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SPECIAL THANKS Art Partner Lindsey Steinberg Julia Reis Cristian Banks Ayesha Arefn Adam Sherman Katie Fash Steve Sutton Christopher Casetti showStudio Charlotte Knight Chris Sutton IMG Steven Bermudez Elizabeth Carpenter James Clark The Society Management Cheri Bowen George Speros Elizabeth Osborn Next Models Ross Young Tammy Francis DNA Models Craig Lock Art + Commerce Annemiek Ter Linden Billy Albores Becky Lewis Ziggy Levin Amanda Fiala Collen Cullen Jessica Daly Matthew Owyang Rebecca Cuglietta Floriane Desperier Paula Ekenger Sally Dawson Total Justinian Kfoury Spencer Morgan Taylor Audrey Houssin Intrepid Anya Yiapanis Management Artists Anita Lee Lindsay Thompson Sofe Geradin Chelsea Maloney Elizabeth Bolitho CLM Deana Spavento Jasmine Kharbanda Anthony Lofti Creative and Partners Anne du Boucheron Christina Montes Rep Limited George Miscamble Lalaland Amber Bembnister Brianna Burgess Artist & Agency Gina Marie Whiterose CXA Steven Pranica Hello Artists Peggy McDonnell Joe Daley Bryan Bantry Carole Lawrence Brydges Mackinney Shawn Brydges Gianina Barrantes De Facto Inc. Rosie Creamer D + V Management Lucy Kay Exposure NY Megan Tully Frank Reps Sara Catullo Jed Root Christopher Cunningham India Gentile Kelly Penford Nicole Watson Rachel King Julian Watson Agency Kate Ryan Leigh Sikorski See Management Alexandra Ciraldo Streeters Charlotte Alexa Gabriela Moussaief Lisa Stanbridge Tim Howard Management Janine Mill Michelle Service Rayna Donatelli Trouble Management Kristin Kochanski The Wall Group Bridget Jarecki Heather Ryan Leela Veeravalli Marissa Caputo Melissa Moscovitch Elite Jeremy Marmiesse Susannah Hooker The Lions Christiana Tran Marcos Olazabal Marilyn Kristen Bolt Red NYC Dave Fothergill WME Jamie O’Hara Leah Appell Women Management Melissa Gonzalez Ryan Molloy HMS Production Helena Martel Seward Vision On David Jones Metromotion The Marlton Hotel The Mercer Fast Ashley’s Pier 59 Studios Red Hook Labs Root Studios Spring Studios 1 00 V MAGAZINe


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AND THE NOMINEES ARE 114 BEST ACTRESSES For Lily Tomlin, Laura Dern, Juliette Lewis, and Melanie Grifth, the next phase of superstardom is only beginning

136 PEACHES NOmINATED BY mICHAEL STIPE The punk priestess pioneer of electro is back. Brace your ears for the new teaches of Peaches

146 BEST IN HOLLYWOOD NOmINATED BY JAmES FRANCO Who better to pay tribute to today’s scene-stealers than Hollywood’s own renaissance man?

122 BEST ARTISTS Marc Jacobs, Eva Chow, and Phil and Shelley Aarons sign of on the most collectible talents of the moment

137 READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS Who’s the best at Instagram? What summer movie did you watch again? V readers pick their favorites in culture, entertainment, and more

148 V gIRLS The next generation of It Women, chosen by Grimes, Robyn, Tinashe, Liv Tyler, Le1f, Sharon Van Etten, and Jessie Ware

124 BEST ARCHITECTURE NOmINATED BY PETER mARINO The luxury architect extraordinaire pays homage to a few of his favorite monuments 128 BEST BUYS Do some damage in three of the world’s coolest boutiques with their ferce selections of must-have merchandise 134 V SELECTS From candy coats to car services, see what V’s family and friends are endorsing this fall 1 04 V MAgAZinE

138 BEST THEATER NOmINATED BY NEIL PATRICK HARRIS The ultimate emcee spotlights his favorite on—and of— stage productions 140 BEST PLAYLIST NOmINATED BY SAm SmITH The Grammy-winning singer selects the next round of most valuable pop players 144 THE BEST CAUSE NOmINATED BY mILEY CYRUS Our most adventurous contributing editor shares stories and snaps from her Happy Hippie Foundation

156 BEST TRENDS FOREVER Step into the new rock star duds: dressing in denim, lace, and fur for today 160 PRO CHOICE Top makeup artists select the best beauty products to perfect any look 165 BEST FASHION NEWS Fendi’s fur couture, Prada’s new uniform, Louis Vuitton’s mega muse, de la Renta’s new designer, and Nick Knight’s pop discovery


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best in show 182 GIRL MOST LIKELY BY STEVEN KLEIN Lana Del Rey may be the closest thing to an old-fashioned rock star that America has. Here, she tells James Franco why life’s a Honeymoon Styled by Mel Ottenberg 192 BEST NEW ROMANTICS BY NICK KNIGHT High-volume Victoriana stormed the Fall runways, and Molly Bair embodies the drama Styled by Amanda Harlech 208 BEST IN THE WEST BY MARIO SORRENTI Grimes relocates to L.A. to record a new LP and get lost in aesthetic inspirations Styled by Mel Ottenberg

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220 SIMPLY THE BEST BY SEBASTIAN FAENA A bevy of the industry’s most in-demand beauties curl up in lace for the sake of giving face Styled by Julia von Boehm

260 THE NEXT BEST THINGS BY ANTHONY MAULE Lady Gaga selects nine up-and-coming designers worth keeping an eye on Styled by Brandon Maxwell

238 BEST NEW GIRL BY WILLY VANDERPERRE Lineisy Montero is the girl of the moment, personifying elevated streetwise chic Styled by Katy England

268 BEST OF BOTH WORLDS BY PIERRE DEBUSSCHERE Gender lines have never been blurrier. Escape into the new reality of ready-to-wear Styled by Tom Van Dorpe

250 BEST WISHES BY SØLVE SUNDSBØ The fantasy of Fall fashion is put into sharp relief in a topsy-turvy world of divine decadence Styled by Beat Bolliger

278 BEST MAKEOVER BY RICHARD BURBRIDGE Dior Beauty’s global artistic director Peter Philips plays makeover on four fresh faces with his own new creations—you won’t be able to unglue your eyes (and lips) Styled by Charlotte Collet


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you like v! you really like v! If September is the January of fashion, that means we’re knee-deep in award season. That may be a stretch, but when it came to assembling our biggest issue of the year, an idea began to take shape. What if we created a print version of an awards ceremony, giving out “V Awards” to the best and brightest in every feld? But then again, do these people really need more awards? We decided instead to ask the best to select the best. Hence the theme of this issue was born: THE BEST OF THE BEST. When we reached out to our friends and collaborators to nominate their favorite things, the answers were as varied and amusing as one could expect—quintessential V, and we couldn’t be happier. We welcome you to celebrate the best in art, architecture, music, style, flm, and philanthropy in 2015, as chosen by Sam Smith, James Franco, Nick Knight, Marc Jacobs, Miley Cyrus, Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, Neil Patrick Harris, Peter Marino, and many more. We are also thrilled to welcome back our former columnist Lady Gaga. For her contribution, Gaga selects eight young designers

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for an incredible fashion moment, in collaboration with her stylist (and budding designer) Brandon Maxwell. We also asked our readers for their opinions on these topics and more, and the results can be found on page 137 of this issue. No awards show is complete without a Best Actress category, and for ours, we champion women who’ve managed to keep breaking the rules in Hollywood: Laura Dern, Juliette Lewis, Melanie Grifth, and Lily Tomlin. We’ve also got all the headlines of the Fall season, from Louis Vuitton’s newest ambassador and Oscar de la Renta’s new designer to Karl Lagerfeld’s frst haute fourrure collection for Fendi and Prada’s gender-bending uniformity. This issue’s fashion stories are in a category all their own: we’ve got Molly Bair’s otherworldly beauty by Nick Knight and Amanda Harlech, Grimes getting messy with Mario Sorrenti and Mel Ottenberg, catwalk sensation Lineisy Montero by Willy Vanderperre and Katy England, an enchanted forest by Sølve Sundsbø and Beat Bolliger, supermodel beauties by Sebastian Faena and Julia von Boehm,

collections by Pierre Debusschere and Tom Van Dorpe, and a surprise makeover by Richard Burbridge and Peter Philips that you will need to lay eyes on (literally) to believe! Every so often, an artist comes along who touches a generation. If it isn’t clear from the spell she’s cast over millions of listeners, Lana Del Rey is that most special kind of pop star—the dark horse with a mystique that keeps fans enthralled the world over. The top-streamed female artist in the U.S., Del Rey’s popularity is inarguable but she still has a complicated grasp on her own fame and iconography, made difcult by journalists who seem hell-bent on breaking apart the perceived façade of her work. In a frank conversation with her good friend James Franco, Del Rey lays herself bare, opening up about being misunderstood, allowing her music to speak for itself, and the role of the singer-songwriter in today’s oversaturated echo chamber of opinions. Once you hear what she has to say—and see her photographed by Steven Klein and styled by Mel Ottenberg—you’ll see what we’ve seen in her all along. She’s the absolute best. MR. V


OUTSTANDING ART, ARCHITECTURE, FILM, MUSIC, SHOPPING, THEATER, BEAUTY, AND STYLE SELECTED BY A PANEL OF V’S FAVORITE PEOPLE V MAGAZINE 113


PhOtOgRaPhy DOUg INgLIsh FashION NIcOLas KLaM

LAURA DERN

after working with an intimidating list of revered directors, hollywood’s ultimate underdog is championing the new

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In the cancelled HBO show she cowrote and cocreated with costar Mike White, Enlightened, Dern played a New Age do-gooder with such unreasonable intentions that audiences widely failed to grasp the script’s realistic insight, while the Golden Globes awarded Dern with a Best Actress win. “You may not like these people,” Dern says of characters like protagonist Amy Jellicoe, “but they’re human beings trying to fgure it out. [Amy] didn’t want to just fgure it out, she wanted to change the world, and she was going to do it, and she didn’t care whether people liked her or not, ultimately. She would have liked to be liked, but she was willing to risk things that made her seem crazy, like her job, her friendships, and her marriage, in order to do the right thing.” Dern could as likely be describing the lack of support Enlightened saw upon airing. “What I loved about the arc of the show is that the starting point was, ‘Oh my god, she’s insane,’ and hopefully, where we got with the end was, ‘Boy, too bad we don’t have more people like her, who would risk everything to expose corruption, do the right thing, tell the truth.’ As you can tell, I’m very passionate about all that.” When Dern describes Enlightened, her deliberate cadence is no diferent than that of Sandy Williams describing a dream of robins bringing light to a world of evil. What separates Dern’s wrought characters from similar on-screen naiveté stems from a deep understanding of the dark contexts in which such optimism is best represented. Flashback to 1985. In one of her frst roles, Dern stars in an adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates’s short story, “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” entitled Smooth Talk. Treat Williams plays a serial child abductor opposite Dern’s fighty mallrat. The challenges she met on set, Dern now recalls, would inform much of her later work. “Treat and I had a half-hour dialogue, which you never have in a movie,” she says. “The scene starts with a ‘no’ and it ends with a ‘yes’—the worst ‘yes’ possible, which is that she agrees to go with him on a Sunday afternoon ride. I remember when I met Steven Spielberg for the frst time, he had seen me in [Smooth Talk]. That had had a big impact on him, I think probably as a father more than anything. I remember telling him, ‘You made the scariest movie I ever saw, Jaws—it was a masterpiece.’ He was like, ‘No, you made the scariest movie.’ I just love that about him as a flmmaker, that he let that in as a place of terror.”

To be in the position to demonstrate just how complex these fctional women are, Dern suggests, is another platform on which she can advocate for justice. “It’s unfortunately a rare privilege to be in a profession where you can question what’s acceptable on a deep level about women,” she says. “For so many years we’ve tried to navigate being women, or being heard, by doing it the way men do it. I’m really interested in playing women who are allowed to be as complicated and fawed, and enraged, and broken and sexual or asexual as any other man in any flm, but the way women are.” She cites a time in her twenties when she would hear such enraging writing room comments as, “‘Ugh, she’ll just seem like it’s that time of month for her. I mean, who wants to hear a woman nagging like that?’” Dern’s own speech quickens: “Did they say that about Tony Soprano? I’m just curious. There’s no dialogue about men being angry, or men being complicated, or men setting boundaries, or men not wanting to be ripped of…or men wanting to have sex—it’s just part of their nature. And we always have to make excuses for our behavior. So I’m just interested in being part of flms where the excuses are removed.” And now? “It’s still a battle, but it’s a battle that can be won if you’re in the company of like-minded people. I’m someone who can say that my friends, who are also the people that, luckily, I work with and remain in close relationships with, are David Lynch and Alexander Payne, Paul Thomas Anderson, Jonathan Demme and, God love him, Robert Altman. These are people who have given me the opportunity to do everything I’m talking about, but they’re also the people who demanded it of me and gave me the training ground to even know I wanted it. And as we learn from relationships of all kinds, people are who they are. You know, fnd your tribe, basically. HBO is certainly one of those places. It’s people who are subversive and thoughtful, unafraid of everything, from conspiracy to controversy.” So, there’s another HBO show in the works? “There is,” Dern confrms. “I’m actually meeting them today. We’re just fguring out exactly what it is, but there defnitely will. I think we’ll come up with something exciting.” Natasha stagg

CLOTHING EMPORIO aRMaNI SHOES RaLPh LaUREN 99 HOmES IS IN THEaTErS SEpTEmbEr 25

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Consider Laura Dern’s character Sandy Williams in David Lynch’s 1986 melodrama, Blue Velvet. About three decades later, Dern is still the sunny blonde in a sea of dark makeup and dim lights, optimistic almost to the point of being troubled. In life and through the characters she chooses, Dern fghts for, as she describes it, “the voices of the voiceless.” Next year, she’ll play the neglected wife of McDonald’s franchise founder Ray Kroc (Michael Keaton) in The Founder and the drug addicted ex-wife of Wilson (Woody Harrelson) in a flm adaptation of Daniel Clowes’s beloved graphic novel Wilson. In theaters this fall is the emotional thrill ride 99 Homes, in which Andrew Garfeld and Michael Shannon tug on either side of a Florida housing scam. Dern plays Garfeld’s hairdressing mother with a heart of gold. Dern’s most well-known roles to date are a runaway romantic in Lynch’s Wild at Heart, which saw its twenty-ffth anniversary this year; a pregnant paint hufer in Alexander Payne’s Citizen Ruth, which becomes more relevant with every law passed concerning abortions; and an incredulous archaeologist in Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, the flm franchise that released its third sequel this summer. In last year’s Wild, Dern saw her second Oscar nomination for her portrayal of Cheryl Strayed’s ailing mother. The flms may have little in common, but Dern’s acute attention to their multiple conficts is one constant. “Whether it’s hilarious or broken or deeply sad, a true story or not, I mean, they all kind of have a through line,” she says. “In Citizen Ruth, even 99 Homes, or Wild, I can think of flms that are so completely diferent, but all are about someone who would never have been considered or heard from if we weren’t seeing the story.” Like her revered parents, actors Diane Ladd and Bruce Dern, she both spends plenty of time with advocacy groups and fnds parts that somehow advocate, too. “I love fnding a way to tell true stories,” Dern says over the phone from her home in California. “Authentic stories about what human beings are going through. I think it was the passion of both my parents. If growing up in Hollywood got me to those characters, I think it is by way of not only parents who love playing complicated and raw and vulnerable and lost humans, but also a mom who was very social and politically aware and responsible. I was raised around a lot of flmmakers and documentarians.”


heroes

JULIETTE LEWIS

with a hot tv series and a script in the works, the free-spirited star shows no signs of settling down

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like Strange Days and Natural Born Killers, who exist squarely on the opposing side of the law. “I love challenges and playing things opposite of myself,” Lewis says. “I’m very animated and free with my emotions, and I love the idea of playing a character who wears an emotional straightjacket. It’s gonna take me years to fgure her out. I love that she is in a profession that I have the utmost respect for, that I’m fascinated by. There are so many things about Detective Cornell that will stay in my interest for a long period of time, so that was key. I feel like I was just starting to settle into her skin, so I’m excited about next season.” Social media is another new territory for the actress, through which she keeps up with fans of the show from week to week. “People have been mentioning Natural Born Killers, which was such a big thing for me, and that Woody Harrelson was doing True Detective at the same time. We’re both being detectives! You can’t predict this stuf.” When it comes to the future, Lewis remains preternaturally open. “And for my next trick,” she says, “I’m going to attempt to manage acting and music and do things inspired and inspiring on both ends. Since my dad passed [in April of

this year], it was a bittersweet, powerful transition for me. I shed a lot of anxieties that I had. All those things I had on the back burner that I knew I should get around to at some point, that were deep loves of mine, I’m now fully investing in.” Soon Lewis will have a teen thriller, Nerve, and a liveaction version of Jem and the Holograms hitting theaters, but the project she is most excited about is another frst: an original screenplay, which she hopes to put into production next year. “I was writing a script for the last fve years, very much about a girl’s relationship to her ailing father,” she reveals. “I’ve been chipping away at it and I’m going to have my frst draft in a week. It’s funny, it’s dark, it’s psychedelic, it’s weird—everything you’d expect from me.” And for the girl who once walked through live snakes for Oliver Stone, it’s one less thing to be nervous about. “Once you go through the thing you fear the most, there’s nothing else left. There’s a fearlessness that just takes its place.” PATRIK SANDBERG

BODYSUIT LEWIS’S OWN PANTS EMPORIO ARMANI SHOES STUART WEITZMAN EARRINGS HARTFIELD BRACELETS TIFFANY & CO. JEM AND THE HOLOGRAMS IS IN THEATERS OCTOBER 23

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Not everybody can boast making out with Robert De Niro, fghting vampires with George Clooney, and walking through a feld of live snakes with Woody Harrelson—all before the age of 25—as resumé fller. But then again, Juliette Lewis has cornered the market when it comes to the business of onscreen adventurism. “I’ve walked through live rattlesnakes and lived to tell about it,” Lewis says of the famous scene in Oliver Stone’s Natural Born Killers. “I feel it’s symbolic. At night, we had to pretend we’re on mushrooms and we had to stumble about. But what you don’t know is that rattlesnakes won’t strike you when they’re cold. So that was our one little safety measure.” In a career spanning just shy of 30 years and more than 45 flms, safety isn’t usually the operative word when it comes to Lewis’s choice in characters. “People are like, ‘Here, point this gun. It’s not loaded.’ You just do these things in movies,” she says. “Like this one time me and George Clooney had to run from a building when it exploded [in From Dusk Till Dawn, 1996]. It’s explosion day, and you have the pyrotechnic guy saying, ‘Yeah, it’s really safe. I would put my two-year-old daughter right there where you guys are standing.’ But what he didn’t take into account was that the set had been sitting in 120-degree heat in the desert for a month and was more fammable than anyone ever knew. So when it exploded we felt the pushback and our hair got singed and the whole set caught on fre. They had to rebuild the Titty Twister! That’s a fun story.” Born into show business, Lewis—the daughter of the great character actor Geofrey Lewis, a Clint Eastwood favorite—beneftted from growing up around a few Hollywood greats and went on to start her career in a TV movie at the age of 14. Some of her earliest memories of acting come from a childhood spent with the cult icon and camp queen Karen Black. “Karen was like a second mother to me,” she says, “defnitely my creative fairy godmother. I used to go to her house and we would play charades. I would be fve or six, and she was the frst person to validate my creative impulse and make me realize I had the propensity to create characters through storytelling and imagination. We’d play this game called Are You Pleased?, you know, [asking] what would it take to please you? We’d make up things, usually creating a mini play or an improv scene. That’s my earliest memory of acting.” Fast-forward to Lewis earning an Oscar nomination for her frst major flm with Martin Scorsese, Cape Fear. When she arrived at the ceremony with Brad Pitt as her date and her hair in cornrows, she made red carpet history—her look is often featured alongside the likes of Cher and Celine Dion as one of the most memorable Academy Awards looks of all time. It’s something she can laugh about now. “What’s funny is that I was such a rebel, but not in a hostile way. My individuality was so nurtured by my parents that there’s a lot of innocence to it,” she says. “Picture a feral cat or a wolf child coming into show business. I had no handlers— nor would I have ever followed any. There was no coaching. I was literally like, Oh my God, I have to dress up to this big show. How should I wear my hair? I want it of my face. Then I remembered getting it braided when I was 13 and I felt strong, raw, powerful—my version of beautiful. So that’s how I wore my hair. There was no logic. That it didn’t go with a ’20s hand-beaded vintage gown? My looks from when I’m young, they’re all haphazard.” For an actress who dropped out of Hollywood at the height of her career to form a punk band, new creative territory might be hard to come by, but Lewis has found a fresh experience in the form of serial television. Her starring vehicle on ABC, Secrets and Lies, has just been picked up for a second season. “Taking that show, I had to look far in the future,” she says. “You have to think, this is potentially your gig for a long time, so I keep joking that it was a very grown-up decision for me. I can have an aversion to too much routine, but then of course in certain chapters of my life I crave it. It’s always a funny dichotomy.” Her character, Detective Cornell, is a far cry from her characters in flms


heroes

Melanie Griffith

with a new GeneRatiOn OF FOLLOweRS, the ORiGinaL wORkinG GiRL iS StiLL ShOwinG uS hOw it’S dOne

When Melanie Grifth shows up at a caviar restaurant in Hollywood she’s exactly as you’d want her to be. “I would have caviar every day if I could,” she says, lighting a cigarette behind giant sunglasses. She wears her vulnerability proudly (and literally) on her arm. The “Antonio” tattoo she had inked on her right bicep for her third marriage—to actor Antonio Banderas in 1996—is slowly fading after several trips to a laserist. Grifth is the centerpiece of a Hollywood dynasty as the daughter of Hitchcock heroine Tippi Hedren and the mother of Fifty Shades of Grey star Dakota Johnson. She may be a Golden Globe–winning and Academy Award–nominated actress, but her life away from the cameras has been no less dramatic. She met Don Johnson when she was a teenager and married and divorced him two separate times. (She and Johnson are now good friends, as with her other ex-husband Steven Bauer.) But the role she says she has relished the most is the one that is now changing from a starring role to a supporting part: motherhood. Stella Banderas, her youngest of three children, just graduated high school, leaving Grifth an ofcial empty nester. Just after wrapping Zoe Cassavetes’s Day Out of Days, the 58-year-old is ready to think about the days ahead. DEREK BLASBERG

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that when you see it happen to someone else you’re better equipped to handle the business. Does your mother still live with lions and tigers? MG Yeah, she still has 35 lions and tigers. You sit in her living room and you see three tigers outside the front window. I got my frst lion when I was 13. His name was Casey. A pet lion. Does that make play dates difcult? MG Well, I met Don when I was 14, so I sort of stopped the play dates around then anyway. You and Don have quite a story. MG He is wonderful. What would you tell a 17-year-old girl who wants to get married? MG Do not ever get married—not just young, but not ever [laughs]. You two seem to have a very mature, progressive relationship today, which is a testament to mutual respect. MG Yeah, I will love him forever. He’s great. I love Kelly, his wife, too. And their kids are amazing. We all sort of accept each other as one big family. I see everyone on Instagram and Twitter.

MG Isn’t Twitter funny? When I go on, almost everyone wants to talk about Dakota. Rarely do they want to know anything about me. Do you ever get any nasty comments on Instagram? MG Yeah, there are some haters. That’s what my friend Kris [Jenner] calls them. But people also say very nice things. Most of the time they just don’t know what they’re talking about. I just went to Hong Kong to visit my sister and she took me to this beautiful nunnery full of golden Buddhas. You weren’t supposed to take pictures, but I posted a picture of a beautiful mammoth tusk. I got all these nasty responses about ivory poaching. I was like, It’s a mammoth. It’s 10,000 years old. It’s a cultural relic from a bygone era. I didn’t just go out and kill an elephant and decorate my house, people. Besides, you’re moving. MG I’m downsizing. I wouldn’t have a place to put a woolly mammoth even if I had one.

SHIRT SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE PANTS ALEXANDER WANG BRA GRIFFITH’S OWN DAY OUT OF DAYS IS OUT NOW

Makeup Mai Quynh (Starworks) Hair Jamal Hammadi (Forward Artists) Production Gianina Jimenez Barrantes Digital technician Maxfeld Hegedus Photo assistant Brian Stevens Stylist assistant Sarah Hartzog

You said that since Stella graduated, you’re entering the phase in your life where you can—and this is a direct quote—“Do whatever the fuck I want.” MELANIE GRIFFITH Yes! And I just sold the house I lived in for 16 years, too. So what the fuck do you want to do? MG I don’t know yet. I’m still in the midst of moving, and Stella is going to school in New York, so I need to get her set up there. After that, I’m just not sure. When I sold my old house and was looking to move into a smaller place, I realized I don’t even know if I want to keep on living in L.A. I read somewhere that the most stressful things in life are a death in the family, moving houses, and— MG Getting a divorce. I’m going through two at the same time. What’s on Melanie Grifth’s to-do list? MG I’d like to do Broadway again. And some interesting flm roles. I don’t even care about starring in a movie or in a show either. Like with Zoe’s flm, I play the lead character’s mother, and that part was so rewarding and fun for me. I just want to do diferent, new characters, y’know? You uttered my favorite line in flm history in Working Girl: “I’ve got a head for business and a bod for sin.” I’m sure you’ve been told that before. MG Yeah, by everyone. Did you think when you were making that flm that you would get a Golden Globe for it? MG And, ahem, be nominated for an Academy Award, too. I sure didn’t know. I mean, they kept telling me that it was going to be good and the character felt real. But, c’mon, I knew it was going to be a good flm because it was a script by Kevin Wade, it was with Harrison Ford and Sigourney Weaver, and it was Mike Nichols directing it. He was the best. Zoe’s flm revolves around an actress who is getting older in Hollywood and the roles are disappearing. MG And what you go through when you’re too old in this town. I went through it myself. And although it wasn’t an easy lesson for me to learn, this is what I realized: It’s not about what other people think of you; it’s about what you think of yourself. This is a tough town and a tough business, but you have to be tougher. You grew up mainly in California but moved to New York. MG When I moved it was to study at Stella Adler, and I really struggled. Don’t laugh, I’m serious. I was poor. I couldn’t aford a taxi or food. I lived on 45th Street and 8th Avenue, which I know has been cleaned up now but when I was there it was so seedy and gross. Do you think that you developed a tougher skin because your mother was an actress? MG We’ve gotten better with each generation. Dakota is way better than I ever was. And I know I am better than my mom was. I don’t mean better from a talent point of view—oh no, if my mom reads this I’m going to hurt her feelings. I just mean


heroes

lily tomlin

THE UNSTOPPABLE COMIC GEARS UP FOR WHAT COULD BE A WELL-DESERVED EGOT

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In Grandma, she plays Elle, an openly gay intellectual who spends an unlikely day helping her young granddaughter secure an abortion. Along the way, Elle hopes to impart a feminist education to the pregnant youngster, and that agenda is one that’s been close to Tomlin’s heart for her entire life. “I believed feminism was about moving the whole species forward, not just half of it—I truly, truly thought that,” she says, adding that she’s concerned now by young actresses who are afraid to declare themselves as feminists. “Somebody has to point the way for people, for kids,” she says. “It’s just like people who are intimidated to say they’re liberal. The greatest people in our history have been progressive.”

Past the awards hype, Tomlin is sanguine about Grandma’s chances. “I didn’t know if I would even have another [starring role in a] movie for as long as I live,” she says, “and people may not necessarily see it. What is the audience going to be like for a 70-year-old, mouthy person?” I suggest to her that it might be comparable to the dedicated audiences that have supported her for decades, and she relents. “Might be super,” she allows modestly. “Might be good.” KYLE BUCHANAN

JUMPSUIT AND SHIRT DONNA KARAN RING AND BRACELET TIFFANY & CO. CAMISOLE, EARRINGS, WATCH TOMLIN’S OWN GRANDMA IS IN THEATERS NOW

Makeup Bonita Dehaven Hair Marlene Williams Production Gianina Jimenez Barrantes Digital technician Maxfeld Hegedus Photo assistants Michael Cliford and Joe Daley Stylist assistant Ali Raizin

“I don’t know if I should tell you this or not,” begins Lily Tomlin, a wicked smile playing on her lips. I’ve just asked the legendary 76-year-old comic actress about the Oscar buzz attached to her upcoming flm Grandma, which won Tomlin rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival and just got a prime awards-season berth in August. If the movie carries Tomlin into contention for a Best Actress Academy Award, she’ll have the opportunity to join a very exclusive club of showbiz fgures who’ve managed the full EGOT: that is, they’ve won an Emmy (Tomlin’s already got six), a Grammy (which Tomlin won in 1972 for Best Comedy Recording), an Oscar, and a Tony (Tomlin has two, one of which she netted for the one-woman stage show The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, and a Lifetime Achievement Special Tony Award—which she received way back in 1977). So what might Tomlin do if she manages to fll out that very rare trophy collection? “I have to have fun with it,” she grins. She tells me how her friend Albert Brooks proposed crafting a rolling case to hold her other trophies, with a niche for the statuette yet to be won. If Tomlin hears her name called from the stage at the Academy Awards, then, “I’d come up, and I’d be really humble and everything, carrying on...and then they’d roll out the case and I’d open it and put the Oscar where it belongs.” Tomlin collapses into laughter—she’s kidding, of course. This is the woman who initially ignored her recent invitation to receive an award at this year’s Kennedy Center Honors, believing for weeks that she’d simply been sent a letter to fy to Washington, D.C., and watch other entertainers accept the laurel. “I don’t want to say that I don’t take [awards buzz] seriously, and yet you almost have to say it, because it’s going to blow over in no time at all,” Tomlin says. “I’ve always had a slight perversity about me. I know that they’ve got to pick a certain amount of people every year, so if I come around...” Still, even by her own pragmatic standards, you should expect Tomlin to come around quite a bit this year. For one, she’s nominated for another Emmy. This time it’s for Grace and Frankie, the Netfix sitcom that pairs her with her Nine to Five costar and close friend Jane Fonda as former frenemies who are forced together when each of their husbands comes out of the closet. “We met up with Netfix and HBO and diferent people for it,” says Tomlin, “but we were kind of secretly hoping to get Netfix because it was the hot thing to do.” A devotee of the highbrow binge-watch, Tomlin’s seen all of House of Cards, and she’s such a big fan of Orange Is the New Black that she had its third-season release date memorized. A second batch of Grace and Frankie episodes was recently announced, too. “I feel Netfix’s support entirely,” Tomlin says. Another key creative talent in her corner is flmmaker Paul Weitz. The director cast Tomlin as Tina Fey’s mother in last year’s Admission and was so enamored by her performance that he scripted Grandma—a rare septuagenarian star vehicle in youth-obsessed Hollywood—just for Tomlin. “The last night we shot, I knew he was listening on earphones, and I said, just so he could hear, ‘This has been one big fucking gift,’” she remembers. “I didn’t know that it would do well or anything like that, I just felt that it was so natural and so easy and good, and I like him so much. He just went to bat for me, and it was a wonderful thing.” The role is a perfect ft for Tomlin—literally: the actress wore her own denim jacket and Jack Purcells on-screen.


MUGLER.COM

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


best ARtists

Remembering 1781 At Sea (2014)

Needless to say I love and respect Michael’s artwork. I love living with it and collecting it. To me his works are giant worldscapes that make me think of all colors and shapes of where we all come from or where we are going. And I always love images that make me wonder while I enjoy their beauty. Painting for a decade in London during his youth, Michael returned to his true passion after a 50-year radical sabbatical. He’s been making up for lost time, working in the studio nonstop. As a natural-born collagist, Michael creates works that are half painting/half sculpture, combining elements that V MaGaZine 1 2 2

wouldn’t normally go together. With precise yet spontaneous control, and through the process of construction and destruction, Michael achieves a perfect balance of chaos and harmony. The canvases, most spanning over 12 feet wide, are splashed, slashed, nailed, stapled, burned, warped, and twisted with pure silver sheets, eggs, sponges, gloves, and other surrounding materials. Treating precious metals like trash and trash like precious metal, Michael challenges the viewer to rethink the concept of value in the material society we live in.

His show Voice for My Father was exhibited at the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing earlier this year in conjunction with the celebration of the 120th birthday of his deceased father, Zhou Xinfang, a national treasure of China and a grandmaster of Beijing opera. Having showed at the Power Station of Art in Shanghai this summer, the exhibition will travel to the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in February 2016. EVA CHOW

Voice for My father opens february 13 at the andy Warhol MuseuM

This spread, clockwise from left: Courtesy Eva Chow and the artist © Ed Ruscha, courtesy the artist and Gagosian Gallery Courtesy Shelley Fox Aarons and Philip Aarons

michael chow nominated by eva chow


Metro Mattress #1 (2015)

ED RUSCHA nominAtED by mARC JACobS Ed is one of the coolest guys in the world. Literally, fguratively, and conceptually I connect with his text and his work. MARC JACOBS

Metro Mattresses opens noveMber 3 at sprĂœtH Magers berLin

Untitled (Thirteen Skull Plaque) (1971)

mARtin wong nominAtED by pHil AnD SHEllEy AARonS Martin Wong is an artist we have been thinking a lot about. We recently purchased a fantastic early ceramic piece he made in 1971 [pictured above]. Sadly, Wong died from AIDS in 1999, but his work remains very much alive in the present

moment, particularly because of its importance to some of the most inspiring artists working today, such as Danh VĹ?. Wong was underappreciated in his lifetime, his only museum shows having been in 1998 at the New Museum and the Gallery of

Illinois State University. That is about to change. SHELLEY AARONS

Martin Wong: HuMan instaMatic opens noveMber 8 at tHe bronx MuseuM of tHe arts


nominated by peter marino

best architecture

seagram building “The classic, perfectly proportioned black façade with regular glowing bands of light on the ceilings for one meter in is earth shatteringly elegant. The siting of the building on the plaza majestically set behind two fountains is the best I’ve seen in New York.” PETER MARINO ADDRESS: 52nd Street and Park Avenue, Manhattan COMMISSIONED BY: The Seagram Liquor Company V MAGAZINE 1 24

ARCHITECT: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe YEAR COMPLETED: 1958 HISTORY: The public plaza allegedly inspired NYC to create zoning incentives for developers to create “privately owned public spaces” and at the time was completely revolutionary as it set the building back from Park Avenue. The New York Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp called it “the millennium’s most important building.”

PRESENT DAY: The Four Seasons Restaurant housed on the building’s ground foor was under threat of reconstruction in May, spurring contention amongst preservationists. In the end, the only update approved was a new carpet. FUN FACTS: The building and its fountain were featured in Breakfast at Tifany’s. The building’s visible I-beams (the ones framing the windows) are entirely nonfunctional.


the man who redesigned our idea of the luxury space pays tribute to his favorite modern monoliths, from manhattan to rural france PhotograPhy adrian gaut

lever house “The juxtaposition of the doughnut and the rectangular solid is beautiful; the glass curtain wall by SOM was a brilliant, elegant invention that we are still using today.” PEtEr Marino ADDRESS: 54th Street and Park Avenue, Manhattan COMMISSIONED BY: Lever Brothers Company ARCHITECT: Gordon Bunshaft YEAR COMPLETED: 1952 HISTORY: Marking a pointed transition for Park Avenue from

brick-and-mortar apartments to towering glass skyscrapers, the Lever House was constructed in the International Style, in accordance with the design principles of the German-American architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. In 1982, the tower became an ofcial New York City landmark, and it was also the frst building to use a zoning provision, which allowed it to be built with no setbacks, as it only took up 25 percent of the lot. PRESENT DAY: The lobby is currently an exhibit area for the Lever House Art Collection. A cosmetic and structural

renovation in 1998 brought the building up to structural and energy efciency standards, but left the original architecture intact and added marble benches designed by Isamu Noguchi to the building’s plaza. FUN FACTS: Lever is the frst all-glass building in NYC (although the UN building was fnished the same year) and was built 22 years after Frank Lloyd Wright’s all-glass St. Mark’s tower proposal. Its construction revolutionized the New York City skyline.


villa savoye “Conceptually brilliant, the elegant white box foating on pilotis is light, still modern almost 90 years later, and starkly beautiful. The open foor plan also works magnifcently.” PETER MARINO

COMMISSIONED BY: The Savoye family ARCHITECT: Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, better known as Le Corbusier YEAR COMPLETED: 1931 HISTORY: The home was originally built for the Savoye family, V MAGAZINE 1 2 6

who left swiftly after the war. The building was then placed in the possession of the town of Poissy in 1958. Plans to abolish the house and turn it into a school were interrupted by protesting architects who advocated for the building’s historical and artistic value. In 1965, the Savoye was added to the historical monument list. PRESENT DAY: Renovated after the war, the Savoye now stands highly protected and polished and is open to the public for tours.

FUN FACTS: The building’s design adheres to Le Corbusier’s Five Points of Architecture: concrete columns bear the structural load, the ground plan is not restrained by load-bearing walls, the façade is free from structural constraints as well, a horizontal window lights the building equally throughout, and a garden is kept on the roof. It is also the last in a series of white houses that he designed.


best buys

It’s tIme to buIld your fall wardrobe, but selectIng the season’s best Is a dauntIng task. so let the experts at colette, barneys new york, and dover street market be your guIdes. after all, It’s theIr job PhotograPhy Dan forbes teXt KatharIne K. ZarreLLa

FROM TOP: raf sIMons stan sMIth SNEAKERS IN NAVY AND GREEN ($455) MoLLy goDDarD LOUISE DRESS ($1,610) CoMMe Des garÇons PVC SHOES ($485) gosha rUbChInsKIy PANTS ($335) AND T-SHIRT ($85) PraDa LEATHER ELBOW GLOVES ($675) JUnya Watanabe POLYURETHANE HEADPIECE (PRICE UPON REQUEST) Moynat REJANE PM BAG IN EMERALD ($5,275) DaUPhIn YELLOW GOLD CUFF ($9,000) freeWay SUNGLASSES ($200) ana KhoUrI OPA EARRINGS ($5,280)

dover street market new york’s exceptIonal essentIals Rei Kawakubo’s Dover Street Market is heaven for the fashion savvy. From young talents based in Tokyo, London, and beyond to iconic brands like Prada, Azzedine Alaïa, and V MAGAZINE 1 2 8

Kawakubo’s Comme des Garçons, DSM boasts a treasure trove of covetable high-concept fnds. After sifting through the F/W ’15 collections, DSMNY’s general manager James

Gilchrist selects his “favorite shoe of the season,” a dress by “a recent discovery,” an irresistible “expensive novelty,” and more surprises to elevate your wardrobe.


BARNEYS NEW YORK’S MUST-HAVES FROM TOP: FINLAY & CO. EBONY WOOD SUNGLASSES ($225) MONIQUE PÉAN WHITE, CHAMPAGNE, AND BLACK ROSE-CUT DIAMOND AND 18-KARAT RECYCLED WHITE GOLD NECKLACE (PRICE UPON REQUEST) R13 DENIM-AND-SHEARLING OVERSIZE TRUCKER IN INDIGO ($995) MAISON MARGIELA SNEAKERS ($960) ALBERTUS SWANEPOEL LUCERO FUR FELT WESTERN HAT ($625) ALTUZARRA GHIANDA BULL ROPE AND CROCODILE LEATHER SADDLE BAG IN NAVY ($19,995) MANOLO BLAHNIK SNAKESKIN SHOES IN SILVER ($855)

There’s no arguing that Barneys is a New York (and now countrywide) shopping institution. It’s the downtown girl’s favorite uptown escape, and the Park Avenue princess’s answer to living on the edge. The discerning store’s equally discerning fashion director Tomoko Ogura manages to strike the perfect balance between playful opulence and essential luxury when choosing Barneys’ stock, and as we plunge into the Fall season, she selects the menswear-inspired shoes with the “perfect dose of femininity,” the bag in “the perfect shade of navy,” a denim shearling jacket with a “modestly cool attitude,” and more so you don’t have to. V MAGAZINE 1 3 0


FROM TOP: THOM BROWNE WHALE BAG ($2,500) MIRA MIKATI DARCEL BOMBER in nAVY ($1,860) EDWARD BESS X COLETTE ULTRA SLiCK LiPSTiCK in DEMi BUFF (PRiCE UPOn REQUEST) BERNSTOCK SPEIRS ZiP BOWLER in BLACK ($242) DICK MOBY X COLETTE SUnGLASSES (PRiCE UPOn REQUEST) MOSCHINO SPRAY PAinT CAn PHOnE CASE ($115)

Since founding Paris’s premiere concept shop, Colette, with her mother in 1997, Sarah Andelman has become the city’s prime purveyor of all things on-the-pulse. Ofering classic luxury staples, rare art books, and quirky, extravagant splurges, among many other delights, Colette always has something extraordinary for everyone. Here, Andelman picks F/W ’15’s most “poetic” bag, the “craziest” phone case, the “coolest bomber jacket ever,” and more, all for your shopping pleasure. V MAGAZinE 1 3 2

Prop stylist Lisa Gwilliam Production Nicole Watson (Jed Root) Digital technician Todd Barndollar Prop assistant Jack Richardson Location Root Brooklyn

COLETTE’S FALL FAVORITES


publicschoolnyc.com


NoMINated By aMaNda Wellsh, Model MarNI crossbody rEsIN clutch ($2,270, marNI.com) Consuelo Castiglioni introduces a sleek carrier with a thick bombé strap,

marrying a Chiclet-chic shape with modern functionality—available in super ’70s earth tones.

INDUSTRY INSIDERS PICK THEIR FAVORITE ESSENTIALS FOR FASHION WEEK AND BEYOND photography therese aldgard

NoMINated By karolINa kurkova, Model gIuseppe zaNottI desIgN blacK PatENt lacE-uP saNdal ($895, gIusEPPEzaNottIdEsIgN.com) Says Giuseppe Zanotti of this latest black tie heel, “My idea was to create an androgynous design with a distinctly feminine touch. I transformed a man’s classic brogue into a sophisticated ultra-high stiletto. I love when women’s creations are sexy with a masculine touch.”

NoMINated By stella greeNspaN, stylIst ralph laureN PIlot shadEs ($219, ralPhlaurEN.com) Like the rest of his F/W ’15 collection, these aviators embody Ralph

Lauren’s passion for driving. The front is made from a single piece of aluminum and connects to the arms with vintage hinges and screws. Perforated leather temple tips round out the reference.


NOMINATED BY JASON REMBERT, STYLIST DAVID YuRMAN LIMITEd EdITIoN BuBBLEGuM PINkY RINGS ($875, dAvIdYuRMAN.coM) Fusing fne jewelry with the nostalgic aroma of an old-fashioned candy

store, these pieces pair 18-karat gold and eco-friendly resin imbued with

aromatic oils. Available in cotton candy, spearmint, bubblegum, black licorice, or grape.

NOMINATED BY CARLYNE CERF DE DuDZEELE, STYLIST uBER “Uber changed the life of people—true!” —CCD

NOMINATED BY ANNA TREVELYAN, STYLIST JuICY COuTuRE BLACk LABEL ABSTRAcT JAcquARd PuffER ($298, JuIcYcouTuRE.coM) The Juicy girl will delight over this graphic jacket. Lovingly named Ziger, the silver-and-black print is based in part on the stripes of a tiger and in part on those of a zebra.

NOMINATED BY DEVON WINDSOR, MODEL STELLA McCARTNEY ALINA PLAYING BRA ($110, STELLAMccARTNEY.coM) Stella McCartney’s limited-edition hot pink lingerie set was designed with breast cancer awareness in mind, and it supports in more ways than one: a percentage of its sales will be donated to the Linda McCartney Centre and both the U.S. and the Australian National Breast Cancer Foundations.

v MAGAZINE 13 5


nominateD By michael stipe

PEACHES

perfectly summed up on Rub’s title track, in which the nowiconic performer invites listeners to shake of whatever hangups (or clothing) might be holding them back: “Come with me, you know me, feel free, Peaches.” T. Cole RaChel

Few contemporary musicians of the past decade have managed to push as many buttons as Peaches. It helps that Peaches—the nom de plume of Canadian-born Merrill Beth Nisker—is no mere musician. A performance artist in the truest sense of the term, Peaches has spent the past 15 years simultaneously freaking people out and turning people on with her very particular blend of genre-busting and gender-defying electro punk rock shenanigans. Earlier this year saw the release of What Else Is in the Teaches of Peaches—a collection of photographs by Holger Talinski that documents exactly what Peaches has been up to: endless touring, a semiautobiographical rock opera (Peaches V MAgAZinE 1 3 6

Does Herself, which became a flm of the same name), a one-woman production of Jesus Christ Superstar (redubbed Peaches Christ Superstar, naturally), and a stint singing the lead in Monteverdi’s seventeenth-century opera L’Orfeo. Now, some six years since the release of her last studio album, Peaches returns with Rub—a new full-length album (featuring contributions from Kim Gordon, Feist, and Vice Cooler) that revisits some of her most constant themes—sexual freedom, gender fuidity, and generally not giving any fucks. For someone who has forged an unlikely career by gleefully skewering taboos, Peaches’s enduring message of radical self-realization remains remarkably prescient. It’s a sentiment

PhoTogRaPhy Chad mooRe Fashion ClaRe byRne clothing veRsaCe RUB iS AVAilABlE SEPtEMBER 25 FRoM i U ShE MUSic

Makeup Kristin Hilton (The Wall Group) Hair Michael Silva (The Wall Group) Retouching Josh Garcia

what else is in the teaches of peaches? the DiVine GUiDinG spiRit of all thinGs shocKinG is BacK, anD with a BooK, a toUR, anD a new alBUm, class is in session

Are you surprised that you’ve been doing this for over a decade at this point? PEACHES A decade and a half. When I think about people that I love…you think about the Sex Pistols, they only played for a year and a half. That’s it. I start to get little obsessed, like, Oh my God, what am I thinking? It feels good though. There was a pretty healthy gap between your last record, 2009’s I Feel Cream, and this one, but you certainly were busy doing a lot in the time in between. Did the experience of doing the other stuf—the stage shows, the flm, and the book—change the experience for you when you went back into the studio to make new music? P No, it just made me like doing it again. Before, I always made an album and then toured it for two years, and then made an album and toured it for two years…I did that four times. That was 10 years of work. I needed a little break from that. I’ve seen you perform many times over the years, but I specifcally remember watching you in the early 2000s and the audience just being like, What the actual fuck is this? You were pushing really radical ideas in a way that no one else was. Fifteen years later do you feel like culture has fnally kind of caught up with what you’ve always been talking about in your work? P Yes, I think that it’s become a little more open. People in the pop world are not adhering to whatever standards they might have had to in the past. They’re breaking out. I mean, armpit hair was the fashion of the summer. Who knew? I’ve always believed that you should do whatever you want as long as you’re comfortable with it. I feel like in some ways I’m an inspiration for that. It’s great to start something and know 15 years later that there’s a validation for it. It doesn’t mean that I never felt satisfed before, but it is great to realize that there really was something that needed to be addressed and that things are changing. Were there times when it felt a little dangerous? Getting up and performing this kind of material, were you ever frightened or threatened? P No, not at all. Sometimes I would wonder if there would be trouble, but even in the Midwest—or places like Russia— people were usually up for it…and if they weren’t, the reaction was usually just, “Oh my god, what is this?” I just played a little party in Paris and there were a lot of younger people there who had never seen me. Again, they were just like, “Oh my god, I’ve never seen anything like this!”—people are still saying that to me, even now. The only time I’ve felt threatened is when I opened up for Marilyn Manson back in the day and his fans tried to threaten me while I was onstage by spitting on me. I had this perspective: if I leave the stage, they win, so I stayed even though it was hard to stay in front of 10,000 people who don’t want you there. One night I actually went into the audience and actually beat someone up with a microphone because I couldn’t take it anymore. It’s funny now because, years later, people from those shows all across Europe are like, “I saw you play for Marilyn Manson. Marilyn Manson was just a pussy compared to you!” I think people take for granted how serious your work is sometimes. There is a camp aspect to it but also all of your records have been embedded with deeper messages about the body and sex and gender. Do you feel like, the longer you’ve been doing it, maybe people recognize that a little bit more? P Yeah, I think they do. Different people get different things out of my music. It’s also very important for me to not mask the message, but I express it in sort of a campy, fun, safe way, so that people are enjoying themselves, and then getting the message. Also, the presentation is part of the message itself. You don’t have to be heavy about it, but it is important.


Left to right, from top left: Steven Klein; Instagram @badgalriri; Steven Klein; Twitter @cher; Ben Cope; Murray Close; Live Nation; Instagram @mileycyrus; Syco/Columbia; Claudette Barius © 2015 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. and Ratpac-Dune Entertainment, LLC; Chuck Zlotnick/Universal Pictures; courtesy Republic Records; Lamar Taylor

READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS SomE VAluEd inSighT inTo whAT ouR BEloVEd REAdERS loVE moST

V asked, you answered. This summer, via social media (follow us at @vmagazine and @vman) and mailed-in cards, our readers made their way to a poll with suggested categories and tons of blank space. Once all the write-ins

were assessed, we took the top-ranking topics and put them in a multipleanswer questionnaire. These are the stars, songs, social outputs, and more that got the most votes overall and the percentages by which they won.

BEST PoP STAR

BEST muSiC VidEo

BEST TouR

lAdy gAgA 59%

“BiTCh BETTER hAVE my monEy” By RihAnnA 38%

EndlESS SummER: lAnA dEl REy, CouRTnEy loVE, gRimES 55%

BEST TwiTTER

BEST ComEBACK

BEST ACTRESS

hilARy duff 55%

JuliAnnE mooRE 41%

BEST inSTAgRAm

BEST hAiR

ChER 63%

BEST moViE

JuRASSiC woRld 52% hARRy STylES 40%

milEy CyRuS 35% BEST ACToR

BEST AlBum

BEST TRACK

ChAnning TATum 30%

how Big, how BluE, how BEAuTiful By floREnCE + ThE mAChinE 46%

“ThE hillS” By ThE wEEKnd 33% V MAGAZINE 13 7


nominATEd By nEil pATRick hARRis

best theateR

whEThER wiTh dAncERs, ThEspiAns, oR old-FAshionEd dRAmA qUEEns, ThE REigning king oF BRoAdwAy likEs To gET in on ThE AcTion PhotograPhy adrian MeŠko text neil Patrick harris Immersion. Listen, I love me some traditional theater. While there is nothing like sitting in a Broadway theater in New York and experiencing a shiny musical or a fully produced and thought-provoking play, right now, immersive theater is kind of blowing my audience mind. People often think that watching theater only means sitting in the twentieth

FUERZA BRUTA

This show has been going strong for years, and for good reason. The audience is jammed, shoulder-to-shoulder, into one large room with a low ceiling. Lights go out, music plays, shadows of people appear above you. Then the roof is literally ripped to shreds, revealing a massive, club-like space with aerialists swinging above you in climbing gear, others slamming themselves onto the foor while rain pours onto them, and moving platforms forcing you one way or another; all the while thumping music is played live while you dance, gawk, and sweat the night away. Super fun. I recommend comfortable shoes, efective deodorant, and no inhibitions.

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row of a big, dusty cavern and watching passively from your uncomfortable seat, but now there are so many emerging theater pieces out there that break the mold and get audiences literally on their feet. Seat, feet. Look at that, I rhyme now. These are some of my current favorites.


THE BOX

QUEEN OF THE NIGHT

This is late-night nastiness of the highest (and lowest) order. Nearly impossible to get in (unless you have connections or are willing to shell out crazy money for bottles of booze at reserved banquettes), this tiny, two foored, smoke-flled speakeasy has a rotating roster of performers doing the most bizarre feats imaginable: I watched slack-jawed as an acrobat’s assistant, wearing a strap on dildo, lay down on a table and the acrobat did a handstand and balanced on the erect phallus using only one fnger. It’s an image I’ll ne’er forget.

This decadent show takes place in the restored underground theater and hallways of the Paramount Hotel in Times Square. You arrive early, dressed to impress, drink mixology cocktails and get randomly pulled away by cast members (are they?) into intimate corner rooms where secrets are revealed—often your own. Before you know it, a massive feast is served and the intoxicating show, flled with dark and sexy variety performances, will leave you full, breathless, and horny.

SLEEP NO MORE

ESCAPE THE ROOM

I can’t stop talking about this, the granddaddy of them all. You freely wander an eerie, 99 room hotel, masked and anonymous, no less, while a brilliant company of actors perform a wordless David Lynch version of Macbeth. Stand and observe the drama? Follow someone intriguing all night? Open drawers and cabinets? The choice is yours. It’s brilliant.

If large groups of strangers aren’t your thing, or if (like me) you prefer solving puzzles, this is awesome. Small groups are locked into various themed rooms (apartment, theater, cell, Sherlock Holmes–type study) for 60 minutes and have to decipher clues, fnd keys, and solve mysteries in order to escape. It takes focus, collaboration, and wicked smarts to do so, but I love it. Quite a rush.


Sam SmIth’S

best playlist

DISCLOSURE Sam Smith I’m trying to think of things to ask you that I have never asked you. What is your musical guilty pleasure? It has to be a song you’ve never told anyone that you love. Guy Lawrence I think it has to be one of the many ’80s rock bands that we love. “Is This Love” by Whitesnake. They just remind us of our childhood and our dad rocking out and blasting it full volume at us in the living room, and car, and kitchen...and garden. SS What is your proudest moment so far in your career? V MAGAZINE 1 4 0

GL Getting a number-one album in the UK has got to be up there. howard Lawrence Although having Sting tell me I’m a good bassist is a strong contender too. SS Is there any genre of music you’d love to try doing one day? hL I’m listening to a lot of bossa nova music at the moment. I fnd Brazilian music in general fascinating and brilliant. I’d defnitely like to experiment with that at some point. SS If you were on a desert island and had to listen to two songs

on loop every day for the rest of your life, what would they be? GL “The Root” by D’Angelo. hL “I.G.Y.” by Donald Fagen.

FROM LEFT: GUY WEARS JACKET BURBERRY PRORSUM SHIRT GIORGIO ARMANI PANTS COACH HOWARD WEARS SUIT ACNE STUDIOS SHIRT MICHAEL KORS EARRING HIS OWN


OVER A FULL YEAR AFTER THE RELEASE OF HIS DOUBLE-PLATINUM DEBUT ALBUM, SAM SMITH IS STILL TOPPING CHARTS AND SELLING OUT SHOWS. HERE, HE NOMINATES A FEW OF HIS FAVORITE ARTISTS MAKING THEIR OWN MARK IN 2015 PhotograPhy BEN haSSEtt FaShIoN aNNa trEVELyaN tExt Sam SmIth Hello to whomever has picked up this beautiful V magazine. I hope you are having a beautiful day, wherever you may be. My name is Sam Smith and I sing a little bit. I have been obsessed with music from a very, very young age, and my favorite thing to do, other than make music myself, is to share music. Everyone has such diferent tastes and I’ve always found it so fascinating how certain songs could make one person cry and another grimace. My taste in music is “broad” to say the least, and hopefully these next few artists will show you that. Some of these people are friends of mine—I’ve had the joy to actually watch how they do what they do, and in Disclosure’s case, I actually work with them. And some are just my musical crushes and obsessions. I hope you enjoy.

JON BATISTE SS John, you astound me in every single way. Have you always been this confdent and social? Jon BatiSte I’ve always been comfortable being diferent but I defnitely wasn’t as confdent onstage in my early years. I was inspired by seeing so many charismatic performers when I was growing up in New Orleans. That was only the beginning though. When I arrived in New York at age 17 to go to Juilliard I began to experiment. I decided to start playing in the subway and in unconventional locations. That’s where I really developed my confdence and my ability to deal with spontaneous social situations. SS You seem like the happiest man in the world. Do you have any favorite sad songs you love?

JB I am deeply moved by negro spirituals and early blues music. “Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child” or “St. James Infrmary” for example. Also Stevie Wonder’s “Village Ghetto Land” or some of the more melancholy classical music by French impressionist composers such as Erik Satie and Claude Debussy. “Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most” by Betty Carter is a recording that really hits me. SS What’s the best gig you’ve ever played in your life? JB That’s a tough one. We’ve played so many diferent but great gigs. Maybe when we played Carnegie Hall for the frst time and people were standing on the chairs for Love Riot. Another was the time that we played in a juvenile detention center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. So deep. I think one of

my most fulflling creative experiences happened last week in New York City at the NoMad Hotel.My band and I took over the entire hotel for seven days straight and I curated a diferent musical presentation each night blending food, drink, music, and luxury. It was the frst time that I’ve had the chance to manifest my vision of a live performance in such detail. I got to bring in many of my favorite performers to collaborate with, besides Sam Smith of course! SS If you could only ever sing and play one song for your entire life, what would it be? JB “Amazing Grace.”

JACKET VErSaCE SHIRT AND pIN BrIoNI TURTLENECK ISSEy mIyaKE


JAZMINE SULLIVAN SS Jazmine, I am your biggest fan and you know this, so sorry if these questions are really fangirly. What is your happy song? The song you listen to, to cheer you up when you’re sad? JAZMINE SULLIVAN The weird thing is when I’m not feeling great I fnd it more therapeutic to kind of cry out my issue. So I never look for a really happy song. I might listen to a gospel song if I need to be uplifted. But I’ll listen to “Fix You” by Coldplay because it’s the kind of love I want one day. It makes me cry but it’s like a purging cry. Then I feel a litle better.

SS What’s the hardest decision you’ve ever had to make as an artist? JS When I was 12 and my mom asked if I wanted to sing gospel or not. I was being ofered a gospel record deal but I declined because I felt like I would want to eventually address things that I couldn’t in gospel music. SS What’s the most embarrassing song on your phone and why do you love it so much? JS “Money Can’t Buy You Class” by Countess LuAnn from Real Housewives. The funny thing is I was looking through my songs like, I don’t have anything embar—oh, here it is.

SS Who’s your dream collaboration? JS I have so many, but currently it is Ms. Lauryn Hill. She created one of the greatest albums ever. Plus I efn’ love her. SS Are you aware that you are the best singer I’ve ever heard in my entire life? That wasn’t a question, it was a statement. JS Ha. I’m aiight. Thanks Sam. You are the sweetest, sexiest serenading guy I know.

JACKET JUST CAVALLI CORSET HIPS & CURVES SKIRT AND NOSE RING SULLIVAN’S OWN EARRINGS LARUICCI


IBEYI

Makeup Maki Hasegawa (The Wall Group) using Tom Ford Hair Neil Grupp (The Wall Group) using Aquage Digital technician Carlo Barreto Photo assistants Roeg Cohen, Ayesha Malik, Mike O’Shea Stylist assistant Paulina Olivares Location Pier 59 Studios

SS I think you both are so incredible and your music is so transfxing. NAOMI DIAZ Thank you so much, Sam. SS What inspired the song “River”? LISA-KAINDÉ DIAZ I wrote the chorus of the song before going onstage one night and we met a Cuban dancer who started to improvise to one of our songs during the show. He told us later that he was a twin like us, and son of the Orisha Yemaya like me. He also told us, “I was not going to come to this festival, I was feeling homesick, went to the river to wash my soul and then decided to come here tonight without knowing what concert I was going to go to.” On the train back home I realized that I had composed a chorus about him without even knowing him, so I decided to write “River.” SS Do you both have the same taste in music? LKD We grew up going to the same concerts. At home our parents used to listen to many diferent things and a lot of jazz. We have common loves like Meshell Ndegeocello, Yoruba Afro-Cuban chants, James Blake, and Jay Electronica. I have always been driven to female voices and down tempos. Nina Simone is my goddess. But I also love Lauryn Hill, Fiona Apple, Billie Holiday, and the Bulgarian Voices Angelite. ND I am more into beats. I listen to a lot of hip-hop and reggae. I love funk and Erykah Badu, anything that grooves. SS Have you ever had any weird twin moments where one person is in pain and the other can feel it? ND We can’t lie to each other. Even on the phone we always know the truth. When one of us is in pain the other is too but this is more because we love each other tremendously. SS Lisa, what’s your favorite thing about Naomi? And Naomi, what’s your  favorite thing about Lisa? LKD Naomi has never cared about what people say. She follows her instincts and desires. And I wish I could move like her. ND Lisa-Kaindé is a beautiful person, talented and generous. She accepted me in Ibeyi and I ain’t easy.

FROM LEFT: NAOMI WEARS DRESS CHANEL EARRINGS HAUS OF TOPPER SEPTUM CUFF O THONGTHAI RING CHRISHABANA LISA-KAINDÉ WEARS SWEATER AND SHIRT MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION SHORTS EMPORIO ARMANI EARRINGS CHRISHABANA


nominated by miley cyrus

the best cause

tHrouGH Her HaPPy HiPPie Foundation, miley cyrus GiVes Homeless and lGbtQ+ youtHs a Voice and a cHance


Courtesy the Happy Hippie Foundation

As an out, visible, and queer transgender person of color, I feel free to be myself, but my freedom of expression is often stifed by those who attempt to police my body, my words, and my desires. I feel free until I am met with violence; until people purposefully misgender me in order to “put me in my place” (whichever one of the two boxes they deem ft for me); until people tear down my body, telling me what to do with it and that I will never be more than their assumptions of what my body is, does, or looks like; until people tell me that who I am is not valid, is disgusting, is unacceptable, is inhuman. I am free to be myself, yet I am also trapped beneath misunderstandings, projections, assumptions, and assertions. When I go out into the world, I am always on guard, always mentally preparing a script for when I walk into a public bathroom, always holding my breath when I walk past a group of people on the sidewalk. This is not the freedom I desire. The freedom I long for can only be made possible through

challenging and changing the ways in which people think about gender, sex, sexuality, race, and class. This is a goal of the Happy Hippie Foundation, which provides resources for and combats the stigmas facing society’s most marginalized populations, including homeless and LGBTQ+ youth. For Happy Hippie’s most recent project, #InstaPride, Miley photographed several transgender and gender expansive individuals, including myself [with Miley Cyrus, second row, left], and used her platform to amplify our voices and share our stories. When marginalized people are represented positively and accurately in the media we have a greater chance at living our authentic lives free of judgment, harassment, and violence. The #InstaPride photo shoot was nothing less than magical. Everyone was buzzing with excitement and positive energy, and we all cheered each other on while we had our photos taken. Even though most of us were meeting one another for the frst time, there was a strong sense of support,

understanding, community, comfort, and joy in the room: the true spirit of the Happy Hippie Foundation. Surrounded by new friends, I felt free to embrace and express every aspect of myself. I think we all left that shoot feeling prouder, more inspired, and less inhibited than ever before. I trust Miley with my story because she doesn’t try to tell it for me. Instead, she chooses to use her resources and her platform to share my words and my work with the world. I trust Miley behind the camera because she sees me for nothing less than who I am and because she understands and relates to me as a human and as a friend – not as a gender or as a stereotype. I trust Miley and her work to help make the world a better place, because in her presence, my freedom knows no bounds. Tyler Ford

SUPPORT THE HAPPY HIPPIE FOUNDATION! TO DONATE AND lEARN mORE, vISIT HAPPYHIPPIE.ORg v mAgAZINE 14 5


nominated by james franco

b e s t i n h o l ly w o o d

from a hunger games heartthrob to an hbo heavyweight, james franco pays poetic tribute to tinseltown’s scene stealers ARTWORK AND TEXT JAMES FRANCO V MAGAZINE 1 4 6


nat wolff

cara delevinGne

Jacki weaver

The boy never stops Moving, A handsome jester Who does imitations

If you’ve been In any city In the world You’ve seen her

The power beneath Her sweet sweet Exterior—replete With high voice

Of everyone, And remembers every Funny thing said On set.

Staring out at you With her bold Eyes, and bold Brows

And small stature— Is measured Proportionally With such sweetness.

He plays music With his brother, He’s an innocent But won’t stay that way.

From fve million Ads, from Mulberry, To DKNY, to YSL, To Tom Ford, naked.

She deceives With this little package, For underneath She is smuggling

The world wants in, The women want in, Hollywood is calling, Spider-Man is calling,

Now she’s in Movies, A sultry force Taking over with Natural Instincts of domination.

Nat, stay Nat. Nat.

Such strength She could knock out Jake LaMotta, pow. “You got me down, Weave, You got me down.”

Pamela romanowsky a$aP rocky

Gia coPPola

The poster child For the new face of Moviemaking: Intelligent young woman

I know little About this man, Except that he’s An unstoppable

Gia is all taste. She was a baby In a basket On the sets

With a vision And a love of flm. Who goes to NYU, Gets into the Sundance

Force, rising In public consciousness Like an ethereal ghost, An LSD vision,

Of her grandfather. Some of the frst Things she saw Were movies

Director’s Lab— The inside Line for Young flmmakers—

Who gets under The expected, Breaks open the doors Of perception,

Being made, She probably took Her frst steps on a set, Said her frst words on a set.

Makes a great flm, Based on a book by A self-obsessed crazy man. And despite a rejection

To see Beneath the surface Of the white hegemony The trippy land

She knows everything That is cool, Knows everyone Who is cool.

From the Sundance Film Festival, and self-serving backlash From the attention-starved writer, She triumphs in the end

Where everything is possible. And she: An ethereal Fairy Who throws Artistic lightning bolts

With a delicate hand.

With an incredible flm.

selena Gomez If she started As the consort Of the teen-terror Justin Bieber, She has emerged From that shadow As the voice Of a new generation Of genuine young Women who seek Strength in honesty, Power in integrity.

Josh hutcherson Tough young man On the back of a huge Franchise, That has soared him

Like the dragon does The boy In The NeverEnding Story. He is one thing In The Hunger Games, (Lovelorn victim)

But another in life: A cigarette-smoking Good old boy from Kentucky, Who used his movie money To buy his mama a house.

But there are so Many secrets. We all have them, It’s just that we only Want to know yours, Selena.

neustadter and weber

andrew Jarecki

The balls on this guy. The son of a billionaire These boys are the team Using his money Behind (500) Days of Summer, To take on the crazy With its quirky story Of love gained and lost; Son of another Billionaire, The Spectacular Now, In his six-part, The frst of the Shailene Indelible doc, Woodley sensitive young Women vehicles; The Jinx. He knew what The Fault in Our Stars, He had, The second Woodley That Durst Thing, now pushed To a sensitive, dying, Said he killed Them all, Young woman. But kept it under They get young love Wraps up until And can put it down In scripts It aired. Boom. Like no one else.


PhotograPhy DrIu + tIago fashIon gIllIan wIlkIns


nominated by Robyn “It’s almost post-empowerment,” says Ebba Tove Elsa Nilsson, aka Tove Lo, who looks especially statuesque in a silver jacket and shredded jeans. She’s brushing of a question she gets a lot: the one about being an independent woman in the music industry. “I’ve been raised to not question in any way that you can’t do this ’cause you’re a girl. I can do whatever I want. It’s not something I think about.” There’s a “new group of girls,” she says—songwriters—who happily take their gender for granted. “I’m not saying there’s not still a lot left to be done, but we don’t question ourselves.” She mentions another one of these “new girls,” Lorde, who tapped her for a Hunger Games soundtrack contribution last year. “She’s so fucking smart. I was saying, ‘If I was anywhere close to the way you are when I was 17…’ She’s like, ‘Maybe you just haven’t talked to enough 17-year-olds in a while.’ Well, that’s not it. I can go back to my journal.” At 27, it seems that Tove Lo has lived a few lives. Like so many of her contemporaries, the singer wrote plenty of radio hits for stars like Ellie Goulding, Hilary Duf, Icona Pop, and Cher Lloyd before releasing a solo album. It’s a pattern Charli XCX has recently made popular: impress the labels with innocuous lyrics sung by sweet voices over sick melodies, then hit them with the hard stuf: personal pain and gain, sung by the source. “My album [Queen of the Clouds] is very much my own songs. They were never considered for another artist,” she says. But even some of the songs Tove Lo pitched out have proven to be too dark for contemporaries—too Swedish, perhaps (she lists Robyn as a hero, citing her Scandinavian disregard). “Artists have been like,

tove lo

‘Why do you have to say ‘fuck’ so much?’ I don’t know; I want to. I swear. I like sex.” Before “Habits (Stay High)” could be heard rolling out of any bodega or bar in the States, another Tove Lo track was charting over here: one she put out after she’d fnished her frst solo set of songs. “I did ‘Heroes’ with Alesso [in 2014]. It’s the most inspirational song I’ve ever written. Most [of my songs] are about heartbreak. I think it’s what I needed after a long time of digging deep through my scars.” America, on the other hand, isn’t done yet. Lyrics like “I eat my dinner in my bathtub, then I go to sex clubs” eventually found their audience here, too, and it’s massive. A remix of “Habits” put Tove Lo back in the club, and then in just about every earbud belonging to someone who has faced a breakup. “I think it’s just daring to say that something failed,” Tove Lo ofers, explaining the song’s success. “It’s why people relate to a lot of my songs. It’s like, I listed my faws here. I’m not handling it the best way, but this is what I need to do right now to feel okay. There’s so many songs about ‘I’m better of without you, I’m stronger, you’re gonna regret this!’ But that’s not usually how you feel afterward.” It’s true: Tove Lo’s frst album is to an Ingmar Bergman drama as the average breakup ballad is to most American rom-coms. And it isn’t just about one person, again and again. “This is going to sound really sad, but this is basically a pattern of how most of my relationships have gone,” she says. “It starts of really passionately, you fall in love, it gets really scary, and it ends really painfully, with someone doing something stupid, or a lot of fghting. It’s about how I’ve never really grown in love with anyone.” Does that mean she’s never been

in love? “Oh, I’ve totally fallen in love,” Tove Lo corrects. “I fall in love every week! I have diferent kinds of love where it’s like, I’m in love but I can’t see a future with this person because I can’t trust them fully, or I do see a future but for some reason it doesn’t work out. A lot of people can’t handle what I do. My last relationship, he just couldn’t handle…this. The distance, the way I live my life, and also just the stuf I write. It’s not easy to think, Is this one about me?” So, what’s changed since Tove Lo wrote about staying high all the time, other than overdue recognition? “Probably a lot of people wouldn’t agree with me when I say this, but I feel a lot more together now,” she laughs. “I mean, they still tell me to slow down. I have a really hard time sleeping. The worst thing for me is like, go to bed, lie down, it’s quiet. That’s the time when I’m like, no, no, no, no, no, no. I really panic. I never want the night to end. I’ve pretty much stopped drinking now, but I still stay out. When we tour and we don’t do press, usually me and my band are pretty crazy. I never know if they’re going to show up or not. They always do, but you’ll never know in what condition. I mean, I’ve been the same, but I kind of had to realize that I can’t live fully like that if I’m going to do this. If I’m a writer, I could get fucked up as much as I wanted, but I couldn’t show up in the studio and be like, ‘Guys, we’ve gotta take it easy today.’ I can’t come here [a photo studio] coming down from Molly. That would be super unprofessional.” Natasha stagg

BODYSUIT BaLMaIN TOve lO IS On TOUr wITh erIK hASSle nOw v MAGAZIne 14 9


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nominated by jessie ware Hannah Ware describes herself as shy, but spending more than fve minutes with the British-born actress proves the opposite. Pop singer Jessie’s older sister is eloquent, but eager. It’s immediately easy to see how she ended up acting. And Ware’s star is undoubtedly on the rise. She recently landed her frst leading Hollywood role alongside Rupert Friend and Zachary Quinto with this year’s action thriller Hitman: Agent 47. “We shot in Berlin and Singapore, and we all had very interesting characters; we were a small cast, I was the only girl really,” Ware says of the flm. “I never thought I’d do an action movie per se, but there’s so much to the characters that we play that when everyone says, ‘You just shot an action flm,’ I have to remember that’s what it was.” Ware may not have imagined herself in such thrilling scenarios, but her parents had. In fact, they had an entirely different future in mind for her and her sister. “My dad really wanted Jessie and me to become policewomen. Me and my sister will kind of laugh at each other when we’re called a

hannah ware

creative family because my mom is a social worker and my dad is a journalist and they keep asking when we’re going to get proper jobs.” It wasn’t for lack of trying other avenues that either of them ended up in the spotlight, though. “I’ve done everything back to front really,” says Ware. “I didn’t go to a proper acting school as English actors go; I started when I was past the respectable age of acting. So I’d done everything back to front and before I’d learned the ropes I got a big role. I’ve been learning quite publicly, the way that Jessie has with singing.” Ware was working as an architect up until a quarter-life crisis, she says. “I was in New York, modeling part time in the middle of having sort of a faux nervous breakdown,” she explains. “A friend of mine told me, ‘You’re so dramatic. You need to go to an acting class.’ So I started going and became obsessed with it.” She enrolled full time, found a manager (in a bar), and quickly began landing auditions. “I was really naive,” Ware says of her frst role—a drug addict, alongside Kelsey Grammer on the Starz series Boss.

“I just rolled in, did the audition, and didn’t think I would get called back. When I did, it was the biggest surprise…I was like, This acting business is much easier than architecture. And you get to meet all of your heroes.” Ware has since learned that Hollywood is not quite as easy as all that. “That was just a really freaky situation, and since then it’s not been a grind but it’s been hard work.” She may feel late to the game, but Ware is able to appreciate what her various ventures in other felds have taught her. “Life experience is always good for an actor,” she says. “I actually don’t think I could have done it at a younger age. It wasn’t something I would have felt comfortable with. I was shy—not that I’m not shy now, but I know who I am a bit more, as we all do when we’re older. I think that having gone out and been in the world was good for me. You’ve got to live in order to be able to tell stories about people.” William Defebaugh

COAT CÉliNe EARRINGS WARE’S OWN HITmAN: AGENT 47 IS OuT IN SElECT THEATRES NOW


nominated by grimes “I got to know my boyfriend, Luca, through working on stuf together. We only started dating because of that.” Speaking with Valerie Teicher, aka Tei Shi, one gets the idea that becoming a New York indie-electro darling has less to do with determination and more to do with destiny. “We were like, ‘We’re both moving to New York, let’s work on some stuf.’ He was one of the frst people that I showed my songs to.” The couple cocreated Teicher’s debut EP Saudade in 2013, released after the two graduated from Berklee College of Music (previous alumni include Quincy Jones, Juliana Hatfeld, and John Mayer). It wasn’t until 2014, though, with the release of her sultry cover of Beyoncé’s “No Angel,” that the blogosphere started to buzz around the unknown artist. The next swarm came with her whisper-to-wail track “Bassically,” with which Tei Shi broke out of her sonic shyness. The seductive qualities of Teicher’s vocals could easily peg her as just another artist selling sex, but the music video for “Bassically” shows something far less predictable. Picture this—a Grindhouseinspired group of camo-clad ladies sneaking around back

tei shi

alleyways to battle a reptilian monster. “At frst we wanted it to be like an ’80s cartoony girl army–type thing. We went and bought all these crazy swords and hats and shit.” Teicher was born in Buenos Aires but has lived in Bogotá, Montreal, and Vancouver in addition to New York, where she ended up. The mélange of cultural infuences seeps into her sound. There are traces of R&B, power pop, and electronica, but if she has to defne it she prefers “mermaid music.” Her transfxing voice and penchant for changing hair colors— platinum, blue-green, Fifth Element orange—give this comparison legs. For an ever-evolving artist, though, it’s important to stick to a singular aesthetic. “I’m really picky with who I want to work with just because I feel like it’s really easy to get infuenced,” she says. “I’m kind of holding out on bringing people into the mix right now.” One artist that has made it into the mix is producer Cyril Hahn, well known for his Xanax-injected rework of Destiny’s Child’s “Say My Name.” “He actually was the frst person that ever emailed me. I put out my frst song and the next day

I guess he saw it online,” Teicher recalls. Despite the early enthusiasm and the shared experience of living in Vancouver, it took the two almost a year to meet up. “He’d say, ‘Send me stuf,’ and I’d say, ‘Okay, you send me stuf.’ We both just sucked at sending each other anything.” Another Vancouver local, Grimes, has been an early backer, too. “Her younger brother, Mac, is one of my best friends from home. When I did my frst music video, I did it with him because he also was starting to get into flmmaking, so we shot that at their mom’s house. Grimes saw the video and it was cool, she posted about it when it came out and was very supportive of it.” The two have yet to link up amidst back and forths. “We’ve been meaning to do a Skype session and talk about things for a really long time. I think we’re both just the worst people to make things like that happen.” IAN DAVID MONROE

DRESS ALEXANDER WANG NOSE RING TEI SHI’S OWN TEI SHI IS ON TOUR WITH YEARS & YEARS NOW


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nominated by le1f At Wesleyan University, where Bronx-born Rahel majored in African-American studies—specifcally the media’s representation of black sufering—her interest in pop music was mostly analytical. So, when she decided to release a surprise album called Alkali in March, she wasn’t expecting it to get reviewed by major music outlets like Pitchfork and The FADER. “I was in the gospel choir at school because it was an easy A,” she recalls. “In my last semester, Le1f showed up and was like, ‘What are you doing?!’” He convinced her to feature on his and friend DonChristian’s tracks, and even set up a label so she would release something. “[Camp & Street]’s not really a label,” Rahel corrects. “I don’t want to say it’s a collective, but it’s a crew who told me I needed to sing.” Not that she didn’t want to sing. “I just thought it was an unstable line of work. My parents worked really hard to send me to private school, so it almost felt like I’d be throwing all of that away if I didn’t get a job that had the most earning potential.” After college, her friends continued to nag her about her voice. And then The-Drum’s Jeremiah Meece ofered to executive produce the album. His unique sound, says Rahel, is what really got

RAHEL

her to quit her pre-K teaching job and focus full time on Alkali. “I grew up listening to ’90s R&B for real, for real. Not, like, dabbling in it. I was afraid that the trend in 2012 and ’13 was to harken back to that, and I didn’t want to be another person doing that. I didn’t want to cheapen it in any way.” The other motive for songwriting, says Rahel, was to bring back the love. “People stopped glorifying what it’s like to be in love, or to be heartbroken. Feelings were taken out of a lot of R&B and hip-hop, replaced with hyper-sexualization. I grew up seeing that happen to people who look like me, so I was defnitely like, I can do that, I can rumpshake and I can show my titties of, but I really don’t want to. You get bitter. I’d started making these broad brushstrokes about men, like, ‘This is how they view women, so this is how they’re going to treat women.’” Songs like the bubbly “Bae” and “Serve,” however, are far from bitter, speaking solely of pining after a crush. “How does dating work for me as a black woman?” she asks rhetorically. “I feel crazy all the time, having to be understanding and intimate at the same time, and being like, ‘You’re still a dude, and dudes are dumb…’ I’m paying more attention to

how identity politics play into dating.” Rahel intends to chip away at how “basic” writing love songs can be, she says. “But being slick about it, or making funny little references here or there, it works. People, they get it because that’s kind of their approach to love these days. It’s not as simple as it was in the ’90s.” The idea of love, like music, she argues, has only gotten more confated since the glory days of hook-up music. “People are talking about darker stuf, like how clichéd you actually are, when you thought you weren’t…but you really are.” As complex as the dating scene is now, Rahel’s lyrics are overtly simple, bordering on sentimental. “I was like, ‘How do I get as far away from [hyper-sexualization] as possible?’ It’s going back to, ‘I’m soft, I’m emotional, I can’t handle that stuf.’ It’s getting back to what I was like before. It’s not the same, because as a black woman I feel like my image has been dragged through the mud. So, I’m just trying to get clean here. I’m just trying to get back on track for me and my girls.” NS

ALKALI IS OUT NOW FROM CAMP & STREET RECORDS


nominated by LiV tyLeR Thirty-two-year-old singer-songwriter Domino Kirke is without out a doubt a card-carrying member of the Kirke clan. Apart from a startling resemblance to her acting-inclined younger sisters Jemima (Girls, Tiny Furniture) and Lola (Gone Girl, Mistress America), Kirke possesses the same brand of eccentricity that seems to fow freely in her family—for which the singer feels a deep sense of gratitude. “Both my parents are artists in their own right,” she says. “I didn’t really have the nine-to-fve family. My father [Bad Company drummer Simon] was gone a lot on tour, so from a young age I knew about the music lifestyle. Lola studied theater in school, so I always knew she was going to be an actress, and Jem kind of fell into it in this funny, fuky way. I was the only musician of the siblings, which was nice. We are all very supportive of each other and understanding of the lifestyle. They’re like my muses, those two.” Classically trained by her father and the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art in New York City, Kirke was signed to Fun Machine at the age of 17. Her professional career began in the form of her band DOMINO, which she

domino kirke

started with fellow musician Jordan Galland. “It was more of a pop outft back then,” recalls the singer. “Mark Ronson was producing us and we were on his label and then we toured with Lily Allen and Gang of Four and all these crazy people, and it was amazing, but right as we were about to fnish the record I got pregnant, so I was like, Bye guys.” Her hiatus from music only lasted a couple years, and her solo return (2013’s The Guard) was a critically acclaimed success. Now, Kirke is promoting her newest project—an ethereal new EP called Independent Channel that she created with neighbor and Here We Go Magic frontman Luke Temple. Their atmospheric tracks mark a more evolved, electronic sound for Kirke (the most notable being the EP’s frst single, “Ordinary World”). Appropriate for the singer’s own path, she describes the project as being about transition and change. Kirke will take the songs on the road with Temple for weeks at a time playing shows. Her son, Casius, will stay home with his father, who is a musician as well. “We switch of,” says Kirke, of parent duties. “You go be creative for two weeks and then you come back.”

In between shows and studio sessions, Kirke managed to establish her own doula collective, Carriage House Birth, for which she provides services to the women in her “village” (Williamsburg, Brooklyn). In case you’re wondering, Kirke doesn’t fnd her two jobs to be at odds with each other. “To me it’s all the same. It’s just a life cycle. I don’t have to shift gears. I don’t go to my desk job and then go out at night. It’s all me. And all my clients who are having kids with me know that I perform sometimes, and they get babysitters and they come to the shows.” If anything, becoming a mother and a doula has only enlightened her perspective as a musician. “It’s all so much more fun now. I was so serious before. All I cared about was myself and if people liked it and understood me. I did it all the time so I had no real respect for it. I took it for granted, the amount of time I had to write and record. Now it’s a gift.” WD

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nominated by SHaRon Van etten Twenty-four-year-old Mackenzie Scott hadn’t heard a PJ Harvey album until 2014, she tweeted in March of this year. Yes, comparisons have been made between the singer and Polly Jean, but the tweet is even more interesting if you know that Scott’s second album as Torres, Sprinter, was recorded with the bassist and drummer with whom PJ Harvey most frequently collaborates. “Everyone that I’ve worked with, it’s amazing, they’re practically legends, but I hadn’t listened to any of their respective projects going into it,” she says, adding, too, that Adrian Utley of Portishead played guitar on the record and that her new band will tour with Garbage this fall. Her singing voice is a perfect balance of the emotional intensity on Rid Of Me, the calculated distance on Dummy, and the roughed-up sensuality on Garbage, but that’s most likely what attracted these musicians to her, not the other way around. “I listened to a lot of country and pop music growing up, and then got really into Joan Jett,” she laughs, as if that

torres

should be obvious. “Johnny Cash is kind of my number one,” she adds, mentioning her college years in Nashville before the move to Brooklyn. Scott’s go-to attire refects her love for the man in black, but her voice and lyrics are unquestionably current, emoting the bold wonder that ties Torres to her notoriously determined, if pessimistic, generation. And the press—ever since a string of shows at SXSW and a successful West Coast tour with an all-new backing band—can’t get enough of that voice. Outlets like Pitchfork and NPR often note that Scott is “only 24”—not a descriptor we tend to see in reviews of emerging acts. The incredulity comes from fnding out, through her songs, that Scott has experienced more emotional turmoil than most people born in the nineties. One factor might be that she was adopted, as was her adopted mother. “It’s becoming a surprising bonding element that I didn’t really anticipate or think about a lot as a kid,” says Scott, who was raised in the conservative, Christian city of Macon,

Georgia. The theme of adoption informs her songwriting, too. “There are a lot of questions raised [on the album] about family history and genetics, nurture versus nature. I don’t necessarily think I have answers, not at this point. So it makes its way into the writing as just some questioning. I’m curious about what exactly is in your blood: what sticks from simple genetics and what makes its way in as a part of your upbringing.” Since moving to Brooklyn, Scott has found a musical family of friends who she says are overwhelmingly supportive. “I was obsessed with Sharon Van Etten’s album Tramp before meeting her,” she recalls. Now, they’ve played together and even worked together on a song. “Her music has gotten me through some of the most painful parts of my life thus far,” she says, green eyes downcast. “And she’s been one of the dearest friends I’ve ever had.” NS

EAR CUFF ANA KHOURI TORRES IS ON TOUR WITH GARBAGE NOW


Digital technician Adrien Potier Photo assistant Mattian Satterstrom Stylist assistants Michael Beshara and Yety Akinola Makeup assistant Kalvin Dume Hair assistants Erin Herschleb and Kiyo Igarashi Prop assistant Christina Agostini Location Red Hook Labs Equipment Highline Locations

nominated by tinaSHe Now might be the perfect time for pop punk to make a serious comeback, and although her music is hardly described as such, Bebe Rexha’s attitude alone could funnel many an angst-ridden teen in that direction. Since her debut EP, I Don’t Wanna Grow Up, was released this May, the born-andraised New Yorker has been stomping across stages on the Warped Tour, distancing herself from the electro tracks that put her name on the mainstream map. “Everybody wants to label me as an EDM girl,” she says, half in the British accent she admittedly used to fake on songs like “Take Me Home,” her 2013 Cash Cash collab. “I mean, I was in a band with Pete Wentz [Black Cards, 2010–12]. When you come watch me live, it’s like you’re fucking watching Marilyn Manson on stage. Like, it starts with a choir.” On set for this shoot, Rexha’s mother and brother stop by to see her get glammed—or rather, scrubbed. After the false lashes are pulled of and the blow-out soaked, Rexha’s mother comments in a thick Staten Island accent that she

BEBE REXHA

should always wear this amount of makeup (meaning less). But bright-eyed Bebe is the frst to admit she’s insecure about her looks. “I was bullied,” she says bluntly. “When I was like, 12, there would be 30 girls at the cafeteria table and they would go, Pretty, pretty, pretty, and then when they got to me they’d say, Ugly. And honestly, whatever. I’m actually glad that I was like that because it kind of makes me me.” After hiding behind songwriting for a time (her extensive credits include Eminem and Rihanna’s Grammy-winning “The Monster,” and Tinashe’s “All Hands On Deck”), Rexha stepped back into the spotlight, and while there, aired out the complicated relationship she has with her own sense of self-worth. Fans have echoed her laments ecstatically via social media, often citing the feeling of fnally being understood. Songs like “I Can’t Stop Drinking About You” go where the songs Rexha has written for others can’t. They infuse the most emotional components of dance music (the

builds and drops) with punky disregard for the radio, lyrically. “We’ve had this candy-coated pop,” says Rexha of the state of music today, “and right now we’re kind of in a grayer place, but not in a negative way. That’s what happens with music in general, or fashion. Maybe we want to dress all crazy, and call ourselves all this crazy stuf, and auto-tune, and now this whole new group of girls have come into the spotlight.” She nods to Tove Lo, up next to get her portrait taken. “It’s really raw.” Of course, rawness in song lyrics always leads to speculation about its subject. “Yeah, if you make me fall in love with you, I’m going to write a song about you,” Rexha laughs. “If you make me happy I’m going to write a fucking happy song, and if you screw me over I will dis you in a song, and you will never die. You will be in a song, so you will forever know you were a douchebag. Isn’t that scary?” NS

BEBE REXHA IS ON TOUR WITH NICK JONAS NOW


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AfTeR 50 YeARS AT THe HeLM Of fendi, KARL LAGeRfeLd LOOKS TO THe fUTURe Karl Lagerfeld celebrated his fftieth anniversary at Fendi this past July. Except that “celebrating” probably isn’t the best word. In fact, the designer, who has repeatedly said he prefers to look to the future as opposed to commemorating the past, defers any questions about his tenure as the reigning king of fashion. When I ask him if he has found any recurring themes in his work over the past half century, he wags a half-gloved fnger at me. “I’m not intimidated by a blank page. I have these electric fashes when I see something and—bam!—the ideas just pour out of me. I keep maybe 5 percent of them and the rest go in the trash. That is the most important piece of furniture in my house: the garbage can.” While Lagerfeld refuses to look through fashion history for inspiration, his knowledge of the creative world that came before him is vast. At the moment, we are backstage before the runway presentation of a special collection of Fendi couture—or fourrure—during Paris’s haute couture fashion week. We’re in one of Lagerfeld’s favorite venues in the French capital, the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, which was built in 1913. We have watched the gilded curtain—which was only recently restored to its polished greatness, much to Lagerfeld’s glee—open and close several times, slowly moving like a relic from a forgotten world. The sounds of Russian composer Igor Stravinsky are blaring from the speakers, a nod by the designer to the history of the theater. “The frst time [the French] heard this music was in this room,” Lagerfeld says. “This was the beginning, here, 103 years ago, and it was a huge scandal at the time. They were used to much sweeter sounds.” And, on the back of the stage is Giorgio de Chirico’s surrealist masterpiece Piazza d’Italia, which Lagerfeld chose because this show is a combination of Italy’s—or more specifcally, Fendi’s—masterful use of fur and France’s dedication to haute couture. The greatest accomplishment of Lagerfeld’s design tenure at Fendi is his ability to use fur as any ol’ material. “I have V MAGAZINE 1 6 6

tried my whole life to create a reality where fur is the same as anything else, like a silk or a velvet,” he says. No other house has taken on such a challenge. Fendi’s staf is skillful enough to allow someone like Lagerfeld to, as we see later in his show, create a wedding dress made entirely of snow white sable—a favorite fur of Lagerfeld’s. (There are also no other designers who have proved the capacity to show two couture shows in the same week. Chanel, which included no fur, showed the morning before.) But Lagerfeld is careful to point out that just because it’s fur doesn’t mean it’s fabulous. “If you use it to say, ‘Look how expensive it is,’ then you are being vulgar. As a status symbol alone, using fur is horrible,” he explains. So, who are the shoppers that will soon fll the theater behind us? Are they wearing these designs for warmth? Lagerfeld smiles. “It is true that you will never die of cold if you have on a sable coat, but the people who buy this are not in need of warmth. This is for people who live in a world that has more money than ever before: the world of private jets, private islands, unrelated to a real reality. This is haute couture dresses and evening coats, this is not for the street.” I leave Lagerfeld when the doors to the theater open and take my seat to wait for the heavy, gilded curtain to rise again. As the Stravinsky songs start on the soundtrack, 36 looks parade around the theater, each a one-of design of an exotic fur, like ermine (Lagerfeld’s other favorite). The show opens with a chocolate brown hooded cape, which is followed by a bevy of looks, each more over the top than the one before it. I’m reminded of what Lagerfeld said when he was adjusting the collar on a cape that Lily Donaldson wore backstage. “The idea to put feathers and other things on top of sable, it is very—how shall I say this?—it’s a complete fantasy for fashion.” And if there’s one thing Lagerfeld has given us over the last 50 years, it’s fantasy. derek blasberg

PhotograPhy sChohaJa


louis vuitton:

BEST nEw muSE

“What will happen to me if I fail your test?” The question, posed by the cyborg character Ava in this year’s sci-fi sleeper film Ex Machina, is loaded with implications. The alpha subject of a Turing test to determine her ability to persuade her tester that she is a sentient girl, Ava is certain that her inability to successfully pass as human will secure her doom. For Alicia Vikander, the actress who commandeered the role—and the attentions of rapt audiences worldwide—there is sure to be no such fate. Though she’d appeared in nine feature films prior to Machina’s release, including the critically acclaimed A Royal Affair, the young Swede’s performance of Ava cemented her arrival in Hollywood as the hottest young v mAGAZINE 1 6 8

actress of the year. It’s no wonder a luxury contract came ex supra. “I’ve always admired his work and followed his career,” Vikander says of Nicolas Ghesquière, the designer fastest to bring the actress into fashion’s fold at Louis Vuitton. “To hear that he watched my flms and had been looking out for me was the biggest honor to hear.” Vikander joins the ranks of Jennifer Connelly, Michelle Williams, Charlotte Gainsbourg, and the eminent Catherine Deneuve as an ofcial Louis Vuitton ambassador—an intimidating clique of some of cinema’s nerviest and most emotionally intelligent performers. “They’re all such strong and artistic and free, free women,” Vikander says. “I’m at the beginning, but that’s

PhotograPhy Paolo roversi CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES loUis vUitton THE DANISH GIRL IS IN THEATERS NOvEmbER 27

Makeup Marie Duhart (Atomo) Hair Yannick d’Is (Management Artists)

she went from on-screen robot to red-hot campaign star in the blink of an eye. get to know alicia vikander, the unreal new talent everybody’s buzzing about

what I aspire to be myself. I met them for the frst time at the shows and that was quite a big thing, just to be able to shake hands and say hi. But all of them are like, the most down to earth, cool women. They greeted me with open arms. If I was nervous beforehand, it wasn’t very bad.” And the fashion! “It’s interesting,” Vikander says. “When I see Nicolas’s work, it always makes me remember certain other eras. Sometimes ’70s, and I can see the ’60s. But I think the thing that makes his work very futuristic is that he’s able to see what actually is happening now. I went to a show last year and saw references from earlier times, and yet just a year after it seems like whatever he’s created has become something that I’ve seen in fashion in other places. He’s able to pay tribute to past things that he can relate to and that he is inspired by and he uses his own little magic to create something new.” This blending of eras is evident in Vikander’s oeuvre to date, which includes seventeenth-century Holland (Tulip Fever), nineteenth-century Russia (Anna Karenina), eighteenth-century Denmark (A Royal Afair), 1920s Denmark (The Danish Girl), 1960s Italy and Germany (The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), and the future (Ex Machina)—to name only a handful of her flms, half of which come out this year alone. “I do a lot of time traveling,” she laughs. “As an actor it’s lovely to be transferred to diferent times, spaces, and contexts. To be on a set where you’re in a diferent time, it kind of helps you, it does a lot of the work for you creating your character and your journey, and story. In Man from U.N.C.L.E., to suddenly walk out of the hotel and have Rome closed down, with 300 extras walking around in the ’60s with amazing outfts and vintage cars, with all the store windows totally changed into a ’60s vibe, I was just amazed. I was able to play in that world and really fool myself that I was there. It’s a bit of magic to come on those sets, it helps you use your imagination.” With Ex Machina, Tulip Fever, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Light Between Oceans, Adam Jones, and The Danish Girl all out in 2015, Vikander owes her cresting year both to instinct and coincidence. “It’s defnitely overwhelming,” she admits. “It’s strange because the flms that come out this year, some of them were flms that have been two or three years in the making. I mean, I’ve pinched my arm I don’t know how many times in the last couple of years. I’ve gradually started to feel more comfortable in the industry and the work and feeling more at home in the craft, but with the flms coming out you do the press, and I haven’t done any of that up until now, suddenly.” Remarkable, given her of-the-cuf candor and gregarious ease with conversation (her English is fuent, her laugh seductively raspy). “I’m just very happy to know the flms are fnally seeing their audience.” With no shortage of role ofers on the horizon thanks to her surging profle—bolstered most recently by the announcement of a new Bourne flm with Matt Damon—Vikander is sticking to her process of seeing what, or who, grabs her attention most vividly. “It’s a bit like falling in love,” she says. “If I look back on the flms I’ve done, it’s probably been meeting people, the directors and actors I really wanted to work with. The people involved have really meant a lot to me. When you meet people you admire and they tell you about a vision or an idea and they invite you to come try to make it a reality, that’s when I really get engaged. I get almost a tunnel vision and just want to get lost in whatever project is right.” If Ex Machina doesn’t earn Vikander attention come awards season (which it should: her arresting Ava seamlessly embodies the uncanny valley between real and artifcial to an unnerving and unforgettable degree, thanks in part to the actress’s background in dance), The Danish Girl surely will. In the flm, Vikander portrays the early twentieth century Danish artist Gerda Wegener, married to Einar Wegener, one of the frst documented recipients of sexual reassignment surgery, played by Oscar-winner Eddie Redmayne. Directed by Oscar-winning Tom Hooper (Les Misérables, The King’s Speech), the flm comes as a veritable pressure-cooked feast for Academy voters. But perhaps the most exciting prospect could be a Machina sequel. Wishful thinking? “Next Machina,” Vikander says with a tormenting laugh. “It’s a curiosity everyone possibly has, walking out of the cinema. I would love to work with everyone who was involved in that flm and I adored creating Ava. But I love to see a flm that can be its own story, that lives on by itself and has its own life.” With a singular career already at the young age of 26, the beautiful Vuitton girl could easily be describing the story of Alicia. “I really hope I will do more sci-f flms, too,” she adds. Being that Ghesquière is quite the sci-f buf himself, it goes without saying that the house would approve. Patrik sandberg


prada:

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Makeup Susie Sobol (Julian Watson) Hair Shin Arima (Frank Reps) Models Alice Metza (The Society), Alex Prado and Astrid Holler (IMG), Genad Wilen (Red), Grace Bol (Elite), Serena Jara Manicure Kelly B. using Dior Vernis Production Helena Seward Digital technician Kyle Petrozza Photo assisant Fletcher Lawrence Stylist assistant Kristen Mom Makeup assistants Ayaka Nihei and Kuma Production assistant Daniel Aros Location Root Drive-In


THE UNIFORM IS PERHAPS ONE OF THE MOST BANAL MODES OF DRESS, BUT MIUCCIA PRADA’S F/W ’15 MEN’S AND WOMEN’S COLLECTIONS ARE ANYTHING BUT. WITH CEREBRAL TWISTS AND STRICT, MILITANT LINES, PRADA TURNS THE REGIMENTED STYLE ON ITS HEAD AND PROVES THAT SOMETIMES YOU’VE GOT TO SUIT UP TO STAND OUT


oscar de la renta:

best new classic

The ofce of Oscar de la Renta hasn’t changed much since the designer’s passing in the fall of 2014. The corner of the twenty-ffth foor of the fashion house’s headquarters on 42nd Street is still a serene, whitewashed space with a big bookcase of well-worn Post-it note–flled tomes on master painters, fowers, gardens, and fashion history. The walls are adorned with signed photographs featuring design triumphs from de la Renta worn by famous actresses, frst ladies, and top models shot by Annie Leibovitz. In fact, the only thing that has changed in the two seasons since the designer’s death after a long battle with cancer is the person sitting behind the desk: Peter Copping, who de la Renta handpicked as his successor. “This [ofce] is something so special to inherit,” Copping says. “You can learn a lot about somebody by the books V MAGAZINE 1 74

they read and the things they liked to see.” Copping, who served as the creative director of Nina Ricci before this post, is hulky but with a light touch and sensitive, big blue eyes. He has the delicate voice of an Englishman and the dry humor of his homeland. Keeping a fashion company afoat after the passing of its founder is not a new concept. Look no further than Balenciaga and Lanvin—designers who died in the last century but whose labels we still see on shop foors. In the modern era, de la Renta’s experience most closely mirrors that of Valentino Garavani. However, when Garavani retired in 2008, he was at frst publicly disappointed in his replacement (the designer Alessandra Facchinetti, who lasted two seasons) and then was appeased when two of his protégés, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Maria Grazia Chiuri, took over to great

PhotograPhy Dominick shelDon Fashion stella greensPan CLOTHING AND JEWELRY oscar De la renta

Makeup Susie Sobol (Julian Watson Agency) Hair Hiro + Mari (Bryan Bantry) Model Mina Cvetkovic (Women Management) Digital technician Haren Mehta Photo assistants Alex Austin and Ian Barling Stylist assistant Derek Brown Makeup assistant Ayaka Nihei Location Canoe Studios

for his first collection in succession to the late, great designer, peter copping updates an elegant legacy

critical praise. “Oscar himself never wanted to stand still, so you want to keep things moving, but yes, you have to be happy that what you are creating is part of your vision too,” Copping says of the challenge of stepping into an established house. What Copping fnds both inspiring and ironic about the brief time he crossed over with his predecessor – which was only a few months – was how little de la Renta wanted to speak about fashion in their chats. “Oscar was someone who operated on so many diferent levels and had so many things going on in his life. Fashion was just one of them, which he would paint into a much broader picture,” Copping says. In fact, they only discussed fashion one time, he recalls, when Copping phoned from a fabric mill in Italy. Perhaps what de la Renta saw in Copping was something he recognized in himself. The story of Oscar de la Renta is fashion legend: The youngest of seven children and the only boy, he was born in 1932 to a middle class family in the Dominican Republic. At 19, he studied painting in Madrid and sketched dresses for newspapers and fashion houses. The wife of the US ambassador to Spain saw a sketch and commissioned some dresses for her daughter’s coming-out, which led him to the studio of Cristóbal Balenciaga, who became his mentor. After Balenciaga, he worked for Lanvin in Paris, and then in 1963, came to New York to lay the foundation for his own label. But it was during his time in Paris that his imagination let loose and his creative inspiration fourished. “That’s what I bring to the label now,” Copping, who, prior to his Nina Ricci post, worked at Louis Vuitton, explains. “I bring 20 years of working in Paris, which was such an essential feeling for Oscar. Not that he would only want me to bring something – it’s just as important to be able to maintain things too.” Copping and his partner, Rambert Rigaud, a distinguished forist, moved to New York’s West Village last November and have been adjusting to the city’s particular swirl. This hasn’t exactly been easy since, after two decades in the French capital, “we were completely set up,” Copping says. “We knew the boulangerie to go to; we had a house in the country in Normandy.” One of his biggest adjustments was flling de la Renta’s society shoes. “I always thought I was quite social, but Oscar was another level. In New York, it’s not uncommon to have three black ties in a single week. I wore a tuxedo two times a year in Paris. But that was one way Oscar built his business, and it’s important to do that. No one knew their clientele like Oscar did.” Indeed, it will ultimately be the ladies-who-lunch crowd that decides Copping’s fate, not the fashion press. Luckily for him, though, his frst show in February was a bittersweet moment for Annette de la Renta, the designer’s widow, who stoically led the brigade of de la Renta loyalists. (Copping proved he can win over a younger crowd of sophisticates too, with Taylor Swift and Karlie Kloss perched in the front row.) “I’ve been speaking to Oscar’s friends, like Carolyne Roehm, and I’ve met with his old design assistants and some of his old house models. It’s been interesting to speak to those people. He was a very loved man.” He also points out that New York is a friendlier fashion town than Paris, at least when it comes to designers. Vera Wang, Francisco Costa, and Joseph Altuzarra all sent him fowers and congratulations after his frst show. Copping’s fondest fashion moment from de la Renta’s career is the one he can’t seem to physically track down. He remembers that back in the early nineties, when de la Renta designed Balmain’s haute couture collection there was a particular dress “that was designed with such a slight of hand, and with the most wonderful embroidery. It got so much editorial. I saw it everywhere. I dreamt of that dress. But I haven’t been able to fnd it.” Then the designer, still easing into his predecessor’s ofce, looks around and a smile dances across his blue eyes. “But you know what? I’m sure it’s in here somewhere.” Derek BlasBerg


NICK KNIGHT’S BEST-KEPT SECRET:

KALI UCHIS

WITH A MOUTH LIKE A SAILOR AND A VOICE LIKE AN ANGEL, THIS SELF-MADE STAR IS NOTHING LIKE THE REST photography NICK KNIght FashIoN CarrI MuNdeN V MAGAZINE 1 76


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Makeup Jess Taylor Hair Roxane Attard using Bumble and bumble Production SHOWstudio Manicure Kate Cutler (WAH Nails) Digital technician Laura Falconer Photo assistants Britt Lloyd and Markn Ogue Stylist assistant Randa Rherba Retouching Tom Wandrag (Epilogue Imaging Ltd) Lighting Direct

In a jazzy, high-hat dappled summer jam, a Melanie Safka– esque purr switches between English, Spanish, and doo-wop flls, asking us to “stay afoat when it feels like it’s all going nowhere.” The singer-songwriter of “Rush,” Kali Uchis, is having a moment in the surf and sun, but she’s not counting on anything to stay the way it is. Like the song says, the 22-year-old instead opts to let the tide “rush all over.” That’s because for Uchis—who grew up in Colombia, spent her adolescence in Virginia, and now lives in California—even before she started touring the world, nothing was permanent. “I hate baggage,” she says, her voice almost gone after torch-singing and uptempo-ing through her frst European dates in May. “When I moved to L.A. I brought one book bag with me and donated all my old things to charity. I don’t need any of it, and I am very OCD about having ties.” It’s a theme that runs not only through the lyrics of Uchis’s sophomore album, Por Vida, but her online output as well. She’s fne with deleting whole projects—like a music video she made for an early song, “Table For Two,” which one fan later reposted on YouTube without permission—not that she’s embarrassed. Her newer videos are simply better, she says. And like her carefully curated Tumblr, what Uchis has invented to represent her current mood is what sits at the top of the list. Nothing else matters in this scheme. To accompany the self-released nine-track Por Vida, Uchis designed shirts that borrow Fiorucci’s classic cherubs and put them up for sale on her website. She next styled and starred in a Death Proof– inspired road trip, a Moonrise Kingdom–referencing romance, and a Nick Knight–directed video for which this photo shoot acted as an embryo. Movies and magazines from every era

inspire her Old Hollywood-meets-ambiguously religious deity aesthetic. If it seems like Uchis lives in her own world, that’s because she does. “Growing up, I was criticized a lot for being Latina with white skin and blonde hair. My family would make fun and say I looked adopted. I felt like a black sheep. Nowhere felt like home. My family didn’t feel like family. I felt constantly misunderstood, manipulated, abused, and outcast everywhere.” She retreated into recording and art directing, mastering the process of creating a song and its video from start to fnish pretty much on her own. Her frst album, Drunken Babble, she recorded and released within 48 hours. Impressed by her extensive knowledge of old school R&B, Snoop Dogg hit her up for a collaboration, and 2014’s “On Edge” was born. The feature and production asks followed, including one from Tyler, The Creator, whose endorsement put her on a certain discerning music media map. Immediately, comparisons were drawn. Amy Winehouse and Lana Del Rey came up most often, likely based on the look. Uchis was already used to that. “When I got older and grew into my facial structure as a teenager it became, ‘You’re Lady Gaga, Gwen Stefani, Miley Cyrus, Kreayshawn, Iggy Azalea.’ I could always tell what female artist with blonde hair was most relevant at the time based on which one I was compared to.” Her classic sad-girl sentiment at times shifts to a switchblade-sharp defense behind those pearl-glossed lips. “In my opinion,” she continues, “comparison is the laziest way to defne something. I would rather be defned eloquently, with an educated synopsis. But we live in a society where, as females, we are judged by our looks, rather than our minds or talent. This is why the

entertainment industry is so difcult for true artists. They push the model-Barbies to the front of the stage while backing them with a well-oiled machine of writers, creative directors, stylists, choreographers, image counselors, etc.” A true DIY-er, Uchis has learned to let a lot roll of her back, adopting some Zen-like mantras concerning shit-talking. “Nowadays I don’t respond, or I just smile and say, ‘Okay,’ because it’s a natural, everyday occurrence. I’ve been a sarcastic jerk before, asking them if they wanted an autograph, telling them to take a picture or to eat a dick. After a while, coming up with witty responses just got boring.” Now, she’ll instead wear a shirt that says “Eat a Dick” in Coca-Cola Classic font and post it on Instagram for her 68k followers to like. Her fans hang on her every post. But Uchis hasn’t lost her sense of direction with infated attention. She’s working on another record now, after a slew of press outings and sold-out shows. “As an artist, you have a choice,” she says, launching into a lesson in industry endurance. “There’s the conventional way to go about things. The packaged, proven way. This road has been frolicked on by many and most. The industry puts their money on these people because they are a safe bet, the ones who don’t dare to defy genre or disturb the formulas. These entertainers will have their moment of fame and fortune, and they will become celebrities like they always wanted to be. They will have great choreography and two dancers on each side of them, their hit single will take quickly to radio, and every kid in America will know the words to their song. It’s just so boring, so predictable. I want to build my own road, even if it takes longer.” NATASHA STAGG


girl most likely

lana del rey By steVen klein & mel ottenBerg

Best new romantics By nick knigHt & amanda HarlecH

Best in tHe west

grimes By mario sorrenti & mel ottenBerg

simply tHe Best

top models By seBastian Faena & JUlia Von BoeHm

Best new girl

lineisy montero By willy Vanderperre & katy england

Best wisHes

By sølVe sUndsBø & Beat Bolliger

next Best tHings

on lindsey wixson By lady gaga, antHony maUle, & Brandon maxwell

Best oF BotH worlds By pierre deBUsscHere & tom Van dorpe

Best makeoVer

By ricHard BUrBridge, peter pHilips, & cHarlotte collet V MAGAZINE 181


the enigmatic star captivating a generation of listeners rarely gives interviews and hates the press. now preparing to unveil her latest album, lana del rey turns over a new leaf. as she tells her good friend James franco, this is the honeymoon of her life photography steven klein fashion mel ottenberg teXt James franco Last year when I was doing Of Mice and Men on Broadway, I watched Lana Del Rey’s video for “Ride” while I was waiting to go onstage. I was immediately taken with Lana’s magic. The video features an American landscape and a soundscape pushed to the extremes of loneliness: a lost soul sings from lonely motel rooms in desert wastelands about the kindness of strangers that she has met on the road. I later learned that the song was a testament of all that is Lana: a contrast between innocence and experience, light and dark, life and death. Almost every one of her songs features a lovelorn angel who has comingled with a devil, and as a result has tasted the highest passion, even though the relationship will also lead to her doom. After watching the “Ride” video I asked my friend Keegan Allen for Lana’s number. By coincidence it was her birthday, so I texted her birthday wishes while she was on tour in Europe. When she returned to the States two weeks later she came to Of Mice and Men and we quickly became friends over our mutual love of music and flm. One of our constant subjects of conversation is persona versus the true self. As an actor I see art as a performance, and even life as a performance. Lana as a singer-songwriter sees her work as an expression of her reality. I try to argue that even if her songs V MAGAZINE 1 8 2

are confessional, they are contributing to a creation of Lana’s making—that her “reality” is largely of her own creation. This view disturbs Lana because she sees herself as a creative reporter of her experience, rather than an active sculptor of her persona. She asked me to interview her for V because the regular interviewers inevitably ask the same questions about her love life and her death wishes. They read too literally into her lyrics, and generally try to denigrate her for reasons I can’t fathom, but suspect have something to do with her being a successful woman, albeit one who writes songs about the dark side of life rather than uplifting anthems of positivity. Lana has outlived the live fast-die young period, if only because she is now older than James Dean ever was. The tragic heroines in her songs might live tragic lives and die for love before their time, but the real Lana has endured. Her songs might involve broken fgures living in the dark, beautiful realms of the shadows, but her career is the opposite: a feminine triumph against all odds amidst an uproar of critics who purposely misread her. Lana is an enigma that after a year I am still unable to untangle. She seems to want her songs to be read as confessions, while on the other hand so much of her work is a conscious creation. As always, I tried to get to the bottom the mystery that is Lana Del Rey.


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JAMES FRANCO I saw a headline that said that you and I were secretly dating. LANA DEL REY Is there something you want to clear up in print? JF Well, I wonder why people think that. LDR I think it’s natural for them to think it, because we have common interests and we’ve spent time together. We’re of the same ilk. It wouldn’t be far-fetched for somebody who was looking in on it, right? JF I remember how we became friends. You came to my play and I felt like we just really got along. LDR Defnitely, me too. JF Tell me about your videos—when you’re performing in them, it seems to me like you’re supposed to be a character. LDR I was surprised at how much you thought that it was a character, and looking back I do get it. I think it’s so hard to tell what facets of a person go into what you see on-screen. I’m hesitant to divulge further because when you’re in a certain position you try to keep part of the story to yourself even though you feel compelled to share it artistically. I think that’s been a little bit of a roadblock for me, feeling like I was writing about things autobiographically and following in that vein visually. There were things I wanted to say but I didn’t want to comment on them any further than in the medium that I put them in. JF With songwriters, a lot of their work is read like it’s fact. LDR When you write a record, lyrically, completely yourself and then you conceptualize these videos, people have no other alternative than to take them at face value. I think considering the content of the videos and the songs, that’s where the criticism arises from. But I do have a colorful past, and I’ve been pretty candid about that. JF So, what about a song like “Florida Kilos”? LDR It’s funny you should bring up that song because that’s actually the only co-write on [Ultraviolence]. And that is Harmony Korine. He wanted me to write a tune about his movie that I think you’re going to be in [The Trap]. It’s about cocaine cowboys. So for fun, that was something where he was just spitting of insane lyrics and asking me to put them into melodies. That song in particular is not autobiographical. JF But there is that expectation, that people will read into it. LDR I mean, that’s the risk! JF Maybe you didn’t consider these kinds of things as much on your frst album because you had this naïve freedom... but then it got so big. Does that change the way you write? LDR A little bit. I didn’t monitor myself on Ultraviolence because, with how tumultuous my trajectory has been, I felt even more of a need to be candid. You have to select things within your own body of work for a record if you want a concept record—which they all are, in my mind. For instance, for Ultraviolence, I really felt the need to get back to my roots and back to something that felt a little more feral and wild. That’s why I asked Dan [Auerbach of the Black Keys] to help me—that’s the kind of world he lives in. He does whatever he wants. I had a lot of freedom to do a song in one take. Even if it’s not perfect and my voice is breaking, it’s special to me because it’s the moment it was captured in. The concept with that record was to be as raw as I wanted to be. JF Even though you had been criticized? LDR The luxury is that you get to continue to tell your story. The reward is in documenting your life, if that’s something that’s important to you. I’m not really a director, but I do like to write and for a writer, you don’t know any story better than your own. In some ways making the record is easy, and then talking about it is hard. With Honeymoon, I got to feel a little more playful. I didn’t feel the need to delve into personal issues as much, but to indulge in a more jazzy feel for the opening and closing of the record and then get a little bit grimier in the middle with some mid- to up-tempo songs. JF Charles Barkley would say, “Look, I’m an athlete. I play basketball really well. I’m not a role model.” When you get criticized for not putting out a positive message, it’s weird to me. LDR First of all, when you’re writing a record alone, you don’t really think about the efect your music is going to have on other people. I’m not really the type of person to condone any behavior that would end up being harmful to anyone else but at the same time I’m not going to limit my lyrical content to things that don’t really relate to me or sing about things just because they rhyme. The further away I get from each record the more space I have to think about whether it’s important to be responsible. I still don’t know. I’ve been infuenced by things I’ve read—that’s why I’m a writer—but I don’t think it’s ever made me do something I wasn’t going to do anyway. I always bring up Allen Ginsberg and “Howl” and how interesting it was that it resonated with me at 14 and that it didn’t with most of my classmates. In fact, it didn’t with any of them. There was a reason why Beat poetry was

important to me as soon as I discovered it. But people would stay up all night on amphetamines at that time and churn out novels and it didn’t make me want to do that! It made me want to play with words. Some people listen to music and they don’t really think about it too much further than that they like to hear it in the car. Some people listen to it and they think, “God, that’s appalling, I’m not going to let my daughter listen to that.” The luxury we have as a younger generation is being able to fgure out where we want to go from here, which is why I’ve said things like, “I don’t focus on feminism, I focus on the future.” It’s not to say that there’s not more to do in that area. I’ve gotten to witness through history the evolution of so many movements and now I’m standing at the forefront of new technological movements. I’m not undermining other issues. But I feel like that’s obvious, like I shouldn’t even have to bring that up. JF There’s something about singer-songwriters. You get a particular kind of pressure. LDR But we need to be taken at face value. At the forefront of the Civil Rights Movement were the folk singers, because of what they were saying. JF In old movies, the gangsters would have to be punished. LDR Being a writer is more like being a director than it is like being an actor. You’re directing the script. Nobody’s telling you what to do and you choose where that lyrical story is going to go. As you’ve seen with the stuf I’ve gone through, you can’t control anything else that follows it. The story is in the record. It’s your decision as to whether that person is your taste or not. I mean, you can’t be everybody’s cup of tea. JF Your songs are evocative because they capture human circumstances so well. You’re articulating things in a very clear way. LDR Thank you. I think you hit the nail on the head because clarity is the key. A lot of people have good ideas, but it’s all about communication. With a lot of my songs, you don’t have to look much further. I’m right here. It’s right here. We could almost talk about anything else because I’m putting it all out there already. Any time you have a question you can always refer back to the songs. Therein the story lies. JF The new album is a little less dark, but it is dark. LDR So is life! JF And art is the place for that kind of thing. It needs to be talked about. It needs to be put into psalms. I look at something I’ve done, like Spring Breakers. The character I play in that flm is not a role model. He’s a murderer, he’s a drug dealer, he’s crazy, he’s kind of a clown. But on another level, he is sort of a liberated fgure and almost a guru. If you look at the flm as a piece of art that uses extreme circumstances to talk about the human condition, then I’m very proud of it. We captured something unique and I feel that’s true of your songs as well. LDR You have to remember that historically, cinema is where people go to be entertained and to escape. It’s the truest form of entertainment that America knows and loves. And music, historically, is where people have gone to look for truth, if you’re talking about roots singers, folk singers, jazz singers, and the origins of rock and roll. But that being said, music has gotten to a very diferent place now where stars of all sorts are all on the same shelf to be looked at by the same eye. I don’t mean that in a demeaning way. I think my music has gotten to the point where the visuals are just as important. JF You told me that you never wanted to be a live performer, at least not in huge venues, but it sounds like [the Endless Summer Tour] was a really positive experience. LDR It was amazing. We played 40,000 capacity shows. Being in America, that defnitely blew my mind. JF So you’re getting used to it? LDR Yeah [laughs]. JF Tell me about your recording process. LDR I guess my process has been similar for the past six years. I took two years in London and Sweden and elsewhere in Europe to do Born to Die. That time frame came from the fact that my song was on the radio and it was time to have a full record. So I picked my favorite songs. [The Paradise Edition] was out about a year later. Then a year and a few months after that Ultraviolence came out, and now a year and a few months later, I’ll have another record out. I toured for a few months, I made my record for about eight months before. I mixed and mastered for three additional months. Now I’m in a great position where I can conceptualize something else if I want to. JF You’re already thinking about the next one? LDR I’m always thinking about the next one. JF You played me one song that I wanna say was gospel infuenced, from the new record. LDR There’s one song called “God Knows I Tried” which has a little bit of a gospel feel to it. There are a few songs that

are really easy to listen to, like “Honeymoon” and this song called “Terrence Loves You.” They’re beautiful melodies with a kind of noir atmosphere. The middle section of the record is pretty beachy and a bit more sexy and mid-tempo. JF Who are your early, eternal infuences? LDR Nothing really started for me until I was 17, and I haven’t grown out of that taste. The frst would be Bob Dylan. He’s the person I always look to. He’d probably hate hearing that, but it’s true. I love how efortlessly his muse came to him and I liked hearing him talk about when that stopped. He kept writing anyway, with diferent styles, from folk to electric. I love the D. A. Pennebaker flm Dont Look Back. That was a big infuence for me, seeing all the people he had on the road with him, like Joan Baez and his band. I also love Nirvana. That’s been well documented. You know, Nevermind. I love Courtney. Being with her [on tour] was like a real-life dream. I love everything she does. I’m really inspired by her and her approach to life. The Beach Boys. Pet Sounds. I love Dennis Wilson’s solo stuf. JF It’s funny, I associate you so much with the West Coast but you’re a total East Coast baby. You were just so drawn to everything West Coast? LDR I was. I didn’t even know I was incorporating so much imagery from the West Coast into my videos, even when I was 16. At that point, that was the dream life. Then I got here and it could all be real. And it is [laughs]. It’s a beautiful thing when that happens. JF Why did you call the new album Honeymoon? LDR “Honeymoon.” I guess it’s the word that sums up the ultimate dream. I mean, life is a honeymoon, y’know? Life, love, paradise, freedom...that’s forever. With someone, or just with yourself. It just felt right, kind of the way Ultraviolence felt right before that, when I had a little more rage [laughs]. I love the concept that life is a dream and you curate your own space so that it becomes your heaven. It’s all contingent upon your state of mind, which is why I don’t always do interviews—because it puts me in a bad fucking mood. I really try and keep my world beautiful but it’s tricky. We’re at a point in time when life truly can be what you want it to be. Is that something you think about or do you just think about work? JF My life is exactly how I want it to be. LDR I know this interview isn’t about you, but something I’ve always wondered was, is it necessary for your life to be an extension of your art? JF I try to make my private life as stable as possible so I can do whatever I want in my creative life. And one of the most intimate things I can do is make something with somebody. I have one more question. You once said that you were more successful in Europe. Do you still feel that way? LDR People’s perspectives are always changing. People change their minds. But I know that when I go to Paris and play a residency at the Olympia that it’s going to be beautiful and I’m not going to be misunderstood. I never was, in France or Milan. Even for all the hard times I’ve had in some of the British press it was my frst home, musically. So it’s probably always going to be that way. But I do feel a lot more comfortable here now. JF You’re the number-one female artist here in terms of streaming. Your music is undeniably popular. [laughs] LDR I guess there’s a really big discrepancy in the amount of people who apparently listen to the music and a very vocal sector of people who have a lot of negative things to say. I mean, they almost cancel each other out. Statistics are so ethereal, it’s hard to get a grasp on them. So, hearing what people say to your face if you have an altercation or if you read something in a publication that you read everyday, I don’t think you can ever have a good grasp on whether people like you or not. But that doesn’t mean they’re not listening. JF It’s not like you’re… LDR A shock rock artist? JF Right! And if you could just make your music without giving any interviews, you would. You’re not asking for a lot of attention, but you strike such a chord with people. Why is that? LDR I think if you take an artist at face value, you’re forced to look at the lyrical content and some of it isn’t that easy to digest. People do have bad reactions to some of the more negative scenarios I might go into musically. If it’s not that, it’s something else, and what that something else is, we’ll probably never know, right? But my work is my life and I feel lucky to be able to travel around with a journal and take in nature and refect my interpretations of that in song form. I mean, it’s a luxury, and I know that. As uncomfortable as my interviews can be, when I’m not doing them I have all this time to do what I want. And to be able spend your life doing what you love? That’s the ultimate goal.

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photography nick knight fashion amanda harlech “the eloquence of molly bair is evoked through the lens of nick knight, in gestures of light and shadow, a poem. code name: hamlet. renaissance scholar, poet. ‘amor’ is an expression about the romance of thinking, the algebra of love, the equation of thought and how it is expressed. design is a voice—the questioning of cloth until it sings, the mystery of great design by the greatest designers, the deep currents of obsession to perfect a truth”—amanda harlech V MAGAZINE 193


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somehow between touring with lana del rey, illustrating comics, and attending fashion shows in the desert, claire boucher—aka grimes—has managed to move to l.a. and record a full album—the follow-up to her breakout lp, visions. she’s also remained an inspiration to designers worldwide. go inside the weird world of pop music’s lone ranger photography mario sorrenti fashion mel ottenberg text patrik sandberg

Catching up with Claire Boucher, the sonic and visual wizard behind the popular alternative music project Grimes, can be trying. Email her, and you’re likely to receive an autoresponse: “I’m no longer using email,” she signs of, with a heart emoji, after issuing a directive to contact a representative at Roc Nation. Being that Roc Nation is the entertainment management company famously founded by Jay-Z and looks after the careers of artists like Rihanna, Timbaland, Shakira, and Kanye West, it’s not the most obvious match for a self-described “comic book villain” known for composing neo-baroque, goth, science-fction operas in her bedroom in Vancouver, British Columbia. But then again, Boucher isn’t one for sticking to the obvious. “I want to do the opposite of anything anyone ever thought Grimes was,” Boucher says. She’s recently relocated to Los Angeles, where she’s putting the fnishing touches on a new album, the follow-up to 2012’s rapturously received Visions. “My favorite thing about California is that you can be fairly weird in public and people don’t seem to mind,” she says. “You could probably walk around L.A. in a bathrobe and no shoes and no one would care. L.A. has a lot of issues, but the city is very alive, although it’s quite dystopian.” As evidenced by her work on previous albums Visions, Halfaxa, and her 2010 debut, Geidi Primes, Boucher is drawn to the darker side of the galaxy when it comes to music, style, and her other creative endeavors. Her comic illustrations that accompany her music often fuse the morbid with the bubbly and the grotesque. Of her current style, she says, “I guess I’m drawn to things that seem like something a villain would wear.” Her cowboy hats and two trench coats are her favorite wardrobe items at the moment. “Honestly I would wear better things onstage but my show is so physical that I tend to either fash people or injure myself or ruin the clothes,” she says. Coming of the second half of Lana Del Rey’s 2015 Endless Summer Tour (Courtney Love took the frst half), Boucher is referring to her uniform of simple. “It’s defnitely not a representation of my style goals,” she continues. “If I’m worried about ruining outfts, that can negatively impact the show, unfortunately. That’s one of the reasons I admire pop stars so much, people who can perform in heels blow my mind.” Of her current favorite crop of artists, she lists Del Rey in addition to Perfume Genius, Azealia Banks, Paramore, Avril Lavigne, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Nine Inch Nails, Tink, Tei Shi, FKA twigs, and the K-pop star Kyary Pamyu Pamyu—artists she’s regularly shouted out on Twitter and her widely followed and at times contentious Tumblr page. “I think for a long time I didn’t really internalize things and I felt like I could be fairly candid in public,” she says. “But lately I’ve had to become a lot more private. My carefree Twitter days are over, I’m afraid.” Consider it a transfer of energy. Now that Boucher is living more of the grid—save for a few thrilled rants regarding Game of Thrones, when she feels so compelled—she has more time to work on her music, which she writes, produces, and records all by herself. “I’ve V MAGAZINE 2 0 8

really had to put up with a lot and give up a lot of opportunities to maintain my authorship and keep control over this project,” she says. “It’s still difcult for women to do technical jobs in music and therefore I feel obligated to not outsource. Honestly, I want more stuf to exist that has no male producers so if the teenage version of me exists somewhere, she doesn’t feel like she’s inherently worse at the technical aspects of music simply because of her biological gender. I think one of the reasons why women are such a minority in music is because it can be hostile working in technical roles. I’ve been in studios and literally not been allowed to touch the computers, whereas my male counterparts were. Even when women coproduce they are often uncredited in the press. I’ve seen it happen a million times and it’s happened to me. I feel like I have to do this alone simply to get credit for my work. But even if that wasn’t the case, it’s always been an auteur kind of project. I enjoy doing everything. But sometimes I collaborate with other people.” One such collaboration with indie rock musician Jack Antonof, the song “Entropy,” wound up soundtracking the closing credits of a crucial episode of HBO’s Girls last season. “I can only write music with people I love, and Jack has been really good to me and is generally extremely chill,” Boucher says. “One of the main reasons I wanted to work with a producer like Jack was to get out of my sonic comfort zone and do something with somebody with a completely diferent skill set.” As for the new record, Boucher is staying reticent…for now. “It has a name but I don’t know if I’m allowed to reveal it,” she laughs. “It’s pretty diferent from Visions. I change my sound every album. Visions was pretty much entirely made on one keyboard and this album has guitars and violin solos and stuf like that. It’s just way more grandiose but equally if not more weird and fun, simultaneously.” Of the fashion industry’s support over the past three years, Boucher’s appreciation and curiosity only continues to grow. “Designers are probably the main people who add, creatively, to Grimes,” she says. “I always spend a lot of time researching designers and being aware of what’s up and what’s new. Fashion seems to be an imperial phase currently and it’s a cool art form because clothing as art is essentially creating cool characters. It meshes well with performers. I think there are some great artists of style who work in fashion, like Mel [Ottenberg], Pat McGrath, Nicolas Ghesquière, the Proenza boys, Alex Wang, etcetera.” Citing medieval Mongolia, Game of Thrones, comic books, John Waters, and Etsy as current style touchstones, Boucher was thrilled to see Ottenberg and Sorrenti’s mishmashed direction when it came to her shoot for V. “I’ve admired them both from afar for a long time,” she says. “The energy was perfect and it’s fun to work with people who have endless good ideas. It felt really special. It was very Dawn Davenport: insane and illegal, which is my favorite vibe.”


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WAKE UP TO TODAY’S SUPERMODELS IN SUNLIT LACE, DIAMONDS, AND FUR—THESE NATURAL BEAUTIES WOULDN’T GET OUT OF BED FOR ANYTHING LESS

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FASHION JULIA VON BOEHM


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after debuting on prada’s fall runway as an exclusive, lineisy montero quickly booked shows with loewe, balenciaga, cÉline, givenchy, louis vuitton, stella mccartney, and miu miu. now the dominican beauty is the most in-demand girl in the business. when you see her, say a prayer, and kiss your heart good-bye photography willy vanderperre fashion katy england V MAGAZINE 2 3 8


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NASTYA WEARS cloThiNg FENDI


HARLETH WEARS CLOTHING AND EARRINGS BALENCIAGA


HARLETH WEARS DRESS SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE EARRING GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI


NASTYA WEARS JACKET AND BOOTS ALEXANDER WANG BRIEFS ERES HARLETH WEARS DRESS AND BOOTS ALEXANDER WANG


HARLETH WEARS CLOTHING TOM FORD


HARLETH WEARS CLOTHING CHANEL BOOTS RICK OWENS

MAkEup HIROMI uEdA (JuLIAN WATSON AGENCy) HAIR SHON (JuLIAN WATSON AGENCy) MOdELS HARLETH kuuSIk ANd NASTyA STEN (THE SOCIETy) Manicure adaM Slee (StreeterS) Production Sally dawSon and Paula ekenger digital technician anna hendry Photo aSSiStantS SiMon Mcguigan, JaMeS whitty, SaM hendel StyliSt aSSiStantS edward Bowleg and JoSefine SkoMarS MakeuP aSSiStant kaMila forini hair aSSiStant ryuta Saiga Manicure aSSiStant JeSSica thoMPSon retouching iMPact digital


LESLIE AMON With a focus on “modern glamour,” and clothes that “fatter a woman’s body,” 26-year-old Leslie Amon’s ladylike Central Saint Martins graduate collection packs a shocking pink punch. The Geneva-born designer, who is now based in Paris and London, says that her primary infuences are her “travels and amazing friends from diferent social backgrounds.” Amon admits that she’s “very clumsy in real life, but a perfectionist at work.” The latter fact can be seen in the precision of her smartly tailored, oft exaggerated silhouettes, which she sculpts from unusual fabrics.

CLOTHING LESLIE AMON SHOES POLLINI BAG ISABELLE MAYER

LADY GAGA AND BRANDON MAXWELL’s V MAGAZINE 2 6 0


GOLAN TAUB Bright and playful with fetishistic undertones, Golan Taub’s latest collection is a delightful cacophony of frills, thrills, and color. Describing his work as “fun, clean, and graphic,” the Tel Aviv–based Shenkar College of Engineering and Design graduate aims to “make people feel good and enjoy themselves” through his clothes. “Fashion should be taken seriously, but it’s important to have fun with it,” the 27-yearold asserts. With inspirations ranging from napkins to grafti, Taub is planning to launch an accessories range infuenced by his latest lineup. Also on the docket? “To keep enjoying what I’m doing.”

DRESS AND BAGS GOLAN TAUB ShoES GIANNICO EARRINGS ISABELLE MAYER

lady gaga aNd HER STylIST, BRaNdON MaXWEll, WHO dEBUTS HIS OWN FaSHION lINE THIS SEPTEMBER, SElECT THE EIgHT MOST PROMISINg TalENTS OF TOMORROW PHOTOgRaPHy aNTHONy MaUlE FaSHION BRaNdON MaXWEll TEXT kaTHaRINE k. zaRRElla


BETH POSTLE A fusion of Picasso, Jean Dubufet, and Niki de Saint Phalle, 25-year-old Beth Postle’s graphic aesthetic frst turned heads when she won the prestigious L’Oréal Professionnel Creative Award after her Central Saint Martins M.A. graduate show last February. While Postle’s signatures include thick black lines that lend her oversize garments a cartoonish Pop feel, the London-based talent muses that her designs are “all about the textiles. I want to create wearable works of art for the body. Color, too, is really important in my work.”

clothing BETH POSTLE BootS POLLINI


DILARA FINDIKOGLU This Turkish-born, London-based Central Saint Martins graduate has aspirations that extend far beyond commercial success and celebrity dressing. “Fashion needs an intellectual revolution,” says the 24-yearold, “and I’m the starting point.” Describing her work as “controversial, bizarre, brave, sharp, and feisty,” Findikoglu hopes that, through her designs, she can “break the repetitive process of the fashion industry and raise awareness in a creative way. The future of fashion should be more intellectual and less about the surface.”

CLOTHING DILARA FINDIKOGLU HAT VINTAGE CHRISTINE BEC FROM DAVID CASAVANT ARCHIVE EARRINGS ANA KHOURI


AMIR KHORASANY A native Londoner, Amir Khorasany trained to be a pilot before heading to Central Saint Martins to complete his B.A. in fashion. Perhaps his time in the sky explains, in part, the airy freedom present in his ethereal graduate collection. “I fnd things that [provoke] a strong emotional reaction very inspiring, be it a flm, a piece of contemporary art, or the universe,” the 27-year-old says of his infuences. In addition to lunching with Empress Farah Pahlavi and “boogieing with Janet Jackson,” Khorasany dreams of “being able to dress women with the luxury of a couture atelier.” At the moment, though, he’s preparing to head back to Saint Martins to pursue his M.A. in fashion design.

DRESS AMIR KHORASANY CROWN GLORIA YU


KRYSTYNA KOZHOMA “My clothes are a direct refection of my personality,” says Ukrainian talent Krystyna Kozhoma. “I like ‘sexy’ and my clothes are exactly that.” Citing Grace Jones’s masculine sexuality, the work of Zaha Hadid, Helmut Newton’s photographs, and Alfa Romeo’s Disco Volante sports car as inspirations, the 24-yearold, who earned both her B.A. and M.A. at Central Saint Martins, isn’t afraid to experiment with unlikely silhouettes and proportions. “My brand’s alien-like look is produced by a unique set of textiles that form odd but attractive shapes around the wearer’s body, and my abnormal shapes are achieved purely through draping and manipulating the textile or jersey.”

TOP KRYSTYNA KOZHOMA SHOES CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA HEADPIECE FRANCESCO BALLESTRAZZI GLOVES TABLEAUX VIVANTS


NATALI GERMANOTTA At just 23 years of age, native New Yorker Natali Germanotta has already developed a strong vision and sense of purpose. “My aesthetic is architectural yet classic,” explains the Parsons School of Design graduate. “My designs cater to the ‘artists’ who view their lives as a curation. I fnd something rather tantalizing about walking the line between what is safe and unsafe.” We should expect nothing less from Germanotta, who happens to be Lady Gaga’s little sister. “I fnd a lot of inspiration through the love that my family and I share for each other,” the talent continues. “Their love is a portal for my creations. Love has a way of giving the vulnerable you a sense of confdence.”

DRESS NATALI GERMANOTTA HEADPIECE GLORIA YU EARRINGS PEREZ SANZ


ANNA CAMMISH

MAKEup ALICE LANE (THE WALL GROup) HAIR BEN SKERvIN (STREETERS) MOdEL LINdSEY WIxSON (THE SOCIETY) Manicure casey HerMan (Kate ryan) Production Miranda neri (Jed root) digital tecHnician dereK nelson PHoto assistants saM evans-Butler and stePHan HawK stylist assistant HeatHer dunPHy, sara taves, elliot soriano location root drive-in catering Monterone

As sweet and soft as cotton candy, 22-year-old Anna Cammish’s Birmingham City University graduate collection is a plush, girlish fantasy. However, this U.K. native’s pastel pink and baby blue lineup has an unlikely inspiration. “Language—the origins of words and their meanings—is a powerful subject that ofers a lot of interesting starting points and can be explored visually,” Cammish says. Somewhat ironically, the fedgling designer adds that she can only listen to foreign music when working in her studio so she can’t sing along. “No one needs to hear that,” she jokes.

SWEATER ANNA CAMMISH BRIEFS STYLIST’S OWN SOCKS MARIA LA ROSA SHOES LIUDMILA


boundaries between genders continue to dissolve as more and more designers embrace an androgynous future for fashion. choose your own reality in womenswear for her and him photography pierre debuscherre fashion tom van dorpe

FROM LEFT: JONAS AND SAM WEAR CLOTHING RAF SIMONS

INE WEARS CLOTHING AND BOOTS DIOR

V MAGAZINE 2 6 8


INE WEARS clothINg PROENZA SCHOULER gloVES BOSS JoNAS WEARS SWEAtER SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE SAM WEARS tANK TELFAR PANtS TOM FORD


INE WEARS CLOTHING BOTTEGA VENETA BELT STYLIST’S OWN jONAS ANd SAm WEAR CLOTHING BOTTEGA VENETA


INE WEARS dRESS LOEWE JONAS WEARS TURTLENECK PALLAS PANTS RAF SIMONS SAM WEARS SHIRT LOEWE PANTS J.W. ANDERSON


sam and ine wear CLOTHinG CHLOÉ


sam and jonas wear pants boss ine wears CLotHinG and GLoVes boss


jonas wears CLoTHInG GUCCI BeLT sTYLIsT’s own Ine wears CLoTHInG GUCCI BeLT sTYLIsT’s own BooTs DIOR


Hair Vi Sapyyapy (ManageMent artiStS) Makeup adrien pinault (ManageMent artiStS) ModelS ine neefS (dna), SaM H (ulla ModelS), JonaS B (doMinique ModelS) Production rebecca cuglietta (art + commerce) digital technician SebaStien meulenbergh (254 ForeSt) Photo aSSiStant maxime taillez lighting aSSiStant hugo michaux (254 ForeSt) StyliSt aSSiStant StePhy galvani hair and makeuP aSSiStant Sarah lucia location Production claire andrzejczak art direction Pierre daraS (254 ForeSt) retouching yelle vandenbruaene (living room) location Sonian ForeSt, bruSSelS


ine and jonas wear CLoTHinG BALENCIAGA saM wears panTs BALENCIAGA BeLT sTYLisT’s own


INSPIRED BY PAPER DOLLS, PETER PHILIPS PROVES JUST HOW MUCH fUN MIxINg, MATCHINg, AND PLAYINg WITH DIOR’S NEW MAkEUP CAN BE

PHOTOgRAPHY RICHARD BURBRIDgE MAkEUP PETER PHILIPS fASHION CHARLOTTE COLLET TExT NICOLE CATANESE

“The inspiration for this story is a playful one—it came from paper dolls,” notes Peter Philips, the creative and image director of Christian Dior makeup and the mastermind behind the makeup looks seen on these pages. “Stephen Gan contacted Richard [Burbridge] and me and proposed to do a project with reusable stickers, so we came up with the idea of capturing four natural ‘new’ faces—fresh models—and to shoot in the same light and same angle diferent variations of lip shades and eye makeup.” The beauty of their plan: test-driving Dior’s 2015 Fall makeup line and Philips’s debut collection with the iconic beauty brand (although he’s had a hand in the vision and trends of the past two runway shows as well as several new product launches, he’s not yet seen an entire color line from start to fnish) is now foolproof and fun. “[The stickers] give you the opportunity to mix and match the V MAGAZINE 2 7 8

makeup elements on the nude faces just like with paper dolls,” says Philips. “Because it’s inspired by a children’s toy, I believe it is important to just have fun with it.” Dior’s just-launched Fall makeup collection, which Philips appropriately named Cosmopolite, contains bold, prismatic eye and lip shades. “For Fall, my collection refects the many beauty facets of a woman,” Philips says. “This translates itself in a range of shades like khaki to warm pink, gold, and burgundy alongside cooler tones such as silver, dark blue, purple, and black.” It’s not surprising that Philips, revered for his avant-garde approach to makeup (at the Spring 2015 Dior show, he created multicolored, mirrored eyeliner stickers to lay across models’ lash lines to create a sci-f efect), would veer away from plain Jane nudes and neutrals that monopolize palettes to cater to the color shy. “Color can be intimidating, especially

bright shades,” notes Philips. “But that’s why for this collection, I proposed a harmonious range of shades as well as a few diferent textures and colors that can give your makeup look a twist.” To fnd what suits you best, Philips ofers a simple pro trick: “Depending on your skin tone, you can go for warmer (pink or burgundy) or cooler shades (such as blue or khaki green) while metallics (gold or silver) give a nice contrast with the velvety shades and the cream textures to complement all skin.” As for who Philips had in mind when he created this colorsaturated collection, he describes “a woman who feels at her best with natural makeup as well as somebody who likes to play with products and isn’t afraid of wearing a full face of makeup.” Go ahead, peel and play on the following pages, and anywhere else you see ft!


FroM leFt: Rouge DioR lipstick in nouvelle FeMMe #542 DioR 5 CouleuRs cosMopolite eyeshadow in eclectic #866


Lauren This spread: CoaT Dior

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WilloW

This spread: JackeT Courrèges

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AmilnA this spread: shirt ralph lauren

ON sKiN Diorskin star studiO MaKeup spectacular BrighteNiNg Weightless perfectiON iN 080 eBONy aNd 050 darK Beige Diorskin star cONcealer iN 005 MOKa Diorskin nuDe air lOOse pOWder iN 040 hONey Beige Diorblush cheeK sticK iN 845 cOsMOpOlite piNK ON eyes (thrOughOut sticKer sheet) Diorshow icONic Overcurl WaterprOOf Mascara iN 090 Over BlacK Diorshow desigNer iN 090 BlacK


AlexAndrA this spread: Coat DsquareD2

oN skiN Diorskin star studio Makeup speCtaCular BrighteNiNg Weightless perfeCtioN iN 020 light Beige Diorskin star CoNCealer iN 001 ivory Diorskin nuDe air loose poWder iN 010 ivory Diorblush Cheek stiCk iN 675 CosMopolite Coral oN BroWs Diorshow BroW styler iN 001 uNiversal BroWN oN eyes (throughout stiCker sheet) Diorshow desigNer iN 090 BlaCk

hair yaNNiCk d’is (MaNageMeNt artists) Models laureN de graaf, aMilNa estevao, alexaNdra elizaBeth (the soCiety), WilloW haNd (the lioNs) Manicure Huberte cesarion Production Jessica daly (art + coMMerce) digital tecHnician Kevin Kunstadt (caPture tHis digital) PHoto assistants KiM Feenberg, enrico brunetti, saraH reinMann stylist assistants MarJorie cHanut and lou levoir MaKeuP assistants delPHine delain and estelle Jaillet Hair assistant yoann Fernandez location studio astre, Paris


V97 The Best of the Best Issue  

Lana Del Rey "Private Collection" by Steven Klein

V97 The Best of the Best Issue  

Lana Del Rey "Private Collection" by Steven Klein