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spring 2012

the spring Fashion issue By carine roitFeld

hollywood’s generation next Fast cars hot girls hard parties slick style

US $5.95 CAN $9.25 DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 3, 2012

France’s leading man

tahar rahim

in Balenciaga By nicolas ghesquière photographed By nick knight


www.marcjacobs.com

bobby gillespie photographed by juergen teller

marc jacobs stores worldwide


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© D.YURMAN 2012

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COMING SOON


Nicola Formichetti is the Creative Director of Mugler, Fashion Director of Vogue Hommes Japan, Uniqlo, and Lady Gaga.

EVEN THOSE WHO INSPIRE US NEED A PLACE TO BE INSPIRED. VFILES.COM


VMAN 25 Guest Editor-in-Chief

Editor-in-Chief/Creative Director

CARINE ROITFELd

STEPHEN gAN

Editor ELLIOTT dAvId

Editor-at-Large dEREK BLASBERg

Contributing Editor

Visionaire

Advertising Directors

Copy Editors

SARAH CRISTOBAL

CECILIA dEAN

jORgE gARCIA

TRACI PARKS

jAMES KALIARdOS

jgarcia@visionaireworld.com

ANNE RESNIK

gIORgIO PACE

jEREMy PRICE

Associate Editor/Online PATRIK SANdBERg

Contributing Fashion Editors

gpace@visionaireworld.com

jOE McKENNA

Research Editor

Photo Editor

NICOLA FORMICHETTI

Advertising Manager

EvELIEN jOOS

OLIvIER RIzzO

FRANCINE wONg

BEAT BOLLIgER

fwong@visionaireworld.com

Bookings Editor

CLARE RICHARdSON

NATALIE HAzzOUT

HANNES HETTA

Advertising Coordinator vICKy BENITES

Financial Comptroller

Managing Editor/ New Media & Special Projects

Fashion Editor-at-Large

vbenites@visionaireworld.com

SOORAyA PARIAg

PANOS yIAPANIS

646.747.4545

Fashion Assistant

Production Director

KATELyN gRAy

MELISSA SCRAgg

Consulting Creative/ Design Direction

Special Projects

Assistant Comptroller

jAy MASSACRET

Fashion & Market Editors

ANNIE HINSHAw

gLORIA KIM

gREg FOLEy

Interns Communications

BIANCA AMBROSIO

Art Director

ANUSCHKA SENgE

jULIAN ANTETOMASO

SANdRA KANg

SyNdICATE MEdIA gROUP

LORENA CAMPILLO

212.226.1717

REBECCA gLASER

Fashion News & Market Editor CHRISTOPHER BARNARd

FARzANA KHAN

Administrative Assistant

TOM vAN dORPE CATHERINE NEwELL-HANSON

Creative Imaging Consultant PASCAL dANgIN

STEvEN CHAIKEN

Senior Fashion Editor

jAMES POgUE

MAddIE RAEdTS

Associate Art Director CIAN BROwNE

Contributing Editor/ Entertainment

Design

gREg KRELENSTEIN

jEFFREy BURCH

STARwORKS

ALExA vIgNOLES

Distribution

ALBAN ROgER

dAvId RENARd

NATHAN SIMPSON

CONTRIBUTORS

Nick Knight Bruce Weber Karl Lagerfeld Peter Lindbergh Jean-Baptiste Mondino Sebastian Faena Willy Vanderperre Karim Sadli Michael Avedon Ben Hasset Shu Akashi Michaela Dosamantes Gideon Lewis-Kraus Selita Ebanks Giancarlo DiTrapano Emily Kate Roemer Paolo Zagoreo Paolo Zerbini Alex Carrasco Kevin McGarry Courtney Malick SPECIAL THANKS

Charlotte Knight SHOWstudio Art + Commerce Jimmy Moffat Billy Albores Amanda Fiala Lindsay Thompson Sandrine Bizzarro Ward Ivan Rafik Jeannette Shaheen Jeremie Roumilhac Helena Martel Lionel Vermiel Eric Pfrunder Katherine Marre Mighela Shama Art Partner Giovanni Testino Amber Olson Allison Hunter Tiziana Trischitta Streeters Jerry Morone Dtouch Janvier Sandrine Noennec Palma Driscoll Lindsay Reitzes Lindsay Cruickshank Management Artists Alexandre Lamare Anne du Boucheron Francesco Savi CLM Cale Harrison Artlist Jonathan Ferrari Michael Quinn Wayne Wilson Ford NY Paul Rowland Sam Doerfler Emily Novak Blake Woods Jesse Simon Jake Madden Matt Raimos IMG Kyle Hagler Tracey Mattingly The Wall Group Tania Celestin Jed Root Calliste Pier 59 Tony Jay Federico Pigntatelli Milk Studios Diane Suarez Danielle Rafanan Fast Ashleys Michael Masse ROOT [EQ, Capture+Studios] Kip McQueen Aldana Oppizzi Morgan Anderson Splashlight Shell Royster Jack Studios Ron Fillman Smashbox John Cassidy David Radin Rebecca Cabage Spring Studios Bar Bar Verien Wiltshire Kelley Blevins

VMAN is a registered trademark of VMAN LLC. Copyright © 2012 VMAN LLC. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. VMAN (BIPAD 96492) is published quarterly by VMAN LLC. Principal office: 11 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Speedimpex 35-02 48th Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101. For subscriptions, address changes, and adjustments, contact Speedimpex 35-02 48th Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101, Tel: 800.969.1258, vman.com, e-mail: subscriptions@speedimpex.com. For back issues, contact VMAN, 11 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10013, Tel: 212.274.8959. For press inquiries please contact Anuschka Senge at Syndicate Media Group, Tel: 212.226.1717


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contents 92 on the cover tAhAr rAhIM: A MAn For ALL SeASonS BY nIcK KnIGht France’s new leading man sets his sights on America, and we’re gazing right back 36 neWS From the art world’s greatest tributes to technology’s greenest gadgets, snap into spring with our favorite things 48 MAn AnD hIS MAchIneS They say nothing is more timeless than a classic car—check out these timepieces and test-drive that theory 58 BrInG In the noISe How a Broadway understudy found himself on the big screen, doing duets with Dolly Parton 60 WeS BentLeY cLeAnS up The American beauty with the baby blue eyes finds his way back from beyond the razor’s edge 64 reAL LIFe reAL GuYS Men’s fashion isn’t just made for the models. Firefighters, florists, construction workers, and chefs need clothes too 74 the MuSIc MAn The talented Trey Songz has ruled R&B with 4 albums. Here he speaks with Selita Ebanks about making Chapter 5 78 hIDInG out WIth reeve cArneY Actor, front man, and crime-fighting crusader: spend an evening with the star of Broadway’s biggest show in history 84 the ArtIStS Are preSent Richard Avedon’s grandson inherits the family business, shooting portraits of 6 up-and-coming art guys

91 FroM pArIS, WIth Love Guest editor Carine Roitfeld talks straight on men’s fashion, her take on masculinity, and how to put together a perfect dinner party 98 LouIS GArreL BY KArL LAGerFeLD The French dreamer embodies the spirit of France’s cinematic icons 104 hoLLYWooD BABYLon BY SeBAStIAn FAenA Where have all the leading men gone? Dig through the rubble with Hollywood’s next great hopes 120 FrActureD YouthS BY Bruce WeBer Bruce Weber writes a heartfelt letter and assembles some photos for his friend Carine Roitfeld 130 eL torero BY JeAn-BAptISte MonDIno José María Manzanares is more than a matador and muse to Riccardo Tisci, he is bullfighting’s bleeding heart 140 everYWhere MAn BY peter LInDBerGh Follow the shadow of our man-about-town, who turns Paris on its ear with sensational style 156 cALenDAr GIrLS BY WILLY vAnDerperre For the year’s first issue, find your favorite month with a supermodel squeeze


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foreword

one mission of a men’s magazine is to scour the globe for archetypes of masculinity, ambassadors of manliness, those rare physical paragons and genetic miracles we put in our pages, on billboards, and runways. one could argue that dressing the industry’s best fashion on the species’ best specimens isn’t merely romanticizing clothing, it has nothing to do with setting an unrealistic precedent of physique for our readers—if anything, we celebrate with our readers a form of expression pushed to its most glorious levels, just like a team with their hired athletes; we’re professionals. and, if you think about it, fashion is closer to reality than most other socio-aesthetic art forms. fiction, film, fine art—all predominantly exist in a context of the unreal. we at vman strive to proffer our taste and hope it somehow inspires your own. everything is purchasable, obtainable. we deal in reality, albeit a fantastical one. so for this spring fashion issue, when guest editor Carine roitfeld, the woman responsible for some of the most imaginative and creative editorial fashion reveries ever created, declared we would feature only “real” men, we were astonished at how original the idea seemed. and so we began to scour once again. who did we find? modern versions of the everyday man, each with deep, idiosyncratic character, representing themselves rather than a manufactured notion of manhood. we have mechanics, a vegan chef, a bullfighter, an entrepreneur, and more. Carine worked with some of the world’s greatest photographers and some of its newest. the work of legends like Karl lagerfeld and peter lindbergh fits easily

with youngsters like Karim sadli, who captured an array of guys who span from a

florist to a firefighter, and michael avedon, the 21-year-old grandson of iconic photographer richard avedon, who shot six up-and-coming artists in their studios. this is the first time Carine has worked with nick Knight, presenting our cover star tahar rahim, perhaps france’s most talented actor, who speaks of his struggles with his own identity at home as well as a future life in the states (once hollywood usurps the destined star). she collaborated with Jean-baptiste mondino again after a two decade hiatus, photographing the young bullfighter José maría manzanares, who is revolutionizing the art with his grace and mercy. with bruce weber, they showcase young musical phenoms trey songz, Jeremy Jordan, and reeve Carney. the issue is a multilingual, complex conversation between vman and Carine, but more so a show of appreciation for the men in the world who inspire and support this industry. not that Carine is an orthodox realist. she briefly danced into fantasy with sebastian faena and hollywood’s brightest future stars, and with willy vanderperre to create a calendar featuring twelve of the world’s most celebrated beauties—we had to end on a dream, but at least it’s one that looks to the future. literally. if there’s one thing this collaboration has changed in us it’s how we see the months to come. we hope to keep this idea of real guys in a real world alive in vman moving forward. but most of all, we’re honored to share with our readers Carine’s unique perspective on contemporary masculinity. enjoy. the editors

carine roitfeld photographed by peter lindbergh on the coVer photography nick knight fashion carine roitfeld tahar rahim wears sweater, shirt, pants, shoes balenciaga by nicolas ghesquière soCKs happy socks Willy Vanderperre calendar girls maniCure elsa Durrens (artlist new yorK) prop styling piers hammer (art + CommerCe) Casting John pfeiffer photo assistants roman Duris, nyra lang, Kim ohrling Digital teChniCian henri Coutant (DtouCh) stylist assistants miChaela Dosamantes anD sabrina baCon proDuCtion staCee robert (management artists) Catering nuela retouChing Janvier loCation milK stuDios, new yorK


LOS OS AN ANGEL GE ES, S LA LAS S VEGA VEGAS, S, NEW NE YORK K AND SE SELEC LECT T OPTI OPTICAL CAL ST STORE ORES. S. TOM TO FOR RD.C COM O


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v m a n n e w s spring is synonymous with a rebirth of style. whether s onic, sartorial, or downright spiritual, upgrade yourself with this seas on’s essentials

p.38 THE NEW COLOR OF ART

p.46 KIM JONES TAKES ON LOUIS VUITTON

p.42

p.40

CALVIN KLEIN’S FAMILIAR NEW FACE

2012’S SHINIEST NEW TOYS

p a g e

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NEW COLORS Quantum Light is the title of photographer David Benjamin Sherry’s second monograph to date, and the name only begins to get at the vibrancy of the images found inside. Sherry has been praised throughout the art world for the past few years for his unique ability to transform photographs (analog, developed in a darkroom, and never digitally manipulated) into images that feel more like luminous, photorealist paintings. Perhaps this is in part due to his masterful relationship with color, which often appears to have seeped from somewhere deep beneath the paper and risen up, pressed flush against the surface of his photos. Or maybe that is just the effect one experiences because Sherry’s visceral subject matter, which focuses on natural elements and camouflaged, painted bodies, evokes such immediate emotions that they tend to bubble to the contours of one’s own exterior when confronted with his work. One of the book’s less visually stunning portions is the truly insightful conversation Sherry has with photographer Collier Schorr. In it, Schorr tries to get to the bottom of his use of color as a medium in and of itself, and the artist’s sincerity shines just as brightly as his work. Courtney MaliCK

Quantum Light is available February from Damiani/Salon 94

NEW SPIRITUALIZED Jason Pierce, known more popularly as J. Spaceman,

NEW LEGACY This spring, on the heels of the artist’s passing, the Guggenheim Museum in New York will mount a career retrospective of sculptor John Chamberlain’s work. One of the great American poets of junk, Chamberlain traversed the twentieth century with a steady, sixty-year output, creating brutish, slickly tinted forms built of twisted car parts and other industrial refuse. The result bridged abstract expressionism, minimalism, and pop. One hundred of his pieces will spiral up the museum’s rotunda, and a new work called C’ESTZESTY (2011) will stand twenty-feet tall outside on Fifth Avenue. The show’s accompanying catalog will compact the work into paper format, in a fittingly heavy edition. Kevin McGarry John Chamberlain: Choices runs February 24-May 13, 2012 at the Guggenheim Museum, New York

Sweet Heart Sweet Light is out in March from Fat Possum page 38

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN IMAGE COURTESY THE GUGGENHEIM DAVID BENJAMIN SHERRY IMAGES COURTESY DAMIANI

has been getting high since 1982. First he did it as one half of Spacemen 3, the buzz-sawing minimalist project that moon-landed on a new frontier for psychedelic music. Later, the high was achieved through the use of a prism of mind-altering drugs. Finally, Pierce has been reaching atmospheric altitudes as the cerebral nucleus of Spiritualized, one of the most influential and sonically momentous musical projects of the past twenty years. Over the course of six albums, the songwriter and front man has established a dazzling and vertical new direction for rock and roll by creating a harmony out of classic pop songwriting, layers of melodic simplicity, and lyrics with direct emotional truth that cut directly to the terrestrial core. Still, the centerpiece of his spirit enhancing discography, throughout innumerable lineup changes (Wikipedia has built a chart out of them), has remained the seminal 1997 album Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space, the title track of which set a skying precedent in the art of building layers upon layers to achieve an all-encompassing meteoric sensory experience of, for lack of a better term, epicness. Now, Pierce presents his seventh album, Sweet Heart Sweet Light, a testament to the strength of his talent and craft, and a reassertion of the basic principles that have made him a hero to countless rock and roll icons who’ve emerged in his wake. Recorded over two years between Wales, Los Angeles, and Reykjavik, the LP spans ten tracks of signature buzzing, gospel-wielding lessons in life and heartbreak. This is particularly clear on the track “Too Late,” which glorifies a defiance of a mother’s warning to steer clear of love (the chorus: “It’s too late, I made up my mind/Love always shows when there’s eyes that can blind/It’s too late, something I’ve learned/Love lights the flame when there’s hearts that can burn”), and closing track “So Long You Pretty Things,” hammering the listener’s emotional strings with the band’s trademark repeat refrains. “When you make a record, it has to be the single most important thing in your world,” Pierce reasons. Ladies and gentlemen, listening to this record might become the most important thing in yours. PatriK SandberG


NEW ESSENCE Spring is about the sporting life starting with Victorinox Swiss Unlimited Eau de Toilette Spray (swissarmy.com, $78). For the coast-hopping sophisticate there is Neroli Portofino by Tom Ford (Neiman Marcus, $190), the

designer’s cool take on beach in a bottle, or from the

Sicilians across the way, Dolce & Gabbana The One

Sport (macys.com, $73). Eternally chic Hermès offers a new unisex (so French) scent for Spring, Voyage

d’Hermès (hermes.com, $125), best for use after your regularly scheduled equine activity. Meanwhile, Dior Homme Sport (dior.com, $74) gets a bit more daring— for all the real men out there. Christopher Barnard

NEW TECHNOLOGY in 2012, technology is tantamount. that’s why it’s important to get in gear with the gizmos that will get you going for spring. one accessory we can suddenly no

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FragraNcE pHotograpHy EMily KatE roEMEr

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longer live without is wearable tV, in the form of the Sony Personal 3D Viewer (1. sony.com, $800). With one HD olED screen for each eye, the specs create a visual dialogue resulting in a breakthrough in 3D technology. the Viewer also sports 5.1 virtual surround sound, simulating a theater’s sense of distance and precision, all customized to fit perfectly. Sensory deprivation has reached new cinematic heights. the temperature, however, is perfect—as long as you’ve shacked up with the Nest Learning Thermostat (2. nest.com, $249). practically psychic, the device learns to adjust itself based on your personal preferences, and can be controlled remotely via mobile for optimum energy saving. also newly up to date, the beloved instant camera, in the form of the polaroid Z340 instant digital Camera (3. polaroid. com, $300). operating as a digital camera, users can view, crop, and correct photos before printing, and add fun or classic borders for effect. it might not be the same as the original, but the same can certainly be said for the Biscotti (4. biscotti.com, $200). Bringing the retro-futuristic idea of the videophone into the present, the biscuit-shaped camera unit sits atop the tV, connected via HDMi, and uses Wi-Fi to make calls to other Biscotti owners and google video chat users. this way your loved ones, no matter how far, can still find a way to interrupt your sports game. if hitting the field is more your personal speed, you can now soundtrack it wirelessly with the Bose Soundlink Wireless Mobile Speaker (5. bose.com $300). With sound quality and clarity unheard of in a bluetooth speaker, the fairway (and the subway) just got louder. if you want to get lighter while staying green, without resorting to cheap fluorescent bulbs, the Switch Bulb (6. switchlightbulbs.com, $40) uses eighty-five percent less energy with the soft light of a regular bulb. it looks like the future just got a whole lot brighter. ps


NEW S OUNDTRACK YVES SAINT LAURENT’S NEW S OLES Stefano Pilati’s safari sport Spring 2012 mens collection was heavy on khaki (a clever nod to Yves’s Saharienne) and crisp whites; a clean, approachable proposition on the whole. But upon closer inspection there was brilliant, menacing color in the form of the turquoise and orange python loafers, slithering just below Pilati’s signature cuffs. This standout shoe of the season is more suited to the city sidewalk than its original jungle floor provenance, but it will make you no less a stylish hunter. CB

CALVIN KLEIN’S NEW STAR

PhotograPhy Paolo ZerBini fashion Paolo Zagoreo BrIeFS Ck Bold

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Le Voyage Dans la Lune is available now from eMI

YSL SHOe PHOTOgrAPHY eMILY KATe rOeMer guCCI FALL 2012 PHOTOgrAPHY SONNY VANdeVeLde AIr ALBuM ArT COurTeSY eMI MuSIC

VMAN cover star Matthew Terry has been very busy since we left him last summer, after winning the VMAN/Ford Model Search. The 20-year-old just booked and shot Calvin Klein’s CK Bold underwear campaign and is also the new face of the the label’s CK Jeans line, announcing on billboards around the globe that Terry has arrived. We spoke with the rising star just before he left for Milan for the mens Fall 2012 shows. “The last time I went it was the first time I had ever left the country. This season should be a little easier. I have friends now!” As for the attention he’s received since landing our last cover: “These few months have been busy but amazing. I shot in St. Barth’s with Steven Klein (for Calvin), I’ve been traveling and working as much as I can. It’s the most fun I’ve had...ever.” Between bookings, Matthew is working on a band with pals in Philadelphia where he still lives. The New Jersey native is staying close to home for now, not quite ready to make a permanent move to New York. “I’m staying here for now, but not sure how long I can manage that. It’s a good distance, but I know it’s inevitable.” As for what’s next: “I’m ready for whatever comes my way. But the past few months will be hard to top. This has all been a dream. Thank you, VMAN!” CB

Adding a dark twist to an already rich, moody collection for Fall 2012, Frida giannini chose the tracks from Air’s latest album (at the time, unreleased), Le Voyage Dans la Lune for her velvety gents to walk the runway. The album was actually commissioned to score a new color version of george Méliès’s 1902 short film (of the same title) about the first man on the moon. The picture had no original musical score and Air was the most dreamy and fitting choice to invigorate the French masterpiece. An icon of French cinema, Le Voyage is the story of six astronomers chosen to explore the lunar surface. As for scoring the gucci men’s season, the distant but driving beats kept things moving for the man who always seems to be arriving or departing—for Fall, a quick lunar jaunt— while looking so perfectly disheveled. This season it was smoky suits in burgundy, aubergine, and turquoise with the house’s signature sunglasses that suggest the right amount of world-weary glamour. It was elegance in a minor key, and gave those in attendance exactly what you want from a catwalk, something completely new, whether on the runway or the speakers. If you’re iTunes inclined, the playlist included tracks “Seven Stars,” “Parade,” and “Astronomy Club.” From now until the weather turns next Fall, Air will be on a steady loop. CB


NEW YORK | BOSTON | lOS aNgElES | TORONTO | TOKYO | hONg KONg | lONDON | gENEva | DÃœSSElDORf

| VICTORINOX.COm


NEW PHOTO DIARY “I kind of wish I had been there,” says Gus Van Sant, in his prologue to GabeTM, the new book by photographer Nick Haymes. Chronicling the American travels of young skateboarder Gabe Nevins, the star of Van Sant’s 2007 film Paranoid Park, Haymes’s photographs document the intimate experiences of a rough and tumble youth with a haunting, nostalgic distance not dissimilar to Van Sant’s own work. Perhaps it’s why both artists were drawn to Nevins. For Van Sant, his precociousness lured him in: Nevins was ultimately cast in Park due to his speculated ability to break audiences’ hearts. Haymes sees Nevins as a veritable every-boy, having come up as a photographer documenting skateboarding and urban street culture. Capturing all the ephemera of today’s adolescent (including tree climbing, firework throwing, cat tossing, alcohol spitting, Facebook commenting, and wrestling), the resulting artifact is appealing to anyone who’s lived through a rollicking young period—and who hasn’t? It’s also vaguely homoerotic—but what isn’t? The titular trademark might be an affectation, but the contents of the images most certainly aren’t. PS GabeTM is available now from Damiani

NEW BOOK FOUR BOYS

These driving glasses for Spring vary from retro to space-age but are the perfect protection against any glaring obstacles when you hit the road. From top: sleek tortoise shell from Salvatore Ferragamo (marchon.com, $250) and Balenciaga (Bloomingdales, $345), wooden frames from Jil Sander (marchon.com, $270), or mod plastic from CK Jeans (price available upon request, 800.544.1336) will put you in the right frame of mind for any decade or destination. CB pag e 44

The Dangerous Book Four Boys is available in April from Rizzoli

SuNGlASSES PHoToGRAPHY EMIlY KATE RoEMER JAMES FRANCo IMAGES CouRTESY RIzzolI NICK HAYMES IMAGES CouRTESY DAMIANI

NEW WINDSHIELDS

Not only does James Franco act, direct, and publish fiction, he now has an artist monograph to boot. Entitled The Dangerous Book Four Boys, the tome, published by Rizzoli, directly reflects Franco’s first solo exhibition of the same title, which opened in 2010 at New York’s Clocktower Gallery. It is less the images in the book and more the essays—written by such luminaries as MoMA chief curator Klaus Biesenbach and original P.S. 1 founding director Alanna Heiss—that shed light on Franco’s subject matter. The most prominent of the installation shots are that of three simple wooden structures resembling playhouses—our first clue that Franco is exploring themes of childhood. Through the texts we discover that these structures also house videos, some dealing with the houses’ own destruction and others taking a more narrative tone. Their content varies from a masked Franco making a film for his favorite director, Wes Anderson, to ruminations on artist Paul McCarthy’s indulgent installation “Pig Island” (2003-10), to an awkward yet explicit sex scene between Star Trek’s Spock and Kirk. While the show’s reviews focused primarily on Franco’s meditations on childhood and memory, this book, which reveals much of the process behind the exhibition, seems to move beyond such basic categorizations. Franco’s work is disjointed yet it patches together various corners of our media-saturated culture, within which he knowingly plays a large and influential part. It is this self-acknowledgment more than any specific imagery that grounds his work and, more importantly, brings to it a certain sense of intrigue. CM


spring/summer 2012

fall/Winter 2012

fall/Winter 2012

LOUIS VUITTON’S NEW MAN “Being at Louis Vuitton is amazing and fantastic. This is a dreamlike situation. No one says no to you,” admits Kim Jones as he reflects on his first season designing the house’s men’s collection. “The products you can make and the access to

his own collection as well as a successful collaboration with athletic brand Umbro. He was an unexpected choice for the suits at LVMH, much like his womenswear

counterpart, Marc Jacobs, but the gamble seems to be paying off with a welcome injection of youth and ingenuity.

here.” And he has used those resources to great effect in his outing for Spring 2012. He was thinking, naturally, of travel, specifically to Africa. Glamorous safari and the 1920’s was the starting point and it came through in exuberant printed scarves and chic evening suits, with younger, slimmer cuts. “But I also have to think about practical things like being comfortable, lightweight, and carefree but still interesting.” To bring a new sense to a house so steeped in a specific idea of luxury and travel is no easy task, but Jones brought forth a bold and memorable collection. The brash feeling you get from the runway is mixed with a refreshing personal modesty, coming from someone leading such a hefty brand. “I have an intrinsic idea of what I should do, and I follow that. There is the idea of Vuitton and I work with it, but it all has to come from me.” It is decidedly Kim’s own take on how the Vuitton man should go about his global business that has received praise from critics and customers alike. “I visit the stores and see what works in different spots. You have to listen.” Jones, a Central Saint Martins alum, brings a uniquely British sensibility with a great reverence for traditional menswear mixed with some healthy, left-field quirk. The designer was most recently creative director of British luxury brand Dunhill and before then designed

On life in Paris, Jones is still getting to know the terrain. “I work so much that I hardly know the city itself. But my next collection (Fall 2012) will be more about two cities, Tokyo and Paris, and the men who live there. Not just now but in the past as well. But always modern.” Ample in sophistication and style, Japan embraces the Vuitton penchant for logos and branding. As for the oft-dreaded sophomore slump? Just hours before we shipped to print, Jones turned out a Fall collection brimming with luxury, both chic and exotic; heavy in camel, kangaroo, and crocodile. There were trim, color-blocked suits, those persistently of-the-moment varsity jackets, and the return of the scarf! Jones substituted the waistcoat from a three-piece with a karate gi, an inventive take on an elegant staple. And of course the bags; structured duffels in deep blue and attachés in burgundy crocodile. Rich and radical all at once, you could see him embrace the LV extravagance in the fabrics and rare exotics, but not too heavily, knowing what this man will actually buy and wear. Travel, they say, improves the mind. We say it improves the eye, and Jones is continually and dutifully improving. “I travel so much I really don’t remember where I’ve been. Everywhere. But it all registers and that’s when it comes out in the clothes, I guess.” Jones is going places and taking Vuitton with it, coolly and carefully. CB

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Bringing The noise Broadway Breakout JereMy JordaN BriNgs his perfect tiMiNg to the Big s creeN photogra ph y b ru c e we b e r fashion ca r i n e roi t f e ld It’s been said that in the entertainment industry, timing is everything. Jeremy Jordan, the Broadway sensation-turnedmovie heartthrob, will attest to that. Todd Graff, director of Joyful Noise, a musical comedy that sees Jordan costarring with Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah, stumbled upon the actor when he saw him in Rock of Ages on Broadway. “But I was just the understudy filling in for the lead, who was sick,” Jordan remembers. “And it was my very first performance.” Graff had just completed his script when he saw the play and instantly visualized the character he just wrote as Jordan. They met, had a reading, didn’t talk for a year, and then, “before I knew it I was on a plane to L.A. to star in my first major film. Yeah, I guess it has a lot to do with timing,” Jordan deadpans. “And I must not have done too horribly in my audition.” In the film, Jordan plays a rabble-rousing wild child who is sent to live with his grandmother (Parton), and then falls in love with a girl in the choir (Keke Palmer, who plays Latifah’s daughter). What did he think of his superstar cast members? “Dolly is, without a doubt, the kindest, sweetest person I’ve ever met. And Queen Latifah is just hilarious.” While this was his first film, Jordan was already a performance veteran. The Corpus Christie, Texas, native moved to New York City after graduating from Ithaca College, where he studied acting and musical theater. He was a swing in that fortuitous run of Rock of Ages, and after filming Joyful Noise he took over the lead role as Tony in West Side Story in the Tony-winning Broadway revival and starred in the Broadway debut of the new play Bonnie and Clyde. He’s currently prepping for the new Broadway show Newsies, based on the 1992 film starring Christian Bale. This name is destined to enter the Hollywood vernacular. Again, as it were. Jordan, who has Googled himself, readily acknowledges that he isn’t the first Jeremy Jordan to strive for stardom. There was the 1990s pop sensation of the same name, and even a star of the adult film variety (who won an illustrious award in the ’90s for “Best Group Scene”). But, it seems he’s giving them all a run for their money. “I thought about changing it, but it’s a good name and it’s actually mine,” he says, referring to the fact that the other Jeremy Jordans out there were not born as such. “But maybe one day we’ll all meet up and form a club.” Derek BlasBerg JeremY WeArS ALL CLoTHING Tim Coppens HAIr DIDIer mALIGe for frÉDÉrIC feKKAI GroomING fuLvIA fAroLfI for CHANeL PHoTo ASSISTANTS mICHAeL murPHY, Joe DIGIovANNA, Jeff TAuTrIm, CHrIS DomurAT, JoHN BeeCrofT STYLIST ASSISTANTS mICHAeLA DoSAmANTeS, vINCeNT CIArLArIeLLo, JuLIAN ANTeTomASo HAIr ASSISTANTS TAKASHI YuSA AND NAoKo SuzuKI GroomING ASSISTANT ImANe fIoCCHI ProDuCTIoN AND CASTING GWeN WALBerG (LITTLe BeAr INC) ProDuCTIoN ASSISTANT CHrIS BuTLer LoCATIoN mILK STuDIoS, NeW YorK

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WES BENTLEY cLEaNS up After conquering Addiction, former AmericAn BeAuty AvAnt-heArtthroB, Wes Bentley, mAkes A glorious return to the s creen With gone And the hunger gAmes . this time, We’ll cAll it A comeBAck p hotogra ph y B E N h aSS E t FaS h I o N to m vaN dorp E


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“All of A sudden I hAd All the choIces In the world, And when It wAs In front of me And I needed to mAke decIsIons, I froze.” –wes bentley

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Wes Bentley’s favorite joke is, “Paper or plastic?” In 1999,

Aside from the occasional meet-up with old actor

his pair of arctic blues appeared on the screen in the Sam Mendes film American Beauty. Wes played the high school loner with a handycam who filmed traces of beauty he found in the world around him, most memorably an instance of a plastic bag and the wind engaged in a floating dance in front of a brick wall. Watching that scene now is like staring at a horrible augury for the actor’s future relationship with a different kind of plastic bag, a smaller one, filled with a floating of its own. The introduction of Bentley to the world was not just another meaningless appearance of a pretty face. The critics weren’t just impressed with the eyes, but with what seemed to be turning behind them. He’d given a pitch perfect performance, and Hollywood arrived promptly at his feet. But in the face of his big break, and in a youthful and what he calls “unprepared” reaction, Wes turned 180 degrees away from Hollywood and his career. “I shied away from the fame, I went inside myself, and I took drugs and alcohol with me,” Bentley says.

friends at a club, where he’d find himself getting high

alone in the bathroom, Wes had completely detached from anything to do with the scene. He found himself mostly at his dealer’s house, or in his own small apartment with maybe an accomplice or two. He was tearing through an eight ball of blow and a couple of grams of heroin every few days while making what he modestly calls “probably horrible” music on his computer. No one was forgetting his eyes anytime soon, so there were still jobs out there. When he needed money, he would take an acting gig, but nothing in which he might thrive. He has now been sober for two and half years, and is married with a 1-year-old son. With strong spring roles in the American public’s own future addiction, The Hunger Games, a lauded run in the play Venus in Fur, and the new thriller, Gone, with Amanda Seyfried, Wes is making a steady return to the center of the world that threw him into the gutter the first time around. When I

ask him why he would step back into a world that already once handed him his ass, and if he thought Hollywood has changed, he says: “I’ve changed.” “I was young back then,” Bentley continues. “I didn’t know how to handle myself in the face of attention and I didn’t know how to handle money. We didn’t have much growing up so I’d never been given a whole lot of choices. All of a sudden I had all the choices in the world, and when it was in front of me and I needed to make decisions, I froze.” There aren’t many, but the one virtuous adjective that can be applied to today’s Hollywood is “forgiving.” To those who fess up about any sordid goings-on, show business seems to turn a new cheek. Having a drug problem can be a good move for an actor these days publicity-wise, as long as you are currently finished with it and are “working on your problem.” “I’m lucky to have found out how understanding and supportive people have turned out to be. It’s a very supportive industry for anyone who wants to come clean about something. during my first run it seemed like the more drugs you did, the more they loved you. Now it’s the opposite. We’re living in a TMZ world, people are going to see it, and it’s not fun to watch. It’s destruction.” Bentley doesn’t have to cop to anything; he could’ve easily kept his mouth shut. He does, however, admit that there are also some selfish reasons behind why he’s been speaking so openly about his missing years, and he sounds genuine about it: the publicity has been kind. But most importantly, he feels that whatever version of himself is out there needs to hear it, needs to hear that you don’t have to get high to be creative. His appreciation for the minds of Salvador dalí and artists from the ’70s previously led him to believe that artistic genius required drug use. I’d read he had said this, thought it sounded a bit outlandish, so I held him to the quote: “I thought all of these geniuses were high, so I thought I had to get high to get where they were. I learned later that most of the people I looked up to and who I thought were high, were actually not high at all. And the ones doing the drugs had died. I was sober when I read about dalí famously saying, ‘I don’t do drugs. I am drugs,’ and it blew me away. I just want to put that out there for whoever needs to hear it. You don’t have to get high to be creative. You can ‘be drugs’ instead. don’t be Hendrix, be dalí.” GIANCARLO DiTRApANO


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neil fenton, mechanic “I was the kid who had way too many bicycles in my front yard,” laughs Neil Fenton about his childhood in Huntington Beach, california. “I would fix them up and sell them to the neighbors.” His first motorized bike was one of the many cheap, discarded 1960s Vespas that litter california. He had to fib to his mother about it. “She didn’t want me to have a motorbike, so I lied and told her it was just a scooter, and my dad jazzed it up,” he explains. “Being a kid at the beach, you really didn’t want an office job. All you wanted to do was surf, which doesn’t make enough money for a nice car. So you learn how to fix up something yourself.” Wheeling and dealing two-wheelers would be momentarily put on hold when Fenton was scouted and then brought to New York to model, something he still dabbles in when the situation arises. But now he is back to fixing up bikes—much bigger ones these days. He shares a Bushwick garage space filled with welding machinery, tools, and all sorts of motorcycles and custom-built pieces. “I’m still impressed that this hobby has become a business,” he laughs. And it would make his surfer friends proud that he’s still not in an office job. JAckeT Salvatore FerraGamo SHIRT Paul Smith GlASSeS NeIl’S OWN

Parker voss, florist When Parker Voss graduated from Georgetown University, he was faced with a bit of a paradox. He wanted to find a vocation where he could get his hands dirty, but he’d just earned a degree in art history. So he discovered the joys of floral design, “which is sort of a living art form,” he explains. A picturesque landscape is something Voss knew at an early age, growing up in Rye, New York, just outside the city. “It changes your perspective growing up near but not in a big city. I’m not so New York–centric,” he says. “My adolescence allowed me to experience both worlds, and I always had a creative bent.” To date, he’s worked in museums and on fashion shoots, and of course he has put together countless tablescapes and arrangements. One of his favorite jobs was building a flowering labyrinth for a musician’s wedding at a downtown New York club. “I like the idea of a fleeting moment, which you have with flowers. I think, in a way, it’s very romantic that they’re alive and then they die,” he says. “But one day I’d like to do something more permanent.” All clOTHING Gucci pag e 64


REAL LIFE REAL GUYS I t mI gh t b e a m a n ’ s wo r l d, bu t I t ’ s d efI n I t ely a m a n ly o n e . h e r e are a h an dful of f e l l as m a k I n g l I fe t h at muc h m o r e m as cu l I n e for t h os e out t he r e wh o d o n ’ t wan t to get t h e I r h a n ds d I rty p hotography k arim sadli fas hion tom van dorpe text derek bl asberg


John barboni, architect m a r k b a r b o n i , r e s tau r at e u r John and Mark Barboni, fraternal twins who grew up in Southern California, had an idyl-

lic childhood. They skied, snowboarded, surfed, and even played in nearby lemon- and orange-tree groves. “It was one of those picturesque suburban towns where you can do it all,” John laughs. But after high school, they went their separate ways. John moved to New York, studied architecture, and then started work at a Manhattan firm. Mark was a premed student, then went to Costa Rica where he was sidetracked by organic ecology studies and travelling through Central and South Americas, researching coffee production. “What was amazing about being twins and separated is that it was like living two lives at once, building groups of friends simultaneously,” Mark says. Eventually the two recombined their lives to open their first restaurant, Hudson Clearwater, in Manhattan’s West Village. “At some point I realized that we had so many friends—and we both wanted to create a place that could be filled with loved ones and that had an old-European feel; a place that you’d never want to leave,” John says. Mark adds, “In a weird way, the restaurant was a full circle for us: we were coming from such different places for so long, and now we’re together again.” FROM LEFT: JOHN WEARS SHIRT ANd pANTS ArmAni JeAns SCARF PAul smith SOCkS FAlke MARk WEARS SuIT louis Vuitton SHIRT ArmAni JeAns SOCkS FAlke

h u n t e r pa r r i s h , b r o a d way a c t o r To date, the actor Hunter parrish’s biggest roles have been playing Mary-Louise parker’s drug-dealing eldest son on the Showtime

hit Weeds and portraying one of the rebellious, depressive teenagers in the Tony award –winning Broadway show Spring Awakening. For his next role, he wanted a bit of a stretch: Jesus Christ. This past winter, parrish took on the starring role in the Broadway production of Godspell, a musical from the ’70s loosely based on the book of Matthew. The Messiah has proven an exhausting part. “I’m not surprised that I’m as tired as I am,” he laughs. “Yet there’s something invigorating about being worn down and in live theater.” parrish grew up in Texas, but as a child actor had brief stints living in New York (he was 8 when he lived in SoHo, which he says was “less homogenized” then) and Los Angeles, where he spent most of his youth. Back in town, however, he sounds like a regular New Yorker. His favorite hot spots? “I found this underground ping-pong and shuffleboard club,” he laughs. “And have you ever been to the bowling alley in port Authority? It’s kind of ghetto, and kind of cool. They give you towers of beer.” JACkET Dior homme SWEATER ADiDAs slVr


n at e yo u n g , D ru m m e r Nate Young picked up his first pair of drumsticks at the ripe old age of 10, and by eighth grade was already in a punk band, Anberlin, and honing his onstage look: “dirty shirt, Levi’s,

and some old boots I’ve always worn,” he explains. “rock and roll isn’t about dressing up.” the tampa, Florida, native—along with his fellow bandmates, vocalist Stephen Christian, guitarists Joseph Milligan and Christian McAlhaney, and bassist deon rexroat—was already recording his first album by his freshman year of high school, and before graduation he had traveled throughout the United States, Europe, and the Far East. “Well, yeah, now that I think about it, I guess it was pretty awesome to be 15 and in a recording studio in Seattle,” he reflects. Young says his favorite place to tour is Australia, where Anberlin has been, he calculates, almost a dozen times. things are fuzzy when you’re a teenage rock and roller. But just because he’s crisscrossed the globe as a punk rocker doesn’t mean he’s lost touch with his roots. One of seven children, he still lives close to his family in tampa. “I’ll probably live in Florida my whole life. It’s home to me.” SWEAtEr WooyounGmi tUrtLENECk Hermès

m at t h e w m o s s h a rt, v e g a n c h e f Matthew Mosshart, a Vero Beach, Florida, transplant who now lives in Manhattan, has a very specific daily routine: every morning he wakes up early to take the dogs he is paid to walk for a few laps around the neighborhood, and then in the evening he heads to the BabyCakes bakery on the Lower East Side to whip up some vegan goodies for the next morning. (He starts at nine p.m. and finishes around two a.m.) It’s not what he went to school to learn at Flagler College in St. Augustine, Florida. (“I studied business. I don’t know why. Everyone else was doing it?”) But after he moved to New York and enrolled in a culinary school, he discovered a love of baking. “Cooking is not measured,” he says. “It doesn’t have to be specific, and I like the idea of winging it.” When pushed, Mosshart admits that perhaps his business education does help when he’s putting together his recipes. But it’s not the mathematics that keep him in the kitchen. His new favorite thing to bake is pizza with wheat dough. “You have to knead it and then let it rise, then beat it down and let it rise, and then beat it down again. It’s a full-body workout.” And a lot like living in New York. SHIrt ANd JACkEt Comme des Garçons


peter bici, FireFighter Peter Bici beat the odds. First, the die-hard New Yorker became a pro skater, a pipe dream for most teenagers, and traveled all over America, Canada, Europe, and Australia. And then,

before he turned 20, a scout approached him on Lafayette Street and asked if he’d consider doing a Calvin Klein ad—not an ordinary occurrence for most city kids. “I took a Polaroid, and the next thing I knew I was doing a global campaign with Kate Moss,” he says. What followed was a career of fashion milestones: he remembers skateboarding backstage at Marc Jacobs’s first Louis Vuitton menswear show and hanging out with Donatella Versace backstage at Gianni Versace’s last show before his 1997 murder. But then came a time, Bici says, when he started thinking about a future beyond fashion. “I can’t board all my life, I can’t be a model all my life. So in 1998, I took the New York Fire Department test and spent the next six years qualifying.” He’s currently a member of Ladder 18 on New York’s Lower East Side. “We do a lot of things besides going to fires,” he laughs. “We’ll all eat together, clean up the house together. It’s like a family—which, in a way, is a lot like my experience in fashion.” SHIrt Marc Jacobs BoW tIE Louis Vuitton

Nico lopez, coNstructioN worker, with daughter eagle marie What’s in a name? Eagle Marie Lopez, the first and, for now, only daughter of Nico Lopez, a construction worker who lives in

Brooklyn, was supposedly named on a whim. (“It just popped into my head one day when I was in the bathtub,” explains Eagle’s mother, raquel.) But perhaps there is something more significant in the appellation. Nico, a reluctant part-time model, grew up in Uruguay before he moved to New York, where he plays the drums for fun. “I prefer to work with my hands,” he says. Starting a family so young, however—Nico was 23, raquel a year older—has compelled the couple to sort of soar over some of the more trivial matters that preoccupy most twentysomethings in this town. Says raquel, “We’re much more grounded, and there’s this big ole piece of love in our lives now, and everything we do has taken on a whole new meaning.” Nico adds, “Basically, we fastforwarded through a lot of meaningless crap.” SHIrt AND JACKEt PraDa

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rya n p i l st l , v i s ua l - D i s p l ay a rt i st Window shopping isn’t a recreational activity for artist ryan Pilstl. While the rest of us

are looking at all the wares for sale, Pilstl is curious about the display itself: How was it

designed? How was it built? Is it selling the products? “You look at things differently when you’re on that side of the game,” he explains. “And you realize how much more goes into it.” Pilstl, who grew up in Southern California splitting his time between skateboards and surfboards, describes his life as being spontaneous, to say the least. How did he move to New York? “I came out to see some friends over the summer when I was 19 and decided I didn’t want to leave.” How did he begin a career in commercial visual displays? He was working at Urban Outfitters and was promoted to manager, but he hated the administrative responsibilities. “I kept on trying to quit, and finally they offered me a job building the windows.” turns out he was a natural. J.Crew and Moncler are now among his clients, and he’s started his own company, Spoke Visuals. “I see the world a little differently,” says Pilstl. “the conversation of art and design, and how much work and time goes into the perception of a product—it’s impressive.” SHIrt PoRTs 1961 JACkEt RalPh lauRen

D av i D F l i n n , s c u l p t o r Much of sculptor David Flinn’s life and work is about rebellion. Because he grew up in New York City, he finds himself drawn outside of it. “I’m stuck in the context of the city, but I feel like a true woodsman,” says the artist, who often uses a mix of driftwood and raw materials with chains, concrete, and steel. New York has become merely a recreational town. “I don’t need to get inspired by the city,” he explains. “I already am the city.” Despite his academic upbringing—both of his parents were economics professors—he’s most comfortable in more blue-collar environments. “I prefer to work with my hands and fix problems with basic materials.” Flinn attended the School of Visual Arts, graduating in 2009, and was immediately asked to mount his first solo show, at Envoy Enterprises. (He’s since clocked another four one-man shows.) While he has a studio at the end of Long Island, where he works four days a week, it seems his mind still can’t escape Manhattan. “When I was growing up there, SoHo was full of hookers and crack dealers. We used to have to skate around them and interact with them. We had no fear,” he says. “So I sort of do detest what it’s become, because now I have to work a little harder to flirt with danger.” He lets out a laugh and then adds, “But I will always live here, even if it’s just to be able to come home and say I fucking hate it.” SHIrt AND SWEAtEr Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci


THE MUSIC MAN TREY S ONGZ cONTiNuES TO REwRiTE ThE R&B GamE wiTh hiS NExT alBum, Chapter 5 photogra ph y b ru c e we b e r fashio n ca r i n e ro i t fe ld

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worn throughout: necklace Rafaelo & Co. watch audemaRs Piguet bracelet and earrings songz’s own


“To conTribuTe To people who are in need, like how i needed and how my moTher needed, is someThing ThaT i’m Truly blessed To be able To do.”–Trey songz

You have to do it all these days, and Trey Songz is a ferocious overachiever: rapper, producer, singer-songwriter, and actor—and he makes it all look easy. On the eve of the drop of his new record, Chapter 5, and the launch of his Anticipation 2our, the 27-year-old phenom speaks with another beautiful mind: model Selita Ebanks in her very first outing as interviewer. SELITA EBANKS Hi, how are you? TREY SONGZ I’m great, and yourself? SE I’m blessed, can’t complain, God is good as always. TS Happy New Year! SE Yeah, Happy New Year! Last year went by so fast. You were pretty busy! TS Yeah, it was a busy year. I was doing a lot of stuff. SE It was. I did my research. This is my first interview, so I wanted it to be very accurate, or at least as close as possible. TS Okay…let’s see about this research. SE The world has heard four albums of your seductive voice, and Chapter 5 brings some new Trey “Songz.” VMAN is a men’s fashion magazine that shines light on a new kind of man. How does Chapter 5 shine a new light on you? TS As I’ve grown from a young man to a man, I think a lot of people have been able to see that progression [in the music], as far as my fans are concerned, as far as consumers are concerned, and just the general public. So I’ve gone from “Gotta Make It” to “Top of the World.” I’ve gone from “I Invented Sex” to “Sex Ain’t Better Than Love.” I think life is about growth and I think fashion, in a lot of ways, is about growth as well. I think the new album will reflect very much where I’m going as a person and what I’ve been through. Music, for me, is very much an expression of how I felt at the time when that song was made. And it’s almost been a year and a half since I put my last album out [2010’s Passion, Pain & Pleasure], so we’ll see how much I’ve grown and how much I’ve changed since that album’s dropped.

SE When are you going on tour? TS The first day is February 9 th in Cleveland. It’s the Anticipation 2our and it’s the first time I’ve ever toured for a mixtape [Anticipation 2]. I’m one of the few R&B artists who has been making mixtapes throughout the full extent of his career—[I made one] even before my first album came out. I went back to that formula, going back to the work ethic that I had initially at the start of my career, knowing that that’s what basically gave me the chance to make it to Chapter 5. SE Last year you launched Angels with Heart (AWH), the foundation that you started to unite all of “Trey’s Angels.” You have a really big following, and if anyone’s been to one of your concerts you’ll see signs and shirts and all the ladies going crazy, and they’re all a part of Trey’s Angels. What was your motivation behind it, and what exactly does the foundation do for the community and the individuals whose lives you touch? TS Angels with Heart is something that’s really dear to my heart. It’s basically for homes and communities like the one I came from, with a lot of single moms and a lot of children who’d have an amazing future ahead of them if only they had that, and only that, to focus on. I remember coming up in Virginia, and a lot of kids would get in trouble after school and get into situations they didn’t need to be in because they’d be home alone and they didn’t have places to go. I came from a situation where I got clothes from the Salvation Army and I was on welfare, so to be able to contribute to people who are in need, like how I needed and how my mother needed back then, it’s something that I’m truly blessed to be able to do. I eventually want Angels with Heart to have community centers where kids can go and study after school. We had a benefit concert in November, and dedicated a whole month to giving back. It’s something I’m very in love with. SE There has been a lot of cyber bullying and a lot of hate toward young people, through the

Internet, texting, and things of that nature. What message would you send to young people as far as bullying goes? TS Bullying is childish, and a lot of kids get stuck in situ-

ations where obviously something is wrong at home, so it’s kind of a release for them. It’s a comfort blanket and it’s affecting so many people as well as themselves. It’s important to speak not only to the people being bullied but to the bullies as well. To the people out there who are being bullied, just stay strong. There’s only one you. I tell this to people all the time, to kids, to grown men, grown women: there’s only one you, and to think that being you is not enough is to say that God didn’t do his job, because He only made one you, and that alone should show you that you’re special. SE That’s a really great message. You’re a renaissance man, from music to acting to philanthropy— is there anything else we can look forward to in the big 2012? TS I’m happy to be living another day, let alone another year. But throughout this year, just watch me closely, I plan to grow with every step I take. I challenge myself and I’m a very hard worker; I just encourage people to do the same in their lives. And to all my supporters out there, thank you for being a part of this ride, because I couldn’t be here without you. And to the VMAN audience who don’t know much about me, to the people who are just getting to know my name…stay tuned, baby.

Chapter 5 is available from Songbook/Atlantic in Spring 2012 GROOMING FuLVIA FAROLFI FOR CHANEL PHOTO ASSISTANTS MICHAEL MuRPHY, JOE DIGIOVANNA, JEFF TAuTRIM, CHRIS DOMuRAT, JOHN BEECROFT STYLIST ASSISTANTS MICHAELA DOSAMANTES, VINCENT CIARLARIELLO, JuLIAN ANTETOMASO HAIR ASSISTANTS TAkASHI YuSA AND NAOkO SuzukI GROOMING ASSISTANT IMANE FIOCCHI PRODuCTION GWEN WALBERG (LITTLE BEAR INC) PRODuCTION ASSISTANT CHRIS BuTLER LOCATION MILk STuDIOS, NEW YORk


hiding out with reeve carney just listening to s ome rare bootleg recordings of jeff buckley p hotogra ph y b ru c e we b e r fashio n ca r i n e ro i t fe ld If you can walk through Times Square without tripping over a rolling suitcase, getting impaled by an errant umbrella,

or obstructing a tourist’s cell phone photo op, you might hang a left on Forty-third Street and find yourself at the back door of the Foxwoods Theater. If you make it past security, punch in the proper code, and navigate your way through the bowels of the building, you’ll come across a door covered in autographs, perhaps from old inhabitants or recent admirers. Behind it is a dressing room the size of a small walk-in closet that belongs to Reeve Carney, more commonly known as Peter Parker‚ or Spiderman. He is the star of the most expensive musical production in the history of Broadway. Whether strumming a guitar or putting up one of dozens of Post-it notes on the wall referring to key changes and time signatures, the young star of Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark is perfectly content in this cloistered existence, where he spends his days writing songs—that is, when he isn’t reading up on his latest fixation, the doomed musician Jeff Buckley (more on that later), or preparing to save New York City from mutant forces of evil (most specifically, a bioterrorist madman who calls himself the Green Goblin). Today, Carney is offering this writer a stick of gum as I marvel at his Spiderman-branded toilet seat, only a few feet from where I sit blocking the exit on a small sofa. “It was really an accident,” Carney says with a charming laugh. He’s not speaking of one of the five notorious incidents resulting in injuries that plagued the start of the show’s previews in 2010—prompting the city’s more ravenous media outlets to declare the play a doomed cataclysm. He’s referring to being cast in the first place as a singing, dancing—and most conspicuously—flying crusader on the Great White Way. “It’s weird, man. It’s not something that I ever thought I would do.” Raised between New York and Los Angeles, Carney was brought up around show business (his great-uncle was the well-known actor Art Carney), but he’d by all means hedged his bets on becoming a lifelong musician, after studying jazz guitar at USC’s Thornton School of Music. In 2010, his band (also named Carney) released its debut LP. “In some ways I thought, Oh man, this might make me look like a joke as a musician. Spiderman is the most high profile production I’ve been involved with, so many people might think acting is primarily what I do, but I couldn’t pass it up.” Performing six nights a week to sold-out audiences also packs in its fair share of front man rehearsal for the budding rock star. “It’s an amazing experience for anyone who’s a rock-and-roll musician,” he says, “because the diligence it requires is hard to compare to anything else. I haven’t worked quite this hard since I was in high school.” He recalls the play’s preview period as “intense,” in what might be the understatement of the century. Delays, rewrites, and crew changes—including the well-publicized page 78


All clothing And jewelry throughout cArney’s own


departure of director Julie Taymor—delayed the play’s official premiere so much so that reviewers weighed in with polarizing reviews before the play officially opened. “We were in previews for ten months and it was like a twelvehour day job every single day.” Though he repeatedly voices his gratitude for the experience and for the acceptance the Broadway community has shown him, the reluctant actor maintains that it is his band that he hopes will keep him occupied for the rest of his life. It was his music, after all, that landed him the gig in the first place. “I was playing a concert at the Mercury Lounge,” he says. “Julie Taymor was invited by a friend of mine and ended up being intrigued by what we do as a band. She said, ‘I think you should audition for my film, The Tempest.’” Carney landed the part of Ferdinand. Following this, he auditioned for three months for the role of Peter Parker before he was cast. Speaking with Reeve Carney, his fortuitous thrust into the limelight doesn’t come across as a colossal shock. With chiseled features, disarming friendliness, and an earnest attitude toward work, he wouldn’t seem out of place in a Tiger Beat centerfold, or brooding in a Twilight film. On the day we sat down, the media continued a running commentary on Mr. Carney’s relationship with Twilight saga actress Ashley Greene—a topic he politely prefers to keep out of the conversation. Romantic and gymnastic opportunities aside, Carney has also found himself playing to a massive stadium of people, opening for U2 on the final stop of their infamous 360 tour, after Bono and the Edge—who composed Spiderman’s musical numbers—extended the invite to him and his band. Even the supposed jinx that ushered Spiderman into the press seems to have worn off, with the play reportedly bringing in a million dollars per week at the start of 2012. Faced with the opportunity to move on as a free agent, Carney chose to extend his contract through May. “I was having a good time,” he says. “I hope that the show runs for as long as possible, so the people who invested can make all of their money back…and then some.” Next, the emerging star will tackle another big on-screen role, that of the late singer Jeff Buckley. “I don’t want to mimic what he did, but I want to capture his essence. The role is a step forward but also represents something of a blissful stasis for a now-established performer and musician. “I get to sing, act, and play guitar all at once,” he marvels. “If I could play music 365 days a year—write songs, perform them live, and record them, I would be so happy.” Meanwhile, at around seven fifteen p.m. on any given week night, if you emerge from the back of the Foxwoods Theater you’ll see hordes of excited ticket holders lining up around the block. Patrik Sandberg

HAIR DIDIER MALIGE FOR FRÉDÉRIC FEkkAI GROOMING FULvIA FAROLFI FOR CHANEL PHOTO ASSISTANTS MICHAEL MURPHy, JOE DIGIOvANNA, JEFF TAUTRIM, CHRIS DOMURAT, JOHN BEECROFT STyLIST ASSISTANTS MICHAELA DOSAMANTES, vINCENT CIARLARIELLO, JULIAN ANTETOMASO HAIR ASSISTANTS TAkASHI yUSA AND NAOkO SUzUkI GROOMING ASSISTANT IMANE FIOCCHI PRODUCTION AND CASTING GWEN WALBERG (LITTLE BEAR INC) PRODUCTION ASSISTANT CHRIS BUTLER LOCATION MILk STUDIOS, NEW yORk


the artists are present rocking runway looks in laid back style, these 6 rising artists are just starting to make a name for themselves, as is the young man who shot them, michael avedon, 21-year- old grands on of iconic photographer richard avedon P h oto g ra P h y M iChael aVeDon Fashion toM Van DorP e

Mil es McMil l an, Pain ter “My work is figurative, focusing on the human form and desert plants in their isolated worlds. I have painted women for the longest time, but last spring I turned my practice on myself, painting myself naked. It was a huge turning point in the way I look at my work and myself as an artist.”

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Pau l G o n d ry, multidis ciP l inary exP erimen tal ist “I think that working with only one medium can be restraining in many ways. I like to experiment with all mediums, such as film, painting, comic books, drawing, and music. I am inspired by the diversity that art has to offer. I am inspired by the intensity present in the decadence of our civilization. I like to draw chaotic landscapes and distorted faces and figures—but I think the subjects for my art are always evolving, as I see art as a process of transformation.”

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Brian KoKosKa, Pain ter “Romance, fetish, ritual, and gender. I have a thing for masks and costumes. My work is kind of like a gloomy mess of youth, flowers, text, hairstyles, and accessories. It’s also very much about whimsy and an awareness of the expansive history of painting. I want to start painting girls; most of the figures in my paintings are very boyish, ghoulish, and/or androgynous. I was always afraid of offending women, so it didn’t feel right to include them in my work. But now it feels right. I’m going to embrace my feminine side.”

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B ru n o Levy, pain ter/p hotog rap her/video artist “I think the Internet has shifted the way we live our lives and process information, clicking and scrolling, entertaining ourselves when we’re bored. Everything moves faster. There is a constant need to create faster, produce more. Most artists have to operate like a fast-food chain—blogging their moves, advertising their hip, cool lives—all in an effort to market works of furniture displayed in galleries.”

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“To describe the state of the art world and the state of artists today is tough. The question implies a kind of unity that I don’t think really exists. Generally, I am positive about art and I like looking at things. I can, though, imagine something healthier—or, better. [But] the work that influenced me the most when I was growing up was, I guess, minimalism—Walter De Maria, Carl Andre—but also Bruce Nauman and the idea that if you are an artist and in your studio then whatever you are doing is art.”

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R Émi L aman dÉ, p hotog Rap heR “I photograph people in staged situations in which I like to show an exaggerated lack of emotions, over-feminization, and play with the codes of fashion imagery.”

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f rom par i s with love

“I wanted to capture the look of dazed confusion, to capture that state of utter shock that Oscar winners enter, where they go to bed thrilled, then overnight, it dawns on them that they’ve changed, that they’ve just become a star.” – Terry O’Neill*

PHOTO COURTESY GETTY IMAGES/TERRY O’NEILL *AS qUOTED IN The Observer, MARCH 13, 2010

When I sat down to work on this issue, I asked myself, Who would make up a perfect dinner party? The new face of French cinema, Tahar Rahim, was my first choice for a cover star, and we scoured L.A. to find the fresh faces of Hollywood for a special portfolio that pays homage to Terry O’Neill’s brilliant image of Faye Dunaway [above]. My friend Riccardo Tisci suggested a bullfighter, the elegant José María Manzanares, and I had to look no further than my own family photos to find a young man who I’ve seen grow up, JT Besins, to portray a mystery man. The whole process of guest editing this issue was a joy, in large part due to the people with whom I worked. I call them my Dream Team: long-term friends and collaborators like Bruce Weber and Peter Lindbergh, whom I’ve known and loved for years; and Jean-Baptiste Mondino, whom I’ve always admired but haven’t worked with in two decades. Putting this issue together was a homecoming in many ways, and also a discovery. It was my big dream to do something with Nick Knight because we have never had the opportunity before now, and we finally did here. I loved it. Michael Avedon is a new talent, and this is one of his first shoots for a magazine. I

p a g e

was happy to find him: he is the grandson of Richard Avedon, who we all know, but he has an interesting eye that is all his own. Fashion can be a difficult thing for men to follow. It’s not as literal. My goal was to make fashion look smart and, just as important, to look cool. Sometimes men’s fashion can look too crazy to be believable, but I think a man should be elegant and effortless. Working with these men has been a rejuvenation for me. In fact, I’ve had to buy a new address book because this issue has introduced me to so many new friends. Finally, when I looked around at these amazing dining companions, I realized I was the only woman. Normally this is not a problem, but, I thought, every table needs a batch of beautiful flowers. That’s why we finished the issue with some of the most beautiful women in fashion. I could not be happier with who came to dinner. Sit down with us, and enjoy the meal. carine roitfeld

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TA H A R RAH I M : A MAn foR All s e A s o n s

France’s most powerFul young actor is unabashedly proud oF his roots, but with one eye on america, it won’t be long until he calls hollywood his home

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“As Actors And filmmAkers we hAve to tAke it on ourselves to tell stories About everyone...we hAve to be Able to invent different heroes for the culture.” –tAhAr rAhim

“I am French, I know that; I’ve never had a problem bears, one would at least hope, little resemblance to here, I’m French with Algerian roots, and I’m here to do because that’s simply who I am. But at the same time Rahim’s, they come to similar senses of refuge. For my job and act. I’m not interested in talking about what I’ve never been interested in hiding my family’s Algerian Rahim, the work of the actor is to accept and under- it means to be a minority working as an actor, I’m just origins. I’ve always known that would be a mistake.” The stand that there is no such thing as a “typical” person interested in the work of the performance.” 30-year-old Tahar Rahim is best known to international and no such thing as an “authentic” Frenchman: what Which isn’t to say that he shies away from roles with audiences for his role as Malik El Djebena, a newbie an actor does is invest a compelling individual with the explicit political significance. Both of his two big roles inmate turned gangland don, in Jacques Audiard’s A right to tell his own story. “Being an actor should mean since A Prophet have had broad social relevance. This Prophet, which took home the prestigious Grand Prix that I can play anything. Well, maybe not some blond past year has seen the release of Ismaël Ferroukhi’s at Cannes. It’s one of the most virtuosic performances Norwegian,” he says with a soft, self-deprecating laugh. Les Hommes Libres (Free Men), in which Rahim plays in the history of the criminal-education genre; his slow “But as actors and filmmakers we have to take it on our- one of the little-known French Muslim soldiers who hardening from shivery naïf to tempered, winning villain selves to tell stories about everyone, French people fought against the Nazi occupation, cooperating with is as heartrending as it is terrifying, and it’s no surprise of French descent, French people of Arabic descent, the Resistance and secretly harboring Jews. “It was that it gained him all manner of international acclaim. French people of African descent. We have to be able really important to take part in a film that talked about But if he’s going to become one of his generation’s great to invent different heroes for the culture.” those people, that told their stories—stories that most international film stars, he’s going to do it on his own When it comes to these questions, Rahim is thought- people in France didn’t know.” Rahim also made Love terms. In a strange way, there are parallels between his ful and articulate, but he’s also clear that, in an ideal and Bruises with the Chinese director Lou Ye, who’s had rise as an actor and El Djebena’s ascent to thug and world, he wouldn’t have to talk about this as often as he to struggle with government censors to get his movies racketeer: both of them bridle at the presumption of does. He seems like a pretty unruffled guy but I can tell made. Love and Bruises is making the festival rounds group solidarity based on the accidents of birth. he’s grown bored of having to chat about his hyphen- now, having recently shown in Toronto and elsewhere. Rahim was born in Belfort, France, near the German ated existence. “When I am in France I am always being It surely can’t be long before Hollywood sends for border, and studied sports and computer science in asked about my origin. In America this is not a question him, and Rahim is looking forward to it. “There are so Strasbourg and Marseille before heading to Montpellier people ask.” This is one of the reasons Rahim looks for- many great American directors and screenwriters, so for a film program. He finally landed in Paris in 2005, ward to working with American directors. “When Denzel many more working in the States than we have in Europe.” where he enrolled in a prestigious drama school. It was Washington gives an interview, nobody ever asks him He names the obvious ones, saying he’s long admired there that Rahim began to work out his ideas about where his family came from originally, they just accept the films of Steven Soderbergh and Martin Scorcese what it meant to be a minority working in French cinema. that he is an American actor. In America you have crossed and admits, with another self-deprecating giggle, that “In drama school, everyone thought the problem was this bridge, but we are still working on it.” “Spielberg is still Spielberg,” but says that his favorite that those of us of foreign descent had to show France, Rahim agrees that things in the world of French cin- contemporary directors aren’t as well known. He greatly and the world, that we could play a French person with ema are much better than they were, referring to the admires James Gray’s films Two Lovers and We Own a French name. But that’s not the problem anymore, commercial French films of the ’90s, where minorities the Night, and would love to work with Courtney Hunt, or at least not my problem.” For Rahim, the struggle were mostly relegated to stereotypical minority roles. whose Frozen River got a lot of attention a few years ago. shouldn’t be about overcoming one’s background—pre- But, especially in the wake of successful North African He’s also looking forward to doing more acting in tending that your family has lived in France for hundreds cultural figures such as Jamel Debbouze, the French- English. In A Prophet, Rahim acts in Arabic, French, and of years—because that only reinforces the attitude that Moroccan actor and comedian who’s become one of the Corsican. He says one of the great challenges and pleathe only true national identities are long-inherited ones. most popular entertainers in France, the terms of the sures of being in that film—and in Kevin Macdonald’s This is exactly the problem El Djebena confronts upon his conversation have changed. Rahim no longer feels as The Eagle, where he got the chance to deliver his lines arrival in prison: raised in an orphanage without religion, though he needs to engage with these questions in an in Gaelic—was the opportunity it gave him to inhabit his El Djebena feels no natural sense of solidarity with the explicit way. Instead, he just gets on with his work. He’s character in a different way. “When it’s a different lanMuslim inmates, though he can speak their language. already become known for his Method ethic, and spoke guage you’re not used to speaking every day, you have He ends up forced into the protective employ of the at length to a German magazine about the experience to be careful, to step out of your own shoes. It’s a difCorsican mafia, but despite his imagination and com- of spending nights in the solitary-confinement cell as he ferent kind of music, a different accent, and a different petence he knows he’ll never be taken as one of them; prepared for his role as El Djebena. For him, the mean- set of stresses. You have to be a scholar of the role in a to them, he’s just a dirty Arab. Uncomfortable with the ing of being an actor lies in a strenuous commitment new way, understand the character in ways you’re not presumption of loyalty based on ethnicity but denied the to plasticity, the opposite of a fixed and claustropho- used to.” Again, it’s the joy of the work itself that provides fact of loyalty based on service and effort, El Djebena bic ethnic identity. “I’m an actor, I’m here to do my job, such satisfaction for Rahim, and the joy of his work that develops an allegiance only to himself. not to plant a flag or start a fight, and that’s a political will, if we’re lucky, provide such satisfaction to an everThough El Djebena’s ascent to ruthless self-assurance thing to do, a political way to be—to just insist that I’m growing international audience. Gideon Lewis-Kraus


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L O U I S GA R R E L HISTORY IN

THE MAKING

belmondo. delon. CoCteau. artaud... there’s a long lineage of iConiC frenCh faCes. it’s not Celebrity that imbued their looks with appeal, but rather something before fame, s omething mystiCal, inexpliCable, and

it’s a spirit reborn in the aCtor louis garrel

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“LOUIS GARREL’S fORm hAS A dEpth And A SInGULARIty nO yOUnG fREnch ActOR hAS.” –kARL LAGERfELd

f there is somebody with a French Face (a

French face you can hardly find today on the streets of Paris) it’s Louis Garrel. His face and expression are totally unrelated to the faces of leading men of the late ’50s and ’60s. Nothing to do with the beauty and the sexiness of an Alain Delon or a Jean-Paul Belmondo. His face has something much more mysterious, rooted deeply in the old French movie and stage traditions. He is the son of the avant-garde director Philippe Garrel, but he could be the direct reincarnation of some famous French movie stars of the early silent days and of the ’30s. His face, his expression, and the way he plays with it could be compared to the faces of actors like Albert Dieudonné, in Abel Gance’s famous Napoléon. But he also could be Jaque Catelain, the first jeune premier, as the French say, from the early days of the French silent movies, around the 1920s. In movies made by Marcel L’Herbier or Louis Delluc, they had the French faces that decade—Jean Cocteau and Antonin Artaud who plays the monk in Dreyer’s famous silent movie Joan of Arc. With some makeup and his opulent, curly black hair, he even could transform himself (for the fun of it) into Kiki de Montparnasse. All those people were French beyond French—in the best sense of the word. Today it would be nearly an insult to try to re-create that spirit and form of expression, but Louis Garrel’s form has a depth and a singularity no young French actor has (and there are many gifted young actors in France).

Hating and refusing to give interviews may be a way to preserve Garrel’s mystery. He likes to be photographed and it is a real pleasure to take his picture. Every image you get is a part he plays. Garrel was born to be an actor, but also perhaps a director. His first part was in 1988 in one of his father’s movies, Les ministères de l’art. From then to now he’s acted in some twenty movies— he has also directed three short films. For Petit Tailleur, I designed a special dress that was an important part of the plot. But it was not a fashion movie. Four times, he’s played on the stage—but I think the silver screen (as it used to be called) is his future—and on both sides of the camera. But what makes his fame so French? French on a higher intellectual level. He makes things visible only by analogy and suggestion that includes a certain moral emotion. His integrity and his sincerity cannot ever be disarmed. That is also one important reason why he wants to talk so little about himself—to keep that part of him totally secret and out of the public eye. One can talk about him—but he has no desire to say anything about himself. He is capable of explaining complex emotion containing elements of pain and pleasure. “There is no noble sorrow except in a noble mind,” said the philosopher George Santayana. But don’t think he is dead serious and boring in real life. He can be fun and lighthearted, but his real nature is somewhere else. Karl lagerfeld


Top row, from left: Albert Dieudonné and Kiki de Montparnasse Middle row: Albert Dieudonné, Antonin Artaud, Pierre Blanchar, Bottom row: Jaque Catelain, Jean Cocteau, Albert Préjean


“There is no noble sorrow excepT in a noble mind.” –GeorGe sanTayana

grooming Peter PhiliPs for Chanel hair orlando Pita for orlo salon maniCure anny errandonea (marie-franCe thavonekham) Photo assistants olivier saillant, Bernward solliCh, Xavier arias, frederiC david stylist assistant audrey taillée retouChing ludoviC d’hardivilié


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Nick krause Age: 19 Birthday: April 14, 1992 Hometown: Austin, Texas Known for: The Descendants What are some of the staple films of your youth? I always loved the Monty Python films as a kid. It was more or less a family tradition to watch The Holy Grail over dinner. What films/actors inspired you to want to try acting? Honestly, the first thing I saw that really inspired me to act was an episode of Whose Line Is It Anyway? To see a group of guys be so funny on the fly was not only hilarious but inspiring as well. Besides acting, what do you do to express yourself? I play guitar! I’ve played for seven years now and it’s always been one of my favorite forms of expression.

What’s your acting weakness? What’s your most reliable strength? Some of my weakness lies in my age—for someone whose job it is to understand and reflect the world around them, I feel a bit underprepared sometimes. What I lack in knowledge and experience, though, I make up for in trying to be easy to work with and ready to learn. Who represents masculinity to you? Who’s your male icon? Who’s your personal hero? Albert Einstein. All three. He lacked physical strength but excelled with the power and the discipline of his mind. He saw the world as new every day of his life and spent his entire time on this earth trying to improve it. That’s masculinity. That’s an icon. That’s my hero. TUXEDO, SHIRT, CUMMERBUND, SHOES DiOr HOMMe SOCKS FaLke


Ian HardIng Age: 25 Birthday: September 9, 1986 Hometown: Herndon, Virginia Known for: Pretty Little Liars What inspires you besides acting? Stories. I read a lot. Good music, in all forms. Nature—I could walk through the woods for hours. And food; love me some food! What’s your weakness in this industry? What’s your most disconcerting weakness? I can’t say. Not because I don’t want to, but because my weaknesses and strengths are so fluid. One day I’ll be able to cry and break down in an audition, then the next I’ll literally be stumbling over a single line. There are so many factors that go into it that I have no control over, so I try to go balls to the wall every time and hope the best comes out. How do you see the state of male actors compared to female actors today? Female actors definitely have it worse. I know for a fact that there are fewer meaty female roles than there are male parts. The pressure to be thin is very real and extremely vicious. But I do think it’s getting better, especially as more and more women rise to places of authority behind the camera. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? Many things: waiting; limited artistic control; lack of job security; or perhaps the glut of douche bags inhabiting Los Angeles. At the same time, it’s the best job in the world, and if someone told me I couldn’t do it anymore, I would probably put a gun in my mouth. TUXEDO, SHIRT, BOW TIE BUrBErrY PrOrSUM BRACELET SHaMBaLLa SHOES BOTTEga VEnETa VINTAGE TELEpHONE OKTHESTORE.COM


Colton Haynes Age: 23 Birthday: July 13, 1988 Hometown: Andale, Kansas Known for: Teen Wolf Besides acting, how do you express yourself? I am very expressive in the way I dress. All of my friends and coworkers make fun of me because they know that, if given the option, I would sleep in a suit. What’s your training regimen? I have been on an extremely intense training regimen recently. My trainer, David Buer, has been killing me about five days a week. The hardest part for me is not being able to eat carbs or junk food. I always break and get Wendy’s, but I have to pay for it later because he always finds out. When/how did you convince your friends, family, and yourself that you could make it as an actor?

The only person I had to convince was myself. It was scary to pick up and drive to

California after I graduated [from high school] without having anything waiting for me in

L.A. My family wanted me to move to NYC to pursue theater, but I felt the need to switch things up and just give L.A. a try. I still don’t think my family quite understands what I do! How do you feel about your competition? I have a lot of respect for my fellow young actors. It takes a lot to push forward after being told no a million times, and that is what we all have to go through. So those who push through deserve respect. There are so many talented young actors in the industry and I’m just happy to have a job! Who’s your personal hero? My brother, Clinton. TUXEDO, SHIRT, BOW TIE lanVIn CUFF LINKS DaVID yURMan


Chord overstreet Age: 22 Birthday: December 2, 1989 Hometown: Nashville, Tennessee Known for: Glee What has been the most terrifying moment of your life? I thought I was going to play professional baseball, but I had a major injury and had to have surgery. So I had to realize that I wasn’t able to play at a professional level anymore. What’s the most challenging aspect of your job? Juggling the hours and everything else that comes with it. Probably the toughest part is not having much privacy. If you could remake any role from the past, what would it be? Marty McFly from Back to the Future. What scares you most about this industry? One day you’re working a lot, the next day you can be doing nothing. TUXEDO, SHIRT, BOW TIE, CUMMERBUND doLCe & GABBANA CUFF LINKS dAvId YUrMAN SOCKS FALKe SHOES GIorGIo ArMANI


Peter Vack Age: 24 Birthday: September 19, 1987 Hometown: New York City Upcoming project: I Just Want My Pants Back on MTV

What films or actors inspired you to want to try acting? When I was a young teenager—a tween?—my parents rented Gandhi, and I remember not being able to fall asleep that night I was so preoccupied with Ben Kingsley’s performance. That was, and still is, one of the finest examples of what an actor can accomplish. What has been the most terrifying moment of your life? I’ve had some briefly scary moments, but what frightens me the most is the thought that my most terrifying moment is still in the future. What’s your ideal role? I’d like to play a rock star. I’d also like to play a comic book villain. And I’d like to play someone who carries a gun, or perhaps guns, plural. Maybe I’ll find a role where I

get to do all three. How do you feel about your competition? There are a lot of great young actors out there and I guess I hope that everyone else is having an off-day when we all go in for that gun-slinging villainous rock star role I want. Who represents masculinity to you? My father. He has sung on Broadway, opened restaurants, started businesses, made feature films, and yet his priority has always been spending time with his family. He has accomplished so much—and yet everything he does, he does without a shred of ego. He has coached me on nearly every audition I have ever had and has been an unwavering source of support, encouraging me—even in my darkest moments—to forge ahead. And to top it all off, he’s got really great hair. TUXEDO AND SHIRT Marc JacOBS BOW TIE tOM FOrD CUff lINKS DaViD yurMan

SOCKS FaLke SHOES canaLi


AlexAnder ludwig Age: 19 Birthday: May 7, 1992 Hometown: Vancouver, Canada Upcoming project: The Hunger Games Besides acting, what do you do to express yourself? I write music and surf, and I am an extreme skier. How long have you been skiing? I’ve been skiing since I was 17 months old, and I am a huge adrenaline junkie. I recently came back from Bali, Indonesia, where I was surfing like a madman. I love that feeling of living on the edge and just being free. When I am jumping a 40-foot cliff on skis, or getting barreled in a glassy wave—in that moment nothing else matters, it’s pretty magical.

What’s your training regimen? For The Hunger Games, I needed to get jacked, so I ate like a caveman and lifted heavy weights almost every day. To gain muscle, dieting is just as important as the actual working out, if not more so. I also wanted to keep an eight-pack so I had to bike a lot and do a ridiculous amount of sit-ups. What’s your acting weakness? What’s your most reliable strength? I’m growing every day as an actor and my weaknesses lie in my inexperience. I’m confident in intense roles and dramatic choices. I love action, drama, and love stories. Those are definitely where my strengths lie. TUXEDO, SHIRT, BOW TIE, SHOES CAlVin Klein COlleCTiOn


“I have a lot of respect for my fellow young actors. It takes a lot to push forward after beIng told no a mIllIon tImes, and that Is what we all have to go through. so those who push through deserve respect.” –colton haynes

Josh henderson Age: 30 Birthday: October 25, 1981 Hometown: Dallas, Texas, and Tulsa, Oklahoma Upcoming project: the Dallas remake How do you stay in shape? I’ve always had an active lifestyle. I grew up playing sports, and my main goal [used to be] to play professional baseball. But I try to hit the gym five days a week. Usually I don’t have time for that much, but I try! I mostly do weights and machines at the gym, and prefer cardio outdoors, like canyon running and hiking. What has been the most terrifying moment of your life? Falling down the side of a cliff from 200 feet up while rock climbing. When did you decide you could make it as an actor? Right out of high school I took a huge risk and gave up an opportunity to play baseball in college for a career in entertainment, with really no training or relationships in the business. And somehow, by the grace of God, I booked my first audition. And

then it quickly became clear that I made the right decision. What do you find to be the most challenging aspect of acting? Keeping your confidence and patience when times get slow. And lack of sleep! I can’t get to bed early enough to save my life; daily early call times can run you down and bring your relationship with espresso to a new level—tough when you’re not a huge coffee fan! Who’s your personal hero? The most amazing man I ever had the pleasure of meeting and growing up around, my grandfather, Dr. Warren Hultgren, who died a little over a year ago. He left such huge footprints on this earth, and lived a life of service, exemplary for people all over the world. A minister for forty years, husband for seventy years, and if I can live a tenth of the life he did, my life would be a success. TUXEDO, SHIRT, BOW TIE, ROBE, SHOES ToM Ford CUFF LINKS dAVId YUrMAn SOCKS FALKe GLASSES PersoL


Chris Zylka Age: 26 Birthday: May 9, 1985 Hometown: Warren, Ohio Upcoming project: The Amazing Spiderman What are some of the staple films of your youth? Honey I Shrunk the Kids and Dancer in the Dark (for completely dif-

ferent reasons). What inspires you besides film and acting? Teachers, as they’re responsible for shaping the future. How do you define success as an actor? How do you define it for yourself? You’re successful when you earn the respect of your peers. I define my success by the work I put into creating a role. What’s your ideal role? My ideal role is the next one. What scares you most about this industry? The unknown. JACKET salVaTOrE FErraGaMO SHIRT, pAnTS, BOW TIE, SHOES GiOrGiO arMaNi SOCKS FalkE BRACELET shaMBalla

HAIR DAvID vOn CAnnOn (STREETERS) GROOMInG CHERI KEATInG fOR THE LAB SERIES (THE WALL GROUp) MAnICURE nETTIE DAvIS (THE WALL GROUp) SET DESIGn JOSEpHInE SHOKRIAn STUDIO TAILOR M’LYnn HASS (LARD nORD STUDIO) pHOTO ASSISTAnTS JUSTIn SCHAEfER, COREY WHITTED, MARIO SAnCHEz DIGITAL CApTURE DARYL HEnDERSOn LIGHT DESIGn CHRIS BISAGnI fOR CHRISTOpHER BISAGnI STUDIO STYLIST ASSISTAnTS MICHAELA DOSAMAnTES, RITA zEBDI, MELIDA RODRIGUEz HAIR ASSISTAnT SOnG JOO GROOMInG ASSISTAnT SYDnEY zIBRAK SET DESIGn ASSISTAnTS IvAnA ARELLAnES, DEREK GOnzALEz, EMILY HASTInGS pRODUCTIOn HELEnA MARTEL pRODUCTIOn ASSISTAnTS ALExAnDRA nATAf, GOnzALO ROMERO, BERnARD KUH, JR., TEDDY GRASSET pOSTpRODUCTIOn pICTUREHOUSE CATERInG fOOD LAB L.A. EqUIpMEnT REnTAL SMASHBOx STUDIOS (LOS AnGELES) SpECIAL THAnKS JILL COLLInS, DEAn TAILTOn, DAvID RADIn, JOHn CASSIDY, STARDUST vISIOnS


Fractured Youths

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BruCe WeBer BROCK WEARS ShiRt John VarVatos

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JUAN JoSE HErEDIA, CoLLAGE ArtISt

IAN MELLENCAMP, MUSICIAN/ACtor

Juan wears shirt Tommy Hilfiger Jeans DocTrine Belt VintaGe ian wears Jacket and Belt VintaGe shirt comme Des garçons scarf uncle sam’s Jeans 7 for all mankinD


GRANT MELLON, ACTOR

Grant wears Jacket John VarVatos


BROCK HARRIS, OUTDOORSMAN

Brock wears Jacket VINtaGe shIrt John VarVatos JeaNs 7 For all Mankind GloVes kFi nYC arMY & naVY Goods


GreG wears Jacket KFI NYC ArmY & NAvY Goods sweater rAlph lAureN BlACK lABel Jeans JohN vArvAtos Belt VIntaGe

GREG REmmEy, s cREEnwRitER


Grant wears Jacket KFI NYC ArmY & NAvY Goods Jeans ArmANI ExChANGE Underwear WEbErbIlt


Ian wears Jacket and belt VIntaGe shIrt John VarVatos Jeans 7 For all Mankind scarf Uncle saM’s boots Frye Juan wears shIrt Woolrich Woolen Mills Jeans calVin klein Jeans belt VIntaGe boots John VarVatos necklace Juan’s own


BEN ELLIOTT, ACTOR/ JAZZmAN

Ben wearS Jacket vintage JeanS G-Star alex wearS Jacket KFI NYC armY & NavY GoodS Sweater t bY alexaNder WaNG JeanS HudSoN

ALEX ELLIOTT, BmX BIKER

Hair DiDier Malige for frÉDÉric fekkai grooMing fulvia farolfi for cHanel talent ian MellencaMp, grant Mellon (click), alex elliott (Soul), Ben elliott (nouS), ruiSDael cintron, greg reMMey (requeSt), Brock HarriS (Mint), ruSSell BranDi (forD Men ny), Juan JoSe HereDia (reD) pHoto aSSiStantS MicHael MurpHy, JoSe Digiovanna, Jeff tautriM, cHriS DoMurat, JoHn Beecroft StyliSt aSSiStantS MicHaela DoSaManteS, vincent ciarlariello, Julian antetoMaSo Hair aSSiStantS takaSHi yuSa anD naoko Suzuki grooMing aSSiStant iMane fioccHi proDuction anD caSting gwen walBerg (little Bear inc) proDuction aSSiStant cHriS Butler location Milk StuDioS, new york Special tHankS Juliette cowDin (np nurSing agency) ), Jennifer alicea, tony auguSto, wHat goeS arounD coMeS arounD


RUISDAEL CINTRON, RACE CAR DRIVER/ AUTOMOTIVE ARTIST

RUSSELL BRANDI, pOLITICAL S CIENTIST/ ACADEMIC

Ruisdael weaRs shiRt Diesel Jeans James Jeans Russell weaRs t-shiRt Calvin Klein necklace Russell’s own


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JOSÉ MARÍA MANZANARES MAy bE thE wORld’S MOSt CElEbRAtEd bullfightER, ANd thAt’S bECAuSE hE tREAtS hiS COMbAtANt with MERCy ANd RESpECt. likE At

wORld -RENOwN REAl MAEStRANZA dE CAbAllERÍA dE SEvillE, thE OldESt bullRiNg iN SpAiN, whEN hE lEt

thE bull ARROJAdO gO fREE AftER A fEROCiOuS fight—A fiRSt iN thE RiNg’S 250+ yEAR hiStORy. vivA El tORO.

vivA El tORERO

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jacket, tie, kilt, shoes, earrings (worn throughout) Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci shirt black comme des GaRçons pants adidas slvR cummerbund chaRveT ring (worn throughout) manzanares’s own


jacket, shirt, tie Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci pants adidas slvR bracelet and wrist brace (worn throughout) manzanares’s own


All clothing And shoes Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci cummerbund chaRveT


All clothing Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci


jacket, shirt, tie, shoes givenchy by riccardo tisci vest and pants rick owens cummerbund charvet


“JosÉ MarÍa is the only hero still alive today. he is a dreaM Man who Masters his technique so perfectly that he represents the Most talented bullfighter of his generation.” –riccardo tisci

his is a story about blood and the bullring, fashion and beauty. When Givenchy creative director Riccardo Tisci settled his gaze on José María Manzanares, it was a sort of love at first sight, not only because of Manzanares’s beauty, but also because of something stronger, something related to living on the brink of death. “Everybody will look at a bullfighter, even if he doesn’t speak,” declares Manzanares, who is pioneering a bullfighting revolution. “We give off a special energy.” The fashion industry needs a constant influx of characters and excitement, which is why if there was love in Tisci’s eyes when he saw Manzanares—a man who has a brand of strength no model can emulate—it was perhaps a love for fashion itself. Oscar Wilde once wrote that “each man kills the thing he loves.” But this story has more to do with love than death. Alex CArrAsCo

VMAN Your grandfather, your father, and your brother are all bullfighters. Does the profession run through your veins? José MAríA MANzANAres I was born into a bullfighting family, but no one ever imposed anything on me. I have always loved animals. I wanted to be a vet, but when I was 19 I decided to devote my life to bulls. Was it a hard decision? JMM This job requires total dedication; my youth was totally null and void. Family and bulls: nothing else matters. But so much effort compensates you when it bears fruit. Is fear part of your profession? JMM Sure. And whoever doesn’t agree with me may be lying. But we should never fear ourselves, because bulls, as dogs, are very protective: they can smell your insecurity. It is then when you are at risk in the bullring. In fact, there have been bulls that have gored me because I didn’t feel sure in front of them. How many scars does your body bear? JMM I wouldn’t be able to count the bruises and knocks. Now I have a serious injury in my left-hand tendons. I have been operated on eleven times and I go to rehabilitation three hours every day. It has been really tough. A goring on your leg was the closest you’ve ever come to death, wasn’t it? JMM Yes. [But] all my scars are a lesson that life has taught me. They show me new things about myself and about my limits. When you are young you risk too much, because you don’t know the consequences. That’s why it is so fascinating to see how bullfighters mature. Do you think about death? JMM Of course I do! People I knew lost their lives in the bullring. But I prefer to change this thought and to concentrate on creating pure emotions in the audience. Is the bull inside the bullring your enemy or your partner? JMM It is my partner, for sure. You can never treat it as your enemy; the bull is your ally when you want to create art and beauty inside the bullring. You have even said that “bullfighting is sometimes like having sex with the person you love.” Is it that strong? JMM Yes, a lot . . . I wouldn’t be able to define it. When I am bullfighting, I feel the most beautiful feelings. I especially remember Arrojado, the bull I fought in La Maestranza of Seville and which elevated my professional career. There was a moment when it looked as if there was just the bull and me in the whole universe; it was as if space

and time had just stopped. What do you feel when you bury the sword in the bull’s back? JMM I can assure you it is not pleasure. A lot of times you have conflicting feelings. Why do you think bullfighters generate so much excitement the whole world over? JMM Any profession that has to do with facing death generates admiration. In our profession, aesthetics is also a factor involved. I guess it is a combination that captivates people, even outside Spain. The bullfighting world is still very classic and traditional, no? JMM It is true. Although we were at a standstill, the bullfighting image is changing. It is up to bullfighters to make the art form evolve, but of course with respect. social networks can be a good way to spread this message. Do you use them? JMM Yes, I like Twitter. I can be close to bullfighting aficionados and explain to them my feelings. They demand a lot of effort, though, because sometimes before a bullfight, when you need to be really concentrated, you feel the need to tweet, something that didn’t exist before. Your use of new technologies has given you the nickname “The Bullfighting Apple,” hasn’t it? JMM It’s [also] a joke with my surname [which translates to “apple”], but it really makes sense because of how I feel toward bullfighting and living, which for me is the same thing. I want to make [the fight] better every time, more elegant and modern, and with the best design, because aesthetics is essential in my job. Are you interested in fashion? JMM I like it, but I’m not a staunch follower. My style is quite classical. But fashion is interested in you. riccardo Tisci has settled his gaze on you . . . JMM Riccardo has always talked to me sincerely. He has been really kind, and he has showed a lot of interest in bullfighting. That’s why I gave him a bullfighter’s costume. I hope he wears it someday! You have been shot by Bruce Weber, Peter Lindbergh, and James White, and now you have posed for VMAN. on this shoot, you worked with Mondino and Carine roitfeld. How do you feel being part of the fashion world? JMM I enjoyed it a lot with Carine and Mondino. We shared a lot of ideas: they wanted to know about my profession, and I wanted to know about theirs. There was a huge connection. I was really impressed by their ability to concentrate. It reminded me of the concentration bullfighters have when we are in the bullring. even though you are not keen on fashion, you say aesthetics is vital in your job. Do you participate in the design of your costumes? JMM Aesthetics is not just vital in bullfighting but in life. I take part in the creation of my costumes by modifying traditional proportions and choosing colors and embroideries. I have a soft spot for deep red and gold. Do you feel you are part of spanish culture and sports as a great ambassador, like Pedro Almodóvar, Penélope Cruz, or rafa Nadal? JMM No, I don’t feel like that, and it is not the aim of my job. I must be concentrated on my profession. Ambition can dazzle you and make you change your way. Is bullfighting art or sport? JMM In my opinion, it is art. I don’t compete against anyone—even though we train as elite sportspeople. If it is art, you must have a muse. Who is she? JMM Apart from the people I love, it is music. I listen to Alejandro Sanz and Camarón de la Isla. I love flamenco. What can I say? I’m very Spanish.


All imAges courtesy getty imAges/mAnuel QueimAdelos Alonso


jacket (worn on shoulder) Prada suit Givenchy by riccardo Tisci


All Clothing And shoes Givenchy by RiccaRdo Tisci

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Suit Louis Vuitton Sweater and ShoeS tom Ford SunglaSSeS and watch Cartier


Suit, Sweater, pocket Square Ralph lauRen watch and bracelet caRtieR


shirt and shOrts Bally sCarF Paul Smith BELt Salvatore Ferragamo WatCh, BraCELEt, sunGLassEs Cartier


shirt equipment HOmme


Jacket, Jeans, belt, shoes Tom Ford t-shirt CK Jeans bag ralph lauren bracelet and Watch CarTier

hair david von cannon (streeters) grooming sabrina bedrani For tom Ford (traceymattingly.com) Photo assistants Ward ivan raFik and steFan raPPo digital technician shaina Fishman griP richard higachi stylist assistant michaela dosamantes Producer ricardo martins (north six) equiPment smashbox studios, los angeles retouching Ward ivan raFik (la station) catering Foodlab sPecial thanks azzurro mallin and boxeight studios, los angeles


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S 25

S 26

M T 27 28

W 29


l i ly

M i s s T F s s M T W T F s 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

M A R C H

s M T W T F s s M T W T F s s M T W T F s 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


m i r a n da M i s s

S M T W T F S S M T 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

W T 11 12

F 13

S 14

A P R i L

S M 15 16

T W T 17 18 19

F 20

S S M T W T F S S M 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30


adriana M i s s

T W T F s s M T W T 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

M A Y

F s s M T W T F s s M T W T F s s M T W T 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


izabel M i s s

F s s M T W T F s s 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

M T 11 12

W 13

T 14

J U N E

F s 15 16

s M T 17 18 19

W 20

T F s s M T W T F s 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30


ca ndice M i s s

S M T W T F S S M T 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

J U L Y

W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


a na be at r i z M i s s

W T F S S M T W T F 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

A U G U s T

S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


alessandr a M i s s

S S M T W T F S S M 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

T W T 11 12 13

s E P T E M B E R

F 14

S S 15 16

M T W 17 18 19

T 20

F S S M T W T F S S 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30


anne

M i s s

O C T O B E R

M t W t F S S M t W t F S S M t W t F S S M t W t F S S M t W 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


chanel

M i s s T F S S M T W T F S 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

S M 11 12

T 13

N O V E M B E R

W 14

T F 15 16

S S M 17 18 19

T 20

W T F S S M T W T F 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30


Makeup peter philips for Chanel hair anthony turner (art partner) Models karolina kurkova, Joan sMalls, CandiCe swanepoel, Chanel iMan, lily donaldson, Miranda kerr (iMG), adriana liMa (Marilyn ny), anne vyalitsyna, izabel Goulart (woMen), doutzen kroes, alessandra aMbrosio (dna), ana beatriz barros (next ny)

k a rolina

M i s s S S M t W t F S S M 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

D E C E M B E R

t W t F S S M t W t F S S M t W t F S S M 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31


vman issue 25 spring 2012 vman.com

Profile for V Magazine

VMAN 25  

The Spring Fashion Issue

VMAN 25  

The Spring Fashion Issue

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