Page 1

MAY / JUN 2016 Our Life with Autism pg. 8 What Moms Really Want pg. 16 8 Ways to Play, Screen Free pg. 26 DIY Outside Art Projects pg. 31

ChippewaValleyFamily.org

Turning 40 and Looking Back pg. 59

FREE

get on track FOR THE BEST SUMMER EVER

JUMP IN AND EXPLORE >>

COMMUNITY

LIVING

DISCOVERY

ACTIVITY

CREATIVITY

EVENTS

RESOURCES

PERSPECTIVES


2

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S


C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

3


CHIPPEWA VALLEY

family may / june 2015

S T U D E N T S AT R O O S E V E LT E L E M E N TA R Y PA R T I C I PAT I N G I N A N A F T E R - S C H O O L STEM PROG R AM BY B LU GO LD B EG I N N I N GS

RENEE SOMMER

staff & info

editor’s note

publisher Nick Meyer • editorial & development Renee Sommer additional editors Tom Giffey, Eric Christenson web Mike Paulus, Don Ross • listings James Johonnott designers Serena Wagner, Janae Breunig • advertising Brian Maki, Chase Kunkel, Neil Hodorowski • photo editor Andrea Paulseth advertising info

contact

(715) 552-0457 editor@ChippewaValleyFamily.org

205 N. Dewey St. Eau Claire, WI 54703

basic info

Chippewa Valley Family is a locally owned, locally operated, and locally focused family publication. We distribute 10,000 copies to 200 locations in Eau Claire, Menomonie, and Chippewa Falls every other month and we’re online every day at ChippewaValleyFamily.org.

contributing and submitting

If you’d like to become an occasional or regular contributor to CVF, please contact us to learn how. We also welcome the submission of ideas or completed works from the community for consideration.

We offer a multi-platform solution for effectively reaching families in Western Wisconsin via print, web, mobile, email, or social media. Email advertising@chippewavalleyfamily.org for information.

on the cover

The Chippewa Valley Railroad in Carson Park offers rides in replic trains. Photo: Andrea Paulseth

printing

Page 1 Printers, on recycled paper.

© 2016 chippewa valley family The writing, artwork, and photography in CVF remains the property of the authors, artists, & photographers. The opinions expressed here are not necessarily those of the publication or its advertisers.

A P UBLICATION OF:

community partners •

4

as school ends, remember to thank a teacher IT’ S TH E E N D O F TH E SCH OO L Y E AR and summer is barreling down on us like a freight train full of sunshine and ice cream. As the school bell tolls for the final time this year, kids (and parents) are going to be running away as fast as possible from the building and into the bliss of vacation. But it’s really, really important that we don’t forget the people we’re leaving behind in those buildings: the dedicated teachers, administrative staff members, and principles who make up our schools. While you may think they rush home, kick off their shoes, and relax for the next three months, that’s not really the case. There are mandatory training days, summer jobs that help pay the bills, and the next school year to plan for. Plus, while it seems school employees have sweet gigs with summers off, they’ve probably earned them by putting in countless overtime hours during the year to give students the best possible experience they can – with little thanks at all. If I had to guess, I would say most teachers didn’t enter the profession thinking that it’s easy, that they’ll make a ton of money, and that every student and parent they work with will be unchallenging and obedient. Rather, they do it because they’re passionate about education, helping kids and parents, and

securing a creative, intelligent future for all of us. But as with every other profession, burnout happens to educators, and one of the biggest contributors to burnout is lack of appreciation. Teachers need to hear we value them, that we’re grateful for the time they spend day in and day out with our kids each year. They need to know they’re making a difference. They need to know we believe in what they’re doing. And that doesn’t mean that you give them something straight off of Pinterest (although those things are adorable). It means you look them in the eye and say, “You’ve impacted my kid. I appreciate you. What do you need for your classroom?” While there’s a whole lot we can do as a community when it comes to being active participants in elections and referendum votes, PTA groups, and fundraising that may help teacher burnout and turnover, it can all start with just that simple “thank you.” So before you and the kiddos disappear into summer, turn around once and take in everything behind you. You’ll see the faces that are helping shape our Valley, doing their best to make a world of difference. Thank you, district friends. Sincerely. –Renee Sommer

C H I P P E W A V A L L E Y F A M I LY T H R I V E S O N T H E O N G O I N G S U P P O R T F O R L O C A L F A M I L I E S F R O M T H E S E I N S T I T U T I O N S :

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S


cool stuff inside community

living

EXPRESS FAMILIES

CONNECTING WITH DAD

13

17

discovery

creativity

BUILDING A LEGACY

MUSIC AT HOME

24

30

activity

perspectives

R

TRAVEL HACKS

FULL OF DAD JOKES

61

32

ALL AG E S

AG E S

3-5 9-12 AGES

about our age badges Whenever relevant, articles in Chippewa Valley Family include a small badge indicating the suggested age range for kids interested in participating in the topic at hand. Most often these badges are only a guide. Parents and caregivers know what’s best for their kids at what age. If you have questions regarding age-appropriateness, please contact the organizer of the event or activity for more information.

follow the gang on facebook Get the latest news every week and be part of the fun conversation, find Chippewa Valley Family on Facebook!

join our fun e-mail list Stay up-to-date in the comfort of your inbox. Check out ChippewaValleyFamily.org for more info and to sign up.

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

5


tidbits creativity

sensory-friendly movies create a safe space A COLLABO R AT I O N between Alex Edwards and Cora Quinn from WAXX Radio and Micon Cinemas is bringing monthly sensory-friendly movies to the area for children with autism and other special sensory needs. Families that attend can expect lower sound volumes and dimmed (but not pitch-black) lights, and a safe environment for those behaviors that can make families feel uncomfortable attending a traditional movie showing. “It’s amazing to watch what happens in their minds,” Edwards said of such a screening. “Some of the kids sat on the floor, others seemed to watch people around them more than the movie, and last year, one even went right up and touched the screen.” After two successful annual events, they’ve decided

to make sensory-friendly screenings monthly. The plan is to rotate showings through the various Micon locations, making them even more accessible to people throughout the area. All families are welcome, even those who do not have special sensory needs. “It’s a great world view and life experience for kids who don’t have these sort of challenges to spend time with those that do,” Quinn said. “Plus everyone has the opportunity to network with other families and find support they may not have known about.” The next sensory-friendly movie is scheduled for May 7th at Micon Cinema in Eau Claire. To see the full schedule and details, visit ChippewaValleyFamily.org and search sensory movies.

community

counting down the days until

school’s out!

The long-awaited summer vacation is about to begin, so parents mark your calendars and start planning those trips, bucket lists, and beach days!

living E AU C L A I R E A R E A S C H O O L DISTRICT: June 2: Graduation June 3: Last day of school for students C H I P P E WA FA L L S S C H O O L DISTRICT: June 3: Last day of school for students June 3: Graduation M E N O M O N I E S C H O O L D I ST RICT: May 28: Graduation June 2: Last day of school for students R E G I S C AT H O L I C S C H O O L S : May 25 – Graduation June 3 – Last day of school for students

community

having a bored jar is the solution to summer boredom T H E A R R I VA L O F S U M MER often means that kids have an awful lot of free time on their hands, and sometimes they don’t know what to do with it. To combat the inevitable “I’m bored!” whine session, we’ve put together some handy instructions for creating your own boredom-busting resource: the bored jar. There are many ways to make a bored jar, but the basic idea is simple: When your kiddos start complaining that they have nothing to do, they simply draw out one of the activities from the jar and complete it. Activities range from doing a chore to getting creative; they can be adapted to almost any age or ability; and they can be done solo or with friends and family. The best part is that most of the activities require zero financial investment or planning, and can be done right at home. Visit us online at ChippewaValleyFamily.org and search for the phrase “bored jar” to find handy printables and full instructions for making one for your kiddos.

6

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

feeling isolated at home? MOMS Club of Eau Claire can help THE DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY of being a stay-at-home parent is evident in a recent Gallup analysis of more than 60,000 U.S. women. Stay-athome moms (SAHMs) are more likely to report experiencing sadness and anger a lot of the day than other women. So how are local SAHMs fighting the isolation blues? The MOMS Club of Eau Claire Area, that’s how. This local chapter of the International MOMS Club is a nonprofit group that provides support for SAHMs. For just $25 a year, members enjoy monthly meet-ups, educational field trips for both kids and moms, exercise groups, recipe swapping, coffee drinking, and plenty of good conversation. In addition, they host MOMS Night Out events that include things such as potlucks, ceramics, tubing down the river, and spa treatments. While MNO events are typically sans kiddo, kids are always welcome at all MOMS Club events – you never have to pay for a babysitter to attend. For more information, check out their website at http://bit.ly/1Sfgxun or search MOMS Club Eau Claire Area on Facebook!

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S


tidbits discovery

recreation

here’s how you can fish ... for free W E H AV E A CO NTINUOUS FISHING S E AS O N here in Wisconsin on a wide variety of species, but the traditional kickoff for anglers comes when the general inland waters season begins on the first Saturday in May (this year, that’s May 7). According to Department of Natural Resources warden Scott Thiede, “Fishing is important to connect people with nature, promote physical health, and provide funding and resources that benefit the environment and the economy.” To help promote the sport of fishing and assist those who need the help, the DNR provides fishing gear rental, absolutely free, for the public. In addition, there’s a free fishing weekend June 4-5 where licenses are not required.

Rentals can be picked up, on a first-come, first-served basis at the following area locations: • Brunet Island State Park • 23125 255th St., Cornell • (715) 239-6888 • Lake Wissota State Park • 18127 County Highway O, Chippewa Falls • (715) 3824574 • DNR West Central Regional Headquarters • 1300 Clairemont Ave., Eau Claire • (715) 839-3733 or (715) 839-2877 For more information on fishing regulations and licenses, visit dnr.wi.gov.

ANDREA PAULSETH

schools may cover costs

for summer camps and classes SUMMER FU N A N D E D U C AT I O N just got more affordable in the Altoona, Eau Claire, and Chippewa Falls school districts. Each district offers to cover tuition for select programs, classes, and summer camps for students within their boundaries. From theater to STEM classes, nature discovery groups to artistic pursuits, parents can get several hundred dollars worth of classes covered (minus the material fees) by simply searching out programs their child may be passionate about and interested in. The organization itself will help parents determine if their classes are eligible for district coverage. To find a whole heap of camps in the surrounding area, visit ChippewaValleyFamily.org and search CAMPS.

ANDREA PAULSETH

community

savor the flavor at Chippewa Valley farmers markets FROM SAVO R I N G PRODUCE at the peak of freshness to meeting the people who actually grow your food, there are countless reasons to support farmers markets. Grab your shopping lists and canvas carrying bags and head out to load up on fresh fruits and veggies, locally raised meat and eggs, and – of course – amazing baked goods!

E AU C L A I R E D OW N TOW N FA R M E R S M A R K E T Phoenix Park • Saturdays 7:30am-1pm (starting May 7) • Wednesdays 7:30-1pm (starting June 1) • Thursdays noon-5pm (starting June 2) E AU C L A I R E FA R M E R S M A R K E T Gordy’s Market, 3310 E. Hamilton Ave., Eau Claire • Opens June 4 • Tuesdays and Saturdays 8am-2pm Gordy’s Market, 2717 Birch St., Eau Claire • Wednesdays 8am-2pm Gordy’s Market – Chippewa Commons, 303 Prairie View Road, Chippewa Falls • Sundays 8am-2pm

M E N O M O N I E FA R M E R ’ S MARKET Wilson Park • Opens May 21 • Wednesdays 11:30am-6pm • Saturdays 8am–1pm C H I P P E WA FA L L S FA R MER’S MARKET Downtown Chippewa Falls • Opens June 12 • Thursdays noon-6pm

KELSEY SMITH

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

7


community community

even the simplest things in life are different when your child has autism Local dad relates what life is like with a child on the spectrum, and his fears for the future WORDS + PHOTO BY JIM MAHLUM

M

y son Jayden looks like a normal teenage boy. I see him as silly, funny, sweet, affectionate, and intelligent. When new people meet Jayden, they always fall in love with him. He’s wiggled his way into the hearts of so many people. And yet Jayden is not your typical teenage boy. Jayden has autism. In 2001, when Jayden came into this world, 1 in 150 kids were said to be on the autism spectrum. And as a commonly thrown around adage says, when you’ve met one kid with autism, you’ve met one kid with autism. Each autistic child is different. They have different joys, different struggles, and different personalities. Jayden, at 15, is mostly nonverbal but he communicates in different ways. He has the singing voice of an angel and enjoys singing insurance jingles. (“Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there!”) He’s fairly talented on a set of drums. And he can work YouTube like a boss. He often listens to the same music or cartoon video repetitively. (Thank God for headphones!) But Jayden experiences the world around him differently. His heart beats faster than mine, and he can hear it. Sometimes the clock ticking on the wall is the loudest sound in the room. And seemingly everyday noises, like a hairdryer or a vacuum running, or certain words we call “trigger words,” can send him into a meltdown. And sometimes just the overwhelming experience of being out in the world can cause a meltdown. Unlike most 15 year olds, Jayden can’t be left alone. Ever. He needs to wear GPS monitoring because he has a tendency to run away. He doesn’t know how to look for cars before crossing a street. Finding a sitter is nearly impossible because people are afraid of him. They don’t understand how to interact with him. Luckily we have a wonderful respite worker to help us out. But simple, everyday things that other parents take for granted, we have to adapt, carefully plan, or forgo all together. For example: • Grocery shopping. I have to put Jayden in a wheelchair. If I don’t, he thinks it’s hilarious for me to chase him around the store. He’s knocked over coffee filter and spice displays, and it’s just easier for everyone if he’s simply riding around vs. running. • Daily cares. Most 15 year olds are bugging their parents for brand names, but my son cannot even dress himself. We still have to brush his teeth, bathe him, and get him dressed everyday. • Rearranging furniture. Not so much that we can’t do it, but HE does it. He moves the refrigerator, the

When you’ve met one kid with autism, you’ve met one kid with autism. Each child is different. They have different joys, different struggles, and different personalities. 8

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

J I M M A H LU M EN J OYS A H A P PY M O M ENT WITH H I S 1 5 -Y E A R- O L D S O N , JAY D E N , W H O H A S AU TI S M .

washer, the dryer. He’s incredibly strong. • Consistently non-broken faucets. Jayden loves running water. So much so, that he’s been known to overextend faucet handles which has caused floods and water damage. • Chatting with my son. As I mentioned, Jayden is nonverbal. I cannot sit and reminisce about the old days with him. I can’t impart wisdom about being a man. And I can’t have a regular angsty teenage argument with him. I can’t explain that he’s going through puberty, and he can’t tell me how it makes him feel. While he is gaining some verbal skills, it’s not what most parents experience with their kids. • Closets being just for storage. When Jayden gets overwhelmed, he has a blue yoga mat on the floor of his closet that he chooses to stand on. It’s a self-calming ritual for him. • Opening windows. He pushes the screens out. It’s destructive and possibly dangerous for him. • Regular sleep. The first three years of his life he would be awake for four to five days at a time. He’d sleep for two hours and then go another stretch of four to five days. Now it’s controlled with medication, but it knocks him out so hard that he wets the bed at night and must wear diapers.

• Going to the beach. He loves the feeling of sand on his hands, but unfortunately I can’t take him to the beach. He gets so excited that he throws sand at everyone else. I’m not asking for sympathy, because I have an amazing child in my life. But I want to paint a picture of what life is like for us. I want to advocate for support for kids like Jayden and for families like ours. The most recent statistic I’ve heard is one in 68 children are on the autism spectrum at this point. One in 68! I worry that our schools – which face budget and staff cutbacks – are not ready for these kids. I worry that there’s no incentive for members of the next generation to become special needs educators and professionals. I worry that as the numbers grow, the services and support will dwindle. I worry that the people who are doing remarkable things for these kids every day, like the staff at Delong Middle School, won’t get the recognition they deserve and that my “thank yous” will never be enough. I worry that kids like Jayden will be judged for behaviors they cannot control, for seeing and feeling the world differently. I worry. I worry a lot. Jim Mahlum is a local father who works at Cascades and is a full time advocate for his son and others with Autism.

C I V I C N E W S / S C H O O L D I S T R I C T S / N O N - P R O F I T S / B U S I N E S S E S / C O O L K I D S / LO C A L T I P S / T H E LO C A L E X P E R I E N C E


community

come out and play, everyone! Children’s Museum initiative opens doors to all kids, no matter their background or income BY H A LE Y WR I G HT / P H OTO BY A N D R E A PAU L S ETH

T

he Children’s Museum of Eau Claire is a unique destination for the children of the Chippewa Valley to learn and be inspired by engaging all of their senses in hands-on exhibits and interactive programming. The museum’s recently launched Play for All Initiative is intended to open up the museum’s doors (and unlock its wonders) to all children in the community who would benefit from the museum and its offerings, regardless of circumstances, socioeconomic status, or financial hardship. The initiative is composed of several elements – Family Free Play Nights, Passport to Play, Special Days for Special Kids, and All Play Family Memberships – but the principle underlying each offering is to eliminate barriers to accessing the museum. Jacqueline Van Hemert, the museum’s director of programs and events, explained the initiative. “Family Free Play Nights will debut in partnership with local school districts to provide free museum admission for children in free and reduced lunch programs on designated nights once a quarter in 2016,” she said. “Passport to Play provides mini-grants to schools and community organizations who need funding for field trips. Special Days for Special Kids open up the magic of the museum to children with special needs through free, quarterly play days featuring modified sounds, light and sensory activities facilitated by volunteers and therapists. Finally, All Play Family Memberships continue to provide reducedprice memberships for low-income families in addition to children with special needs and military and foster care families. This membership provides unlimited access to the Children’s Museum for just $10 annually.” The Initiative came about as a result of some strategic planning that took place at the museum in 2014, the knowledge of how many families in our community are in need, and a genuine desire to provide

CIVIC NEWS

access to the museum despite barriers. “One of the results of our planning revolved around wanting to serve more children who need us the most,” said Michael McHorney, the museum’s executive director. “About the same time and during an application process for partnership with another local nonprofit, it was brought to our attention that more than 5,000 children ages birth to 5 in the Chippewa Valley live at or below 200 percent of the poverty line! We learned more about the kinds of needs these families have and began to research the best ways to meet them. Although we were already offering discounted museum memberships to families in financial need, we quickly realized that we could do more to reach the children who need us most. Born was the Play for All program and our annual fundraising campaign is now dedicated to this effort. Our goal is to double the number of families served by 2018.” McHorney says membership has already grown 15 percent since the launch of the program, and he notes that in addition to the museum’s annual fundraising campaign, which is now called Play for All, local corporate sponsors and grants are helping to make the initiative possible. To gain access to the Children’s Museum through the Play for All Initiative, an agency referral can be made or “[f]amilies can simply bring in verification of their eligibility either for EBT benefits program, WIC program, active military ID, or a school free and reduced lunch program letter. We also attempt to place information at the many agencies and schools serving families in our community to build awareness,” McHorney said. “To improve awareness, we are beginning to meet with staff at different youth and family serving organizations. Our hope is that together they and our staff can serve as a bridge for families to feel comfortable and connected to the museum in a special way.” To learn more, check out www.childrensmuseumec.com.

/ S C H O O L D I ST R I C TS / N O N - P R O F I TS / B U S I N E SS E S / CO O L K I DS / LO C A L T I P S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

9


community

childhood hunger

doesn’t take a vacation When the school year ends, some kids face lack of food at home. BY BECCA BAADER

E

very morning as I drive to work, I pass the bus stop in my neighborhood. About 10 kids stand waiting to head off to school, and it hit me one morning that – statistically speaking – two out of those 10 students do not have enough food at home and struggle with hunger. Many of the students rely on school meals as their main source of nutrition. On the weekend when school meals are not available, too many kids go without the healthy food that they need. To bridge this gap, every Friday nearly 2,100 students in Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls receive meal bags to take home as part of Feed My People’s Weekend Kids’ Meal Program. But what happens for these students when summer comes? What happens when the buses stop running and the school bells stop ringing? For most students, summer break is a time for “kids to be kids,” spending time playing at the park, swimming in the pool, and taking bike rides down the

street. But with fewer resources available when school is not in session, many of our young people have the additional worry of hunger on their mind. Previously, I rarely thought about hunger in a way that was so close to home. It was easy to think of hunger as a far-off problem – something that only happened in large cities or maybe even other countries and never something that could happen to my own neighbors. On a trip to a local elementary school, I met a blonde-haired, blue-eyed fourth-grader wearing a hoodie and jeans named Molly. There was nothing unique about the way she looked; in fact she looked like any other kid that I would see around the Chippewa Valley. After talking with her for a while she shared this with me: “When I’m hungry, I don’t want to play. I just want to curl up on the couch because I am tired.” Meeting kids like Molly has quickly shown me that hunger is not something you can see by just simply looking. During the summer months when school is out, it is more difficult to directly reach students. Feed My People Food Bank’s partner food pantries and

S U M MER WEEKEND KIDS MEALS The following sites are pick-up points for summer meal bags: • All Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls summer school sites • Boys and Girls Clubs in Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls • L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library • Hmong Mutual Assistance Association • The Community Table • Eau Claire Parks and Recreation–River City Adventures Program • To learn more about the program, call (715) 835-9415.

10

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

meal sites continue to offer nutrition to families in the summer, and many report a surge in the number of people served. The Community Table in Eau Claire has seen increases in the average number of residents coming in to have meals. Feed My People has offered a Summer Weekend Kids’ Meal Program for many years, but it can still be extremely difficult to find and serve the children who are no longer receiving school meals. To solve this critical problem, Feed My People has partnered with organizations in our community that serve children and youth in the summer to distribute the meal bags. These partners are located across Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls and have been a key component in reaching as many students as possible. L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library is one of these partners in Eau Claire. The library’s youth services manager, Shelly Collins-Fuerbringer, shared her realization of the program’s

impact. “A grandma signed up for meals for her four grandchildren,” CollinsFuerbringer recalled. “She had been coming regularly, and then we didn’t see her for a couple of weeks. She called and explained that she didn’t have money to spend on gas or the bus to get to the library, so she was hopeful we would save the meals for her grandkids. It has been an eye-opener for me to realize that some of our regular customers have this struggle. Something pretty simple can make a big difference in someone’s life.” This summer when the buses stop running and the school bells stop ringing, you can help more kids be able to just be kids. Spread the word about the availability of this program to those you know – organizations, teams, or clubs you or your child are a part of. You never know who might benefit. Becca Baader is communications specialist at Feed My People Food Bank in Eau Claire.

CIVIC NEWS / SCHOOL DISTRICTS / NON-PROFITS / BUSINESSES / COOL KIDS /

LO C A L T I P S


community SHOUT OUT REMARKABLE KIDS DOING REMARKABLE THINGS

Jason Lin juggles improv and Ivy League offers BY RENEE SOMMER

K N OW A R E M A R KA B L E K I D?

While Jason Lin doesn’t specifically mention juggling as being one of his skills, it’s pretty apparent that – at least metaphorically – he’s pretty adept at keeping multiple balls in the air. Boasting an impressive 4.0 GPA and a laundry list of accomplishments, this Memorial High School senior knows a thing or two about multitasking. With several offers from Ivy League schools and a final acceptance into Stanford University, Lin’s parents give the credit to “all those years of hard work that Jason put into his studies while juggling with other activities.” From being on the high school improv team for four years to the composition of a 19-page humanities research paper that landed him the opportunity to present his work at an MIT symposium, Lin is showing an amazing amount of promise that hasn’t gone unnoticed. He was recently selected out of 87,000 applicants to receive a $20,000 scholarship from Coca-Cola. “I remember starting and finishing my application with a deep desire to be authentic,” Lin says. “I projected my ideas of what worthwhile

service includes.” Community and service to the greater good are important to Lin. While he participates in flute and piano solo festivals, he said it’s not the competition that brings him the most joy but rather the camaraderie with other musicians. Additionally, he initiated a local patriotism day event that featured presentations, a Wounded Warrior Project guest speaker, and plenty of star-spangled gratitude. And, according to his parents, his participation in the Telluride Association Summer Program sparked an “eagerness to engage in social reform and address the pressing issues of our time.” As the oldest of three boys, Lin will be the first member of his family to attend college. “My parents weren’t given the opportunity to finish secondary education, growing up in a post­-Cultural Revolution China.” Lin says. “My work ethic largely stems from my gratitude towards my parents, who have sacrificed so much for their sons. I am forever grateful to be raised by such loving and caring parents and owe them a debt that I can never truly repay.” But Lin’s gratitude doesn’t stop there. When asked if there was anything else he’d want to share, he didn’t even consider talking more about his accomplishments. Rather he gave credit to the staff of the Eau Claire Area School District: “Without your encouragement and guidance,” he said, “I would only be half the person I am today.”

Contact us at editor@ChippewaValleyFamily.org

CIVIC NEWS / SCHOOL DISTRICTS / NON-PROFITS / BUSINESSES /

COOL KIDS

/ LO C A L T I P S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

11


12

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C I V I C N E W S / S C H O O L D I S T R I C T S / N O N - P R O F I T S / B U S I N E S S E S / C O O L K I D S / LO C A L T I P S


S

community

a place to call home beyond home plate Every summer, local families open their doors to host Eau Claire Express players, and you can too B Y C V F S TA F F

T

he Eau Claire Express baseball season comes out swinging in May, and while fans are gearing up to scarf down hot dogs and cheer for the home team on the Caron Park fan deck, players are looking for places to call home. Each year, approximately 30 young men from across the nation leave behind their homes and families to play for the Express. They spend the summer perfecting their skills while maintaining a grueling 72-game schedule. And while we love to watch the players knock it out of the park, most of us don’t think about where they go to unwind after a particularly hard day. As it turns out, they stay in the homes of families right here in the Chippewa Valley. Host families provide a place to stay, meals, and guidance to players. “I enjoyed the positivity my host family brought to myself and the other players in the house. It was very laid back and reduced the stress of spending the summer away from home,” says Alec Crawford, who played with the Express in 2011 and 2013. “I felt as if I could ask any question or turn to them for advice while I was living with them.” But the host program doesn’t just benefit the players, according to host parent and host family coordinator Barb Santolin. “These players become role models for the young children and athletes in our community,” she said. “Each player must participate in com-

EXPRESS PHOTOGRAPHY

munity service, either through visiting day cares and disabled individuals, reading to students in a classroom, participating in baseball camps for local youth, or serving a meal at The Community Table.” Nick Addison, a 2011-13 Express veteran, agrees: “You have to take a role model approach and set a good example for the kids you are staying with. They watch and see everything you do, so you need to lead by example.” Host families also receive free season tickets, access to special events with the Express team, and the opportunity to make lifelong friendships with the players.

“We don’t get paid monetarily for being a host family, but what we gain in relationships with these young men are priceless,” explained host parent Becky Drath. “Most of the host families visit their past players long after they played with the Express, going to their weddings, just hanging out with them and visiting with them when they have their children. It often is not just a season thing, but also a lifetime relationship.” For more information or to apply to become a host family, visit eauclaireexpress.com, click on the “Community” tab and then on “Host Family Program.”

KID HISTORY

TAKE A QUICK STEP BACK IN TIME IN THE VALLEY

swinging for the fences WHETHE R I T ’ S B AS E B A L L , S O F T B A L L , OR T-BA L L , hearing the crack of the bat for the first time has been one of the best parts of spring for generations of kids. This photo from the Chippewa Valley Museum, which dates to 1953 or 1954, shows an Eau Claire Little League Team called the Midgets. In 1953, the Midgets were sponsored by the U.S. Rubber Co., which had a tire factory in what is now Banbury Place. Other teams in the league were the Hobbs-Phoenix Bantams, the Police Cadets, the Sterling Paper Co. Mites, the Presto Kids, and the Book Store Cubs. More than 60 years later, some of those business still exist in the Chippewa Valley. As for these players, look closely, because one of them could be your grandpa! PHOTO COURTESY OF CHIPPEWA VALLEY MUSEUM

CIVIC NEWS / SCHOOL DISTRICTS / NON-PROFITS / BUSINESSES / COOL KIDS /

LO C A L T I P S

/

KID HISTORY

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

13


community

not ‘those’ kids, everyone’s kids McKinley Charter School raises funds to celebrate 20 years of success B Y R E N E E S O M M E R / P H O T O S B Y S TA C I B O W E

T

wenty years ago, educators in the Chippewa Valley recognized a gap in our community: education for students whose needs exceeded traditional schooling and social services. They believed students who struggled with disengagement, poverty, drug or alcohol abuse, homelessness, and teenage parenthood could graduate and go on to do remarkable things – they simply needed different paths to get there. So in April 1996, those paths were created in McKinley Charter School. McKinley offers individualized paths to success through five different components: two on-site at the school (1266 McKinley Road) and three that take place off-site at the Juvenile Detention Center, the Eau Claire County Jail, and in individual students’ homes. All these programs ultimately result in either a credit or competency diploma – and a new outlook on life. “I was enrolled at Memorial High, but never went to school. I felt out of place, and due to my choices I was behind,” says 2007 graduate Jamie AGES Jones, who has since gone on to work in health care + and climb the ranks into management. “If it weren’t for McKinley I never would have graduated. They pumped me full of confidence every time I was there.” Pattie Huse, parent of a 2016 McKinley graduate, has observed a similar transformation in her child. “My son found peace within himself for the first time in 15 or so years,” Huse says. “He found self-respect, self-confidence, and most of all, he found his smile and laughter again!” Susan Fanning, the mother of three children who have graduated from

17

“Students know we love them; they can smell it, feel it, and see it! Each day is a chance to turn it all around and try again.” N E V A D A F R A N Z , McKinley School staff member

14

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

McKinley, said her kids didn’t succeed with a traditional school. “They really could not understand the ‘politics’ of why things had to be the way they are,” she says. However, according to Fanning, they’ve seen plenty of success since attending McKinley, with one joining the Army, one landing a professional sales position, and the other currently in college studying anthropology and geology. “I wish that more people understood that McKinley is not for ‘bad’ kids,” she says. “Many students end up at McKinley simply because they learn differently or face different challenges in life. Teachers are motivating and help prepare students for their future – both academically and with self-esteem. The typical classroom setting is not for everyone, but this does not make these students bad, ignorant, or not wanting to participate in society. It simply means they need to find their way to fit in – even if it is through a different path.” Megan McCrackin, competency component facilitator at McKinley, explains that “I don’t want our students to be labeled as ‘those kids.’ ” While some of the 140 current students some have experienced homelessness, struggled with mental health and with their own AODA issues, the problem is largely disengagement from the system. According

CIVIC NEWS /

to McCrackin and Nevada Franz, competency component support staff, some students disengage early in their school careers and by the time they reach middle or high school, they stop seeing value in their education. “They struggle in the larger classes, and most have fallen behind in credits, or might need a modified classes to allow for behavior

SCHOOL DISTRICTS

interventions,” Franz explains. “Our students are no different than any other school’s students. We just are able know their troubles, anxieties, and fears because of the way our school is set up.” McCrackin agrees: “We have the ability to ask a student, ‘How are you doing today?’ and have time to hear the answer.”

/ N O N - P R O F I T S / B U S I N E S S E S / C O O L K I D S / LO C A L T I P S


S

community McKinley is a charter school, so while it remains public and a part of the Eau Claire Area School District, it is allowed greater freedom in its structure and teaching. This liberty has not only turned students lives around but also has contributed to a great tenure record for the school. The most junior teacher has been at McKinley more than seven years. Franz, who has been there since the school opened, attributed teacher longevity to one thing: love. “Students know we love them; they can smell it, feel it, and see it! Each day is a chance to turn it all around and try again.” Fanning, the mother of three McKinley grads, agrees: “I have always told my children they are smart, and once they decide what they want to do in life they will be highly successful. However, most kids don’t believe this just from a parent – especially when they don’t fit in to what society’s expectations or normal path.” The McKinley staff reinforced her message in the classroom and delivered it with genuine care. “The biggest change to all three of my children is they have been motivated to take ownership of their own learning,” she says. “They have also been able to gain confidence, after years of ‘failure’ in (other) schools. They all now believe in their success and their abilities.” McKinley Charter School is holding its first ever reunion in August to celebrate 20 years and 1,600 successful graduates. With no PTA group to help cover the cost, McKinley is seeking community donations. They’ve set a fundraising goal of $5,000 and plan to put any remaining funds into their greatest need and post-secondary endowment funds, which are set up through the Eau Claire Public Schools Foundation. If you’re interested in making a donation or helping with the reunion, call the school at (715) 852-6910

school is out, work is in Tips for high school and college students seeking summer jobs BY SUSAN FANNING

F

or millions of students, summer is about beaches and barbecues. But for many high school and college students, summer is also a time to bank some bucks. Here are some steps that will help students succeed in finding the perfect summer job. First, you need to do is decide on the summer job you want or need: the type of job, location, hours, and pay. You may not be able to find a job that meets all of your needs, but given the current labor demand you should be able to find one that meets most of them. Next, you need to analyze your skill set along with what goals you wish to meet for your future. Can you find a job that will help you move toward your long-term goals? Are you hoping to be hired on for permanent work if you are not going to school in the fall? Is there an internship you can use to build a résumé, or will the job simply provide you with income for when you return to school? After you have analyzed your reasons for work and identified your skills, past work, and volunteer experience, you should create a résumé. This will help you leave a very professional image with employers. There are many sites online to help you with a résumé and cover letter.

CIVIC NEWS / SCHOOL DISTRICTS / NON-PROFITS / BUSINESSES / COOL KIDS /

AGES

15+

Then comes the most difficult part. You need to find the perfect job by using every resource at your disposal. Talk with your parents and family members, your friends’ parents, your teachers, job service, and staffing agencies. Also you need to actively read newspapers, use online job boards, and use job boards from school. You need to take action and look for the job – it will not simply come to you. Apply for all jobs that interest you. Make sure you complete the applications completely, as some companies will not review an application with just a résumé attached. Your hard work will land you an

LO C A L T I P S

interview. Make sure you know something about the company and are prepared to answer common interview questions. Think also of questions you could ask the employer. Practice your interview with a family or friend. Dress conservatively for your interview without spending a fortune by shopping second-hand and bargain stores. And before you walk out the door for your big event, look in a full-length mirror and ask yourself, “Would I hire the person in the mirror?” Good luck! Susan Fanning PHR is a SHRMcertified professional, a service manager at Doherty Staffing Solutions, a mother of four, and an Eau Claire native.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

15


living

what moms really want for mother’s day

5 totally free tips for making this year extra special BY STEPHANIE SIREK I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y S E R E N A WA G N E R

M

other’s Day is right around the corner. It’s time to show her how much you love Mom and appreciate everything she does for the family each and every day. So off you go to the store looking for something she might like: Maybe a shirt, but what size? What about some perfume? Will she like the smell? Flowers and chocolates? Been there, done that. With all the possibilities, your head is probably starting to swirl. Don’t panic: You don’t need to waste time or money roaming the stores for that perfect gift. I’ve got you covered. Here are five things Mom would love to get that won’t cost you a dime: 1. LEAVE HER ALONE IN THE BATHROOM It seems simple enough, but little ones think the bathroom is the perfect place to get some quality one-on-one time with Mom. If you know she is headed in there, make sure the kids are not joining her, knocking on (or asking questions through) the door, or even sticking their chubby little fingers under the door. Let Mom have some alone time to do what she needs to in there, uninterrupted. *Bonus points: Put a towel in the dryer when she starts her shower. When she gets out she’ll have a toasty warm towel to use. 2. BE HER PRESS AGENT In our house, this is how it goes: My kids will want something to eat. Instead of asking my husband (who is standing in the kitchen), they will go on a massive manhunt searching every room until them find me to ask if I can get them a banana. Really?! When you hear your children calling out Mom’s name, pretend to be a guard at the White House protecting the president. Field all the questions and requests. Only DEFCON Level 1 situations need to be brought to Mom’s attention today. *Bonus points: No questions are allowed from Dad, either. Instead of asking her if she wants help with something, just do it for her. Not sure where she put something? Take a look around; I’m sure you’ll find it. 3. TIDY UP Now don’t freak out here: I’m not suggesting that you scrub the toilets. I am just saying that you can help the kids clean up their rooms (or wherever they have all their toys scattered). Don’t leave the dishes in the sink. Put them in the dishwasher and start it. Instead of taking off your clothes and dropping them

16

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

a foot from the laundry basket, extend your arm and make sure they go in. I’m not telling you to clean from floor to ceiling. Just pick up, put things where they belong, and make it look presentable. *Bonus points: Actually scrub the toilets. It’s a nasty job that no one likes to do. 4. BE THE CHEF Take over meal preparations. I don’t care if you give the kids cold cereal or a five-course meal: Mom would love to take off the chef’s hat for the day. Sorry to break the news here, but this also includes doing the dishes and cleaning up the kitchen afterwards (see above). “I’ll get to it later,” won’t cut it today. *Bonus points: Make a dessert. It can be as simple as a boxed cake mix, but the effort you put into it will make it one of the best cakes she’s ever had. If for some reason you are unable to do any of the other suggestions I’ve given, then PLEASE at least do this last one:

5. TELL HER Sit her down, look her straight in the eye and tell her exactly how you feel. Try and be specific when you tell her how much you appreciate everything she does for you and the family. Tell her what a wonderful job she is doing as a mother, and how she impacts the kids’ lives. Remind her how much she is loved, valued, and needed. If saying it out loud is uncomfortable for you, then at the very least write it down in a card. *Bonus points: Do something to help her relax. Rub her back. Draw her a bath. Tell her to go read in her room. Let her unwind for an hour, and I know that she will be grateful and happier afterwards. So here’s to all the hard-working moms out there. Motherhood is a journey that we love and enjoy – at least most of the time. Stephanie Sirek is a stay at home mom of four, moderator of several local Facebook groups, and Chippewa Valley native.

S E L F / F O O D / H E A LT H / M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S / F I N A N C E / R E L AT I O N S H I P S /

PA R E N T I N G


living

don’t forget dad

it comes so many different opportunities. My dad always made time. Weekdays or weekends, it did not matter. He attended my sporting events, helped me with homework, and made time for just about anything I needed. Being available was never an issue for my father. And in looking back on everything that made growing up great, it all centers on time. Being a father is a full-time position.

Local dad reminisces about his father and the lessons he’s taught him

SHARE IN ACTIVITIES My dad often jokes that this part was easy for us, as my love of hunting and fishing was as strong as his. My dad was, and still is, my fishing partner and my hunting guide. Growing up we had Saturday morning rituals of getting up at 6am to go ice fishing, spending Sunday afternoons in the woods chasing grouse, and summer weeknights out in the boat. It was these activities that really solidified our relationship when it came to quality time. I feel it was no accident that I took to these activities with the same passion as he did. My dad took the time early on to teach me, and it was his passion for the outdoors that became mine. He was patient and willing to give so much of his time and energy for my comfort and success, both in the woods and on the water.

because he made time for you B Y S A M F I S H E R / I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y S E R E N A WA G N E R

S

unday, June 19, is Father’s Day – the official celebration of fatherhood and the important roles our dads play in our lives. Father’s Day is about celebrating the bond between father and child. Father’s Day is also about reflection – reflecting back on all that we have shared with and learned from our fathers. It should be a reflection on time spent together; a reflection of love and appreciation. Regardless of your age, your dad is always your dad. Even now in my early 30s, I still look to my father for advice. And although the role a father plays in our lives can change and evolve over time, there are some things that never change. Being a father is something that is inside of you from the moment your child is born and – in my experience – never leaves. Being a father is more than just answering to the name “Dad.” It is about teaching and mentoring, loving and supporting. Most of all, it is about parenting. Knowing that it is more important to be a father than it is to be a friend. When looking back on my life and my relationship with my father, there is much I have learned. I am very fortunate. You see, I have a father who is the definition of the word. Throughout my entire life he has always been there for me and taught me what it takes to fill this role, as I now find myself answering to the name “Daddy.” For all the new fathers out there, here are some things I have learned that can help build that strong bond that fathers are known for.

ESTABLISH TRADITIONS, BIG AND SMALL My life rotates around the seasons. And with each season comes another tradition. My dad and I have managed to keep many of the traditions alive that we started when I was growing up. Some are big and some are small. Some occur the same week every year, others happen more casually as time allows. But they all happen. One of the biggest is our annual Canadian fishing trip. For the past 19 years we have taken the trip together, and it is one of the best weeks of the entire year. It is an opportunity for us to strengthen our bond and enjoy an activity that we both love. LOVE UNCONDITIONALLY It is as important to a child as it is to a father to love. It is a part of the all of the things you do and the time you spend together. Love is about teaching, supporting, and letting your children know you are proud of who they are. The love that exists between a father and child enhances all of the time, activities, and traditions that you share. It is the center of the bond. When I reflect back on my entire life with my father, it is the love that I remember most.

MAKE TIME This idea seems so simple, yet it often gets lost in our busy lives. I believe it is by far the most instrumental part of fatherhood. Making time for your child is paramount. Time is something you cannot get back, and with

Sam Fisher is a lifelong Chippewa Valley resident who obsesses over fishing, hunting, and Play-Doh possibilities with his daughter.

CHEW ON IT

FOOD YOUR KIDS CAN MAKE (WITH OR WITHOUT YOU)

campfire orange cinnamon rolls Ingredients: • 1 can of 8 cinnamon rolls • 8 oranges • Aluminum foil

SELF /

FOOD

Instructions: 1. Cut a 2-inch “lid” off the top of each orange and use a spoon to scoop out the insides. Leave some orange on the skin, though, because scooping AG E S out too much will cause the rolls to be bitter. 2. Put one cinnamon roll inside each of the hollowed-out oranges.

ALL

3. Wrap tightly in tin foil and place directly in the coals (but not in the flames). 4. The total heating time will depend on the overall heat of your coals, but 10-15 minutes should be sufficient. 5. If desired, drizzle the frosting that comes with the cinnamon rolls over the top before serving.

/ H E A LT H / M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S / F I N A N C E / R E L AT I O N S H I P S /

PA R E N T I N G

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

17


living

selecting your new furry best friend

Veteran dog trainer offers advice on picking a pooch, breeder BY KAREN RUDE / PHOTO BY KELSEY SMITH

S

electing a pet for your family is a major life decision. And as with any major life decision, it warrants some planning, family discussion, and thoughtfulness. Here’s a quick guide to get you on your way. T H I N G S T O T H I N K ABOUT WHEN SELECTING A DOG: • Most important: Make sure if you have children, you pick a breed of dog that is good with kids. Temperament is the most important, so pick a breed of dog that is conducive to your lifestyle. • Are you active, and do you have room for a large dog to run daily? • Do you want a dog that sheds? If not, grooming is expensive and needs to be done every three months – and that can be costly depending on the breed of dog. • Big dogs are harder to walk. • Some dogs drool. • Protective breeds can be aggressive. • Puppies are a lot of work – housebreaking, crying at night, vet bills for shots, obedience training – so would an adult dog be better fit than a puppy? W H E R E T O F I N D Y OUR NEW FAMILY MEMBER: • Pick a good breeder who is reputable by looking at referrals from a veterinarian, a kennel club in your area, or maybe a trusted friend. Make sure you visit the kennel and look at the conditions: Is it clean? Is the staff knowledgeable? Look at the sire and dam (mom

18

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

S E L F / F O O D / H E A LT H / M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y /

PETS

and dad): Are they friendly? If you cannot see the dam, buyers beware! • Do not buy from a puppy mill (someone with many different breeds). Pet stores often buy from puppy mills! No quality breeder will meet you on the highway or halfway. • Resist impulse buying. Instead, have the patience to make a responsible choice. Responsible breeders usually have a waiting list of puppy buyers. They rarely have a sign out front or newspaper advertisements. • Never pick out your puppy until it’s seven weeks of age. They are too young to leave before seven weeks. • Make sure both parents have hip clearances and other necessary clearances for your breed. (Your pre-buying research should help guide you.) • Most breeders have contracts. Look them over. Is the breeder willing to provide you with references and numbers of other people who have purchased puppies from them? BREED RECOMMENDATIONS: For families, I highly recommend golden retrievers, Labradors, collies, beagles, springers, standard poodles, cocker spaniels, and cavalier King Charles spaniels, just to name a few. The American Kennel club has a great breed book to look at all the different breeds and decide what’s right for you! Karen Rude is the owner of Rude Dog University & K-9 Dorms.

/ F I N A N C E / R E L AT I O N S H I P S / PA R E N T I N G


living

put night terrors

back to bed for good Parents can take steps to address kids’ scary nighttime episodes B Y A LY S S A VA N D U Y S E / I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y S E R E N A W A G N E R

Y

ou’re finally starting to relax. You put your child to sleep more than an hour ago and haven’t heard a peep. Then chaos ensues: a bloodcurdling scream followed by a crying fit. You can’t get to little Suzy’s room fast enough. You fling her bedroom door open, but there’s no hideous monster hovering over her. And all of Suzy’s limbs are firmly intact. Yet she’s in a state of panic. You try to comfort her, but she doesn’t acknowledge your presence. Suzy is likely experiencing a night terror. Less than 6 percent of children, mostly between the ages of 3 and 12, have night terrors, according to WebMD. Tim Karpenske, sleep lab technologist and educator at the Sleep Disorders Center of HSHS St. Joseph’s Hospital, is trained to diagnose and treat sleep disorders such as night terrors, but it was his own child’s experience with night terrors that gave him firsthand knowledge. “It’s scary,” he said. “You’re sitting there at night holding your kid. It’s mortifying to see your child like that. It’s not called the ‘night scaries.’ It’s terrifying.” Karpenske said he doesn’t see many children in the sleep center, but with any patient who enters the lab, he attempts to determine if the problem is occurring during the dream phase known as REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep, or if it’s during non-REM sleep. Night terrors oc-

cur during non-REM sleep. Children have more non-REM sleep than adults, which is why children typically outgrow night terrors as they age, he said. That doesn’t help parents whose children are going through the ordeal now, though. Karpenske said there are clear signs of night terrors, as well as things parents can try to hopefully stop them. Night terrors are characterized by frequently recurring episodes of intense crying and fear during sleep. Rarely can parents wake children during an episode. Kids typically do not remember what happened when they wake in the morning, Karpenske said. Night terrors also tend to run in families. And while many times there is no specific cause, Karpenske said the most typical trigger is a stressful life event. In the case of Karpenske’s son, they determined his night terrors started after a tonsillectomy. “The child often doesn’t know they are feeling stress,” Karpenske said. “But if you can offer reassurance, a safe environment and a good, steady routine, the child will feel secure.” Karpenske also asked for his son’s favorite toy, and then told him that all of the family’s love was inside of that toy. The child slept with the toy and the night terrors went away. But it’s not always that simple.

Karpenske said another option is to disrupt the sleep pattern. If the child typically goes to bed at 9pm, and at 10pm the episodes begin, wake the child 10 minutes before the night terrors typically occur. Have him or her go to the bathroom, or get a drink of water. “Break the sleep cycle into a couple of pieces,” Karpenske said. If the child is at risk of hurting himself or others, it may be time to look into counseling or medications. Corina Fisher is a licensed clinical social worker and substance abuse specialist with L.E. Phillips-Libertas Treatment Center in Chippewa Falls and HSHS Sacred Heart Behavioral Health in Eau Claire. Although she doesn’t specifically work with children, Fisher said she does help people who have sleep disorders. “Most of the time they know what it’s related to – some sort of traumatic experience,” Fisher said. “It can be something short-term, too, like a death or car accident.” The same holds true for children

with night terrors. Fisher makes sure her patients don’t have a physical condition needing medical attention first, then she concentrates on coping skills. “We work on relaxation techniques, and thinking about positive things. I ask them to journal about the stress they feel. All of that should be done before bed,” she said. “It’s about simple things that we can change before bed.” Karpenske said the same holds true for children. “It’s gut-wrenching for a parent, but to understand what is going on, and to know that parents can do a lot by just getting their child in a routine and minimizing stress is huge,” he said. “This is not something that parents have to feel ashamed to talk to their pediatrician about. For families, this is horrifying.” Alyssa Van Duyse is a marketing specialist with HSHS Sacred Heart and St. Joseph’s hospitals. Sacred Heart is a community partner for Chippewa Valley Family.

put these on your financial to-do list every year P R E S E N T E D BY T I M C A R L S O N & B O B D I L LO N O F W E S TC O N S I N I N V E S T M E N T A DV I S O R S • Think about deductions. If you have made a great deal of money in a given year and have the option of postponing a portion of the taxable income until the following year, that may bring some tax savings. • Can you maximize your retirement plan contribution at the start of the year? If you can do it, do it early – the sooner you make your contribution, the more interest those assets may earn. • Required Minimum Distributions? Retirees over age 70½ must take RMDs from traditional retirement plans. Make sure you are aware of the deadlines. • Transaction? Did you (or will you) sell any real property this year? Start a business? Receive a bonus? Sell an investment held outside of a tax-deferred account? These moves may have an impact on your taxes.

SELF / FOOD /

H E A LT H

/ M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S /

FINANCE

• Charitable gifts? Remember, if you make charitable contributions this year, you may claim the deductions on your return. • Mortgage payments? Can you make a January mortgage payment in December, or make a lump sum payment on your balance? If you have a fixed-rate mortgage, a lump sum payment may reduce the loan amount and total interest paid. • Life changes? Did you marry or divorce? You may want to change beneficiary designations and/or take look at your insurance coverage. If your last name is changing, you will need a new Social Security card. • Do not delay – get it done. Talk with a qualified financial or tax professional. Tim Carlson may be reached at (800) 924-0022, ext. 7219. Bob Dillon may be reached at (800) 924-0022, ext. 7218.

/ R E L AT I O N S H I P S / PA R E N T I N G

05062015-WR-1271

get more tips at:

ChippewaValleyFamily.org/tips

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

19


living

before you buy your first home, answer these four questions BY JENNY EBERT

Y

our best friend just bought a house and has invited you over for to see it for the first time. You pull up to the curb filled with a sense of amazement and dread, wondering how did they do that? No one teaches a class in school called “How to Buy a House,” and it is all a mystery. Actually, buying a house should not be a mysterious or intimidating process once you understand when you are ready. So ask yourself a few questions (yes, right now). 1. Have you been with your current employer for at least a year? Are you are paid an hourly or salaried wage? Do you receive commission or bonus income that needs to be included? If so, you need two years on the job in order to use it as qualifying income. Are you self-employed? Then you’ll need two years of self-employment and two years of federal tax returns as proof of your income.The point is that lenders are looking for good job stability to qualify for a mortgage loan. 2. What do you have for monthly debt? Is it easy to pay your bills and still have money left over for living expenses and savings? Bonus points. Lenders will evaluate your monthly debts to calculate what is left over for a potential house payment. Car payments and leases, student loan payments, other loan payments, and credit card required payments are all considered, so have detailed information about this with you. Lenders do not include utility or insurance bills. With student loan debt the “required” full student loan payment will be used in debt calculation, even if you

are currently on an income-based repayment plan or student loan payments are deferred, or even if you are still a student. For most student loan payments, these figures can easily be accessed from student loan websites. 3. What is your credit history? Have you paid all of your bills on time for the last 24 months? Do you know what your current credit score is? Have you had collections accounts or judgments filed against you? Have you had a bankruptcy or a foreclosure? What percentage of your potential credit card debt is being used? Many credit cards now offer you a free credit score on your statement each month. Be less concerned about the actual score than with the direction the score is moving in. If it is moving up, that’s a good thing; if it has taken a sudden plunge, you need to find out why. Credit Karma is an app that many people have added to their smart phones. The score does not match what a lender would pull on a mortgage, but the direction and the general range of the score are important. If you have some negative factors, work to correct them NOW (not when you have fallen in love with a house). Pay off collections and judgments. Allow adequate time to pass after a bankruptcy or foreclosure (or a short sale) before you attempt to buy again. Check with your lender on what is required for timing (it changes by loan program). 4. Have you started saving money for a down payment? “No,” you may say. “How can you save for something that you don’t know the price of?” Having a savings history and adequate funds for a down payment can be the key component to what kind of home

loan product you’ll be looking at. Establishing a price range and savings goal are a few of the things you’ll accomplish when you meet with your lender. The next step is to sit down with a lender of your choosing to review these items and see which loan program will fit your needs and purchase price. This can be too big (and confusing) of a process to do it totally online. The 45 minutes you spend face to face with your lender will lay some nice, clear groundwork on what you want to accomplish and when. A good lender should be a good listener and be able to explain the various factors of different programs. So get recommendations from friends on a good home loan officer to work with and start dreaming the American Dream. Jenny Ebert has been a mortgage lender at Associated Bank for 25 years. She specializes in helping first-time homebuyers and uses many different loan programs and down payment assistance programs to do so. You can reach her at jenny.ebert@associatedbank.com or (715) 831-3584.

online boutique Runchkins

makes buying kids’ clothes a snap W O R D S B Y S A L LY M E Y E R / P H O T O B Y A N D R E A PA U L S E T H

M

y Facebook newsfeed has long a UW-Eau Claire grad who recently been filled with ads for subpartnered on the start-up. Welch’s scription services offering evbackground in technology design and erything from meals to snacks, wine, adult customer experience helped craft this clothing, accessories, beauty products, clothing service with a more sustainable toys, crafts, and more. If you are looking approach. Runchkins, which launched for a more convenient way to shop and earlier this spring, sends you a box of try new products, you’ll likely have four to five complete outfits for a no trouble finding it these days. As $10 styling fee. You pay for what AG E S a mother of two, I am well aware you love and decide to keep and of the time and hassle of shopping send the rest back in a pre-paid for kids clothes, and it’s not uncomshipping bag. You can opt in or out mon for me to be rifling around in the any month that you’d like. However, morning looking for something clean that unlike other clothing services, Runchfits and is weather appropriate to dress kins recognizes the temporary nature of my kids in. Enter Runchkins! kids clothing and gives you the option to It was only a matter of time before sell the items back when your children a kids clothing subscription service hit outgrow them. the Web, so I was excited to get an email I recently had the chance to try out from a longtime friend, John Welch, Runchkins, and my boxes were filled

0-6

20

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

S E L F / F O O D / H E A LT H / M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S /

with cute outfits for my kids to try on. I filled out a profile and selected colors, patterns, styles, and sizes that would fit them. When the box arrived a few days later, I immediately noticed how nice the clothing was! The outfits ranged from preppy to dressy to casual, and most items were priced between $20 and $40. Each box comes complete with pricing and “buy-back” details, so when your kiddos outgrow the clothing you can receive cash or store credit for the items you no longer need. I loved trying the service and found it to be an easy way to find everyday and specialoccasion outfits for my kids that you won’t find in stores around here. If you are interested in trying a convenient and fun way to find children’s clothing, check out runchkins.com.

FINANCE

/ R E L AT I O N S H I P S /

PA R E N T I N G


SELF / FOOD /

H E A LT H

/ M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S /

FINANCE

/ R E L AT I O N S H I P S / PA R E N T I N G

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

21


22

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

S E L F / F O O D / H E A LT H / M AT E R N I T Y / B A B Y / P E T S / F I N A N C E / R E L AT I O N S H I P S / PA R E N T I N G


living 4. BRING GRUB It doesn’t have to be an elaborate multi-course extravaganza. As long as it tastes good and requires little to no prep work for the new parents, it’ll do the trick. 5. HANG OUT WITH THE BIG KIDS While the parents may be taking care of the baby, they’re not the only ones adjusting to the changes. Spending time with older siblings can help remind them that they are equally loved and appreciated. Even if they’ve welcomed a new baby before, the adjustment is unique each time. Try taking them out of the house for an adventure, play date, or sleepover. This way you can give the older kids some individual attention while giving their parents an opportunity to relax.

LESLIE DUFFY PHOTOGRAPHY

7 tips for meeting a new baby

Birth is a joyful time – and a stressful one. Here’s how to handle a visit to a newborn like a pro.

6. ZIP IT ON THE ADVICE Everyone’s experience is different regardless if they’ve given birth, adopted, chosen a surrogate, or become foster parents. Modern parents are surrounded by countless blogs, forums, websites, and other media outlets offering conflicting recommendations, which makes it hard to absorb all of the information available. When you add the static noise of unsolicited advice, it becomes even more confusing. Try not to compare your own experiences with theirs or push your own opinions. Every family is different, and what works for some may not work for others. Respecting their choices and parenting philosophies will go a long way in encouraging their confidence and showing that you support them.

BY R ACHEAL ULBE RG

F

ollowing the birth of a baby, family and friends often come to visit in the hospital or at home. Many will come toting balloons, flowers, and adorable baby clothes along with hugs, snuggles, and cameras. But whether you’re an enthusiastic godparent or an uncomfortable new uncle, you can lessen the parents’ stress and win some brownie points by leaving the balloons behind and following these tips for meeting a newborn: 1. BE CAREF U L W H A T Y O U S A Y In an age of online birth announcements and texting, tone and intent are sometimes lost in translation. Be mindful of the words you use and their implications when sending your congratulations, and never comment negatively on another person’s journey to parenthood. It might sound silly to you, but well-intentioned phrases like “at least the baby is healthy” or “it’s a good thing you had the epidural” might be upsetting to someone whose experienced complications during labor.

2. ALWAYS CALL BEFORE YOU VISIT It’s OK for the parents to want to spend time alone with their new baby and get a chance to introduce him or her to loved ones at their own pace. No matter what you do, you will not be the baby’s favorite person. This is a huge adventure for them, too! Understand that being held and passed around among visitors is really stressful for newborns because all they want is to be snuggled, fed, and soothed by their parents day and night. Let mom and dad hold the baby and wait until you are offered a chance. 3. HELP AROUND THE HOUSE There is a lot more to this parenting gig than changing diapers, giving baths, and singing lullabies. Taking care of a newborn is a lot of work, and there are still a lot of other responsibilities to take care of. Doing a load of laundry, washing dishes, or sanitizing bottles only takes a few minutes, but it can relieve a lot of stress.

7. BE A GOOD FRIEND The weeks following birth are especially important to the parents, the baby, and the rest of the family. But as time goes by and the baby grows older, there will be fewer visitors. New parents may find themselves progressively becoming more isolated from others. Keep checking back in and offering your support. Postpartum depression, one of the more commonly known postpartum mood disorders, can manifest weeks after birth and has extreme symptoms such as panic attacks, insomnia, and suicidal thoughts. Partners are susceptible to a similar depression called paternal postnatal depression. At the end of the day, your love and enthusiasm alone will be appreciated, but it never hurts to go the extra mile. You never know, maybe you’ll want them to return the favor sometime soon! Racheal Ulberg is the owner of Eau Claire Doulas and an Eau Claire native. She enjoys camping with her son, reading, and eating burritos.

fluoride varnish makes protecting kids’ teeth easier This safe, effective method to prevent tooth decay is still relatively new in the United States Topical fluoride can be applied by your dentist’s office in two ways: as a gel (which is the more traditional method) or as a varnish. Topical fluoride varnish is relatively new in the United States, but it has been commonly used in other parts of the world. Basically, the varnish is a coating that is “painted” on the enamel of teeth, and it allows the fluoride to be absorbed. It is generally applied at a routine dental cleaning appointment, and it is especially useful for young kids and kids who have difficulty with the traditional fluoride trays.

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, “using fluoride for the prevention and control of cavities is documented to be both safe and highly effective.” Fluoride varnish has made this useful tool easier to apply to the teeth of young kids. Fluoride varnish sets quickly, is easy to apply, and adheres to the teeth for a longer period. Next time your young children are at the dentist, ask about fluoride varnish.

get more tips at:

ChippewaValleyFamily.org/tips

SELF / FOOD /

H E A LT H

/ M AT E R N I T Y /

BABY

/ P E T S / F I N A N C E / R E L AT I O N S H I P S / PA R E N T I N G

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

23


discovery

building a legacy,

one pair of socks at a time A pair of ambitious seniors at Regis launch their own business BY MEGHAN KULIG / PHOTO BY SHARP PHOTOGRAPHY

M

att Manas and Michael Hoffmann like to stay busy. In addition to participating in academics and athletics, the two Regis High School seniors have started their own company. “Last year, we got the idea to start a sock brand called Legacy Socks,” Manas said. “We came up with the name of the company based around the idea that we all have such a finite amount of time in our lives and the only thing we’ll leave behind is our legacy.” Legacy Socks offers fun and unique sock designs available for purchase online. Manas and Hoffmann say the funky designs are all about standing out. “In our current generation, the way you dress says a lot

“Their ability to take an idea and put it motion on the open market does not surprise me. They have a vision, and I believe it will be successful.” PAU L P E D E R S E N Regis High School Principal

24

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

about yourself,” they said. “Our designs definitely make you stand out!” The two seniors create all of the sock designs themselves before handing them over to a local graphic designer to be polished and finalized. Legacy Socks currently offers four designs. “I didn’t realize how much detail goes into creating a company that supplies such a basic necessity,” Hoffmann said. “But seeing the progress of the work and our ideas becoming a real product is such a great feeling and makes all of the work worth it.” Regis High School Principal Paul Pedersen says he’s impressed by the work ethic and high level of motivation both Manas and Hoffmann have shown. “Matt and Michael are both very creative and confident young men,” Pedersen said. “Their ability to take an idea and put it in motion on the open market does not surprise me. They have a vision, and I believe it will be successful.” Prior to combining their entrepreneurial spirits together to launch Legacy Socks, Manas and Hoffmann each started a company on his own. For Hoffmann, it was a lawn-care service; for Manas, it was a clothing line called BE. Lifestyle Clothing, which he started in August 2015. “The T-shirts have powerful sayings,” he said. “BE Different. BE Strong. BE United. What’s even better is that 10 percent of all profits go to a local homeless shelter and to an organization called Be The Match, which manages the largest bone marrow registry in the world for patients in need of transplants

LEARNING /

PROJECTS

MATT MANAS AND MICHAEL HOFFMAN, LEGACY SOCKS

throughout the country.” While Manas and Hoffmann took the responsibility of creating Legacy Socks on their own, their parents were a huge part of their support system. In addition to providing positive support, they also helped the two entrepreneurs when they had questions about legal issues or needed advice on making good financial decisions. “We are impressed with Michael and Matt’s initiative to start this company and their commitment to follow through with their message throughout the whole process,” said Michael’s father, Scott Hoffmann. “We are happy to see what they created and are excited for their future.” “It’s been so awesome to see Matt and Michael work on their companies,” added Matt’s mother, Julie Manas. “Not only have they been doing a great job with their business endeavors, but they’ve also maintained excellent grades and have been active in

extracurricular activities.” Following graduation from Regis High School, Manas plans to attend the University of Colorado-Boulder, while Hoffmann will go to UWMadison. They plan to continue to grow their business as they attend college, using the connections they make to their benefit. It’s safe to say these two are excited for the future. “We want to create a quality, meaningful brand,” Manas said. “We truly believe in this company and hope, more than anything, to spread peace, love, and positivity.” If you’d like to purchase a pair of socks from Legacy Socks, visit www. legacysocks.com. They are $13.99 a pair and can be shipped anywhere in the U.S. To purchase an item from the BE. Lifestyle Clothing line, visit www. BeDuds.com. Meghan Kulig is communication director at Regis Catholic Schools in Eau Claire.

/ S C H O O L S / H I S T O R Y / S C I E N C E / T E C H N O L O G Y / S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y / V O L U N T E E R I N G


discovery

going green

table organizations like cellphonesforsoldiers.com that turn old cell phones into opportunities for those in need.

without seeing red 5 easy tips for making your family more eco-friendly BY RENEE SOMMER

Y

ou could melt polar ice caps with all the heat the topic of going green gets online. Between conflicting scientific opinions and the humorous (albeit completely false) drudgery of anonymous Internet trolls, it’s difficult for us normal, everyday folk to figure out just how we’re supposed to single-handedly save the polar bears, the bees, and the whole planet. Not everyone can afford to put up giant solar panels, and not everyone has the space or time to plant a garden that will produce everything they’ll need for the year. But instead of giving up on the whole idea of going green, it’s easier to get started if you just take one little bite out of the whole environmentally friendly pie at a time.

BUY LOCAL Consider the amount of pollution created just to get products you use every day from the manufacturer to your pantry. Whenever possible, buy from farmers’ markets and retailers that peddle locally produced wares. Not only will you be reducing the amount of greenhouse gases created when products are trucked in, but you’ll also be giving a boost to the local economy. RECYCLE OLD CELL PHONES The average cell phone lasts around 18 months, and if they just get dumped in landfills the phones and their batteries introduce toxic substances into our environment. There are many reputable companies that will recycle your cell phones for free, but consider chari-

L E A R N I N G / P R OJ E C TS / S C H O O L S / S C I E N C E / T E C H N O LO GY /

STOP PAPER STATEMENTS Your bank and utility companies probably offer incentive programs to get you to ditch the paper statement and go green with online billing. By switching to paperless statements, you’ll not only save some trees but possibly some cash as well. Many companies offer discounts or small monetary rewards for making the switch. DITCH PLASTIC Plastic bags are not biodegradable. This means they are making their way into our oceans and subsequently the food chain. Stronger, reusable bags are an inexpensive and readily available option. LITTER FREE LUNCH If you’re packing lunches for you and the family every day, you probably go through a mountain of plastic baggies a

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

/ VO LU N T E E R I N G / C LU B S

year. But most disposable items can be easily replaced by reusable ones. Try inexpensive stainless steel cutlery, cloth napkins, and reusable containers. Once you make these small changes in your every day life, you’ll find that going green isn’t so difficult after all. And with any luck, you’ll be on your way to rescuing a polar bear in no time.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

25


discovery

8 ways to play without using a smartphone It’s pretty easy if you actually try.

BY JAC Q U E L I N E VA N H E M E R T

F

rom toddlers with touchscreens day is a lot of time for a kid to spend on to tweens and texting, one of the anything, especially when that thing has hottest topics among parents accelerated so rapidly we’re still waiting and educators today is the proper role of for the research to catch up. digital media in children’s lives. Although But before you freak out and flip to their recommendations are slated for reyour Facebook feed, remember these key vision this year, the American Academic points to put things in perspective: of Pediatrics (AAP) currently recomToo much of anything (even a mends no more than two hours of good thing) can be a bad thing. screen time per day for children Excessive media use leads to and teens, and none at all for attention problems, school infants under age two. difficulties, sleep and eating The revisions come from disorders, obesity, addictive AAP’s 2015 Media Symposium, behavior, anxiety, and underde“Growing Up Digital,” which veloped social skills. Like “junk acknowledges technological innofood,” a bit of “junk media” has its vation as a basic reality of our kids’ place, but too much is problematic. lives. For pint-sized “digital natives” Parenting involves setting limits, AGES (the ones who can hack parental conplain and simple, from diet to sleep trols faster than you can figure them to screen media. Your child’s brain out), even the phrase “screen time” is is more like a sponge than a filter. It outdated: Nearly 38 percent of infants absorbs information easily, but isn’t as use mobile devices, 73 percent of 13- to skilled at wading through that informa17-year-olds have smartphones, and the tion to make wise decisions. YOU are average kid spends seven hours a DAY in your child’s filter. front of screens. The media IS the message. EducaLet’s be honest. Even if the new AAP tional games and apps have their place, guidelines are generous, seven hours a but the channel itself speaks louder than

S

b T a l t w s d q w

ALL

the content, especially for kids under two. Our brains respond differently to an electronic device than to a physical object or live human person. And since your baby’s brain is still rapidly developing, too much electronic engagement can literally change the way that tiny brain forms. Of course, simply limiting media usage doesn’t guarantee that kids will use their time well. Try these eight tricks to help get them back into creative play: 1. STAGE A BLAST FROM THE PAST! Most kids have never heard the awful screech of a dial-up modem. Introduce your tech-savvy tweens to recent history! Pull out the flip phone, fire up that Nintendo system, or tour the monster computers at the Chippewa Falls Museum of Industry & Technology. Give your kids an increased appreciation for the ease of technology they’ve known all their (very young) lives. 2. USE MEDIA TO GROW CLOSER TO YOUR KIDS. Avoid the “iPacifier” and harness the power of media to strengthen your parent-child connection. For littles, try digital stories, finger plays, or video chats – whatever it is should foster two-way “talk-time” and true interaction, not just passive video. For older kids, pull up an online version of Chess, Checkers, or Battleship. Relive your childhood while they learn to strategize and handle wins or losses. Plus no tiny pieces! 3. SEND KIDS OUTSIDE! Pretend and active play are much easier in the great outdoors. Trees become castles, rocks become royal subjects, and soon they’re begging to skip dinner to keep playing. 4. TABLETS CAN’T BEAT PAPER, SCISSORS, AND GLUE! According to teachers and occupational therapists, an increasing number of kids are entering school without the fine

26

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

LEARNING /

P R OJ E C T S / S C H O O L S / H I S TO RY / S C I E N C E /

T E C H N O LO GY

motor skills to grip a marker, hold paper while coloring, or use scissors to cut. Give your child time to practice with these tools. Remember mess equals success! 5. KEEP OBJECTS THAT INSPIRE CREATIVITY. Avoid too many toys with lights, bells, and whistles. Cardboard boxes, blankets, Legos, dress-up clothes, blocks, and pots and pans are the seeds of your kiddo’s imagination. 6. LET KIDS BE BORED. Boredom is the prerequisite for creativity, so fight the urge to pacify your little one’s every complaint or demand for entertainment. (In other words, relax!) 7. PUT DOWN YOUR PHONE AND DESIGNATE MEDIA-FREE ZONES. Believe it or not, kids notice when you ignore that notification in favor of their conversation and eye contact. What are your “talk times” with your kids? Dinner? Car rides? Bedtime? Whatever they are, keep them and keep them sacred. 8. TAKE FAMILY FIELD TRIPS! Places like the Children’s Museum, the library, the Chippewa Valley Museum, the YMCA, and public parks are all committed to the preservation of screenfree free-play. Parenting is a big ol’ adventure, and the rise of digital media has thrown in a few detours, but we still only get so much time with our little ones before they’re not so little anymore. Teach your kids to enjoy technology, but don’t be afraid to remind them that friendship can be found outside of Facebook, “likes” don’t change how much they’re loved, and sometimes the very best play station is waiting right in their own backyard. Jacqueline Van Hemert is director of programs and events at the Children’s Museum of Eau Claire.

/ S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y / V O L U N T E E R I N G


discovery

5 smart ways to avoid

the dreaded summer slide Just because school is out, doesn’t mean learning should stop BY PA N TH AO

S

ummer is right around the corner, and it brings with it a more relaxed schedule with an endless supply of bubbles and dripping Popsicles. There are so many things to AGES add to your summer bucket + list, but one thing to avoid is the dreaded summer slide, which occurs when kids lose some of the academic skills they gained during the school year. Here are some quick and easy ways to beat learning loss without taking away the summertime fun:

5

1. PICK UP A BOOK. Reading during the summer means performing better in the fall. Libraries such as the L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library have something for everyone. Kids can read biographies, fables, chapter books, poetry, or even the newspaper. Reading is like brain food, so be sure to get in 20 minutes every day. 2. COOK IT UP. Prepare meals together to enhance kids’ understanding of the science

behind food and cooking. Pick out some favorite recipes, get out the measuring cups, and put those math and reading skills to use. Make a trip to the farmers market where you can also teach the values of local food and community building. 3. MINI ROAD TRIP! Take a field trip somewhere in the Chippewa Valley, which is home to a number of parks, museums, and even a zoo. Our community is full of learning opportunities from exploring the properties of water at the Children’s Museum of Eau Claire to discovering Orion’s Belt at Hobbs Observatory. Pack a sack lunch and make a day of it! 4. BRUSH UP. Turn your next vacation into a social studies activity. The kids can research the destination’s history, attractions, and famous landmarks. Encourage kids

to journal about their travels to continue developing their writing skills. 5. GET PROGRAMMED. Take advantage of the summer programs offered in the Chippewa Valley. The Eau Claire Area School District along with UW-Eau Claire’s Children’s Nature Academy have a number of programs with opportunities to build critical thinking skills. For park adventures, arts and crafts, and team sports, check out the Boys & Girls Club, the YMCA, or your city’s parks department. Summer is a great time to help kids get their imagination flowing while brushing up on their academic skills. With these simple strategies, you can incorporate learning into your summer adventures without having to put away the rainbow-colored chalk and sprinkler. When the new school year begins, your child will be ready to go with brand-new skills gained over the summer!

learning STEM skills can begin at home engage your kids’ natural curiosity to help them engage with science, technology, engineering, and math

BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY

LEARNING

/

PROJECTS

Students today are being exposed to more and more STEM-related learning skills than ever before. STEM is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. For many parents, seeking out STEM-based learning for young children can feel a bit out of their comfort zone, but it doesn’t have to be. Young children are naturally curious, and educational opportunities are obtainable right in their own homes. Simple STEM examples that can be done in home including cooking, shopping, planning a field trip or family vacation, exploring the backyard, gardening, science projects, measuring, remodeling, building a tree house,

creating with Legos, and so much more! It’s really that simple. Sylvan Learning Centers across the world support STEM learning, and locally we are delighted to offer advanced STEM programs throughout the year in Robotics, Coding, and Math Edge for grades 2-6. Have fun and enjoy STEM with your children! –Kayann Bock, executive director, Sylvan Learning of Eau Claire

/ S C H O O L S / S C I E N C E / T E C H N O L O G Y / S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y / V O L U N T E E R I N G / C L U B S

get more tips at

chippewavalleyfamily.org/tips

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

27


creativity

expressing feelings without words

Art therapy helps children express inner turmoil

W

BY J U STI N E C H I LD S + P H OTOS BY A N D R E A PAU L S ETH

O

ne of my favorite activities with my granddaughter is when we “do art.” We bring out the huge tub of glue, glitter, construction paper, googly eyeballs, pom-poms, markers, pencils, crayons, coloring books, stickers, pipe cleaners, and beads and just create. The creations don’t have to make sense – and they usually don’t – but it’s during these times that she really talks. Our hands are busy and our eyes are focused on the task at hand, but our minds and mouths are free to wander. Not everything she says makes sense, and there is a lot of giggling, but that’s when I learn the most about her life away from me. April Becker at Hope Tree Family Therapy uses this same foundation in her art therapy program. April is a marriage and family therapist who has always had a passion for working with children and their families. She focuses on family therapy, parenting support, play therapy, and adolescent therapy. She has been in practice since 2012 and opened Hope Tree a little over a year ago. “Art therapy can reach areas that words cannot,” she said. “It can resonate in a different way than words can.” Some kids won’t connect with art therapy because they don’t feel they have the tools to do it, but most do connect with it, she explained. “We are creative beings, and when working towards finding solutions (to life’s problems) we need to be able to tap into a creative part of ourselves to achieve positive, long-standing change,” she said. Patients may not have the ability to

28

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

verbalize their feelings or may even feel discomfort talking. In these situations, art therapy in the forms of clay, games, painting, drawing, and collage can draw out those feelings. Then April is able to follow up with questions. “Art can be more descriptive when words can’t do justice,” she explained. Success with art therapy has been favorable for April, helping her to reach greater depths with patients. She shared with me a piece of art a middle school-aged child created, which represents the beginning of therapy and one year later. The difference was dramatic: Colors and images at the beginning of therapy were dark and barren; one year later, they were bright and full. It was quite striking, with feelings of sadness making way for hope and happiness. April educates families on the importance of art. “Art, music, and social connections are the top healthy coping skills kids need when so much is calling for their time,” she said. She encourages parents to pay attention to (and not to minimize) journaling or doodling, which are important coping skills. She also cautions parents not to use the removal of art as a means of punishment. “It is crucial,” she said, “to not take that outlet away but think of another option.” April has begun a “Create Group” for kids 8 to 18, which meets every Tuesday night. Participants use expressive art to help reduce stress, increase selfesteem, and process feelings. Materials and a light snack are provided. Times will vary depending on the age group. (Call or email for more information.)

VISUAL ARTS

b a A w o e p a w s c i

g d t – E a h h a s

As I thanked April for her time and went to leave, a sign in her foyer bearing a quote from Dr. Seuss caught my eye. It read, “Why fit in when you born to stand out?”

I completely agree. April Becker at Hope Tree Family Therapy • 3521 London Road, Suite B, Eau Claire • (715) 770-9335 • april@ hopetreefamilytherapy.com

/ M U S I C / T H E AT E R / B O O K S / M O V I E S / C O M P U T E R S / W R I T I N G / C R A F T S / I N N O VAT I O N


N

creativity

grandma shares 13 fantastic tales Stories for grandkids can be found in new book BY BA R BA R A A R N O LD / P H OTO BY A N D R E A PAU L S ETH

W

hen Jean and Tom Hebert’s grandchildren came for a visit, they got to build a huge nest of blankets, quilts, and pillows on the floor at the foot of their grandparents’ bed. And then the real fun would begin: They would grab the three-ring notebook full of stories Grandma Jean created for each grandchild based on their personalities and imagination, and Grandma or Grandpa would read them a bedtime story. Soon after, the grandchildren would crash and sleep in the fluffy nest. Jean’s stories about her 13 grandchildren are now available in a delightful 114-page book, with 13 chapters – one for each grandchild, of course – called Grandma Jean’s Fantastic Tales. Each chapter opens with a colorful acrylic painting of the child in his or her own fantastical tale, with a photo of his or her face (Jean admits that faces and portraits are not her forte). The stories appeal to anyone; you need not

be a member of the Hebert family to appreciate the adventures taken and the lessons learned. The grandchildren and their stories are: • Brittany Richards, then 12 years old and now 28, in “A Dairyman (A History Lesson).” • David Bartz, at the age of 6, told the basis of “The Beings” story to Grandma. He is now 23 years old and married with a son of his own. • Rebekah Bartz, then 10 and now 22, is the main character in “Tiger Eyes,” which begins with the question, “Can you imagine a palace so beautiful it seems to be magic?” • Sarah Bartz, then 12 and now 20, in “The Mysterious Golden Box.” • A.J. for Andrew Joseph Snyder. Then 5 and now 20, in “A.J. Finds a New Friend” also authored by Jean’s mother, Leone Laird. • Katherine Snyder, then 5 and now 18, in “Princess Katherine and the Evil

summer theater programs can spark kids’ creativity

Knight.” • Elizabeth (Lucy) Bartz, then 9 and now 18, in “I’ve Been to the Moon.” • Sophia Gamble, then 9 and now 16, in “A Horrible Snake Named PooDoo.” • Paige Hebert, then 7 and now 15, in “A Horse Called Furious Thunder.” • Grace Gamble, then 7 and now 14, in “Grace is Amazing.” • Genevieve Brehmer, then 8 and now 12, in “The Crystal Dragon.” • Sloane Brehmer, who passed away unexpectedly at 15 months, would be 10 years old now had she lived. “Sloanie Balonie and the Deer Family” is a story told by Sloane’s older sister, Genevieve, when Sloanie was almost a year old. • Nicole Hebert, 5 years old then and 8 years old now, in “The Golden Touch of Dristan.” Grandma Jean’s Fantastic Tales

is available for $11.99 at The Local Store, 205 N. Dewey St., Eau Claire; Hebert Dental, 4710 Commerce Valley Road, Eau Claire; the gift shop at St. Joseph’s Hospital, 2661 County Highway I, Chippewa Falls; and Books “N” Things, 200 N. Broadway St., Stanley. You can also contact the author directly at abear2@charter.net or (715) 382-4941.

EAU CLAIRE CHILDREN’S THEATRE PRODUCTION OF ‘PINKALICIOUS’

BY R E N E E SO M M E R / P H OTO BY A N D R E A PAU L S ETH

T

here’s something magical students focus on acting and movement about playing pretend. And games that allow them to explore there’s something especially creative thinking and gain experience remarkable about it when it happens in a on stage. Older students can choose to collaborative group with a vision, a stage, participate in performing classes that and a little theatrical lighting. culminate in an onstage show, or they According to Kevin Grady, associate can choose from a variety of creative and director of the Eau Claire Children’s informational classes such as Relaxation Theatre, participating in theater can for Actors, Street Art, or Techie have a big impact on a child’s life. Training. “Engaging in theater at a young At the Grand Theater in Eau age helps children to become Claire, the Chippewa Valley AGES more effective communicators, Theatre Guild also hosts about 150 collaborators, and develop students each summer. The guild emotional intelligence,” Grady offers a drama camp, theater art says. “There’s obviously a social classes, and workshops for children aspect as well, and it’s very common ages 4-18. “Classes are designed so that for children who participate in theater children receive hands-on experience to develop close friendships with their learning dance and music, stage makefellow performers.” With these goals in up, creating sets and props, designing mind, two local theater organizations costumes, working on lighting and sound have created summer camps and classes effects, and improving their acting with to involve area kids in the arts. fun shows,” says Ann Sessions, executive The ECCT offers more than 40 classes director. that are tailored to a wide age span (3 An added bonus: Each group offers a to 18 years old) and varying abilities. program under which students can have Each year their summer programs have their tuition paid by the school district in between 300 and 400 attendees. Younger which they reside.

3-18

VISUAL ARTS / MUSIC /

T H E AT E R

/

BOOKS

“I wish more people understood how important it is to develop an appreciation for the arts at a young age, and not only performing arts: visual arts, reading, writing, music, anything,” Grady says. “Your appreciation for the arts is something that can serve a whole life long, especially when those skills are acquired early on.” He goes on to

/ M O V I E S / C O M P U T E R S / W R I T I N G / C R A F T S / I N N O VAT I O N

encourage parents to have their children, “Watch plays, perform, create, read new books, write, listen to music – whatever sparks their passion and interest. It all leads to a more well-developed child who will bring a unique perspective and contribution to our world!” For full program and tuition options visit ecct.org or cvtg.org.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

29


creativity

bringing music into your home How to teach your kids to love music without the lessons BY A LI SO N WAG E N E R

T

he benefits of musical training school choir and now have kids of their are impressive and widespread, own who are interested in learning? ranging from improvements in Poss says any musical involvement with linguistic ability to even, in some cases, your kids is better than none, and it’s delaying the onset of dementia. However, never too late to learn. “If you’re serious as Nick Poss puts it, no one makes about enjoying the social benefits, music to hear conversations the health benefits, the cognitive better at a dinner party when benefits, then get involved, and they’re 65. He has a point: Mufind a way,” he says. “It doesn’t sic is inherently social, and it have to be playing the ukulele. can provide rewarding opportuIt could be beating a drum. It nities for interaction with your could be slapping your legs. It children, even if they don’t go on could be singing. There’s no one to become child prodigies. who can’t do one of those things.” If you want your kids to start reapThese days, nearly every single ing the benefits of music but don’t know piece of recorded music is available at where to start, have no fear. You’ll be our fingertips thanks to services such glad to learn that getting your kids as YouTube, Pandora, and Spotify. involved with music doesn’t have to Relying on recorded music while mean investing in lessons, instrudoing simple musical activities is a AGES ments, and hours of practicing right great start, but if you want your kids away. Instead, Poss – owner and to learn how to play music, you may instructor at the Eau Claire Music School want to consider diving in and teaching – offers some great tips to incorporate yourself. Poss is primarily a piano player, music into your daily family life. but a baby grand isn’t as readily available First, the best way to get your kids as the smartphone in your pocket. So, to engaged in music is simply to make it be ready for whatever musical opporyourself. “So if you want your kids to tunity arises, he taught himself how to dance and play instruments, you’re going play the ukulele. He says its small size, to have to dance and play instruments,” portability, and ease of playing has made he says. “If you want your kids to enjoy it a great instrument to play with his kids. listening to music, then you should make Poss says that one easy skill anyone time to enjoy music yourself.” can teach their children is “rhythmic Modeling music for your children entrainment.” “This means helping them will come more naturally to parents who to move in a steady rhythm,” he says. already have some musical background. “This could be through dancing, hitting But what about the people who didn’t a percussion instrument, (or) shaking grow up taking piano lessons? The kids a shaker along with recorded music or who mumbled their way through middle while you’re making it yourself.” For a

ALL

30

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

VISUAL ARTS /

MUSIC

N I C K P OS S TI C K L E S TH E I VO R I E S W IT H S O N S O LI V E R , L E F T, A N D C A R S T E N .

low-cost music-making option, a quick Internet search will produce a wide variety of ideas for creating homemade instruments, including drums, banjos, guitars, and many others, that you can use with your kids to work on their internal rhythm. But the most important part of integrating music into your home life is to remember not to treat it as a subject your children have to master. “It should be a fun thing,” Poss says. “It should be something that you’re making space in your life for. And that includes music lessons too, you know. Music should be a joyous,

fun activity that inspires kids. And so if you make it a task, or a chore, I think you’re diminishing a lot of the benefits.” So instead of scheduling time for your child to practice his or her instrument, plan time to rehearse your family band in preparation for your first living room show (even if it’s only for the family dog). Before you’re ready to go pro, check out Nick Poss’ Spotify playlist “Family Music Time: Songs for dancing, singing, and listening” for ideas for music to listen to as a family. Alison Wagener is a student at UW-Eau Claire.

/ T H E AT E R / B O O K S / M O V I E S / C O M P U T E R S / W R I T I N G / C R A F T S / I N N O VAT I O N


N

creativity

get your art on

in the great outdoors These easy art projects are sure to keep the creativity flowing all summer WORDS + PHOTO BY RENEE SOMMER

I

t’s a fact: Art, especially with Natural embellishments: AGES kids, is messy. But the warmth of • Leaves + summer gives us the opportunity • Moss to get outside, get a little dirty, and • Small sticks still get in a ton of creative, • Stones art-fueled play without all the • Acorns stress of trying to get paint • An easily accessible tree out of the carpet. So grab Instructions: the kids, head outside, and 1. To create the “face,” press your let them go crazy with makclay into the bark and smooth out edges. ing art in the sunshine – just This is a good time to shape any feahave the hose ready! tures you’d like as well. 2. Use your natural embellishments BUBBLE PAINTING (leaves, stones, etc.) to add character to Materials the face. • Bubble mix Tip: While these may hang on for a • Bubble wands while depending on location and weather, • Food coloring or liquid watercolors these probably won’t be long-term decora• Paper tions, so take lots of pictures!

3

Instructions 1. Pour 1 tablespoon of bubble mix into a small, shallow bowl. 2. Add a few drops of food coloring to the bubble mix and stir well. 3. Place your bubble wand in the colored bubble mix, remove and blow bubbles towards your paper. 4. As the bubbles hit the paper and pop, they will leave interesting patterns. Repeat with other colors. Tip: This activity can be frustrating on a windy day – choose a breeze-free spot outdoors to make it easier! ‘EXPLODING’ SIDEWALK CHALK Materials: • 1 cup cornstarch • 1 cup vinegar • Food coloring • 12 tsp. baking soda • Ziploc bags Instructions: 1. Mix the cornstarch and vinegar together. 2. Quickly divide the mixture into four Ziploc bags 3. Add food coloring to each bag (8-10 drops). 4. Partially seal the bag, leaving just enough space to add the baking soda. Quickly seal the bag, swish it around to dissolve the soda, and then lay it down on the sidewalk. Wait for it to POP! Tip: Once the bags have popped, kids can have fun painting with the mix still inside the bag, or swirling the “splatter” with brushes. TREE FACE SCULPTING Materials: • Clay-heavy mud or air-dry natural clay (make it as benign to the environment as possible)

VISUAL ARTS

RESIST PAINTING Materials: • Large canvas • Painter’s tape • Paint (if you’re planning on displaying, using acrylic paints will help it last longer, but other washable paints can be used as well) • Brushes

W H I L E E X P LO D I N G C H A L K BAG S A R E A LWAYS CO O L , P L AY I N G I N T H E A F TER M ATH I S P R E T T Y AW E S O M E , TO O.

Instructions: 1. Layout a pattern on the canvas with painter’s tape. You can do a standard grid, wild lines that start and stop wherever you like, or simple stripes. 2. Let the kids go wild with the paint on the canvas. They can experiment with splattering the paint, using different brushes to create unique results, or squeezing it directly onto the canvas. 3. Once the paint is dry, carefully peel off the tape. OVERSIZED MARBLE PAINTING Materials: Butcher paper Plastic kiddie pool Balls of various sizes (golf ball, basketball, etc.) Paint (tempera is washable, but you can use other paints as well) Instructions: 1. Tape a large sheet of butcher paper to the bottom of the kiddie pool. 2. Dip each ball in a different paint color and toss into the pool. 3. Let the kids experiment with lifting and spinning the kiddie pool to force the balls to roll around inside. Tip: You can also use toys with wheels to create unique tracks on the paper in place of the balls.

/ M U S I C / T H E AT E R / B O O K S / M O V I E S / C O M P U T E R S / W R I T I N G / C R A F T S / I N N O VAT I O N

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

31


activity

families are

on the road again Travel hacks for making road trips with kids easier BY STEPHANIE SIREK

W

e travel a lot. In the last three years we have done a weekly road trip for our summer vacation with three (and now four kids) under the age of 8. We travel for holidays and when my husband has had job interviews out of town. In the last year alone we have spent 16 nights in 10 different hotels. I’ve tried lots of different ideas I’ve found on Pinterest, and here are the things I think are useful – I think you will, too. SMALL ORGANIZER = FOOD CADDY This is our favorite and most-used tip. I found small plastic organizers at Target Dollar Spot and at the Dollar Store. They have one large rectangular spot and two smaller spots that are perfect for holding fast food or snacks. The nuggets or sandwich go in the large spot while fries and a juice box fit perfectly on the other side. We can easily fill them up and pass them back to the kids. The kids aren’t fumbling around trying to open packages and the garbage is contained instead of flung around the back seats. They easily stack together when not in use and can be thrown in the dishwasher to be cleaned.

32

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

ZIPPERED STORAGE BAGS For each day we will be traveling I pack an outfit for all the kids in one storage bag. If you have one or two kids a gallon-sized bag will do, but if you have four kids like I do, you’ll need to get two-gallon bags. Take the first outfit and lay down the pants, then the undies, and then the socks and the shirt on top. Roll them up and place them in the bag. Do this for each child’s outfit, stacking them on top of each other in the bag. Label the bag for a day of the week or if they are pajamas. Instead of unpacking the entire suitcase you only need to pull out that day’s bag. EMERGENCY KIT It will happen. Someone is going to get sick, have a headache, need a Band-Aid, or need to clean his or her hands. I pack up a small container and keep it under one of the seats for when emergencies strike. This way we can take care of the problem without having to find a Walgreens or spend a small fortunate at a gas station. Recommended Contents: • Advil (children’s and adult) • Baby wipes • Hand sanitizer • Band-Aids • Tweezers • ChapStick

EXERCISE /

OUTDOORS

• Thermometer • Anti-itching sticks • Doggie waste bags. (We don’t have any dogs, but these come in very handy. A child can use one if he or she gets sick, or you can use them for dirty diapers, soiled clothes, or trash. They hold in the smell and are very compact.) BED BUMPERS One of the things that scares me is the thought of the younger kids rolling off the bed at night. To help keep this from happening, I take two extra pillows and tuck them under the fitted sheet. The pillows won’t fall off the bed, and they create a bump that helps reduce the likelihood the child will roll off. (This tip should NOT be used with infants.) STREAM MOVIES Hotels have a very limited number of TV channels, especially for young children. We bring our laptops along with an HDMI cord. Most hotel TVs have a connecting port so that we can hook up the laptop and change the

TV setting to HDMI. This allows us to watch movies from streaming services such as Amazon and Disney Anywhere or to play DVDs. COMPACT CD HOLDER Since we’re on the topic of movies, we use portable DVD players in the car. For us it’s inconvenient to store the discs in a visor holder, so instead I use a portable zippered CD case. The kids can store them in the back, and it’s easy to grab the small case and bring it inside the hotel to use with the laptop. GLOW STICKS This is my kid’s favorite tip. If we are traveling at night I make sure to grab a few glow sticks from the Dollar Store. When it gets dark out, we light them up for the kids to wear and use as lights if they need to find something or are trying to read. No matter where the road takes you, enjoy the journey. Hopefully some of these tips will help make it easier. Happy trails!

/ S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N / C A M P S / S A F E T Y / PA R K S /

T R AV E L

/ GARDENING


activity

fall off the exercise wagon? here’s how to get back on B Y R E B E C C A H AY D E N

W

ouldn’t it be so much easier to exercise more consistently if there weren’t so many other things going on? If only we didn’t have to deal with nagging things like having a job and taking care of responsibilities. However, life is messy and sometimes that spills over into even the most carefully planned workout routine. Even the most devoted exercisers sometimes have to abandon their routines. Many of us deal by thinking, “As soon as [this annoying situation] is over, I’ll get right back to exercise!” And then you find out that once that annoying situation is over, there’s a brand new one just waiting in the wings. So, what do you do when you’ve gotten so far away from the old fitness routine you that you don’t even know where to begin? How do you get over the guilt and fear and just get moving again? The good news is, it’s easier than you think. 1. Admit where you went wrong. Take some time to think about what threw you off track and how you might have prevented it, if possible. 2. Stop kicking yourself. Guilt, when taken too far, can sometimes keep you from getting back to your healthy habits. (“I obviously can’t stick with a program, so why bother?”) Give yourself a time limit (say 20 minutes) for feeling guilty. When the time’s up, put it aside and move on. 3. Figure out your weak areas. Look back at common situations that tend to throw you off and notice any patterns. Do you ditch your workouts every time you leave town or have to work late a few nights in a row? Becoming aware of your weak areas and planning for them can help you stay on track. 4. Ease into it. Getting back to your routine doesn’t necessarily mean jump-

ing right back into the same program you were following before. The biggest mistake many of us make when getting back to exercise is overdoing it, or what I call the “guilt response.” When we get off track, our first response is often to jump back in and do twice as much work to make up for what we have missed. This can lead to injury or make you dread your workout and want to quit again altogether. 5. Make it fun. You’ll have more success if you enjoy what you’re doing. Try new activities or enlist a friend. If you have kids, get them involved, too. Get silly together, play in the backyard, create games, or try fun outdoor activities. 6. Listen to your body. One frustration in returning to exercise is facing the loss of strength and endurance. Many of us try to push too hard, wanting to be where we were rather than starting out where we are. But whatever your mind wants, your body has its own agenda, and it’s important to act on your body’s cues to back off. This is especially true when coming back from an illness. If you had a nasty cold or flu, your body expended a lot of energy in fighting it and may be weaker than you think. Rebecca Hayden, community engagement and wellness coordinator, has been with Mayo Clinic Health System for seven years. She teaches a variety of classes including “Stepping On” Falls Prevention, Strong Bones, fitness classes, and babysitter training. She also hosts many youth and family wellness events. Rebecca is very passionate about health, wellness, and fitness. She enjoys teaching people ways to exercise and be healthy without having to go to a gym or spend a lot of money. She loves to show people how to make exercise fun by doing it in a variety of ways or with their kids.

ANDREA PAULSETH

EXERCISE

/ O U T D O O R S / S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N / C A M P S / S A F E T Y / PA R K S / T R AV E L / A G R I C U LT U R E

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

33


activity

beware of wisconsin’s own poisonous plants ‘Leaflets three, let it be’ and other valuable insight that will keep you from itching up a storm as you enjoy the outdoors BY RENEE SOMMER

T

he Chippewa Valley is full of parks, hiking trails, rolling fields, and enchanting forests, so it’s no wonder that we love to get out there and play. But not everything in our picturesque landscape is our friend, and it’s important to know what to avoid when you’re convening with nature.

WILD PARSNIP Other names: Bird’s Nest, Hart’s Eye, and Madnip

POISON IVY Other names: Poison Creeper and Three-Leafed Ivy How to identify: Leaflets three, let it be! The leaves of this plant are divided into three leaflets, which may vary in size, shape, and appearance. Some leaves have a slightly toothed edged while others are smooth. Flowers are a greenish yellow and they produce a yellowish-white berry with stripes that make them resemble a peeled orange. The danger: Poison ivy causes dermatitis in the form of skin irritation (read: wicked itch) and blisters that eventually turn into scabs. Symptoms usually occur within 24 hours of exposure.

How to identify: This plant is commonly found in roadside ditches and grasslands. The plant, in its younger stages, will produce a rosette of large leaves that look like celery leaves. As it ages, it will grow to 3 to 5 feet tall and produce flowers. The flowers are arranged in clusters and have five small, yellow petals.

What to do if exposed: Wash the area as soon as possible with soap and water. While pharmacies have a wide range of products available should a rash develop, simple home remedies can include a bath in baking soda, a poultice made from an apple cider vinegar-soaked paper bag, or applying banana peels or cucumbers to sooth the rash.

The danger: Mild exposure will produce red areas on the skin that feel sunburned. In more serious cases, the skin first turns red and blisters. If the sap gets on your skin and is exposed to sunlight, it is possible to suffer severe blistering that usually forms within 24 to 48 hours of exposure. The scars from the more severe burns can last for months or even years. What to do if exposed: Wash with soap and water as quickly as possible. Cool, wet clothes can be applied to help relieve the burning sensation.

STINGING NETTLE Other name: Burning Nettle How to identify: This plant is routinely found in the fertile soil of barnyards and fencerows. The plant itself grows to heights of 2 to 7 feet and the dark green leaves range from 3 to 6 inches long. The leaves have saw-toothed edges and are covered with stinging hairs. The danger: As the name indicates, exposure to this plant can cause welts, skin inflammation, and a burning sensation. The burning will begin almost immediately as the hairs act like tiny needles that inject chemicals into the skin. What to do if exposed: Use tape or tweezers to remove the hairs from the skin. Cooling creams, lotions, and anti-itch topical medications usually will sooth the symptoms soon after application.

34

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

EXERCISE /

OUTDOORS

POISON SUMAC Other names: Poison Dogwood, Poison Ash, Poison Elder, and Swamp Sumac How to identify: This plant grows as a shrub or tree, ranges from 5 to 25 feet high, and is usually found in swamps. Poison Sumac has greenish-white berries similar to those of poison ivy, and the leaves turn orange-red in the fall. The danger: Contact with the plant causes blisters to form within 24 hours. What to do if exposed: Wash the area with soap and water as soon as possible. If blisters develop, soak in a cool oatmeal or baking soda bath. You can purchase Dome-Boro tablets over the counter at most pharmacies, which can be mixed with pint of water. The solution is then used to create compresses that can be applied to the affected area.

/ S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N / C A M P S / S A F E T Y / PA R K S / T R AV E L / G A R D E N I N G


E X E R C I S E / O U T D O O R S / S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N / C A M P S / S A F E T Y / PA R K S / T R AV E L / A G R I C U LT U R E

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

35


activity

summer camps offering something special From history to firefighting, your kids can learn a lot B Y C V F A M I LY S TA F F NORDIC SUM M E R C A M P A T THE AGER H O U S E This three-day camp (Aug. 1-3) gives campers the chance to learn about Nordic lanAG E S guages (think Swedish and Norwegian), practice their kubb skills, and sample dishes, arts, and music from Scandinavian countries. • Contact (715) 834-5204 or visit agerhouse.org

7-12

GIRLS ON FIRE CAMP AT CVTC This exciting camp, full of adrenalin and learning, runs Aug. 7-11 and covers every skill a professional firefighter and EMS AG E S worker uses on the job. Girls will don firefighter gear, play team-building games, engage in fitness activities, and practice lifesaving measures on a patient simulator. • Contact (715) 855-7508, email kmero6@cvtc.edu, or visit cvtc.edu

7-12

TIME TRAVELERS AT THE CHIPPEWA VALLEY MUSEUM Every Wednesday starting in June, the museum educator takes students back in time through AG E S our region’s history. From local experts to hands-on adventures in our area, campers get the opportunity to learn about what makes the Valley so amazing. • Contact (715) 834-7871 or visit www.cvmuseum.com

6-12

FOLK ART MINI-CAMPS AT THE ATELIER STUDIO The Atelier Studio in Chippewa Falls is offering folk art minicamps and classes for kids on various dates throughout AG E S the summer. Arts include calligraphy, knitting, weaving, crocheting, printmaking, origami, watercolor, bookmaking, and more. Private classes are also available. • Contact (715) 933-2510 or luciannefbd@gmail.com

7-11

36

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

dig into local community gardens Whatever your age or experience level, you can join the local food movement B Y K AT I E R O B E R T S O N / P H O T O B Y A N D R E A PA U L S E T H

A

ndrew Werthmann and the other community gardeners of Eau Claire certainly aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty. Having grown up on an organic dairy farm, Werthmann knew when he came to UW-Eau Claire in 2001 that he wanted to become a part of the food-growing process. With an eye on that goal, he co-founded the Eau Claire Community Gardens back in 2010, and the program has only grown since then. As the gardens move into their seventh season, Werthmann expects that the group will grow beyond the 200-plus members it had last year. About 100 gardeners cared for the Forest Street garden alone, but there is definitely room for more people to dig in at all of the city’s community gardens. Getting involved is easy: You can either rent an individual plot or join a shared garden and volunteer time to help maintain it. Being part of the shared gardens does not obligate you to put in a set number of hours, however. You volunteer as much as you can when you can. Whether you’re a first-time gardener or a seasoned veteran of the soil, the gardening community is very welcoming. Newcomers can work alongside experienced gardeners on the group plots doing a variety of jobs, such as managing rain barrels, tending to compost piles, watering, general maintenance, and harvesting. Volunteers get to bring home a cut of the harvest, and the rest goes to the Com-

FOREST STREET GARDENS, EAU CLAIRE

munity Table food pantry. The gardens usually contribute between 2,000 and 4,000 pounds of fresh produce to the pantry each year, which is about 70 percent of the harvest. Aside from gardening, the community also holds a couple of potlucks and social gatherings throughout the season to relax and get to know one another. There are also meetings about garden management, which shared-garden and individual plot members can attend to help hash out any issues and give their input about what should be done. Gardeners make decisions together, which is one of the many aspects of community gardens that fosters a positive, communal environment.

Werthmann notes that, like him, many people in the area have backgrounds in farming and growing food. These experiences usually come with fond memories, and tending community gardens allows people to remember those times while creating new memories with friends and family. Community gardening also provides healthier food options to families, allows people to spend some time outdoors, and helps build ties with neighbors and other members of the Eau Claire community. For additional information about a garden near you or to sign up for the upcoming season, check out the Eau Claire Community Gardens website at eauclairecommunitygardens.com.

OUT THE DOOR

QUICK TRIPS AND PLACES THE WHOLE CLAN CAN EXPLORE

fawn over critters at Fawn-Doe-Rosa If you want to get in a little furry BONUS: If you have some added fun outside of the Valley, head to time to kill, Wild Mountain is just a Fawn-Doe-Rosa in Saint Croix Falls. short drive away in Taylors Falls, This 53-year-old, 17-acre wildlife Minn. Families can burn off energy educational park gets you and (and cool down if needed!) at an the kiddos up close and personal enormous water park complete AG E S with a variety of animals. Deer, with water slides, a lazy river, and birds, goats, and sheep roam freely a water playground. There’s even around the park and are extremely a 1,700-foot-long Alpine Slide that friendly to their human visitors. carries daring riders down the side of Guests have the opportunity to pet the ski “mountain.” live skunks, ride miniature ponies, Fawn-Doe-Rosa Wildlife Educational and watch bears, wild cats, and farm Park • (715) 483-3772 • fawndoerosa.com animals enjoy a life of leisure with the Wild Mountain • 37200 Wild help of an extremely knowledgeable Mountain Road, Taylors Falls, Minn. • and caring staff. (651) 465-6365 • wildmountain.com

ALL

EXERCISE /

OUTDOORS

/ S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N /

CAMPS

/ S A F E T Y / PA R K S /

T R AV E L

/

GARDENING


activity

4 fantastic pizza farms within driving distance Pack up the family and head out to one of these idyllic Wisconsin farms to gorge on pizza made with locally sourced ingredients

A

recent trend has Midwestern farms converting themselves into gourmet pizza parlors across the state. Farms have found a new way to utilize their resources by harvesting fresh, homegrown ingredients to craft mouth-watering pizzas that can be enjoyed right there on the farm. Round up your family and friends for a summer picnic on one of Wisconsin’s pizza farms!

AtoZ PRODUCE AND BAKERY Stockholm Drive time: 1 hour AtoZ Produce and Bakery, located just east of the Mississippi River, has developed quite the following for their highly regarded pizza nights. Once winter is behind us, AtoZ opens its doors to serve unique, woodfired pizzas to hoards of hungry customers. Wait times increase significantly as the days get warmer, but pizza will be served rain or shine. AtoZ now also serves wine and beer by the bottle. If you’re in a rush and can’t stay to enjoy the atmosphere, the folks at AtoZ would be more than happy to fix you up a pizza to go! STONEY ACRES FARM Athens Drive time: 1 hour, 30 mins. Stoney Acres offers a range of seasonal pizzas in addition to their rotating selection of specials. If pizza isn’t enough on your visit, don’t forget to check out the farmer’s market stand for some fresh produce (and maybe even some sweets!) to take home with you. They also feature various local area and artisan cheeses from across Wisconsin. Think of Stoney Acres Farm as your one-stop farm shop!

E X E R C I S E / O U T D O O R S / S P O R T S / R E C R E AT I O N / C A M P S / S A F E T Y / PA R K S / T R AV E L /

SUNCREST GARDENS FARM Cochrane Drive time: 1 hour Suncrest Gardens Farm, settled in the serene Yaeger Valley, is the perfect farm for a pizza dinner. Wood-fired pizzas are cooked in less than two minutes, thanks to their handmade, Italian-style oven. Suncrest also offers a gluten-free option for those with special dietary needs. Be sure to check suncrestgardensfarm. com for a full schedule of live music throughout the season! THE STONE BARN Nelson Drive time: 1 hour The Stone Barn in Nelson will have you raving about its hand rolled crusts and homegrown toppings. All of the meats used as toppings are locally raised and hand-seasoned so that every bite bursts with flavor. Don’t forget dessert! The Stone Barn also serves ice cream so you won’t have to leave without satisfying that sweet tooth. New pizzas are added to the menu often, but you can always customize your pizza with the “build your own” option. –Travel Wisconsin

A G R I C U LT U R E

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

37


kids & family events: may / june 2016

GET OUT THERE. YOUR FUN AWAITS. E A U C L A I R E / C H I P P E WA FA L L S / M E N O M O N I E / & P O I N T S B E T W E E N Family-oriented happenings in the Chippewa Valley // All events are subject to change, please call ahead to confirm. Find even more searchable family events, or list yours free, at www.ChippewaValleyFamily.org, or by calling 715-552-0457.

ARTS & CRAFTS CREATE: An Expressive Art Group for Kids and Teens

Tuesdays, 4:15-5:15pm (Ages 8-11); 5:30-6:30pm (Ages 12-15); 6:45-7:45pm (Ages 16-18) • HopeTree Family Therapy, 3521 London Rd, Suite B, Eau Claire • $25 for all age groups • (715)770-9335 • hopetreefamilytherapy.com/special-events.html This group will be using expressive art to help increase self-esteem and process feelings in a fun and creative environment. No experience necessary. Materials and a light snack will be provided.

Young Artists May. 6, noon-2pm; May. 28, 2-4pm

• Eau Claire Regional Arts Center, 316 Eau Claire St., Eau Claire • $25 • 6-10, 11-18 • (715) 832-2787 • EauClaireArts.com A 2-hour workshop to help inspire young creative minds. A fun and qualified instructor will guide you through the painting of your very own masterpiece. Everything you need is provided to create a work of art - and you take your painting home at the end of class.

Chippewa Valley Museum: Mommy & Me Painting Party May. 7, 10am-noon • Chippewa Valley Museum,

1204 E. Half Moon Dr., Eau Claire • $10 for CVM members, $15 for non-members; pre-registration required • 3-18 • (715) 834-7871 • cvmuseum.com Join guest artist Cyndi Kortbein from The Paint Shack for a painting party. Just in time for Mother’s Day, this class is designed for a child and parent (or grandparent!) to collaborate on an original work of art. Cyndi will guide participants through step-by-step instructions to complete a two-part painted masterpiece featuring a vase on one canvas and the flowers on another. All materials provided.

Tracy Lea Landis Hand-Dyed Apparel Trunk Show

May. 7, 1-4pm • Arts Coming Together: School of the Arts, 107 Wilson Court, Menomonie • FREE • All Ages • (715) 233-4293 • facebook.com/zenwarriorberet/ Local artist and hand-dyer Tracy Lea Landis will be showing off her new cotton and rayon hand-dyed clothing for 2016 before it’s made available at the local farmer’s market. In the midst of the on-going display of Landis’ cotton muslin tapestry called “Yard Flags,” she will be showing colorful washfast hand-dyed garments for the whole family.

GIANT SLIDES AT EAU CLAIRE’S CARSON PARK

Mom ‘n Me Zumba & Craft Party May. 7, 8-10am •

Z.Vida Fitness @ The Center, 3701 E. Clairemont Avenue, Eau Claire • $20 per mom ‘n kid team ($5 per extra child) • Kids (Ages 7-14) and their Moms • zumba. com Moms will enjoy an energizing dance party while kiddos prepare special Mother’s Day crafts. Then switch and the kids take to the dance floor while the moms relax with coffee and treats. Space is limited & pre-registration is required. E-mail your name, child’s name & age, and contact info by 5/4.

Annual Chippewa Valley Homeschool Book Sale & Kid’s Craft Sale May. 7, 9am-noon • Bethesda Lutheran Church, • FREE • All dors with new games, crafts,

123 W. Hamilton Ave., Eau Claire Ages • (715) 835-5073 40+ venand used books, curriculum, toys, and misc. educational resources.

FAMILY FRIENDLY FESTS Bowling With Buddies May. 1, noon-4pm • Bowl Win-

kles, 1616 N Clairemont Ave, Eau Claire • $25 for 3 games (shoes included) for 2 people • (715) 552-0564 • specialolympicswisconsin.org Bowling with Buddies pairs Special Olympics Athletes with local league bowlers. The public is welcomed to support this cause and take advantage of our special event pricing, raffles, and more. Proceeds from the event benefit The Special Olympics. The first 60 bowlers who team up with a Special Olympic Athlete and sign up ahead of time get

38

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

ANDREA PAULSETH

FREE bowling, shoes, and pizza. Sign up via e-mail.

Bowl for Kids Sake! Bowling Fundraiser May. 3, 5, 6,

19, 20, 5:30pm • Wagner’s Lanes, 2159 Brackett Ave, Eau Claire • $25 per team • All Ages • 715-828-3536 • bbbsnw.org This signature Brothers Big Sisters of Northwestern Wisconsin fundraiser raises 40% of its annual budget. Participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite celebrity or character on the big or small screen as they compete in games and contests for prizes, all while helping to raise money for a great cause.

7th Annual Fairy Tale Ball May. 6, 6-8:30pm • The Flo-

rian Gardens, 2340 Lorch Ave, Eau Claire • $10 (activity/food tickets sold separately • All Ages • (715) 8327529 • cvtg.org An evening with live Disney characters, games, entertainment, dress-up, activities, Sharp Photo booth, food, dancing, horse-drawn carriage rides, and a special visit from Princess Leia and friends.

The Past Passed Here May. 12 & 13, 3-6pm; May. 14,

9am-6pm; May. 15, 9am-4pm • Allen Park, S. Bridge St., Chippewa Falls • $3/person, FREE for 5 and under • All Ages • Journey back in time 150+ years and experience early Wisconsin’s “living history”. Explore authentic French fur trade camps and participate in hands-on camp activities. Interact with dozens of colorful and knowledgeable re-enactors and buy a rare souvenir. Visit a new Lumberjack exhibit. Enjoy old-fashioned food, live music and family fun.

69th Annual Doll & Pet Parade May. 14, 1pm • Water

Street, Eau Claire • FREE • All Ages Water Street Mer-

chants present the 69th Annual Doll & Pet Parade. This year’s theme is a Beach Party. Featuring bands, treats, clowns, prizes and more for the entire family.

Father/Daughter Dance May. 14, 6:30-9pm • Eau

Claire YMCA, 700 Graham Ave., Eau Claire • $10 Y members, $15 community • 4+ • (715) 836-8460 • eauclaireymca.org No moms allowed! This magical event is just for dads (or other male role models) and their daughters to enjoy an evening together with music and refreshments. Come dressed in your best for this night that you will not soon forget! All daughters who register by April 30 are eligible to receive a FREE corsage on the big night.

Friday Family Night Every Friday until May. 20,

5-9pm • Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center, 3456 Craig Road, Eau Claire • $4 • Ages up to 12 • (715) 552-1200 • ecsportscenter.com Bring the whole family for Friday Family Night from 5-9pm sponsored by Group Health Cooperative of Eau Claire. Enjoy a variety of activities including basketball, volleyball, soccer, football, inflatables, coloring, movie time and free popcorn. We’ll have something for everyone.

Family Fun Zone Every Monday, Thursday, Friday until

May. 27, 9-11:30am • Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center, 3456 Craig Road, Eau Claire • $4/child, adults are FREE • Ages up to 12 • (715) 552-1200 • ecsportscenter. com Spend some quality time with your children while they enjoy the large inflatables, riding-toys, big bouncy balls, dress-up, book corner, and so much more. Come and go as you would like.

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

30th Annual Fido & Friends Fun Run May. 21, 11am-

3pm • Carson Park- Pine Pavilion, Carson Park Dr., Eau Claire • $30/person • All Ages • 715-839-4747 • eccha.org Fundraiser for the Eau Claire County Humane Association. Registration begins at 11am with the fun run starting at noon. Your furry friend is welcome to participate in the talent show. Vendor tables to visit and food concessions will be available.

Maxx’s Splash Bash: School’s Out Jun. 12, 1-4pm •

Fairfax Pool, 4200 Fairfax St., Eau Claire • $4.25 or Fairfax Season Pass • All Ages • (715) 839-1680 Join us for music, games, and inflatable fun as we celebrate the beginning of summer.

liveART 6 & Plein Air Paint at Manyfires Art Studio and Farm Jun. 18, 9am-5pm • Manyfires Studio &

Farm, 14008 Olson Dr., Fall Creek • FREE • All Ages • (715) 877-3155 • manyfires.net Create art with your family and friends, see professional artists create artwork, and experience a fun day of the arts at your own pace all for free. Sit down in the grass and listen to live music, grab a chair and sketch with an instructor, and hike the land of the beautiful farm to find different artists, talk to them about their work, and purchase pieces to take home.

Wisconsin State Button Show Jun. 9, 6-9pm; Jun. 10,

11am-5pm; Jun. 11, 9:30am-2pm • Plaza Hotel & Suites, 1202 West Clairemont Avenue, Eau Claire • FREE • All Ages • wsbs.org Features buttons in all price ranges for sale by national dealers. In addition, the show will

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES


events: may/june feature educational displays and a judged button competition. On Saturday morning from 10:30-11:30am, a discussion of the educational exhibits will take place in the showroom. Come to see the magnificent miniature works of wearable art.

Friends of the Menomonie Library Book Sale Apr. 29,

10am-5:30pm; Apr. 30, 10am-4:30pm; May. 1, 1-3pm • Menomonie Public Library, 600 Wolske Bay Rd, Menomonie • FREE admission • ALL • (715) 232-2164 • menomonielibrary.org Books, DVD’s, CD’s and more for sale. Thursday night is a pre-sale for Friends of the Library only; you can sign up for a membership that night at the door. Sunday sale is a $5 bag sale.

Just Between Friends Community Kids Sale May. 5,

10am-8pm; May. 6, 10am-8pm; May. 7, 10am-8pm • Altoona Hobbs Sports Center, 2300 Spooner Ave, Altoona • $2 Donation - First Day only • All Ages • eauclaire.jbfsale.com Everything for kids & more: furniture, strollers, high chars, carseats, ride-em toys, bikes, toddler beds, exersaucers, infant items, bedding, kids, teen & maternity clothing, costumes, shoes, DVDs, electronics, books, and toys. Learn more about shopping and selling with JBF online.

Pause and Pamper: Retreat for Mothers and Daughters May. 7, 9am-5pm • Metropolis Resort, 5150 Fair-

view Drive, Eau Claire • $75/moms and $25/daughter(s) • (888) 861-6001 • metropolisresort.com A fun and relaxing retreat for moms and their teenage daughters (age 12-18) at Metropolis Resort. A chance to reconnect and enjoy time together. Attendees will enjoy facials, massages, manicures and pedicures, rock wall team building, yoga sessions, a maze challenge, photo booth, communication workshops, health experts and more.

FISHING EVENTS Sunday Music at the Fish Farm Sundays May. 8 - Sep.

25, 1:30-4:30pm • Bullfrog’s Eat My Fish Farm, N1321 566th Street, Menomonie • FREE • All Ages • (715) 6648775 • eatmyfish.com Catch some local music at the side of the pond, Sunday afternoons at the Fish Farm. Sit back, relax, drop your lures and eat some Hobo Shorelunches.

Hooked on Fishing Jun. 4, 9-11am • Lake Hallie Sport-

man’s Club, 2910 109th St, Chippewa Falls • FREE • All Ages • (715) 726-1050 Some fish poles are available for loan for children who don’t have poles, and Mouldy’s Tackle supplies the worms. Children fish from the fishing pier on Lake Hallie. A casting “contest” is also held during the fishing time. A lunch of nacho chips with cheese, fruit, hot dogs, soda, and water is served. Prizes donated by local businesses. Held rain or shine.

Fishing Fundamentals Workshop May. 7, 10am-4pm

• Menomonie Public Library/ Point Comfort Park, 600 Wolske Bay Rd, Menomonie • FREE • All Ages • (715) 232-2164 Ext. 10 • menomonielibrary.org Start at the indoors clinic at the Menomonie Public Library. Clinic geared toward young anglers accompanied by parents. Topics include safety, invasive species, knot tying, fish handling and more. Many prizes to be given away. Lots of hands on fun with bait, casting, fishing, and a walleye and bass boat tour at Point Comfort Park in the afternoon.

Parent and Child Fly Fishing Clinic Jun.

15, 9am-12:30pm • Beaver Creek Reserve, S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • $30 for Friends, $40 for Nonmembers • 12+ • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Join Trout Unlimited volunteers and Beaver Creek Reserve staff for a fun morning learning the ins and outs of fly fishing. You will learn how to tie flies, how to cast a fly rod, and then travel to a local pond to try your hand at catching some fish with your very own flies. This camp is open to youth ages 12 and up, and a parent or legal guardian.

GARDENING Tiny Scientists - Plant Lab Mondays until May. 16,

Tuesdays until May 10, 10:30-11:30am • Lily Pad Lab, 2524 Golf Rd S2D, Eau Claire • $50, Drop in $12 (call ahead) • Age 2-6 • 715-529-6186 • lilypadlab.com You and your child will share in learning about plants, the Earth, and what it means to be a scientist. Hands-on experiments, interactive nature activities and science related art projects, and work together to create LPL’s plot in a community garden. Drop ins are welcome for all classes but please call ahead to ensure there is space available. 1, 8am-5pm • Down To Earth Garden Center, 6025 Arndt Ln., Eau Claire • FREE • All Ages • (715) 833-1234 • dwntoearth.com Spring is in the air and we have many great specials all weekend. The friendly staff to help you get your spring planting and landscaping projects started. Enter the Spring Spectacular Drawing in the Greenhouse for a chance to win a Beautiful Hanging Basket.

FO R TH E MO ST UP -TO -DATE LIS TIN GS & EV EN TS !

FOOD EVENTS

Spring Spectacular - Open House Apr. 30, 9am-5pm; May.

Jr. Chef Cooking Classes: Street Food Extravaganza

Mother’s Day Celebration Weekend May. 7 & 8, 9am-

Pizza Fest May. 20, 6-8pm; May. 20, 6-8pm • Children’s

“Construct” A Mini Garden Party Jun. 7, 4pm • Down

Mother’s Day Brunch @ 29 Pines May. 8, 10am-2pm •

Father’s Day Weekend Jun. 18 & 19, 9am-5pm • Down

May. 14, 1-4pm (ages 9-12), 5-8pm (ages 13-17) • Forage, 930 Galloway St., Building 13, Suite 212, Eau Claire • $50 per class • 715-309-9331 • palateprofessor.com The fifth in Chef Michelle Kauffman’s series of kids cooking classes. Each class will build off of the previous lesson. Maximum 12 students per class. Preregistration and pre-payment required.

Museum of Eau Claire, 220 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • Tickets $7 each (no one family pays more than $25) • All Ages • (715) 832-KIDS • ChildrensMuseumEC.com Grab the kids and come hungry for Pizza Fest, a brandnew, family-friendly event. Enjoy all-you-can-eat pizza samples from all over the Chippewa Valley, unlimited trips to the Bitty Beverage Bar, Fabulous Face Painting, Brilliant Balloon Animals, Museum Play & more. 29 Pines Hotel and Convention Center, 5872 33rd Ave., Eau Claire • $16 Adults, $14 Senior (60+), $6 Children (6-12), $4 Children (3-5) • All Ages • (715) 874-2929 • facebook.com Be the favorite child and bring Mom to Mother’s Day Brunch at 29 Pines. Reservations recommended.

THE BIG TO-DO

5pm • Down To Earth Garden Center, 6025 Arndt Ln., Eau Claire • FREE to attend • All Ages • (715) 8331234 • dwntoearth.com Stroll through the greenhouse and get some coffee at the cafe. Free chocolate covered strawberries for all moms. (while supplies last). Enter the Mother’s Day Drawing for a chance to win one of several great prizes. To Earth Garden Center, 6025 Arndt Ln., Eau Claire • $35 child, $20 adult (Price of mini garden included in child ticket price) • All Ages • (715) 833-1234 • dwntoearth.com This mini-garden party is geared toward kids that love to dig in the dirt. Enjoy a rough and tumble lunch constructed of sandwiches, “dirt cake” and more. Finish the event with a construction themed mini garden that you get to take home. To Earth Garden Center, 6025 Arndt Ln., Eau Claire • FREE to attend • All Ages • (715) 833-1234 • dwntoearth.com Include a visit to Down To Earth as part of your Father’s Day weekend to pick out a tree for Dad on his special day while he enjoys a free root beer float and a lunch special.

5 family event picks may and june

H

SEVENTH ANNUAL FAIRYTALE BALL

ADVENTURE RACE TUNE-UP

PIZZA FEST

May 6 • Florian Gardens, Eau Claire • 6-8:30pm Disney characters, games, live entertainment, dress-up, horse carriages and much much more. Princess Leia and all her friends from a galaxy far far away will be there.

May 14 • Wakanda Park, Menomonie • 10am-2pm Calling all adventurers in the Chippewa Valley. Test your endurance by trekking, biking, and paddling your way through the course while using a series of maps to navigate your way team through the wilderness.

THE PAST PASSED HERE

LIVEART 6 & PLEIN AIR PAINT Jun. 18 • Manyfires Studio & Farm • 9am-5pm Tour the grounds of the Many Fires studio and farm, watch artists practice their craft, listen to live music, and sit and sketch with instructors. Bring your artistically minded kids to this familyfriendly art festival and experience the arts at your own pace.

May 12-14 • Allen Park, Chippewa Falls Travel back in time and experience early Wisconsin history. Learn about the Voyageurs; early French explorers and fur trappers in dozens of hands-on, “living-history” installations. Live music, old-fashioned food, and colorful re-enactors.

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

May 20 • Children’s Museum of Eau Claire Pizza samples will be served from restaurants all over the Chippewa Valley. It’s all you can eat, plus trips to the Bitty Beverage Bar, balloons, time to play in the museum, and more.

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

39


events: may/june MUSIC & PERFORMING A R TS L E SS O N S Swan Lake Ballet Classes - Kids Every Monday, Sat-

urday, Sunday until Jun. 6 • Swan Lake Ballet Studio, Banbury Place Bldg 13 Ste 122, Eau Claire • $5-8 for 1 class, $25-$49 for 8 classes • 5-12 • 715-590-8502 • swanlakeballetstudio.com Spring 9-week ballet lesson series. Learn diversity through dance, study classical ballet vocabulary, build up strong body, and experience creativity in dance. Students learn classical ballet choreography and perform at various venues such as Mabel

Tainter and the UWEC Davies Center. Go online for age bracket and class information.

Chippewa Valley Theatre Guild: Shakespeare Workshop Jul. 18-22 & Jul. 25-29, 9am-4pm • The Chippewa

Valley Theatre Guild, 102 West Grand Avenue, Eau Claire • $120, FREE for ECASD Students • High School Students • 715-832-7523 • cvtg.org This workshop is designed for actors and students interested in behind the scenes work. Open to entering freshmen through graduating seniors. Will give students the skills to interpret, perform, and design a Shakespeare play

Total Percussion Camp Jun. 13-17, 9am-noon • Haas

Fine Arts, UW-Eau Claire Campus, 102 Water Street, Eau Claire • $169 per student – early bird through May 16; $189 per student – after May 16 • Grades 6-12 • uwec.edu A challenging, fast-paced week of instruction and performance in all areas of percussion including mallet, drum set, snare, timpani, concert and world percussion. Focus on technique, musicianship and ensemble playing. Instruction is divided into beginner, intermediate and advanced tracks for most lessons.

Beginning Ukulele Camp Jun. 13-17 & 20-24 • Eau

Claire Music School, 1620 Ohm Avenue, Eau Claire • $39 • 2nd-9th graders • 715-514-0475 • eauclairemusicschool.com Affordable, portable, and fun, the ukulele is a great way to start the lifelong practice of music making. Students will learn how to play melodies, chords, and songs, plus they’ll about the history of the ukulele and its big impact on American culture.

NATURE & SCIENCE INTERESTS Children’s Museum: Super Small Science! May. 3,

11-11:30am • Children’s Museum of Eau Claire, 220 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • Free with Museum Membership or Admission • Preschool & under (w/ grown-up) • (715) 832-KIDS • ChildrensMuseumEC.com Introduce your little one to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) early. Join Dr. Labcoat for some hands-on, squishy science as you discover the very big (and sometimes very small) world around us.

Australian Animals May. 15, 2pm • The Heyde Cen-

ter for the Arts, 3 South High St., Chippewa Falls • $7 Adults, $6 Seniors, $3 Youth, $16 Family • All Ages • (715) 726-9000 • cvca.net Australian Animals will showcase 5 – 8 live animals from Australia and talk about their survival, natural history, geography, natural behaviors and conservation education. The presenter, Wildlife Encounters, works with “Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom” and “Animal Planet” to promote awareness and enthusiasm for wildlife conservation education.

B is for Birding Jun. 14, 8-11am • Beaver Creek Reserve,

S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • $20 for Friends, $30 for Nonmembers • Age 7-9 • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Birds are fabulously cool creatures! They come in all colors and shapes and most of them can FLY! Designed to help young nature lovers discover the marvels of the bird world, this camp will introduce beginning ornithologists to bird identification, proper use of binoculars and simple field guides. After some inside classroom time, we will take our new-found skills on the trail to search for birds. Warning: your child may develop a lifelong love for the birds and their habitats when encouraged to join fun outings like this.

Nature Nuts, Ages 5-6 Jun. 20-24, 9:30am-noon • Bea-

ver Creek Reserve, S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • $50 for Friends, $60 for Nonmembers, Free for ECASD Students • Ages 5-6 • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve. org Nature Nuts is designed to encourage the inherent curiosities of young nature lovers. Daily activities are geared to discovery of the natural world. Adventures include activities like adopting a tree, meeting a Rock Wizard, searching for the elusive pieces of the rainbow and creative art projects.

R is for Reptiles Jun. 28, 9:30-11:30am • Beaver

Creek Reserve, S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • $20 for Friends, $30 for Nonmembers • Age 5-6 • (715) 8772212 • beavercreekreserve.org This camp is perfect for the child who is fascinated with animals and learning more about them. We will learn about local reptiles, meet some of the reptiles that live here at the Nature Center and will take to the trails to see if we can find any of the reptiles that call the Reserve home.

Geology Underground Jun. 30, 9am-3pm • Beaver

Creek Reserve, S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • $45 for Friends, $55 for Nonmembers, FREE for ECASD Students | Choose One Day • 7th & 8th Graders • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Learn first-hand about how caves are formed and some of the geology of west central Wisconsin as we take a guided tour of Crystal Cave. If time allows, you will be able to try your hand at panning for gold along the Eau Claire River. Transportation and cave admission included. Bring a lunch and come dressed for being inside a cool cave.

40

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES


events: may/june HAVE A BLAST IDEAS FOR LOCAL ‘DATES’ WITH YOUR KIDS

get your kid hooked on fishing For some of us, nothing brings on a wave of nostalgia like the idea of sitting next to dear ol’ dad in a jon boat while casting out a fishing line in hopes of reeling in the big one. But unfortunately, many kids today aren’t getting that same opportunity. That’s why the Hallie Optimist Club gives kids the chance to try the sport at the annual Hooked On Fishing event. While this event is great for the whole family to attend, it may just be the perfect opportunity for fathers and their kiddos to reconnect with nature and each other – making it the perfect date with dad. Hooked On Fishing will be held rain or shine from 8-11am on Saturday, June 4, at the Lake Hallie Sportsman’s Club, 2910 109th St. It’s completely free, and there will be a few poles to borrow for kids who don’t have poles of their own. Mouldy’s Tackle will supply bait for all participants. Children fish directly from the pier on Lake Hallie and can join in on a casting contest

SHOWS & CONCERTS Stepping Up May. 7, 6-8pm • Eau Claire North High

School Auditorium, 1801 Piedmont Rd., Eau Claire • Admission by donation • All Ages • 715-852-6724 Janelle’s School of Irish Dance presents their 10th Annual Irish dance show “Stepping Up”. A familyfriendly show filled with great music & dance. The dance school has taken a step up & jumped outside the box to bringing you a show filled with a unique variety of dances that will keep you (men, women, & children alike) at the edge of your seats.

Infinity Dance Center Spring Recital - Drive-In Movie Night May. 15, 1pm • Eau Claire Memorial High School,

2225 Keith St, Eau Claire • Prices vary -$5.50-$14.00 • All Ages • 7158283110 • infinitydancecenter.info Order tickets online from Infinity Dance Center’s Facebook page.

NHS Big Band Bash May. 20, 6:30pm • The Heyde

Center for the Arts, 3 South High St., Chippewa Falls • Adults $10 Students $5 • (715) 726-9000 • cvca.net The Big Band Bash is NHS Band Parents largest fundraiser of the year. A jazz concert of North and Northstar jazz bands along with a local guest artist Dr. Phil Ostrander. Raffle prizes include Disney tickets, Cancun Vacation, Harley Davidson riding lesson, Packer football tickets, and more. All goes to support the NHS bands.

Sounds like Summer Concert Series Thursdays from

Jun. 2 - Aug. 25, 6:30-8:30pm • Phoenix Park, 330 Riverfront Terrace, Eau Claire • FREE • The Sounds Like Summer Concert Series is Volume One’s Thursday night gig in downtown Eau Claire’s Phoenix Park. Local bands play to crowds each night on the banks of the Chippewa River in June, July, and August. Enjoy a pre-show set from area singer/songwriters at 6pm. Multiple food vendors will have food for sale. Pets are allowed at the concert.

CVTG Presents: The Music Man Jun. 23-25, Jun.

26, 1:30pm • The State Theatre, 316 Eau Claire St., Eau Claire • $22 adult, $20 senior, $10 youth/student • (715) 832-2787 • eauclairearts.com The six-time Tony award winning musical comedy follows fasttalking traveling salesman Harold Hill as he cons the people of River City, Iowa into buying instru-

ANDREA PAULSETH

once they master their skills. While parents aren’t awarded any prizes for catching fish (sorry, grown-ups, the prizes are for the kids!) they’ll likely find that watching their little ones learn about the fine art of fishing is prize enough. For more information, check out hallieoptimistclub.org or facebook. com/hallieoptimist.

ments and uniforms for a boys’ band despite the fact that he doesn’t know a trombone from a treble clef.

E A R LY L E A R N I N G ABC’s for 2’s and 3’s Every Monday from Apr. 11 to

May. 16, 9-10am; Every Thursday from Apr. 14 to May. 19, 10-11am • Lily Pad Lab, 1620 Ohm Avenue, Eau Claire • $40, Drop in $8 (call ahead) • Age 2-3 • lilypadlab.com ABC’s for 2s and 3s is a fun step into exploring letters, numbers, and shapes. Children will enjoy open exploration time, songs, stories, sensory play and art. Register for classes and events online. Drop ins are welcome for all classes but please call ahead to ensure there is space available.

Busy Bodies Every Thursday from Apr. 14 to May. 19,

9-9:45am • Lily Pad Lab, 1620 Ohm Avenue, Eau Claire • $40, Drop ins $12 (call ahead) • Age 18mo - 6yo • 6 week class for kids and adults come have fun and move, move, move! Classes will consist of stretching, action songs, moving with props, dancing, basic tumbling, group movements and obstacle courses. Taught by Ms. Brenda. Drop ins are welcome for ALL classes but please call ahead to ensure there is space available.

Movin’ & Groovin’ Every Monday until May. 31, 9:30-

10:15am • River Source Family Center, 403 High Street, Chippewa Falls • FREE • Birth to 5 years • 715-7201841 • riversourcefamilycenter.com Each Movin’ & Groovin’ class is filled with laughter & fun. This class promotes language & play through the use of instruments, song & dance. No registration required.

Littlest Lab Every Tuesday from Apr. 12 to May. 17,

9:15-10:15am • Lily Pad Lab, 1620 Ohn Avenue, Eau Claire • $30, Drop in $7 • Age 0-2 • 715-514-0475 • lilypadlab.com Lily pad lab invites you to do an activity each week geared towards your child’s development; songs and rhymes, busy bags, simple crafts or sensory play. Guest instructors will share skills useful for early development. Parents can socialize and enjoy refreshments.

Toddler/Parent Class Beginning Movement and Yoga

Every Saturday until May. 28, 9:30-10:15am • Evolution Studio, 3521 London Rd, Ste B (below Active Health Chiropractic), Eau Claire • $6/child • 1.5 to 5 with

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

41


42

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES


events: may/june adult • 7155144648 • baredfeet.wordpress.com/classes/ Wwarm up with action rhymes, move through the developmental stages, explore concepts to fun music through movement games and stories, and wind down with easy yoga and cuddle time. Enjoy bonding and release some of your own stress.

Afternoon Adventures Every Thursday from Apr. 14

to May. 19, 1-2:30pm • Lily Pad Lab, 1620 Ohm Avenue, Eau Claire • $50, Drop ins $12 (call ahead) • Age 2-6 • Fun with art, sensory activities, do science projects, play with letters and numbers as well as provide large scale motor skills activities (obstacle courses, running games, balloon play, etc.). Parents are welcome to participate in the activities or enjoy some quiet time. Drop ins are welcome but please call ahead to ensure there is space available.

ily friendly atmosphere for everyone to enjoy. Come watch some exciting and fun martial arts on display. Eau Claire County Relay For Life Jun. 10, 6pm • Carson Park, Carson Park Dr., Eau Claire • FREE • All Ages • ci.eau-claire.wi.us The American Cancer Society Relay For Life movement is the world’s largest and most impactful fundraising event to end cancer. It unites communities across the globe to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and take action to finish the fight once and for all.

Grandparents Tuesdays at Fairfax Pool Every Tuesday

from May. 31 to Aug. 30, 11:30am-6pm • Fairfax Pool, 4200 Fairfax St., Eau Claire • FREE with children’s admission • (715) 839-1680 Grandparents get into Fairfax Pool for FREE with child’s admission or season pass.

SPECIAL NEEDS Sensory Friendly Movie Screenings May. 7 (Ratchet

& Clank at Micon Cinemas Eau Claire), May. 28 (Angry Birds at location TBD), Jun. 25 (Finding Dory at Micon Chippewa Falls); All movies at 10am • Child’s admission for everyone at all locations • All Ages • Sensory-friendly screenings (lights up and sound down) at multiple locations. Movies and locations are subject to change. Special $1 popcorn and $1 soda price at all locations.

S.P.O.T.S. Presents Yoga and Mindfulness Every

Tuesday until May. 11, 4-4:50pm • S.P.O.T.S. Pediatric

Therapy, 2661 County Hwy I, Chippewa Falls • $120 for 6 sessions (financial assistance available) • 7-12 • (715) 717-5390 • stjoeschipfalls.com/spots The regular practice of yoga has many benefits including increased strength, balance, body awareness and motor planning. Mindfulness is the practice of being present in the moment and slowing your body down to notice around you. Combining both can allow children to slow their body down and focus. This can help decrease anxiety and improve concentration. One-to-one assistance will be provided by UWEC volunteers, or by a parent, if you prefer.

Picky Eaters Every Wednesday until May. 12, 11amnoon • S.P.O.T.S. Pediatric Therapy, 2661 County Hwy I, Chippewa Falls • $140 for 6 weekly sessions (financial assistance available) • Age 3-6 • (715) 717-5390 • st-

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Girls on the Run of the Chippewa Valley 5k May.

14, 10am-noon • Owen Park, 1st Ave., Eau Claire • $20 for Adults, $10 12 & under, after May 1 $25 adult, $15 12 & under • All Ages • gotrchippewavalley.org Girls on the Run of the Chippewa Valley 5K Celebration is a great family friendly non timed run. Fun and festivities begin at 9am, race at 10am. You can register on race day too. Join GOTR to celebrate it’s 10 years of being in the Chippewa Valley, inspiring girls in grades 3-5 to be healthy and confident.

2016 Color Run Packet Pick Up/Check In Party

May. 14, 10:30am-6:30pm • Kohl’s Department Store, 3711 Gateway Drive, Eau Claire • FREE. • 14+ • eventbrite.com Volunteer to help check racers in and receive free registration for the Color Run race on May 15th. Join in the fun by handing out race packets, t-shirts, and other materials.

2016 Color Run May. 15, 7am-1:30pm • Carson

Park, Carson Park Dr., Eau Claire • $34.99, $42.99, $54.99 • All Ages • ci.eau-claire.wi.us The Color Run, also known as the Happiest 5k on the planet, is a unique paint race that celebrates healthiness, happiness and individuality. The YMCA is looking for 200 volunteers to help with this amazing and colorful event to make it not only successful, but fun for everyone participating. Go online for more information.

2nd Annual Chippewa Falls Parkview Color Run May.

21, 9am • Northern Wisconsin State Fairgrounds, 225 Edward St., Chippewa Falls • $25 to register by 3/31, $30 after 4/1 • All ages • parkviewcolorrun.eventbrite. com All money raised from this fun and healthy event will be used to fund extra activities, projects and field trips not covered by school budgets. Online includes free t-shirt and color pack. After the event, there will be a Color Blast After Party with music and Big Blasts of Color.

Adventure Race Tune-Up May. 14, 10am-2pm • Wakan-

da Park, Wakanda Park Rd. and Pine Ave. E, Menomonie • $40 before May 1, $50 after, Advanced registration Required • 12+, under 18 need adult partner • (715) 232-1664 • mnoc.org Novice-level 3-4 hour adventure race involving trekking, biking, paddling, navigation, and special challenges. Pre-registration required.

Twisty Tots Yoga May 1, 11:15-11:55am • The Center

EC, 3701 Hwy 12, Eau Claire • $5/1st Yogi; $3/each additional sibling Yogi • 3-6 years old • The purpose of this class is to get your little one up and moving, while exploring some fun yoga poses to help increase flexibility, balance, strength, and mindfulness.

Lunch Break Skate Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednes-

day, Thursday, Friday until May. 20, 11am-1pm • Hobbs Ice Center, 915 Menomonie Street, Eau Claire • $3/person or City Pass • All Ages • (715)839-5040 • eauclairewi.gov/hobbs Join us out on the ice to stay active during the week. Lunch Break Skate is open to the public - experienced skaters and first-timers. Skate rental is free during Lunch Break Skate.

3rd Annual Family Fun Run May. 20, 6:30pm •

Northstar Middle School, 2711 Abbe Hill Dr., Eau Claire • Pre-registration $15/person and $25/family; $20/person and $30/family after 5/13 • (715) 8525100 • nms.ecasd.k12.wi.us Locust Lane PTO and Northstar PTSA are hosting the 3rd Annual 2 Mile Family Run. Also a 1/4 mile run for the kids along the track. Each participant will be entered for prize drawings and fun family activities will be available. All proceeds from the event support student programs at our schools. Registration forms are available on school webpages and in their main offices.

12th Annual Best of the Best Karate Tournament May.

21, 8am-2pm • McDonnell High School, Chippewa Falls • Spectators $7 for 7yrs & up (6yrs and under are free) • All Ages • elitekaratestudios.com A great fam-

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

43


44

Make it all the way across the monkey bars

Clean out your closet

Go Camping

Read a good book

Explore a Cave

Write your name with sparklers

Do a cannonball

Make a sandcastle

Ride a train

Harvest Something

Grow a Green Thumb

Become one with nature

Find new friends

Eat cheese curds

Get out on the water

Eat local food

Spend the day volunteeringÂ

Watch a movie under the stars

Act like a tourist

Shoot Some Hoops

Feed your brain

Visit a festival

Dance Like No One is Watching

Catch a fish

Eat Frozen Treats

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S


make the most out of summer with our ultimate bucket list

E

ven though summer is just about to begin, we all know how quickly it can go by. Suddenly school is starting again, the leaves are changing, people are rolling out the pumpkins, and you’re left wondering how it’s possible that you didn’t even make it to the beach ONCE. So to combat this summer time-travel phenomenon, we’ve created a handy bucket list to help ensure you don’t miss out on all the Chippewa Valley has to offer during the warmer months. You can rip this right out of the magazine and hang it on the refrigerator as a constant reminder to slow down and explore with the family. But the wonder of this bucket list doesn’t stop with you tacking it up at home. It’s also available in a fully interactive version on our website. Simply join us at ChippewaValleyFamily. org and search “Bucket List.” You’ll be able to click on each component and find helpful lists and articles that’ll make accomplishing your summer goals that much easier. From free music concert listings to s’more recipes, we’ve compiled everything you need to fully soak up the Valley this summer.

events: may/june joeschipfalls.com/spots This group is based on the SOS approach to feeding. Sessions will focus on food exploration, working from smelling and touching foods all the way to eating them. The goal is to increase your child’s comfort level with a variety of foods. Children enrolled in this class must be able to safely chew and swallow a variety of foods, feed self independently with fingers and must be able to follow instructions in a group.

Get it Write Handwriting Every Wednesday until May.

12, 4-5pm • S.P.O.T.S. Pediatric Therapy, 2661 County Hwy I, Chippewa Falls • $140 for 6 weekly sessions (financial assistance available) • Age 7-11 • (715) 7175390 • stjoeschipfalls.com/spots This group is geared for children who have an understanding of letter formation, but are struggling with spacing, size, alignment and accurate top to bottom formation of letters in print or cursive. These children may also have difficulty with pencil control and grasp. The focus of this group will be helping children maintain focus for extended writing periods by increasing their ability to process sensory input and increase fine motor skills.

Picky Eaters - Meal Club Every Thursday until May. 13,

4-5pm • S.P.O.T.S. Pediatric Therapy, 2661 County Hwy I, Chippewa Falls • $140 for 6 weekly sessions (financial assistance available) • Age 8+ • (715) 717-5390 • stjoeschipfalls.com/spots This group is based on the SOS approach to feeding and will be used to combat picky eating while interacting with peers to plan and prepare meals and snacks. This group is geared for children who are 8 years old or older and is led by an occupational therapist. Please note that a variety of foods will be used and the organizers should be alerted to any significant food allergies or intolerances before the group begins.

ClaireArea@gmail.com Learn about how MOMS Club helps at-home moms socialize, make friends, plan activities, go on field trips, and share in the joys of being an at-home mom.

plies last) and meet other mommies. Bring your little ones for awesome playtime OR take advantage of free childcare. Daddies, nannies and caretakers welcome, too. May’s topic is how to get siblings to get along.

Parent Café - Eau Claire County Second Thursday,

5:30-7:30pm • Family Resource Center for Eau Claire County, 4800 Golf Rd., Suite 450, Eau Claire • FREE, registration required • 715-833-1735 • frcec.org Meeting topics will include daily parental concerns, conflict resolution, school preparation, positive discipline, and more. Includes a free dinner, child care, and take home incentives.

Parent Café - Dunn County Third Tuesday, 5:30-

7:30pm • Crossroads Community Center, 710 4th St., Menomonie • FREE, registration required • 715-8282240 Meeting topics will include daily parental concerns, conflict resolution, school preparation, positive discipline, and more. Includes a free dinner, child care, and take home incentives.

Mommy Mingle at the Museum May. 18, 9:30-11am •

Children’s Museum of Eau Claire, 220 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • FREE with Membership or Admission • Mommies and Caregivers • (715) 832-KIDS • ChildrensMuseumEC.com Once the kids are off at school, come enjoy free coffee and breakfast on us (while sup-

P L AYG R O U P S F O R K I DS Play N Learn Play Group May. 6, 9:30-11am • Prai-

rie Ridge Early Learning School, 3031 Epiphany Lane, Eau Claire • FREE • Pre-K • 715-852-3658 • ecasd.us You and your child will experience story time, hands on activities, and lots of learning through play. Snack will be provided. Community resources & food pantry will be available.

Lily Pad Lab Open Lab Every Monday until May. 23,

10:30am-noon • Lily Pad Lab, 2524 Golf Rd S2D, Eau Claire • $4 per child, $10 max per family • 715-5296186 • lilypadlab.com Come enjoy a relaxing morning at the Lily Pad Lab. Kids can play in the sensory table, do an art projects, explore our play-stations and enjoy our educational toys. Free coffee and comfy couches for adults.

Play & Learn Tuesdays & Thursdays• River Source

Family Center, 403 High Street, Chippewa Falls • FREE

Sensory and Social Exploration Every Friday until

May. 14, 11am-noon • S.P.O.T.S. Pediatric Therapy, 2661 County Hwy I, Chippewa Falls • $140 for 6 weekly sessions (financial assistance available) • Age 2-5 • (715) 717-5390 • stjoeschipfalls.com/spots Interactive group for children who are still working on learning how to interact with others as well as the boundaries of their body. This group will be run by a speech-language pathologist and an occupational therapist. Groups will include hands on activities, movement and opportunities for working together. Parents will also be encouraged to participate to better understand sensory strategies (ways to help calm and organize the body) and social skills.

SUPPORT FOR PARENTS Prenatal Yoga at Latitude 44 Yoga Studio Every Mon-

day 7-8pm Tuesday 10-11am until Aug. 15 • Latitude 44 Yoga Studio, 313 E. Madison Street, Eau Claire • $15 drop-in (or membership, punch-card) • (715) 828-3936 • Latitude44Yoga.com This class is designed to strengthen and support your body throughout your pregnancy. Meditation, breath, and movement are used to focus on awareness and muscles that are key to a healthy pregnancy and labor. Connect with your body’s innate wisdom and other moms-to-be in the area.

Postnatal Yoga with Latitude 44 Yoga Studio Tues-

days, Thursdays until Aug. 15, 1:30-2:30pm • Latitude 44 Yoga Studio, 313 E. Madison St., Eau Claire • $15 drop-in (or membership, punch-card) • (715) 828-3936 • Latitude44Yoga.com Postnatal yoga assists with recovery and gently rebuilding the pelvic floor and abdominals following the birth of your baby. Your baby and partner are welcome to join the class as well. Please clear your visit with your doctor prior to joining us.

Parenting and Self Care Thursdays until Jun. 16,

6-7:30pm • Hope Lutheran Church, 2226 Eddy Lane, Eau Claire • $240 for 8 week course • 21+ • 715-5778658 An eight week course on parenting and self care. Enhance your health and wellbeing, manage your stress, improve your effectiveness at work and home. Learn to identify activities and practices that support your wellbeing as a professional and as a parent to help you to sustain positive self-care in the long term.

Mom’s Morning Out Every Friday until May. 27, 9am-

noon • Lily Pad Lab, 2524 Golf Rd S2D, Eau Claire • $10 registration fee, $5/hour, $7/hour under 18 months • 6 months-6 years • 715-529-6186 • lilypadlab.com Every Thursday and Friday morning, Lily Pad Lab offers a special Mom’s (or Dad’s) Morning Out program for children ages 6 months to 6 years. You can drop off your child to join in the fun at any time during the morning. Register online.

The Parenting Class Second Wednesday, 1-2:30pm •

Family Resource Center for Eau Claire County, 4800 Golf Rd., Suite 450, Eau Claire • $10 • 715-833-1735 • frcec.org The Parenting Class will cover various general parenting topics such as: co-parenting, communication, discipline, routines and dealing with children’s anger. Online class also available.

MOMS Club of the Eau Claire Area Second Thursday,

9:30am • Hope Lutheran Church, 2226 Eddy Ln., Eau Claire • FREE • (715) 379-3517 • MomsClubEau-

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

45


events: may/june

LEGO CLUB

• Age 0-5 • 715-720-1841 • riversourcefamilycenter.com You and your child will enjoy free play, songs, dancing, stories, crafts & snacks. Here you will find playing & learning go hand in hand.

Parent and Me Playtime Wednesdays until Jun. 1,

9-11am • Eau Claire Sport Warehouse, 2983 11th St., Eau Claire • $5 per child per session or purchase a 6 session pass for $25 • ages birth-10 • (715) 514-5944 Playtime and fitnesss sessions will be led by Nicole Pederson and her son. Structured fitness time for parents and kids, plus open playtime featuring fun kids’ play equipment, inflatables, parachutes and more.

Parachutes Playtime Fridays, 11-11:30am • Children’s

Museum of Eau Claire, 220 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • FREE with $6 general admission per child • 1-5 • (715) 832-KIDS • ChildrensMuseumEC.com Join us upstairs in our multipurpose space to move and groove with the gigantic parachute! Kids 1-5 and their grown-ups.

46

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

Altoona Public Library: LEGO Club Second Monday un-

til May 9, 3:30-4:45pm • Altoona Public Library, 1303 Lynn Ave., Altoona • FREE • ages 4-12 • 715-839-5029 • altoonapubliclibrary.org LEGOs are provided in the library’s community room for imaginative play. Creations will be displayed in the library for a month. Recommended for children ages 4-12. No sign up required.

Rural Library Play N’ Learn Playgroups Third Tuesdays

at Fall Creek, 9:30-10:45 // Third Tuesdays at Augusta 5:30-6:45 // Third Thursday at Fairchild, 10-11:45am // Third Friday at Altoona, 10-11:45am or 12:30-1:45pm • Family Resource Center for Eau Claire County, 4800 Golf Rd., Suite 450, Eau Claire • FREE • 715-833-1735 • frcec.org Playgroups at Fall Creek, Augusta, Fairchild, and Altoona public libraries hosted Eau Claire Family Resources Center. Free, fun interactive creative learning time for parents and children. Each family will receive a featured book. Call ahead to reserve your space.

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES


C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y /

EVENTS

/ GUIDES / PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

47


local resources, listings, & guides

CHECK IT OUT. JOIN UP. GET BUSY. E A U C L A I R E / C H I P P E WA FA L L S / M E N O M O N I E / & P O I N T S B E T W E E N All information is subject to change, please call ahead to confirm. Find even more searchable listings of local resources, or get your local family organization listed at www.ChippewaValleyFamily.org.

ATTRACTIONS Action City 2402 Lorch Ave., Eau Claire • (888) 861-

6001 • metropolisresort.com/action-city/ Action City is a 55,000-square-foot family-fun center offering more than 100 arcade games, indoor go karts, bumper cars, laser tag, batting cages, a climbing wall, mini bowling, outdoor mini golf, an outdoor slick track, and dining options. Experience the colorful outdoor maze, leading customers through an 8,000-foot series of paths complete with dead ends, unexpected turns, and big twists. Monkey in the Middle Pizza is Action City’s own name brand, made-to-order pizza.

Amish Tours The Woodshed, Augusta Appointment

Only; May through October • 105 West Lincoln Street, Augusta • (715) 286-5404 • woodshedheirlooms. com Augusta is home to one of the largest Amish settlements in Wisconsin, with more than 150 families. This “motor buggy” takes 1.5 to 2 hours, with stops at an Amish bakery and candy shop, woodshop, home, and farm - Carload $42.50 (Fee may be higher for vehicles and vans over 6 passengers).

Bullfrog Fish Farm open with vigor noon-6pm week-

ends, plus some holidays • N1321 566th St., Menomonie • (715) 664-8775 • bullfrog@eatmyfish.com • eatmyfish. com Rent poles or bring your own, fish in the pond, and have your catch cleaned and packed on ice to take home for dinner. No license required; no catch limit.

Carson Park Train Rides Memorial Day-Labor Day:

Noon-5pm Sundays and Holidays • 101 Carson Park Drive, Eau Claire • (715) 831-0900 • chippewavalleyrailroad.org The Chippewa Valley Railroad Depot is a one-quarter sized steam train that gives quarter mile rides through Carson Park. Adults $3, youth $2.

Children’s Museum of Eau Claire 220 S. Barstow St.,

Eau Claire • (715) 832-KIDS • info@cmec.cc • cmec. cc The interactive environment for children and their grown-ups in the Chippewa Valley that inspires imagination, discovery, creativity, and the love of learning. Everything in the museum is designed with a “learning through play” philosophy. When children take part in the activities of the museum, they are entering a world created just for them. $6 admission (Kids under 1 FREE).

Crystal Cave W965 State Road 29, Spring Valley • (715)

778-4414 • acoolcave.com Knowledgeable guides will lead you on a one-hour tour through a maze of welllighted passages where glistening cave formations such as stalactites, stalagmites, and rippling flowstone can be seen hanging from the ceiling or covering the ledges. The cave is accessed by a series of steps and ramps that allow you to descend 70 feet underground where your journey follows well-lit, graveled trails. The cave temperature hovers near 50 degrees, so a sweatshirt is recommended. See contact info for admission costs.

Irvine Park Zoo Open daily year-round from dawn until

dusk. Petting zoo open Memorial Day-Labor Day, daily 10am-6pm. Christmas Village open Thanksgiving Day to New Years Day from 7am to 9pm • Bridgewater Ave., Chippewa Falls • (715) 723-0051 • Info@irvineparkzoo. org The mission of this park is to foster public support for the animals of the Irvine Park Zoo by: educating the public about their preservation, creating a positive environment for the interaction of humans and animals, and to provide funding for the animals’ living quarters.

FAMILY & SOCIAL SERVICES EDUCATION Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northwestern Wisconsin 424 Galloway St., Eau Claire • 835-0161 • info@

bbbsnw.org • bbbsnw.org Big Brothers Big Sisters helps children reach their potential through professionally

48

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

supported one-to-one relationships. Check out their services, or donate or volunteer to be a “Big,” helping your “Little” better their life and relationships.

Boy & Girls Clubs of the Greater Chippewa Valley

201 E. Lake St., Eau Claire • 855-0081 • cvclubs. org Established in 2001, “The Club” provides a safe place for kids to go after school and during school vacations. The Club provides structured programming, homework help, and healthy meals for youth in grades 3-12 in Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls and grades 3-5 in Menomonie.

Eau Claire Family Literacy 510 S Farwell St., Eau

Claire • (715) 835-0610 • ecflwdhs@westerndairyland. org • westerndairyland.org A collaborative literacy program in Eau Claire. Programs involved: Western Dairyland Head Start, YMCA (Infant, Toddler Child Care) and Literacy Volunteers - Chippewa Valley. Education at the same site. Full day, full year program for 3-5 year olds offering family literacy and wrap-around child care for 2-5 year olds.

Educational Solutions 2224 Heimstead Rd., Eau

Claire • 715-552-1620 • edso.co Founded for the sole purpose of serving the needs of children and families. Their mission is to nurture abilities and the independence of children who are challenged by developmental, learning, and emotional disorders by providing a broad spectrum of advanced therapeutic and educational programs.

Head Start Contact the Eau Claire Area School Dis-

trict • (715) 852-3600 • ecasd.us Head Start is a free preschool program for income-eligible families with children ages 3-5. Head Start offers a creative learning environment with age-appropriate activities, healthy meals and snacks, health and nutrition education, and opportunities for parents to be involved. Head Start is a EC4T Partner (4 year-old kindergarten).

Junior Achievement of Wisconsin 505 Dewey St.

South, Suite 204 Mailbox 10 Eau Claire, WI 54701 • (715) 835-5566 • NWD@jawis.org • wisconsin. ja.org Corporate and community volunteers deliver relevant, hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship.

Menomonie Head Start Oaklawn Harmony Centre,

3375 Kothlow Ave. Suite #10, Menomonie • 715-2359122 • menomoniehs@cesa11.k12.wi.us • headstart. cesa11.k12.wi.us Serving children ages 0-5, pregnant women and teens. We are a licensed facility providing free daily nutritious meals, school readiness skills and parent opportunities.

River Source Family Center 403 High Street, Chip-

pewa Falls • 715-720-1841 • riversourcefamilycenter. com The mission of River Source Family Center is to embrace and strengthen families with young children by promoting growth through education, information, referral, and opportunities to share experiences.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH & AT-RISK

CRYSTAL CAVE, SPRING VALLEY

Eau Claire County Restorative Justice 3605 Gateway

Dr., Eau Claire • (715) 835-6521 • twavrunek@gwicc. org, atruitt@gwicc.org • eauclairerestorativejustice. org A unique way of approaching crime and delinquency that focuses on the harm done to the victims, community, and the damaged relationships between them. Services include accountability workshops, accountability mentoring, and victim-offender conferencing.

L.E. Phillips Libertas Center: Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health & Wellness 2661 Co Hwy I, Chippewa

Falls • 715-723-5585 or 800-680-4578 • info@libertascenter.org • libertascenter.org As young people grow and develop their own identities, they may experience challenges like poor self-esteem, depression, aggression, family conflict, deviant behavior, poor impulse control, or a combination of these and other issues. These child

SUBMITTED PHOTO

therapists help youth and their families face these obstacles and instill faith, hope, and confidence that they can achieve their full potential.

Northwest Journey 402 Technology Dr. E, Menomonie

• (715) 235-4245 • NWJMenomonie@nwcgc.com • nwcgc.com Northwest Journey provides a community-based treatment option by offering comprehensive intervention and preventative services aimed at preventing out of home placements and creating family stability and individual success. In addition, Northwest Journey provides therapeutic support services for children, adolescents, and families transitioning back to the community from out-of-home placements.

Positive Alternatives, Inc. 603 Terrill Rd., Menomo-

nie • 715-235-9552 • positive-alternatives.org Positive Alternatives, Inc., is a private non-profit, communitybased, multi-service organization serving youth and families in Wisconsin. Through a continuum of family and strength-based services, Positive Alternatives strives to equip at-risk youth and young adults with the social, emotional and developmental skills.

FAMILY RESOURCES Chippewa Family Services Inc. 812 Bridge St., Chippe-

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES


resources & guides wa Falls • (715) 723-7566 • See contact info for details.

Family Resource Center for Eau Claire County 4800

Golf Rd., Ste. 450, Eau Claire • 715-833-1735 • frcec. org Located in the Sears wing of the Oakwood Mall, the mission of the Family Resource Center is to provide programs and services that build on family strengths through prevention, education, support and networking in collaboration with other resources in the community. The Family Resource Center is available to ALL families and children in Eau Claire County.

Family Support Center 403 N. High St., Chippewa Falls

• 715-723-1138, 800-400-7020 • familysupport@fsccf. org • familysupportcentercf.com Provides free services and support to families that are struggling with issues such as domestic assault, sexual assault, parental conflicts, and difficulty managing children.

FOSTERING SERVICES Family Works Programs, Inc. See contact info for

location details, Eau Claire • 608-233-9204 • familyworks.com As a child-placing agency, Family Works Programs, Inc. provides treatment foster care to at-risk children throughout the state of Wisconsin. We license, train, and support foster parents to care for children in the foster family’s home. The job of foster parenting is made easier by our social work staff who visit the foster home frequently, develop treatment plans, and facilitate the child’s treatment team.

SaintA • 855-GROW-HOPE • growhope@sainta.org •

growhope.net Providing safe, nurturing foster homes for children with emotional, behavioral or developmental challenges since 1984. Now providing services for relative families of children needing foster placement, basic foster care for children with minimal physical and emotional issues, as well as adoption licensing and services.

WOMEN Beacon House 309 E. Lake St., Eau Claire • 715-834-

4357 • ecihn@sbcglobal.net • beacon-house.org Serving families and pregnant women who are temporarily homeless or at risk of homelessness by providing resources for emergency assistance, stabilization, and prevention.

Bolton Refuge House 807 S Farwell St., Eau Claire • (715) 834-9578 • boltonrefugehouse@yahoo.com • boltonrefuge.com A non-profit organization that provides advocacy services, emergency shelter, and transitional housing to survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

The Bridge to Hope 1901 South Broadway, Menomo-

nie • 235-9074 • manager@thebridgetohope.org • thebridgetohope.org A domestic abuse and sexual assault agency, helping victims of Dunn and Pepin counties rebuild their lives. Check out their services or volunteer or donate money and other much-needed goods such as household items.

SUPPORT Catholic Charities 448 N. Dewey St., Eau Claire • 832-

6644 • eauclaire@cclse.org • cclse.org Providing adoption and post adoption services, pregnancy support services, a community homeless facility, and charitable outreach, financial education and enrichment to the community. Donation & volunteer opportunities available.

Community Table 320 Putnam St., Eau Claire • 835-

4977 • Rachel@thecommunitytable.org • thecommunitytable.org A collaborative effort of local churches, serving over 100 meals a day, 365 days a year. They rely completely on volunteers to function and serve our community effectively. Donate or volunteer to cook, clean, serve, etc.

Habitat for Humanity 2620 Stein Blvd., Eau Claire, Eau

Claire • (715) 833-8993 • info@cvh4h.org • hfh-wi-chip. huterra.com Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities, and hope.

Lutheran Social Services 1320 W. Clairemont Ave.,

Ste. 200, Eau Claire • (877) 967-5577 • lsswis.org Lutheran Social Services (LSS) offers a variety of services throughout Wisconsin and Upper Michigan. With the help of over 1,100 employees, LSS provides services across a person’s lifespan, addressing a variety of conditions. Services are available for children and families, adults, older adults and persons with disabilities. Services are open to all, regardless of religious affiliation or background.

Stepping Stones of Dunn County 1602 Stout Rd.,

Menomonie • (715) 235-2920 • info@steppingstonesdc. org • steppingstonesdc.org A non-profit umbrella organization that manages three vital community programs: a food pantry, homeless shelter, and support services program which provides emergency financial assistance,

volunteer support, and referral information.

West CAP See contact info for location details, Meno-

monie • 800-606-9227 (715) 265-4271 • westcap@ wcap.org • westcap.org Established in 1965, West CAP was one of the first community action agencies in the United States. Since then, West CAP has worked to promote the self-sufficiency of low-income families in the rural communities of west central Wisconsin, operating as an equal opportunity employer and service provider. West CAP continues to help families overcome poverty and achieve economic stability by following its mission.

HMONG ASSOCIATIONS Eau Claire Area Hmong Mutual Assistance Association, Inc. 423 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire • (715)

832-8420 • ecahmaa@gmail.com • ecahmaa.org This NPO strives to assist the Hmong community to become socially, educationally and economically empowered by promoting leadership and educational advancement, enhancing economic development and self-sufficiency, strengthening the health and well-being of families, and promoting and preserving traditional culture, customs and rituals.

Eau Claire Area Hmong Mutual Assistance Association: Building Bridges for Hmong Youths 423 Wiscon-

sin St., Eau Claire • (715) 832-8420 • ecahmaa@gmail. com • ecahmaa.org The ECAHMAA provides mentoring and tutoring services to Hmong youth during the school year. Building Bridges offers opportunities for students to participate in after-school activities that will increase their academic learning and teach healthy alternatives to alcohol use and underage drinking as well as healthy nutrition.

CA M P S Beaver Creek Reserve S1 County Highway K, Fall

Creek • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Summer Camps available for youth. Camps are geared towards youth of different ages and focus on various topics such as fly fishing, wildlife monitoring, butterflies, glaciers, and more. Details on Summer camp events will be available on their website in April.

Camp Chip-a-Y-a Hosted by the Chippewa Valley

YMCA, 611 Jefferson Ave., Chippewa Falls • 715-7235135 • chippewaymca.com/cymca.cfm?c=38 Camp Chip-a-Y-a is a day camp program which provides special experiences through a wide variety of activities. They include arts & crafts, cooking, field trips, singing, sports, and storytelling. We will expand your children’s interests through the unique worlds of culture, drama, exercise, music, and nature. Your child will develop new friendships, experience a wide variety of activities and feel like they belong to a community. Children must have completed Kindergarten to participate.

Children’s Nature Academy 1190 Priory Rd., Eau

Claire • 715-836-2178 • oneilcc@uwec.edu • uwec.edu/ children Accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs, this academy provides children of UW-Eau Claire students, faculty and staff with a highquality program that is both affordable and convenient. This nature-based early childhood program promotes physical, social, emotional and intellectual development in a safe and nurturing environment.

CVTC Summer Camps Hosted by Chippewa Valley

Technical College, 620 W. Clairemont Ave., Eau Claire • 800-547-CVTC or 715-833-6200 • infocenter@cvtc. edu • cvtc.edu/page/camps.aspx Featuring many camps including Girls on Fire: A  firefighter and emergency medical service (EMS) career exploration camp for girls entering 7th through 12th grade. This five-day, funfilled, hands-on residential camp focuses on firefighter and emergency medical skills experience, while involving the girls in leadership and fitness activities. Other tech camps include High Voltage!, Intro to Construction, VEX Robot Basics, Cosmetology, Law & Order, Auto Collision Repair & Refinish, and more.

Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center Summer Camp The

Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center, 3456 Craig Rd., Eau Claire • (715) 552-1200 • ecsportscenter.com Offering several fun filled weeks of inside and outside playtime with other children and counselors who love to spend extra time getting to know each child. Each week includes a pool day and an additional field trip (i.e., Beaver Creek Reserve, Irvine Park).

Hand in Hand Summer Camp Hosted by REACH Inc.,

800 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire • 715-833-7744 • reachinc.org Hosted by REACH Inc.: Regional Enterprises for Adults & Children. You can schedule week to week and enjoy family discounts. Breakfast, lunch, snack provided. Daily field trips and swimming at fairfax every Friday.

Immanuel Lutheran College Summer Camp Im-

manuel Lutheran College, 501 Grover Rd., Eau Claire

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

49


resources & guides • Tom Naumann, 920-266-5387 •  thomasjnaumann@ gmail.com // Jessica Sydow, 952-905-9981 • jessicasydow10@gmail.com • youthcamp.clclutheran.net/index. html  Crafts, field games, FOB, survival classes, open gym dance parties, ninja, devotions, dodgeball, loud games of Bunco, jewelry-making, swimming, kickball, lightning, music sing-a-longs (a camp favorite!), campfires, s’mores, skits and so much more. Intended for kids entering grades 5-9.

Kamp Kenwood 19161 79th Ave., Chippewa Falls • 715-

723-5561, 715-214-7244 • jburgess@wisconsinfarmersunion.com • kampkenwood.com Built on the shores of Lake Wissota through volunteer labor by members of Wisconsin Farmers Union over 50 years ago, Kamp Kenwood’s educational mission has flourished in the time since its dedication by offering a place for people of all ages to come together to celebrate, to learn, and to enjoy family, friends, and nature.

STEPS: Science, Technology and Engineering Preview Summer UW-Stout, Menomonie • hoppj@uw-

stout.edu; staryw@uwstout.edu • uwstout.edu/steps/ A five-day summer camp for girls between their 6th and 7th grades. STEPS offers an introduction to the exciting world of science, technology and engineering with hands-on experience with high-tech equipment, outstanding professors, recreational and developmental activities such as bowling, swimming, a pizza and karaoke party, a ropes leadership and problem solving course, and much more.

Sylvan EDGE Camps Hosted by the Sylvan Learning

Center, 3409 Golf Rd., Eau Claire • 715-838-1234 • locations.sylvanlearning.com If you’re looking for ways to introduce your child to new and fun experiences, check out Sylvan EDGE camps. Whether your child is interested in a robotics camp, a video game design camp, or a cool study edge camp, these camps are designed to be fun and interactive. Kids just love them. Camps are offered winter, spring and summer breaks.

Trinity Equestrian Center S5300 Hwy 37, Eau Claire

• (715) 835-4530 • info@trinity-ec.com • trinity-ec. com Trinity is a multi-purpose horse ranch with a variety of programming throughout the year. Ranch Care is

50

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

Trinity’s innovative and fun, Christian-based child care program for kids ages 7-12 and is available only during the summer. Trinity’s mentoring program offers at-risk and special needs children access to the support they need to thrive.

Also featuring Horse Camps for ages 7+. They kick off with a review of fundamentals of riding, ground work, safety, and horsemanship. Then move quickly into a whole new approach deepening the relationship, communication and connection.

UW-Eau Claire Blugold Beginnings 105 Garfield Ave-

nue, Eau Claire • (715) 836-3015 • blugoldbeginnings@ uwec.edu • uwec.edu Blugold Beginnings offers a variety of summer camps each summer to promote college knowledge, campus comfort, and the overall goal of obtaining a higher education.

UW-Eau Claire Continuing Education: Summer Institute Eau Claire • 715-836-3636 • ce@uwec.edu • uwec.

edu Whether you’re looking for positive enrichment, extra challenge, academic support or college preparation for your child, you will find a Continuing Education program that will be the perfect fit. Camps educate on specific skills, including architecture, digital photography, writing, percussion, and more.

YMCA Camp Manitou 27960 137th St., New Auburn •

(715) 828-2628 • camp@eauclaireymca.org • ycampmanitou.org A resident camp in New Auburn, Wisconsin that has been operated through the Eau Claire YMCA since 1926. Located on the shores of the beautiful Long Lake in Chippewa County, youth will learn values like honesty, responsibility, caring, and respect in a unique outdoor environment.

DA N C E ST U D I OS

Arthur Murray Dance Studio 401 1/2 S Barstow St., Eau

Claire • (715) 834-6166 • arthurmurrayec@sbcglobal. net • arthurmurrayeauclaire.com Arthur Murray teaches rhythm and Latin dances, country western dances, specialty dances, and more. Learn from qualified instructors in a friendly and relaxing environment. Arthur Murray

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES


resources & guides

RUN INTO THE SUNSHINE: with camps, camps and s’more camps! SUMMER LEARNING Children’s Nature Academy 1190 Priory Rd., Eau

Claire • 715-836-2178 • uwec.edu Accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs, this academy provides children of UW-Eau Claire students, faculty and staff with a high-quality program that is both affordable and convenient. This naturebased early childhood program promotes physical, social, emotional and intellectual development in a safe and nurturing environment. The Children’s Nature Academy, located at The Priory, is the ideal setting for exploration and discovery. There will be different programs every week such as hiking, learning about birds, insects, flowers, invasive species, rain,

Chippewa Valley Theatre Guild: Youth Drama Camp 102 West Grand Avenue, Eau Claire • 715-

832-7523 • cvtg.org At the Chippewa Valley Theatre Guild Youth Drama Camp, students of all ages can attend a wide variety of classes over multiple weeks. Students can learn acting, singing, dancing, puppet making, improvisational comedy, teamwork, costuming, special effects, sound, stage makeup, storytelling, how to put on a play, and much more. Classes are free for Eau Claire Area School District students.

Summer Programs at Beaver Creek Reserve S1

OVERNIGHT CAMPS Camp Chip-a-Y-a Hosted by the Chippewa Valley

YMCA, 611 Jefferson Ave., Chippewa Falls • 715-7235135 • chippewaymca.com Camp Chip-a-Y-a is a day camp program which provides special experiences through a wide variety of activities. They include arts & crafts, cooking, field trips, singing, sports, and storytelling. We will expand your children’s interests through the unique worlds of culture, drama, exercise, music, and nature. Your child will develop new friendships, experience a wide variety of activities and feel like they belong to a community. Children must have completed Kindergarten to participate.

WeHaKee Camp for Girls N8104 Barker Lake Road,

Winter • (715) 266-3263 • wehakeecampforgirls.com At WeHaKee Camp for Girls, girls from the Eau Claire, Wisconsin area will have more fun than you can imagine, create incredible friendships with girls from around the United States and the world, and discover gifts within you that you never knew were there. Over 40 creative, active, and water activities to enjoy. Also hosts the WeHaKee Leadership Academy for high school girls.

YMCA Camp Manitou 27960 137th St., New Auburn •

(715) 828-2628 • camp@eauclaireymca.org • ycampmanitou.org A resident camp in New Auburn, Wisconsin that has been operated through the Eau Claire YMCA since 1926. Located on the shores of the beautiful Long Lake in Chippewa County, youth will learn values like honesty, responsibility, caring, and respect in a unique outdoor environment.

Immanuel Lutheran College Summer Camp Immanuel Lutheran College, 501 Grover Rd., Eau Claire • youth-

SPECIAL INTERESTS Joshua’s Camp See contact info for location details,

Eau Claire • 715-514-1485 or 239-246-7530 • jcfinney45@yahoo.com • joshuascamp.org Joshua’s Camp is the realization and celebration of a wish Joshua Holm made before he lost his battle with cancer in 2008. He wanted to start a Camp for families who have a child being treated for cancer. Joshua knew all too well that a family going through the everyday ordeal of cancer treatment needs a place where everyone can just smile, laugh, have fun and remember what it’s like to really be a family again.

Hand in Hand Summer Camp Hosted by REACH Inc.,

800 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire • 715-833-7744 • reachinc.org Hosted by REACH Inc.: Regional Enterprises for Adults & Children. You can schedule week to week and enjoy family discounts. Breakfast, lunch, snack provided. Daily field trips and swimming at fairfax every Friday.

Trinity Equestrian Center S5300 Hwy 37, Eau Claire

• (715) 835-4530 • info@trinity-ec.com • trinity-ec. com Trinity is a multi-purpose horse ranch with a variety of programming throughout the year. Ranch Care is Trinity’s innovative and fun, Christian-based child care

camp.clclutheran.net/index.html Crafts, field games, FOB, survival classes, open gym dance parties, ninja, devotions, dodgeball, loud games of Bunco, jewelrymaking, swimming, kickball, lightning, music sing-alongs (a camp favorite!), campfires, s’mores, skits and so much more. Intended for kids entering grades 5-9.

Kamp Kenwood 19161 79th Ave., Chippewa Falls • 715-

723-5561, 715-214-7244 • jburgess@wisconsinfarmersunion.com • kampkenwood.com Built on the shores of Lake Wissota through volunteer labor by members of Wisconsin Farmers Union over 50 years ago, Kamp Kenwood’s educational mission has flourished in the time since its dedication by offering a place for people of all ages to come together to celebrate, to learn, and to enjoy family, friends, and nature. The education programs focus on cooperatives, family farms, sustainability, leadership, conservation, rural communities, social justice, and active citizenship. Our overnight camp activities include: hiking and campfires, swimming and sports, singing and drama, speakers and workshops, co-op games and theme nights, and arts and crafts.

UWEC Blugold Beginnings Summer Camps & Programs 105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire • blugoldbegin-

nings@uwec.edu • uwec.edu Blugold Beginnings offers a variety of summer camps each summer to promote college knowledge, campus comfort, and the overall goal of obtaining a higher education. Camps and programs include a Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), music and visual arts, youth leadership, junior entrepreneurship, introduction to middle or high school, and bio-medical science and kinesiology. Camps are free for Eau Claire Area School District students

program for kids ages 7-12 and is available only during the summer.

UWEC Blugold Youth Sports Camps McPhee Educa-

tion Building, UWEC upper campus, Eau Claire • (715) 836-2546 • sportscamps@uwec.edu • blugolds.com/ camps Blugold Sports offers youth training camps for men’s basketball, women’s basketball, cross country, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming, volleyball, and wrestling. Some camps are offered as day camps, others are offered as overnight camps with residence hall stays and meals served. Full schedule and registration information available online.

Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center Summer Camp The

Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center, 3456 Craig Rd., Eau Claire • (715) 552-1200 • ecsportscenter.com Offering several fun filled weeks of inside and outside playtime with other children and counselors who love to spend extra time getting to know each child. Each week includes a pool day and an additional field trip (i.e., Beaver Creek Reserve, Irvine Park).

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

County Highway K, Fall Creek • (715) 877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Summer Camps available for youth. This year will feature birding, fly fishing, reptiles, butterflies and more. Explore the rivers like a 17th century voyageur fur-trapper: swim from sandbars, kayak, eat lunch on riverbank, and glide under eagles nests. Details and registration for summer camp events will begin in April.

Total Percussion Camp Every Day from Jun. 13 to

Jun. 17, 9am-noon • Haas Fine Arts, UW-Eau Claire Campus, 102 Water Street, Eau Claire • $169 per student – early bird through May 16; $189 per student – after May 16 • Grades 6-12 • uwec.edu Join us for a challenging, fast-paced week of instruction and performance in all areas of percussion including mallet, drum set, snare, timpani, concert and world percussion. We’ll focus on technique, musicianship and ensemble playing. Instruction is divided into beginner, intermediate and advanced tracks for most lessons.

Architectural Design Camp: Build Your Dream Home Every Day from Jun. 20 to Jun. 24, 9am-noon

• University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire McPhee - Rm 198D, 509 University Dr, Eau Claire • $189 • Grades 6-9 • uwec.edu Explore the world of residential and landscape architecture! We’ll start by learning basic architectural concepts, history, styles and vocabulary. Then you will design your own “dream home” using home design software. You’ll draw up blueprints and build a scaled-down model of your home.

Electron Microscopy Every Day from Jul. 11 to Jul.

15 • UW-Eau Claire Campus, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire • $169 Early Bird Registration through June 17 $189 Standard Registration after June 17 • Grades 9-12 • uwec.edu/ce/programs/youth/ his course will allow you to learn how an electron microscope works and to gain practical experience operating one. You will create a portfolio of images and data collected. If you are a high school student hoping to go to college in a science or engineering field, this is the course for you.

Summer Writing Camp Every Day from Jul. 18 to

Jul. 22, 9am-noon • UW Eau Claire Campus, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire • Fee $169 per student early bird through June 17 $189 per student - after June 17 • Grades 6-10 • uwec.edu There are as many ways to tell a story as there are people in this world. Find YOUR creative voice at UW-Eau Claire this summer. You’ll choose the track that most interests you: poetry, novels & short stories, creative nonfiction & memoirs, digital composition, or combination of genres.

Chippewa Valley Theatre Guild: Shakespeare Workshop Every Day from Jul. 18 to Jul. 22, 9am-

4pm; Every Day from Jul. 25 to Jul. 29, 9am-4pm • The Chippewa Valley Theatre Guild, 102 West Grand Avenue, Eau Claire • $120, FREE for ECASD Students • High School Students • 715-832-7523 • cvtg. org This workshop is designed for actors and students interested in behind the scenes work. Open to entering freshmen through graduating seniors. Will give students the skills to interpret, perform, and design a Shakespeare play. RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES

Intro to Engineering: 3D Printing Every Day from

Jul. 25 to Jul. 29, 9am-noon • UW Eau Claire Campus, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire • $169 Early Bird Registration through June 17; $189 Standard Registration after June 17 • Grades 6-8 • uwec.edu/ce/ programs/youth/ Discover 3D printing and how it is changing our future. In this course you will design an object on the computer and then 3D print it. You will learn elements of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and how 3D printers work.

Summer Camps at Children’s Museum of Eau Claire 220 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • (715) 832-

KIDS • childrensmuseumec.com/programs/summercamps/ Register your kids for a week of hands-on, interactive “edu-tainment” during the following summer day camps. Includes art classes, construction, gardening, and hands-on tiny science! Free for Eau Claire Area School District students.  CVTC Summer Camps: Tech Camps CVTC Manufacturing Education Center, Eau Claire • 715-8744638 • cvtc.edu/page/camps.aspx  In STEM Race Camp campers will use power-electric cars and apply math, science, and engineering principles. Learn about sustainability and stewardship by assessing alternate energy technologies (fuel cell, solar, and wind) to power the electric cars. In Nuts Bolts & Thingamajigs, campers design and build a product experiencing the start to finish satisfaction of creating something they can show off with pride. Throughout the process, they learn how to do CAD design and operate various kinds of manufacturing machinery under the close supervision of expert manufacturing trainers. Cost information available online.

UWEC Bilingual Beginnings - Summer Language Immersion Programs 1190 Priory Rd., Eau Claire

• (715) 834-8642 • uwec.edu/Children/index.htm The university, in collaboration with the Children’s Nature Academy (CNA), is offering two-week language immersion camps in Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish. Go online for full program and schedule information. Registration deadline for sessions 1 and 2 is June 1st, and the deadline for sessions 3 and 4 is July 1st.

CVTC Summer Camps: Girls on Fire 3623 Cam-

pus Road, Eau Claire • 800-547-CVTC or 715-8336200 • infocenter@cvtc.edu • cvtc.edu/page/camps. aspx Featuring many camps including Girls on Fire: A firefighter and emergency medical service (EMS) career exploration camp for girls entering 7th through 12th grade. This five-day, fun-filled, hands-on residential camp focuses on firefighter and emergency medical skills experience, while involving the girls in leadership and fitness activities.

STEPS: Science, Technology and Engineering Preview Summer UW-Stout, Menomonie • hoppj@

uwstout.edu; staryw@uwstout.edu • uwstout.edu/ steps/ A five-day summer camp for girls between their 6th and 7th grades. STEPS offers an introduction to the exciting world of science, technology and engineering with hands-on experience with high-tech equipment, outstanding professors, recreational and developmental activities such as bowling, swimming, a pizza and karaoke party, a ropes leadership and problem solving course, and much more.

Sylvan EDGE Camps Hosted by the Sylvan Learning

Center, 3409 Golf Rd., Eau Claire • 715-838-1234 • locations.sylvanlearning.com If you’re looking for ways to introduce your child to new and fun experiences, check out Sylvan EDGE camps. Whether your child is interested in a robotics camp, a video game design camp, or a cool study edge camp, these camps are designed to be fun and interactive. Kids just love them. Camps are offered winter, spring and summer breaks.

UW-Eau Claire Continuing Education: Summer Institute Eau Claire • 715-836-3636 • ce@uwec.edu •

uwec.edu Whether you’re looking for positive enrichment, extra challenge, academic support or college preparation for your child, you will find a Continuing Education program that will be the perfect fit. Camps educate on specific skills, including architecture, digital photography, writing, percussion, and more. M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

51


resources & guides has a three way approach to teaching dance: private (and couple) lessons, group lessons, and practice parties.

Live and stuffed native animals are also on display. Visitors can also hold a snake, pet a turtle, dig for fossils, or snowshoe. Part of the Chippewa Moraine Ice Age State Recreation Area - FREE (but donations welcomed).

Danz Kraze Building 4/6, Suite 205, 800 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire • (715) 832-3269 • DanzKraze@gmail.com • danzkraze.com Youth dance teams use Eau Claire’s largest studio space and are modeled after High School dance teams, offering poms, hip hop/funk, kick, and jazz. Short sessions available for those who are indecisive.

Chippewa Valley Museum Memorial Day-Labor Day:

closed Monday; 1pm-8pm Tuesday (5pm-8pm free); 1pm-5pm Wednesday through Friday, Sunday; 10am5pm, Saturday 1-5pm Sunday • 1204 E. Half Moon Dr., Eau Claire • (715) 834-7871 • info@cvmuseum.com • cvmuseum.com Have your own adventure in history at the Chippewa Valley Museum in Eau Claire’s scenic Carson Park! Explore award-winning exhibits, take in the multimedia object theater, let the kids (of all ages!) become historians in the hands-on history gallery, and enjoy an old-fashioned ice cream soda in the vintage ice cream parlor.

Diamond School of Dance 123 S. Graham Ave., Eau

Claire • (715) 577-1285 • DiamondBallet@aol.com • diamondschoolofdance.com Offers ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical, pointe, hip-hop, and competitive performance. Classses begin at age 2 with pre-ballet through adult.

Eau Claire School of Dance 306 Main St., Eau Claire

• (715) 832-9900 • ecschoolofdance@aol.com • eauclaireschoolofdance.com Providing quality dance instruction to the Chippewa Valley since 1998. Classes offered in ballet, jazz, tap, hip hop, lyrical, musical theatre, pointe, and more to students age 18 months-adult. Performance and Competitive Teams are also available.

En Avant School of Dance 3330 North Town Hall Rd.,

Eau Claire • (715) 874-5575 • info@enavantdance.com • enavantdance.com En Avant strives to help children attain self-confidence and the highest level of skill she/ he is capable of achieving. We provide the foundation for dance to become a lifetime activity that will lead to physical and psychological well-being.

Infinity Dance Studio Classes held at Gold’s Gym,

3225 Lorch Ave., Eau Claire • (715) 828-3110 • Infinitydances@gmail.com • infinitydancecenter.info A fullservice dance studio devoted to providing exceptional recreational or competitive dance instruction to children ages two through adult. We work on respect, teamwork, and self-confidence through dancing in a family friendly environment.

Janelle’s Irish Dance Dance Studio at the State The-

atre • (715) 563-6057 • janellesirishdance.com Janelle Glenna began teaching Irish dance classes in 2006 with six students and continues to develop further progressive courses of instruction for advancing students - having over 90 students at present in 11 different levels of Irish dance.

Jean Marie’s School of Dance 31 W. Spring St.,

Chippewa Falls • (715) 723-8635 • jeanmariedance. com Specializing in children’s classes, Jean Marie offers tap, ballet, jazz, and basic acrobatics. Classes for adults also available.

Jewelry Box Dancer 110 W. Main St., Menomonie •

(715) 563-3534 • jewelryboxdancers@gmail.com • jewelryboxdancers.com This studio teaches children ages 4-14 years old in combined tap, jazz, ballet, and hip hop. Limited adult classes offered as well. Find Jewelry Box Dancer on Facebook too.

Just for Kix 1412 6th St., Menomonie • 715-505-0460

• menomonie_wi@justforkix.com • justforkix.com Offer proven technical training, a focus on teamwork and a respectful experience to our students. With a strong

52

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

Colfax Railroad Museum 500 E. Railroad Ave., Col-

fax • (715) 962-2076 • colfaxrrmuseum.org The Colfax Railroad Museum currently has a growing collection of railroad equipment from railroads that serviced the western Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota region. The depot houses the large collection of lanterns, railroad china, and the nation’s largest railroad paper-weight collection.

COOK-RUTLEDGE MANSION

Cook-Rutledge Mansion One tour at 2pm Thursday-

Sunday, June-August; group tours available throughout the year: call for details • 505 W. Grand Ave., Chippewa Falls • (715) 723-7181 • info@cookrutledgemansion. daughter, Carol Ryrie Brink, based the 1935 Newbery com • CookRutledgeMansion.com The Cook-Rutledge Award-winning children’s book Caddie Woodlawn on Mansion, listed in the National Register of Hisher life - FREE. toric Places, is one of the finest examples Chippewa County Area History Cenof High Victorian-Italianate architecture ter 9am-4pm Tuesday • 123 Allen St., in the Midwest. Extraordinary handChippewa Falls • (715) 723-4399 • painted ceilings and walls, ornately ccgswi@gmail.com  The Chippewa carved woodwork, parquet floors, County Area History Center and handcrafted silver doorknobs and Museum building was formerly hinge plates, and crystal chandethe Notre Dame Convent, built liers enhance the beauty of the intein 1883. Your tour will take you rior. The grand staircase of carved through the history of the Chipgolden oak provides an elegant setFO R EV EN MO RE pewa Valley and includes exhibits ting for the cathedral stained glass RE SO UR CE S on furniture, photos, lumber-period & window on the landing- Adults $5, GU ID ES ! toys, a seashell collection, lumberjack 18 and under $1. tools, Native American artifacts, miliDells Mill and Museum 10am-5pm, tary artifacts, railroad artifacts and much May-October • E18855 County Road V, more - FREE. Augusta • (715) 286-2714 • dellsmill.com  The Chippewa Falls Museum of Industry and Technology five-story Dells Mill was built in 1864 as a grist mill. Appointment Only • 21 E. Grand Ave., Chippewa Falls • Wisconsin had been a state for just 16 years and Augusta (715) 720-9206 • info.cfmit@gmail.com • cfmit.org The was a town for eight years. The area was barely settled museum was an idea that sprang from local citizens who and Augusta was just a pioneer community; there were wanted to record and preserve the history of important, no automobiles and almost no railroads. Please call unique and ground breaking innovations in industry ahead for reservations and rates.As of 2015, the future and technology that were developed right here in the of the museum is uncertain, so call ahead before visiting. Chippewa Valley. It opened in May 1998 and now has a Empire in Pine Lumber Museum Noon-5pm Saturdayvariety of exhibits that include the Seymour Cray SuperSunday, Memorial Day to Labor Day • County Hwy computer Collection, Leinenkugel’s, Mason Companies C, Downsville • (715) 232-8685 • dchs@discover-net. Inc., and other area historic exhibits. net • dunnhistory.org/siteep.html  This award winning Chippewa Moraine Interpretive Center Tuesday display exhibits the rich logging and sandstone quarry through Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. • 13394 County history of the Red Cedar Valley. The exhibit includes: Hwy M, New Auburn • (715) 967-2800 • dnr.wi.gov ExKnapp, Stout & Co., blacksmith shop, muzzle-loading hibits and videos explain the glacial history of the region. ANDREA PAULSETH

balance of fun and technique in our classes, we create a teaching environment that is low stress and less pressure. Additionally, our dance classes in Menomonie are very economical.

Swan Lake Ballet Studio Banbury Place, Bldg 13, Ste

122, Eau Claire • (715) 590-8502 • swanlakeballetdancestudiollc@gmail.com • gannakotenko.wix.com/swanlakeballetstudio Swan Lake Ballet Studio brings new opportunities to see the beauty of classical ballet in Eau Claire, educating children on classical ballet choreography. For a variety of age ranges.

LO CA L H I STO RY The Ager House 514 W. Madison St., Eau Claire • (715)

835-8718 • ager2@charter.net • agerhouse.org Presented by the Waldemar Ager Association, the Ager House is the historic home to Norwegian-American writer Waldemar Ager, restored to its early-1900’s likeness. Part of the National Register of Historic Places a Literary Landmark by the National Association of Friends of Public Libraries, the public may tour by appointment, hold events at the house, visit its unique resource library, and much more.

Bloomer Bi-Centennial House 2200 Main St., Bloomer • (715) 568-1776 • See contact info for details.

Caddie Woodlawn Historical Park Daylight hours;

spring - fall • 9 miles S. of Menomonie on Hwy 25, Menomonie • (715) 232-8685 • dunnhistory.org/sitecw. html The house in which Caroline Woodhouse lived has been moved to the park from a nearby farm. Her grand-

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES


resources & guides bunks, rare up-and-down saw, quarry tools, stonecutting examples, Dead Man’s Corner, 1865 Louisville Post Office, and village jail. - Adults $2, kids $1, members and ages 5 and under free

cardio workouts. Also offers a fitness membership where members can independently use the facility and equipment during non-class hours.

Fall Creek Historical Society Museum For admission into

9218 • jasondutton@elitekarate.cmasdirect.com • elitekaratestudios.com Karate instruction in both private and group settings focusing on the three core values of honor, discipline, and respect.

the museum contact Gary Knuz. • E111940 County Road J, Fall Creek • (715) 877-2850 • kunztwo@centurytel.net • fcHistoricalSociety.com See items from Fall Creek’s history including a doctor’s office, a drugstore, dresses, and military uniforms. Also on the grounds are a washhouse, kitchen, and jail. Open by appointment (715) 877-2850.

Mabel Tainter Center for the Arts 205 Main St., Meno-

monie • (715) 235-0001 • office@mabeltainter.com • MabelTainter.com The Mabel Tainter building includes a lavish 313-seat “crown jewel” Victorian tehatre and a historic reading room. It is a premier example of a restored vintage American Theater. Take a self-guided tour to inspect the intricate hand-stenciling, handcarved   white pine archways, rich walnut, mahogany, and oak woodwork, gleaming brass fixtures, leaded glass windows, and a rare working Steere and turner tracker pipe organ with 1597 pipes.

Old Courthouse Museum and Jail Tues; 10am-noon,

year round except for holidays, Saturday; 1-4pm, Memorial Day weekend through October 10, Thurs-Sun; 11-4, May 28th-August 30, and by appointment anytime year round • 315 W. Madison St., Durand • (715) 672-5423 • OldPepinCountyCourthouse.org Wisconsin’s last remaining woodframe courthouse features an iron-latticed cellblock in the jail; upstairs courtroom in near-original condition; a tribute to Helen Parkhurst, railroad room, bridges of Durand, century-old paintings of C.H. Gleason, doctor and dentist office equipment, and appliances and tools used in the home, shop, and fields - FREE. Donations are willingly accepted.

Paul Bunyan Logging Camp Museum 10am-4:30pm

daily, May-September • 1110 Carson Park Dr., Eau Claire • (715) 835-6200 • paulbunyan1934@gmail.com • paulbunyancamp.org Take a step back into time when you visit the Paul Bunyan Logging Camp Museum. Begin your tour with an introductory movie on logging in the 1890s and then visit their barn, blacksmith shop, cook shanty, bunkhouse, and heavy equipment shed to experience a day in the life of a logger. To schedule a tour, please call (715) 834-7871. Fees are $5 adults and $2 children. Joint fees for the logging camp and the Chippewa Valley Museum are $9 adults and $3 children.

Russel J Rassbach Heritage Museum Winter: Noon-

4pm Wednesday-Sunday, Summer; 10am-5pm Wednesday-Sunday • 1820 Wakanda Street, Menomonie • (715) 232-8685 • dunnhistory.org This museum, headquarters of the Dunn County Historical Society and the Dunn County Genealogical Society, interprets the history of Dunn County through its collection of exhibits.

Stanley Area Historical Society Museum 228 Hel-

gerson Street, Stanley • (715) 644-0464 • facebook. com The museum houses exhibits on the Northwestern Lumber Company, children’s toys, the Stanley Fire, military displays, Dr. Mathwig’s wildlife display, a general store, harness maker, railroading, and much more. The Logging and Farming Building recognizes the contribution lumberjacks, farm families, and carpenters made to Stanley’s settlement and growth FREE. Sat-Sun 1pm-4pm.

Wilson Place Mansion 101 Wilson Circle, Menomonie

• (715) 235-2283 • Wilson Place was built in 1859 by Capt. William Wilson, a principal in Knapp, Stout, & Co. lumber company, founder and first mayor of Menomonie, and the area’s first state senator. Three generations of Wilsons remade it from a colonial house to a Queen Anne-style mansion to a Mediterranean villa. Call for admission rates and tour times.

Wisconsin Canoe Heritage Museum 312 N. Front

Street, Spooner • 715-635-5002, 715-635-2479 • info@ wisconsincanoeheritagemuseum.org • wisconsincanoeheritagemuseum.org Featuring displays comprised of canoes and canoe related ephemera, plus a 2500 square foot canoe shop.

MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMIES AKF Martial Arts Academy of Eau Claire 1606 S. Hast-

ings Way, Suite B, Eau Claire • (715) 613-8282 • akfeauclaire@gmail.com • martialartseauclaire.com KyukiDo is focused on helping you and your families achieve goals through martial art techniques, practical self defense, and traditional principles. Offers classes for ages 4 and up, and done in a group setting. Can also accommodate private lessons.

American Tae Kwon Do & Fitness Banbury Place 800

Wisconsin St. Bld 13 Suite 5, Eau Claire • (715) 5139787 • contactatf@atf.nu • atf.nu Taekwondo classes in both private and group settings offering fast, hard-hitting

Elite Karate 410 Bay St., Chippewa Falls • (715) 720-

The Grind Fitness Factory 800 Wisconsin St., Bldg D4,

Eau Claire • 715-513-6621 • steve@thegrindmma.com • thegrindmma.com Train to fight or simply train like a fighter. The classes at The Grind MMA cater to individuals of all skill levels and are inspired by Boxing, Kick Boxing, Karate, Mauy Thai, Wrestling, Jiu Jitsu, Judo, Filipino Martial Arts, and many others.

Ju’s Taekwondo Karate Academy 415 S. Farwell St., Eau Claire • (715) 834-5766 • justaekwondo.com Taekwondo classes in both private and group settings. Classes target self-defense, weight control, physical and mental fitness, improved coordination and agility.

Karate American - Altoona & Elk Mound3460 Mall Dr.,

Altoona // W201 Menomonie St., Elk Mound • (715) 8326488 • info@karate-american.com • karate-american. com Karate instruction for all ages in both private and group settings. Lessons in Karate, Taekwondo, Judo, and Aikido are available.

Land Shark Martial Arts 2524 Suite B. Golf Road, Eau

Claire • (715) 210-5308 • landsharkma.com A traditional Martial Arts school, Land Shark’s focus is on helping to build confidence and learn practical self-defense skills for kids and adults. This is the best way to ensure one will remain safe from harm, and also be better prepared to overcome other obstacles in life.

Menomonie Goju Karate Dojo 1807 Wilson St. # A,

Menomonie • (715) 233-9927 • menomoniegoju@hotmail.com • menomoniegoju.com Center for traditional Okinawan Goju Karate in west-central Wisconsin. Traditional Non-Sport oriented Karate Dojo focusing on skill building for life. Children’s classes for age 7-12. Private and group instruction available.

One Tree Martial Arts 1417 S. Hastings Way, Eau Claire

• (877) ONE-TREE • info@otma.net • onetreemartialarts.com Martial arts instruction for all ages in Taekwondo, Hapkido, Jiu-Jitsu, and several other arts. Also offering women’s self-defense and kickboxing classes.

Red Dragon Academy 438 Main St. E, Menomonie •

(715) 235-1122 • reddragonacademy@hotmail.com • reddragon-academy.com Karate instruction for all ages in both private and group settings.

M E N TO R I N G Big Brothers Big Sisters 424 Galloway St., Eau Claire

• (715) 835-0161 • bbbsnw.org One of the oldest and largest youth mentoring program in the United States, children reach their potential through one-on-one, professionally supported relationships with mentors.

Blugold Beginnings University of Eau Claire, Eau

Claire • 715-836-3015 • Educate and inspire students to believe that post-secondary education is important, attainable, and available at the University of WisconsinEau Claire and other institutions.

The Boys and Girls Club of the Greater Chippewa Valley 201 E Lake St, Eau Claire • (715) 855-0081 •

bgca-chippewavalley.org Ages 8-18 can learn and grow in a safe, productive, and positive place after school and during school breaks. They offer free tutoring and homework help as well as programs in areas like sports, recreation, and fitness, character and leadership, and education and career.

Brighter Beginnings Early Learning Center 1612 Truax

Blvd., Eau Claire • (715) 831-9944 • admin@bbelc.org • brighterbeginningseauclaire.com Brighter Beginnings is proud to offer Christian based programs that are designed to build self-esteem, confidence, and personal achievement through the use of a “Love and Logic” behavioral management technique. Serving children ages 6 weeks to school age. Also their Clubhouse School Age Center provides tutoring, homework help on topics including math and science, arts and crafts, and helps build social skills for kids in Kindergarten to age 14.

Eau Claire Area Hmong Mutual Assistance Association: Building Bridges for Hmong Youths 423 Wisconsin

St., Eau Claire • (715) 832-8420 • ecahmaa@gmail.com • ecahmaa.org The ECAHMAA provides mentoring and tutoring services to Hmong youth during the school year. Building Bridges offers opportunities for students to participate in after-school activities that will increase their academic learning and teach healthy alternatives to alcohol use and underage drinking as well as healthy nutrition.

Eau Claire Family Literacy 510 S Farwell St., Eau

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

53


resources & guides Claire • (715) 835-0610 • ecflwdhs@westerndairyland. org • westerndairyland.org A collaborative literacy program in Eau Claire. Programs involved: Western Dairyland Head Start, YMCA (Infant, Toddler Child Care) and Literacy Volunteers - Chippewa Valley. Education at the same site. Full day, full year program for 3-5 year olds offering family literacy and wrap-around child care for 2-5 year olds.

Junior Achievement of Wisconsin 505 Dewey St. South,

Suite 204 Mailbox 10 Eau Claire, WI 54701 • (715) 8355566 • NWD@jawis.org • wisconsin.ja.org Corporate and community volunteers deliver relevant, handson experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship.

KAMO (Kids and Mentors Outdoors) • (608) 575-7786 •

bwgruber@gmail.com • kamokids.org KAMO provides outdoor experiences to children including fishing, canoeing, camping, hunting, wildlife viewing and hiking. Mentors who pass a background check are matched with local children to help provide them with outdoor experiences. • Find us on Facebook

Northwest Reading Clinic 2600 Stein Blvd., Eau Claire •

715-834-2754, 800-773-2605 • northwestreadingclinicltd. com For nearly 50 years Northwest Reading Clinic has been providing children, adolescents, and adults the support and skill sets they need to achieve in an academic curriculum.

Trinity Equestrian Center S5300 Hwy 37, Eau Claire

• (715) 835-4530 • info@trinity-ec.com • trinity-ec. com Trinity is a multi-purpose horse ranch with a variety of programming throughout the year. Ranch Care is Trinity’s innovative and fun, Christian-based child care program for kids ages 7-12 and is available only during the summer. Trinity’s mentoring program offers at-risk and special needs children access to the support they need to thrive. Also featuring Horse Camps for ages 7+. They kick off with a review of fundamentals of riding, ground work, safety, and horsemanship. Then move quickly into a whole new approach deepening the relationship, communication and connection.

Western Dairyland’s RSVP Volunteer Program See

contact info for location details, Eau Claire • 715-9852391 ext. 1205 or ext. ext. 1232 • cheryl.padula@wdeoc.

54

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

org, kristin.sosalla@wdeoc.org • westerndairyland.org/ rsvp.phtml The Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) connects individuals age 55 or older with meaningful volunteer opportunities in their communities. Volunteers are matched with volunteer opportunities that best reflect their interests, available time, and preferences.

Western Dairyland partners with 60 different organizations throughout Buffalo, Jackson, Trempealeau, and Eau Claire counties. Volunteer sites are varied and may include tutoring or mentoring children. See contact info for full details.

WyzAnt Tutoring • (877) 999-2681 • wyzant.com An

online resource connecting community members to private tutors in the Chippewa Valley on a variety of subjects. Tutors are searchable by subject and zip code.

MUSEUMS Children’s Museum of Eau Claire 220 S. Barstow St.,

Eau Claire • (715) 832-KIDS • info@cmec.cc • cmec. cc The interactive environment for children and their grown-ups in the Chippewa Valley that inspires imagination, discovery, creativity, and the love of learning. Everything in the museum is designed with a “learning through play” philosophy. When children take part in the activities of the museum, they are entering a world created just for them. $6 admission (Kids under 1 FREE).

Chippewa Falls Museum of Industry and Technology

Appointment Only • 21 E. Grand Ave., Chippewa Falls • (715) 720-9206 • info.cfmit@gmail.com • cfmit.org The museum was an idea that sprang from local citizens who wanted to record and preserve the history of important, unique and ground breaking innovations in industry and technology that were developed right here in the Chippewa Valley. It opened in May 1998 and now has a variety of exhibits that include the Seymour Cray Supercomputer Collection, Leinenkugel’s, Mason Companies Inc., and other area historic exhibits.

Chippewa Moraine Interpretive Center Tuesday

through Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. • 13394 County Hwy M, New Auburn • (715) 967-2800 • dnr.wi.gov Ex-

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES


resources & guides hibits and videos explain the glacial history of the region. Live and stuffed native animals are also on display. Visitors can also hold a snake, pet a turtle, dig for fossils, or snowshoe. Part of the Chippewa Moraine Ice Age State Recreation Area - FREE (but donations welcomed).

Chippewa Valley Museum 1204 E. Half Moon Dr.,

Eau Claire • (715) 834-7871 • info@cvmuseum.com • cvmuseum.com Have your own adventure in history at the Chippewa Valley Museum in Eau Claire’s scenic Carson Park! Explore award-winning exhibits, take in the multimedia object theater, let the kids (of all ages!) become historians in the hands-on history gallery, and enjoy an old-fashioned ice cream soda in the vintage ice cream parlor.

Colfax Railroad Museum 500 E. Railroad Ave., Col-

fax • (715) 962-2076 • colfaxrrmuseum.org The Colfax Railroad Museum currently has a growing collection of railroad equipment from railroads that serviced the western Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota region. The depot houses the large collection of lanterns, railroad china, and the nation’s largest railroad paper-weight collection.

Dells Mill and Museum 10am-5pm, May-October •

E18855 County Road V, Augusta • (715) 286-2714 • dellsmill.com The five-story Dells Mill was built in 1864 as a grist mill. Wisconsin had been a state for just 16 years and Augusta was a town for eight years. The area was barely settled and Augusta was just a pioneer community; there were no automobiles and almost no railroads. Please call ahead for reservations and rates.As of 2015 the future of the museum is uncertain, so call ahead before visiting.

Russell J. Rassbach Heritage Museum 1820 Wakan-

da Street, Menomonie • (715) 232-8685 • dunnhistory. org The Dunn County Historical Society seeks to discover, preserve, interpret and disseminate knowledge about the history of Dunn County and its role in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Canoe Heritage Museum 312 N. Front

Street, Spooner • 715-635-5002, 715-635-2479 • info@ wisconsincanoeheritagemuseum.org • wisconsincanoeheritagemuseum.org Featuring displays comprised of canoes and canoe related ephemera, plus a 2500 square foot canoe shop.

MUS IC LESSONS Band Lessons on Broadway 902 North Broadway St., Menomonie • (715) 879-5500 • facebook.com Band and music lessons for trumpet, saxophone, clarinet, guitar, piano, percusion, voice and more.

Charles Music Studio Eau Claire (see contact info

for location) • (715) 214-9109 • charlesmusicstudio@ gmail.com • charlesmusicstudio.com Kristin Charles (or “Charlie”) has been teaching music lessons  since  the age of seventeen. Her enthusiasm and passion for music is contagious. She enjoys teaching both children and adults. If you’ve been looking for a good instructor,

a place to belong and a fun time, look no further. First two lessons FREE.

Eau Claire Music School 1620 Ohm Ave., Eau Claire

• 715-514-0475 • info@eauclairemusicschool.com • eauclairemusicschool.com Offering music lessons for piano, voice, guitar, string, brass, woodwind, percussion, accordion and more for toddlers to seniors.

Morgan Music 2405 E. Clairemont Ave., Eau Claire •

(715) 834-7177 • morganmusiconline.com/lessons Instructors encompass a wide variety of musical backgrounds including music degrees, extensive teaching experience, and professional performance. They teach beginners to advanced students in most instruments.

Northwoods Violins LLC 15 East Central St., Chip-

pewa Falls • (715) 861-5656, (715) 828-4330 • donweibel@northwoodsviolins.com • northwoodsviolins. com Stringed instrument instruction.

Offbeats Violin & Guitar Studio 307 S. Farwell St., Eau

Claire • (715) 579-3016 • offbeatsviolinstudio@yahoo. com • offbeatsviolinstudio.com Offering lessons in violin, fiddle, viola, cello, voice, and guitar. Lessons available for individuals or groups/ensembles.

Pedals Plus Music 307 S. Barstow St., Eau Claire • 715-514-4662 • facebook.com/pedalsmusic Pedals Music is a local music store owned and operated by an active musician to serve the needs of the working musician both locally and nationally.

Phil Circle Music • (773) 936-4953 • philcirclemusic@

gmail.com • philcirclemusic.com Before splitting his time between touring the country and living in Wisconsin’s beautiful Chippewa Valley, Chicago-born Singer/ Songwriter/Guitarist Phil Circle spent more than twenty years writing and performing around Chicago and nationally. Take him up on guitar classes today.

Roger Anderson See contact info for location information • 715-832-0363 • Guitar, bass and banjo lessons.

Schmitt Music 919 S. Hastings Way, Eau Claire • (715) 832-5564 • schmittmusic.com Offering group and private lessons for a variety of instruments.

N AT U R E & S C I E N C E CENTERS Beaver Creek Reserve S1 County Highway K, Fall

Creek • 715-877-2212 • beavercreekreserve.org Enjoy a multitude of flora and fauna on more than 400 acres of diverse habitat. Beaver Creek Reserve offers a butterfly house, citizen science center, obstacle course, field research station, and much more.

Chippewa Moraine Interpretive Center Tuesday

through Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. • 13394 County Hwy M, New Auburn • (715) 967-2800 • dnr.wi.gov Exhibits and videos explain the glacial history of the region.

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

55


resources & guides Live and stuffed native animals are also on display. Visitors can also hold a snake, pet a turtle, dig for fossils, or snowshoe. Part of the Chippewa Moraine Ice Age State Recreation Area - FREE (but donations welcomed).

S P O R TS L E SS O N S

Chippewa Falls Museum of Industry and Technology

Eau Claire Indoor Sports Center 3456 Craig Rd., Eau

Appointment Only • 21 E. Grand Ave., Chippewa Falls • (715) 720-9206 • info.cfmit@gmail.com • cfmit.org The museum was an idea that sprang from local citizens who wanted to record and preserve the history of important, unique and ground breaking innovations in industry and technology that were developed right here in the Chippewa Valley. It opened in May 1998 and now has a variety of exhibits that include the Seymour Cray Supercomputer Collection, Leinenkugel’s, Mason Companies Inc., and other area historic exhibits.

Hobbs Observatory S1 County Highway K, Fall Creek

• 715-877-2212 • An astronomical observatory owned by UW-Eau Claire and named after the Hobbs Foundation. Private programs and presentations available upon request.

Irvine Park Zoo Open daily year-round from dawn until

dusk. Petting zoo open Memorial Day-Labor Day, daily 10am-6pm. Christmas Village open Thanksgiving Day to New Years Day from 7am to 9pm • Bridgewater Ave., Chippewa Falls • (715) 723-0051 • Info@irvineparkzoo. org The mission of this park is to foster public support for the animals of the Irvine Park Zoo by: educating the public about their preservation, creating a positive environment for the interaction of humans and animals, and to provide funding for the animals’ living quarters.

James Newman Clark Bird Museum 8am-5pm Mon-

day-Friday and Saturday, when classes are in session during the academic year and summer • Phillips Hall UW-Eau Claire, 101 Roosevelt Ave., Eau Claire • (715) 836-3523 • youngjlm@uwec.edu • uwec.edu The bird museum, circular in shape, contains four dioramas and surrounds the planetarium in Phillips Hall room 002. The 530 species housed in the museum were collected by James Newman Clark from the 1870s through the 1920s. Two popular exhibits are the bald eagle and golden eagle, which require the university to hold a license to have them. The four dioramas depicting native birds in their natural habitats include: a white pine forest with ruffed grouse, a screech owl pouncing on a mouse, the now extinct passenger pigeons, and shorebirds from downtown Eau Claire - FREE.

Lake Wissota State Park 18127 Cty. Hwy. O, Chippewa

Falls • (715) 382-4574 • This 1,062 acre park combines pine and hardwood forests, lake, prairie, and marshland. Visitors to the park will enjoy the scenery, and if you’re a bird watcher, you can find up to 200 different avian species throughout the year.

Wise Nature Center December - March; Tuesdays -

Saturdays 9 am - 4 pm and Sundays 12 - 4 pm, April - November; Mondays - Saturdays 9 am - 4 pm and Sundays 12 - 4 pm • S1 County Road K, Fall Creek • (715) 877-2212 • bcr@beavercreekreserve.org • beavercreekreserve.org The Wise Nature Center is your starting point for exploring the reserve. Stop in, pay trail fees, rent equipment, grab a map, and check out the animal exhibits, observation deck, and nature store - Adults $3, children 15 and under $1, members FREE.

Claire • 715-552-1200 • ecsportscenter.com Offers a variety of indoor sports activities including batting cages and leagues. Also has pucks and nets to use for free during open gym times. Not on ice. Call ahead to find out open gym times as they vary day to day.

Eau Claire Sport Warehouse 2983 11th St., Eau Claire

• (715) 514-5944 • info@ecsportwarehouse.com • ecsportwarehouse.com An indoor space for sports enthusiasts with programming for all ages. Group training boot camp classes available in morning or evening sessions. Featuring  three  batting cages, weight training/fitness area, basketball/volleyball sport court, multipurpose spaces, rentals, private and small lessons and clinics for softball, baseball, strength & conditioning, volleyball, basketball, and more.

Eau Claire YMCA Kid’s Gym 400 Graham Ave., Eau

Claire • (715) 836-8460 • eauclaireymca.org Packed with a rope swing, basketball hoop, climbing wall, balance beam and Space Maze, the YMCA Kid’s Gym is designed to keep your child moving. Most of these facilities are offered at no cost to members, with a nominal fee for non-members.

Girls on the Run Eau Claire County PO Box 1041, Eau

Claire • (715) 271-7703 • girlsontherunec@gmail.com • gotreauclaire.org Girls on the Run is a transformational physical activity-based positive youth development program for girls in 3rd-5th grade. GOTR teaches life skills through dynamic interactive lessons and running games. The program culminates with the girls being physically and emotionally prepared to complete a celebratory 5k running event. Program runs Feb.-May.

Hobbs Ice Arena 915 Menomonie St., Eau Claire •

(715) 839-5040 • ci.eau-claire.wi.us In addition to a ton of leagues, Hobbs offers youth open hockey clinics on Wednesday evenings. Open skate times are Sunday and Wednesday evenings. Rentals available. Admission fee.

Menomonie Archery Club N2520 State Road 25,

Menomonie • 715-664-8626 • menomoniearcheryclub. org Menomonie Archery Club is a nonprofit club that holds archery classes for all ages.

UW-Stout SEGA Gymnastics 224A Sports & Fitness

Cente, Menomonie • 715-232-5187 • Stout Elite Gymnastics Academy (SEGA) Classes holds gymnastics classes in the sports & fitness center.

YMCA 400 Graham Ave., Eau Claire • 715-836-8460

• Youth organization that provides local kids with a safe, fun, and energetic place to have fun and stay fit.

YMCA 611 Jefferson Ave., Chippewa Falls • chippe-

waymca.com Youth organization that provides local kids with a safe, fun, and energetic place to have fun and stay fit.

L I B RA R I E S

S CO U T I N G Boy Scouts of America 710 S Hastings Way, Eau Claire • (715) 832-6671 • scouting.org One of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizaitons. BSA provides a program for young people to develop physical fitness, trains them in the responsibilities of citizenship, and builds character.

Girl Scouts of America 4222 Oakwood Hills Pkwy, Eau

Augusta Public Library 113 North Stone Street, Augusta • (715) 286-2070 • augustalibrary.org

Bloomer Public Library 1519 17th Avenue, Bloomer • 715-568-2384 • bloomerpubliclibrary.org

Chippewa Falls Public Library 105 West Central Street,

4-H CHAPTERS

Elk Mound Public Library 101 East Menomonie St., Elk

Courthouse Rm. 13, Chippewa Falls • (715) 726-7950 • chippewa.uwex.edu 4-H is the youth development program of our nation’s Cooperative Extension System. Locally brought to you by UW-Extension.

Dunn County 4-H Chapter 800 Wilson Ave., Room 330,

Menomonie • (715) 232-1636 • dunn.uwex.edu A community of young people who learn leadership, citizenship, and life skills in a learn-by-doing approach.

Eau Claire County 4-H Chapter 227 1st Street West,

Altoona • (715) 839-4712 • eauclaire.uwex.edu A youth organization for grades K-13, 4-H organizations offer a place to make friends, develope life skills, build confidence, and help the community.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

715-839-5029 • altoonapubliclibrary.org

Claire • (715) 835-5331 • girlscouts.org Girls discover the fun, friendship, and power of girls working together. Through community service projects, sports, cultural exchanges, and environmental stewardship programs, girls develop to their full individual potential.

Chippewa County 4-H Chapter 711 North Bridge St./

56

Altoona Public Library 1303 Lynn Avenue, Altoona •

Chippewa Falls • 715-723-1146 ext.108 • chippewafallslibrary.org

Colfax Public Library 613 Main St., Colfax • 715-9624334 • colfaxlibrary@colfaxpubliclibrary.org • colfaxpubliclibrary.org Mound • (715) 917-1070 • elkmound@menomonielibrary.org • elkmound.menomonielibrary.org

Fall Creek Public Library 122 East Lincoln Avenue, Fall Creek • 715-877-3334 • fallcreekpubliclibrary.or­g

L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library 400 Eau Claire

St., Eau Claire • 715-839-5007 • ecpubliclibrary.info/ kids/

McIntyre Library 105 Garfield Avenue, UW-Eau Claire • (715) 836-3856 • uwec.edu/library/

Menomonie Public Library 600 Wolske Bay Road, Menomonie • 715-232-2164 ext. 16 • menomonielibrary.org

University Library (Robert S. Swanson Learning Center) • 715-232-1215 • uwstout.edu/lib/about/index.cfm

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES


C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S /

RESOURCES

/ PERSPECTIVES

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

57


58

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S


perspectives

what I wish I had known when I turned 30 As her 40th birthday looms, a local mother compiles lessons for her younger self BY STEPHANIE SIREK

I

’m a few weeks away from closing out my 30s, and I find myself doing the traditional mid-life review. This last decade was busy – I got married and started a family, was promoted within my career, then left to become a stay-at-home mom, lost loved ones to relocations and sometimes death – but thankfully, I’ve seen many more highs than lows. However, if I could go back in time to when I was closing out my 20s, I’d love to tell myself: ENJOY THE BABY YEARS Don’t get me wrong, these are hard years. The constant crying will wear you down. The daily washing of bottles and butts gets old. The lack of sleep will make you wonder how you can even form a semi-intelligent thought. Please don’t forget that although it feels like it is never going to end, it will. They will grow out of that crying stage, bottles will be traded for cups (that thankfully the dishwasher cleans), and they will sleep for longer periods at a time. Enjoy the moments when they snuggle in your arms while feeding or you read them a story. Get down on the floor and play with that annoying toy they love. Hold onto that hug a few seconds longer – nothing will ever be as sweet. Enjoy these years more than you wish for them to outgrow them.

DON’T LET FRIENDS SLIP AWAY You have a small group of friends, and I know you like it that way. But everyone is starting families and getting busy with babies and work. At first, you’ll still do those weekend play dates, but they will get less frequent. You’ll want to plan something, but zoning out to reality TV sounds easier then meeting for an hour-long play date. I wish you would make more of an effort. Your life is going to start to revolve solely around the kids. You’re going to talk less and less to friends and go out a couple of times a year (if you’re lucky). You’re going to forget how fun it is to laugh about nonsense things, and how much of a relief it is to take off the mom hat – even if only for a few hours. Your friends are on this ride, too. They can relate. They can sympathize. You’re not alone. Please make more mom dates than play dates. GIVE YOURSELF GRACE This is a hard one. The mom guilt is real. There will be so many moments where you feel like you’re failing. Thanks to things like Facebook, you’re going to see everyone’s highlight reels while you live in the behind-the-scenes chaos. You’re going to yell at the kids. You’re going to second-guess your decisions. You’re

going to feel like everyone else has it together when you struggle to get out of the house on time. You need to remember that no one lives 24/7 in that highlight reel. You are doing the best you can. Your kids’ happiness and wellbeing are always at the top of your list. We all have moments we regret as parents. You’re no different. Stop criticizing yourself and playing the moment over in your head. It happened, it’s done, and you can’t go back. Apologize and do better next time. Realize that it was one small moment in time, and that it’s not who you are overall as a parent. Now my 40s are knocking at the door, and I’m ready to embrace them. Over the next decade, the kids will be entering their teenage years and at the end my oldest will be leaving the house. (That’s hard to even digest.) I’m sure my life is going to revolve around shuttling kids to sports and activities, wadding through teenage drama, and hopefully, making a ton of great memories. But when I get to the end of this decade I want to look back with no regrets, so as I start this new chapter, I have set these two rules for myself: SAY ‘YES’ My thirties had me saying “no” a lot. Especially to foods I’ve never had before. I’d never even tried them, but I know that I won’t like them became my

frequent response. My unwillingness to try new things wasn’t limited to food but also to experiences. If it was out of my comfort zone, then it was met with a resounding no. Now that my story is close to half written, I want to be open to saying yes. What’s the worst thing that could happen? That the food won’t be my favorite or that I’ll trip and fall while trying Zumba? It will either give me something to giggle about years later or maybe, God forbid, I may just stumble into something I love. GIVE GRACE TO EVERYONE I need to continue to offer myself, and my kids, grace. As they get older and start to spread their wings, they are going to make mistakes – they can’t live and grow without them. I hope to be the parent who gives them a shoulder to lean on. The one who gives advice when needed and knows when to let them fail. These might turn out to be the hardest years yet, so we all will need buckets of grace to throw around. My hope is that the chapters I have left will be filled with funny, embarrassing, and thrilling moments. Watch out forties, here I come! Stephanie Sirek is a stay-at-home mom of four, the moderator for several locally recognized Facebook groups, and a Chippewa Valley native.

The mom guilt is real. There will be so many moments where you feel like you’re failing. Thanks to things like Facebook, you’re going to see everyone’s highlight reels while you live in the behind-the-scenes chaos. I N T E R E S T I N G L O C A L PA R E N T S / G R A N D PA R E N T S /

NEIGHBORS

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

59


perspectives: a grand view

I’m the funniest guy around,

just ask anyone (except my family) B Y R O B R E I D / I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y J A N A E B R E U N I G

T

o supplement my income, I travel and perform as a storyteller. To distinguish myself from the other storytellers, I bill myself as a “children’s humorist.” I was inspired to come up with this term when I heard Garrison Keillor refer to himself as the “world’s tallest radio humorist.” I specialize in making kids and their families laugh via storytelling, musical activities, and wordplay. In fact, I guarantee they will laugh. Here’s a sample of my show. I start by having the entire audience join me in storytelling warm-ups that includes hitting falsetto notes and doing tongue pushups. I let the audience know I’m warmed up by doing a very fast tongue-twisting poem. I share two or three funny stories mixed with musical activities. Favorite stories include “The Exploding Frog,” “The Biggest Juiciest Apple in the Whole Orchard,” and “Why I’m Late for School.” Favorite songs include the arms-flapping, waist-bending camp song “My Aunt Came Back.” Over the years, I have provoked laughter from Seattle to Birmingham, from Phoenix to Montreal. Everywhere … except at home. I’m taking a wild stab at this upcoming piece of insight, but I’m guessing I practiced my routine out loud on the home front one too many times. Over the years, the sounds heard inside my house turned from giggles to groans. I recently read Judd Apatow’s book Sick in the Head: Conversations about Life and Comedy. Apparently even famous comedians are underappreciated by their families. Apatow’s daughter told him, “Dad, all those things you say that you think are jokes are not funny.” He interviewed Jerry Seinfeld who confessed that when he told his son, “You know, I’ve made up a lot of words that people actually use as words,” his son

I N T E R E S T I N G L O C A L PA R E N T S /

G R A N D PA R E N T S

replied, “Uh, really, like what? Unfunny?” I know the feeling. I can share what I think is a funny story at the dining table with my wife and whichever grown child is visiting, and there will some eyeball rolling, an uncomfortable pause, and then one of them will ask, “Will someone pass the butter?” I was partly inspired by my own Uncle Guy, who cracked a lot of jokes at family holiday gatherings. His face would light up and he would laugh loudly at his witty remarks and not seem to notice the eyeball rolling and groaning from the rest of us. Now my family accuses me of telling “Dad Jokes.” I didn’t even know “Dad Jokes” were a thing until recently. I just got bifocals for the first time, and in the presence of my son, I held up my new glasses and said

/ NEIGHBORS

“Hi-focals.” He immediately shouted, “Dad Joke!” I retorted that I had, in fact, just shared an “Uncle Guy Joke.” I have some personal routines I frequently use that I’m sure my kids think of as “Dad Jokes.” Feel free to disagree with them. For example, when I hear an odd word or phrase, like “ablation therapy,” I will say, “I once dated a girl named Ablation Therapy.” I don’t remember when I started this “shtick,” but I’ve been doing it for years. Sometimes I say “I once dated a girl named Tungsten Carbide” or “I once dated a girl named Ambient Light.” You get the picture. No double entendres. I’m just making funny noises. Another corny routine is to read the Culver’s sign as if the menu items were one food dish, like “Banana Cream Tuna Salad.” Or “Chocolate Volcano Walleye.” You probably do it, too. OK, I know I’m complaining too much. I still get the occasional chuckle from my wife and kids … when I share new material. I’m old enough now to appreciate that Uncle Guy most likely didn’t care about going for the laughs. He was going for the eyeball rolls and groans instead. That was part of who he was, and maybe that’s part of who I am. I may even be somehow passing this on to the next generation despite the eyeball rolling. I’m very proud of the moment when I overheard my son telling his fiancée that he “once dated a girl named Deciduous Shrub.” The nice thing about entertaining other people’s kids is that the turnover rate is high. I get to use my old material over and over again each year on fresh ears. And on the home front, my own grandchildren are coming along. It won’t be long before they’ll be old enough to appreciate my humor. I’m looking forward to that day when I ask them, “Hey kids, want to hear some Grand-Dad Jokes?”

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

61


perspectives: part of the family

a single dad, a veteran, and a master tickler this single father of five doesn’t sweat the small stuff; his faith and his family keep him going name

Tim Boehnen

family

Isaiah (9), Joy (8), Levi (5), Solomon (3), and Eden (1)

neighborhood

West Hill, Chippewa Falls

background Tim is a busy single father of five who works full time and also serves as a major in the Wisconsin Army National Guard. Originally from Mt. Horeb, he is a graduate of Viterbo University and works as safety and security manager at eBay Enterprise in Eau Claire, where he does his part to help keep people safe and plan for when things go wrong. He’s proud of his 16 years of service in the National Guard, which has included a tour in Iraq. Here, Tim talks about being a single dad, the importance of his faith, and how quantity time is necessary for quality time.

We love the Chippewa Valley because there is so much to do! We love that this area is the perfect blend of “city life” with northwoods living. You get the beautiful river and Lake Wissota, amazing trails and parks, and yet you are just minutes from every urban desire – whether you want elegant dining, a great store, or even a specialty sport shop. We have traveled a lot and never found someplace as uniquely beautiful as the Chippewa Valley.

I make sure to never miss a moment with my kids. Between being a single dad where I have lost 50 percent of my time with my children and the Army taking me away its fair share of the time, I have truly come to treasure all the precious, fleeting moments I have with my kids. They are so precious to me and I count it a true blessing that they are mine. I can’t get enough of them and crave more time with them.

My favorite place to take the kids is Irvine Park in Chippewa Falls. We can spend so much time there with everything from the zoo, to the multiple playgrounds, to the water park in the summer, and the awesome wooded areas to be active in.

Our typical weekend includes finding something active to do as a family, especially if we can be outdoors. It can be as simple as throwing a football around, going to the park for a few hours, or just taking a walk. Attending church at Jacob’s Well is also always one of our highlights. We love the children’s programming they have there and the messages are definitely transformational.

As the weather starts to warm up you’ll find us outdoors enjoying it! It’s the whole reason we live in

Wisconsin! We love the changing seasons, especially the next new season. We really enjoy any activity that gets us moving outside together.

My kids would say my super power is tickling. We have awesome tickle wars and my kids do their best to resist – but in the end, Daddy always gets a laugh. We have some of the best times wrestling on the ground trying to not laugh as we endure the best tickle torture that can be mustered at the time.

My kids will tell you that their dad is silly, strict, fun, weird, a good cook … and smelly. I’m not so sure I’m proud of the last one, but they insisted I own up to the truth. Kids say the darnedest things …

If I could pass on one bit of advice it would be ... when I was a new father I had a good friend, Dan Deuth, who taught me about quality time vs. quantity of time. He taught me that some people fool themselves into thinking they can schedule quality time with their kids in lieu of having a quantity of time. Dan taught me that the truth is that quality time is spontaneous and can’t be scheduled and the only way you can end up having true quality time with your kids is by scheduling a quantity of time dedicated to them. I know it’s not a rule set in stone and that some situations prohibit a quantity of time (such as being deployed), but I think it is a great rule of thumb, and something I try to keep in the back of my mind. Through my almost 10 years of being a dad, the moments I treasure most with my kids were usually the unscheduled times that just seemed to happen.

PHOTO: SHARP PHOTO STUDIO

62

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

I N T E R E S T I N G L O C A L PA R E N T S

/ G R A N D PA R E N T S / N E I G H B O R S


C O M M U N I T Y / L I V I N G / D I S C O V E R Y / C R E AT I V I T Y / A C T I V I T Y / E V E N T S / G U I D E S / P E R S P E C T I V E S

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 6 C H I P P E WAVA L L E Y FA M I LY. O R G

63


Chippewa Valley Family May/June 2016  
Chippewa Valley Family May/June 2016  
Advertisement