Tickets start at $15; at TIX on the Square, macewan.ca/TheatreArts CHIMPROV • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-

101A Ave • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every 10pm, until Jul • $12 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun, 2014

A CLOSER WALK WITH PATSY CLINE • Mayfield

Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 Ave, 780.483.4051 • Homage to Patsy Cline and her climb to stardom, from her humble beginnings in small town Virginia to the bright lights of Carnegie Hall • Until Nov 3

THE DAISY THEATRE • The Club, Citadel Rice Theatre • citadeltheatre.com • Presented by Ronnie Burkett Theatre of Marionettes; recommended for ages 16+ • Until Nov 17, 8pm ELVIS AND THE LAS VEGAS HANGOVER • Jubilations Dinner Theatre • The annual Elvis festival in sunny Las Vegas featuring hit songs by Elvis Presley, and more • Nov 1-Feb 14 FORBIDDEN BROADWAY'S GREATEST HITS •

La Cité Theatre • Two One-Way Tickets to Broadway Production • Directed and chorreography by Linette Smith; music directon by Robert Bradford • Nov 8-16

HOTBED HOTEL • Kinsmen Hall, 47 Riel Dr, St Albert • stalberttheatre.com • Dinner Theatre, St Albert Theatre Troupe; by Michael Parker, directed by Mark McGarrigle • Oct 31, Nov 1-2 • $47.50 at box office IM HUSSEIN JUBILEE SHOW • Arden Theatre, St

Albert • ardentheatre.com • Celebrating 25 years of comedy staged by the Ajyal Theatrical Group, featuring Im Hussein • Nov 3, 8pm • $45-$85

PAINS OF YOUTH • Timms Centre • U of A Studio Theatre • By Ferdinand Bruckner, translation by Martin Crimp; Kim McCaw directs • Oct 31-Nov 9; no show Nov 3; Nov 7 mat at 12:30pm • $11-$22 at TIX on the Square, Timms Centre box office PIG GIRL • Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St • By Colleen Murphy, Theatre Network –Live at the Roxy: world premiere • Nov 5-24; Tue-Sat, 8pm; Sun 2pm; Nov 5-6 (prev9ew); Nov 7 (opening, 2-for-1) • $15-$27 at theatrenetwork.ca PYRETIC PRODUCTIONS SIA • ATB Financial Arts Barns’ PCL Studio, 10330-84 Ave • Arts at the Barns Presentation Series: The day Canadian volunteer Nick Summers is scheduled to fly home from Ghana, he wakes up hung over and tied to a chair • Nov 8-17 SCARY NASTY' HALLOWE'EN NIGHT • Fort

Edmonton, Capitol Theatre • Comedy improv Hallowe'en Special full of laughs and screams presented by the DieNasty improv troupe • Oct 31, 7:30pm • $20/$45 (dinner and show) at fortedmontonpark.ca

THE SEAGULL • Robert Tegler Student Centre

Auditorium, Concordia University College, 73 St, 111 Ave, 780.479.9269 • By Anton Chekhov, translation by Pam Gems • Theatre at Concordia, directed by Caroline Howarth featuring student performers and production crew from Concordia • Nov 1-2, 7:30; Nov 2, 2pm • $15 (adult)/$10 (student/senior)

THEATRESPORTS • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Until June • $12/$10 (member) at TIX on the Square two PiAnos–Four HAnds • Citadel Shoctor Theatre, 9828-101A Ave, 780.425.1820 • Written, starring, directed by Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenblatt. The farewell tour of a Canadian Theatre musical sensation plays at the Citadel Theatre • Until Nov 17


FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // DRAMA

Rattle the chains Trading in suffering as spectacle

Blink twice if you were kidnapped

S

olomon Northup was an educated Queen's Shame (2011) prompted me husband and father, a talented to wonder whether or not I really did violinist and a free man in his early like Hunger (2008), his debut. In any 30s when, in 1841, he was lured from case, both of those films trade in sufSaratoga, New York to Washington, fering as spectacle, and in this regard was kidnapped, sold into slavery, 12 Years a Slave—which features a shuttled down to New Orleans and protracted, painterly, unbroken shot thereafter brutalized, humiliated and in which Northup dangles from a forced to work. Not only did he lose noose, his toes tapping desperately every vestige of the life he knew, he on the muddy earth that can't quite was coerced into denying his identity. relieve him, while his fellow slaves 12 Years a Slave, adapted by John Rid- going about their business for fear of ley from Northup's bestselling mem- meeting the same fate—is hardly a oir and directed by British gallery departure. How could it be? The eeartist and filmmaker Steve McQueen, rie, awful beauty of this shot doesn't appropriately depicts the beginnings mitigate the moral imperative to make this nadir in Northof Northup's jourup's story as gruelney as a nightmare: Opens Friday ling to behold as he is misled and Directed by Steve McQueen possible. It's just drugged; he wakes Princess Theatre that McQueen's in shackles; he's  realization draws informed that he as much attention isn't who he knows himself to be but rather a runaway to his impeccable craft and cool aufrom Georgia; he's viciously beaten dacity as it does to its horror. for no coherent reason. From this point the film becomes a sort of per- Whatever my reservations—and version of the picaresque, with Nor- whatever yours may be—I hope thup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) being moved it's clear that 12 Years a Slave is from one plantation to the next, at about as close to compulsory viewone point indentured to a benevolent ing as any movie can be. The quesmaster (Benedict Cumberbatch), at tion, raised in some recent essays another to an alcoholic sadist (Mi- prompted by the film's release and chael Fassbender), never knowing if immediate acclaim, as to whether salvation may suddenly appear out of atrocities such as slavery or the the blue or forever elude him until he Holocaust can or should be the subject of movies isn't very helpis either worked or beaten to death. McQueen's third feature is less for- ful when trying to reckon with the malist than its predecessors. With work itself. See the film, struggle its somewhat more conventional with it, admire it, if you will. Recoverage, litany of star cameos and member that Northup's is just one sweeping Hans Zimmer score, the story among millions. And let's film, which counts Brad Pitt amongst indeed celebrate the fact that the its producers—and famous bit-play- wonderful Ejiofor has finally found ers—incorporates the tropes of the the breakthrough role he's so long Hollywood historical prestige picture, deserved. Given the nature of the though it does so with more auster- material, his performance is one of ity and less sentiment than anything immense, nuanced restraint. The from Steven Spielberg, whose own smartest thing he and McQueen do slavery epic, Amistad (1997), isn't in bringing Northup's story to cinematic life is to leave the fathomless among the director's renown works. I came to the 12 Years a Slave with emotions largely to the audience. some skepticism. The phony bathos JOSEF BRAUN and shameless showmanship of Mc- JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

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FILM 19


FILM ASPECTRATIO

JOSEF BRAUN / JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Spectral invitation

Ghosts, eccentrics and waves all crash together in The Uninvited

What was that sound?

Waves are always crashing against the shore in The Uninvited (1944), lulling in a way that seems more threatening than calming—things happen when you slip into a trance. If you live near the ocean the ocean is ordinary, but ordinary things are eerie here, houses most of all. English thespian Lewis Allen's film directing debut is a beguiling gem from wartime Hollywood, a ghost story riddled with whimsy but finally very serious about spectres, and, like any good spooky movie, very focused on atmosphere. Charles Lang Jr won an Oscar for his cinematography, which not only renders those crashing waves as sensual and doom-laden but also manipulates the light beaming off those waves

so that it enters people's homes—that ocean really is everywhere—and plays with shadow in a way that's mysterious and unnerving, romantic and sexy. "It's getting almost too dark to see you," says the film's leading man to the woman he's slowly falling for. The penumbra is where lovers meet, and where billowing phantoms materialize. The Uninvited is now available for inviting into your own home, on Blu-ray or DVD, thanks to the Criterion Collection. Based on a novel by Dorothy Macardle, something about The Uninvited's set-up strikes me as curious. Patrick and Pamela Fitzgerald (Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey) are wandering along the Cornish coast when they discover

Winward House, a vacant hilltop manor with vast rooms and a bleak recent history. Before they learn of that history, which involves "a quiet, ladylike" murder, they spontaneously decide to put all their savings into buying the house. The two get along swimmingly. They're young enough, charming enough and good-looking enough—though Pamela's approach to her eyebrows betrays some hidden eccentricity—to give the air of a happy couple. They're actually brother and sister. I'm not implying anything unseemly, but the odd closeness of these siblings is just one of many weird and compelling ingredients in The CONTINUED ON PAGE 21 >>

KAT DANSER Celebrating the release of her latest Blues album,

Friday, November 1 7:30 pm | $28

Arden Theatre Box Office

780.459.1542 ardentheatre.com Cultural Services

20 FILM

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


FILM

WEEKLY

Fri, Nov 1-Thu, Nov 7, 2013 CHABA THEATRE–JASPER

6094 Connaught Dr Jasper, 780.852.4749 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:00; SUN-THU 8:00 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:00; SUN-WED 8:00 FRANCIS HA (STC) Film Club Night: THU, Nov 7: 7:30

DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE Peter Travers,

“A game-changinG

movie event.” lou lumenick,

1:00 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:45, 9:10; SAT-SUN, THU 1:45 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) DAILY 7:30, 9:30; SAT-SUN, THU 2:15 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) DAILY 6:30, 9:05; SAT 1:30

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12

★★★★

5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779 MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:20, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 4:15, 6:50, 9:30 ELYSIUM (14A gory violence) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:35, 4:00, 6:45, 9:25; MON, WED-THU 4:00, 6:45, 9:25 DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:00; 3D : DAILY 3:50,

a bsolutely

7:10, 9:40

essential v ie w ing.”

THE SMURFS 2 (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:30; 3D : DAILY 3:55,

6:40, 9:10 GROWN UPS 2 (PG crude content, not rec for young children) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:05, 7:30; MON, WED-THU 7:30 THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) FRI-SUN,TUE 1:10, 4:10, 7:00, 9:55; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 7:00, 9:55 THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:25, 4:10, 6:55, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 6:55, 9:45 THE CONJURING (14A frightening scenes, disturbing content) DAILY 3:45, 10:00 PLANES (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:50, 4:30, 7:05, 9:20; MON,WEDTHU 4:30, 7:05, 9:20 LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:15, 4:05, 7:00, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:05, 7:00, 9:50 KRRISH 3 (PG violence) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:55, 5:00, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 9:00 ISHQ GARAARI (PG) Punjabi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:40, 4:35, 7:40; MON, WED-THU 4:35, 7:40 SHE'S THE ONE (PG) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:45, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:40, 7:20, 9:50

claudia Puig,

★★★★

deeply evocative &

6601-48 Ave Camrose, 780.608.2144 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) DAILY 7:15, 9:25; SAT-SUN, THU 2:00 FREE BIRDS (G DAILY 7:00, 9:00; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:00; THU

brilliantly

acted dr ama .”

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00, 10:50 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI-WED 12:50, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00; THU 2:05, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI-WED 6:40, 9:20; THU 6:40, 7:50, 9:20, 10:35; FRI, SUNWED 2:10, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; SAT 11:20, 2:10, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; THU 2:10, 5:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI-WED 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; THU 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 10:15 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) FRI, SUN-THU 1:30; SAT 11:05, 1:30; 3D : DAILY 4:10, 6:30, 8:45 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI-SAT, TUE 2:30, 5:10, 8:10, 10:40; SUN 2:40, 5:10, 8:10, 10:40; MON 2:30, 5:10, 10:20; WED 2:30, 8:10, 10:40; THU 2:30,

5:10, 7:45, 10:40 ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) FRI, SUN-TUE, THU 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:55; SAT 11:00, 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:55; WED 4:00, 7:00, 9:55; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI 1:40, 4:20, 7:30, 10:25; SAT 11:10, 1:40, 4:20, 7:30, 10:25; SUN-THU 1:40, 4:20, 7:30, 10:20 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-TUE 2:00, 4:50, 7:50, 10:35; WED 2:00, 4:50, 10:20; THU 2:00, 4:50, 7:35, 10:45 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI, MON-TUE, THU 1:50, 4:15; SAT 11:30, 12:00, 1:50, 4:15; SUN 12:30, 1:50, 4:15; WED 4:15; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00; 3D : FRI-SAT, MON-WED 12:30, 2:50, 5:05, 7:20, 9:40; SUN 12:50, 3:05, 5:20, 7:35, 9:45; THU 12:30, 2:50, 5:05, 7:15, 9:45 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) DAILY 1:20, 4:15, 7:20, 10:10 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content) DAILY 12:45, 3:50, 7:10, 10:15; Sat 11:15 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI-SAT 1:00, 2:15, 3:20, 4:30, 5:40, 6:50, 8:00, 9:10, 10:20; SUN-TUE 1:00, 2:15, 3:20, 4:30, 5:40, 6:50, 8:00, 9:10, 10:25; WED 1:00, 2:15, 4:30, 5:40, 6:50, 8:00, 9:10, 10:25; THU 1:00, 2:15,

3:15, 4:30, 5:30, 8:00, 10:25 ROLLING STONES: SWEET SUMMER SUN (STC) MON 7:30 BARNYARD (G) SAT 11:00 OUT OF AFRICA (STC) WED 3:30, 6:45

grey 50%, white backgound

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 1525-99 St 780.436.8585 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI-SAT 1:05, 3:25, 5:45, 8:05, 10:35; SUN 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:00, 10:25; MON-THU

2:40, 5:00, 7:35, 9:55 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRISUN 7:00, 9:45; MON-THU 6:50, 9:45; FRI, SUN 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; SAT 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; MON-WED 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15; THU 2:00, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI-SAT 1:00, 4:20, 7:30, 10:30; SUN 1:05, 4:10, 7:30, 10:30; MON-TUE, THU 1:05, 4:05, 7:15, 10:15; WED 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:15

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) BRUTAL VIOLENCE, DISTURBING CONTENT

12YEARSASLAVE.COM

STARTS FRIDAY!

Check theatre directory or go to www.tribute.ca for showtimes

22 FILM AIM_VUE_OCT31_3rdPG_SLAVE.pdf

Allied Integrated Marketing EDMONTON VUE

Copyright © 2013 Twentieth Century Fox. All Rights Reserved.

FRI-SAT 12:30; SUN 12:25; MON-TUE, THU 2:20; WED 2:05; 3D : FRI-SAT 2:50, 5:10, 7:25, 9:50; SUN 2:45, 5:05, 7:20, 9:40; MON-TUE, THU 4:35, 6:55, 9:25; WED 4:20, 6:55, 9:25 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI-SAT 12:35, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:20; SUN 12:30, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:20; MON-TUE, THU 2:35, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10; WED

1:20, 7:15, 9:50 ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) FRI-SAT 1:30, 4:25, 7:15, 10:10; SUN 12:55, 3:50, 6:55, 9:50; MON-WED 1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40; THU 3:50, 6:45, 9:40; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00 RUSH (14A coarse language) FRI 1:45, 4:45, 7:55, 10:45; SAT 4:45, 7:55, 10:45; SUN 4:30, 7:25, 10:20; MON-TUE 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10; WED 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 10:10; THU 1:30, 4:20, 10:10 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI-SAT 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:45; SUN 12:05, 2:35, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25; MON-THU 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:00 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-SAT 2:00, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25; Sun 1:50, 4:35, 7:15, 10:00; MON-TUE 1:35, 4:20, 7:00, 9:50; Wed 1:35, 4:20, 10:10; THU 1:35, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI, SUN 12:20, 2:40, 4:50; SAT 12:20, 12:55, 2:40, 3:05, 4:50; MON-THU 2:30, 4:40; 3D : FRI, SUN 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15; SAT 12:15, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15; MON-THU 1:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:50, 10:00 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI-SAT 1:25, 4:15, 7:10, 10:00; SUN 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; MON-THU 1:10, 3:55, 7:00, 9:55 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: 50 YEARS ON STAGE (Classification not available) SAT 2:45 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content) FRI-SAT 12:50, 3:55, 7:00, 10:10; SUN 12:50, 3:55, 7:05, 10:10; MON-WED 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:05; THU 4:00, 7:05, 10:05; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00 VERMEER AND MUSIC: THE ART OF LOVE AND LEISURE (G) SUN 12:55 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI 12:00, 1:10, 2:30, 3:35, 5:05, 6:00, 7:30, 8:20, 9:55, 10:40; SAT 12:10, 1:10, 2:30, 3:35, 5:15, 6:00, 7:30, 8:20, 9:55, 10:40; SUN 12:00, 12:35, 2:20, 2:55, 4:50, 5:20, 7:10, 7:35, 9:30, 10:05; MON-WED 2:15, 2:55, 4:40, 5:15, 7:10, 7:40, 9:30, 10:05; THU 1:25, 2:55, 3:45, 5:15, 9:45 OUT OF AFRICA (STC) WED 4:00, 7:00 ALL IS LOST (PG coarse language) FRI 1:55, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05; SAT 11:20, 1:55, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05; SUN 1:45, 4:20, 6:55, 9:35; MON-THU 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:35 BARNYARD (G) SAT 11:00 MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG (STC) THU 7:00 CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS Cineplex Odeon Windermere, Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00 VERMEER AND MUSIC: THE ART OF LOVE AND LEISURE (G) VIP 18+SUN 12:55

CITY CENTRE 9 10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:25, 3:45, 7:10, 10:10; MON, WED-THU 3:45, 7:10, 10:10 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) DAILY 3:25, 7:00, 9:25 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:35; MON, WED-THU 3:15, 6:30, 9:35 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:50, 4:05, 6:55, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:05, 6:55, 9:50 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI-SUN, TUE 9:55; MON, WED-THU 9:55 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:30, 3:50, 6:40; MON, WED 3:50, 6:40; THU 3:50 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:20, 3:40, 6:50, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 3:40,

6:50, 9:50 GRAVITY (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:45 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:35, 4:00, 7:15, 10:05; MON, WED-THU 4:00, 7:15, 10:05 ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:05, 3:20, 6:45, 9:40; MON, WED-THU 3:20, 6:45, 9:40 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:10, 6:35; MON, WED-THU 6:35; 3D : DAILY 3:30, 9:30

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY

Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave, 780.439.5285 THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING! THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING!

(PG) MON, NOV 4: 8:00

EMPIRE CLAREVIEW 10 4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) FRI-WED 6:55; 3D : FRI, MON-WED 9:10; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:25, 9:10 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI, MON-THU 6:35, 9:00; SAT-SUN 3:00, 6:35, 9:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI, MON-THU 6:40, 9:10; SAT-SUN 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:10 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI, MONTHU 6:50, 9:20; SAT-SUN 12:40, 3:05, 6:50, 9:20 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI, MONTHU 7:00, 9:40; SAT-SUN 1:05, 3:45, 7:00, 9:40 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI, MON-THU 6:30, 9:40; SAT-SUN 12:50,

3:30, 6:30, 9:40 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI, MON-THU 6:45, 9:15; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:10, 6:45, 9:15 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI, MON-THU 6:50, 9:25; SAT-SUN 12:50, 3:40, 6:50, 9:25 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI 9:15; SAT-SUN 3:40, 9:15; MON, WEDTHU 8:10; TUE 2:40, 8:10; FRI, MON-THU 6:30; SAT-SUN 12:55, 6:30; 3D: FRI, MON-THU 9:00; SAT-SUN 3:15, 9:00 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI, MON-THU 6:55, 9:35; SAT-SUN 12:35, 3:20, 6:55, 9:35 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) SAT-SUN 12:40

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI 5:35, 8:00, 10:25; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 8:00, 10:25; MON-THU 7:40,

10:00 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; SAT 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; SUN 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; MON-THU 7:15, 10:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI 3:30, 6:40, 9:50; SATSUN 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50; MON-THU 6:40, 9:45 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) SAT-SUN 12:25, 2:50; 3D : FRI-SUN 5:15, 7:40, 10:05; MON-WED

7:20, 9:50 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI 4:25, 7:00, 9:35; SAT-SUN 1:50, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35; TUE-THU 6:50, 9:20 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI 4:40, 7:20, 10:00; SAT 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00; SUN 2:00,

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

4:40, 7:20, 10:00; MON-THU 7:05, 9:40 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI 4:00, 6:50, 9:40; SAT-SUN 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40; MON-THU 6:45, 9:30 FREE BIRDS (G) SAT-SUN 12:15, 2:30; 3D: FRI-SUN 4:50, 7:10, 9:30; MON-THU 7:00, 9:15 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI 3:35, 6:30, 9:25; SAT-SUN 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:25; MON-THU 6:30, 9:25 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI 5:25, 7:50, 10:15; SAT-SUN 12:35, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:15; MON-THU 7:30, 9:55 ROLLING STONES: SWEET SUMMER SUN (STC) MON 7:30 BARNYARD (G) SAT 11:00

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 12:35, 2:45, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) DAILY

1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 FREE BIRDS (G) DAILY 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:50, 8:45 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) DAILY 1:10, 3:10, 7:05 DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) DAILY 5:05 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) DAILY 9:10 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) DAILY 1:45 3:45 5:45 7:45 9:40

METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212 A TOUCH OF SIN (14A gory brutal violence) SAT 7:00 CASTING BY (PG coarse language) SAT 9:30 OUR MAN IN TEHRAN (PG mature subject matter) FRI, MON 7:00; SAT 12:30; SUN, WED 9:15 BLUE JASMINE (PG coarse language, substance abuse, mature subject matter) FRI 9:00; SAT 4:30; SUN 7:15; TUE 9:15; THU 7:00 THE ROOM (14A nudity, sexual content) FRI 11:30 ARGO (14A) SAT 2:15; MON 8:45 ANNIE HALL (PG) SUN 12:45; THU 9:00 FESTIVAL OF LIGHT (STC) Celebrate Diwali: SUN 3:00 HEIMA (STC) Music Docs TUE 7:00 KINNGAIT: RIDING LIGHT INTO THE WORLD (STC) WED 7:00;

Free

EMPIRE THEATRES–SPRUCE GROVE 130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI 6:00, 8:50; SAT-SUN 12:20, 3:10, 6:00, 8:50; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 7:50; TUE

2:00, 5:00, 7:50 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI 6:30, 9:10; SAT-SUN 12:50, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10; MON, WED-THU 5:10, 7:45; Tue 2:10, 5:10, 7:45 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) FRI 6:15; SAT-SUN 12:40, 6:15; MON-WED 5:15; 3D : FRI-SUN 8:30; MON-WED 7:30; SAT-SUN 3:00; TUE 2:15 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI 6:40; SAT-SUN 1:00, 6:40; MON-THU 6:00; 3D : FRI 9:15; SAT-SUN 3:40, 9:15; MON, WED-THU 8:10; TUE 2:40, 8:10 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI 6:50, 9:20; SAT-SUN 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:20; MON, WED 5:30, 8:00; TUE 2:20, 5:30, 8:00; THU 5:30, 8:15 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI 6:20, 8:40; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:20, 6:20, 8:40; MON, WED 5:20, 8:15; TUE 2:30, 5:20, 8:15; THU 5:10, 7:20 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI 6:10, 9:00; SAT-SUN 12:30, 3:15, 6:10, 9:00; MON, WEDTHU 5:05, 7:40; TUE 2:05, 5:05, 7:40

PRINCESS 10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing

content) FRI 6:45, 9:20; SAT-SUN 2:00, 6:45, 9:20; MONTHU 6:45, 9:20 WADJDA (PG) FRI 9:00; SAT-SUN 3:00, 9:00; MON-THU 9:00 AUSTENLAND (PG) FRI 7:00; SAT-SUN 1:00, 7:00; MON-THU

7:00

SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400 PRISONERS (14A brutal violence, not rec for children) FRI-SUN 9:40 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (STC) THU 8:00, 10:50 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN 12:50, 3:10, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10; MON-WED 12:55, 3:10, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10; THU 12:55, 3:10, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI-TUE 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; WED 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; TUE 1:30, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) FRI-SUN 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:15; MON-THU 1:00, 4:00, 7:10, 10:15 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) FRI-SUN 12:00; MON-THU 1:15; 3D : FRI-SUN 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:50; MONTHU 3:45, 6:55, 9:20 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI, SUN 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40; SAT 12:20, 2:50, 8:00, 10:40; MON, THU 1:20, 4:10, 10:25; TUE-WED 2:30, 5:10,

8:00, 10:25 LAST VEGAS (PG coarse language, sexual content) FRI-SUN 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:45; MON-TUE, THU 1:50, 4:40, 7:35, 10:15; WED 4:40, 7:35, 10:15; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00 ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) FRI, SUNMON 2:00, 4:45, 7:40, 10:35; SAT 5:20, 7:40, 10:35; WED 12:55, 3:40, 10:35 WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) FRI-SUN 1:20, 4:00, 6:50 FREE BIRDS (G) FRI-SUN 12:30; MON-THU 1:45; 3D : FRI-SUN 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30; MON-THU 4:20, 7:15, 9:30 THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not rec for children) FRI-TUE, THU 1:40, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20; Wed 1:40, 4:30 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: 50 YEARS ON STAGE (STC) SAT 2:45 MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG (STC) THU 7:00 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI-SUN 12:10, 1:10, 2:30, 3:30, 4:50, 5:50, 7:20, 8:20, 10:00, 10:45; MON-TUE 1:10, 2:10, 3:30, 4:50, 5:50, 7:20, 8:10, 10:00, 10:35; WED-THU 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10, 10:35; THU 2:10, 4:50 ROLLING STONES: SWEET SUMMER SUN (STC) MON 7:30 ENDER'S GAME: THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI-MON, WED-THU 1:30, 4:15,

7:00, 9:45


COVER // METAL

MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Mon, Nov 4 (6:30 pm) Slayer With Gojira, 4arm Shaw Conference Centre, $49.50 – $54.50

slayer goes old school as the band remembers a fallen member

H

e was always supposed to come back. Jeff Hanneman's departure from Slayer was meant to be short, the result of freak-accident circumstances: in 2011, the guitarist suffered a spider bite while in a friend's jacuzzi, and though he initially dismissed it, the wound spiralled into a case of necrotizing fasciitis, a flesh-eating disease (don't google the images if you're squeamish). Treatment meant he had to bow out of Slayer's Australian tour that year; Gary Holt of Exodus was the short-term fillin, and Cannibal Corpse's Pat O'Brien stepped in too when Holt had to return to his other band. Hanneman recovered from the disease, but he only made it back onstage with Slayer for a two-song encore in California; in May, 2013 he passed away from liver failure. The ultimate cause was alcohol-related cirrhosis (there were some early reports the spider bite had directly contributed to his passing, which were untrue). "This is pretty much the beginning of when they allowed us to talk about it—which I think is a little bit odd," guitarist Kerry King says over the phone, the "they" in question referring to the PR people around the band. "Because people want to know, and this is the media age when everything is right now—it's not five months later, it's not six months later. So the weirdest thing was not talking about it for a long time." "I think they just blanketed every-

body," he adds. "In case somebody got asked questions they weren't prepared to answer." Over the phone, King doesn't strike you as a guy who would be unprepared for any sort of query. The tattoo-clad guitarist co-founded the band with Hanneman, vocalist Tom Araya and then-drummer Dave Lombardo, back in '81; Slayer's particular corner of the thrash metal Big Four has always been the muscular, dark, heavy one: for all its thrash and bluster, throwing up the horns always seemed to mean a little more with Slayer. King's blunt in a very amiable sort of way. On not having Hanneman be part of the groundwork for Slayer's next album, he's honest without being sentimental. "Two, two and a half years ago, I just started writing music," King says. "'Cause at that point, I'm like, all right, new Slayer record. We don't know if Jeff is going to contribute anything— we assume he does—I'm gonna make up music for Slayer. ... So I took it in that perspective: I'm gonna make up stuff, and if at the end of the day, it ends up being an entire Slayer record, at least I'm prepared for it. "Realistically, we haven't really collaborated since 2001," he adds, on not having Hanneman as part of the process at all. "Because we're so far apart from where we lived. When we were kids, we would always go to Tom's garage, and he'd play guitar, I'd play

drums, or vice versa. But when we deconstruct it and almost start over in became mature men, and moved our the attempt to make it better. I also feel own separate ways, we didn't get to- that if we're going to put anything from Hanneman out, gether with unfinished I don't want ideas as often. Usually, he would come in with on the nuance of it to just be something Jeff a finished song, I would Hanneman did. come in with a finished song, and there wasn't VUE WEEKLY: Physically, what I want it to be really room to modify kind of prep do you need to something aweit or make it better. It do before going on a tour like some. I don't want the last was already good." this? KERRY KING: I mean, if thing anybody That said, Hanneman you went into this cold tur- hears from Jeff may yet make a conkey, and didn’t headbang or Hanneman to tribution to the album: stretch or anything for weeks be adequate. prior, I probably couldn’t even If it's not awethe band's been going move [laugh] ... The big long some, I don't through his archival muscles—I don’t know what want anybody recordings, looking for they’re called, they go along hearing it until any gems worth fleshyour spine—when you head- it is awesome." ing out and releasbang, those stretch in ways In lieu of a new ing. But King seems that you’re not used to hav- album, Slayer's more concerned with ing those muscles stretch. It’s touring with protecting his friend's all about getting in sort of a an old-school legacy than releasing shape to go to battle, go to set: songs will anything just for the war, play sports. Same kind of be drawn from sake of releasing it. way. There’s a certain physical- Show No Mercy "Everybody wants to ity that comes into it as well as (1983), Hell hear Hanneman's stuff playing your instrument.” Awaits (1985), if he's got it," King says. Reign in Blood "There's a song finished (1986), South for the last record, and my spin on that is, 'It didn't make the of Heaven (1988) and Seasons in the record because it wasn't that finished.' Abyss (1990). Holt's back in the lineup; You know what I mean? [I was] just given he's been the band's de facto guitalking to a producer yesterday: when tarist since 2011, having him instead of you've got something like that, that Hanneman hasn't really been an adjustwas finished once, you've really got to ment. Or more accurately, it's an adjust-

the headbang

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

ment that's already happened. "That's kind of a weird part to this equation, because we've been playing without [Hanneman] since February 2011," King says. "So that part of it has already worked itself out. That's not weird. And at the end of the day, if there's any silver lining to the end of this story, that's it. We already had this part of Slayer going out. People'd seen this part of Slayer and were used to seeing this part of Slayer. Did everybody want Jeff to be there? Of course we do. But if it had to be a certain way, and this is the way it had to be, at least people were already used to seeing Gary." (As for the other corner of the band, rounding out the drums will be Paul Bostaph; founding kitman Dave Lombardo is currently out of the band. Bostaph previously sat in with the band from '92 – '96, and then again from '97 until 2001.) King says he's considering writing something in tribute of Hanneman for the band's next album. It still wouldn't be sentimental, though. "I think it'd be more like an anthem," King says. "Y'know, what he stood for, stuff like that—that's how I would approach it. I wouldn't approach it in any sorrowful way. I would want it to be a celebration, like his service was. If I did anything dedicated to Jeff Hanneman on this record, it'd be a fucking celebration." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC 23


REVUE // JACKASS

Bad Grandpa

Grandpa's being a jackass again

Y

ou'd think Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa—Johnny Knoxville's made-over into an old man travelling from Nebraska to North Carolina with a kid (Jackson Nicoll) acting as his grandson; the pair get into escapades

SPECTRAL INVITATION << CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20

Uninvited's simmering stew. So Patrick, a music critic and aspiring composer, is a free agent, leaving him to wonder about Stella Meredith (Gail Russell), the sleepy-eyed beauty whose grandfather sells Winward House to the Fitzgeralds against her will. You see, there's familial weirdness here, too: when the Fitzgeralds first enter Winward, Pamela instantly feels attracted to it on account of its resemblance to their childhood home and the memories it stirs of their deceased mother; Stella doesn't want her grandfather to sell Winward because it is a monument to her mother, who lived in the house and died when Stella was three, along with Stella's father and her father's Spanish mistress. Stella thinks her mother still lingers in Winward and, judging from the disembodied weeping that wafts through Winward's rooms, she may be right. Criterion's Uninvited is slim on supplements, but what it's got is pretty great. Filmmaker Michael Almereyda provides an excellent audiovisual essay that clocks in at just under a half-hour. It includes a smart survey of Milland's long career, a biographical sketch on Russell, whose tenure in Hollywood was fraught with insecurity and reckless drinking, a chapter entirely devoid of narration, and another featuring an interview with an anthropologist speaking about the history of spiritualism, featuring a shot of Almereyda's subject that appears to be taken from the point of view of a ghost. V

that appal everyday folk—wouldn't inspire contemplation. And yet, onto those parenthetical comment-cards that pop into movie critics' brains, this lazy mash of About Schmidt, Borat and Just For Laughs: Gags does

provoke certain blots and jots of wonder. (Uh, why's co-writer Spike Jonze slumming it with Being Johnny Knoxville juvenilia instead of working on more of his own films, targeting people whose standards of comedy

and pathos demand more than the club on Ladies' Night. Suddenly, the sight of a "shart" splattered up a res- movie's dick obsession's ridiculed, male sexuality's exposed for the taurant wall?) As you might expect from its fran- whip-it-out brag-farce it so often chise patron, Bad Grandpa stuffs is, and a penis-prosthetic's finally male jackassery—obviously set- stretched into a decent joke. The up stunts; old lecher constantly second—grandson Billy drags it hitting on women; gags weaving up for a "Cutie Pageant," only to drunkenly between respecting and twist his talent-competition turn mocking the mostly working-class into a striptease. The dial on the creepy blacks and Latinos caught up in sexualizing-self-esteem, Toddlers & Tiaras the act—into a culture's merely paper-thin piñata Now playing nudged from 10 of a contrived Directed by Jeff Tremaine to 11 here, but plot (odd couple  shocks competiroad-trips and tive moms and bonds en route), then blindly bashes us over the show-judges with the (un)natural, head, again and again, with a stick (il)logical extension of all those marked "SEE WHAT AN OLD MAN curled locks and luscious lashes AND A YOUNG BOY CAN GET flicked and fluttered by their preAWAY WITH!" (Hmm ... imagine pubescent darlings. (Wow! Jackhow much funnier and less clichéd ass Co. makes you think for two and sexist the film would've been fleeting moments—well, I guess if any stupid, pants-down franchise as Bad Grandma.) stumbles on long enough, it'll let What you might not expect are rip one or two whiffs of thoughtful two inspired satires amid all the comedy through sheer dumb luck throwaway shock-schtick. The alone.) first—Grandpa tries to out-strip BRIAN GIBSON the male dancers at a black strip- BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // SIGUR ROS

Heima

a plane carcass in a meadow or a fishing village become ghost town. What emerges is the music's delicate reflection of and tender affection for its communal country (only around 310  000 people); this is less the slick tour-doc and more the cozy kitchen-party 'round the crackling fire.

Countryside concert

I

celand's post-rock band Sigur Rós often gets tagged with spacey, outthere metaphors, from "glacial" or frontman Jonsí's "angelic" voice to talk of star-noise or galaxy-song. So 2007 film Heima, shot and directed by Canadian Dean DeBlois, is a good grounding—the band (usually accompanied by all-female group Amiina) plays free shows in July and August 2006 in various small towns dotting Iceland ("heima" means "at home").

This music-film reverberates a sense of the country's people, places and history, and especially a sense of natural intimacy and intimacy with nature: the band plays "Von" in a community hall or "Vaka" acoustically to protest a hydroelectric dam. For "Glósóli," shots of rushing water contrast with the silhouette-etched scrim on stage, and the audience's applause—too clichéd or easy, DeBlois realizes?—is drowned out by a ship's wake.

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

There's too much talking throughout about what the band's doing (more show, less tell!), mind you. But capping it all is the band's best-ever, "Popplagið," a stunning 12 minutes of build-and-release songwriting. DeBlois matches it with a montage of venues in long shot, closeup nature-shots, and medium shots of listeners' faces, until the aural explosion overwhelms the visual—then there's just a slurry of light and colour. It's a shiver-inducing sequence—delightfully undercut by Jonsí's anecdote about one unimpressed invitee who left early. The apt short before the feature at Metro Cinema is Evangeline Belzile's wispy art-video for DeBlois, best known for How Tue, Nov 5 (7 pm) the new four-minTo Train Your Directed by Dean DeBlois ute piece "Straits" by experimental Dragon, which Metro Cinema at the Garneau electronic Edmonused some Jonsí Originally Released: 2007 ton musician Mark songs, mostly avoids drawing up Templeton. It gets a tourist brochure for Iceland. There's ghostly, in black-and-white, when the quaint whimsy: kids playing in the goop song turns more ominous and sombre of a beach's sand; the band playing by near the end. an abandoned shack, among folk-art. He BRIAN GIBSON takes their music down wistful paths, to BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM 21


MUSIC

FRI, NOV 1, AVENUE THEATRE

THE DEEP DARK WOODS

W/ THE SUMNER BROTHERS

WED, NOV 6, ROYAL AB MUSEUM

MATT MAYS

ACOUSTIC DUO W/ ADAM BALDWIN

PREVUE // ART ROCK

The Darcys

THU, NOV 7, AVENUE THEATRE

AMELIA CURRAN

W/ FIELD ASSEMBLY

FRI, NOV 8, ROYAL AB MUSEUM

LINDI ORTEGA

W/ DEVIN CUDDY BAND

SAT, NOV 9, ROYAL AB MUSEUM

AIDAN KNIGHT & JUSTIN RUTLEDGE

W/ DON BROWNRIGG

FRI, NOV 15, THE ARTERY

PAPER LIONS

W/ JORDAN KLASSEN & WHITE LIGHTNING

SAT, NOV 16, THE ARTERY

GREG MACPHERSON BAND W/ GUESTS

TUE, NOV 26, THE ARTERY

BRENDAN CANNING

OF BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE

W/ DINOSAUR BONES

WED, NOV 27, AVENUE THEATRE

THEE ATTACKS (DENMARK)

W/ HEAVISIDE & GUESTS

THU, NOV 28, AVENUE THEATRE

SHANE PHILIP

W/ GUESTS

FRI, NOV 29, AVENUE THEATRE

BARNEY BENTALL’S GRAND CARIBOO OPRY

W/ THE GOLD RUSH ALL STARS

SAT, NOV 30, AVENUE THEATRE

BASIA BULAT

FRI, DEC 6, AVENUE THEATRE

PAUL LANGLOIS OF THE TRAGICALLY HIP

W/ EVENING HYMNS W/ GUESTS PETE MURRAY & GREG BALL

SAT, DEC 7, AVENUE THEATRE

DANIEL WESLEY

W/ STONE IRIS, & MAYDAY AND THE BEATCREEPS

The many faces of The Darcys

'T

o look across the stage and realize you might be a professional band and legit players of your instruments I think was something funny and not on the radar when we started as a band in Halifax trying to get free beer and meet chicks," jokes Wes Marskell, drummer for art-rock group the Darcys. Indeed, the Darcys have come a long way both personally and professionally. In its early days, the band seemed plagued by a continual

nearly hit by a semi-truck and robbed of most of their gear. The easy option would have been to admit defeat, but the Darcys have pushed forward and released its third album, Warring, in September, marking the conclusion of a trilogy on the venerable Arts & Crafts label. The Darcys' previous releases, a selftitled disc and Aja—a reinterpretation of Steely Dan's record—offer a decidedly opposing sound to Warring, which moves away from the darker, brooding sounds the band had become known for towards melodies that are still atmospheric and evocative, but which feel lighter and more upbeat. "When the record came out it was about closing the last bit of that chapter and getting through losing a singer and covering a Steely Dan record and doing all these things that bogged us down and slowed our momentum, and all of a sudden when that was finalized we also had this new record that was opening up new doors for us," Marskell says. "It's a bit bittersweet because I do still connect to those older records, but it feels like they're sort of being pushed out of a live set in a live show that focuses on new material—and also, everyone // Erika Altosaar seems to think this is such a giant series of unfortunate events—and leap forward for us that they don't even now the members are cur- really care about those other ones, rently dealing with which is different a personal loss and interesting, Tue, Nov 5 (8 pm) that resulted in and all part of the With the Belle Game, Bear cancelling several process, I guess." Mountain shows before the Pawn Shop, $12 band makes it to Warring has western Canada. In been a long time 2010 alone, former lead singer Kirby coming. The Darcys began writing Best left the band, prompting guitar- it three years ago in and around ist Jason Couse to step in on vocals, sessions for its self-titled release the guys were held up at knife point, and Aja, gathering a repertoire of songs that seemed to fit neither session, destined for something bigger. Marskell explains that despite the connection he still feels to the band's previous albums, it always felt as though its best work was yet to come. "It was a weird period for us because every time we'd play a show we'd sell our self-titled record or Aja, which are still records I love and feel strongly about, but always knowing that this other record was half done or half written or being pressed and we still can't tell anyone about it, so it was a weird struggle for us," Marskell adds, noting plans for a 20-minute instrumental epilogue that touches on each album to finish everything off may be in the works. "That's been a big shift for our band now is it feels like we're leading with our best foot forward and not trying to secretly say, 'Oh, yeah, buy that record, but trust me a better record's going to come soon, I promise.'" MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

24 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Where's the dance floor? The Strumbellas strive for better on new album Alt-country six-piece the Strumbelheard an old demo of them. las spent two weeks recording its VW: When you were writing the sophomore album We Still Move songs, did you come at them in a parOn Dance Floors—a time that in- ticular way? Lyrics first? Music first? volved many takes, making things SW: For the most part, melodies just up on the fly, artistic vision versus pop into my head when I'm brushing my teeth or riding the streetcar reason and working with a Grammywinning producer. Prior to a show and then I scramble to my iPhone to record it so in Edmonton, I remember it. lead vocalist and Sun, Nov 3 (6:30 pm) songwriter Simon With the Living Daylights Often the lyrWard told Vue all Artery, $10 (advance), $13 (door) ics of the song are based off of about it me improvising words when I'm trying to actually VUE WEEKLY: How long did it take write the melodies of the songs. to make We Still Move On Dance After the basics are done, then I go Floors, from the initial songwriting to the band for help 'cause I'm not a through to the end of the recordpatient person. I get sick of a song ing? after the demo stage. SIMON WARD: The actual time in the studio was about two weeks, and we often stayed up late into the night VW: Where did the lyrics begin for to finish parts because we were you and what did you want to express with this album? pressed for time. In terms of writing the songs, it's hard to say how SW: I basically just tried to not talk long it took. I think I wrote "Sailing," about God, death or my dad as "End of an Era," and "Ride On" in one much as the first album—which morning, but the others happened didn't necessarily happen. I just like writing about random thoughts I gradually for about a year. "The Fire" and "Did I Die?" are actually older have about life. I learned a lot from songs that came back into the wood Shannon Hoon [the late singer of works after someone in the band Blind Melon] in that lyrics can come

from anywhere and basically be a mish-mash of random ideas. VW: What were the recording sessions like for this album? Is this the kind of thing you recorded live or did you piece it together one track at a time? Why? SW: We did it track by track. We just didn't have enough time to do live off the floor because it would have taken many, many takes. And we and our producer wanted a record that was pretty tight, so we needed the editing room. One day we'll do a live off the floor, but not yet. The studio experience was great. We lived there for a couple weeks. It always gets a little tedious but overall we had a blast. It didn't hurt that they had a hot tub. VW: Were there any other songs written that were left off the album? SW: You bet. The title of the album was taken from a lyric of a song we didn't record. We actually really liked two songs that didn't get on the record and we still hope to record them somehow. You guys got a few grand you can loan us?

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

VW: How did you decide which songs to include on the album? Did you have an idea of what you wanted We Still Move On Dance Floors to be when you started, or did the finished shape emerge as the writing and recording went along? SW: We had no idea what we wanted. I have certain things that I'm very stubborn about such as certain parts or melodies, but after that we were open to lots of things we hadn't planned. We decided most of the songs based on a democracy but my favourite story is that I secretly sent the producer a demo of "Era" and together we convinced the band to record it even though it got nixed prior to going into the studio. Simon 1, Strumbellas 0! VW: You worked with Ryan Hadlock to produce the album. What drew you to him and what did he bring to the process?

SW: I hate to say the obvious, but

I really liked his work on the Lumineers' record. He has tons of experience and super great ideas, too, which I felt we needed for this record. I loved his quirkiness and perfectionism. That's what I will always remember him for.

VW: If you were to trace the musical map that led you to We Still Move On Dance Floors what would it look like? SW: I'd say the musical map is just my obsessive compulsiveness for writing better songs than I have previously done. I actually start getting very down on myself if I go into a writing slump. The only thing on my mind when writing for this album was to make it better than the other songs I've written. There was a lot of me sitting by myself in my apartment writing the songs for this album. Lonely Nights and Cowboy Fights. V

MUSIC 25


26 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


MUSIC PREVUE // BLUES

Kat Danser

Thinking on the big muddy

T

he relationship between blues and gospel music can be as murky as the Mississippi delta. On the surface there's a dichotomy of sin and salvation, being tortured and being saved, but the genres are much more closely related than one might think. Throughout their existence, the two have been compared to fraternal twins that, while alike in spirit, do not want to admit how similar they really are. Local blues musician Kat Danser takes a closer look at this relationship on her latest album Baptized By The

Mud, a collaboration with Juno Award- spiritual tunes—a first in her career. winning producer Steve Dawson. Dan- "Prove It On Me" by Ma Rainey is one ser says what people commonly refer example. The song was written in 1928 to as gospel music is, in fact, blues during first-wave black feminism and spirituals—traditional gospel music describes Rainey's love affair with a is essentially singing scripture from woman, something completely taboo for the time. the Bible. To begin "The classic blues her investigation, Fri, Nov 1 (7:30 pm) period was all Danser went back Arden Theatre, $28 about the freedom to the early 1900s when Ma Rainey of women and "gave birth to the blues" and her pianist women's bodies and particularly black Thomas Dorsey became the "godfather women's bodies, which until that point were super confined. They were conof gospel music." "What he did is he used all the same fined in slavery and also confined in blues licks and put different words the patriarchal home structure," Dansin that were like, let's not say juke er says, adding women like Rainey and joint, let's say church," adds Danser, Betsy Smith shook the status quo by who is currently working on a PhD at becoming financially independent and the University of Alberta that focuses proponents of free expression—as on activism in music. "Suddenly ev- free as they could be in a segregated erything became different musically society, that is. "Ma Rainey, for some and so often one is thought of as the reason, was passed over by a lot of devil's music and the other is the mu- artists, but I really wanted to bring sic of the angels, but there is virtually her stuff back. Women back then were nothing that separates them other writing about domestic violence, they were writing about bisexuality, they than word choices." were writing about leaving their men Danser recorded original composi- and having their own lives and their tions that move away from the heavy, own opinions and their own thoughts. slow pace of Mississippi and infuse It was a radical time, and that's the bethe vibrant cultural influences of New ginning of church blues music." Orleans blues alongside cover ver- MEAGHAN BAXTER sions of traditional, little-known blues MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The Deep Dark Woods group of friends heads out to a cabin in the wilderness—sounds like the basic plot for a horror movie, right? Actually, it's what the members of the Deep Dark Woods did out near Bragg Creek to record the band's latest album, Jubilee, with no gruesome events to be had. "We didn't have to worry about time at all," says lead vocalist Ryan Boldt from his hometown of Saskatoon during some time off prior to the band's upcoming slew of tour dates. "When you're in a big studio you're constantly worrying about getting things done, whereas in the cabin we had three weeks set out and we could just really do whatever we wanted, wake up whenever we wanted and record till one in the morning or two in the morning. ... Sometimes you just have to do it when you feel it and that's what we did on this record, which is pretty amazing."

NOV. 1 & 2 • JOANNE JANZEN SUNDAY CELTIC MUSIC 5 - 8PM NOV. 4 • NADINE KELLMAN WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBISON

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mellotron and novachord being re- music and you're playing it." Tracks like "The Same Thing" bring corded later—the Deep Dark Woods crafted a sound that goes on a trip out a Pink Floyd influence—one of through periods of folk and rock his- Boldt's favourite bands since his tory. From the '70s to contemporary teen years. music, Jubilee dabbles in sounds "I like the psychedelic music and they reminiscent of the Byrds, Fairport just have amazing melodies. They've Convention and British folk singer been consistently good since the Shirley Collins. start of the band "Any good album Fri, Nov 1 (8 pm) till the time Roger that you listen to, With Sumner Brothers Waters left—even like [Bob] Dylan's Avenue Theatre, $20 (advance), on The Final Cut Blonde on Blonde $25 (day of show) they were a great or something, you band," he says. can tell what he's "There's not just listening to, you can tell what all two albums that I like, there's 10 that I those guys are listening to," Boldt like, and they all sound different, too." says. "It's just kind of a natural thing MEAGHAN BAXTER when you're a bunch of guys that like MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Secluded quarters meant living and working together away from outside distractions, so it's no wonder Jubilee is centered firmly around community and camaraderie. Recording predominantly live off the floor—with the exception of some instrumental rarities like a

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

MUSIC 27


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Amidst the unending buzz of modernity, more and more people fall through the cracks and become alienated from the world around them. Sudbury's Jeff Houle makes music for them as Strange Attractor. Strange Attractor is already blowing up in Europe for good reason. Houle's storm of angular guitar— featured on "I'm Total Shit" and "Real Dark Place"—and bug-eyed sing-

screaming combine to make powerful garage-punk that never crosses the two-minute mark. Strange Attractor's Back to the Cruel World is fresh air in the stolid world of Canadian rock 'n' roll. Canadians are lucky to finally be able to get Houle's music here— Strange Attractor's past two records have gone unreleased in this country, and only thanks to Mammoth Cave Records are we lucky enough to finally get a taste of Sudbury's finest. JORDYN MARCELLUS

JORDYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Four IN 140 Kodaline, In a Perfect World (B-Unique) @VueWeekly: Another Coldplay stand-in has arrived. Massive & friendly choruses for the big love scene in the movie in your mind.

Pearl Jam, Lightning Bolt (Monkeywrench) @VueWeekly: After all these years, Pearl Jam is still this relevant and incredibly packed with force.

The Avett Brothers, Magpie and the Dandelion (Republic) @VueWeekly: With all the edges removed, these alt-country brothers come out with their prettiest, softest batch yet. A truly forgettable album.

Four Tet, Beautiful Rewind (Text) @VueWeekly: This basically sounds like 2 distinct albums. A dash of loneliness, with strong pinch of downright dance.

Various artists Metal On Ice (Coalition Music) 

Plenty has been written about the extravagance of the Los Angeles metal scene during the '80s, but there is not much material documenting the reverberations up here in the true north strong and free. Author Sam Kelly has a new book that looks at the careers of some of Canada's rockers like Helix and Slik Toxik, as well as Canada's Metal Queen, Lee Aaron. Kelly was so inspired by this subject that he has rerecorded some of the genre's classics for a new EP, using all the original vocalists. This is hair metal, and proud of it. Diamond-cutting solos and Valkyrie vocals tell the story of Warriors and Queens hammering through our Tundra leaving a wake of teased hair and teased boys-and it's totally rad. When that scything guitar and big bootie bass line slash through the intro to "Heavy Metal Love," you wonder why there's so much coolkid hate for this stuff. It's fun party music that throws devil horns in the air and a smile on your face because it doesn't take itself too seriously, despite the fact that the musicians involved would have to take themselves very seriously to play so well. Why debate the lyrical content behind "Metal Queen"? She's the Metal Queen—don't fuck with her. What's "On the Road to Rock" about? GUESS! What's most impressive about these remakes is that the singers involved have all still got it: everyone shreds the mic like it was 1988, plus the production is great, tightening up and flushing out some of the limitations of old masters. If you grew up on rock radio in this country you'll recognize tracks like Darby Mills' "Don't it Make Ya Feel" and you'll dig on the nostalgia. At just seven songs it's a quick way to remember a time long ago, when MuchMusic ruled the airwaves and vans had astral princesses riding intergalactic dragons painted on the side. LEE BOYES

LEE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

28 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


MUSIC TRIBUTE // LOU REED

Magic and loss

Considering Lou Reed's extraordinary heart

'W

hen you're all alone and lonely in your midnight hour and you find that your soul has been up for sale ... " A song of hushed longing, of looking in from the sidelines, of devotion to and redemption through love, "Coney Island Baby" may well be my favourite Lou Reed. It's doo-wop without irony, with background vocals that caress like an ocean breeze. It closes Reed's record of the same name (1975), a collection regarded as MOR at the time, despite the fact that the second track has him threatening to punch a woman in the face, while the fourth is a claustrophobic groove about murder as the ultimate kick, the only one left when the others don't work anymore. Of course, for Reed and his listeners, there are kicks that endure. Reed was Jewish but his religion was music. "Her life was saved by rock 'n' roll," he rasped in one of the most accessible songs ever recorded by the Velvet Underground, the band he and John Cale formed in the mid-'60s. Fusing literary, avant-garde and primal rock sensibilities, VU was little-known during its brief run yet forever altered their idiom. Brian Eno exaggerated only slightly when he said that everyone who heard The Velvet Underground and Nico (1967) started a band. When I discovered the record as a teenager it created a new standard that everything thereafter calling itself rock had to reckon with. I'm avoiding looking at the news, because every time I do I'm reminded that Lou Reed is dead. His disappearance "into the divine" is hard to process, partly because he never seemed to slow down. Sometimes sublime, sometimes ridiculous—sometimes both simultaneously—Reed never stopped working and never seemed to do anything that wasn't done on his own terms. Producer Steve Albini: " ... once in a while I wish to Christ I could give not a fuck as thoroughly as Lou Reed." "When you're all alone and lonely ... " That voice that speaks directly to every listener. Reed, the late-night disc-jockey poet. He had a gift for vernacular and intimacy, his lines at once clipped and conversational. He could be infamously ornery. He made interviewers cry. But if you only listened to his music, you couldn't help but feel he was your friend.

Minus-30 nights in dirt-cheap under-heated basement apartments with only candles, alcohol and "Sweet Jane" to keep us warm. Talking a friend in another city off a ledge with the grandiosely bleak Berlin (1973) as consolation through recognition. Late nights spilling over into early mornings with Rock and Roll Heart (1976) and Street Hassle (1978) on the hi-fi. Huddling in the van in a strange city, getting stoned to the diamond-studded swagger of Transformer (1972). Reed's music has been with me all these years, the years when adolescence tumbles into adulthood and mu-

sical discoveries burn into your brain and the world expands exponentially, but also the years that start to slip away vertiginously and require more fortified shots of panic and wisdom. Reed made the exotic familiar. Drugs, sadomasochism and domestic abuse: no subject was taboo. Suicide, vengeance, fear, self-loathing: he made all feelings easier to bear, acceptable in thought if not in action. He made the worst of us better for the four minutes it took to tell some exhilaratingly sad song. "Have you ever had rage in your heart?" Reed asks near the close of a live version of "Dirty Blvd." He seemed to have everything in his heart. Above all he had restless, idiosyncratic, vulgar audacity. See "Sex With Your Parents (Motherfucker) Part II," from Set the Twilight Reeling (1996) or "I Wanna Be Black," from Street Hassle, in which the narrator wants to die in the spring like Martin Luther King, shoot 20 feet of jism, and "fuck up the Jews." "Mad," from Ecstasy (2000), files complaints by a philanderer caught with his pants down. "I know I shouldn't a had someone else in our bed / But I was so tired ... Who would think you'd find a bobby pin?" My girlfriend actually shouted at the stereo to fuck off. There's the hour of electronic clamour that was Metal Machine Music (1975) and the alienating comedy act of Take No Prisoners (1978). There's that tune from The Velvet Underground (1969) in which rock's dominant purveyor of transgression seeks guidance from Jesus. Did I mention he was a Jew? But Reed's tenderness was equally potent. It was there, fully formed, from the start: is there a more generous declaration of love than "I'll Be Your Mirror"? Love could be remote ("Satellite of Love"), multifaceted ("Some Kind of Love"), a set-up for

the greatest betrayal ("Perfect Day") or immaculate ("Heavenly Arms"). "People are always telling me their secrets," Reed wrote, "and I often put them into song as if they happened to me." He sang for Lisa, Stephanie and Caroline, for Perdo and Romeo Rodriguez—"A diamond crucifix in his ear is used to help ward off the fear / That he has left his soul in someone's rented car"—for Candy, in a tremendously affecting gesture of identification with someone frustrated by the bounds of gender. "I've come to hate my body and all that it requires in this world," goes "Candy Says." "What do you think I'd see / If I could walk away from me?"

"I worry that my liver's big and it hurts to the touch," Reed sang on The Blue Mask (1982). After giving up drugs Reed always looked to be in amazing shape—71 seemed like nothing. But he had a liver transplant earlier this year. He died on Long Island, where he grew up, with his longtime companion, artist and musician Laurie Anderson, near. Did he see death coming? If so, was it the "Beginning of

a Great Adventure," or a final disappointment? Did he feel himself burning out, a "shooting star," or "a star newly emerging?" "You loved a life others throw away nightly / It's not fair, not fair at all." "In the end it was an ordinary heart pumping blood!" "Linger on ... " JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

As time passed, Reed's guitar be-

came more angular and fluid, his manipulation of feedback and distortion more controlled. His voice quickly lost its Velvet-softness, but while age limited his range he actually became far more expressive a vocal stylist. Grunts, growls and stutters became supple, funky, more passionate. It was almost rap, that hostile amphetamine babble at the top of "Gimmie Some Good Times" that sounds like nothing so much as coming up for air. "Where's the number where's a dime and where's the phone?" he snarls in the searing "Temporary Thing." Time also made Reed's intrinsic morbidity acute. As a young man he extolled a longing for protracted spells in oblivion, or to slip far back in time. "Venus in Furs": "I could sleep for a thousand years." "Heroin": "I wish that I was born a thousand years ago." But as a middle-aged man Reed was firmly stuck in the present. "I wished for a magical way to deal with grief and disappearance," Reed wrote of Magic and Loss (1992). That record's gorgeous lead track wondered what makes life worth living when friends vanish.

// Lou Reed for Animal Lab, Inc

2013 - 2014 SEASON

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MUSIC 29


MUSIC PREVUE // ACOUSTIC

Matt Mays M

att Mays' Coyote is the sort He's done this kind of strippedof rock record that places em- down show before, he notes, but alphasis firmly on that first R-word: most exclusively on the East Coast its songs bank on high-altitude dy- (the band hails from Cole Harbour, namics, the give and take between Nova Scotia). Performing the songs its plugged-in acoustically like instruments and Wed, Nov 6 (8 pm) this recalls the altogether coast- With Adam Baldwin album's writing ing on a turn-it- Royal Alberta Museum Theatre, process, Mays up-and-party at- $20 says: Coyote was titude that's best mostly written achieved with fullon an acoustic band backing. And now, Mays is strip- guitar before he brought the songs ping it to the bone. to the band to expand. To shrink On this, his second tour behind Coy- them back down is, more than ote, he's cast away most of its estab- anything, a return to their lished sonics, downsizing towards the original form. more singular creature the album's Being on the road named for: hitting the road with just again also seems keyboardist Adam Baldwin (who will to be acting as also serve as an opening act), Mays a balm for the is doing an (almost) solo run of its guy. Mays' songs. guitarist, Jay "I wasn't really sure how the reac- Smith, untion would be, but I think people have expectedly really been enjoying the change," p a s s e d Mays says over the phone. "There's away in a lot of banter between the crowd Edmonton and me—we talk, and tell stories in March, and have a lotta laughs. Sort of like a the evekitchen party back home." ning after

a show. The difficulty of that is still fresh, still something Mays is figuring out. Touring, he notes, seems to help. "We're holding up," he says. "We prefer to play .... play through it [instead of] be stationary, and have to deal with it. It's good for us to be on the road. Very therapeutic, I suppose. It's been a really shitty year. You just gotta learn to live with it." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Coyote on the road // Melanie Swerdan

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30 MUSIC

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Records: Tell Me A Song, Bailey Sutton, Brother Octopus BOURBON ROOM Live Music every Saturday Night: The Dryland Band Live; 8pm THE BOWER For Those

Who Know: Beasts and Blood Hallowe’en Party: Jr Brown, David Stone; 8pm (door)

Sat Open mic; 7pm; $2 Suite 33 (pop); 9pm

CASINO YELLOWHEAD

Classics; 9pm

CROWN PUB Acoustic

blues open stage with Marshall Lawrence, 2-6pm; Evening: Down to the Crown: Marshall Lawrence presents great blues with Trevor Duplessis, Mad Dog Blues Band, every Sat 10pm-2am, $5 (door)

DUGGAN’S Joanne Janzen DV8 The Blame Its,

Screaming Otter Die Shizen Pistolen; Misfatz

FESTIVAL PLACE Jim

Byrnes; 7:30pm; $32 (table)/$30 (box)/$28 (theatre)

FESTIVAL PLACE Café

Series: Terry McDade’s Harpe Jazz; 7:30pm; $20 FILTHY MCNASTY’S

REXALL PLACE Dixie Chicks (Long Time Gone

STARLITE ROOM KLUB

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

HILLTOP PUB Open Stage,

Jam every Sat; 3:30-7pm HORIZON STAGE Pear

STARLITE ROOM Delhi 2 Dublin, Kush Arora; 9pm THE STUDIO ON 59TH

Studio-warming party: Tony Award ‘Best Musical’ fashion, performers and musicians perform a medley of songs from The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Kiss of the Spider Woman, Smile; 7pm (door); free; pre-register http://www. signupgenius.com/ go/9040845A8AC22A02open WUNDERBAR Night

Committee, Concealer, Cowls

YARDBIRD SUITE Yardbird Festival of Canadian Jazz: From Vancouver/ Edmonton: Campbell Ryga Quartet; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest)

Classical STANLEY A MILNER LIBRARY THEATRE ATMA:

Canadian-Polish Festival of Music: Atma Trio at 6pm; Francine Kay (piano), Penderecki String Quartet at 8:30pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (senior/student)/$10 (member)/free (child under 12) at TIX on the Square, door

FANDANGO’S DJs night

every Fri and Sat with DJ Stouffer FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip

hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Sat

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Collective Saturdays underground: House and Techno LUCKY 13 Every Fri and

Sat with resident DJ Chad Cook

NEWCASTLE PUB Top 40 requests every Sat with DJ Sheri PAWN SHOP Transmission

Saturdays: Transmission Halloween Costume Party Nov 2: Little Pawn Shop of Horrors III: Jay with Eddie Lunchpail

RED STAR Indie rock, hip

hop, and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Mkhai

Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday: retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests TEMPLE Step’d Up Saturdays with Lolcatz, Yaznil, Badman Crooks, Ootz UNION HALL Celebrity Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous Y AFTERHOURS Release

Saturdays

SUN NOV 3 ARTERY The Strumbellas

(alt country, folk), the Living Daylights; 6:30pm; $10 (adv)/$13 (door)

BLACKJACK’S ROADHOUSE–Nisku Open

mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Sunday Brunch: PM Bossa; 9am3pm; donations BLUES ON WHYTE Keith

Hallett

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

Enterprise Quartet; 2pm

WINSPEAR CENTRE

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

LIBRARY Pure Romantic:

Masterful Mozart: ESO, William Eddin (conductor/ piano), Sara Davis Buechner (piano), Nora Bumanis, harp), Elizabeth Faulkner (flute), Sarah Tako (bassoon); 8pm; $24-$79 at Winspear boxoffice

Celtic Music with Duggan’s House Band 5-8pm

DJs

HOG’S DEN PUB Rockin’ the Hog Jam: Hosted by Tony Ruffo; every Sun, 3:30-7pm

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: The Menace

Sessions: Alt Rock/Electro/

PALE BLUE DOT AS BLINK 182 • LABRADOODLE AS WEEZER • CANYON ROSE OUTFIT AS BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE E STREET BAND • CABANA BIRD AS RANCID • THE UNFORTUNATES AS NIRVANA • CODY NOUTAS FUNERAL AND LYNDSAY BURNETT AS JANIS JOPLIN • AARON VINCENT AS JOHNNY THUNDER AND THE HEARTBREAKERS • DEAD CITY DOLLS AS GUNS N ROSES • HEARSAY AS THE STROKES • THE MIGHTY STEEDS AS THE RAMONES • JAKE IAN BAND AS STEVE EARLE AND THE DUKES • BOOTLEG SAINTS AS GREENDAY • SINGLES AS ALICE IN CHAINS

SOU KAWAII ZEN

Sound and Light show; We are Saturdays: Kindergarten

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter’s stage; starts with a jam session; every Sun, 7pm

WHITEMUD CROSSING

$15. GET TIX AT BLACKBYRD, SANCUTRARY AND TICKETFLY.COM

DEC/6&7 MONSTER TRUCK

ENCORE–WEM Every Sat:

BALLROOM Swing Dance Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing.com

Stuart Bendall

ONE NIGHT ONLY

7TH ANNUAL BAND AS BANDS HALLOWEEN PARTY

ROUGE LOUNGE Rouge

every Sat; 9pm

ROSE AND CROWN

Big Blues and Roots Open Jam: Every Sat afternoon, 2-6pm

OCT/31

NOV/1 NOV/2 NOV/8 NOV/9 NOV/15 NOV/16 NOV/22 NOV/23 NOV/26 NOV/26

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

SUGAR FOOT

GAS PUMP Saturday

OMFG

It’s Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with resident Dane

THE RIG Tony Poirer

RED STAR Movin’ on Up:

indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri

THE COMMON Get Down

“B” STREET BAR Rockin

Helloweenorama Afterbirth: Malice, Terrorfist, Fight to Swill; 8pm-2am

LUCKY 13 Every Fri and

RED PIANO BAR Hottest

Who Know...: House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests

LOUNGE Your

Free Afternoon Concerts: Sermon on the Mountain with guest Royce Matthew; 4pm; no cover

RENDEZVOUS

Suchy Sister Saturdays: Amber, Renee or Stephanie with accompaniment; 9:30-11:30pm; no cover

THE BOWER For Those

the Douchettes: Tales From The Twat; A Halloween Burlesque

Sat with resident DJ Chad Cook

RED PIANO Fright Night Flashback: ‘80s themed Hallowe’en party

LOUISIANA PURCHASE

Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr Erick

Sat afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Evening: Keith Hallett

CASINO EDMONTON

party; use your concert ticket to get in free with priority entrance

Sat jam with Terry Evans, and featured guests; host Mark Ammar

RENDEZVOUS Deliah and

THE BOWER Zukunft: Indie

RANCH Dixie Chicks after

LEAF BAR AND GRILL

BLUES ON WHYTE Every

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE

Shop: Striker (metal), Binge & Purge, Secret Rivals, Etown Beatdown, Ten Second Epic, more; 8pm; $10 adv

L.B’S PUB Karen Claypool

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Ellen McIlwaine; 8:30pm; $20

Every Friday DJs on all three levels

Ramifications with Edmonton’s Hottest DJs; What a Ghoul Wants: semiformal masquerade ball; 7pm; $25 (adv student)/$30 (door student)/$50 (adv)/$55 (door); proceeds to the Canadian Liver Foundation

(horn based contemporary jazz band); 9pm; $15

STANLEY A MILNER LIBRARY THEATRE ATMA:

L.B’S PUB Tasman Jude

ON THE ROCKS The

Weymes

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ The JQ

dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm2am

Hair of the Dog: Al Lukas (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

DJs

‘n’ roll open mic every Fri; 8:30pm; no cover

IRISH SPORTS CLUB Amie

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Rachel Nightengale (CD release party, jazz soul singer); 9pm; $15 LIZARD LOUNGE Rock

(country); 7:30pm; $35 (adult)/$30 (student/senior)

King’s Music Department Annual Highlight Concert: Lisa Yui (piano); 8pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (student/ senior/alumni) at King’s Bookstore, door

WINSPEAR CENTRE

Halloween Howler; 9pm; no cover

SUITE 69 Release Your

SHERWOOD HOLMES PUB–Campus Stan

J+H PUB Early show:

HIGHRUN Andrew Scott–

Dubstep, house, trance, electro, hip hop breaks with DJ Aeiou, DJ Loose Beats, DJ Poindexter; 9:30pm (door)

SHERWOOD HOLMES PUB–WEM Party Hog

HOGS DEN PUB Sinder Sparks Show; 8-12pm

Downchild Blues Band; 9:30pm; Sold out

LOUNGE Amplified Fridays:

TREASURY In Style Fri: DJ Tyco and Ernest Ledi; no line no cover for ladies all night long

Dizon

Canadian-Polish Festival of Music: Francine Kay (piano) with Jerzy Kaplanek (violin, nov 1); ten-year-old Maya Budzinski (violin) opens with Francine Kay; 8pm; $40 (2 adults/3 concerts); $20 (adult)/$15 (senior/ student)/$10 (member)/free (child under 12) at TIX on the Square, door

FESTIVAL PLACE

SOU KAWAII ZEN

FANDANGO’S Sun

Industry Night: House mix with DJ JEZ LF; Show and Shine/open stage every Sun: hosted by Marshal Lawrence; 6-11pm

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

UBK PRESENTS

STANTON WARRIORS (UK) || ELITE FORCE (UK) || J ROC (SOULD OUT DJS) UBK PRESENTS

DELHI 2 DUBLIN AND KUSH ARORA

UNION EVENTS PRESENTS

HOLLERADO STARLITE PRESENTS

REND CD RELEASE W/ GUESTS ALTERRA, CAMPUS THEIVES & I AM MACHI UBK PRESENTS

FUNK HUNTERS & GAFF UNION EVENTS PRESENTS

ALL AGES, DOORS 5PM

THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA, THE GHOST INSIDE, VOLUMES & TEXAS IN JULY UBK PRESENTS

CAPITAL CITY BURLESQUE UBK PRESENTS

IDES OF WINTER CD RELEASE W/ THE ORDER OF CHAOS, WROTH UNION EVENTS PRESENTS

SHAD STARLITE AND MOVEMBER CANADA PRESENT

THE MOVEMBER WRAP PARTY LIVE NATION PRESENTS

- GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

!MPULSE RETURNS OCT 25

THE SKY, SHARKS ON FIRE!, NOV/1 TRACE OLD TOWNS & DEAD OAKS THEFT UNDER 5, NOV/8 JAIDE, VENICE & TOAST W/ THE GIBSON BLOCK, NOV/9 WILLHORSE RANDOM FALTER, EAST PACIFIC RISE & COLIN CLOSE FIGHTING OUR LAST NOV/15 UNBALANCED, DAYS (CALGARY), WHITE PONGO NOV/16 BEACH TRAVELERS REUNION NOV/21 SONREAL W/ RICH KIDD MOUSTACHE MOVEMENT NOV/23 MODERN CHARITY FUNDRAISER YEARS FURTHER, BURNING DAISY, NOV/29 FIVE DIRRRTY SHOW & ELECTRIC REVIVAL DNA AND STARLITE PRESENT AND GUESTS

EVERY RUBY TUESDAY TUESDAY LIKE RUBY TUESDAY ON FACEBOOK FOR DETAILS

EVERY EATS

AND BEATS

WEDNESDAY EVERY WEDNESDAY, $0.35 WINGS

EVERY THE ULTIMATE OPEN STAGE THURSDAY EVERY THURSDAY, OPEN TURNTABLES, OPEN STAGE

NOW HIRING PORTERS, BUSSERS AND SECURITY

MUSIC 31


JUBILEE AUDITORIUM

The ABBA Show starring ABBAsolutely fABBAulous NEWCASTLE PUB Sun

Soul Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

THU OCT 31 HALLOWEEN WITH THE BRAINS & EAST END RADICALS

W/ GUESTS SAM HATE & THE SPADES

HELL AT THE SHOP STRIKER IRON MAIDEN AS

BINGE AND PURGE AS METALLICA W/GUESTS SECRET RIVALS,ETOWN BEATDOWN, AND TEN SECOND

EPIC AS SICK OF IT ALL, MADBALL AND OTHER HARDCORE CLASSICS • FIRE NEXT TIME/WEEKEND KIDS AS NOFX • OLD WIVES AS THE BRONX

SAT NOV 2

LITTLE PAWNSHOP OF

HORRORS III

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

RICHARD’S PUB Sun Jam

BLUES ON WHYTE

THE RIG Every Sun Jam

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

SHERWOOD HOLMES PUB–Downtown Tony

FIDDLER’S ROOST

hosted by Steve and Bob; 5-9pm

SHERWOOD HOLMES PUB–WEM Party Hog SHERWOOD HOLMES PUB–Campus Stan

Gallant

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Hair of the Dog acoustic Sun Jam with Bonedog and Bearcat; every Sun; 2-6pm

Festival of Canadian Jazz: From Toronto: Shuffle Demons; 7pm (door), 8pm (show); Members $20 / Guests $24

TUE NOV 5 THE BELLE GAME W/ BEAR MOUNTAIN & THE DARCY’S

ALL SAINTS’ ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL Missae I:

W/ VALFREYA, MONGOL & GUESTS

THU NOV 7

SONIC 102.9 PRESENTS...

JULY TALK & ZERBIN WITH GUESTS I65

Pro Coro, Michael Zaugg (conductor); 2:30pm; tickets at Winspear box office CITY HALL Enterprise

String Quartet (concert of Romantic quartets by Mendelssohn and Schumann); 2-3pm; free

ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH The

Wonderful World of WindRose: WindRose Trio; 2pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (senior/student) at door, TIX on the Square ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT CENTRE

Romantic Verve: Concordia Symphony Orchestra, David Hoyt (conductor), John Stewart, Piper Concert; 2pm; $40 (door)

DJs

FRI NOV 8

FORESTER, KICKUPAFUSS, WHALE OF THE WOLF, THRILLHOUSE SAT NOV 9

LURE REUNION SHOW

W/ GUESTS THE ORDER OF CHAOS & PEOPLE CALL IT HOME FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

WEDNESDAY PINT NIGHT’S

$2.75 DOMESTIC PINTS

SAT NOV 2

FREE SHOW 4PM

SERMON ON THE MOUNTAIN W/ ROYCE MATTHEW

Sleeman Mon: Ross Neilsen Band; 10pm; no cover

hosted by Andrew White and the Joint Chiefs; 4-8pm

Classical

ARKONA

32 MUSIC

ON THE ROCKS The

COSTUME PARTY • DOORS 9 • $10 • HOSTED BY DJ’S EDDIE LUNCHPAIL & BLUE JAY

WED NOV 6

ARTERY Boreal Sons (CD

every Sun; 9:30pm-1am

YARDBIRD SUITE Yardbird

TRANSMISSION PRESENTS:

MON NOV 4

O’BYRNE’S Open mic

Dizon

FRI NOV 1

TUE NOV 5

release), Ghost Cousin; 7:30pm; $8 (adv)/$10 (door)

Dungarees

CJSR 88.5FM PRESENTS

Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

Mississippi Heat

Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm; host changes weekly Monday Nights Open stage hosted by Norm Sliter’s Capital City Jammers; all styles and skill levels welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover OVERTIME–Sherwood Park Monday Open Stage PAWN SHOP The Belle

Game (alt, pop), the Darcys, Bear Mountain; 8pm; $12 (adv)

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Main Floor: Soul Sundays:

A fantastic voyage through ‘60s and ‘70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky,

Mississippi Heat

monthly appearances by guests Shawn Langley, Locution Revolution, and Northside Clan

BRIXX BAR Ruby Tuesdays

DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

with host Mark Feduk; $5 after 8pm; this week guests:

DRUID IRISH PUB

Jamhouse Tues hosted by Chris Wynters, guest

Psychobilly, Hallowe’en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR Experimental

FIDDLER’S ROOST

Indie rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

J+H PUB Acoustic open mic

SUITE 69 Rockstar Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

Tuesday Nights fiddle circle jam; all levels of musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover night every Tue hosted by Lorin Lynne; Everyone will have 10-15 minutes to play

L.B.’S PUB Tue Variety Night Open Stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm LEAF BAR AND GRILL

Tuesday Moosehead/ Barsnbands open stage hosted by Mark Ammar; every Tue; 7:30-11:30pm O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park The Campfire Hero’s

WED NOV 6 ARTERY Must Be Tuesday (CD release party), the Skips, Carrie Day; 7-10pm; pay-what-you-can ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

Open stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Glitter Gulch:

live music once a month; On the Patio: Funk and Soul with Doktor Erick every Wed; 9pm

J+H PUB Acoustic open mic

night hosted by Lorin Lynne

LEAF BAR AND GRILL Wed

variety night: with guitarist Gord Matthews; every Wed, 8pm MERCURY ROOM Little Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12 NEW WEST HOTEL Free classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park Jason Greeley

(acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member) RED PIANO BAR Wed Night Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5 THE RIG Open jam every Wed hosted by Will Cole; 8pm -12am

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510

(acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE

WUNDERBAR Krang Tour

PAWN SHOP Arkona (folk

BOHEMIA Wednesday

Wednesday’s: Phillip Solo, Cab’ral, Cees, Kassette

YARDBIRD SUITE From

ROUGE RESTO-LOUNGE

RANCH CFR Kickoff

Open Mic Night with Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE Slayer, Gojira,

4ARM; all ages; 6:30pm (door); $49.50 (adv at unionevents.com, ticketfly. com, Blackbyrd)

metal), Valfreya, Mongol, guests; 8pm; $20 (adv)

Party: One More Girl Live (country); 9pm (door); $10 at ticketweb.ca

RED PIANO Jameoke with

the Nervous Flirts: Sing with the band; no cover

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE

CONVOCATION HALL–U

Matt Mays Acoustic Duo (acoustic) with Adam Baldwin; all ages; 7pm; $20 (adv at Blackbyrd)/$26 (day of show)

of A U of A’s Academy

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

Classical

Strings Orchestra; 7:30pm; free

Session: Prequal; 7:30pm (door), 8pm (show); $5

DJs

DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay

CROWN PUB A Sexy

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BLUES ON WHYTE

Night with DJ Phoenix and MJ with Sleepless DJ, DJ Breeze and more every Mon; 9pm-2am DV8 T.F.W.O. Mondays:

Roots industrial,Classic Punk,Rock, Electronic with Hair of the Dave

Main Floor: alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections

CROWN PUB Underground at the Crown Tuesday: Trueskool and live hip-hop with residents Jae Maze, Xaolin, Frank Brown;

Mississippi Heat

THE BUCKINGHAM The Blackstone, Katosaurus Wrecks; 9pm; no cover COOK COUNTY CFR

Kickoff Party: the Boom Chucka Boys; 9pm (door); no cover CROWN PUB The Dan Jam:

musical styles from around the globe with Miguel and friends; musicians are invited to bring their personal touch to the mix every Wed DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

Wed open mic with host Duff Robison ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave Open mic every

Wed (unless there’s an Oilers game); no cover

FANDANGO’S Wed open

stage hosted by Michael Gress and Cody Noula; Original artist showcase at 9pm

FIDDLER’S ROOST

Kickoff: Banshee

Toronto: Eucalyptus; 7pm (door), 8pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest)

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

Classical WINSPEAR CENTRE The Recorder in Concert: JeanFrançois Rivest (conductor), Maurice Steger (recorder); 7:30pm; $24-$69 at Winspear boxoffice

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: RetroActive

Radio: Alternative ‘80s and ‘90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe BRIXX BAR Really Good... Eats and Beats: every Wed with DJ Degree and Friends THE COMMON The Wed

Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane

Wednesday Nights Folk and Roots Open Stage: amateur and professional musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk

HOOLIGANZ Open stage

TEMPLE Wild Style Wed:

and ‘80s metal every Wed

RED STAR Guest DJs

every Wed

every Wed with host Michael Gress; 9pm

Hip hop open mic hosted by Kaz and Orv; $5

9125-50 St, 780.465.3500 NOORISH CAFÉ 8440-109 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 O2'S–West 11066-156 St, 780.448.2255 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave PUB 1824 12402-118 Ave, 587.521.1824 QUEEN ALEXANDRA COMMUNITY HALL 10425 University Ave RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 THE RIG 15203 Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.0869 ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT CENTRE 7128 Ada Boulevard ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209-123 St ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235101 St

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE 12845-102 Ave SET NIGHTCLUB Next to Bourban St, 8882-170 St, WEM, Ph III, setnightclub.ca SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 SPORTSMAN'S LOUNGE 8170-50 St STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 STANLEY A MILNER LIBRARY THEATRE 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq THE STUDIO ON 59TH 5951103A St SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 TREASURY 10004 Jasper Ave, 7870.990.1255, thetreasurey.ca VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428 YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295 ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St

VENUEGUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 AGORA Strathcona County Community Centre, 401 Festival Lane Sherwood Park ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 "B" STREET BAR 11818-111 St BISTECCA ITALIAN STEAK HOUSE AND WINE BAR 2345111 St BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku 2110 Sparrow Dr, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLOCK 1912 10361-82 Ave BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CAFÉ TIRAMISU 10750-124 St CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055

Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464153 St, 780.424 9467 CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHICAGO JOES 9604 -111 Ave COMMON 9910-109 St CROWN PUB 10709-109 St, 780.428.5618 DUGGAN'S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8130 Gateway Blvd EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave ENCORE–WEM 2687, 8882170 St EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ 9938-70 Ave, 780.436.1554 FANDANGO'S 12912-50 St, fandangoslive.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER'S ROOST 7308-76 Ave FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper

Ave, 780.429.0700 HILLTOP PUB 8220 106 Ave HOGS DEN PUB Yellow Head Tr, 142 St HOOLIGANZ 10704-124 St, 780.995.7110, 780.452.1168 J+H PUB 1919-105 St J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JAVA XPRESS 110, 4300 South Park Dr, Stony Plain, 780.968.1860 JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 11455 87 Ave, edmontonopera.com L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR AND GRILL 9016132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LEGENDS SPORTS BAR AND TAP HOUSE 9221-34 Ave, 780.988.2599 LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132104 St LIZARD LOUNGE 13160-118 Ave MERCER TAVERN 10363-104 St MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St MUTTART HALL–Conservatory of Music 10050 MacDonald Dr NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 NEW CITY 8130 Gateway Boulevard NICHOLAS B. KNOPPERS HALL–King’s University College

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

more United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm EDMONTON UKULELE CIRCLE • Bogani Café,

2023-111 St • 780.440.3528 • 3rd Sun each month; 2:30-4pm • $5

ELIZABETH’S ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLE SALE • Alberta Aviation Museum, 11410 Kingsway

COMEDY

Ave • Pop culture, vintage clothing, collectibles, shabby chic, antique furniture, militaria, jewellery, petroliana, art glass, vintage toys, china, LPs, sports memorabilia, coins, stamps, watches, comics • Nov 1-2, Fri 2-8pm; Sat 10-4pm • $5

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Underdog Comedy

FERTILITY AWARENESS CHARTING CIRCLE •

show: Alternating hosts • Every Thu, 8-11pm • No cover • Underdog Hallowe'en Comedy show: Oct 31

BRIXX Comedy and Music once a month as a part

of Ruby Tuesdays

CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd •

780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Cen-

tre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Thu: 8:30pm; Fri: 8:30pm; Sat: 8pm and 10:30pm • Kevin McGrath; Oct 31-Nov 2 • Paul Sveen; Nov 7-9 COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999

• Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Nigel Lawrence; until Nov 3 • Bret Ernst; Nov 6-10

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 •

Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm

FILTHY MCNASTY'S • 10511-82 Ave • 780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Stand-up comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9-11pm; no cover KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE/CONNIE'S COMEDY

• Komedy Krush Open Comedy Mic Halloween Extravaganza starts at 9pm • $5; T: 780.914.8966 to get on roster • Oct 31 MYER HOROWITZ THEATRE • 8900-114 St • CBC's The Irrelevant Show • Sat, Nov 2, 6:30pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • $12-$23 at Ticketfly.com OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic com-

edy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

RIVER CREE • Joe Rogan, standup comedian; Nov

9, 6pm (door), 7:30pm (show); Sold out

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Sterling Scott

every Wed, 9pm

RUMORS ULTRA LOUNGE • 8230 Gateway Blvd

• Every Thu Neon Lights and Laughter with host Sterling Scott and five comedians and live DJ TNT; 8:30pm VAULT PUB • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam

Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Thu, at 9:30pm

ZEN LOUNGE • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize

comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EDMONTON •

8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side),

Justisse-Healthworks for Women, 10145-81 Ave • justisse.ca • Meeting • Nov 4 • $10 (donation) Repeating dates: Dec 2, Feb 3, March 3, April 7.

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church,

8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm HOME–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne Assisted

Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun, 3-5pm LOTUS QIGONG • 780.477.0683 • Downtown •

Practice group meets every Thu

MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION • Faculté

St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • madeleinesanam.org/en • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register

NSAI SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot,

9351-118 Ave • 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters.com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106

St • 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside

Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm

SEVENTIES FOREVER CLUB • Call 587.520.3833

for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50 • Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10-min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta) SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Stanley A.

Milner Library, Centennial Rm (bsmt); edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists.ca; Monthly roundtable 1st Tue each month

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave •

780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door)

9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw. ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace

BRAIN TUMOUR PEER SUPPORT GROUP • Mount Zion Lutheran Church, 11533-135 St NW • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext. 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Mon every month; 7-8:45pm • Free

THOUGHTFUL TUESDAY • King Edward Community Small Hall, 8102-80 Ave • Movie Monday: Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead; Mon, Nov 4, 7-9pm • Movie Monday: Gasland; Nov 11, 7-9pm • Free; pre-register

CANADIAN INJURED WORKERS ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA (CIWAA) • Augustana Lutheran

Church, 107 St, 99 Ave • canadianinjuredworkers. com • Meeting every 3rd Sat, 1-4pm • Injured Workers in Pursuit of Justice denied by WCB

EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD • Avon-

United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • 780.479.5519 • Low-cost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Meets every Mon, 6:3pm

THOUGHTFUL TUESDAY • King Edward Community Small Hall, 8102-80 Ave • Movie Monday: In Organic We Trust : Nov 18, 7-9pm TOASTMASTERS • Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700

Jasper Ave; 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet

every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Power Speakers Toastmasters Club: Jasper Park

Community League, 8751-153 St (top fl); Meet every Wed, 7-9pm; Contact: VP Ed, 780.720.2277 • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331 WILD ROSE ANTIQUE COLLECTORS SOCIETY

• Delwood Community Hall, 7515 Delwood Rd • wildroseantiquecollectors.ca • Collecting and researching items from various periods in the history of Edmonton. Presentations after club business. Visitors welcome • Meets the 4th Mon of every month (except Jul & Dec), 7:30pm

WINTER CYCLING AND BICYCLE LOVE • King Ed-

ward Park Community League Small Hall, 8008-81 St • Movie Night: Documentary • Nov 6, 7-9pm

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS THE ALARMING STATE OF CANADA'S DEMOCRACY • The 2013 Merv Leitch Q.C. Memorial

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo.com/group/ bwedmonton BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

FLASH NIGHT CLUB • 10018-105 St •

WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womonspace. ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured

• Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs.com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome 780.969.9965 • Thu Goth + Industrial Night: Indust:real Assembly with DJ Nanuck; 10pm (door); no cover • Triple Threat Fridays: DJ Thunder, Femcee DJ Eden Lixx • DJ Suco beats every Sat • E: vip@ flashnightclub.com

G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION • teamed-

LETTING IN THE LIGHT SYMPOSIUM • L1-490,

G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E Bldg, Craft-

101 St • 780.429.0166 • Symposium 2013: Exploring the different ways we remember • Reception/ keynote: Nov 1 • Nov 1, 6pm-Nov 2, 3:45pm GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s AnglicanChurch,

8424-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month, Safari: Zambia, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa & Ethiopia (2012 & 13), Lee Dioszeghy (member of the Stephen Lewis Foundation, Grandmothers for Africa) • Nov 4, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $3

THE EXCEPTIONAL LIFE AND TIMES OF WINSTON CHURCHILL • Strathcona County

Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Ave, U of A • science’s luminaries in ecology gather for a symposium to demonstrate how environmental policies based on sound, cutting-edge science can minimize the long-term damage to the environment • Thu, Oct 31, 9:30am-5:30pm PHOTOGRAPHIC TRADE SHOW • U of A Universiade Pavilion, Butterdome, 87 Ave, 115 St • Canada's largest photographic trade show featuring 13 of the industries key suppliers demonstrating the latest in photographic technology • Nov 3, 9:30am-5pm • $12 (adv)/$15 (door)

room, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @shaw.ca

ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608-

105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm

INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campus-based

QUEBEC VALUES CHARTER: WHOSE VALUES

organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transidentified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca

SEEING IS ABOVE ALL • Acacia Hall, 10433-83

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling

• Telus Centre, U of A, Rm 134 • Panel discussion hosted by CRC, partnering with APIRG (Alberta Public Interest Research Group) • Nov 6, 6:15-8:15pm • Donation

Ave, upstairs • 780.554.6133 • Free instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light • Every Sun, 5pm

SEIZE EVERY MOMENT • Grey Nuns' Community

Hospital, Mill Woods, Edmonton • Annual Prime Time for Women Conference: Freefall Memoir Writing, Healthy Eating, Gluten-free or Not, Conflict Management • Nov 9, 8:30am-3:30pm • $35 (incl lunch) • covenanthealth.ca/news-resources/whatshappening.html?WHK=626

TIME TRAVELLERS XX • Royal Alberta Museum

Theatre, 12845-102 Ave • Lecture series: Unearthing...the discovery of Richard III's remains, an Arctic shipwreck, life as a Neanderthal and human history at the end of the ice age • Oct 31, Nov 7 • $8 (per lecture)/$25 (four lectures, one series) at royalalbertamuseum.ca

QUEER AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912 Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month

10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP

Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • Born To Be A Leader: Churchill’s Early Life: presented by Rod MacLeod; Sun, Nov 3, 2-4pm; $10 (adult)/$5 (student) at door • Churchill As A Military Man: presented by Rod MacLeod; Sun, Nov 10, 2-4pm; $10 (adult)/$5 (student) at door • Churchill And Stalin: A Tricky Alliance and a Common Enemy: presented by Rod MacLeod; Sun, Nov 17, 2-4pm; $10 (adult)/$5 (student) at door

CITY AND MEMORY • Sutton Place Hotel, 10235-

PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian Church,

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76 Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

monton.ca • Blazin' Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary School Gym, 10925-87 Ave; Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@ teamedmonton.ca • Mindful Meditation: Pride Centre: Every Thu, 6pm; free weekly drop-in • Progressive Core Stability and Abdominal Training with Barb Turner: Parkallen Community League Hall; Every Thu, Sep-Dec 19, 6pm (beginner/intermediate), 7:15pm (advance); $50 (month), $200 (season) • Swimming–Making Waves: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@ teamedmonton.c; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Bowling: Bonnie Doon Bowling Lanes: Every Tue, 6:30pm; until Apr 1, 2014; $15/week • Volleyball: Westminster Junior High School (Garneau) every Thu, until Nov 21, 7-9pm; St Matthew Elementary School (NE): Tue, Dec 3-Mar 11, 8-10pm; Stratford Junior-Senior High School (west end): every Tue, Mar 18-Apr 29, 7-9pm, $65 (season), $35 (Half season), $5 (drop-in) • Badminton: Westmount Junior High Sch: Every Wed until Nov 6, 6-7:30pm • Curling: Granite Curling Club: Every Tue, until Mar 25, 7pm • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@ teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton. ca, sillum.ca

Lecture by Andrew Coyne (Columnist, Postmedia News) presented by the U of A Faculty of Law • Nov 4, 5:30-7pm; rsvp: by Oct 31: lawcomm@ualberta.ca

Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca

MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities. com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre

of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@ pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, shortterm by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for femaleidentified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave •

780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SPECIAL EVENTS CAKE WALK • The Westin • thenina.ca • Cake

challenge teams compete on stage represented by music celebrities performing wedding hits featuring Colleen Rae and Josh Mellot; live and silent auction • Nov 4, 7pm (reception), 8:30pm (show) • $100/$800 (tables) come with preferred seating to the stage show, recognition and exclusive food and beverage service; all tickets incl food, drinks, fun at TIX on the Square; fundraiser for the Nina Haggerty Centre for the Arts

CFR 40: CANADIAN FINALS RODEO • Rexall

Place, Northlands Park, 78 St, 115 Ave • Nov 6-10, noon

DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to: 780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on SG guitars: upcoming Century Casino show as well; GarageGigs Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank) HARVEST FEST • Ritchie Community League Hall,

7727-98 St • Dancing to local bands and fiddlers, free workshops, market • Nov 2-3, 3pm (door); Workshops/Market until 6pm; dinner: 6-7:15pm; music: 7:15pm-midnight • $15/free (child under 12); http://edmontonpermacultureharvestfest-eorg. eventbrite.ca/ LEGION LEGACY • ACCA Centre, 3591‐91 St • 780.708.3665/780.916.5698 • South Side Legion Boxing Club competition • Nov 10 • $15/$10 (student/senior)/$5 (Veteran)

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE • 780.963.5691 • Fundraiser

in support of palliative/hospice and continuing care in Stony Plain, Spruce Grove, Wabamun, Seba Beach, Parkland County • Nov 1 • Donation boxes at WestView Health Centre, Good Samaritan Facilities in Stony Plain and Spruce Grove; $10 donation will light a bulb on one of the campaign symbols that will glow in memory of your loved one

MAGPIE BAZAAR • The Bower, 10538 Jasper Ave • magpietheatre.ca • Local Art Auction, Living Spectacle, DJ Dance Party: Fundraiser for Magpie Theatre's collaborative projects melding performance with visual imagery, music and dance • Nov 7, 7pm • Tickets at Blackbyrd, magpitheatre.ca PLANNING FOR PROSPERITY • Shaw Conference Centre • Fundraising event in support of the

Planning and Development program at the U of A • Nov 6

RUTHERFORD HOUSE REMEMBERS • Rutherford House, 11153 Saskatchewan Dr • 780.427.3995 • Sample economical war-time foods, learn how the Rutherford’s showed support; browse the First World War displays • Nov 3, 12-4pm • $4 (adult)/$12 (2 adults and children 7-17)/$3 (senior/youth 7-17)/free (child six and under) TIMERAISER • ATB Financial Arts Barn,

10330-84 Ave • Volunteer fair, silent art auction, night on the town • Nov 9, 6-10:30pm • $10 • facebook.com/events/549202145153185/?source=1

VOLUNTEER INFORMATION NIGHT • Alberta Avenue Community Centre, 9210-118 Ave • Taste, See, Delight in the Olde New Year–With food (of course); Deep Freeze Winter Festival on Jan 11-12 • Nov 5, 6-8pm • RSVP required at E: deepfreezevolunteers@gmail.com

BACK 33


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“In the Cards”-- I’m kind of a big deal.

CLASSIFIEDS To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 130.

Coming Events

OIL CITY DERBY GIRLS All tickets are $10.00 in advance and $15.00 at the door, Kids under 10 are free! Next up: sk8mare #7 Nov 23 @ Oil City Grindhouse 14420 112 street Doors at 5pm Visit www.oilcityderbygirls.ca for more information

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Bells will be ringing November 14th - December 24th for the 2013 Christmas Kettle Campaign We are looking for volunteers to come out and ring in Christmas to help us reach our goal of $500,000. We have 9000 volunteer hours to fill. If you have a few hours we would love to have you join us. Call 780-423-2111 ext 241 to sign up or email:

edmonton_kettles@can.salvation army.org or online

http://www.salvationarmy.ca/ volunteer/

If you can’t make it out to a kettle but would still like to give visit: www.fillthekettle.com Can You Read This?

Across

1 Drill sergeant’s syllable 4 Formal promise? 10 Casablanca’s country: abbr. 13 Land on the Med. Sea 14 He wrote of Walden Pond 16 Diminutive ending, in Italian 17 Pop artist who used faceless stick figures 19 Big shot in the office 20 Serial piece 21 Budget brand of Intel CPUs 23 “Comfortably ___” (Pink Floyd) 24 Jazz great with the album “High Priestess of Soul” 27 Location finder, briefly 28 High-rated search engine, once 29 Hip hop fan, maybe 30 Increasingly hard to find net surfer 31 Calvin and Naomi 33 “The Devil’s Dictionary” author 36 ___ and Guilder (warring “The Princess Bride” nations) 37 They may include twists 38 Dip ___ in the water 39 Handout after a checkup 40 Choke, or a joke 43 15th-century Flemish painter 46 “Damn Yankees” vamp 47 Vlad, as the legend goes 48 Green energy type 49 You, to Yves 50 He played Locke on “Lost” 54 “I’d like to buy ___” (“Wheel” request) 55 With great skill 56 Battle (for) 57 Ave. crossers 58 Had a debate 59 Superlative ending

Down

1 Outdoors activity 2 Depletes 3 Rainbow creators 4 “Am ___ only one?” 5 “Keep it down!” 6 Condo grp. 7 Part of ETA 8 German cameras

34 BACK

9 Highway sections 10 Of small organisms 11 Two-person basketball game 12 Andy and Mickey 15 “Unattractive” citrus 18 Margarine holder 22 Campfire remains 24 Parachute fabric 25 Finishes a cake 26 Message response that’s not really a response 28 “Footloose” actress Singer 30 Cold sore-fighting brand in a tiny tube 31 Mall booth 32 “___ get this party started” 33 “Gimme Shelter” speedway 34 Oft-mocked treats 35 “Helicopter” band ___ Party 36 Dish served with a distinct sound 39 “Cyrano de Bergerac” star Jose 40 Become available to the general public, as a new website 41 “Thank U” singer Morissette 42 January birthstone 44 Utah ski resort 45 “I ___ drink!” 46 Reed recently deceased 48 Flooring meas. 51 D&D, e.g. 52 “___ Mama Tambien” 53 “Bravo, matador!” ©2013 Jonesin' Crosswords

Help someone Who can’t! Volunteer 2 hours a week and help someone improve their Reading, Writing, Math or English Speaking Skills. Call Valerie at P.A.L.S 780-424-5514 or email palsvol@shaw.ca Growing Facilitators Volunteer Opportunity Sustainable Food Edmonton offers a Little Green Thumbs indoor gardening program to schools and childcare agencies and we are looking for volunteers. A green thumb is not a pre-requisite. However, gardening experience and a passion for children and youth are an asset. For info and volunteer application form: www.sustainablefoodedmonton.o rg

Habitat For Humanity is building a pool of volunteers to help us with renovations at our newest ReStore. Flexible hours, no experience necessary If interested, please contact Evan at ehammer@hfh.org or call (780) 451-3416 Help someone in crisis take that first step towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Needed for our Long Term Care residence, daytime volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit! Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106 Room to Read is changing children’s lives in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our work, and spread the word about our amazing results. Edmonton@roomtoread.org www.roomtoread.org Volunteer Information Night with Food (of course!) November 5th, 6:00pm 8:00pm Alberta Avenue Community Centre (9210 - 118 Ave) Taste, See, Delight in the Olde New Year The 7th annual Deep Freeze Winter Festival will be held on January 11th and 12th, 2014; and we are looking for Volunteers to celebrate and embrace the magic and beauty that is our northern winter. This free family festival will be situated in the Alberta Avenue Community Center (along 118th Avenue and 90th – 94th Street). Combining cultural foods, winter fun and games, with snow and ice inspired art, the Deep Freeze Winter Festival brings together the Ukrainian, Franco-Albertan, Franco-African, First Nations, Chinese and South American communities to revel in the delight of winter. We need to fill a variety of positions from kitchen staff to gallery attendants, from snow stoppers & shovellers to fire tenders and beyond, and we’d love to have you join us. For more information on Volunteering for the Deep Freeze Festival, please email Marie at

deepfreezevolunteers@gmail.com

We look forward to hearing from you!

Volunteering - Does your employer have a Day of Caring program? We invite you to come and spend some time with us at Habitat for Humanity! It’s easy to sign up a group of volunteers to work on one of our builds. Volunteers from beginners to garage “putterers”, to trades people come out and help us to build homes for families in our community. We provide all tools, equipment, safety gear and lunch. Volunteers work in small crews under the direction of our site supervisors. Our primary focus is safety and we have a fun, welcoming environment that’s great for an employee group to experience giving back to community together. For more information, go to our website at www.hfh.org or contact Kim at 780-451-3416 ext 232. Contact: Kim Sherwood Email: ksherwood@hfh.org Phone: 780.451.3416 Website: http://www.hfh.org

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteering - Habitat for Humanity invites all women to build with us during Women Build Week: October 22-26 Are you a woman who has always wanted to volunteer on a Habitat for Humanity build site but were unsure if you had the necessary skills? You may be surprised how many women -- with no construction experience -- build homes with Habitat for Humanity. If you are a woman who wants to help families in our community, there is an important role for you on our build sites, whether you have no construction experience or a tool belt of skills. Your gift of time will give hard-working families an opportunity to build equity in a home and in their futures. Volunteers are trained and equipped to perform every task accurately and safely by our expert site superintendents and crew leaders and will leave our build sites with an inspiring sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. We provide all tools, equipment and lunch. All volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation/training. No minimum number of shifts required. Check our website www.hfh.org to register as a volunteer online , contact Louise Contact: Louise Fairley Email: lfairley@hfh.org Phone: 780.451.3416 Website: http://www.hfh.org

Volunteering - Habitat for Humanity requires Landscaping Volunteers! New houses with bare yards need love and our energetic volunteers will be beautifying yards for our families by planting trees, laying sod, building fences and decks and putting the finishing touches on our completed homes. This is an active opportunity open to volunteers of all skill levels. Previous volunteers really enjoyed strengthening friendships and building new ones and knowing they had put in a good day of work. Individual and group volunteers welcome. Contact: Evan Hammer Email: ehammer@hfh.org Phone: 780.451.3416 Website: http://www.hfh.org

Volunteering - Improve the Lives of Children in the Developing World Room to Read is changing the lives of children in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our programs, and spread the word about the fantastic results we are achieving. Skills in event planning, PR, marketing, graphic design are needed, but not essential. We welcome all volunteers. If this sounds interesting, email us at Edmonton@roomtoread.org Contact: Kerri Tulloch Email: Edmonton@roomtoread.org Phone: 780.425.4043 Website:

http://www.roomtoread.org/ Edmonton

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Toy Pickup Drivers collecting our toy donations from various locations around the city. To be eligible for this work, you must have a vehicle, show us your valid driver’s license and insurance and be willing to undergo a police check. You will need your vehicle for two or three trips a week to your location, where you will fill up the supplied bags with toy donations and bring them to our warehouse at Northgate Industries (12345 121 ST). For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or call Janet at 780 428-8697

Toy Pickup Drivers for CHED Santas Anonymous are needed at these locations: CHED RADIO STATION (5204 84 ST) - We need four volunteers for this location; one person for each day of the week, Tue-Frid. Pickups must be done before 5pm. COSTCO SOUTH (2616 91 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). MILLWOODS TOWN CENTER (2331 66 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). SOUTHGATE MALL (5015 111 ST NW) WEEKDAYS - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). WALMART WINDEMERE (6110 Currents DR NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). ON CALL DRIVERS sometimes a location driver cannot make a trip and the location will call us asking for a pickup as their box is full. We need people who are available either morning or afternoons in all sections of town.

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we have been granted a booth at the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 which runs from Nov 28 to Dec 1st. We are looking for volunteers to help us man the booth. Shifts are mornings, afternoons and evenings. We will be setting up a silent auction table and a table with information on CHED Santas Anonymous. Please visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca for more information on CHED Santas Anonymous and the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 event. Interested people may contact Janet at

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or 780-428-8697.


1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Greeters welcoming and signing in our warehouse volunteers. Our warehouse is located at 12345 121ST, inside Northgate Industries. Shifts available are: Saturday afternoons from 2pm to 5pm on Nov 16, Nov 23, Nov 30 and Dec7. Sunday afternoons from 1pm to 3pm on Nov 17, Nov 24, Dec 1 and Dec 8. Tuesday daytime hours available on Nov 19, Nov 26, Dec 3 and Dec 10. Thursday afternoons from 3pm to 5pm on Nov 21. For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

3” wide

or call Janet at 780 428-8697.

2005.

Artist to Artist

2005.

2013 Palaeo Arts Contest at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, AB. This year, our scientists have selected a Stygimoloch skull to discover and interpret through art. Our annual Palaeo Arts Contest is open to all grade levels, has prizes for every winner, including two $500 draw prizes that are awarded to schools, and offers the chance to have students’ winning artwork displayed at the Museum. For more information, including topics for each grade level, visit: http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/ Palaeo_Arts_Contest.htm. ARTIST requires agent/manager to assist in selling ART. Commission is generous percentage % . Contact BDC at monkeywrench@live.ca

BOOK YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY! CALL ANDY version 780.426.1996

Artist to Artist

Art Gallery of St Albert (AGSA), a contemporary public art gallery, seeks submissions from artists working in all styles and mediums for exhibition in the 2015 calendar year. Submissions are adjudicated by a panel of visual art professionals who represent a spectrum of expertise in the visual arts. The artists chosen to exhibit receive CARFAC fees. Deadline for submissions: Saturday, March 1, 2014, 5 pm For more information: Jenny Willson-McGrath, Exhibition Curator 780.651.5741 I jennyw@artsheritage.ca

Botanical Artists of Canada (BAC) – Juried Exhibition, The Four Seasons, March 26 – April 6, 2014, Paper Mill Gallery, Toronto. Entry deadline: Friday, January 10, 2014. Open to all BAC members in good standing; non-members may join prior to entering exhibition

www.botanicalartistsofcanada.org/ join.

Submission fee $45 for up to three works. Awards: Best in show – $350 and three other awards – $150 each.

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To download the call for entries: http://www.botanicalartistsofca nada.org/exhibitions/calls-forentries

3” wide version

For more information or questions, email exhibition coordinator Gerry Jenkison, gerry@jenkisonnetwork.com

STUDENT POSTCARD EXCHANGE CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS, THEME: MAPPING Create a postcard that follows the theme of MAPPING. Here are some ideas to get you thinking about mapping, these are only to start thinking about your piece and in no way are meant to be restrictive. Maps can direct you where to go; Customizable and secure. From storage to workspace. they can chart both physical places and ideas. Technology Steel containers from 8' - 53'. has changed the way that we 20' & 40' skids with optional 4' landings understand mapping. Maps are available. Mount with twist locks. 780 440 4037 | SEACAN.COM no longer a static representation of space but change as quickly as the place that they represent. They can record public knowledge or a private understanding of an environment; they can be clear or cryptic. For this exhibition artists can make up to 2 original postcards. Postcards must be 2-dimensional, 4 x 6 WHAT ARE THEY GOOD FOR? ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING. inch postcards. Artists are encouraged to use any media (drawing, print media, painting, collage, etc.). Submission Deadline (postmarked by): Friday, December 13, 2013 Please contact Brittney Roy for more details. harcourtexhibit@shaw.ca Customizable and secure. From storage to workspace. 780.426.4180

WHAT ARE THEY GOOD FOR? 3.75”EVERYTHING. wide version ABSOLUTELY

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3” wide version

3.75” wide version 12345

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November 6-7-8-9, 2013

Westerner Park in Red Deer, Alberta

3” wide version

Steel containers from 8' to 53'. 20' & 40' skids with optional 4' landings available. Mount with twist locks.

The EAC’s annual Community Investment Program Arts Operating Grant is fast 780 440 4037 | SEACAN.COM approaching. If you are running (Province Wide) an non-profit in Edmonton, and primarily support the Iron Filters • Softeners • Distillers • Reverse Osmosis production of artwork, you Tell them Danny “Kontinuous Shok” Chlorinator could be eligible for this grant. Hooper sent you Patented Whole House Reverse Osmosis System

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The deadline for submission is December 1st. Application guidelines can be found through Art Rubicon: http://artrubicon.com/2322/eaccip-arts-operating-grantsorganizations-closesdec-1-annually/

2005.

Artist to Artist

The Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA) is pleased to announce the 2015 Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art Call for Submissions is now open to resident Alberta artists. Details of the call, which closes at 4 pm on Friday, December 13, 2013, can be found at youraga.ca. The exhibition will be on view at the AGA in early 2015 All resident Alberta artists are eligible to submit works for consideration. Submissions should include: a curriculum vitae; a brief artist’s statement; a CD with a maximum of 20 images formatted as a PowerPoint presentation of recent work (with artist’s name, title, media and date of work clearly indicated for each image) or a maximum of three videos or DVDs for media or time-based work; and a self-addressed envelope with appropriate postage for return delivery if required. Submissions should be sent directly to the Art Gallery of Alberta by Friday, December 13, 2013 by 4 pm. Please visit youraga.ca for more information The Paint Spot, Edmonton would like to extend an invitation to your organization, club, society, school or association to make use of the many exhibition opportunities we offer to members of the Alberta art community. We encourage individuals and curators, particularly those who are emerging, as well as groups, to make exhibition proposals to our galleries: Naess, Gallery, Artisan Nook, and the Vertical Space. For further information on these three show spaces, please visit our website, www.paintspot.ca The Writers’ Guild of Alberta Gears Up for the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards! The Writers’ Guild of Alberta (WGA) is preparing to celebrate another successful year with the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards. Writers from across Alberta and their publishers are invited to check out and submit to this year’s award categories. The deadline for submissions to the Alberta Literary Awards is December 31, 2013. For more information and submission guidelines, please visit www.writersguild.ab.ca

2010.

Musicians Available

Old shuffle blues drummer available for gigs. Influences: B.B. King, Freddy King, etc. 780-462-6291

2020.

Musicians Wanted

Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677

3100. Appliances/Furniture Old Appliance Removal Removal of unwanted appliances. Must be outside or in your garage. Rates start as low as $30. Call James @780.231.7511 for details

8005.

Services

Housemaid/House Sitter available. Rate negotiable w/rent also Interested parties fax c/o VUE WEEKLY at 780-426-2889

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

ALBERTA-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS •• AUCTIONS •• ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE Fall Auction Sale. Saturday, November 9, 10 a.m. Viewing 8 a.m. Sand Hills Community Hall, 52032 Range Rd 270, Spruce Grove, Alberta. For complete listing: www.spectrumauctioneering.com. Nick or Gerri 780-903-9393; 780-960-3370.

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DISCONNECTED PHONE? Phone Factory Home Phone Service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call Phone Factory today! 1-877-336-2274; www.phonefactory.ca. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100, sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206; www.crownsteelbuildings.ca.

EVERY WATER WELL on earth should have WRECKING AUTO-TRUCKS. Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, the patented “Kontinuous Shok” Chlorinator imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, from Big Iron Drilling! Why? Save thousands of lives every year. www.1-800bigiron.com. diesel, 4x4 stuff. (Lloydminster). Reply Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON. 780-875-0270. North-East Recyclers truck up to 3 tons. EXCELLENT VALUE! Horse for sale: Energetic 9 year old registered Welsh Cob •• EMPLOYMENT •• gelding for sale. 14.2hh. Excellent for Pony OPPORTUNITIES Club, Western, English. No vices. $3900.; www.equinenow.com/horse-ad-766581. WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must 780-718-8864; e-lynx@shaw.ca. have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at •• MANUFACTURED •• the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax HOMES 780-842-6581. Email: rigmove@telus. net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., CROSS COUNTRY HOMES. Show homes 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W ready for fall possession, including a 1508 1L7. For more employment informasq. ft. double wide. Custom build in only tion see our webpage: www.heoil.com. 8 weeks! Visit us in Acheson. 780-4708000; www.crosscountryhomes.com. PERMANENT POSITIONS available in our Smoky Lake Feedlot. Pen checkNO GST SALE. Show Home Blow Out! All ers/Lead Herd Health Manager paying current 2013 stock must go! Best prices in $20 - 30/hour depending on experience/ town - Free delivery and skirting package. qualifications. Yard labourers and Feed Homes won’t last don’t delay, call Dynamic Truck drivers paying $20 - 30/hour Modular Homes 1-877-341-4422; www. depending on experience qualifications. dynamicmodular.ca. Housing available. Call William 780-6560052 or fax resume to 780-656-3962. SHOWHOME SPECTACULAR! We want you to own a wonderful former AN ALBERTA OILFIELD Company is showhome at a fantastic price. 1672 sq. hiring dozer and excavator operators. ft., too many features to list! $169,000. Lodging and meals provided. Drug testing Ready for immediate delivery; www. required. Call 780-723-5051 Edson, Alberta. unitedhomescanada.com. 148 Eastlake Blvd., Airdrie. 1-800-461-7632. INTERESTED IN the Community Newspaper business? Alberta’s weekly newspapers are looking for people like •• PERSONALS •• you. Post your resume online. FREE. Visit: www.awna.com/resumes_add.php. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/short-term INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator School. No Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. Sign up online! iheschool.com. 1-866-399-3853. AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN REQUIRED. Prefer certified or minimum 3rd year. Track record of quality workmanship & job efficiency. Excellent compensation & benefits. Email: info@ southridgechrysler.com. Fax 403-9387199. Southridge Chrysler, Okotoks, Alberta. Moving bonus will be considered. HORIZON TELECOM INC. requires Journeyman Fiber Optic Splicers. Full-time positions available for various locations throughout BC. Competitive salary based on experience. Send resume to: hti.careers@telus.net. HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE Class 1 or 3 Operators. Full-time and part-time positions available. Openings in several Alberta areas. Fax resume to Carillion Canada 780-449-0574 or email: mcroft@ carillionalberta.ca. Positions to start Oct. 15, 2103. Please state what position and location you are interested in. Tired of Semi Truck Driving? Haul RVs from USA to Western Canada! 1 ton trucks required. 1-800-8676233; www.roadexservices.com. JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Service Technician(s) in Hanna Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $32/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrylser.ca. Fax 403-8542845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

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To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com

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Personals

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


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LUSTFORLIFE

BRENDA KERBER BRENDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Toxic toy chest

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The difficulty of regulating sexy consumer products

Plastic ain't perfect // Wikimedia Commons

In 2001 German Scientist Hans Ulrich Krieg published a study on sex toys that showed that many adult toys off-gas toxic chemicals that are linked to negative health effects. Surprisingly, in the 12 years that have passed since that study became public knowledge, the American and Canadian governments have still done nothing to regulate what goes into adult toys. Now some activists in California are trying to take matters into their own hands. The problem is that sex toys don't fit into any currently regulated category of consumer product. They are not food, they are not drugs and they are not cosmetics. In Canada, children's toys are regulated. In fact the chemical group of concern in adult toys, phthalates, was recently banned for use in any toy for children that might be put in the mouth. Adult toys, however, don't fit in that category. The two routes to government regulation are to have adult toys reclassified into an existing regulated category or to make them regulated in their own category. In 2009, To-

ronto MP Carolyn Bennett actually took on this issue. She wrote a letter to the health minister lobbying for the regulation of sex toys and the banning of the sale of toys containing chemicals that are banned in children's toys. Did Bennett find a sympathetic ear and support in this effort? No. She became a laughing stock. The Health Minister did not address the issue and no other MP's would back her up. It seems politicians don't want their name associated with the vibrator lobby.

the list? All of the chemicals that Krieg and others have found in sex toys. This could mean that if a manufacturer was found to be in violation of Prop 65, they would be required to put a warning label on the toys, much like the labels on cigarettes. 'Warning, this dildo may cause cancer.' I'm guessing that would put a dent in sales. California is a very large consumer of sex toys. If labelling became a requirement, it's likely that manufacturers would clean up the chemical content of their toys in order to keep selling in the state. A notice of potential violation has already been filed against one toy maker. Once a 60-day waiting period is up, legal action can be pursued. It would be the first time an adult-toy manufacturer has faced legal action for the use of toxic chemicals. V

Brenda Kerber is a sexual health educator who has worked with local not-for-profits since 1995. She is the owner of the Edmontonbased, sex-positive adult toy boutique the Traveling Tickle Trunk.

The group in California thinks it has found another way to tackle toxic toys. It's found a provision in a regulation from 1986 called the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act or Prop 65, which says that "no person in the course of doing business shall knowingly and intentionally expose any individual to a chemical known to the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity without first giving a clear and reasonable warning to such person." Every year the governor of California puts out a list of these chemicals. Guess what's on

FREEWILLASTROLOGY ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): Once when I was hiking through Maui’s rainforest, I spied a majestic purple honohono flower sprouting from a rotting log. As I bent down close, I inhaled the merged aromas of mouldering wood and sweet floral fragrance. Let’s make this scene your metaphor of the week, Aries. Here’s why: a part of your life that is in the throes of decay can serve as host for a magnificent bloom. What has been lost to you may become the source of fertility. Halloween costume suggestion: a garbage man or cleaning maid wearing a crown of roses. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): What don’t you like? Get clear about that. What don’t you want to do? Make definitive decisions. What kind of person do you not want to become and what life do you never want to

live? Resolve those questions with as much certainty as possible. Write it all down, preferably in the form of a contract with yourself. Sign the contract. This document will be your sacred promise, a declaration of the boundaries you won’t cross and the activities you won’t waste your time on and the desires that aren’t worthy of you. It will feed your freedom to know exactly what you like and what you want to accomplish and who you want to become. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Are you up for an experiment? Not just on Halloween, but for a week afterwards, be scarier than your fears. If an anxious thought pops into your mind, CONTINUED ON PAGE 39 >>

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

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VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013


DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

YOUR SISTER'S KEEPER

Two years ago, I found a letter in my sister's car informing her that the blood she gave during a charity blood drive had tested positive for HIV. I didn't say anything to her at the time, because it was a really bad time, I wasn't supposed to find out and I didn't know what to say. In the time since, there were a couple times that it sounded like she came close to telling me, but never did. I worry she never will. She has also recently had some health complications that raise concern about how well she's taking care of herself and I am concerned that she's missing out on treatment that she should be receiving out of fear that someone in our family might find out. (As an added complication, our family is a bunch of judgmental religious immigrant types.) My sister and I have had a complicated relationship growing up and have really only begun to get along in the last few years. In short, our relationship is fragile, but I care for her deeply. I can't really understand the gravity of having to live with HIV, especially being from such a family as ours, but I wish we could have her diagnosis acknowledged between us so she can know that I'm not going to stop loving her, that I respect her no less and that I want to help take care of her. I want her to feel supported because this must be terrifying to face alone. But that means having a conversation that I'm not sure I have the right to start. What should I do?

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bare your teeth and growl, “Get out of here or I will rip you to shreds!” If a demon visits you in a nightly dream, chase after it with a torch and sword, screaming “Begone, foul spirit, or I will burn your mangy ass!” Don’t tolerate bullying in any form, whether it comes from a critical little voice in your head or from supposedly nice people who are trying to guilt-trip you. “I am a brave conqueror who cannot be intimidated!” is what you could say, or “I am a monster of love and goodness who will defeat all threats to my integrity!”

Sensitive Issue Surrounds Treating Errant Retroviruses Your sister may not be facing HIV alone. She could have confided in friends, she could be seeing a great HIV doc, she could be attending a support group. And if your sister were in good health, SISTER, I would encourage you to run with those assumptions, ie, that she's getting the help and emotional support she needs. Because it's generally a good idea to err on the side of respecting a sibling's right to privacy—even if that respect is retroactive in your case— while also respecting your sister's specific right to control who she tells about her HIV status. But it doesn't sound like your sister is in good health. While it's possible that she's facing unrelated health problems that you've wrongly attributed to her HIV infection—people with HIV can come down with other shit—that could be a risky assumption. You wanna show respect for your sister, of course, but you don't wanna respect your sister to death. If there's a chance your sister hasn't sought treatment because she feared it would get back to your family (she's still on your parents' health insurance, her physician is a family friend) or because there's some other issue that prevented her from accessing services for people with HIV (language barriers, cultural barriers), I'm going to urge you to err on the side of speaking up. Tell your sister what you know and tell her how you found out. If you don't tell her how you learned about her HIV diagnosis— "How did you know?" "That doesn't

time. Hidden agendas are seeping into conversations and gossip is swirling like ghostly dust devils. Yet in the midst of this mayhem, an eerie calm possesses you. As everyone else struggles, you’re poised and full of grace. To what do we owe this stability? I suspect it has to do with the fact that life is showing you how to feel at home in the world no matter what’s happening around you. Keep making yourself receptive to these teachings. Halloween costume suggestion: King or Queen of Relaxation.

CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): Are you ready to be amazed? Now would be an excellent time to shed your soul’s infantile illusions ... to play wildly with the greatest mystery you know ... to accept gifts that enhance your freedom and refuse gifts that don’t ... to seek out a supernatural encounter that heals your chronic sadness ... to consort and converse with sexy magical spirits from the future ... to make love with the lights on and cry when you come. Halloween costume suggestion: the archetypal LOVER.

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): Unification should be a key theme for you in the coming weeks. Anything you do that promotes splicing and blending and harmonizing will get extra help, sometimes from mysterious forces working behind the scenes. The more you work to find common ground between opposing sides, the stronger you’ll feel and the better you’ll look. If you can manage to mend schisms and heal wounds, unexpected luck will flow into your life. To encourage these developments, consider these Halloween disguises: a roll of tape, a stick of Krazy Glue, a wound that’s healing, a bridge.

LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): Some people in your vicinity are smouldering and fuming. The air is heavy with emotional ferment. Conspiracy theories are ripening and rotting at the same

LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): What do you think you’d be like if you were among the one-percent-wealthiest people on Earth? Would you demand that your government raise

matter!"—your sister will worry that rumours are spreading and that other people already know. So you have to come clean about snooping. Then tell her you love her, tell her you're worried for her and tell her you want to make sure she's getting both the medical care and the emotional support she needs to stay healthy. She may be upset that you know something she wanted to keep secret—she may be furious—but you can point to the last two years as proof that you can be trusted to keep her HIV status confidential. You can't be trusted alone in her car with her mail, obviously, but you've proven to her that you aren't going to blab about this to the rest of the family.

DRESSES FOR ME

I'm a youth who identifies as asexual. That isn't my question. I was born female and I've been binding for a while and identify as gender-neutral. But I'm afraid to tell others that I'm genderneutral for fear of being told I'm wrong because I wear dresses. Does wearing skirts and dresses mean I'm not gender-neutral? I just think I look better in dresses than flannel. Gender Neutral Asexual Youth Wear whatever you like, identify however you like and refuse to engage with idiots who think they have a right to critique, dictate or overrule your gender identity.

SHARED ROOM, NOT SEX

I've been reading your column for years and that helped me tremendously as my husband's kinky side began to

emerge. We have recently started flirting with the idea of "same-room sex" with other couples. We want a couple to watch us have sex and we want to watch them have sex, but there would be no physical contact between the couples. But we have had a difficult time finding couples that do not want a soft or full swap. Long story short, I have decided to surprise my husband with a prostitute who will watch and video us but not have contact with either of us. I think he will be thrilled. But I'm wondering if you have any advice on this situation. What are the dos and don'ts? I am totally naive about sex work and sex workers and I'm also afraid I could get jealous since there would be no other man in the room for me! I should mention that we have had same-room sex with a couple and it went fairly well, but we couldn't really perform because they kept trying to initiate a swap with us. Help me avoid possible pitfalls! Monogamous Voyeurs And Exhibitionists "Surprises are generally unwelcome when it comes to sex and especially to sex work," says Siouxsie Q, a Bay Area sex worker as well as the creator and host of the WhoreCast (thewhorecast.com), a weekly podcast about sex work and sex workers. "You think your husband will be thrilled by a surprise prostitute—but what if he is not?" You're already worried that you might not be into it: you wanna be watched by a male/female couple, but you're only thinking about hiring a woman and that could leave you feel-

your taxes so you could contribute more to our collective well-being? Would you live simply and cheaply so you’d have more money to donate to charities and other worthy causes? This Halloween season, I suggest you play around with fantasies like that—maybe even masquerade as an incredibly rich philanthropist who doles out cash and gifts everywhere you go. At the very least, imagine what it would be like if you had everything you needed and felt so grateful you shared your abundance freely. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): What if you had the power to enchant and even bewitch people with your charisma? Would you wield your allure without mercy? Would you feel wicked delight in their attraction to you, even if you didn’t plan to give them what they want? I suspect these questions aren’t entirely rhetorical right now. You may have more mojo at your disposal than you realize. Speaking for your conscience, I will ask you not to desecrate your privilege. If you must manipulate people, do it for their benefit as well as yours. Use your raw magic responsibly. Halloween costume suggestion: a mesmerizing guru; an irresistible diva; a stage magician. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): I had a dream that you were in the

VUEWEEKLY OCT 31 – NOV 6, 2013

film O Brother, Where Art Thou? You were like the character played by George Clooney after he escaped from a prison chain gang. Can you picture it? You were wearing a striped jailbird suit, and a ball and chain were still cuffed around your ankle. But you were sort of free, too. You were on the lam, making your way from adventure to adventure as you eluded those who would throw you back in the slammer. You were not yet in the clear, but you seemed to be en route to total emancipation. I think this dream is an apt metaphorical depiction of your actual life right now. Could you somehow use it in designing your Halloween costume? CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): I invite you to try the following exercise. Imagine the most powerful role you could realistically attain in the future. This is a position or niche or job that will authorize you to wield your influence to the max. It will give you the clout to shape the environments you share with other people. It will allow you to freely express your important ideas and have them be treated seriously. Let your imagination run a little wild as you visualize the possibilities. Incorporate your visions into your Halloween costume. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): In the course of earning a living, I have worked four different jobs as a jani-

ing jealous and left out. "But if you are going to hire a pro, you might as well get exactly what you want, right?" Siouxsie asks. "There are plenty of escorts who do 'doubles' with other escorts. Take the time to do the research and find a provider who offers doubles with a male escort or a partner—some providers even specialize in this! Communicate about it with your husband and instead of putting together an elaborate surprise, embark on a sexual adventure together. The process of looking through ads and picking out people you both find attractive may even be fun." Siouxsie recommends booking at least two hours for a session like this—you don't want to rush through your fantasy, right?—and to respect your sex worker's quoted rate, ie, no haggling over their hourly rate. "When your providers arrive, communicate your boundaries and expectations clearly so everyone is on the same page," Siouxsie says, "and you and your husband should agree in advance about either of you being able to call a 'time-out' mid-session in order to reestablish boundaries or to talk something out. And finally, on a more personal note, this sounds like a really fun session that most providers I know would be really stoked to book! So get out there and make your fantasies come true!" For your Halloween treat, Dan secures sex advice from a mortician, at savagelovecast.com. V @fakedansavage on Twitter

tor and six as a dishwasher. On the brighter side, I have performed as a songwriter and lead singer for six rock bands and currently write a syndicated astrology column. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Aquarians are primed to cultivate a relationship with your work life that is more like my latter choices than the former. The next eight months will be a favourable time to ensure that you’ll be doing your own personal equivalent of rock singer or astrology columnist well into the future. Halloween costume suggestion: your dream job. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): Author Robert Louis Stevenson loved the work of poet Walt Whitman, recommending it with the same enthusiasm as he did Shakespeare’s. Stevenson also regarded Whitman as an unruly force of nature and, in one famous passage, called him “a large shaggy dog, just unchained, scouring the beaches of the world and baying at the moon.” Your assignment is to do your best imitation of a primal creature like Whitman. In fact, consider being him for Halloween. Maybe you could memorize passages from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and recite them at random moments. Here’s one: “I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.” V

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