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44 vman • masthead


contents

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48 vMaN • CONtENts

NEW ORDER As the iconic Mancunians prepare to release their tenth studio album—their frst in a decade—Bernard and company sit down with Tim Blanks to contemplate a career of personal hits

a D ay i N t h E l i f E Introducing the essential accessories to decorate your daily routine

stuff DIIV “Is Are” back, Takeshi Murata’s new chapter, Phoebe English’s next phase, and Valentino’s art of collaboration

JaMiE XX The dark horse behind one of the year’s best records lifts the cloak to talk recording, sampling, and forging new sonic frontiers

siMON DENNy New Zealand’s hottest art export surveys a landmark year from his airport installation in Venice

JOhN BOyEGa As he prepares to dive headlong into the boldest franchise in movie history, John Boyega talks typecasting and overcoming the fury of fanboys

ROlE Call Eleven of the most exciting working directors fx their lenses on their lead actors and actresses for

a fall flm preview straight from the source

PE a K s E a s O N By t i M Wa l K E R Believe the hype: Charlie Hunnam is the silver screen hero Hollywood has been waiting for Styled by Jacob K

R E a N i M at O R B y s t E v E N K l E i N Reimagining one of his iconic shoots, Steven Klein introduces Jordan Barrett, modeling’s next big thing Styled by Matthew Ellenberger

thE GR aND REuNiON By BRuCE WEBER Five of the biggest male supermodels ever unite for a moment that will go down in fashion history Styled by Deborah Watson

N OW h E R E fa s t By J O s E Ph s Z a B O The former Malverne Senior High School teacher and legend of the lens returns to his old stomping ground for a nostalgic take on Fall fashion Styled by Jay Massacret

a l l yO u N E E D i s a N O v E R C O at By B R u C E W E B E R Marlon, Taylor, Jarrod, Alex, Brett, Trevor, Bobby, Preston, and Nic embrace the coats of the season Styled by Deborah Watson

thE OutsiDERs By BENJaMiN alEX aNDER husEBy Suburban rebels stray far afeld in the best full looks to focus on now Styled by Beat Bolliger

My GiRl aND ME By JOhNNy DufORt The love affair between man and man’s best friend continues in a posh English manor Styled by Haley Wollens

DaRK Pl aCEs By DaNNy tREaCy Inverting his found-garment practice by taking fashion into the dark corners of town, artist Danny Treacy

breaks haunting new ground Styled by Max Pearmain

ChRistOPhER aND his KiND Paying homage to his biggest hero, Kim Jones gave new emotion to a standout season at Louis Vuitton.

Head off for next season with this must-have suitcase

thE vMaN fORD MODEl sEaRCh By stEvEN KlEiN Meet the fve fnalists who caught our eye as they make their debut #SHOTBYKLEIN Styled by Matthew Ellenberger


THE EDITOR

LETTER FROM

What becomes a man in 2015? Or, more specifcally, what is man becoming? The defnition of men’s style is an evolving one, with

on the mind of Max Pearmain, who, for this issue, collaborates

innumerable addendums. If last season was about simplifying and

to be as prescient as we’ve come to expect from Max. A couple months after the shoot—which features street-infected, deconstructed menswear with hoods and face masks—Raf Simons sent similar head coverings down the runway in Paris. Nonconformist minds think alike. It is a distinct pleasure to bring another original and offbeat voice to our pages: the exuberant Tim Walker, whose fashion imagery never ceases to transport viewers into alternate worlds. For his frst VMAN cover, styled by Jacob K, Walker captures cinema’s next heroic leading man, the dashing Charlie Hunnam. As Hunnam bids farewell to his TV reign on Sons of Anarchy and prepares to release the haunting and nightmarish Crimson Peak, he refects on his journey as an actor, those lingering comparisons to Brad Pitt, his choice to walk away from Fifty Shades of Grey, and stepping into armor for Guy Ritchie’s next franchise (good-bye Sherlock Holmes, hello King Arthur). Hunnam is quick to note that his career started with the risky and groundbreaking Queer as Folk series and tells Paul Flynn why he still prefers to follow his instincts—moving forward can require a backward glance. Hindsight seems to be a theme when it comes to fashion editorial this season, our Fall issue playing out as a warped take on “now and then.” It’s back to the future for Steven Klein, who pays homage to one of his favorite men’s stories of the past, originally shot with Brad Pitt, now recast with male modeling’s current supernova Jordan Barrett. He also shoots this year’s VMAN Ford Model search winners in a Warholian Polaroid style, crossbreeding ’70s Cruising-era Friedkin with ’90s Kids-era Larry Clark, for a look that screams sex. Benjamin Alexander Huseby and Beat Bolliger tackle collections through a lens of suburban isolation, evoking the time when bands like Joy Division, Bronski Beat, and Pet Shop Boys came of age, while Johnny Dufort and Haley Wollens create a tongue-in-cheek tale that provides a subversive-yet-fanciful update on a storybook romance. And in his frst fashion story since 1999, the legendary Joseph Szabo returns to Malverne High School, where he shot the indelible images of his Teenage book, to make an au courant update to his iconography with Jay Massacret. Perhaps no one captures the essence of a moment like Bruce Weber, without whom, VMAN arguably wouldn’t exist. Where would we be if it weren’t for Bruce’s tireless pursuit of documenting the beauty of experience? In an uplifting story styled by his close collaborator Deborah Watson, Bruce brings fve male supermodels together for what he calls “the Grand Reunion”: Jack, Andres, Brad, RJ, and Tyson. VMAN was launched with these faces in the forefront, and they only grow more rugged and refned with age. They are a poignant reminder of where we were when we frst began as a publication, and how far we’ve come. And in typical style, Bruce is already one step ahead of us: following his grand reunion, he highlights newer faces to know in the season’s strongest outerwear. Wherever menswear and the cult of identity drifts next, we embrace man’s freedom to wear what he wants, say what he feels, and become who he (or she) wants to be. With designers exploring femininity, masculinity, militarism, tradition, and tribute—especially in the case of Kim Jones’s Christopher Nemeth homage at Louis Vuitton, with which we close the issue—there’s room enough for everybody. No rules need apply. PATRIK SANDBERG

honing in on established signatures, Fall/Winter is about chucking preestablished notions out the proverbial window. When Alessandro Michele stepped into Frida Giannini’s shoes at Gucci early this year, achieving the near-impossible by completing a full men’s collection in the span of fve days, he upended the aesthetic consciousness of the brand, trading in Giannini’s jet-set, European machismo with something intellectual, romantic, and unabashedly sissy. And my, how sissiness has turned into a goal. Michele’s Gucci all but sanctions the gender-bending proposed in recent seasons by the likes of Jonathan Anderson at J.W. and Loewe, Shayne Oliver at Hood By Air, and Walter Van Beirendonck. This is not to mention the increased masculinization of skirts, dresses, and tunics further pushed by Riccardo Tisci, Rick Owens, and Rei Kawakubo—common practice for these three, once thought of as radically outside the norm. Of course, Owens still managed to shock by turning manhood inside-out, quite literally, with his fesh-exposing windows to the groin. The grand actualization of Caitlyn Jenner in the public eye served as the watershed crest on a tide of transgender acceptance in the U.S.—better late than never—while Rachel Dolezal’s transracial scandal tapped into something more apocalyptic and perplexing. Meanwhile, pop culture pariahs have been putting in presidential bids and—at least in the case of the bloated and histrionic Donald Trump—coming dangerously close to the altars of power purely based on cult of personality. (Kim Jong-un, eat your heart out.) In short, the politics of identity could not be more relevant now—for better or worse. It made sense when beginning this issue that we’d turn our focus to the people we see as heroes in this climate, the ones who defy established codes of perception. John Boyega is on the verge of global recognition as he steps onto the Millennium Falcon and sets off for a galaxy far, far away in this winter’s Star Wars: Episode VII Ð The Force Awakens. In his interview with David Renshaw, he doesn’t hesitate to call out the racism he’s faced from fans of the franchise. It’s a shocking reminder of how far we have left to go in terms of social progress in entertainment. But without giving too much away about his character Finn, Boyega implies that the color of his skin will not be the only breakthrough he makes in the realm of the Galactic Republic. With In Colour, the masterful Jamie xx achieved the year’s standout record and also one of its most sensitive and ambient—a welcome reprieve from the bombastic EDM ruckuses of David Guetta and Calvin Harris that have overstayed their welcome on streaming services and the FM dial. Each of these artists can certainly pay a debt to the pioneering pop brilliance of New Order, who, on the eve of their new album Music Complete, sit down with Tim Blanks in London’s Soho neighborhood for a personal and frank conversation about their still-unfolding legacy in a world that’s as restless now as when they frst began, like phoenixes from the emotional fre and ash of Ian Curtis’s suicide. Security, identity, privacy, commerce, and advertising all factor into the biting and provocative work of the New Zealand art star Simon Denny. With four major shows in 2015, including solo outings at MoMA PS1 and the Hammer Museum in L.A., Denny lets Kevin McGarry in on his process from his acclaimed Venice Biannale installation in the Venice Marco Polo airport, playfully photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Anti-surveillance is similarly

50 vman • hello

with the artist Danny Treacy on a fashion story that turned out


NEW ORDER

A DECADE AFTER THEIR LAST RELEASE, THE GODPARENTS OF ELECTRONICA ARE SHOWING THE KIDS, ONCE MORE, HOW TO LET GO AND GET SERIOUS. WHO NEEDS DANCE MUSIC? THIS IS MUSIC COMPLETE. PHOTOGRAPHY NICK WILSON TEXT TIM BLANKS New Order was always four people who rarely felt the need

to put a face to their music. Their most famous creation

was intended to be played by robots, so the fesh and blood could leave the stage. And even if that was actually their manager Rob Gretton’s intention for “Blue Monday,” rather than the band’s, the story fts too well with New Order’s resolute anonymity to let it lie. So there’s an irresistible irony in the fact that anonymity had to be maintained in the face of huge boundary-breaking infuence, massive critical acclaim, and the kind of impassioned following that guarantees pop cultural immortality… never mind that the deep-running still waters of New Order were as troubled below the surface as those in that other never-ending rock soap opera, Fleetwood Mac. I’m really stretching there, but I wanted to bring up Christine McVie, who recently declared that, after living on her farm for a while, she couldn’t wait to get back to Fleetwood Mac. “I know,” says Gillian Gilbert (keyboards, synthesizers, and guitars) with an ironic little smile. “Stephen said, ‘What’s she doing there? She said she’d never go back.’ But you don’t know what you’ll miss, especially while it’s going on.” “Stephen” is Stephen Morris (drums, electronic drums, keyboards, and synthesizers), Gilbert’s husband since 1993. They too have been living on a farm for quite a while, as New Order stuttered along. Following the band’s frst breakup in 1993, after seven albums and a string of the best singles ever to trouble modern ears, Gilbert and Morris didn’t see Bernard Sumner (vocals, guitars, keyboards, and synthesizers) and Peter Hook (bass and vocals) for fve years. There was a reunion in 1998 and another album in 2001—after that Gilbert reluctantly quit, family matters taking an upper hand. “At the time, I thought leaving the band was the worst thing,” she says. “It was a big black hole that was absolutely horrendous. I dropped Stephen off at the airport to fy to Japan. He just looked so happy...and there was me with two little kids.” Without her, New Order released Waiting for the Sirens’ Call in 2005 and toured ftfully, until Hook left in 2007. Sumner announced the band was no more in 2009. Then, in 2011, another reunion, new tours. No Hook, but Gilbert back in the saddle and over the moon after her 10-year hiatus down on the farm. “I was coming round telling my dad about the gigs, and he said, ‘You’ve never looked happier.’” Still, there was the usual tumultuous undertow: mud-slinging, provocation, dueling autobiographies, with Peter Hook not prepared to go gently into that good night. “Joyless Divisions,” one U.K. newspaper punningly dubbed the situation, invoking the mythic crucible in which New Order was formed. Maybe turmoil was always going to be New Order’s fallback, given the circumstances of its formation. Joy Division’s singer, Ian Curtis, hanged himself in 1980 at the age of 23, and it now seems apparent that he left his fellow band members Sumner, Hook, and Morris in a state of shock so intense but so sublimated that they never really processed the emotions that were unleashed. Author Irvine Welsh likened it to PTSD in an essay he wrote to accompany the release of Music Complete, New Order’s tenth studio album, their frst new music in a decade, and the reason why I’m sitting in the bar of a private club in Soho one weekday midmorning with Sumner, Morris, Phil Cunningham (guitars, keyboards, and synthesizers), and Tom Chapman

(bass) arrayed in front of me. Gilbert is upstairs, to be talked to on her own. Speculation on that state of affairs will follow shortly. After everything they’ve been through over the past near-40 years, there’s a striking sense of equanimity about Music Complete. You want to believe it’s hard-won. Sumner has always written the lyrics for New Order. If, in the past, they were characterized by a chilly wryness, the word “love” is all over the new songs: “the secret of all happiness is unconditional love” in “Stray Dog” and “I’m a shadow of a man without your love” in “People on the High Line.” I’m jumping to conclusions. Then there’s “Unlearn This Hatred,” which sounds like a riposte to the animosities of the past 10 years, a man on the brink of his seventh decade with no more time for negative thoughts. “It’s not always about me,” Sumner counters. “I think a lot of these songs are imagined scenarios between imagined characters. If you believe most artists’ lyrics are autobiographical, I don’t.” And yet Sumner acknowledges that the assumption might be a mistake when he refects on Curtis. “After Ian died, we started listening to his lyrics and we were shocked by the content. He was singing very heavy words for a young man in his early 20s, but he presented you with a fgure that wasn’t very heavy. Before he got ill with the drugs and stuff, he was a happy-go-lucky chap, smiling and laughing and perfectly normal, but singing these really heavy lyrics. We assumed they were nonbiographical. I did anyway. It was only after he passed away that you thought, Oh, God.” BLANKS Is that guilt over missing a cry for help? SUMNER Ian would never have cried for help. Men didn’t do that sort of thing. MORRIS If he’d have cried for help in Salford, he would have got a fst in his face for sure. SUMNER Post-traumatic stress didn’t exist in those days either. You’d get a slap in the face and a “pull yourself together.” MORRIS “Lack of moral fber. Don’t be a girl.” SUMNER I think we all doubted in our own ways, but we didn’t speak about it, did we? MORRIS No, just got on with it. It’s very personal. Read between those lines for an indication of exactly what

New Order had to deal with, from their formation onward. And understand why I use a 10-cent word like “equanimity” to describe Music Complete. Perfect for the 10 years since they last released music, refecting the changes, the reconciliations, the peace that hopefully comes with the passage of time. Peace? The album may be upbeat, but it’s scarcely tranquil. “I think it’s pretty relentless,” Sumner agrees. “Possibly the most relaxed, casual track is ‘Restless’ and then it goes for the jugular after that.” “But it’s not an angry record,” says Morris. “I don’t mean in an angry way,” Sumner clarifes. “It’s got a lot of ideas and a lot of energy.” In fact, he considers it a dance album, but the kind of dance album that resonates with Italo-piano and surging strings and a lot of other sounds that take you back to a happier time on the dancefoor. An EDM antidote, in other words.

MORRIS You can’t actually dance to EDM. It doesn’t make me feel anything. SUMNER Does EDM stand for Emotional Dance Music? MORRIS I guess because these are songs, there’s an inherent depth to them, rather than a collection of riffs that people dance to. BLANKS Do you dance? SUMNER Not any more. MORRIS I’m too old.

The 10-year hiatus has become a bit of a musical trope. Bowie’s The Next Day and D’Angelo’s Black Messiah were sensational materializations from the mists of time. But New Order isn’t strictly following in their footsteps. They’ve been touring for more or less the entire decade, for one thing. And, for another, “I reckon it took nine months to a year to make this album,” says Sumner. “Aside from touring, I’ve been doing my book [Chapter and Verse - New Order, Joy Division, and Me] as well, and that’s as much work as an album.”


A recent interview stated that the band now considered have changed since New Order last released new music. themselves songwriters rather than instrumentalists, sug- “The original idea was not just that we were going to write it gesting that their idea of the craft of what they were doing in bits,” says Sumner. “We were going to release it in bits as has changed a little. “We’ve always been songwriters,” EPs. That’s how people consume music really. But I couldn’t Sumner insists at frst. Then? “I guess it has changed a bit. stand working in bits. I just couldn’t stand a verse one month, In Joy Division, I played guitar and keyboards, Steve played and three months later, the chorus. I just wanted to do the drums, Ian sang, and the other guy played bass…” Morris whole fucking lot and then you can break it up.” chimes in, “Before, you’d just be sitting in a room playing Meanwhile, Gilbert is sitting alone upstairs. Why, she has and saying, ‘Oh, that’s a nice bit.’ It was the bit after that no idea, especially when she has been such a pivotal part of that was the diffcult bit.” Continues Sumner, “Rather than the New Order story. It’s a canny move, however, on someone’s the jamming we did in the past, we split into groups, Steve part to have her interviewed alone, because her perspective and Gillian, Phil and Tom, and me on my own, then we’d embraces both an intimate’s and an outcast’s experience of all write a bit and bring it in, so it was much more writing a the band. Contrary to legend, Gilbert was never the drummer’s song the way the Beatles would write a song, I imagine. It girlfriend, drafted in by Rob Gretton to round out the sound. changes the nature of the songs when you’re making them The truth was that she was a Siouxsie fan and a guitar noise as complete, rather than as stitched together.” merchant whom Gretton knew from gigs. Her relationship Music Complete, right? And it is a complete album, with Morris came later. Still, she poignantly acknowledges, sequenced as such, with a proper A side and a proper B “I’m only here because Ian’s not.” And maybe that’s why she side, which isn’t really the way people listen to music any- has always been “other” (or upstairs) in the New Order story. more. That’s maybe a measure of how fundamentally things (Morris and Gilbert called themselves the Other Two when

they went “solo.”) “I remember Hooky barking at me, ‘You’ve got to learn to tune up,’ and little did I know he couldn’t tune up. Barney helped everyone tune up.” But what she’s brought to the peculiar chemistry of New Order can be defned by one of the most immediately striking elements of Music Complete. “I’m good at intros,” says Gilbert. Every song announces itself in a commanding way, like Gilbert, back after 10 years. She knows the chickens on the farm will be gone when she gets back from touring, because there’s no one else to look after them. But, like Christine McVie and the Mac, the importance of New Order in Gilbert’s own life is a reminder of the emotional import of the band for millions of others. She has been given the opportunity to set the record straight. That’s what the band is doing too. Sumner is writing about love, because he has fallen in love with making music again. And, by the way, he takes me aside later in the day to concede that he does still dance. There is no end to that affair. Music Complete is out September 25 from Mute Records

LEGENDS • vmaN 53


from morning to night, fashion’s sharpest minds have you covered with the most crucial accessories of the moment. here’s the perfect way to design your day. photography dan forbes fashion michael gleeson

54 vman • essentials

CloCKwise from top: sCarf and pillboX Hermès Vase Fendi Casa bleu de Chanel fragranCe CHaneL watCh CaLVin KLein table, teaspoon, dog bowl Bottega Veneta Home soCKs gosHa ruBCHinsKiy speaKers and Case Beats By dr. dre blanKet Louis Vuitton shoehorn, towel holder, towels, BruneLLo CuCineLLi soap and lotion Byredo razor eVery man JaCK Cup and sauCer armani Casa tea bag Kusmi tea faCe lotion tom Ford Beauty

prop stylist lisa gwilliam prop assistant JaCK riChardson digital teChniCian todd barndollar loCation root brooKlyn

A DAY IN THE LIFE

wa k i n g u p flip on hot 97 and brew something herbal, it’s going to be a turnt up day.


shop at www.giuseppezanottidesign.com

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hitting the gym go from lazy bear to top dog with upgraded athletic elements. you’ll be a show-off in no time from the free weights to the field. from top: hat Y-3 ball Fendi sunglasses Prada Linea rossa wireless earbuds Beats BY dr. dre duffel bag CaLvin KLein CoLLeCtion crossbody bag JiL sander beverage JuiCe Press sneakers raF simons x adidas

56 vman • essentials


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getting down to business nobody ever built an empire in a day, but you’ve got a leg up on the process when your pencils are custom made in milan. From top: Flask and case Saint Laurent by Hedi SLimane pen and brieFcase HermèS glass bottega Veneta Home wallet brioni pencils and ruler bruneLLo CuCineLLi belt baLenCiaga cuFFlinks LanVin

58 vman • essentials


kicking back alone or on a date, the best way to unwind at home is in close proximity to a fragrant candle and fine china from fendi. from top: hat ErmEnEgildo ZEgna CouturE bag KEnZo sunglasses tom Ford chair and wine glass FEndi Casa shoe giusEppE Zanotti dEsign candle ByrEdo brooches givEnChy By riCCardo tisCi

60 vman • essentials


stuff

D i g i ta L r e v o L u t i o n To encounter Takeshi Murata’s incandescent, chaotic work is to question and confuse familiarity and newness. A late’90s RISD graduate alongside Jim Drain and Ara Peterson, Murata is an artist known for taking the detritus of disembodied digital graphics and rendering them into exuberant scenes of subversive commercial disarray. Murata’s videos employ 3D photogrammetic scans of real objects, sometimes animated through the use of noise generators. His CG still imagery employs Hollywood production-level software to build tableaus that reference classicism through a presentday, post-digital flter. In a sense, an argument is made for CG composition as the painting of now. Cyborg skulls, cult ’80s VHS tapes, citrus fruit, seashells, and cracked iPhones all populate the architectural universe of Murata’s work, alongside original sculptures that are alternately crude and digitally immaculate. “The relatonship between alienation and desire is one I fnd especially relevant,” Murata says in an interview in his new monograph, out now from Salon 94. “It’s also tied closely to the advancement of technology.” Takeshi Murata is out now from Salon 94/Ratio 3/Kunsthall Stavanger

the queen’s engLish London-based Phoebe English’s ethereal womenswear has earned international acclaim, and now, she’s

breaking into the men’s market. For F/W ’15, English debuted a tightly edited range for guys, inspired largely

Phoebe English’s menswear collection is available now at Dover Street Market

D i i v i n to 2 016 It’s hard to believe it’s been three years since DIIV released their debut album Oshin on Captured Tracks—music that

hasn’t lost relevance. Such is the nature of the band’s signa-

ture, narcotic blend of C86, krautrock, and ’80s melancholia, the audio equivalent of a sun-kissed, sorrowful Super 8 flm.

“Oshin took on a life of its own,” says Zachary Cole Smith,

the project’s originator and principle songwriter. “It took the band on a rollercoaster ride. This new record was written while trying to hang onto that rollercoaster.” Abstrusely titled Is the Is Are, after a line in a poem commissioned from a Parisian artist beginning to learn English, the album’s title came from Smith’s desire to convey something that felt “like a universal maxim, but [one that is] ultimately meaningless,” he says. Clocking in at 18 tracks, the fnished product is a mix of fast, slow, happy, sad, dark, and poppy, maintaining a pure melodicism throughout. “This is an insane record for me.” he says. “It’s a document of the craziest, most up-and-down period of my life. Happy, sad, happy, sad, amazing things happening, terrible things happening. I just tried to hold on.”

t h e a r t o f va L e n t i n o Valentino designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli are strong believers in creative cross-pollination. Case in point is the duo’s F/W ’15 menswear collection, whose sharp silhouettes, geometric prints, and graphic intarsias were the result of a collaboration with the young Australian artist Esther Stewart. Initially drawn to cubism and futurism, the designers discovered Stuart’s color blocked paintings while searching the Web, and the combination of her aesthetic codes and the Italian brand’s luxe fabrics and masterful tailoring make for a visually arresting marriage. Indeed, this collection is proof that art and fashion are the most bellissimi of bedfellows. Valentino’s F/W ’15 collection is available in stores now

Is the Is Are is out in January from Captured Tracks

62 vman • neWs

CLOCKWISE: STILL FROM STreeT TrASh, 2012 VIDEO, 1:14 LOOPED COuRTESy THE ARTIST AnD SALOn 94, nEW yORK; COuRTESy VALEnTInO; PHOTOGRAPHy SAnDy KIM; ARTWORK LuCA BARBIERI

by her furniture designer beau. “He doesn’t always look brilliant,” she laughs, “but I admire his aesthetic choices and clothing. He has wonderful vintage pieces.” Friend Peter Bailey, who studied menswear at English’s alma mater, Central Saint Martins, also lent a hand and helped the designer grasp the male sartorial perspective. “It was important to work with a guy to make sure I had the right types of pockets, cuffs, etc. I didn’t want to present insincere work.” The resulting earth-toned lineup features louche trousers, airy outerwear, and subtle shirts, all made from natural materials like cotton, linen, and muslin. Pure and simple, the collection has already been picked up by Dover Street Market, and English plans to expand the offering each season, albeit slowly. “I want to continue to make nice things,” she says. “And we have to walk before we run.”


publicschoolnyc.com


SHIRT LOUIS VUITTON

64 vman • mEn OF THE YEaR


jamie xx

recorded on the road and mainlined from personal memories, jamie xx’s in colour rose above the noise of 2015 to become this year’s standout sonic achievement. in between tv gigs and a bold new art collaboration, the composer and producer pauses to reflect on the process behind his most profound project yet. photography jeff henriKson fashion clare byrne

JACKET AND SHIRT BALENCIAGA SWEATER LANVIN


“it’s scary to get it out into the real world,” says Jamie smith, over tea at williamsburg’s wythe Hotel, on his frst weekend promoting his recent lp, In Colour. the record had its frst public listen the previous evening in a room full of journalists and record executives at the neon-lit New york city headquarters of the Judd Foundation. “But people have been really nice about it.” it’s a characteristically modest understatement from smith, who, under the moniker Jamie xx, has built an ecstatic critical following for his bursts of incandescent, progressive electronic dance music, which he releases in between periods of apparent hibernation. Bashful and usually clad all in black, the london native is more comfortable behind a laptop than in front of a camera lens and harbors no qualms about admitting his uncertainty when it comes to his recording process. “i wasn’t working toward an album,” he says. “i was just making music. then, beginning last year, i decided that if i was going to fnish all the music i had started, i needed some sort of endgame, which was the album, and that allowed me to fnish things. i’m just so bad at fnishing anything off.” one-third of the xx, his popular, brooding indie rock band with his close former schoolmates oliver sim and romy madley croft, smith built a process of recording dance music out of the solitude and alienation he experienced on tour. “when i make music, it’s usually just on my headphones on the tour bus, like, just sort of getting a bit sad and lonely, because it actually makes me happy. But not all of it is made like that. some of it is joyful.” He relays a story of his inspiration behind the song “i Know there’s Gonna Be (Good times),” which features guest vocals from the Jamaican dancehall artist popcaan and the atlanta rapper young thug. it was conceived during the xx’s residency at the park avenue armory in spring of last year. “i was in New york for two months, in Brooklyn, and had to get a car to manhattan every day for the armory shows, and i was listening to Hot 97 in the mornings going over the bridge, looking at the city,” he recalls. “it was just so perfect. i wanted to make something like that.” “(Good times)” is one of a handful of fan favorites from In Colour and was hailed by many critics as the song of the summer. “‘Girl’ was one track that was getting a bit emotional,” smith says. But it’s “loud places,” featuring croft, that the producer cites as the lightning bolt that solidifed the album—the song samples idris muhammad’s “could Heaven Ever Be like this,” a 1977 r&B fusion track. “[“loud places”] didn’t have the big sample in it and it wasn’t quite clicking with me,” smith says. “i had this song that i loved, that i wanted to use for ages, somewhere, and when it worked together it was sort of a eureka moment. that was when i knew i was coming to the end of making the album.” it was smith’s talent for sampling—specifcally his work with the late Gil scott-Heron on their joint 2011 Ep We’re New Here— that frst earned him recognition from the likes of drake, rihanna, Florence and the machine, and adele, all of whom he’s worked with either as a producer or on remixes since. “it was a bit disheartening at times,” he says, “to have so many people involved in making a three-minute song in that pop world. i learned so much. i’m really happy that i did it and i got to work with amazing people, but at the end of it, it made me want to be on my own and make music like i used to. so i will delve into that again, but only at intervals.” Now that In Colour has made Jamie a star in his own right, with many critics putting it on best-of lists before the year was even halfway through, he’s learning to master the late-night television circuit. He’s also putting the fnishing touches on an experimental ballet called Tree of Codes. a collaboration with choreographer wayne mcGregor and artist olafur Eliasson that’s based on a text by Jonathan safran Foer, Tree of Codes premieres at the armory later this month. an early preview hints at a piano-based score, much less voltaic than smith’s soft-core rave hits of late. But then again, his work has redefned the term “quiet storm” at every turn. smith explains as much himself: “in clubs, i like when music is so dynamic that there are moments when you can hear everything that’s going on around you. i like to come back into reality for a bit before it gets loud again. i like how emotive that dynamic can be. it just really works. it’s quite a simple trick.” PATRIK SANDBERG Tree of Codes premieres at the park avenue armory september 14

Hair Nicolas EldiN (art dEpartmENt) GroomiNG Emi KaNEKo (d+V) pHoto assistaNt JordaN Zuppa stylist assistaNt lucas dawsoN locatioN root driVE-iN

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SWEATER BERLUTI


SIMON deNNy

with major exhibitions this year in new york, venice, los angeles, and lyon, multimedia wunderkind simon denny seems to be taking over the planet. it only makes sense for an artist hell-bent on turning modern society’s global connectivity and material messaging completely inside out. photography pierpaolo ferrari 68 vman • men of the year


CLOTHING (THROUGHOUT) DENNY’S OWN


PhoTo ASSISTANT LEoNARDo ScoTTI LocATIoN VENIcE MARco PoLo AIRPoRT

There was a time when business people, paper pushers, and bureaucrats dreamt of the

The second stamp Denny put on 2015 was this spring at the Venice Biennale, the

life of the artist, when artistry was considered something akin to possessing a higher power mutually exclusive from a vocation. That higher power is certainly the calling of Simon Denny, one of the most exciting contemporary visual artists to emerge from New Zealand…ever? But judging by the obsessions that typically lead him to make his research-heavy installations, one quickly gets the picture that Denny’s reveries take him to the deepest reaches of Silicon Valley and the like. Nowadays, when more and more Millennials are coming of age with healthy levels of suspicion and even disgust for the art world, Denny is doing the good work of substantively engaging with the parallel creative universes orbiting around the technology that is shaping society as we know it, and in doing so, is redeeming the function of the artist in society as a proper critic of the times. While the promise of his future is unfagging, it’s fair to say that 2015 has, to date, been Denny’s year. Things kicked off in the spring with his frst signifcant museum solo show in the United States, The Innovator’s Dilemma at MoMA PS1. A mini-retrospective of sorts, the exhibition reprised a suite of projects Denny has made over recent years that tunnel into the lives of human and corporate juggernauts alike, such as the disgraced German-born sharing kingpin Kim Dotcom and the übernational South Korean brand Samsung. “I’m used to bringing other voices and authors into what I do,” he says “I use a lot of appropriation in my work and I also use the work of other people with positions and poses from different angles, and that’s part of what I do in any project.” In a perverse sense Denny could be read as a fanboy, or a revered one, a scholar. Inside the Venn diagram of these competing sentiments is a mix of expertise and an earnest zealousness about mastering arcane subject matters and liberating them as edifying images and experiences for the rest of the world.

outsize constellation of exhibitions put on by just about every country on earth in the

medieval city that is slowly slipping into water. Ingeniously, one of the two venues he scored for the New Zealand national pavilion is none other than the Venice Marco Polo

Airport. Everyone fying into Venice for the show, from museum directors to camera-toting

tourists, arrives at baggage carousels and arrival hall advertisements emblazoned with photographic reproductions of classical portraiture lifted from the second location used for his show, the Marciana Library in Piazza San Marco. Riffng on cultural currency and how cities actually do market themselves in spaces like airports, the Berlin-based artist effectively created a trippy overlay of eras and types of public spaces and cleverly lassoed an arm of the nothing-if-not-circumspect air traffc security apparatus into the show as a collaborator. (In fact, in order to gain clearance to work behind the TSA checkpoint at odd hours and as a non-ticketed entity, Denny says one of the most time-consuming elements of the project was an obligatory course in airport security.) Meanwhile, in the heart of the city, Denny stocked the gilded library with a dozen or so vitrines devoted to recently disclosed information of biblical proportions: the Edward Snowden slides. Ensconced by the holdings of the library, which notably include a world-class collection of ancient maps, Denny’s works here stand as a meditation on data visualization and how far this discipline has come since the charting of the Atlantic. The project could be viewed as a curatorial one, because the vast majority of the images arranged within the glowing, modern shelving—largely anthropomorphized animals and computer accessories drawn as jaunty, colorful cartoon explanations of national security protocols—are the work of a man named David Darchicourt, a fairly anonymous Maryland-based illustrator. “David Darchicourt is actually even more interesting to me than Snowden somehow,” Denny excitedly admits. “The whole thing about the Snowden slides is that they’re


unattributable, and this is their big problem—anyone can say anything about them, and you can’t really say yes or no because the United States and the other governments involved won’t say anything on it. What I think is so compelling about Darchicourt is not only the story of what it’s like to be a human cog in that machine and the contexts that he can draw from, but also that his admission that he designed a logo featured in one of the Snowden slides is the frst confession of authorship that we’ve gotten from anyone.” As a cog in the unwieldy geopolitical instrument that is the Venice Biennale, Denny’s exhibition has been a huge hit and a critical favorite, and the stage could not have been better chosen for a body of work that ponders the state of how global security is pictured in this day and age, accentuated with wacky, wavy fonts and random consumertargeted errata like a Whole Foods chalk drawing advertising buffalo meat. For exploring a topic that is all about restraint, the room sure looks like a party. “Essentially I think the job that Darchicourt had, to make things more accessible and more readable, was in part to make them more fun: posters for training sessions, posters for pay assessment processes—playful and entertaining reminders about info security and not telling your friends about what you were doing.” From this list Denny stumbles onto an ontological truth: “Bureaucracy is inherently boring, I guess, so you want to bring people’s attention to it and get them out of that boredom with color.” Returning to a previous muse with no shortage of color, Kim Dotcom, the eccentric German millionaire founder of Megaupload, Denny speculates that he was able to move to New Zealand with a criminal background because it was an easy place for the United States to spy on him. “He’s kind of an entrepreneur and he did have a very disruptive business model, but at the same time he’s not totally Silicon Valley. He’s politically outside of that. And he cast himself as a kind of crazy bad guy, and then the U.S. sort of took over his story.”

The arc of Dotcom’s life in New Zealand has been an inspiration to Denny, but the story in turn reveals much about the peaceful island nation where Denny’s initial worldview was formed. While people frst welcomed Dotcom, over time their approval of him dissipated, not due to his politics or business practices but rather how he expressed himself stylistically. “What really broke New Zealanders’ trust with Kim Dotcom—because now they sort of hate him—were in fact aesthetic choices, like his massive parties in Auckland. He funded an alternative Internet party for parliament and invited Snowden, Greenwald, and Assange to what went off in the style of a dubstep event, and they thought it was totally off.” For one of his frst large-scale projects, Denny contemplated the redesigned New Zealand passport with the support of a number of members of parliament as well as national journalists. “The human scale of what happens in New Zealand defnitely gives one a different kind of insight, maybe faster than if coming from another context. But I also think that moving away from my home country and having a whole bunch of other references for understanding how things are chosen gives a perspective as well.” With a show slated for London’s Serpentine Galleries in November, Denny plans to close out his banner year with a new project at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles in December. “I want to do something that really resonates with L.A. so I’m thinking of doing something about how Venice has changed over the years and is now some kind of hot spot for startups.” This is the other Venice of course, the beach community rife with speculative real estate, artisanal storefronts, and other signifers of twenty-frst-century capitalism. Grisly, you might say, looking at the gentrifcation up close, but to Denny, “It’s a nice story.” It’s not art, per se, but it’s even better: it’s an acute visual language that offers volumes on how life, inseparable from economy, is composed today. KEVIN McGARRY Hammer Projects: Simon Denny opens at the Hammer Museum December 12


CLOTHING BALMAIN

john boyega

he couldn’t hide forever. the force beckons a little-known actor from north peckham, london, onto the world’s biggest stage as he steps into a role at the center of the billion-dollar star wars saga. in the words of lando calrissian, here goes nothing. photographY paul wetherell fashion anna trevelYan


men of the year • vman 73


CLOTHING KENZO


SHIRT BURBeRRY PRORsUM TIE aLeXanDeR McQUeen

“I’m about to get on and the engine is going fricking crazy,” says John Boyega as he boards a private jet to Comic-Con International in San Diego. It’s his frst time. Gesturing to his friend and colleague, he shouts: “Femi, take a video of me getting on this jet.” Come December, things like this will seem normal to Boyega, when Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens blasts into cinemas. The flm, a chronological sequel to 1983’s Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi, stars Boyega alongside both old generation and new generation franchise stars: Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, and Mark Hamill—or Han Solo, Princess Leia, and Luke Skywalker as they are known to millions—and Oscar Isaac, Lupita Nyong’o, Domhnall Gleeson, Daisy Ridley, and Adam Driver. So how did a 23-year-old from South London land a role that every young actor in Hollywood would have killed for? “There was already contact between me and J.J. [Abrams, the flm’s director],” he explains. “He was a big fan of Attack the Block and we were waiting for a project where we could collaborate.” The casting took seven months. “Disney is a fourbillion-pound company,” Boyega says. “They wanted to make sure they got the right person for the job. I learned that I got the part over a nice breakfast in Mayfair. J.J. said, ‘John, you’re the new star of Star Wars,’ and everything froze for a moment.” Since flming began last May, life has been a series of time-stopping moments for Boyega. Walking on set to see a full-scale replica of the Millennium Falcon was one; meeting Harrison Ford was another. To get himself in the zone, Boyega studied tapes of Ford’s auditions for the original flm some four decades ago. The next thing he knew, they were costars and making small talk between scenes. “He has that knowledge and it’s beautiful to watch,” Boyega says. “He has a great balance between the artistic and technical elements of acting, which is what it’s all about.” Peers on set, Boyega marveled at their differences away from the glare of the camera. “He told me about his career

appeared alongside Oscar nominees Chiwetel Ejiofor and him about fnances because he’s on another level.” Thandie Newton in the 1960s Nigeria-set Half of a Yellow Sun Boyega plays the character of Finn, who he describes and will soon be seen in the British indie Imperial Dreams as as being “in confict, mostly with himself and also with the a reformed gangster fresh out of prison who has his resolve powers” but is tight-lipped about why this confict exists, tested as he attempts to start a new life. He’s adament that or which powers he means for that matter—the Force? his career to date has seen him sidestep stereotypical charAsked what would happen if he was to say, he jokes that acters black actors are forced to take. Abrams would fy a robotic helicopter overhead and he’d “All the flms I’ve done have had a secret commentary on disappear from Hollywood forever. “I’d literally be a regular stereotypical mentalities,” he says. “It’s about getting people on [British soap opera] EastEnders after that.” to drop a prejudiced state of mind and realize, ‘Oh shit we’re What he will disclose, however, is that Finn is a character just watching normal people.’” Part of this desire to smash with a “unique” narrative “never before seen” in the Star Wars preconceptions stems from reaction to his upbringing in a part universe. “We’ve seen him in the Stormtrooper outft and his of London more often associated with crime and gang culture. own clothes. Why is that?” The answer, he says, is “very sur“People write about how I grew up opposite where prising.” And if you think you’ve worked it out, the chances Damilola Taylor was stabbed,” Boyega says. Taylor was are you’re wrong. “J.J. will send me YouTube clips of fans 10 when he was killed on the North Peckham Estate in 2000. reacting to things online and it’s funny. The fans have no idea. “As if that’s my story. Absolute nonsense. I spent most of my It’s great they are talking, but nobody has a clue.” Boyega time dancing and acting. Guns and knives mean nothing got his frst big dose of attention when the flm’s trailer was to me. I had a multicultural society to take advantage of. released earlier this year. A minority of the millions watch- I worked hard and ended up where I am today”—walking ing on YouTube questioned why a black actor was playing a into the most beloved franchise in movie history. Stormtrooper, the racist underbelly of the Internet showing Boyega knows this and has turned to someone who has itself to be no more advanced than when the original flm was gone through a similar process for guidance. “I’m being menreleased in the ’70s. Boyega’s response was a dignifed but tored by Robert Downey Jr. at the moment,” he says. “He’s forthright Instagram message: “Get used to it.” helped me prepare for how my life is going to change and “It was unnecessary,” he says of the negativity. “I’m in that has been inspiring. I’m talking to someone who underthe movie, what are you going to do about it? You either stands the power of choices, both positive and negative.” enjoy it or you don’t. I’m not saying get used to the future, Iron Man aside, Boyega is keeping his crew low-key. but what is already happening. People of color and women There’s Femi, who will flm him getting on private jets, and are increasingly being shown on-screen. For things to be there are other people he has met at house parties and on whitewashed just doesn’t make sense.” nights out. “Most of the friends I have made in L.A. are just Attack the Block was Boyega’s 2011 flm debut, trans- normal guys,” he says. “One of my friends works at the airporting the tropes of a horror classic onto a council estate in port. The only difference is I’m like, ‘I’m going to go to Planet South London. Boyega played the leader of a gang who mugs Jakku now while you go to your offce.’” DaviD Renshaw a woman before helping her to safety as monsters chase them through the high-rise tower blocks of Brixton. He also Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens is in theaters December 18 and his house. I realized that I probably couldn’t relate to


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GROOMING GaRy GIll PROductION SIObahN devlIN (M.a.P.) PhOtO aSSIStaNtS chRIS MIlleR aNd SaM WIlSON StylISt aSSIStaNtS alIcIja aPutyte aNd SaSkIa cOle equIPMeNt RaW aNd bIG Sky StudIOS


role call

Thomas Brodie-Sangster photographed by Wes Ball (20th Century Fox) on the set of Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials in Albuquerque, December 2014

Wes Ball ON ThOmas BrOdie-saNgsTer “Thomas is one of those actors who make my job easy. I just point him in a direction and watch him go. It’s a joy to watch him work. And the fact that he’s such a down-to-earth, genuinely cool guy makes him even more special.” Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials is in theaters September 18

78 vmaN • POrTFOliO


an intense relationship between actor and director is essential yet in effect it dissipates on-screen. here, 11 directors show us their star performers from upcoming films through another lens.

Woody Harrelson photographed by Murray Close on the set of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2

francis lawrence on woody harrelson “I was at dinner when I received a photo of a horribly bloodied Woody on my phone. He had wrecked on his bicycle in some gravel and was in horrible shape. We were in the middle of shooting Mockingjay and he had a scene the next day but his face was damaged. I called immediately and he sounded horrible—weak, worried, and a bit blurry. I was truly worried for him and desperately urged him to go to the hospital. There was a moment of silence and then I heard that amazing Woody laugh. It was a joke that he and our makeup team had devised. None of it was real, but I bought it. I bought it because he brought the same talent to that joke that he does to his performances. He fnds a truth and flls it with vulnerability, unpredictability, gravity, and mischief: the perfect ingredients for a great actor (and also a really great joke).” The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 is in theaters November 20


Denis Villeneuve and Benicio Del Toro on the set of Sicario in Albuquerque, June 2014

DENIS VILLENEUVE ON BENIcIO DEL TOrO “For Benicio and me, this scene was crucial for the defnition of Alejandro’s character. A strong, pivotal moment where our perception of his character will shift radically, dragging us into darkness.” Sicario is in theaters September 18

Kentucker Audley photographed by Alex Ross Perry in Brooklyn, June 2015

aLEx rOSS pErry ON KENTUcKEr aUDLEy “I’ve been a fan of Kentucker’s for some time. He’s appeared in a number of small flms made by friends and always struck me as a sort of classic leading man type whose tendencies are best explored in roles that play against his outward appearance. I was excited to fnally collaborate with him on Queen of Earth, where I put him in scenes with three lifelong professional actors. He more than held his own.” Queen of Earth is in theaters now


Tobey Maguire photographed by Edward Zwick on the set of Pawn Sacrifce in Santa Monica, December 2013

EDWARD ZWICK on ToBEY MAGUIRE “Good actors externalize, hoping to give the director what he wants. Great actors internalize, confdent the camera will fnd what it needs. Tobey’s intellect is so keen, his understanding of the character so deep and his inner life so vivid, truth is his default setting. All you need is to say ‘action.’” Pawn Sacrifce is in theaters January 1


Mario Casas and Antonio Banderas photographed by Beatrice Aguirre on the set of The 33 in Columbia, January 2012

PATRICIA RIGGEN ON ANTONIO BANDERAS “In The 33, Antonio portrayed the real-life miner Mario Sepulveda, the man who saved his group by keeping their hopes and spirits high during the most excruciating frst 17 days of their entrapment where they had no food or signs of ever being found. In a way, Antonio had a very similar effect on our set. As we shot underground in a real mine for 35 days, his generous and unbreakable spirit was crucial in keeping the actors together, despite the harsh conditions of our location.� The 33 is in theaters November 13


Anthony Mackie and Jennifer Connelly photographed by Linda Kallerus on the set of Shelter in New York City, October 2013

PaUl beTTanY On anThOnY macKie “On a 21-day shoot with two days to shoot a week’s worth of work, you need an actor who brings calm and focus. I had Anthony Mackie, the quiet before the storm.” Shelter is in theaters November 6

Michael Shannon photographed by Ramin Bahrani in New York City, May 2015

ramin bahrani On michael shannOn “[In this picture] Michael was waiting for an important call from President Obama about the next real estate crash. He decided to try a new form of leg presses in the meantime.” 99 Homes is in theaters September 25


Jonny Beauchamp photographed by Roland Emmerich in Emmerich’s Los Angeles estate, July 2015

ROLAND EMMERICH ON JONNY BEAUCHAMP “Jonny is like this hidden gem we discovered from his work on Broadway. His performance in Stonewall is so deep, so emotional, it’s hard to believe it’s only his frst movie.” Stonewall is in theaters September 25

Sam Clafin photographed by Thea Sharrock in Majorca, June 2015

THEA SHARROCK ON SAM CLAFLIN “I adore him. We took every step of this movie together; he gave everything and more. I’d do it all again in a heartbeat.” Me Before You is in theaters June 3


Rooney Mara on the set of Carol in Cincinnati, April 2014

todd haynes on rooney mara “She started with the voice. Where it moves in the body and where it doesn’t. That trace of aspiration, defying class. Then the body, shaped by clothes, forming silhouettes of who she was and who she would become. We struggled with the wig, to fnd the balance between innocence and allure. Rooney knew it had to be just right. And all along—as certain roles require and only certain actors can attain with such laser-like precision—we had to see the before and after. To mark those changes with the seeming unconsciousness of living, breathing life. But in the Humpty Dumpty fragments of chaotic production, when it’s all put back together in the end, it seems only a scientist could have ever traced it all with such breathless, stirring knowledge. Every day on set I marveled to myself: From what miraculous planet did Rooney Mara come?” Carol is in theaters November 20


the future

HOLLYWOOD’S FUTURE HERO ARRIVES

THE RUNWAY’S NEXT BIG THING SUITS UP MALE MODELING’S SUPERSTARS REUNITE A LEGENDARY LENSMAN RETURNS TO FORM THE ART OF THE OVERCOAT COMES INTO FOCUS

FALL COLLECTIONS ELEVATE THE FIELD A PEDIGREE OF STYLE REACHES NEW LEVELS

SUITING AND STREETWEAR MEET IN THE DARK & THE VMAN/FORD MODEL SEARCH WINNER IS REVEALED

back to

VMAN 87


88 vman

CAPE AND TUNIC RICK OWENS COAT (UNDERNEATH) BOTTEGA VENETA PANTS EMPORIO ARMANI SLIPPER GUCCI HAT AND ARMOR ANGELS ThE COSTUMIERS GAUNTLET BAPTY SOCKS (THROUGHOUT) FALKE BROOCH GIVENChY BY RICCARDO TISCI


peak season

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from anarchy to the monarchy—charlie hunnam has emerged as the heir in line to hollywood’s leading man throne. as his dazzling new horror film, crimson peak, hits theaters, the brit reflects on his tv reign, passing on fifty shades, and the hero’s journey that led him to the center of king arthur’s court. photography tim walker fashion jacob k teXt paul flynn


PANTS CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION BELT ANN DEMEULEMEESTER


“I really, really prIde myself on beIng a professIonal and as a man of keepIng my word. It means a lot to me, truly.” —CharlIe hunnam


TRACKSUIT CHRISTOPHER SHANNON FLAG (WORN ACROSS TORSO) AND ARMOR ANGELS THE COSTUMIERS SNEAKER NIKE SLIPPER GUCCI BROOCH GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI


“There is a sorT of schizophrenia To iT and a craziness To iT... To The effecT ThaT The pressure has on you. iT’s a very bruTal business.” —charlie hunnam

Before flming the fnal season of his compelling biker saga Sons of Anarchy, Charlie British rites-of-passage TV drama set in the city’s rapidly blossoming gay village. That Hunnam shot his second flm under the direction of the bespectacled Mexican flm genius night, a crew member caught a glimpse of Hunnam’s profle lighting up the director’s Guillermo del Toro. Hunnam and del Toro had earlier formed a signifcant bond on the set monitor and noted, “He’s got the look of a young Brad Pitt.” Pitt’s luminescent shadow of the breathtaking apocalyptic blockbuster Pacifc Rim, a highly charged fantasy piece and glittering career have hung over the 35-year-old since. Since he frst appeared onthat performed particularly well at the increasingly pivotal Chinese box offce, turning screen it has been speculated that if there is a natural successor to that incredible CV, Hunnam into a very twenty-frst-century sort of star. it’s Hunnam. “That I’m the chap?” he asks back. “Well, that’s nice.” Crimson Peak is another beast entirely, more reminiscent of the twisted noir that Hunnam moved to Los Angeles a year after QAF aired in the UK and shot him to an unforecemented del Toro’s reputation on the world stage, Pan’s Labyrinth. The riveting tale of seen level of homespun screen notoriety, partly due to his stepping into untested sexual a British brother and sister who tour the world in an attempt to keep their heads above waters for British TV. The role was a perfect storm of naivety, bravery, beauty, curiosity, and water by hook or (mostly) by crook, it opens a specifc, spooky, and ferociously well- balls—the screen skill sets Hunnam has maximized in the intervening years, climaxing (for observed psychological valve. Jessica Chastain and Mia Wasikowska are a formidable now at least) in the troubled, charismatic frame of Jax Teller. The years between QAF and sparring double act, redolent of Joan Crawford and Bette Davis in What Ever Happened Sons, two explorations of strangely concentric male subcultures, were not all golden. A to Baby Jane?, with Hunnam and Tom Hiddleston the chief rivals for Wasikowska’s affec- string of flm roles with blue-chip credentials (including Nicholas Nickleby with Christopher tions. It’s a marvellous piece of work. Plummer and Jamie Bell and Cold Mountain alongside Jude Law and Nicole Kidman) failed I’d expected Hunnam to explain how that happened but, alas, he hasn’t seen a fn- to capitalize on his captivating early screen presence. When he was initially cast in Sons of ished version of it yet. “I saw a very, very early cut. Is it good?” It’s very good. “Good. Anarchy, he had spent the previous 18 months in isolation, trying to write a script with his It’s the frst time I’ve really talked about it. I’m so far out of that. But yeah, it was a very, cat, George, perched on his lap. He had not earned a cent from acting in the time frame. very different direction to go in and I thought long and hard about whether I wanted to The second time I met Hunnam was at the close of Sons season fve in an unfancy and whether it was the right shade of different direction.” neighborhood café in West Hollywood. His transformation from boy to man was winning, This is not quite how these encounters should pan out, with the interviewer persuading not just in the hefty, streamlined musculature he now wore or a change of accent hovthe star how great his work is. But then, just as Crimson Peak is not quite the flm it at frst ering somewhere over the mid-Atlantic. Mostly it was in the sizeable but likeable confsuggests, Charlie Hunnam is not the marquee name flm star he initially appears to be. He dence he’d clearly inherited from playing Jax Teller. He looked every inch the indigenous has more than enough layers of personal complexity to validate del Toro’s interest being L.A. movie star, arrived on his motorbike wearing plaid and denim. He spoke fuently in piqued by him in the frst place. Beneath his eye-catching exterior, a serious heart beats. the rhapsodic voodoo of the Californian elite. His spirits were riding high, too. He’d just • scored the lead role in Pacifc Rim. It was on downtime between shooting parts one and two of season seven of Sons that This, our third time sitting down together, is at a Lebanese corner café in Marylebone, Charlie Hunnam received a call from Guy Ritchie, another director hero. Ritchie had hand- the ritzy district of Central London that during daylight most resembles the set of a Richard picked a select band of young Hollywood heavyweights to screen test for the role of King Curtis movie and by night has become a paparazzi hotbed as home to Andre Balazs’s frst Arthur in his forthcoming Knights of the Roundtable: King Arthur. Hunnam made the cut. UK outpost, the Chiltern Firehouse. Nominally, we are here to talk about Crimson Peak. A There was a type of cocky British youth that was hit hard by the Guy Ritchie stick in the born storyteller and an intense, engaged talker, Hunnam seems initially reticent to share late ’90s. The director accessed the storytelling wing of a slumbering national machismo thoughts on the flm. He is smoking a shisha pipe, drinking mint tea, and wearing a pinstripe poked back into life by the testosterone shot of Britpop. Just out of school in the North gray/white oxford shirt, chinos, and box-fresh Air Max sneakers. All vestiges of his rogue of England and beginning his acting life, Hunnam was that youth. He was 17 when Lock, biker years look to be packed away. He has been in Britain for six months to flm King Arthur, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels swaggered onto the screen. Snatch, he reckons, is one his longest stay since leaving for Hollywood 17 years ago. He is blond, buff, slicked, and of the few flms he’s ever made repeat visits to the cinema to see. still possessed of that look of the man you would pick out as Pitt the Second. The King Arthur audition comprised two rounds, the frst a sit-down chat with Ritchie. “We have the same manager, you know?” he asks. I did. Cynthia Pett-Dante picked Hunnam The actor and director held a gentlemanly 90-minute conversation about how the medical up as a client in 2003. “It’s funny. I defnitely always really, really admired Brad’s career.” marijuana system works in California. “I said, about 60 minutes in,” Hunnam remembers, (Which young actor of Hunnam’s age didn’t?) “And I do a lot of projects with his production “‘This is not the conversation I had anticipated having with you.’” They got on famously. company. There are two projects that I’ve developed as a writer and as a producer and then Charlie mentioned that the John Boorman flm Excalibur had been a major childhood act- they just actually hired me to star in their next flm.” Five weeks after he wraps King Arthur, ing epiphany. “He said, ‘Man, I really fucking dig you, bro. I hope you act as well as you he will begin shooting The Lost City of Z, the biopic of Percy Fawcett, the geographer, talk and I look forward to seeing you tomorrow.’” explorer, and purported inspiration for the titular character in Steven Spielberg’s Indiana When it came to round two, it became clear to Hunnam that something about his physique Jones. The role of Percy Fawcett was originally developed for Pitt. “So obviously, with a was bothering Ritchie. In a clever actor’s shortcut for grief, he had lost 20 pounds for his manager who’s represented Brad for over 20 years and has represented me for 12 years curtain call playing Jax Teller, the gangland boss who is the anchor of Sons of Anarchy. At there’s always been that sort of running joke and dialogue within our little circle. I’m coming the demise of season six, Jax’s wife Tara is bumped off with sensationally bloody, Freudian for you, Brad.” He laughs. “I think he’s just fne for another couple of years.” gore by his mother, Gemma. “I thought one of the interesting ways to tell that story was to Hunnam has not seen the flm he is supposed to be talking about, Crimson Peak. “I come in just looking gaunt, so you know straight away that’s been a brutal fucking month,” want to be completely candid,” he says, “which I believe you should be. Whenever I read says Hunnam. “He hasn’t eaten. He’s been on benders. He’s fucked up. And I sustained it articles with actors or businesspeople or musicians, which is very, very rare, I always through the season. So I came to meet Guy and I was incredibly skinny.” feel like candor is very tangible when it’s there. It’s sort of pointless spending the time This was not the vision for King Arthur in the eyes of a director who has a specially doing it and then reading the interview if it isn’t honest.” The actor shook hands with del preserved authorial hold on masculinity. “He brought it up about four times. ‘So, how Toro, agreeing to act in the project after the director handed him a working script just heavy have you been?’ The fourth time he brought it up was in the audition.” Hunnam was after they’d wrapped Pacifc Rim. “So I suppose, in all candor, externally I was on a real getting restless. By now, the role was in his sight. “I said, ‘Look, dude, you keep bring- roll when I got offered Crimson Peak. I’d just fnished Pacifc Rim, Sons was absolutely ing this thing up, the physicality. It’s obviously your primary concern so if you want to do killing it, and we were just going back to do the sixth season.” Regardless, he received away with all of this auditioning bollocks, I’ll fucking fght those other two dudes who are advice that taking the fourth lead in an ensemble piece beside Chastain, Wasikowska, out there shooting. I know who they are. You can bring them both in here. I’ll fght them and Hiddleston would not be a wise career move. “Externally, the reservation was that it both. The one who walks out the door gets the job.’” Ritchie was temporarily silenced. just wasn’t smart to take a smaller role when I was out playing leads, and had been play“Then he said, ‘Look, get back in there and read the scene, you cunt.’” ing leads some time. I mean, [Dr. Alan McMichael] is a lead character, but like you say, A week later, Charlie Hunnam received his second call from Ritchie’s offce. The part it’s really the girls’ flm and Tom is essentially the romantic lead.” was his. The waters of this confusing period of his career were further muddied by initial meet• ings to take the marquee role in Fifty Shades of Grey. After initially signing up for the role of It doesn’t take long in a conversation with Hunnam for the B word to sneak in. When we Christian Grey, he had to back out due to scheduling deadlines. “Oh,” he says, looking defated, frst met, it was in 1998 on Canal Street, Manchester, when he was an 18-year-old with a “it was the worst professional experience of my life. It was the most emotionally destrucnoticeable Newcastle accent, flming his breakout role on Queer as Folk, the exceptional tive and diffcult thing that I’ve ever had to deal with professionally. It was heartbreaking.”


Hair MalcolM Edwards (art PartnEr) GrooMinG saM Bryant (d+V) sEt dEsiGn EMMa roacH Production JEff dElicH (PadBury Production) and stEPHaniE BrooM PHoto assistant Max cornwall stylist assistant fan HonG Hair assistant Jason lawrEncE GrooMinG assistant louisE o’nEil sEt dEsiGn assistant warwick noakEs rEtoucHinG toucH diGital catErinG loaM london

when Hunnam talks about work he addresses it mostly in the language of high-stakes worked there for years were like, ‘you’re back?’ i said i forgot something and they knew romance. when he meets a director and likes them, he says, it is akin to falling “madly that was bullshit. that i needed to be there. i smoked a few joints and sat on the back in love.” He has felt the breath of failure too closely at his neck to be dismissive about lots and cried a bunch and said good-bye to him. it was beautiful and it was the right this grand passion. “there is a sort of schizophrenia to it and a craziness to it,” he says thing to do. i took my rings, my bike, my jacket, my knife—fucking a lot. anything that of acting, “and there’s a craziness to the effect that the pressure has on you. it’s a very wasn’t nailed down, i took.” brutal business. you can be working nonstop and then if you turn in a couple of medioHe arrived in Britain to start flming King Arthur on January 2. in an act of physical cre performances or things just don’t perform for whatever reason, work can dry up very exorcism it is impossible not to see as symbolic, his home in l.a. was wiped out within quickly. all actors constantly live with that fear.” a week of his arriving in Marylebone. some repair work on the roof uncovered a mold there is a tangibly uncomfortable undercurrent to our conversation that he may have problem in the house he shared with his girlfriend. “there’d been a leak in the pipes and made the wrong decision prioritizing Crimson Peak over Fifty Shades. “i’d given Guillermo water had gotten saturated in the house and mold had grown up from the side of the my word, over a year before, that i was going to do this flm. People were saying, ‘are you walls and into the ceiling. it was toxic black mold. we lost the house. and all of our shit, crazy? Guillermo still has got four months to recast, it’s the fourth lead, you can go and do you know? the spores become airborne and get into everything. once you take anything this [instead].’ i said, ‘i can’t. He’s my friend, i’ve done a flm with him, i gave him my word.’ out—a sofa, a painting, a book—you can cross-contaminate everything in the next place. i’m pretty mercurial and a very diffcult, longwinded decision-maker at the best of times. and believe me, once you’ve been bitten by the mold problem you don’t rush into it again. it was deeply unpleasant and challenging emotionally. i really, really pride myself on being so that was a fucking serious kick in the balls.” a professional and a man of keeping my word. it means a lot to me, truly.” But Hunnam is strangely sanguine about the problem. Perhaps it was time to let go this professional dilemma was complicated by how attached he had become to the of the past and move on, after all. “there was something really, not liberating, but to look character of christian Grey and the flm’s storyline. “[E. l. James] created two amazing for the silver lining in everything there was a really interesting lesson in impermanence characters and a really compelling narrative between them,” he says of the source text. and relinquishing your grasp on the material.” “But i think the real genius of that book is that she, in a very accessible way, introduced He’s enjoyed shooting with ritchie as much as he thought he would. “More,” he says. some conversations to people that were very sophisticated about some of the darker ele- the pair have become friends through the process. “yes. first and foremost. i’d say friends ments of the human condition. it’s diffcult to make that stuff palatable for a lot of people. before colleagues.” He likens the experience of working with the director to that of being it’s just an amazing achievement, and i’m sure the amazing achievement of the flm and under the charge of Sons of Anarchy showrunner kurt sutter. “it took time with kurt, though. what drew me to it. that’s some pretty heavy shit.” furthermore, Hunnam felt a connec- we were very much employer/employee for the frst fve seasons and for the last two we tion with the flm’s director, sam taylor-Johnson (“i fell in love with that character and i were partners and friends. it was lovely. it was the way it had to be. People that are real fell in love with the director—i loved her”), and the leading actress (“i’ve got to say, i got leaders have such a gentle approach to leadership. i mean, Guy is unquestionably, undenito do a reading with dakota and it was one of those experiences—i did terrifc work and ably, 100 percent the boss. He’s very human, incredibly honest, not particularly coddling, he he came to life in a really exciting way for me, and then i had to surrender him”). really expects people to show up and do the job that they’ve been hired to do and doesn’t it hurt him that the gossip mill suggested he might have shied away from contentious expect to have to babysit people. there’s an alchemy to flmmaking. it’s never been more sexual material. “i was excited about that element of it.” Hunnam is a deeply physical obvious to me than watching Guy’s process. there’s magic to it.” performer. “the outside perception of that was that i got really cold feet and got scared for his king arthur, Hunnam has been watching closely the work of ultimate fighting of the explicit nature of the sexuality of the piece. when i was 18 i was getting fucked in championship irish featherweight conor McGregor. “i’ve spent a lot of time looking at the ass, completely naked on national tV, y’know?” his interviews and his fghts on youtube,” he says. “we thought he’d be an interesting He told taylor-Johnson that he could not commit to the project straight away. the call guy to look at for arthur.” the flm was pitched to him on that frst phone call as Lord of to tell her he was opting out was not an easy one to make. “i called her and we both cried the Rings meets Snatch. “that’s a flm i want to see,” Hunnam says. our eyes out on the phone for 20 minutes,” he says. “i needed to tell her that this was not Hunnam is not a fghter by instinct, though he’s learned to be good at it. “i mean, techgoing to work. i was going to fnish Sons, shoot the whole sequence where tara was bru- nically. i can move. i’m strong. i don’t really spar or fght on the street.” tally murdered, fy to Vancouver the next day, have ten days of rehearsal, and then start He didn’t fght as a kid. “only if i had to,” he says. “no. i got into fghts growing up shooting. then i was going to have three days after that and i’d have to start shooting because where i grew up you didn’t really have any choice. i avoided it at all costs. i was Crimson Peak and then i’d have two days to travel and go back into season seven of Sons. terrifed of fghting. i don’t have a fight instinct, though. i have a fght instinct. it’s a hardthere was a lot of personal stuff going on in my life that left me on real emotional shaky won instinct. i get very scared and have a fear of combat, which i think is a sensible thing ground and mentally weak. i just got myself so fucking overwhelmed and i was sort of to feel. you know, i used to walk around a lot feeling nervous at night in newcastle, when having panic attacks about the whole thing. i just didn’t know what to do.” people were rowdy. and i don’t really feel too nervous anymore.” He laughs. “all right, Given the level of Hunnam’s commitment to Crimson Peak, it’s strange that he’s man, i don’t want to be in this situation but if we have to do it, i’m ready.” opted out of seeing the fnished cut. “i saw an interesting tEd talk recently,” he says, not on the set of Arthur, Hunnam was reunited on flm for the frst time in 15 years with unrelatedly, “about decision-making. about choice being the route of all unhappiness. his old Queer as Folk costar aidan Gillen. “He was probably the most instrumental perthere’s some very compelling studies that have been done that really make you think, son in shaping my perception and process of the flm business. He’s got such integrity a lot, that really articulate the idea of choice and just how corruptive it can be.” this is and he’s so singular and uncompromising about what he wants his career to be and in not, he says, about ego. “i feel like the size of the role doesn’t matter and it’s just about pursuing that. to be exposed to that in my frst-ever job, in my introduction to the busiwhether you can make an impact.” ness of flm, was a really handy thing. learning that lesson from him prevented me from Hunnam hasn’t seen Fifty Shades of Grey, either. “you know, i didn’t for a couple of rea- having to learn it from my mistakes.” sons. i didn’t watch it because i thought it was going to be very painful for me. i also, frankly, Gillen sent him an email after they fnished flming. “it was lovely actually,” he says. didn’t want to have an opinion about it. By the way, i don’t say that assuming that i was not “Just saying, ‘it’s been really wonderful to be on set and watch you do your thing. you’ve going to like the flm. But it would be horrible if i didn’t. i hear sam did a beautiful job.” grown up so much and been leading on set.’” • Hunnam has reconciled himself to the sometimes tricky turns his career has taken. it’s tempting to join the dots between his Fifty Shades experience and charlie Hunnam’s “i think one of the most important lessons that’s been really hard learnt for me is that urgency for the role of King Arthur. underneath both is a man of character and nerve, notion that there never is just one right. that you bring yourself in the environment, you who takes his life and work extremely seriously. there is a further reading of his story, learn as much as you can, you try and leave your ego at the door, and on the day you though, that perhaps charlie Hunnam was not ready to ascend to flms with the blessing try to bring it to life.” of tent-pole budgets and the scent of Brad-scale stardom until he had made his peace Guy ritchie was right all along. after almost two decades on-screen, charlie Hunnam with the end of Jax. is fnally ready to be king. “i took the business of killing Jax teller pretty seriously,” he says. “it was really personal.” in december 2014, Sons of Anarchy wrapped. its star could not deny himself a return to the set to visit the place where he learned how to command a cast and crew— the place where he had earned his stripes as a leading man. “the security guards who’d Crimson Peak is in theaters october 16


jacket giorgio armani pants craig green belt ann demeulemeester

“I dId terrIfIc work and [chrIstIan Grey] came to lIfe In a really excItInG way for me, and then I had to surrender hIm.” —charlIe hunnam


photography steven klein fashion matthew ellenberger 96 vman

REANIMATOR

in the fall of 1997, steven klein captured the essence of male beauty when he photographed brad pitt for the cover of l’uomo vogue. in a rare reenactment of that story, klein introduces a new superstar in the pages of vman. meet the male modeling sensation jordan barrett before he becomes a household name.


THIS SPREAD: JACKET BRIONI SHIRT DIOR HOMME TIE PRADA


COAT MARC JACOBS


T-SHIRT CALVIN KLEIN PANTS PRADA


T-SHIRT CALVIN KLEIN JEANS SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE BOOTS GIORGIO ARMANI WATCH ROLEX


T-SHIRT (CUSTOMIZED) BALMAIN JEANS SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE BOOTS GIORGIO ARMANI


JACKET AND PANTS GUCCI SHIRT PRADA TIE MARC JACOBS WATCH ROLEX


SWEATER BOTTEGA VENETA

HAiR THom PRiAno GRoominG REGinE THoRRE modEl JoRdAn BARRETT (imG) SET dESiGn JESSE KAufmAnn (fRAnK REPS) PRoducTion BEnJAmin BonnET And miKE WilliAmS (WESTy PRoducTionS) diGiTAl TEcHniciAn TAdAAKi SHiBuyA PHoTo ASSiSTAnTS AlEx locKETT And mARK lucKASAvAGE STyliST ASSiSTAnT Bill RodGERS SET dESiGn ASSiSTAnTS colin lyTTon And ZAcH lAmminG PRoducTion ASSiSTAnT coRnE HundERSmARK liGHTinG EquiPmEnT B2PRo PRoducTion EquiPmEnT JAcK STudioS cATERinG PolARiS BiTES


THE GRAND REUNION PHOTOGRAPHY BRUCE WEBER

FIVE OF Vman’s pIOnEErIng maLE sUpErmODELs gaTHEr FOr a DaY OF FrIEnDs, pHOTOs, anD FUn. FasHIOn DEbOraH WaTsOn TEXT KaTHarInE K. ZarrELLa

Picture this: fve of fashion’s top male models, six golden retrievers, a barbecue, an ice-cold pool, and Bruce Weber clicking away with his camera. This was the scene that kicked off the photographer’s latest endeavor for VMAN. “‘Thoroughbreds’ is a perfect name for these fve gentlemen,” says Weber of models Brad Kroenig, Andres Velencoso, Tyson Ballou, Jake Davies, and RJ Rogenski. “They have all that sleekness that Derby winners have and they have all that power that the British royal family equestrian jumpers have, fying high over the fences.” Over a span of 15 years, this quintet of Adonises—who would no doubt give Zoolander and Hansel a run for their

108 Vman

money on the catwalk and off—has posed for everyone

gang. His work on that inaugural edition led him to meet Karl

from Mert and Marcus to Mario Testino; fronted campaigns

Lagerfeld, to whom he is now a muse. Andres appeared

for the likes of Abercrombie & Fitch (the shoots for which introduced Brad and Tyson to Weber) and Chanel; stomped the runways in Paris, Milan, and beyond; and dominated the pages of every men’s fashion magazine imaginable. They’re unbreakable beauties and consummate professionals, and they’ve each been integral to the formulation of the VMAN spirit and aesthetic. Brad covered the frst issue of VMAN. The year was 2003, and he posed for Inez & Vinoodh wearing nothing but shimmering black eye makeup inspired by a ’70s biker

inside that same issue, smoldering in a Helmut Lang suit and tie, as did RJ, who demonstrated three different ways to wear the perfect F/W ’03 jacket. Tyson joined the party in VMAN 2, shot by Sølve Sundsbø alongside Brad. Jake, meanwhile, made his VMAN debut in 2005 when we named him a member of the “New Model Army” in our fourth issue. They’ve all been part of the family ever since. While Weber refers to this crop as thoroughbreds, “supermodels” would also be an apt description. Perhaps that’s why Weber recreated his unforgettable 2008 image


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TySOn WEARS PAnTS Tom Ford RJ WEARS SWEATER And PAnTS GreG Lauren AndRES WEARS COAT raLph Lauren PAnTS duckie Brown BRAd WEARS T-ShIRT dior homme PAnTS GreG Lauren ShOES BirkensTock JAKE WEARS TuRTLEnECK And PAnTS JiL sander


THIS SPREAD: BRAD WEARS SWEATER Baja East

“I’ve always saId that modelIng Is the best job In the world...I get paId to take care of myself.” —brad


of Kate Moss, Daria Werbowy, and Lara Stone in bed with these fve faces. “It’s never been done before from a men’s perspective,” says RJ, “and there was this sense that something big was happening.” There is a reason, of course, that Weber titled this story “The Grand Reunion.” Models come and go season after season, but these fve have worked side by side for well over a decade. “There aren’t many male models who can say they’ve modeled for 15 years straight. It’s a rare thing, and we all have a great mutual respect for each other’s careers,” says Brad. Jake agrees, noting that “the vast majority of guys I started out with just aren’t around anymore, so it’s great to be able to

work with guys that you know and have seen all over the world on various occasions over the years.” Tyson admits that the shoot didn’t feel like work at all. “It was like going to a friend’s pool party—hanging out in the sun, swimming, and playing with the dogs. These guys and I only cross paths every so often, but it’s always like no time has passed.” Maybe so, but time has passed since these men started their careers, and the industry has changed. “There are a lot more celebrities and athletes to compete with now,” offers Brad. Not to mention the invention of the social media–spawned Instamodel. RJ points out that “today, everything is digital. You have 15 people around a screen

and each of them has an opinion. It takes away from the

intimacy when you’re on a shoot with a photographer who’s trying to capture a special moment.” Andres concurs. “Nowadays, you can look at a sneak of the screen on the computer, but Bruce is a master. He was shooting flm, and that was quite nice.” It’s clear that the models have a deep admiration for Weber, his process, and his legacy. Unsurprisingly, the feeling is mutual. “Photographing them for me was like going to a school reunion and seeing once again people I adore,” Weber says. “I’m really happy to say that they make me proud.”


“the way Bruce works, he’s always trying to make something special. we took some pictures, took the piss out of each other, and laughed.” —andres

THIS SPREAD: ANDRES WEARS CLOTHING Dior Homme


THIS SPREAD: TYSON WEARS TuRTlENEck Balenciaga


“It was fun startIng wIth the drIve out— just catchIng up and laughIng In the car wIth rj and andres.” —tYson


“To succeed as a male model, you need paTience, perseverance, and adapTabiliTy. in ThaT order.” —JaKe


THIS SPREAD: JAKE WEARS CoAT Duckie Brown


RJ WEARS ShiRt Y-3


“You get to a point that You don’t reallY care what people think, and there’s this sense of ease.” —rJ


THIS SPREAD: AnDRES WEARS SWEATER Berluti HAT MArtiNe AND JuAN RJ WEARS SHIRT AnD PAnTS Duckie BrowN HAT MArtiNe AND JuAN TySon WEARS SHIRT Duckie BrowN PAnTS SteveN AlAN HAT Nick Fouquet BRAD WEARS SHIRT Duckie BrowN JEAnS Dior HoMMe HAT MArtiNe AND JuAN JAkE WEARS PAnTS Billy reiD CoAT (In HAnD) AnD TIE Duckie BrowN HAT Nick Fouquet


Hair THom Priano aT Garren new York for r+Co GroominG reGine THorre models Jake davies and andres velenCoso (ford), Brad kroeniG, rJ roGenski, TYson Ballou (imG) ProduCTion dawn Boller (liTTle Bear inC.) PHoTo assisTanTs CHris domuraT, Jeff TauTrim, sean JaCkson, rYan Brinkman, Jordan millinGTon sTYlisT assisTanTs Caroline sHin and Halle CHaPman TYler Tailor lars nord makeuP assisTanT marlene CasTro Hair assisTanT lP Giardino ProduCTion assisTanTs Boris m c nerTneY, reYnaldo Herrera, luke adler loCaTion monTauk, new York aCCommodaTions monTauk manor CaTerinG dG CaTerinG


since the 1970s, joseph szabo has captured the spirit of american youth in signature form, with books like almost grown and teenage, which was shot at malverne senior high school in hempstead, new york. he returns there for this story. photography joseph szabo fashion jay massacret 124 vman


LIAM WEARS JACKET VINTAGE RALPH LAUREN SWEATER BRUNELLo CUCINELLI JEANS B SIDES BOXERS SUNSPEL JEWELRY AND BELT (ThROuGhOuT) VINTAGE


KO WEARS JACKET LOUIS VUITTON SHIRT AND T-SHIRT VINTAGE PANTS BRUNELLO CUCINELLI BOXERS HIS OWN


LIAM WEARS COAT BURBERRY PRORSUM T-SHIRT DEMYLEE JEANS B SIDES


Ally weArs COAT MARC JACOBS sweATer A.P.C. PANTs FRAME DENIM BAG CÉLINE


ZACH WEARS COAT DIESEL BLACK GOLD T-SHIRT VINTAGE PANTS ACNE STUDIOS SOCKS fALKE SNEAKERS NIKE SUNGLASSES ANNE ET VALENTIN


ZACH WEARS T-SHIRT VINTAGE PANTS VIVIENNE WESTWOOD ALLY WEARS COAT VIVIENNE WESTWOOD T-SHIRT DEMYLEE


LIAM WEARS COAT ACNE STUDIOS SHIRT vInTAgE NAf NAf T-SHIRT And BELT vInTAgE BOXERS SUNSPEL PAnTS SACAI


ANDERS WEARS JACKET J.W. ANDERSON SHIRT DAVID HART T-SHIRT VINTAGE PANTS ACNE STUDIOS SHOES GOLDEN GOOSE DELUXE BRAND


ZACH WEARS COAT COACH JACKET (UNDERNEATH) WOMEN’S ACNE STUDIOS T-SHIRT AND NECKlACE VINTAGE PANTS VIVIENNE WESTWOOD


ANDERS WEARS SWEATER BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

HAiR HOLLi SmiTH (TOTAL mANAGEmENT) GROOmiNG VALERY GHERmAN (ART DEPARTmENT) mODELS LiAm LiTTLE AND ANDERS jOHNSON (RE:quEST), KO GRimmER (VNY), ALLY ERTEL (muSE), ZAcH TROOST (NEW YORK mODEL mANAGEmENT) PRODucTiON BENjAmiN BONNET (WESTY PRODucTiONS) PHOTO ASSiSTANT TYLER NEViTT STYLiST ASSiSTANTS OLiViA KOZLOWSKi, ALi KORNHAuSER, STELLA EVANS, SAm LANE HAiR ASSiSTANT YuHi Kim PRODucTiON ASSiSTANTS miKE WiLLiAmS AND BOAZ TcHERiKOVER FiLm LAB PRimARY PHOTOGRAPHic LiGHTiNG EquiPmENT ROOT BROOKLYN mOTORHOmE SHOOTiNG STAR cOAcHES LOcATiON mALVERNE SENiOR HiGH ScHOOL cATERiNG mALVERNE DELi

ALLY WEARS TOP MIU MIU


LIAM WEARS VEST DIOR HOMME SWEATER LOEWE BOXERS SUNSPEL PANTS SHAWN JOSWICK


“ALL YOU NEED IS ANBATHING OVERCOAT, TRUNKS, A BED, AND NO PHONE.” PHOTOGRAPHY BRUCE WEBER


FASHION DebOrAH WAtSON Marlon Wears Coat Ralph lauRen JeWelrY (throughout) vintage

vmAN 137


COAT PHOTOGRAPHER’S Own T-SHiRT STyliST’S Own RASH GuARd (On SHOuldERS) VinTAGE O’NEILL


COAt AND SWIMSUIt Ralph lauRen t-ShIrt StylISt’S OWN


Jacket MaRLON’s OwN Rash guaRd, swiMsuit, bOOts PhOtOgRaPheR’s OwN


TAYLOR WEARS SWimSuiT Weberbilt


THIS SPREAD: JARROD WEARS JACKET Moncler SHIRT vInTAgE T-SHIRT calvin Klein BLAnKET PHOTOgRAPHER’S OWn


ALEX WEARS T-ShiRT vinTAgE


Coat Ralph lauRen Shirt and SwimSuit VintaGE


ALEX WEARS CoAt GreG Lauren JACKEt (UNDERNEAtH) DIeSeL SWimSUitS Parke & ronen HAt viNtAgE


BRETT WEARS CoAT And jACkET Tom Ford T-ShiRT PhoToGRAPhER’S oWn SWimSuiT Parke & ronen


BOBBY WEARS CLOTHING Jil Sander


PRESTON WEARS COAT Dolce & Gabbana PANTS billy ReiD


COAT BILLY REID TANK, SHORTS, SWIMSUIT, BOOTS VINTAGE


NIC WEARS HOODIE GreG Lauren SWImSuIt eMPOrIO arManI BOOtS VINtAGE


Coat Y-3 JaCket Nudie JeaNs overalls PHotoGraPHer’s oWN


TREVOR WEARS SWimSuiT Parke & ronen


JACKET PAUL SMITH PANTS JIL SAnder


PanTs KITON BelT model’s own

Hair THom Priano aT Garren new York for r+Co GroominG reGine THorre models marlon PeTer, TaYlor miller (CHosen), Jarrod sCoTT (ford), alex sewall (fronT), BreTT lisTl and Trevor siGnorino (CliCk), BoBBY PenneY (dT models), PresTon TriTes (soul), niC THomPson (wilHelmina) ProduCTion dawn Boller (liTTle Bear inC.) PHoTo assisTanTs CHris domuraT, Jeff TauTrim, sean JaCkson, rYan Brinkman, Jordan millinGTon sTYlisT assisTanTs Caroline sHin and Halle CHaPman TYler Tailor lars nord Hair assisTanT lP Giardino GroominG assisTanT marlene CasTro ProduCTion assisTanTs Boris m cnerTneY, reYnaldo Herrera, luke adler loCaTion Golden BeaCH, florida and monTauk, new York aCCommodaTions monTauk manor CaTerinG dG CaTerinG


SwimSuit SPEEDO hat SamuDra hat (uNDERNEath) viNtagE JaCKEt (ON LEg) IrO


the outsiders

CARL WEARS CLOTHING VERSACE BELT TENPENNY BELTWORKS

158 vman

naïve, fanciful, romantic, or deviant, small-town boys from dead-end worlds can rejoice as fashion’s top collections turn the outcasts into sartorial heroes. power to the hooliGans, the poets, and the punks! photoGraphy benjamin aleXander huseby fashion beat bolliGer


FROM LEFT: SOL AND FINNLAY WEAR CLOTHING BURBERRY PRORSUM


FROM LEFT: CARL WEARS CLOTHING ANd SHOES GUCCI RINGS (INdEX FINGERS) RACHEL ENTWISTLE RINGS (OTHER FINGERS) GUCCI FINNLAY WEARS CLOTHING ANd SHOES GUCCI RINGS RACHEL ENTWISTLE


FINNLAY WEARS CLOTHING AND BOOTS TOM FORD


FROM LEFT: FINNLAY, MATS, ANd FLYNN WEAR CLOTHING CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION


CARL WEARS CLOTHING AND SUNGLASSES EMPORIO ARMANI NECKLACE MIRACLE ICONS


FROM LEFT: SADAF WEARS SWEATER, PANTS, SHOES J.W. ANDERSON TURTLENECK STYLIST’S OWN BELT TENPENNY BELTWORKS SOL WEARS CLOTHING AND SHOES J.W. ANDERSON


FINNLAY WEARS CLOTHING, SHOES, BELT ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE RING GUCCI MATS WEARS CLOTHING, SHOES, BELT ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE SUNGLASSES EMPORIO ARMANI


SOL WEARS CLOTHING AND SHOES COMME DES GARÇONS


FROM LEFT: MATS And TyROnE WEAR CLOTHInG And ACCESSORIES LOUIS VUITTOn


CARL AND FINNLAY WEAR CLOTHING AND BOOTS BOTTEGA VENETA


SOL AND FLYNN WEAR CLOTHING HERMÈS


MATS WEARS CLOTHING VALENTINO GROOMING MATT MuLLHALL MODELS FLyNN CHRISTIE (BANANAS MODELS PARIS), FINNLAy DAvIS (ELITE LONDON), CARL HjELM AND SOL GOSS (SuPA), yuSuF SIDDIquI (TIAD), MATS vAN SNIPPENBERG (NEXT), MAX STREETLy (D1), TyRONE (SELECT) SET DESIGN ANDREA STANLEy (STREETERS) PRODuCTION SOPHIE CASTLEy (LOCk STuDIOS) DIGITAL TECHNICIAN CLARk FRANkLyN PHOTO ASSISTANTS jAMES DONOvAN AND PETER CARTER STyLIST ASSISTANTS EDWARD BOWLEG AND jOSEFINE SkOMARS GROOMING ASSISTANTS PATRICk FORINI, jONATHAN REDMAN, FLORENCE TEERLINCk PRODuCTION ASSISTANT BENjAMIN WHITLEy LOCATION HACkNEy SPORTS CENTRE, LONDON


SOL, MATS, FINNLAY, AND CARL WEAR CLOTHING AND SHOES ALEXANDER McQUEEN RINGS RACHEL ENTWISTLE SOCKS BRESCIANI


My girl JACKET HERMÈS TURTLENECK SANDRO JEANS VINTAGE LEVI’S SOCKS CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE SHOES J.W. ANDERSON

172 vman

the love affair between a man and man’s best friend is a tale as old as time. princely robbi g lives a life of luxury in service to his mistress, wearing enchanting apparel from the fall menswear collections at his manor in the kent countryside. will there be trouble in paradise or a happily ever after? photography Johnny dufort fashion haley wollens


and me


COAT DIOR HOMME SWEATER RAF SIMONS TURTLENECK JIL SANDER TOp (UNdERNEATh) cONtEMpORARy wARDRObE JEANS VINTAGE wRANGLER JEWELRY (ThROUGhOUT) cHROME HEARtS


SWEATER ANDREA POMPILIO JEANS AND BOOTS SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE CHAPS CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE LOCKET (THROugHOuT) STYLIST’S OWN


SWEATER MSGM T-SHIRT CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE PANTS BOTTEGA VENETA SHOES COSTUME STUDIO SOCKS CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE


PANTS JIL SANDER TOP AND SOCKS CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE SHOES J.W. ANDERSON


JACKET JIL SANDER SLIP AND SOCKS CONTEMPORARY WARDROBE JEANS VINTAGE LEVI’S SHOES COSTUME STUDIO


TOP STYLIST’S OWN SHIRT (UNDERNEATH) DIOR HOMME PANTS GIORGIO ARMANI SHOES GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN


HaIr Gary GILL fOr WeLLa PrOfessIONaLs usING sP MeN GrOOMING NaOMI yOsHIda usING MaC COsMeTICs (THe BOOk aGeNCy) MOdeL rOBBI G (TIad) aNIMaL TaLeNT kasPer THe POOdLe (TraCy BrOWN) PrOduCTION NaTaLIe BarNes (arTIsTry LONdON) PHOTO assIsTaNTs aLexaNder HudsON aNd JOrI kOMuLaINeN sTyLIsT assIsTaNTs GIuLIO VeNTIseI aNd CaNdICe sHONa PrOduCTION assIsTaNT BrIONy OaTes

CLOTHING COMME DES GARÇONS


SHIRT MARC JACOBS


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT (UNDERNEATH) PRADA BOOTS (THROUGHOUT) KENZO T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE FROM THE VINTAGE SHOWROOM MASK (THROUGHOUT) VINTAGE FROM ST. ANDREWS HALL

Artist DAnny treAcy often visits whAt he cAlls “non-spAces” to Discover scrAps of clothes AnD then shoots his finDings in A stuDio. here, the process is reverseD, As treAcy brings fAshion to his grim hAunts with the help of mAx peArmAin. Anthony burgess put it best in a clockwork orange: “oh, it wAs gorgeousness AnD gorgeosity mADe flesh!” photogrAphy DAnny treAcy fAshion mAx peArmAin 182 vmAn


HOODIE (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) SUPREME HOODIES (UNDERNEATH, CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM COAT (UNDERNEATH) RAF SIMONS PANTS BURBERRY PRORSUM VEST (OVER FACE) VINTAGE BOY LONDON FROM DARKSIDE CAMDEN


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT (UNDERNEATH) BOTTEGA VENETA SHIRT (UNDERNEATH) GIORGIO ARMANI T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE FROM THE VINTAGE SHOWROOM


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT (UNDERNEATH) PRADA T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE FROM SHEPHERD’S BUSH MARKET


HOODIE (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) SUPREME HOODIES (UNDERNEATH, CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT AND SHIRT (UNDERNEATH) DSQUARED2 T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE W&LT FROM PHILIP BROWNE MENSWEAR


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) RUSSELL ATHLETIC SUIT AND SHIRT (UNDERNEATH) GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE FROM THE VINTAGE SHOWROOM


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT (UNDERNEATH) CERRUTI 1881 PARIS VEST (OVER FACE) VINTAGE BOY LONDON FROM DARKSIDE CAMDEN


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT AND SHIRT (UNDERNEATH) TOM FORD T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE TRIUMPH FROM COLLECTION OF FIZZY JUICY


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM OXFAM SUIT (UNDERNEATH) DIOR HOMME T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE FROM SHEPHERD’S BUSH MARKET

MODEL HAMISH WIRGMAN PRODUCTION CHANTELLE-SHAkILA TIAGI (REP LIMITED) PHOTO ASSISTANT MAx BAINBRIDGE STYLIST ASSISTANT LAURA VARTIAINEN LOCATION LEE VALLEY RIDING CENTRE, LONDON


HOODIES (CUSTOMIZED BY STYLIST) VINTAGE FROM NOTTING HILL RETRO EXCHANGE JACKET (UNDERNEATH) LANVIN T-SHIRT (OVER FACE) VINTAGE ADIDAS FROM NOTTING HILL RETRO EXCHANGE


kim jones pays a fitting tribute to the late, great christopher nemeth at louis vuitton, repurposing prints from the master of salvaged garments. in the spirit of a fashion pioneer, pack up and set off for unknown territory with this limited-edition calf leather-and-wool blanket suitcase. photography jason pietra

192 vman • vision

RetouchING Rebecca MaNsoN (Post offIce NYc)

christopher and his kind


diesel.com

hashtag hashtag hashtag hashtag


diesel.com

I’m looking at a wall


KOA

2015 vman/ford model search winner Photographed by steven klein FASHION matthew ellenberger


Hair andy Lecompte (tHe WaLL Group) GroominG KabuKi modeLS Koa SmitH, noaH metZdorF, Lane FoSter, Landon mcnamara, SHade muLLinS, ZacH roGerS (Ford) manicure Honey (eXpoSure ny) prop StyLiSt JeSSe KauFmann (FranK repS) production JuStin roSe diGitaL tecHnician tadaaKi SHibuya LiGHtinG tecHnician marK LucKaSavaGe pHoto aSSiStantS aLeX LocKett and ian barLinG StyLiSt aSSiStant biLL rodGerS Hair aSSiStantS danieL GaroFaLi and daLLin JameS barber antHony cruZ GroominG aSSiStantS SatSuKi Soma and cHriStyna Kay prop aSSiStantS ZacK cLauSen and omar KinG LiGHtinG aSSiStant aLeXei topounov Location SprinG StudioS caterinG tHe cHeFS aGency


what does it take to be a model? you tell us. our annual ford model search is back and badder than ever. meet the winner and his fellow finalists as they find maximum exposure before the lens of steven klein.

zach


KOA WEARS COAT VERSACE PAnTS DSquARED2 UndERWEAR SupREmE TOP nECKLACE And BRACELET TRASH AND VAuDEVILLE MIddLE nECKLACE, WATCH, RInGS, BELT STYLIST’S OWn BOTTOM nECKLACE gAbRIEL uRIST


KOA


Noah wears Vest DsquareD2 Necklaces stylist’s owN


Noah


Shade wearS Jacket (thiS page) maison margiela Jacket (oppoSite page) saint laurent by Hedi slimane t-Shirt (cUStoMiZed BY StYLiSt) balmain paNtS CoaCH JeweLrY aNd BeLt StYLiSt’S owN


shade


Landon wears JaCKeT and PanTs Saint Laurent by Hedi SLimane Underwear Supreme BeLT dSQuared2 neCKLaCes sTyLisT’s own rinG biJuLeS nyC BraCeLeT traSH and VaudeViLLe


Landon


Lane wears Jacket PhiliPP Plein Pants GiVenChY BY RiCCARDO TiSCi GLoves BRiOni Hat The leATheR MAn beLts TRASh AnD VAUDeVille neckLaces styList’s own rosary and braceLet TiTle Of WORk BY JOnAThAn MeizleR


Lane


Zach wears JacKeT and panTs givenchy By riccardo tisci underwear versace sunglasses saint LaUrent By hedi sLiMane necKlaces and BelT sTylisT’s own BraceleT trash and vaUdeviLLe


zach


diesel.com

fashion is not about standing out


VMAN 34 HEROES  
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