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THE FUTURE OF FASHION AND BEAUTY

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SUMMER 2017

SUMMER DIGITAL ISSUE CARA DELEVINGNE AND DANE DEHAAN STARS OF VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS IN MIU MIU PHOTOGRAPHED BY

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LOOKING GOOD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephen Gan DIGITAL / PRINT EDITOR William Defebaugh EDITOR Joshua Lyon EDITORS-AT-LARGE Derek Blasberg Nick Remsen MANAGING EDITOR Nancy Gillen CONTRIBUTING SENIOR EDITORS Joseph Akel Priya Rao PHOTO EDITOR Nicola Kast BOOKINGS EDITOR Sara Zion CONTRIBUTING EDITORS, ENTERTAINMENT Greg Krelenstein Amrit Sidhu / Starworks CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Gigi Hadid James Franco ASSOCIATE DIGITAL EDITOR Ian David Monroe COPY EDITORS Karly Alderfer Karla Alindahao RESEARCH EDITORS Jennifer Geddes Jy Murphy ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Raf Tillis

ART/FASHION/PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Mia Song DESIGNER Erin Meagher FASHION MARKET DIRECTOR Mia Solkin SENIOR FASHION EDITOR Jay Massacret CONTRIBUTING FASHION DIRECTOR Paul Cavaco CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITORS Amanda Harlech Joe McKenna Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Jacob K Beat Bolliger Melanie Ward Nicola Formichetti Jane How Panos Yiapanis Sarah Richardson Olivier Rizzo Clare Richardson Andrew Richardson Jonathan Kaye Tom Van Dorpe CONTRIBUTING BEAUTY DIRECTOR Kristin Perrotta PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Jessica Kane PRODUCTION / MARKETING COORDINATOR Wyatt Allgeier ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Eliza Weinreb CONSULTING CREATIVE / DESIGN DIRECTION Greg Foley INTERNS Mini Banks Ndey Buri Ross Conway Xin Fang Marissa Fey Yinersi Gonzales Sophia Khalifeh Harvey Lee Alice Ly Truman Ports Sophie Schreurs Jake Seferian Jesse Skupa Adair Smith Jake Viswanath Lingyu Wang Isabela Weeks Christelle Zhang

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Photography Therese Aldgard

ON COVER 1: CARA AND DANE WEAR CHANEL JEWELRY THEIR OWN ON COVER 2: CARA AND DANE WEAR MIU MIU JEWELRY THEIR OWN ON BOTH COVERS: CARA WEARS ON FACE DIOR DIORSKIN STAR FLUID FOUNDATION ON EYES DIOR DIORSHOW MASCARA IN PRO BLACK ON LIPS DIOR DIOR ADDICT LIPSTICK IN PURITY


ROLLER PUMPS SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

READY TO ROLL 28 HEROES Linda Wells celebrates her friend Kevyn Aucoin and traces the rise of other superstar makeup artists

44 POWERHOUSE Today’s most celebrated hairstylists and makeup artists share how (and why) they rose to the top

32 REI-TROSPECTIVE Stephen Gan looks back on V’s storied history with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo

50 V NEWS Raf Simon’s first collection for Calvin Klein, Nicopanda hooks up with the legendary Tom of Finland, plus our roundup of summer essentials.

66 DREAMSCAPE BY NICK KNIGHT Spring haute couture shines with textural knitware accoutrements Styled by Katy England 78 BODY BEAUTIFUL BY MARIO SORRENTI Ashley Graham gets real, both in photos and in a chat with her friend Tracee Ellis Ross Styled by George Cortina

51 AROUND THE WORLD Follow your nose with destination-inspired fragrances

41 PERFUME GENIUS Mike Hadreas’s fourth album finds the singer in a whole new headspace, but as soulful as ever

52 MODEL SPOTLIGHT Meet fashion’s latest It Girls, models Duckie Thot and Hannah Ferguson

92 BACK TO THE FUTURE BY MEL BLES Model Lara Stone celebrates her 10-year anniversary with V and pays homage to the past with preFall fashion Styled by Tom Guinness

42 MEGAN FOX Lingerie label Frederick’s of Hollywood gets an empowering makeover under the watch of its New Girl CEO

58 OUT OF THIS WORLD BY KARL LAGERFELD Cara Delevingne and Dane DeHaan discuss space sex and Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets Styled by Amanda Harlech

102 ON THE RISE BY SHARIF HAMZA V scouts all the new ones to watch in our annual Sundance Film Festival portfolio Styled by Ellie Grace Cumming

22 VMAGAZINE.COM

Photography Therese Aldgard

38 BY THE NUMBERS V’s calendar of the season’s best, from outdoor music fests to a major Balenciaga exhibit


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star-making career choice. Her story highlights that forging one’s future often depends on the hard work of those who have come before, something that current style masters like Peter Philips and Sam McKnight are quick to recognize in our Powerhouse round-up. Rei Kawakubo’s own rise began long before V’s big bang, but her influence on a young Stephen Gan had a profound impact on his fashion philosophy. In honor of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s retrospective, “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between,” Gan showcases a look back at the designer’s work in the pages of V over the years— a reminder that we can anticipate brilliance from her with every new season. Each of our feature subjects represent a similar past/future dynamic, like Nick Knight and Katy England’s take on Spring couture. England paired the bold clothing with accessories born from a decidedly old-school craft: crochet. In a pre-Fall pictorial with model Lara Stone (who’s celebrating the 10-year anniversary of her V debut), Mel Bles and Tom Guinness

work a similar magic by accentuating the clothing’s futuristic vibe with medieval-style hoods. It shouldn’t work, yet it does, especially with the feminine strength Stone adds. Another muse, Ashley Graham, appears in her second story for V, this time working with Mario Sorrenti and George Cortina. The convention-breaker poses in a provocative state of undress, something no magazine of the past would dare. We look forward to a day when similar representations are the norm (and we don’t say that about much). Cara Delevingne and Dane DeHaan have lots to tell about their sci-fi epic Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, while Karl Lagerfeld and Amanda Harlech dress them in a sneak peak at decadently soft and warm Fall fashion. Here’s hoping that the coming months bring a similar comfort. But even if things remain rocky, we’re heartened by every new voice that helps lead us towards a better world. Even if those rockets to another galaxy do get built, in such outstanding company, we prefer to take our chances here on Earth. MR. V

Photography Therese Aldgard

The recent discovery of seven planets that could potentially support life is a history-making find. That it came on the heels of a new political administration—one that threatens so many of the liberties that V holds sacred—adds a particularly strong resonance. The knee-jerk response for many around here was, “Great, sign us up for the next rocket out.” But as each new story came in for this issue, we grew inspired by the fact that the creative community isn’t taking anything lying down. Almost everyone in our Sundance Film Festival portfolio raised their voices at a satellite of the Washington Women’s March, where Jessica Williams delivered an empowering speech that went viral. Venting frustration can often seem futile, but it’s so important to do everything you can within your own realm of influence to inch our country to a better place. It’s impossible to examine the present without looking to the past. In a lighter take on that philosophy, the legendary Linda Wells traces the history of celebrity makeup artistry from a behind-the-scenes job to a


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Photography Myles Loftin


INTRODUCING PHOTOGRAPHER MYLES LOFTIN VFILES RUNWAY 8 WINNER

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HEROES MAGIC TOUCH From film set lackeys to superstars: Linda Wells traces the rise of the celebrity makeup artist. True story: Kevyn Aucoin, the singular makeup artist, came to my apartment for the first time and the doorman asked him to take the service elevator. Kevyn laughed about it then, but I was mortified. He should have been greeted with rose petals and trumpets and carried into my living room on a throne. After all, movie stars and rock stars fought for his attention, so much so that he was jetting down his own path to fame. Some of those celebrities would soon be thanking him in their Oscar and Grammy speeches. But then, back in the early 1990s, makeup artists weren’t yet doormen-recognized famous. Doormen may not care, but the history of makeup artists is a window into the role of beauty in our culture and the way women, in particular, want to see and be seen. And even though shocking, flamboyant effects always hog the attention, the finest makeup artists have an intimate sense of how to enhance the wearer’s natural, personal beauty. There was Max Factor from the 1910s to the late ’30s, Way Bandy in the ’70s and ’80s, Kevyn Aucoin in the ’90s and early 2000s, and François Nars and Pat McGrath from the ’90s until today. All these artists could paint faces with wild colors, no problem. But to coax out the beauty of the wearer so the makeup looks as if it bloomed from some inner source is a special, even rare, talent. The superstar makeup artists possess it, much in the way great modern painters possess a mastery of pure representation. The paterfamilias of makeup artists was Max Factor, a real, live man before he was a brand of cosmetics. He became essential to the success of motion pictures and their male and female stars by tackling the unflattering aspects of early film and inventing products that endured under the hot lights. Factor also popularized the term “make-up” and much that the word defined. His mission, he said, was to tend to actors’ “individual needs by showing them how to enhance their good points and conceal the less good.” It was a modern idea, and one that still drives the best makeup artists and products today. 28 VMAGAZINE.COM

With his refined eye, his chemistry training, and his painterly skill, Factor created movie stars out of ordinary flesh. He was also a nonstop problem-solving machine. Early movie makeup was a thick, ghoulish paste, often concocted out of flour and Vaseline or lard. Factor replaced that with a thin, flexible cream in a multitude of shades. When the lip color melted under the studio lights, he slipped onto the set and pressed the pigment on with his thumb, first on each side of an actress’s upper lip and then once on her lower one, a look that came to be known as “beestung lips.” I’ve seen Pat McGrath execute the same motion on models before a fashion show, believing it was an entirely fresh technique. To me, it’s McGrath’s signature; turns out Max did it first. Way Bandy, working in the ’70s and ’80s, seems to have inherited Factor’s makeup ESP. His technique involved a thorough coating of foundation that turned the face into a blank canvas onto which he built the features. It almost sounds like the makeup version of playing God, but Bandy did it gently and humbly. “He had a little bag with pencils in browns and grays, and he used them to chisel the face,” says Garren, who was starting his career as a hairstylist in the ’70s during Bandy’s reign. “It was contouring, but you didn’t notice the contour. He was really an artist creating dimension with shadow and light.” From Way Bandy came Kevyn Aucoin, a kid living in Lafayette, Louisiana, who tore out Bandy’s Vogue covers and tried to duplicate them on his mother and little sister. When Aucoin moved to New York City in the early ’80s, he spotted Bandy on the street and followed him into a restaurant, fumbling for an autograph. Bandy begat Kevyn Aucoin, just as Max Factor made Way Bandy possible. “Way blanked out the faces and that was Kevyn’s approach, too,” says stylist Paul Cavaco. “Kevyn could fake a natural look by using beige, brown, or black tones, depending on your skin color. He drew over the lips with pencil to make them look bigger, then blended the line and put lip balm on top.” Aucoin also participated in the team led by photographer Steven Meisel that transformed models into supermodels. And in the process, through sheer force of will, Aucoin became super himself. He snapped Polaroid pictures of every moment behind the scenes at shoots and fashion shows, putting together bulging notebooks that predated Instagram. They were selfies before the word existed: Kevyn and Julia Roberts, Kevyn and Janet Jackson, Kevyn and Gwyneth, Kevyn and Winona, Kevyn and Christy/Linda/Naomi/Cindy. In each photo, he gave himself equal billing with the celebrity. That said, I remember Kevyn telling me about the time an A-list actress asked him to do her cousin’s wedding makeup. Of course, Kevyn ended up doing the mother of the bride, the mother of the groom, the many bridesmaids,


KEVYN AUCOIN AND JANET JACKSON, CIRCA 1994 PHOTOGRAPHY JEAN-BAPTISTE MONDINO


HEROES

MAX FACTOR SHOWS OFF HIS SIGNATURE HOLLYWOOD TOUCH

the flower girls, and anyone else who wandered into his room. The actress didn’t even think to pay him for his services, but she did give him a thank you present: a Pottery Barn candle. Kevyn kept that candle in a prominent place in his living room as a reminder that, no matter how cozy he was with his clients, he was still hired help. Maybe to ensure that he’d never be asked to do weddings again, Kevyn moved away from any pretense of naturalism and turned to dramatic makeovers. He molded women’s and men’s faces with heavy, theatrical makeup, toupee tape, and rapid-fire tweezers, so that they resembled other celebrities. Martha Stewart became Veronica Lake, Gwyneth Paltrow became Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde, Christina Ricci was Edith Piaf. These were makeup stunts that showcased 30 VMAGAZINE.COM

WAY BANDY AND SINGER CRYSTAL GAYLE ON THE SET OF HER 1979 TELEVISION SPECIAL Kevyn’s skill if not his accessibility. While Kevyn performed tricks, François Nars pared down the artifice, sometimes photographing women wearing no makeup at all. “Kevyn had a notion of idealized beauty, and François was more focused on the girl’s natural beauty,” says Cavaco. “I saw him walk up to the model on set and push her cheek with his thumb until it was rosy. And when that faded, he’d go back and push it again. He used so little makeup that you could probably fit it all in your purse.” Pat McGrath’s makeup would not fit in anyone’s purse, not even Mary Poppins’s. She famously travels with as many as 85 suitcases filled with makeup, sequins, lashes, lace, leather, and art books. In that way, she is a descendent of Kevyn Aucoin. She also has a way with skin—not to mention those bee-stung

lips—that stretches back to Max Factor. Her star power exceeds all who came before her. When McGrath made a personal appearance at a Sephora in New York City last year to introduce a new highlighter from her Pat McGrath Labs line, fans stood outside the store for hours to meet her. More than a few cried when they did. Now, almost anyone with an Instagram account and a contour kit can become a makeup star, if not a bona fide artist. It’s a change that has moved makeup artists from the movie sets, photo studios, and fashion shows to bathrooms in Scottsdale and Indianapolis. The results combine intimacy with theatricality, bringing a whole new face—really, a whole variety of faces and styles—to the rich story of makeup.

Clockwise from top right: Photo Hulton-Deutsch / Hulton-Deutsch Collection / Corbis / Getty Images; Courtesy NARS Cosmetics; Photo CBS / Getty Images; Courtesy Pat McGrath

PAT MCGRATH PREPS A MODEL BACKSTAGE

FRANÇOIS NARS MASTERS GOTHIC BEAUTY FOR MARC JACOBS’S FALL 2016 SHOW


THE BEST OF PRE-FALL ON VMAGAZINE.COM Each week in May, check out a new roundup of essential looks from the pre-Fall runway trends. MAY 1: BLUE JEAN BABY PHOTOGRAPHY STEVEN YATSKO FASHION KYLE LUU MAY 8: LEATHER FOREVER PHOTOGRAPHY NICOLE MARIA WINKLER FASHION LANA JAY LACKEY

HOLLIE-MAY WEARS JACKET, PANTS, SHOES LOUIS VUITTON

LEFT: AJAK WEARS DRESS NICOLE MILLER ARTELIER JEWELRY BEN-AMUN

RIGHT: JACKET DIESEL BLACK GOLD DRESS MANILA GRACE HAT GLADYS TAMEZ EARRINGS BEN-AMUN

Leather Forever and Suit Up: Makeup Stevie Huynh (Bryant Artists) Hair Edward Lampley (Bryant Artists) Models Lida Fox (Next Management) and Ajak (IMG) Production coordinator Francesca Beltran Stylist assistant Savage Ova Retouching Studio Private Location and equipment Root Studios Blue Jean Baby and Geometry 101: Makeup Mariko Arai (The Wall Group) Hair Shinya Nakagawa (Artlist New York) Models Hollie-May Saker (Models 1) and Simone Carvalho (Muse Management) Photo assistant Zachary Blomquist Stylist assistants Danasia Sutton and Sunny Park Makeup assistant Minako Kiuchi Location and equipment Root Studios Studios

MAY 15: SUIT UP PHOTOGRAPHY NICOLE MARIA WINKLER FASHION LANA JAY LACKEY

MAY 22: GEOMETRY 101 PHOTOGRAPHY STEVEN YATSKO FASHION KYLE LUU

LEFT: LIDA WEARS SUIT AND TOP MSGM BOOTS GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI SUNGLASSES CUTLER AND GROSS

SIMONE WEARS VEST, JACKET, SHIRT, PANTS, SHOES GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI

RIGHT: JACKET, PANTS, SHOES DIOR TIGHTS EMILIO CAVALLINI GLOVES ADRIENNE LANDAU

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When I arrived in New York from the Philippines in the late 1980s, Comme des Garçons was the first fashion show I ever attended. I was 18 and saw a flyer on a bulletin board at Parsons. Comme was looking for backstage dressers, so I volunteered to help. I remember looking at all the models and thinking that everyone was so beautiful and otherworldly, but not in a way that necessarily might be described as sexy today. That feeling about her clothes has never left me. Rei has always been a teacher in the school of fashion that’s about being extreme and quite fantastical. I don’t know if the term “avant-garde” still has the same connotation, but at the time, fashion was about the avant-garde. In a way, fashion has lost a little bit of that, in terms of a designer creating a look that no one has ever seen before. The way you hear stories about Christian Dior’s New Look in 1947, Rei is in that school, offering something completely new. How many times have you heard about so-and-so’s ’70s-influenced collection? It’s a regurgitation of an idea that somebody else had spun out before. It often seems like Rei doesn’t want a visible reference—she thrives on the displacement of the viewer. Dressing in her clothes is a different story, though. In the ’90s, Rei asked me to walk in a show, and I remember thinking on my way to the fitting, I’ll wear anything except shorts. Without communicating that to her, she took one look at me, turned to the racks, and pulled out a linen jacket and a pair of shorts. She had a strange kind of psychic sense: the one thing I resisted was what she honed in on, but her instinct was right. The clothes worked. When I first started V in 1999, Adrian Joffe, Rei’s husband and business partner, was one of the first people I called to ask if it was a good idea. I told myself that without their endorsement, there was no use in starting a fashion magazine. Rei has always been appreciative of talent: the spawning of Junya Watanabe and the many young designers of Dover Street Market is proof of that. She’s of the mind that you craft your own art, and then support others. There’s a generosity there that’s about a true devotion to creativity and seeing a spark that doesn’t always have to be her own. This year’s Met exhibition is truly a moment when justice prevails in fashion. My greatest hope is that it will educate a younger audience, that it will open up an 18-year-old’s eyes the way that first show I went to opened mine. It’s so important to be tapped on the shoulder and reminded of what fashion is, what fashion can be. SG

A LOOK FROM THE FALL 2012 COLLECTION APPEARS IN V79 BY PHOTOGRAPHER MARIO SORRENTI AND STYLIST JANE HOW

REI-TROSPECTIVE In honor of the Rei Kawakubo exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Stephen Gan looks back at the designer’s profound influence on this magazine, and how Comme des Garçons helped shape his own fashion philosophy. 32 VMAGAZINE.COM

PHOTOGRAPHER SEBASTIAN FAENA AND STYLIST CARINE ROITFELD CAPTURE KAWAKUBO’S “THE FUTURE’S IN TWO DIMENSIONS” FALL 2012 COLLECTION FOR V78


“As a technique to try to do something new this time I actually tried to be a different person. I needed to change everything that referred to me. My life, my way of living, my vision, and my way of thinking, even though it is quite impossible to do so, I did strive to be a different me for two months. As one way to try to achieve this, I started out with the intention not to make clothes as such.”

—Rei Kawakubo, V88

FAENA AND STYLIST JULIA VON BOEHM SHOT GIGI HADID IN THE SPRING 2014 COLLECTION FOR V88. “THIS WAS GIGI’S VERY FIRST SET OF PHOTOGRAPHS, AND I REMEMBER THINKING THAT SHE’S NOT TYPICALLY SOMEONE WHO REI MIGHT HAVE IMAGINED IN COMME DES GARÇONS, BUT I THOUGHT IT COULD ALSO BE A GOOD COMBINATION—A COLLISION,” SAYS GAN


“‘Blood and Roses’ is the expression of a deeper significance of roses, typically happy and pretty. Often in history the image of the rose was more connected with blood and wars, in relation to political conflict, religious strife, and power struggles. This is what was interesting to me this time.” —Rei Kawakubo, V94

PHOTOGRAPHER STEVEN KLEIN AND STYLIST PATTI WILSON TOOK KARLIE KLOSS INTO BRAVE NEW TERRITORY IN V94 WITH THE SPRING 2015 “BLOOD AND ROSES” COLLECTION


PHOTOGRAPHERS INEZ & VINOODH CAPTURED MODEL HANNELORE KNUTS IN THE DESIGNER’S SPRING 2000 COLLECTION, WHICH CONSISTED OF AN ABUNDANCE OF PLEATS, RUFFLES, AND COLOR

“I am always wanting to make something new and it doesn’t matter if other people think it is new. What is important is that I myself am surprised and astonished and feel that I haven’t seen this before and that this is good-looking or handsome. Every time I make something, I measure and judge according to this. Every day it accumulates…the constant challenge of not giving up…Noticing social trends, looking at what other designers are doing, analyzing markets, thinking commercially, worrying about journalists, all serves no purpose for me in the work of making new things. And so I can concern myself only in the search for new things. It is, in a way, extremely simple. It is the only weapon I have. But of course it is also extremely difficult. Simple in the thinking but difficult in the realization.”

GAN’S PHOTOGRAPH OF KAWAKUBO’S SPRING 2000 COLLECTION IN PARIS LANDED IN V3

—Rei Kawakubo, V3 VMAGAZINE.COM 3 5


PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID SIMS, STYLIST KARL TEMPLER, AND MODEL RAQUEL ZIMMERMANN SHINED A SPOTLIGHT ON KAWAKUBO’S SPRING 2006 “A LOST EMPIRE” COLLECTION IN V40


FOR V99, PHOTOGRAPHER NICK KNIGHT AND STYLIST AMANDA HARLECH DRESSED MODEL MOLLY BAIR IN THIS LOOK FROM KAWAKUBO’S SPRING 2016 COLLECTION

VMAGAZINE.COM 3 7


MAY 2

Make each day count with our calendar of smart beach reads, outdoor concerts, and must-see art.

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For 2017, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute takes on its most ambitious subject yet: Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons. Only the second living designer to be thus honored (after Yves Saint Laurent in 1983), the exhibition features 150 looks that highlight the artist’s otherwordly aesthetic.

5 The newest summer festival, Fyre, hosts its second weekend in the Bahamas and features talks from cultural leaders, treasure hunts, and a lineup including Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music, Lil Yachty, and more. Bella Hadid and Emily Ratajkowski have given it their thumbs-up, so pack your bags!

FYRE FESTIVAL RUNS MAY 5-7, FYREFESTIVAL.COM

38 VMAGAZINE.COM

"TRANS-JESTER" RUNS EVERY TUESDAY IN MAY AT THE STONEWALL INN IN NEW YORK CITY, THE STONEWALLINNNYC.COM

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V’s Greg Foley teamed up with writer Andrew Luecke to identify and dissect a multitude of subcultures—from Ivy Leaguers to leathermen—in the book Cool: Style, Sound, and Subversion. Foley’s illustrations pinpoint specific style details in clothing, hair, and accessories from each mini society. Rounding it all out is a selection of playlists that reflect each world, contributed by Michael Stipe, Ice-T, Fischerspooner, Shepard Fairey, A$AP Ferg, and more, all streamable via Apple Music. Another V favorite, Ashley Graham, is publishing A New Model: What Confidence, Beauty, and Power Really Look Like, a collection of personal essays that tackle the model’s inspiring experiences, as well as how views of body image are in flux.

COOL: STYLE, SOUND, AND SUBVERSION (RIZZOLI, $35) A NEW MODEL: WHAT CONFIDENCE, BEAUTY AND POWER REALLY LOOK LIKE (HARPERCOLLINS, $27)

Mary Timony was a hugely influential force in the ’90s indie scene, but her band, Helium, doesn't always get the same sort of name check recognition as other revolutionary female artists from the same era, like Liz Phair and Kim Deal. Matador is out to change that with LP reissues of her seminal albums: 1995's Dirt of Luck and 1997’s The Magic City, as well as a compilation of rarities and B-sides for diehard fans, called Ends With And. Timony's guitar riffs run the gamut from trippy to sparse, and her cool-girl, near-atonal voice make an excellent background soundtrack for hazy summer days spent hanging out on the fire escape (or yard, if you're one of those lucky people). At the opposite end of the chill spectrum is The Witch, an intense debut from London's Pumarosa, a fivepiece band who've had fans fiending for more since their first single—which clocks in at over seven minutes long— dropped back in 2015. Lead singer Isabel Munoz-Newsome's voice lives in the Siouxsie Sioux/PJ Harvey neighborhood and betrays her every emotion. The album is perhaps better suited to alone time with your headphones on to really absorb the layers of sound, but there are moments when you'll want to heed the chant of "I just wanna dance" from their single "Priestess."

DIRT OF LUCK, THE MAGIC CITY, ENDS WITH AND, ARE OUT MAY 19 FROM MATADOR THE WITCH IS OUT MAY 19 FROM HARVEST RECORDS

Cristóbal Balenciaga, the couturier and founder of the eponymous fashion house, is the subject of London's Victoria and Albert Museum's sweeping retrospective, "Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion," which gathers together over 100 of his designs. Focusing first on Balenciaga's career, the showcase features the artist's most prolific period, 1950 to the late ’60s, including iconic creations for the likes of Ava Gardner and Mona von Bismarck. It also explores Balenciaga's lasting impact on fashion, highlighting designs by many of his protégés, including Hubert de Givenchy, Oscar de la Renta, and Emanuel Ungaro.

"BALENCIAGA: SHAPING FASHION" RUNS MAY 27FEBRUARY 18 2018, AT THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM IN LONDON. READ AN INTERVIEW WITH THE CURATORS NOW ON VMAGAZINE.COM

This page, clockwise from top: Photo WENN Ltd; Alberta Tiburzi in "Envelope" dress by Cristóbal Balenciaga, Harper's Bazaar, June 1967 © Hiro; Courtesy Rizzoli; Courtesy Fyre Festival; Photo © Paolo Roversi, Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Courtesy Matador

"REI KAWAKUBO/COMME DES GARÇONS: ART OF THE IN-BETWEEN" RUNS MAY 4-SEPTEMBER 4 AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART'S COSTUME INSTITUTE IN NEW YORK CITY

Wigstock cocreater Lady Bunny returns to the Stonewall Inn for another run of her hit one-woman revue, "Trans-Jester." Past performances have included hilarious, and of course offensive, digs at Donald Trump, Rihanna and Chris Brown, Caitlyn Jenner and Ted Cruz. Come for the badass takedowns of gay stereotypes, stay for the rants aganist political correctness.


JUNE

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Like Fyre, the Firefly Music Festival in the woodlands of Dover, Delaware is giving Indio's Coachella a run for its money. Sure, you may not get the desert wind in your hair, but this fourday lineup includes superstars like the Weeknd, Chance the Rapper, and Bob Dylan, alongside upstarts like the fresh-faced Maggie Rogers. Choose from tent or RV camping —starting at $189 and $319, respectively—or go big with the $2,499 glamping option that will ensure a full cell phone charge at all times. Your Instagram fans will surely thank you.

FIREFLY MUSIC FESTIVAL RUNS JUNE 15-18, FIREFLYFESTIVAL.COM

16 6 This page, clockwise from top: Courtesy aLIVE Coverage; Courtesy Netflix; Courtesy Republic Records; Courtesy Verso; Jenny Holzer, MOVE, 2015, Four-sided LED sign: RGB diodes, 243.8 x 15.2 x 15.2 cm, © Jenny Holzer Artists Rights Society (ARS), Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth, Photo Ken Adlard

When a radical feminist grows old, what happens to her revolutionary fire? That’s the question Lynne Segal, a leading activist, posed to herself in 2012's Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing, but should anyone need a reminder of what her good fight is about, Verso’s forthcoming tenth-anniversary reissue of Making Trouble: A Life in Politics is required reading. From the 1970s on, Segal has been at the forefront of the feminist movement in London, where she helped found a women’s center and the radical left newspaper Islington Gutter Press. Her 1987 publication, Is the Future Female?: Troubled Thoughts on Contemporary Feminism was a critical interrogation of long-existing feminist ideology, calling into question many of the theories advanced by feminist leaders such as Andrea Dworkin and Mary Daly. Since then, Segal has written texts that aim to advance more egalitarian theories for feminism, covering topics such as queer politics, gender identity, and a reevalution of normative understandings of heterosexual power dynamics. In later years, as with the aforementioned Out of Time, Segal has turned her attention toward the subject of growing old, utilizing her own advancing age as a lens to consider themes of mortality and legacy, candidly reflecting on her time as an activist as well as her own sexual awakening. Given today’s political climate, Segal’s writing is as relevant as ever.

MAKING TROUBLE: LIFE AND POLITICS (VERSO, $20)

10 Known for her text-based installations and LED sculptures, New York artist Jenny Holzer is set to debut a selection of new and never-beforeseen works at the Swiss outpost of megawatt gallery Hauser & Wirth. Holzer first came to prominence in the late 1970s with her "Truisms" series—anonymous broadsheets displaying caustic phrases wheatpasted around Manhattan—and her utilization of a Times Square billboard to broadcast statements like "Abuse of Power Comes as No Surprise." With her latest works, Holzer continues to embrace the maxim, Words to live by.

"JENNY HOLZER" RUNS JUNE 10-SEPTEMBER 17 AT HAUSER & WIRTH IN ZURICH

It’s been almost four years since Lorde released her groundbreaking debut, Pure Heroine. Her story is, at this point, legend. New Zealand-born Ella Yelich-O’Connor was 17 years old when her first single, “Royals,” became the song heard ’round the world. With its perfectly tuned measure of disaffected teenage angst, the record that followed earned her two Grammys, a top spot on every major chart, and an onslaught of press (V is proud to have given the singer her first fashion cover). Aside from appearances on the Hunger Games soundtrack (2014’s “Yellow Flicker Beat”), a Disclosure track (2015’s “Magnets”), a tribute to David Bowie at the 2016 Brit Awards, and cameos on Taylor Swift’s Instagram, Lorde has remained relatively quiet since her first album. In March, we finally got a first taste of her sophomore effort, Melodrama, with the single “Green Light”—a piano meets dance floor anthem for the broken-hearted. The second track, "Liability," finds the singer lamenting a love that was not enough for her. (In the lyrics, she describes herself as both a storm and a forest fire.) In any artist’s career, the second album is, in many ways, the most critical. Lucky for Lorde fans, Melodrama finds the singer facing the trials and pitfalls of early adulthood head on while coming into her own as an artist and a woman.

MELODRAMA IS OUT JUNE 16 FROM REPUBLIC RECORDS

23 For those of you not lucky enough to have lived through the original 1986 syndicated show Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling, the upcoming Netflix comedy series GLOW is here to take you back—way back. The opening credits alone, which feature fluorescent, animated female wrestlers flipping and tossing each other around in the ring to Scandal’s anthemic “The Warrior,” are enough to get you pumped. Community’s Alison Brie carries the show as a struggling actress who turns to the then thoroughly experimental premise in an effort to pay the bills. Podcaster Marc Maron costars as a sleazy, washed-up director tasked with leading Brie and her counterparts to Hulk Hogan-esque stardom. (The original Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling experienced many a revival and was the subject of a documentary in late 2012.) If all this isn't enough to tempt you, the show was created by Orange Is the New Black's Jenji Kohan, so you know it's binge-worthy.

GLOW PREMIERES ON NETFLIX JUNE 23 VMAGAZINE.COM 3 9


ROOT

ROOTNYC.COM


Makeup Dick Page Hair Rutger (Streeters) Manicure Gina Viviano (ABTP) Executive producer Stephanie Bargas (VLM Productions) Production coordinator Eva Harte (VLM Productions) On-set production Tucker Birbilis (VLM Productions) Lighting director Jodokus Driessen Digital technician Brian Anderson Photo assistant Joe Hume Stylist assistants Malaika Crawford and Ali Kornhauser Production assistants Erik Hanson and Gus Potter Location Industria Retouching Stereohorse

PERFUME GENIUS The singer’s fourth album explores a quieter side of life without sacrificing his trademark grandeur.

Domesticity suits Mike Hadreas. For someone whose existence thus far has included addiction, recovery, a YouTube ban for “promoting mature sexual themes,” a song that closes the second season of Transparent, and several albums of raw, emotional music, you might expect that the guy who performs as Perfume Genius leads a titillating, drama-packed life. That may have once been the case, but Hadreas, along with his boyfriend, relocated last year from his hometown of Seattle and hunkered down in Tacoma, Washington to record his latest release, No Shape (out May 5 from Matador). “It’s changed my music, not being in a little apartment where I had to be quiet,” he says. Fans have nothing to worry about, though: Hadreas’s songs remain undeniably his— ghostly vocals that glide effortlessly into a falsetto and melodies woven with subtle yet powerful key shifts—but the majority of the lyrics are a little less, well, confrontational than usual. In contrast to the pointed lyrics of “Queen,” Hadreas’s sashay won’t be posing any threats to family this time around. “When something is heartwarming and triumphant, and not corny or preachy, it’s such a powerful thing,” he says. “I think I really wanted to try and make stuff that gave you a feeling of warmth and sweetness, and not in an after-school special sort of way.” To

help achieve this, Hadreas changed his standard approach to songwriting by working on the music first and the lyrics second. He explains, “I needed to have a feeling that I was writing differently this time: focusing on the melodies, instinctually singing, and not trying to have a story beforehand.” The process led to some stunning arrangements, like on the first track, “Otherside,” which starts simply—just his voice and minimal piano—before it erupts into a grand, starry explosion of sound. A summer tour will also help kick off the new record, and it couldn’t come at a better time, given the nurturing space his concerts tend to provide for the LGBTQ community. “The best shows are when it feels like a circle,” he says. “Knowing that when you come, there’s going to be a lot of other people to feel safe around, a lot of other weirdos and outcasts.” Once his travels are over, Hadreas plans to move to L.A., but doesn’t expect that returning to a big city will have any real effect on his recent homebody ways. “I still feel like being good is living against my instincts most of the time,” he admits. “I’m just better at doing it now.” JOSHUA LYON

PHOTOGRAPHY INEZ & VINOODH FASHION MEL OTTENBERG JACKET AND PANTS ABZAL ISSA BEKOV F/W 16 TANK VEX CLOTHING VMAGAZINE.COM 4 1


PHOTOGRAPHY BY HART+LËSHKINA FASHION JOHN COLVER

Megan Fox is relaxed, clad in a T-shirt that says “Brunch or Die.” Her seven-month-old son, Journey—Fox’s third child in four years— is just outside with the nanny, adorable as hell in a dinosaurs-andpizza-print onesie. The scene doesn’t exactly jive with the idea of a magazine shoot featuring a sex icon’s new venture: revamping Frederick’s of Hollywood, a heritage intimates company founded in the 1940s. But for Fox, the setting is perfect, because lingerie can be about comfort. “I’m not sitting back and thinking, What are men going to like to look at? Because I don’t care, honestly,” she says, flipping her wrist to shoo away imaginary males. “They’re going to like whatever I put on, and that’s that. Women don’t ever have to acquiesce to whatever we think men will like or not like. They will like it because it’s on our bodies, and our bodies are magic.” Fox—who will star in the upcoming James Franco-directed black comedy Zeroville—isn’t just part-owner of the company, she’s taking creative control and is now the face of the brand. With Fox at the helm, it will remain sexier than most of its competitors, but it won’t kowtow to the male gaze. “I design or pull pieces that make me feel a certain way—things that I can wear with my clothes, things that I can wear out, things that I can put on and dance around my house and no one has to be there,” she says. “It’s just something that makes me feel good in my body. I would hope that the messaging becomes more about that and starts to stray further away from, ‘Buy this because your boyfriend’s going to think it’s sexy.’ Because, fuck, it’s 2017.” Though Fox’s designs won’t be released until October, she says the collection will have political undertones that reflect our country’s current state of affairs. “The individual pieces aren’t political statements in themselves; the overall theme and vibe of this particular collection is influenced by what’s going on in our political environment in the United States,” she says before pausing, thinking about it, and laughing. “Nothing says ‘sexy’ like politics.” MAXWELL WILLIAMS

LOOKING FOXY


Makeup Melanie Inglessis (Forward Artists) Hair Andy LeCompte (The Wall Group) Manicure Ashlie Johnson (The Wall Group) On-set production Lindsay Heimer Photography assistant James Perry Stylist assistant Megan King Location Aesthesia Studios, Los Angeles

MEGAN WEARS COAT MASHA REVA BODYSUIT FREDERICK’S OF HOLLYWOOD


POWERHOUSE

MASTERS AT WORK

SAM MCKNIGHT

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feathery yet sleek short haircut and the extensions For someone with a pedigree as distinguished as Sam McKnight’s, it’s a bit surprising that his earliest jobs Lady Gaga wore as garnish for her meat dress. weren’t particularly chic. He freely admits that work- He’s also the guy who orchestrated Kendall Jenner ing in fashion and hair was never a “burning ambition,” and Gigi Hadid’s hair color switch at the Balmain Fall but after tackling several odd jobs—like cleaning win- 2016 show, and he continues to surprise with looks dows—McKnight found his calling when he landed a job like the playful side ponytails that he created for in a friend of a friend’s hair salon at age 18. “I ended Chanel’s Spring 2017 runway offering (seen above). up helping them out on Saturdays in reception, and I “I like to think I loosened hair up when I came along,” found myself intrigued by the hair world,” the stylist he reveals. “I guess my whole ethos is to make women remembers. “Very soon, I was actually learning how look great, and it’s not about forcing a style on someto cut hair.” one that doesn’t make any sense or doesn’t make McKnight looked to pop culture for much of his them look good.” inspiration. “In the heart of the ’60s, I was really young That point of view has catapulted McKnight from a and captivated by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, respected insider to a celebrity in his own right, with but when I became a teenager, David Bowie became a book called Hair by Sam McKnight published last my style icon,” he reflects. “Glam rock and colored hair fall, and an Instagram following that’s climbed north of were crazy and very, very, very glamorous.” 100,000. “The feedback I’ve gotten on social media is The same could be said of his career: among the amazing because I don’t just do this for my peers,” he many highlights (pun intended) include Princess Diana’s says. “I finally feel like I have given something back.”


These superstar makeup artists and hairstylists have earned a spotlight of their own. PHOTOGRAPHY SCHOHAJA TEXT PRIYA RAO

PETER PHILIPS

While musing about his earliest beauty inspirations, very natural,” he says. makeup artist Peter Philips fondly recalls films from That’s not to say that he doesn’t have a flair for his childhood: “Every Saturday at 4:00 PM there was an the dramatic as well. His recent book, Dior: The Art afternoon movie on Belgian national TV,” the Antwerp of Color, is a glorious celebration of the house’s use of makeup throughout its history, featuring his own native remembers. “I would go inside and watch that movie because I loved those old-school stars.” In looks alongside those of Dior’s previous two legparticular, the opening scene of Singin’ in the Rain pro- endary beauty directors, Serge Lutens and Tyen. In vided ample fodder. “I remember being blown away addition to the visions he sends down the runway, product development has become a passion—he’s when you have all those silent movie stars walking in those outfits for some sort of movie premiere,” he done it for both Dior and his previous employer, Chanel. says. “Before social media, before the red carpet, it “It’s about real-life problems and real-life questions,” just made you dream.” he explains. “You realize that women want to be pretty Dreaming is still very much a part of Philips’s day- in whatever context that means, but not necessarto-day. As the creative and image director of Dior ily fashionable. It’s been a huge eye-opener for me.” Makeup, he conjured a minimalist look with what he This is why Philips prefers not to refer to himself as called “girl power” beauty—a little foundation, primer, an artist but, instead, as a craftsman. “It’s more like light pink blush, and eye shadow—on young models someone who can make really beautiful furniture. It’s for Dior’s Spring 2017 show (seen above). “The skill of gorgeous but needs to be practical, too,” he explains. makeup comes in because you need to make it look “I use my creativity and my skill to combine it.”


POWERHOUSE

DIANE KENDAL

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lineups for Marc Jacobs and M.A.C., the latter of which For British makeup artist Diane Kendal, the greatest compliment she can receive regarding her work is, was released earlier this year. “The nice thing about “You make me look so beautiful.” it is that they can all be mixed together,” she explains “That’s my thing, I want girls to feel and be as beau- of the products’ functionality. “You can use a little bit of the foundation with the lip to mix color, or you can tiful as they can be,” says Kendal, who works with use the lip on the cheek, you can use the eye on the visionaries like hairstylist Guido Palau and designers Marc Jacobs and Chitose Abe. lip. It is all interchangeable, and I think that is what I like about makeup. I like products that you can shift Her creations sometimes veer into otherworldly territory, which makes sense, as she got her start in and change, and mix and match.” special effects and prosthetics at the London College When looking for inspiration, Kendal often finds of Fashion. “I applied for a job at the BBC,” she admits. herself drawn to figures known for pushing creative While her more natural looks are equally skilled (think boundaries, especially when it comes to conventions Jacobs’s Fall 2017 smudgy lashes and pops of fake of beauty. For instance, her recent work for Abe’s freckles), she understands that much of her editorial Spring 2017 Sacai show (seen above) was influenced work doesn’t apply to real life. “A lot of the products by iconic androgynous figures in the music industry, that you use on photo shoots or the runway do not like David Bowie. At first blush, Bowie is perhaps an actually translate to use for the everyday person.” unusual reference for women, but as Kendal notes, Kendal has taken much of that high fashion beauty “Makeup has the ability to make you feel beautiful, but magic and brought it to bear on every day cosmetic also really powerful.”


GUIDO PALAU

Melanie Ward. After Calvin Klein took notice of the Perhaps more than anyone, British-born stylist Guido Palau has been responsible for era-defining hair. Not wunderkind, he flew Palau to New York for the historyonly was he the creative force behind the looks of making CK campaign with Moss and Mark Wahlberg, Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, photographed by Herb Ritts. Cindy Crawford, and Tatjana Patitz in George Michael’s Today, Palau is the global creative director for Redken “Freedom! ’90” video, he also helped usher in the fash- and remains a visible force within the industry. Looks ion world’s embrace of grunge when he created messy, from recent shows include his slicked-back ponytails bed-head hair for David Sims’s unforgettable early at Prada’s Spring 2017 show (see above) and the conblack-and-white images of Kate Moss. “George Michael troversial Rastafarian-esque up-dos at Marc Jacobs. was the epitome of the supermodel,” he says. “But it “Individualism is big in beauty, and I think that’s sort of was also the end of one thing and the beginning of this happened in the last couple of years more and more, other thing. The early- to mid-1990s grunge period, a celebrating lots of different kinds of women,” he says. whole new idea of beauty was happening.” “In any show you’ll see someone like a Gigi or a Kendall, Palau got his start in fashion after working at a Vidal [as well as] a tomboyish girl with short hair, or girls celSassoon salon in London in the ’80s. “It was very cre- ebrating their natural texture with lots of curls.” ative, the beginning of youth culture and street style. As for what keeps Palau continually inspired, he It felt slightly underground,” he remembers. Palau spent claims it’s the “mystique.” He elegantly states, “We his time with a who’s who of visionaries, like Sims and shouldn’t ever miss an opportunity for the dream or Moss, as well as photographer Corinne Day and stylist the fantasy in beauty.”


POWERHOUSE

CHARLOTTE TILBURY

Charlotte Tilbury experienced her first major beauty epiphany when she was an awkward 13-year-old at boarding school. “As a young girl, I had very fair eyelashes. Then I used mascara once and everyone started coming up to me. I became popular overnight,” she recalls. “It was then that I started to understand that makeup is a very powerful tool.” The idea that mascara and the like could be a confidence builder was furthered when Tilbury met makeup legend Mary Greenwell (who tended to Princess Diana’s flawless visage) and began studying at the Glauca Rossi School of Make Up in London. A budding career working on 1990s supermodels with photographers like Mario Testino and Steven Klein came next, but Tilbury’s biggest career breakthrough was three years ago with the launch of her eponymous brand. “When I went on to be a makeup artist, I realized that there were these archetypes that kept coming up over and over again,” she says. This realization became the

crux of her beauty lineup, which was built on the 10 quintessential looks any woman would want to recreate, from the “the Golden Goddess” (think Gigi Hadid) to “the Dolce Vita” (picture Penelope Cruz). “It’s nature and nurture that we are attracted to these types. It’s hardwired into our brains, through movies and social engagements, and we end up wanting what we naturally like.” Recently, Tilbury launched the revolutionary hydrating Instant Magic Facial Dry Sheet Mask, which nourishes skin from the inside out (it reaches the third layer of the epidermis!), and devotees can expect even more products later this year. “I am a thrill-seeker, and I get high on people, so nothing makes me happier than seeing someone who is happy,” she confesses. “In making makeup, you are selling dreams, and when we do that for people, it is one of the most wonderful gifts that you could give to anyone.”


LISA ELDRIDGE Retouching Stéphane Sayah

Eight years before YouTube beauty tutorials became an industry mainstay, Lancôme makeup creative director Lisa Eldridge tackled the then unknown medium with a series of approachable videos that focused on conundrums like how to deal with morning-after makeup. “I literally didn’t mention it to anyone in the fashion industry, and it took about three years for anyone to mention anything to me,” Eldridge remembers of the segments. She initially thought they might be harmful to her editorial career for being too simplistic—she was working with supermodels like Cindy Crawford and photographers such as Mert & Marcus. It was Kate Winslet who spilled the artist’s secret to her contemporaries: “I remember being on a job with Kate—and I had never told her, or any of the celebrities I worked with—and she introduced me to one of her friends and said, ‘This is Lisa, who always does my makeup, and she does these amazing videos on YouTube and

she teaches women all over the world how to cover their spots! Do you know about those?’” As she gained more and more devoted followers, mega beauty companies began to take notice. She eventually landed at Lancôme, where she continues her tutorials and has helped develop a slew of products, including the recently launched L’Absolu Rouge lipsticks that come in a whopping 86 shades. “It was 18 months of work, and I literally felt I had given birth to these lipsticks,” she jokes. She even concocted one called “Idole,” a matte, orange-y red for her own everyday use. “It totally fulfilled my narcissistic goal of having my own lipstick just for me,” she laughs. That kind of personalization reminds Eldridge of her first beauty product love: her mother’s box of old-school Mary Quant crayons. “They were chewed, gloopy, and even smelled different,” she says. “I loved the objects themselves because they had the power to be transformative.”


VVNNEWS

Raf Simons’s subversive Calvin Klein collection, Nicopanda’s kinky hookup, plus a hit list of the season’s best scores

SUMMER BUYS PHOTOGRAPHY THERESE ALDGARD MOSCHINO BATHING SUIT ($300, MOSCHINO.COM)

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AMERICAN WAY

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During the Fall 2017 shows, the fashion world raged. Over the course of the presentations, designers revealed—to varying degrees of success and genuineness—their commentaries on our choppy state of affairs. Some opted to do straightforward (if not pandering) statement T-shirts. Others were more clever in their graphic punchiness—see Ashish, the London-based designer of Indian heritage, who is known mainly for his use of all-over sequins. Of late, he has hit a confident stride combining political agitation and merry abandonment. For instance, one of his Fall pieces, a sparkling T-shirt that spelled out “More glitter less Twitter,” in a rainbow scheme, was a big gay fuck you to President Donald Trump and his reckless social media impulses. The strongest remarks were the subtlest. The best of the quiet commentators was Raf Simons via his debut at Calvin Klein, where he was recently installed as chief creative officer. (Calvin Klein’s Fall 2017 collection was codesigned with creative director Pieter Mulier.) Simons has consistently proven his long-game intelligence with his influential eponymous menswear line, as well as his stints at Jil Sander and Christian Dior, where he proffered minimalist provocations and artful quirkiness, respectively. As such, fashion watchers knew they were in for something good, or at least something worthy of extended discussion. What they got was something extraordinary. Simons created a compelling narrative, and that it was cooly silent only added to its strength.  There were Western shirts, smoothed of their cowboy flares. Plastic sheaths—like couch protectors—covered fur, suggesting an impenetrability into the sphere of wealth. Quilts—pretty reminders of diligent and folksy national lore—were worked into tough parkas. There was even a wrap skirt made from an American flag, albeit with gold-trim tassels. There are some who theorize that these tassels are displayed when admiralty—that is, unconstitutional—law is in practice. It all makes brilliant sense, and it feels, in looking at it now, scathing.  But Simons’s sly creativity is not limited to the runway; his first campaign for Calvin Klein is also spurring. Photographed by Willy Vanderperre, the promo shows models—some in only their briefs— standing in front of works by American artists: Sterling Ruby and a mutilated flag. Richard Prince and his savage humor, even Andy Warhol’s pop-art skulls. All in all, Simons proposed a major riot while remaining completely, almost astonishingly, quiet. NICK REMSEN

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NICK REMSEN (via text) Hey Nicola, what’s up? NICOLA FORMECHETTI Hey Nick, I am in Miami. Staying at the Versace Mansion. In Gianni’s room…It’s major. NR No way. I am jealous. You’re launching a capsule collection of shirts and jackets with the estate of Tom of Finland, the late artist famous for his homoerotic illustrations, and your label Nicopanda. What was it that made you want to do this collab? NF I’ve always been a bit of a Tom of Finland fanatic. I collect carpets, lighters, perfumes, kitchen aprons, bed covers, and pillow cases. We’ve never done a collaboration for Nicopanda and I wanted to try something unexpected. After visiting the Tom of Finland Foundation in L.A., we approached them. 50 VMAGAZINE.COM

NR I love that you made it gender interchangeable— most people likely associate Tom with men only. NF Yes, I didn’t want this to be only about gay men. I love that it’s for everybody. It doesn’t matter. I think it’s so cute to see a cool girl wearing Tom’s drawings. But of course, Tom is like an art version of a LGBTQ flag so we want to do something during Pride in New York. NR Agreed. Do you have a favorite Tom work? NF I love the logo he did for the Tom of Finland Foundation—it has a flying cock! NR Haha NF So, we borrowed this to do our graphic. We created some fun badges, too, that say DOM, SUB, TWINK, DADDY. But they’re for all.

Clockwise from top left: Calvin Klein, courtesy Giovanni Giannoni; Nicopanda, courtesy Kim Reenberg

NICOLA OF FINLAND


AROUND THE WORLD Venture to Tangier, Tokyo, and other far-flung locales with these destination-inspired fragrances. No miles necessary. PHOTOGRAPHY ROBIN BROADBENT EDITOR KRISTIN PERROTTA

TAORMINA, SICILY: ACQUA DI PARMA BLU MEDITERRANEO CEDRO DI TAORMINA

COCO CHANEL’S PARIS APARTMENT: CHANEL LES EXCLUSIFS DE CHANEL 31 RUE CAMBON

POSITANO, ITALY: TOM FORD PRIVATE BLEND SOLE DI POSITANO

TANGIER, MOROCCO: AERIN TANGIER VANILLE

TOKYO: PRADA PINK FLAMINGOS

GRASSE, FRANCE: LOUIS VUITTON LES PARFUMS LOUIS VUITTON APOGEÉ


SPOTLIGHT

THE NEW GIRLS

SHIRT AND EARRINGS LOUIS VUITTON ON FACE HERA BLACK CUSHION FOUNDATION

Future supermodel Duckie Thot explains the origin of her unusual name and reveals what she learned from hosting Sudanese refugees. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAN LEHNER FASHION TOM VAN DORPE

For the record, “Thot” really is Duckie’s last name. “It’s real, guys. It’s not a troll, it’s not me being stupid,” she confirms. “It’s on my passport.” Her first name, however, is a term of endearment with less controversial connotations. “It’s a nickname for ‘Nyadak’—my grandmother’s name, which means ‘beautiful.’ It’s from the Nuer tribe in South Sudan—where my family is from.” So emerges the origin story of one of the most exciting models to land in New York of late. Thot, 21, hails from Australia, but as mentioned, is of South Sudanese heritage. Her family moved Down Under in 1994, when the Second Sudanese Civil War became too volatile. She was born in Melbourne, but was “raised in an African home, and kind of got both cultures.” At a young age, Thot bore witness to the hardships that refugees experience, and how important it is to welcome the displaced with open arms. “My dad helped,” she says. “He’s not a lawyer—he’s a veterinarian—but he could read and write in English, and he’d write letters and give references. We had multiple 52 VMAGAZINE.COM

groups stay with us. A lot of families would spend their first month or two with us and kind of ease into Australia. It’s obviously a really intense switch. Veterans came through with PTSD, but people forget that entire families grapple with that, too. There are no real programs for people that come from places like that—plucked from war zones and put into primary schools in normal environments. That is a really crazy thing.” Thot moved to New York—with only $400 in her pocket—in 2016 after competing on Australia’s Next Top Model. Her first job was shooting Kanye West’s Yeezy Season 4 zine, which was released with this Fall’s Season 5 invites. During those early days, she also met beauty genius Pat McGrath, and they’ve since worked together often. More recently, Thot was seen strutting down library tables in Paris, modeling a barelythere Fenty PUMA by Rihanna wrap. “I was so scared I was going to have a nip slip the whole time,” she confesses. We’re confident that her fame will grow for much better reasons. NICK REMSEN


“It’s a nickname for ‘Nyadak,’—my grandmother’s name, which means ‘beautiful.’”

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ON EYES HERA RICH LONG LASH WATERPROOF MASCARA IN NO.79 LASH BLACK


SPOTLIGHT

SHIRT DIOR EARRINGS (THIS SPREAD) HANNAH’S OWN

As a child, American beauty Hannah Ferguson used to make collages of celebrity models. Now, she’s on her way to becoming one herself.

Growing up with two Marines for parents, 24-year-old and has made regular appearances in the magazine’s Hannah Ferguson admits that her fashion education yearly edition ever since. It’s everything she wished came quite late. “I was always kind of dressing in boy for as a kid, but Ferguson is also excited to take her clothes,” she reveals. “My mom was very conservative. career in a more high fashion direction. “I definitely We weren’t allowed to wear shorts that went above the love wearing Balmain,” she says. “I’ve worn a few of knee or tank tops or anything with spaghetti straps.” their dresses in the past for some events and I’m pretty Still, the San Angelo, Texas native had dreams of obsessed, so it would be awesome to work with them.” modeling—not to mention the looks to make it big. “The Other coups for the up-and-comer would be working thing that caught my eye was Sports Illustrated,” she with Chanel, Marc Jacobs, and Calvin Klein. recalls. “I wanted to look like the women in that publicaWhen she’s not posing in bikinis, Ferguson enjoys tion and aspired to be like them. I would look through it fishing, training her new puppy, and cooking. “I love to with my sisters. We would rip out our favorite pictures bake,” she emphasizes. “I use a chocolate chip cookie and then do a collage across the walls in our bedroom. homemade recipe we had growing up. It’s chocolate I always loved Gisele, Miranda Kerr, and Ana Beatriz.” chip overload, but delicious.” After graduating high school, Ferguson decided to She clearly comes across as the picture-perfect allmake her dreams a reality by traveling to Dallas for a American girl, and that’s something Ferguson embraces. local model search competition. She won, and spent “I’m from Texas, I’m a country girl, so I try to stay true to myself and portray who I am to the world naturally. six more months working in the Lone Star State before I don’t try and be someone I’m not. I just let my inner heading to New York. Almost immediately, she landed a spot in the 2014 Sports Illustrated “Swimsuit Issue,” self shine.” PRIYA RAO 54 VMAGAZINE.COM


“I’m from Texas, I’m a country girl, so I try to stay true to myself and portray to the world who I am naturally.”

ON FACE HERA HD PERFECT FOUNDATION

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Makeup Karan Franjola (Management + Artists) Hair Holly Mills (Streeters) Models Duckie Thot (New York Model Management) and Hannah Ferguson (IMG) Digital technician Nick Barr Photo assistant Po Ewing Stylist assistant Vesper Wolfe Hair assistant Jackie Seabrooke Retouching IMGN Location and equipment Root Studios

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STARS OF SUMMER We’ve stocked our summer issue with a supernova of talent, so follow the Thin White Duke’s advice: “Take your protein pills and put your helmet on.” 58 Cara Delevingne and Dane DeHaan blast things off with a glimpse of Fall fashion that recalls the otherworldly glam of Barbarella, photographed by Karl Lagerfeld and styled by Amanda Harlech. 66 Next, Nick Knight and Katy England craft a new look for Spring couture in colors that rival the Northern Lights. 78 Ashley Graham reveals her inner wisdom to Tracee Ellis Ross, and her outer beauty to Mario Sorrenti in a stunning portfolio styled by George Cortina. 92 It’s been a decade since Lara Stone’s V debut, and she celebrates the occasion with Mel Bles and Tom Guinness, in pre-Fall fashion that recalls past, present, and future. 102 Lastly, our annual Sundance Film Festival portfolio, shot by Sharif Hamza and styled by Ellie Grace Cumming, takes an in-depth look at the next generation of Hollywood talent. “Commencing countdown, engines on!”


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OUT OF THIS WORLD Friends and costars Cara Delevingne and Dane DeHaan show off stellar Fall fashion and chat with Derek Blasberg about their new sci-fi extravaganza, press tour disasters, and partying with Rihanna. Photography Karl Lagerfeld Fashion Amanda Harlech


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MAKEUP PETER PHILIPS FOR DIOR HAIR EAMONN HUGHES IMAGE DIRECTION ERIC PFRUNDER AND KATHERINE MARRE PHOTOGRAPHY CONTACTS OCÉANE SELLIER, ALEXANDRA HYLÉN, ALICE CADAUX MANICURE ANNY ERRANDONEA (MARIE-FRANCE THAVONEKHAM) PHOTO ASSISTANTS OLIVIER SAILLANT, XAVIER ARIAS, FRÉDÉRIC DAVID, BERNWALD SOLLICH STYLIST ASSISTANT FIONA HICKS MAKEUP ASSISTANTS DELPHINE DELAIN AND ELODIE BARRAT HAIR ASSISTANT KUMIKO TSUMAGARI RETOUCHING LUDOVIC D’HARDIVILLÉ CATERING PAPILLON PARIS TRAITEUR


“When I hear that there’s an option that I can do it instead of a stunt person, I’m always like, ‘Please let me do it! Throw me off the building, I like that!’” —Cara Delevingne

Cara Delevingne is teasing Dane DeHaan mercilessly. The two star in Luc Besson’s hotly anticipated intergalactic adventure Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (out July 21), but before shooting that, they both worked on another upcoming film, Tulip Fever. “You never seem to remember,” she digs. “But then again, you didn’t really talk to me.” “We weren’t really in it together,” DeHaan replies. “Umm, we had a scene together!” Delevingne shouts. “But not like a scene where the two of us were talking,” he stammers. “Our characters didn’t know each other.” “I didn’t know characters needed to know each other for actors to talk.” “I’m just saying, once we were in a movie where we had to develop an actual relationship, then it made sense to get to be friends.” “So, you only talk to people if you have to?” Delevingne says with a sly smile. Exasperated, DeHaan sighs, “That’s the only reason I’m talking to you right now!” Delevingne’s ability to needle is part of her charm. I first met the British 24-year-old when she was a teenager—before she became a social media sensation, top model, Chanel muse, millennial poster girl for fluid sexuality, and top Hollywood actress. (Her 2016 film Suicide Squad made more than $750 million at the box office.) Even at that age, her most marked characteristics were that she was naughty, a mischief-maker, and the sort of person who could get you into trouble. That’s why DeHaan, 31, is her perfect foil: his presence is as cool as his icy blue eyes. He grew up in Pennsylvania, studied acting at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, and made his mark in Hollywood with films like The Place Beyond the Pines, Kill Your Darlings, and Marvel’s revamp of the Spiderman franchise. The three of us have met for lunch in a darkened, velvet-covered Parisian hotel lobby to discuss Valerian, the movie version of the influential French science-fiction comic series. First created in the 1960s, the chronicles ended in 2010, and the entire four-decade journey is now compiled in a 21-volume graphic novel. It even has its own encyclopedia. Needless to say, expectations are high. DEREK BLASBERG When you first met Luc Besson, did you know it was for Valerian? CARA DELEVINGNE I didn’t know we were meeting about this movie. Even my agents didn’t know it was for this, and it was clear this was a top-secret project. I was just told, “Luc wants to have brunch,” and I said, “Great, let’s do it.” But when we met, he explained it all with such enthusiasm that it was clear he’d been trying to do this for so long and it was a passion project. DANE DEHAAN I met Luc in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, near 64 VMAGAZINE.COM

where I live. He told me this was the movie he’s wanted to make his whole life. When he was a kid in France, he would sit on his farm and dream about making this movie. CD When I got the script, it came with a security guard who stood outside the room while I read it. Maybe he didn’t trust me? It was 300 pages with all the action sequences and stuff. It was intense, but super exciting. DB Did you have to audition? CD Sort of. I had to prove myself, but not in a typical audition setting. Luc would say stuff like, “Make up a story in your head and describe it to me using no real words, just physicality and random sounds you make up.” Or, “Think of an animal and act it out and I have to guess what animal it is.” DB It sounds like a Saturday Night Live skit! CD He’s incredible at playing! He’s the boss on set, but he’s creative, too. If I wasn’t able to be a bird or fish or whatever, he would do it in one second and be incredible. If he didn’t guess them, I’d try and do them over and over. I was relentless. He was like, “You’re not very good at that, but the fact that you keep trying, that’s what I like.” After that, he pretty much told me I had the part. But I didn’t actually believe him until we were on set. DB Dane, how did you find out you got it? DD After I met with him, he emailed me the script, and it sounded like I was the lead, but I still wasn’t sure. I called him and was like, “Wow, this is really incredible, it’s crazy. I would love to be a part of this.” I remember him saying, “I’m so happy!” And I was thinking, That’s awesome, but am I happy too? I called my agent and said, “I think I’m in this movie, but I don’t know for sure. I know he’s happy, but I don’t know if he’s happy because I liked it or because I want to do it.” It turns out he wanted me to do it. So, I was happy too. CD Someone asked me the other day if we had space sex in the movie. DB Is “space sex” a thing? DD Well, I would assume so. A lot of people live in space and it is the year 2763. DB Is it different than non-space sex? Is it different than Earth sex? DD It depends on where you are, but it’s probably different. CD You never thought about how aliens procreate, did you, Derek? DB No, but while we’re on the topic, I should say you both look very fit in this movie. CD Best shape of my life. But really, Dane’s transformation was incredible. He was up everyday at 6 AM and went to the gym every morning. DB Have you had to bulk up for anything before? DD I had to a little bit for Spiderman. For this, we’re space agents, we have to look like we can save the

universe. It’s a big part of Valerian: if you don’t work out for at least two hours a day in outer space your muscles start to deteriorate. DB Cara, I imagine you liked the action element? CD The stunts were half of my favorite thing. Getting chucked up on wires and getting thrown around, that stuff for me was a ball. DD She loved it, I get terrified on those wires. CD I’m definitely more into it than Dane. When I hear that there’s an option that I can do it instead of a stunt person, I’m always like, “Please let me do it! Throw me off the building, I like that!” CB Dane, you mentioned Spiderman. Was this a similar world to that? DD Not really. It’s not like everybody around the world is super familiar with Valerian. What I think is so cool about this movie is it can hold on to its originality and its voice for a couple reasons. First, people aren’t super familiar with the story. And second, because it’s not being done by an American studio. When I’m making Spiderman, it’s a movie made by a committee, every decision is 10 people’s decision. This is purely Luc’s vision, and that’s going to give it a really clear voice. DB Now you guys will go on the press tour together. Do you think you’ll be better friends by then? DD We are friends! DB Cara, remember when you got into trouble on the press tour for Paper Towns? DD I remember that. When a TV host [on Good Morning Sacramento] asked if you had read the book that the movie was based on? DB Yes, and Cara was like, “No, and I didn’t read the script, either!” I thought that was funny. CD But then it became a big deal. I remember Whoopi Goldberg went on TV and sort of scolded me. When that happened, I was like, I’ve made it! Especially in America, some people still only know me as “You’re that girl who did that nasty interview.” DD So, when I tell people I’m in this movie with Cara Delevingne and they’re like, “Who’s that?” I should be like, “Do you watch Good Morning Sacramento?” CD Did you know that Dane has never been to a nightclub before? DD It’s true. I told Cara that at the premiere of Valerian I’ll go to a club with her and Rihanna. CD He told me and Rihanna both that, and we were both like, “Umm, OK…” DB Dane, I don’t think you know what you’re getting yourself into. That’s like going straight from the bench to the major leagues! DD It’ll be my first club. CD You’re screwed now. DD I figure if I’m gonna do it, do it.


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DREAMSCAPE Nick Knight teams up with legendary stylist Katy England for a brilliant take on Spring couture that pairs rich colors with the intricate textures of custom-made crochet. Photography Nick Knight Fashion Katy England


THIS PAGE: DRESS GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE BY RICCARDO TISCI HOODIE VINTAGE NIKE FROM BLITZ LONDON SCARF CUSTOM-MADE FOR STYLIST BY CECILY CRACROFT-ELEY OPPOSITE PAGE: SKIRT AND BODYSUIT GAULTIER PARIS HAT CUSTOM-MADE FOR STYLIST BY CECILY CRACROFT-ELEY SCARF VINTAGE FROM BEYOND RETRO BELT VINTAGE FROM RELLIK SARA GRACE WEARS ON EYES LANCïME COLOR DESIGN EYESHADOW IN MAKEOVER


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MAKEUP LISA ELDRIDGE (STREETERS) HAIR MALCOLM EDWARDS (ART PARTNER) MODEL SARA GRACE (THE SOCIETY MANAGEMENT) MANICURE EMMA WELSH (AUGUST MANAGEMENT) PRODUCTION RIANNA CASSON (SHOWSTUDIO) DIGITAL TECHNICIAN JOE COLLEY (PASSERIDAE) DIGITAL POSTPRODUCTION MARK BOYLE (EPILOGUE IMAGING) PHOTO ASSISTANTS BRITT LLOYD, ROB RUSLING, TOM ALEXANDER, JOHN HEYES STYLIST ASSISTANTS JAMES CAMPBELL, AURORA BURN, LYDIA SIMPSON MAKEUP ASSISTANT JESSIE RICHARDSON HAIR ASSISTANT STELIOS CHONDROS PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS MICHAEL GHOSSAINY, RITA PETRONUS, MARA BRANSS, SOPHIE BRUNKER EQUIPMENT DIRECT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATION SHOWSTUDIO


BODY BEAUTIFUL Ashley Graham bares all in black and white and talks with her friend Tracee Ellis Ross about role models, mothers, and mantras. Photography Mario Sorrenti Fashion George Cortina

TRACEE ELLIS ROSS Hi Ashley! How are you doing? ASHLEY GRAHAM I’m so good! I’m so happy to be doing this. TER Me too! First of all, you’re slaying everybody’s life right now with your fashion. I was spit out of a fashion womb, thanks to momma [Diana Ross]. I’ve been stealing her clothes for a lifetime. My mom was always like, “What are you doing?” Because she always thought that the costumes were incredibly important and worthy of archiving, but I’ve been explaining to her for many, many years, “Mom! Listen, with just your fashion choices in general, you defined an era. These T-shirts are a curated collection!” But that’s not the point. We’re here to talk about you! AG Who cares! I like being able to talk to you. TER There’s so much I want to talk to you about! Let’s just dive in. When did you make a decision to love the skin you’re in? Was it something that you found your way to, or was there a particular moment? AG It would be so much easier to be like, “This is the date, time, and experience I had,” but there really isn’t one. It was more about experiences in my life of devaluing the fact that I was an average, normal girl living in the city. But being told, “You’re fat,” “You’re ugly” or “You’re just not good enough,” and trying to live in these model standards, that was my normal. I think I hit bottom around 18. I was disgusted with myself and told my mom I was coming home. And she told me, “No, you’re not, because you told me that this was what you wanted and I know you’re supposed to do this. It doesn’t matter what you think about your body, because your body is supposed to change somebody’s life.” To this day that sticks with me because I’m here today and I feel that it’s okay to have cellulite. TER In our culture it’s a big, ugly word, but it’s such a normal part of the human body. As women, we’re taught to see through the eyes of other people instead of our own. 78 VMAGAZINE.COM

AG I remember my first signs of cellulite, in middle school. I remember telling my mom, “Isn’t it disgusting? It’s so ugly.” She pulled her pants down and said, “Look, I have it, too.” And I was like, “Gasp!” She looked at me, then at it, and just rolled her eyes. She didn’t tell me that it’s beautiful or ugly. She just made it a nonissue. It doesn’t define my worth. If women like you and me continue to preach that, then I feel like younger girls are going to grasp it and they’re going to be like, “Who cares!” TER In high school, I came up with the Jell-O and earthquake test. I’d stomp my foot on the floor while staring, naked, in the mirror so I could watch how long my ass jiggled. If it made me uncomfortable, it meant I had more work to do. AG I think you have one of the best asses in the industry! TER Thank you. I never moved into being full-blown anorexic, but that was the sort of tenacious relationship I had with my body growing up. Do you have a mantra you say to yourself when things get tough? AG Absolutely, I have many. I grew up in a very Christian home, so words have power. I took that with me into every area of my life. If you say, “I’m fat,” that’s how you’re going to feel. If you say, “I’m stupid,” that’s how you’re going to start your day. I wake up sometimes and I feel like the fattest person alive, but I’m not going to let that affect the rest of my day. Say to yourself, “I like this day. I am bold, I am beautiful, and I am brilliant.” For me, that hits the interior, the exterior, and it makes me feel smart. TER I do the exact same thing! I get clear on what the specific thing is that is frightening me and then I can turn it around into a positive mantra. I keep little white index cards or put it on the home screen of my phone. You want young girls to start with these good thoughts. But I’m 44 and every day is [still] different. How old are you by the way? AG This year is the big three-oh. (CONTINUED ON PAGE 88)


“I grew up in a very Christian home, so words have power. I took that with me into every area of my life.” —Ashley Graham


“I think now we’re willing to bring our sisters up and fight for one another. At the end of the day, we just want equality and our rights. ” —Ashley Graham

TER I don’t know why people are afraid of getting older. But we should have a conversation about the areas you have to moisturize, and what to do with the armpits as we get older. AG Should I be moisturizing my armpits? TER Moisturize them. Talk to them and make sure they should be doing what they’re doing, but do not forget them. Let’s shift gears. How does what’s happening in our country right now connect to your sense of activism and responsibility? AG I have never had so many political conversations with my girlfriends. If this year has done anything, it’s brought my friendships to a closer level. We’ve been able to get things off our chests and understand things better. We’ve become closer, even just my inner circle. I feel like a lot of American women have gotten closer and tighter and listened to each other more—and been more supportive of each other. It’s not just about the industry we’re in, but the world we’re in. Women have always had a stereotype of being catty or malicious; I think now we’re willing to bring our sisters up and fight for one another. At the end of the day, we just want equality and our rights. TER It’s a strange time, but I think it’s awakened a lot people. What are your thoughts on social media? You use it as a wonderful tool. AG I think there are negative attachments to it as far as the face tuning and flawless face and big round butt and tiny waist. It’s like, We get it. But I honestly think social media has been a really great platform for young adults that haven’t been accepted. If nobody in their small town looks like them or is doing the same things as them, they can find people on the Internet. TER I agree. It’s a way to connect to a like-minded community, but it can obviously go either way. Who are your role models? AG Growing up, I idolized Beyoncé, J-Lo, and the Spice Girls. I was a mix between Ginger and Scary Spice. I wore the Scary buns and Ginger’s slutty, leopard outfits. Today, I have two role models. One of them is my mom. Just seeing how happy she has been going through [life] and how she’s handled every curveball is like, That’s a women who has integrity and dignity and has been kind and generous to people around her. Business-wise, it’s Kathy Ireland. She’s OG. When she was younger and in Sports Illustrated she was like, I’m going to sell some socks and make a business. Now she has a billion-dollar company. Kathy Ireland, if you’re out there, I’m still trying to be your best friend. You’re on my vision board. TER Anything you want to say that I didn’t ask about? AG Buy my book! It’s called A New Model: What Confidence, Beauty, and Power Really Look Like and it comes out May 9th.


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MAKEUP KANAKO TAKASE (STREETERS) HAIR DIDIER MALIGE (ART PARTNER) MODEL ASHLEY GRAHAM (IMG) MANICURE CASEY HERMAN (THE WALL GROUP) SET DESIGN PHILIPP HAEMMERLE (PHILIPP HAEMMERLE INC) PRODUCTION KATIE FASH DIGITAL TECHNICIAN JOHNNY VICARI LIGHTING TECHNICIAN LARS BEAULIEU PHOTO ASSISTANT KOTARO KAWASHIMA STYLIST ASSISTANTS ALEX PAUL AND MARIE MANLEY MAKEUP ASSISTANT KENTO UTSUBO HAIR ASSISTANT ERIN HERSCHLAB TAILOR MARTIN KEEHN SET DESIGN ASSISTANTS RYAN STENGER AND DAN BILLINGHURST ON-SET PRODUCTION STEVE SUTTON AND RYAN STENGER LOCATION SUNSET STUDIOS, BROOKLYN CATERING NOZ


BACK TO THE FUTURE

Ten years after Lara Stone’s first appearance in V, the model’s punk spirit is stronger than ever in pre-Fall fashion’s medieval-style hoods and capes. Photography Mel Bles Fashion Tom Guinness 92 VMAGAZINE.COM 98 VMAGAZINE.COM


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DRESS ACNE STUDIOS CRYSTAL NECKLACE PEBBLE LONDON BLACK/SILVER NECKLACE CHROME HEARTS MAKEUP SAM BRYANT (BRYANT ARTISTS) HAIR NEIL MOODIE (BRYANT ARTISTS) MODEL LARA STONE (IMG) MANICURE MICHELLE HUMPHREY (LMC WORLDWIDE) DIGITAL TECHNICIAN TIM GRANT PHOTO ASSISTANTS EDWARD BARRETT-BOURMIER, TOMMY DAVIES, VALERIA HERKLOTZ STYLIST ASSISTANT BIANCA RAGGI HAIR ASSISTANT ROGER CHO RETOUCHING DAVE ANDREWS (PHOENIX BESPOKE) LOCATION SPRING STUDIOS, LONDON


TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET CALL ME BY YOUR NAME It makes sense that director Luca Guadagnino— whose earlier films include I Am Love—would cast actor Timothée Chalamet to play the part of Elio Perlman, the precocious 17-year-old son of a professor at the heart of the film adaptation of André Aciman’s heady summer romance novel, Call Me by Your Name. Like Elio, Chalamet, who was 20 at the time of filming, is quite gifted: already fluent in French, he learned to speak Italian and play both the piano and guitar for the role. Call Me by Your Name follows Elio and Oliver, a visiting scholar played by the dashing Armie Hammer, as the two develop a passionate, complex love affair. Playing out against the backdrop of a Mediterranean seaside town, the two soon engage in an extended erotic tête-à-tête that is, at turns, lascivious and innocent. When asked for his thoughts on the movie’s frank portrayal of the pair’s sexual encounters, Chalamet is quick to look beyond the sensational appeal. “First and foremost,” he underscores, “Call Me by Your Name is a story about love, and first loves, and unrequited, and then, later, requited love.” As with the fate of many a summer romance, Elio and Oliver’s ends. While the two orbit each other in the years to come, it is Elio alone who longs for Oliver. Nora Ephron perhaps summed up the topic of summer love best: “Summer bachelors, like summer breezes, are never as cool as they pretend to be.” JOSEPH AKEL

TIMOTHÉE WEARS COAT ANN DEMEULEMEESTER S/S ’17 TOP (UNDERNEATH) ALEXANDER MCQUEEN S/S ’17

ON THE RISE V returns to the Sundance Film Festival to scout a new cast of ones to watch and catch up with a few familiar faces. Photography Sharif Hamza Fashion Ellie Grace Cumming


JESSICA WILLIAMS THE INCREDIBLE JESSICA JAMES Ostensibly, Jessica Williams traveled to Utah to promote her new indie comedy The Incredible Jessica James, but she almost upstaged herself with an empowering and much-discussed speech at the festival’s satellite Women’s March. While the former Daily Show correspondent did incorporate a couple of great one-liners, for the most part there was an earnestness and passion not often seen in a comedian standing before a rapt audience. Thankfully, this year’s festival offerings reflected her talking points: “There were a lot of diverse films,” she says. “And there were so many people willing to have a new kind of conversation around film.” One such discussion took place much earlier and resulted in the aforementioned movie, her first starring role, written by director Jim Strouse specifically with her in mind. (They’d previously worked together on his film People Places Things.) “He was like, ‘Wow, you’re so great. I loved working with you and can’t wait until somebody writes you a big part,’” she recalls. “Then he said, ‘Wait, I can do that.’” The finished story revolves around a young Brooklyn playwright navigating her career and dating life. Netflix promptly bought the worldwide rights and early reviews are near unanimous in their praise of Williams for carrying the picture. “The character totally felt natural to me,” she says. “A lot of her reactions and mannerisms—I didn’t have to go too far to figure out how to express it.” Which isn’t to say that she’s not up for expanding outside of her comfort zone. “Feature films are really intense,” she details. “It’s sort of the opposite of how I used to work on The Daily Show, where you work on something for a few hours a day, and then you put it on that night and it’s over. With a movie, it’s more like letting it incubate for a long time, and that’s really exciting to me.” Genres she’d like to explore in the future include science fiction, action, and drama. “I would have loved to have been in any of the Harry Potter movies, but those have passed,” she says with a sigh. Producers of the Fantastic Beasts franchise should take heed. JOSHUA LYON

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GWENDOLINE CHRISTIE TOP OF THE LAKE Gwendoline Christie’s introduction to Sundance was definitely unorthodox. She wasn’t there to run the press gamut and discuss a new indie film. Rather; Christie was in attendance to promote the much-anticipated second season of Top of the Lake which will air on the Sundance channel. When I connect with Christie a few weeks later, she’s still brimming with excitement about her debut in Park City, confessing, “I completely fell in love with the entire experience.” When talk turns to the show’s return, Christie is equally enthusiastic. Of the series’s cocreator and codirector Jane Campion, Christie is effusive. “I’ve been a fan for a long time,” she says. While many details about the upcoming season have been kept under wraps, Christie reveals some exciting news about her role: she’ll be playing Miranda, a police officer who partners with the show’s protagonist, Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss), in the search for answers to the latest mystery, trading the locale of New Zealand for Australia. For those who know Christie primarily from HBO’s megahit Game of Thrones, the idea of her taking on the character of a cop in Campion’s gritty crime drama might sound like she’s treading familiar territory, since GOT favorite Brienne of Tarth is intensely driven by her morals and sense of justice, characteristics typically associated with law enforcement. Christie is quick to dissuade that limited line of thinking, though. “Through my work, I want to explore a narrative of what it is to be a woman or a human being and the darker and more unusual the better,” she says, going on to point out that viewers can expect, “a very different side of me and a very different side of character work.” SARA ZION

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AUBREY PLAZA INGRID GOES WEST No matter how old you are, chances are you’ve found yourself stalking someone on social media. In Ingrid Goes West, a film directed by Matt Spicer, the title character, played by Aubrey Plaza, takes stalking to the next level, moving across the country and changing her entire identity to befriend Taylor Sloane, an Instagram celebrity played by Elizabeth Olsen. “For me, the movie is about that urge that people get to obsess over people they don’t know on Instagram, and what happens when that gets blown out,” Plaza says. To prepare for the role, Plaza stalked Olsen in the flesh, which she found easy to do. “She’s a ridiculous human being. She’s beautiful and funny and effortlessly cool. She’s the whole package. It was very easy to get lost in that.” She also drew on her own experiences with social media sites such as Twitter, which she left in the wake of the election, and Facebook, which she hasn’t used in 10 years. “It felt like everything I was looking at made me feel bad about myself. That can happen if you’re not conscious when you’re using [social media] because it’s human nature to want to look at other people’s lives and feel like they have something you don’t.” A mature person deletes their Facebook account when they can’t stop obsessing about other people’s profiles. A crazy person sells all of her possessions, changes her hair color, and literally tries to become the person whose account they check every 30 seconds, as Ingrid does in the film. But Plaza is careful not to label the character as “crazy.” “I really tried to figure out what the human story is with her and not try to label her in any way in terms of mental illness.” The film doesn’t pass judgment on Instagram stalkers, or social media in general. “There’s no hidden agenda,” Plaza says. “It explores how humans can use Instagram as a device to further their unhealthy behavior, or not.” She adds, “I’ve never gone too far down the rabbit hole.” The real question is: if she did allow herself to, who would she be looking at? BRIENNE WALSH

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EMILY BROWNING GOLDEN EXITS “You know how people have resting bitch face? I have resting worried face.” So says Emily Browning, star of Alex Ross Perry’s Golden Exits and the new STARZ series American Gods. “I permanently look worried, even when I’m not.” The actress has no cause for concern when it comes to her new projects, though. In the former, she plays Naomi, an Australian girl who disrupts the lives of some bougie Brooklynites played by Adam Horovitz, Mary Louise Parker, and Chloë Sevigny, among others. In the latter, she’s Laura, a blackjack dealer who dies in a car accident while giving head to her best friend’s husband and then comes back to life as a sort of super zombie. The intended audiences could not be farther apart. For that matter, neither could Browning’s experiences filming each project. Golden Exits was shot in Carroll Gardens (or “adult Brooklyn” as Browning adorably calls it), where she could stroll to work from the apartment she was crashing in and even wore her own clothes for many scenes. The days tended to wrap by seven at night. “I feel like if it had been a director I didn’t really trust, I might have thought, Maybe we should do a few more takes. But I totally trusted Alex and his method of doing things,” the actress recalls. With American Gods, she needed to be pushed a bit more. “They’d say, ‘You need to go harder with her being awful. Laura needs to be meaner. Trust us, it’s not coming across as too much.’” She partially blames it on her resting worried face: “People kind of empathize with that to some degree,” she muses. Fair enough, but even after Browning got the character locked down, her portrayal of a woman who does some fairly uncool things and then transitions into an ass-kicking supernatural being is so masterful that you can’t help but like Laura. More importantly, though, you believe in her. JL

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ANYA TAYLOR-JOY THOROUGHBRED For an actor, the biggest perk of working with a director who comes from a theater background is that there are usually rehearsals, a surprisingly rare practice on most shoots. And when Anya Taylor-Joy signed on for playwright Cory Finley’s Thoroughbred, a wicked dark comedy about two childhood friends who reunite with potentially deadly consequences, the first-time filmmaker took things a step further. “Cory, Olivia [Cooke], and I sat in a room over the course of two or three days,” the actress recalls. “And rather than focus on the script and the scenes directly, we fleshed out the relationship the characters had prior to this momentary snapshot that you get of them in the movie: what they experienced together, how they kind of grew apart.” All of that work increased the tension once the cameras started rolling. “The dialogue between these two women who are just continuously trying to usurp the other using just their words…It was just Olivia and I combating with each other verbally.” With credits like The Witch, Morgan, and Split behind her, this new film is hardly the first time the actress has delved into suspenseful territory, but the projects are high caliber enough that she skirts the scream queen label. Her choices do beg the question, though: why all the scary stuff? “I guess I like people who have been outcast from society,” she muses. “I feel like everyone’s story deserves to be told [even if] it’s not the conventional one or the likable one. In Thoroughbred, Lily isn’t the easiest person to love, but I love her.” Taylor-Joy feels that same affection for all of her characters. “The worst I had was with Thomasin for The Witch, because I didn’t know that [characters] were real for me yet,” she says. “So, when the movie ended, I was devastated and I couldn’t really figure out where that devastation was coming from. I missed spending time with her, and she was gone. But when I saw the movie, I realized that the character went on within it.” Never mind that Thomasin makes a deal with the devil at the end—it’s still a sweet sentiment. JL

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HARRIS DICKINSON BEACH RATS Before being chosen to play the heroic leading man in The Darkest Minds, Hollywood’s adaptation of Alexandra Bracken’s dystopian YA trilogy of the same name, Harris Dickinson wowed audiences at Sundance with his debut role portraying Frankie, the stoic, rebellious lead in Beach Rats. Written and directed by Eliza Hittman, the film follows Frankie over the course of one Brooklyn summer as he navigates the familiar terrain of adolescent angst and self-discovery. Much of the film’s power comes from scenes devoid of conversation, from Frankie dancing with his would-be girlfriend at a beachside rave to engaging in online flirtations with older men in the solitude of his family’s basement. Dickinson is candid about the demands his first feature placed on him. “It was my first role where I was needed every day, in every single scene, and it became quite deep and dark at times.” His on-screen band of brothers were real-life Brooklyn residents and around his same age, but his new mates only provided partial relief. “You’ve got to remember to keep it distant,” he says. “That can be really difficult, because you just want to have a laugh with your friends, but then you have to say, ‘Okay it’s work time.’” Having grown up outside of London in an area that Dickinson describes as “a little rough,” the characters weren’t completely foreign to him, and he drew on his childhood in portraying Frankie. That said, Dickinson maintains that the film is centered on many universally relatable themes of adolescence, underscoring, “There are a lot of things you feel insecure about—questions of self-identity, self-acceptance and living up to the standards around you.” However, despite the sympathy one may feel watching Frankie navigate the turmoils of his teenage years, Dickinson is the first to admit that his character isn’t always a likable protagonist. “There are times where Frankie is doing stupid, unforgivable things,” Dickinson admits. The 20-year-old actor is quick to distinguish the differences between teenage Frankie and himself, telling me, “He’s someone who’s toxic and uncomfortable with himself. I am very much at peace with who I am.” SZ

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HALEY LU RICHARDSON COLUMBUS Although 22-year-old Haley Lu Richardson recently starred in M. Night Shyamalan’s trippy hit thriller Split, she’s more eager to see how fans will respond to her upcoming role in the indie flick Columbus. The first feature-length film by Korean director Kogonada (the auteur’s chosen nom d’artiste) has a quiet, Before Sunrise-esque plot: Richardson plays a recent high school grad named Casey who befriends Jin (played by John Cho), a visitor to Casey’s hometown of Columbus, Indiana. In real life, the city has a massive amount of modernist architecture and public art, setting a gorgeous backdrop for the characters’ heavy conversations. Columbus is, according to Richardson, “the most fulfilling role I’ve ever done.” She also notes that she was initially pretty freaked out about taking it on. “There’s no intense explosion or special effects, just talking. You have nowhere to hide… you’re fully exposed to yourself as that character.” That Richardson had to be so emotionally raw for her role left her wondering “why they didn’t hire Dakota Fanning.” She adds, “It’s super refreshing to sit down and read a pure story of two people just going through life.” Following her role in Columbus, Richardson hopes to have a career like fellow actors Shailene Woodley and Emma Watson: “Those are girls that kind of look like me and have had similar experiences, but they’re bad ass human beings and inspire me.” In her downtime, Richardson enjoys crocheting. She even has her own Etsy shop, Hooked By Haley Lu, which sells fringed bikini tops and off-the-shoulder minidresses fit for Coachella. “I should set up a booth. I’ll get my friends to model,” she jokes. As for her own style, it’s still evolving: “It’s a little all over the place, kind of like my personality.” PRIYA RAO

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MARGARET QUALLEY NOVITIATE Margaret Qualley, the 22-year-old budding actress and daughter of Andie MacDowell, cut her teeth on HBO’s sci-fi series The Leftovers. Now, she’s venturing into a starring role in Maggie Betts’s featurelength directorial debut, Novitiate. The film is a convent drama set in the ’60s, during the formation of the Second Vatican Council, and follows Cathleen (Qualley) as she trains to be a nun under the tutelage of Reverend Mother (Melissa Leo). “If I could feel like I was in a real relationship [with God], which is what these girls experienced, then I felt like I was doing my job,” recalls Qualley. Like most people, she wasn’t particularly educated on the complicated mid-century ecclesiastical history that sets the film’s scene. “I really used it as an opportunity to learn about Catholicism, to learn about the process that these nuns went through, which was much more intense than now.” To get a visceral feeling of that process, the ensemble of aspiring nuns took a field trip. “Before we shot those scenes, all the girls stayed in a convent overnight just to see what that experience was like. Melissa Leo actually came to all of our doors the next morning at 5:00 AM and called us ‘young ladies’ like Reverend Mother.” Refreshingly, at a particularly divisive time when religion is tied up in politics, Betts takes a neutral stance. “I think one of the things that’s so great about the way Maggie focused the film is that she really doesn’t make it seem overly positive or negative. At the same time, she really illustrates how terrifying conformed religion can be and how beautiful spirituality can be.”

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JAIME KING BITCH “It’s the most powerful film I’ve worked on,” says Jaime King of her latest movie, Bitch. The dark comedy, which debuted at this year’s festival, sees a suburban mom (Marianna Palka) buckle to various societal pressures until she experiences a psychotic break that causes her to believe she’s a dog. Or, as King puts it, “We made a story about inclusiveness, about working through division, loving one another, and caring—letting go of our patterns and the way we think things should be.” On the one hand, she’s describing the plot, since the mom’s breakdown forces the negligent husband (Jason Ritter) to reconnect with his kids and sister-in-law (King). But it’s easy to also interpret a larger social message in Bitch. The movie’s first screening took place on inauguration night, and the next day millions of women across the United States marched to protect their rights from the calamitous current administration. “To have it come out when it did, and have it premiere on that night, was just so wild and strange and ironic and beautiful and painful,” she says. For her, Bitch is as much about a micro-experience within one family as it is a comment on the collective experience of women fighting patriarchy everywhere. “We were able to put everything that we were experiencing in our own lives and what we’re seeing in the world into these characters and these stories,” she explains. King, Ritter, and Palka (who also directed the film) are long-term friends, so much so that King accepted the role without having even read the script. “If you really care about your friends, you have to support one another. You have to take that risk.” It paid off, and their collective closeness created a true sense of intimacy on set that translates to the screen. “My character is supposed to have this intense hatred for [Ritter], but in real life I’m looking at someone I really deeply love and care about,” King says. “That kind of history can’t be manufactured.” IDM

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RILEY KEOUGH THE DISCOVERY In Charlie McDowell’s sci-fi romance The Discovery, Riley Keough plays Lacey, a young woman abandoned by her father and sister after they commit suicide together. All alone in the world, Lacey hooks up with a cultish lab scientist (played with sinister charm by Robert Redford) to examine what really happens when you live and die. If the offering sounds thoroughly existential, it’s because it is, but no more than Keough herself. “I ask a lot of questions,” says the 27-year-old starlet. “I’m very curious about the reason for everything.” Though Keough didn’t come up with any firm answers about mortality while filming (in fact, it was the opposite: she says she walked away even more confused about what it all means), she appreciated the sense of collaboration on set. “It’s fun for me to be around people like Charlie who are at least thinking about the same things, so I don’t feel so alone,” she explains. It seems like the young actress is suddenly everywhere, from Mad Max: Fury Road to The Girlfriend Experience and American Honey, and expect to see even more of her in the coming year. She has six films due in 2017, including The Discovery (out now on Netflix), but Keough stresses that her rise to the A-list wasn’t the result of a string of successes. “It’s been a progression. It wasn’t like it was one movie and it happened overnight,” she says. “My life isn’t any different, but I’m in a place where I have real options.” Those include acting alongside icons like Redford, an especially intense experience for her. “The first day I worked with him, I couldn’t even speak to him. I was just freaking out by myself,” she reveals. “I couldn’t believe he was standing in front of me.” As for what’s next, Keough is dying to do a comedy and is currently working on her own projects. “I’m in the process of writing a film right now that I’m going to make hopefully this year,” she reveals. “You have more control in a way, but it’s less and more pressure because it.” Here’s betting Keough handles said pressure like a pro. PR

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LILY COLLINS TO THE BONE In To the Bone, Lily Collins plays Ellen, a 20-year-old illustrator whose battle with anorexia has brought her to the brink of death. Collins, petite even by Hollywood standards, had to lose serious weight in order to play Ellen. It’s the sort of role that someone who once suffered from an eating disorder, as Collins did, might shy away from. But she embraced the complicated challenge in a healthy way. “[The producers and director] were all female and they were very motherly,” she says. “We worked with a nutritionist, and [the weight loss] was done in a specific, calming, loving way.” Collins read the script for the film—based on director Marti Noxon’s own struggle with the disorder—in the midst of writing Unfiltered, a book of personal essays. She had just finished a chapter on her eating disorder. “It was like the universe throwing it at me, saying, ‘I think this is something important for you to go through.’” Having overcome her issues, Collins is able to bring a sense of hope to the role. “I had all of the stages there to give to Ellen,” she says. “She doesn’t know how to reach them yet.” From the very beginning of the film, there’s a steely strength to Ellen. The same can’t be said for other characters at the group home where Ellen is admitted. That’s the reality of addiction: many addicts never recover, but the hope is that movies like this can help. “I would have loved to have seen something like [To the Bone] when I first started having my problems,” says Collins. In the end, Collins lived with the character for the month it took to complete the film. “It was a really long month,” she says. “But how awesome to face a fear head-on like that?” BW

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DREE HEMINGWAY L.A. TIMES “It was a new feeling, getting used to being alone in Los Angeles,” recalls Dree Hemingway, who relocated from Manhattan a few months before she started shooting L.A. Times, a Whit Stillman-esque comedy of manners. While the city’s rhythms were a change of pace from the “hustle and bustle” of New York, she soon found perks: “I love being quiet and going to bed really early,” she reveals. L.A. Times follows an aspiring writer (Michelle Morgan), her TV-industry boyfriend (Jorma Taccone), and the writer’s interior decorator BFF (Hemingway), all thirty-something creative professionals searching for love. “Los Angeles is definitely the main character of the film,” she notes, adding that the city’s clichés are gently mocked throughout. Hemingway only realized later how true-to-life some of the film’s stereotypes really are, like the aforementioned boyfriend’s obsession with games. “People love a fucking game night in Los Angeles,” she observes. Hemingway’s character, Baker, dates around but struggles to settle. “Los Angeles is weird for dating,” the actress contends, explaining that because people hang around bars less, one often has to use a dating app, something she’s no fan of. “I’m not someone who sleeps with men easily,” she says. “I’m kind of stubborn, where I will wait until I find the right person.” That selective tendency extends to her career, as well. “I’ve been really picky, but I think it’s smart because I’m proud of everything I’ve done,” she explains. Her resume of indie films include Sean Baker’s Starlet and Alex Ross Perry’s Listen Up Philip. Much like her dating life, she notes, “I want [collaborators] to be people I connect with.” WHITNEY MALLETT

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JENNY SLATE LANDLINE

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ZOEY DEUTCH BEFORE I FALL For most of us, the idea of reliving our days as a high school student for the rest of eternity is a nightmare come true (Heather Mooney, natch). But in director Ry Russo-Young’s film adaptation of Lauren Oliver’s YA novel, Before I Fall, this grim fantasy is brought to life. Following high school senior Samantha Kingston as she continually relives the same day leading up to a fatal car accident, the movie is equal parts Groundhog Day and Mean Girls. For Zoey Deutch, who plays the role of Sam, the part was an opportunity to return to a period often fraught with adolescent angst. “For many, high school is a period to be quickly gotten through,” Deutch notes. “But to be honest, I had a cool high school experience.” When pressed, however, on her most embarrassing memory from that time, Deutch is quick to acknowledge, “Everything was embarrassing in high school.” Case in point: she played Seymour in her high school staging of Little Shop of Horrors. “It was a transformative role,” she notes with a hefty dose of sarcasm. Central to Before I Fall’s plot is the evolution of Sam’s character as she struggles to make sense of her new reality. “At the beginning of the film,” Deutch points out, “Sam’s just doing and acting the way everybody else is. She’s living her life unconsciously.” However, as the film unfolds, Sam is forced to examine the choices she makes and what actions might put an end to the cycle she finds herself trapped in—think Butterfly Effect with a moral twist. “It’s a film that looks at a young woman questioning her mortality, her purpose, her meaning,” Zoey underscores. It’s only when Sam realizes her actions affect others, particularly in the context of bullying, that she is able to escape having to experience her own death ad infinitum. Asked if the film had a message for young women today, Deutch remarks, “You are greater than the sum of your flaws, and in turn, others are greater than the sum of their flaws.” JA

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Makeup Susie Sobol for NARS Cosmetics (Julian Watson Agency) Makeup (Lily Collins) Fabiola (Tracey Mattingly) Makeup (Jenny Slate) Kirin Bhatty (Starworks Artists) Hair Marki Shkreli for Marki Haircare (Streeters) Hair (Lily Collins) Anh Co Tran (Tracey Mattingly) Hair (Jenny Slate) Nikki Providence (Forward Artists) Hair (Elizabeth Olsen) Clayton Hawkins Producer Ashley Herson Production coordinator Kate Holland Digital technician Mary Fix Photo assistants Matthew Hawkes, Evgeny Popov, and William Takahashi Stylist assistants Nadia Beeman and Jordan Duddy Makeup assistant Anya Zeitlin Hair assistant Kelly Oliphant Production assistant Tom O’Meara Location Log Haven Residence at Club Lespri

“Don’t be gross, don’t be rude.” That’s Jenny Slate’s seemingly simple motto, but it’s actually a powerful statement that speaks to Slate’s quirky vulnerability both on and off screen. It’s also a huge part of what makes her relatable and entertaining. “I don’t ever leave myself behind,” says Slate. “That’s not the way I perform.” In Landline, Slate’s second feature with director Gillian Robespierre, following 2014’s indie darling Obvious Child, the actress takes on the role of Dana, a lovable but neurotic New Yorker. Written by Robespierre and Elisabeth Holm, Landline depicts a Manhattan family dealing with, as Slate describes, “the ruptures within their [familial] structure [and] relationships,” brought about when Dana’s sister, Ali (Abby Quinn), uncovers their father’s extramarital affair. Set in the pre-cell phone New York of 1995, the narrative follows both sisters and the family matriarch (played by the inimitable Edie Falco) as each reacts to the news. “We’ve set up these three different women who know the same life, but come from different points and are in a cycle of affecting each other,” Slate notes. She appreciates that the film doesn’t play on clichéd female characters, underscoring that the proliferation of oversimplified portrayals of women is “offensive,” and that she actively avoids roles that are “tired tropes of boring women.” Slate brings that same philosophy to interviews: she’s refreshingly candid when asked how it felt to play a newly engaged woman in Landline while concurrently ending her real-life marriage of almost four years. “When you get divorced, your entire belief system is destroyed,” she confesses. For many, it may not seem ideal to take on a project focused on life-defining relationships while ending such an important one, but like the film itself, Slate chose to remain unpredictable. “The thing that comes with me is the need to totally tear things down,” she concludes. “Because when you can obliterate people’s expectations and replace them with something new and functional, that’s when you make progress.” SZ


-LIZAB-TH -L--WIND RIVER & INGRID GOES WEST Starring in Wind River and Ingrid Goes West, both of which premiered at Sundance this year, Elizabeth Olsen couldn’t have played two more diametrically opposed roles. In the first, Olsen is Jane Banner, a federal agent investigating a murder on a Native American reservation, while Ingrid Goes West finds her as Taylor Sloan, a social media influencer with a bewitching Instagram account (Olsen herself did not have one prior to playing the role). “They are really different parts, so it was kind of hilarious that they were both at Sundance together,” says Olsen. The two roles also find Olsen exploring very differing forms of power. Preparing for Wind River, Olsen notes, “I worked with a Green Beret and I got to go to the gun range every weekend.” Meanwhile, her turn as an Instagram star in Ingrid Goes West opened the actress’s eyes to the power of social media. In the film, costar Aubrey Plaza plays a superfan who drops everything to befriend Olsen’s character in Los Angeles. “I didn’t know you could have a profession on Instagram, I thought it was just something people talked about, but wasn’t a real thing,” she laughs. Still, the starlet found ample research for the role, including travel and decor inspiration. “It was really odd to be privy to these people’s worlds. Like, who is taking their pictures all the time? But, I was jealous of some of the things in their apartments.” Nowadays, Olsen is no social media neophyte—she joined the platform in late February and already has 413,000 followers. She also hopes to mimic the kind of account fellow A-lister Margot Robbie has, saying, “She has the best actress Instagram. You don’t know really too much about her, but you can see her out and about.” Aside from filming the next two Avengers movies, Olsen will find herself in a producing role for an upcoming unannounced television series and film. “I like being able to be someone who brings the right people together,” she says. “I love to be a part of every decision.” PR

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Z-- LI-T-R-----BAND AID Zoe Lister-Jones has been acting in, writing, and producing her own work for nearly 13 years, but her latest film, Band Aid, is the artist’s first foray into directing her own material. “It was something that scared me and that’s why I felt that I had to do it,” she notes. “I think for any artist that’s really what it takes to grow.” The film chronicles a feuding married couple that forms a band to help process their unresolved issues. “The power dynamic within any relationship, but especially long-term relationships, is a concept that I personally navigate and am interested in exploring in my art,” Jones explains. “[In many films] you see either the beginning of a love story or the end of a love story, but all of the mess that lies in between is slightly underexplored.” The movie has its share of sex scenes, but it was shooting music rehearsals (in which she sings and plays bass) that really fostered the intimacy ListerJones shares with costar Adam Pally. “It’s such a vulnerable experience to make music with another person,” she says. A host of frequent collaborators—including her husband, Daryl Wein, along with Colin Hanks, Brooklyn Decker, and Jamie Chung—helped relax the mood on set. She also sourced a crew made up entirely of women: “It was definitely deliberate to hire an all-female production crew, because being both in front of and behind the camera, I’m pretty aware of how underrepresented women are on film and TV.” That the Women’s March coincided with the weekend of the premiere proved even more apropos for the group. “My mom flew into Park City and I marched with her on her birthday,” she recalls. “That more and more women are choosing to lend their voices to a larger movement is a really beautiful and exciting thing.” PR

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SEEING STARS

V’s horoscope page returns like Saturn. Read on—your future waits! BY THE ASTROTWINS, TALI & OPHIRA EDUT

VIRGO

CAPRICORN

Celebrations abound! May is Taurus season, a month for cutting loose from all those practical considerations you foist upon yourself (and others). Your creativity could become a cash cow by the June 21 Solstice. It’s all about using your eyes near the seductive Scorpio full moon on May 10. Channel Taurus Linda Evangelista’s penetrating gaze and don’t look away from your target! Your urge to merge gets stronger after June 6 as your ruler, love goddess Venus, takes her annual tour through Taurus. Choose wisely, as this plan could go the distance.

Your hive is abuzz with activity—and like Virgo Queen Bey, you’re running the show. Focus, you’ll lock down a major win before June 4, as motivator Mars charges through your success zone. A new leadership opportunity emerges near the May 25 new moon. A powerful man may also lend a professional assist. In love, you’ll enjoy a minxy May as Venus fires up your libido, so roll up the partition! After June 6, you’ll need a little more independence and space. Travel with a laid-back friend group after June 21—we suggest a pimped-out Airstream.

Like iconic Capricorn Kate Moss, the camera loves you, baby. Thank the Sun and beauty queen Venus for cruising through your fashion-forward fifth house for two months. While you have all those eyes on you, play with an alter ego, like signmate David Bowie. An attraction or creative collab will heat up, and when firebrand Mars hits your relationship house from June 4 to July 20, the bond will solidify or combust. Work gets busy after May 19, with details galore to manage. Simplify, but remember, basic doesn’t have to mean boring. Be creative!

GEMINI

LIBRA

AQUARIUS

Goals, goals, goals! With motivator Mars on his biennial tour through Gemini until June 4, your ambition is fierce. It’s not selfish to be self-focused. Reboot sidelined passion projects and wage a PR campaign on your own behalf. Gemini season begins on May 19, increasing demands for your attention. Opt for group hangs to avoid popularity burnout. A dreamy partnership could put a ring on it or ink a business deal near the June 9 full moon. Truth: Like signmate Natalie Portman, you can have it all.

Ask, believe, receive. The Sun and enchanting Venus visit your alluring eighth house, making “magnetic” your middle name. Silence your inner naysayer and focus on desired outcomes only. Fortune favors Libras near the May 25 new moon, so take a risk! Opportunity can also flow in from afar, so travel (first class) to pursue your ambitions in June. In love, aim for power-couple status à la Libra Gwen Stefani. Mingle strategically with your mate, or find your arm candy amongst the influencers before June ends.

You’ll keep on fallin’ like Aquarius Alicia Keys this spring as planets pulse through your fifth house of romance. Feather your nest—particularly the boudoir—and have fun hosting a guest star (or three) before June 6. You could take a lover in a more serious way near the May 25 new moon. Don’t sleep on your career aspirations. The full moon on May 10 could bring a stunning public success. Work gets busy, but interesting, after June 21. Sneak your laptop to the beach so you don’t miss summer!

CANCER

SCORPIO

PISCES

Nothing basic for you this May and June, Cancer. Your inner unicorn takes the wheel, drawing a fascinating fleet of characters close. With Mars in your compassionate twelfth house until June 4, an activist cause also calls your name. Like Cancer Selena Gomez, your heart wants what it wants—and a rewarding romance gets real near the May 10 full moon. Make a bold and independent move when Cancer season begins with the June 21 Solstice. The risk will pay six months of soulnourishing dividends.

With a spate of planets circulating your relationship zones this May and June, your closest alliances come under scrutiny. The truth is inescapable near the May 10 full moon in Scorpio. Don’t play coy if you’re feeling the love, a bold confession gets the passion brewing. Conversely, has a pairing reached its inevitable conclusion? Consult Scorpio Katy Perry’s liner notes on amicable endings. Wanderlust strikes on June 21. Slip off for a post-Solstice sabbatical—sun and sand a must.

Shaders are gonna shade, Pisces, but you can’t be bothered to care. Kindred spirits pop up at every turn this spring— and they’re coming straight out of the positive people’s party. Network and nurture new alliances until May 19. Then, figure out who deserves to be “inner circle.” Your festive, flamboyant spirit returns with the June 21 Solstice. Pisces Rihanna said it best: “Please don’t stop the music!” Or the romance, which percolates with a new level of passion, thanks to the June 23 new moon.

LEO

SAGITTARIUS

ARIES

Ascend, Leo! You’re Jennifer Lopezlevel motivated in May, and like the lion queen herself, you’ll find yourself stirring lots of different pots. Too many, in fact. But since “less” is not in your lexicon, adopt a collaborative approach—your dream team emerges near the May 25 new moon. Love could arrive bearing a dreamy accent before June 6. Coupled Leos, book a pair of plane tickets for a worldly playdate. Be camera-ready for the June 9 full moon, which delivers far more than 15 minutes of fame.

Let the spring training commence! Your wellness warrior takes the wheel until May 19. Clean up your diet, de-stress your schedule, and systematize life’s messy parts. Along with a serene glow, this creates room in your world for healthy partnerships. Good thing, since lusty Mars and the May 25 and June 23 new moons ignite your mojo through early summer. Like signmate Miley Cyrus, come in like a wrecking ball on June 9 when 2017’s only full moon in Sagittarius declares, “Out with the old, in with the new!”

Subtlety, thy name has never been Aries. But like signmate Lady Gaga, who recently went brunette, you’re ready to switch up your style. Streamline, simplify, be selective. You’ll still make quite the impact. Your discernment draws a profitable partnership near the May 10 full moon. Amorous Venus sizzles from May 1 to June 6, amplifying magnetism. Unattached? Shop around before giving up that single status. Coupled Aries, put the lust in “wanderlust” with an overseas vacay near the June 9 full moon.

120 VMAGAZINE.COM

Clockwise from top left: Linda Evangelista (V14), Photography Mario Testino Fashion Benjamin Galopin; Beyoncé (V25), Photography Mario Testino Fashion Lori Goldstein; Kate Moss (V40), Photography David Sims Fashion Kate Moss; Alicia Keys (V104), Photography Inez & Vinoodh Fashion Jay Massacret; Rihanna (V95), Photography Steven Klein Fashion Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele; Lady Gaga (V85), Photography Inez and Vinoodh Fashion Brandon Maxwell; Miley Cyrus (V83), Photography Mario Testino Fashion Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele; Jennifer Lopez (V76), Photography Mario Testino Fashion Carine Roitfeld; Selena Gomez (V94), Photography Inez & Vinoodh Fashion Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele; Natalie Portman (V62), Photography Mario Testino Fashion Clare Richardson; Gwen Stefani (V52), Photography Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott Fashion Andrea Lieberman; Katy Perry (V89), Photography Steven Klein Fashion Arianne Phillips

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V107: Summer Digital Issue  
V107: Summer Digital Issue