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THE SPORTS ISSUE

AIMÉE MULLINS MADONNA LADY GAGA AZEALIA BANKS RICCARDO TISCI STEPHANIE SEYMOUR MARC JACOBS NAOMI CAMPBELL ADRIANA LIMA LARA STONE KATE UPTON CAM NEWTON CHRISTINA HENDRICKS JACKIE JOYNER-KERSEE CARMELITA JETER MARISA BERENSON ...AND THE BEST OF SPRING FASHION!

76 SPRING 2012

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Copenhagen Fashion summit 2012 Don’t miss the most important international Fashion event oF the year THE COPENHAGEN OPERA HOUSE | MAY 3 | 2012

Join opinion makers and fashion industry leaders in Copenhagen to catalyze the realization of a sustainable fashion industry Highlights include — Launch of a new global code of conduct for the fashion industry in cooperation with United Nations Global Compact. — Presentation of latest insights on consumer behavior and engagement. — Keynotes from leading global fashion companies and experts More information and registration www.copenhagenfashionsummit.com Under the patronage of Her Royal Highness Crown Princess Mary of Denmark


Foto: Casper Sejrsen | Model: Caroline Brasch Nielsen/Elite | Fashion: Stine Goya


LOS ANGELES

BERLIN

ST BARTH

STUDIOS

GALLERIES

EVENTS

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Surfboard and swimsuit Chanel Watch Chanel Watch Bangles and rings Bulgari Leash Saturdays Surf NYC

hello

surf’s up Editor-in-Chief Creative Director Stephen Gan Editor Sarah Cristobal Senior Editor/Online Patrik Sandberg Editor-at-Large Derek Blasberg Photo Editor Evelien Joos Bookings Editor Natalie Hazzout Managing Editor/ New Media & Special Projects Steven Chaiken Senior Fashion Editor Jay Massacret Fashion News & Market Editor Christopher Barnard

Advertising Directors Jorge Garcia jgarcia@vmagazine.com Giorgio Pace gpace@vmagazine.com Advertising Manager Francine Wong fwong@vmagazine.com Advertising Coordinator Vicky Benites vbenites@vmagazine.com 646.747.4545 Digital Strategy Manager Sofiya Shrayber sofiya@vmagazine.com 646.452.6018 Consulting Creative/ Design Direction Greg Foley Art Director Sandra Kang Associate Art Director Cian Browne

Fashion & Market Editors Catherine Newell-Hanson Tom Van Dorpe

Design Jeffrey Burch Alexa Vignoles

Fashion Assistant Katelyn Gray Michael Gleeson

Special Projects Jennifer Hartley

Contributing Fashion Editors Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Joe McKenna Panos Yiapanis Nicola Formichetti Jonathan Kaye Melanie Ward Jane How Olivier Rizzo Andrew Richardson Clare Richardson Fashion Editors-at-Large Jacob K Beat Bolliger Sally Lyndley Sofía Achával

Contributing Editor T. Cole Rachel Contributing Editor/ Entertainment Greg Krelenstein/ Starworks

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Financial Comptroller Sooraya Pariag Production Director Melissa Scragg Production Assistant Gloria Kim Distribution David Renard Assistant Comptroller Farzana Khan Administrative Assistant Annie Hinshaw Copy Editors Traci Parks Jeremy Price Creative Imaging Consultant Pascal Dangin Visionaire Cecilia Dean James Kaliardos

Photography Junichi Ito Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Beauty Editor Caitlin Gaffey

Communications Anuschka Senge/ Syndicate Media Group 212.226.1717


contributors

jump ball

V76 Mario Testino Carine Roitfeld Inez & Vinoodh Nick Knight Jean-Paul Goude Sebastian Faena Alasdair McLellan Cedric Buchet Marilyn Minter Jonathan Kaye Sharif Hamza Benjamin Alexander Huseby Daniele + Iango Lady Gaga Riccardo Tisci B. Akerlund Benny Horne Joanne Blades Adrian Gaut Miguel Reveriego Erika Kurihara Junichi Ito Vincent Gapaillard Tyrone Lebon Anna Trevelyan Marisa Berenson Suzy Gorman Patti Wilson Anthony Maule Jason Schmidt Alexandre de Brabant Rick Rickman Kevin McGarry Dina Kwit Robin Givhan Mark Jacobs Simon Castets Special thanks Art Partner Giovanni Testino Amber Olson Candice Marks Jemima Hobson Allison Hunter Sally Borno Jeff Stalnaker Benny Medina Mark Young The Collective Shift Jae Choi Brenda Brown Lisa Weatherby Christine Lavigne Marc Kroop SHOWstudio Charlotte Knight Art + Commerce Jimmy Moffat Billy Albores Lindsay Thompson Amanda Fiala Helena Martel Bryan Bantry Palma Driscoll Virginie Laguens R&D John Gayner Maysa Marques Pietro Birindelli Charlotte Draycott Box Delphine Delhostal Picturehouse David Hazan Claudia Galindo Dtouch Jeanny Bachelin Michelle Vitiello Nex9 Tina Preschitz Neil Cooper Ashley Herson Streeters Robin Jaffee Neilly Rosenblum Management Artists Jed Root David Bault Thuy Nguyen CLM Cale Harrison Nick Bryning Heath Cannon Erick Ruales Felix Frith Shea Spencer Pippa Mockridge Jasmine Kharbanda Caitlin Thomas Kristin Kochanski Troy Chatterton Vanessa Setton Michelle Service George Miscamble Brydges Mackinney L’Atelier NYC FRANKREPS The Wall Group The Magnet Agency Brent Smith Tracey Mattingly Joe Strouse Amy Fraher Joey Jalleo Ford NY Paul Rowland Peter Cedeno IMG Kyle Hagler Maja Chiesi Valentina Nourse DNA David Bonnouvrier Marilyn Chris Gay Eric Schandel ROOT [EQ,Capture+Studios] Kip McQueen Aldana Oppizzi Morgan Anderson Pier 59 Tony Jay Federico Pigntatelli Milk Studios Diane Suarez Shaun Murdock BOXeight Azzurro Mallin Splashlight Shell Royster Fast Ashleys Michael Masse Smashbox John Cassidy Rebecca Cabage David Radin Spring Studios Bar Bar Verien Wiltshire Kerry Youmans Lane Bentley Cover photography Mario Testino Fashion Carine Roitfeld Makeup James Kaliardos Hair Oribe for Oribe Salon Miami Beach Manicure Tom Bachik (Cloutier Remix) Prop stylist Bill Doig Tailor M’Lynn Hass Digital technician Christian Hogstedt (R&D) Photo assistants Aaron Thomas and Benjamin Tietge Stylist assistant Michaela Dosamantes Makeup assistant William Kahn Hair assistant Judy Erickson Production Jemima Hobson and Michelle Lu On-set production Erick Jussen (GE Projects) Production assistant Alexandra Nataf Videographer Keith Kendall (The Magnet Agency) Video Look Films Location Milk Studios, Los Angeles Catering Love Catering Retouching R&D Special thanks John Gayner, Maysa Marques, Pietro Birindelli, Charlotte Draycott, Shaun Murdock Jennifer Lopez wears Jacket Prada T-shirt Calvin Klein Necklace David Yurman Interns Bianca Ambrosio Julian Antetomaso Payton Barronian Loreno Campilo Jayeon Chung Alberto Maria Colombo Rebecca Glaser Roytel Montero Maddie Raedts Sasha Rodriguez Alban Roger Nathan Simpson Liz Siporin

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Photography Junichi Ito Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Basketball, top, sweatband, whistle Y-3 Shorts Adidas by Stella McCartney Bikini Adidas SLVR Watch Swatch Ring Robert Lee Morris


contents

start your engines

96 FROM THE DESK OF LADY GAGA Our columnist expounds on being drunk at a Mets game, hitting home runs, and how pearls fit into the picture

142 ON TARGET Christian Dior taps Anselm Reyle to give the house’s signature accessories a camouflage kick

100 PARTY Las Vegas gets chic with a dose of Chanel; Louis Vuitton plants roots in Rome; and Prada has a 24-hour pop-up party

144 NEWS From beauty tricks to the season’s sneaks, we’ve got Spring’s best activities, and accessories to match

108 HEROES Aimée Mullins, Olympic athlete and model, scores a new cosmetics campaign; Marisa Berenson remembers her grandmother, the great Elsa Schiaparelli; and Jackie Joyner-Kersee recalls a record-breaking career

146 NOTHING BUT NET Stay fresh to death in Spring’s surest bet: mesh

116 SPEED RACERS Three top pro athletes reveal what inspires them to go from zero to 100

150 V-BAY From parrots to tropical fruits, ear candy just got weird

118 BODY BEAUTIFUL Jean-Paul Goude looks back on a musclebound muse 120 LIKE A PLAYER Madonna gets into the groove with Riccardo Tisci and Givenchy for the 2012 Super Bowl 122 SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Athleticism’s lasting impression on the world of high art 124 MEET LOULOU She’s a hybrid of inspirations past and present; you just can’t lose with Inez & Vinoodh’s new muse 126 ONES TO WATCH Four young designers are shaking things up with a refreshing new perspective on fashion 134 WORK IN PROGRESS Jennifer Rubell reflects on inspiration’s gestation; Nicole Eisenman makes a smile out of sadness 138 FRENCH CONNECTION Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton are fêted with a dual exhibition in Paris 140 HOT TO TROT Abandoning the stables to become a show pony, equestrienne Kate Upton hits her stride

148 VISION QUEST When it comes to breaking new boundaries of beauty, who can say no to a little Visionnaire?

152 TROPHY CLUB Both the valedictorian and the varsity squad will do a victory lap for the season’s chic sportswear 156 HOLDING PATTERN Ferragamo, Jil Sander, and Gucci prove patterns continue to pack a big punch 158 POWERHOUSE The world of pro sports gets a winning dose of girl power 164 THE LADY IS A CHAMP From the end of her marriage to her new business venture, Jennifer Lopez is pop’s prize fighter. Photography Mario Testino 176 PRETTY MUCH EVERYWHERE Inez & Vinoodh introduce LouLou to the world by dropping her in on their favorite locations. Photography Inez & Vinoodh 188 GET BACK, STAY BACK! Lara Stone defends herself against a predator in Prada. Photography Nick Knight 204 SEA MORE STEPHANIE The supermodel shows off sumptuous curves in some of the season’s most scuba-ready ensembles. Photography Sebastian Faena

212 ONE IN A MILLION Rising rap star Azealia Banks isn’t taking anyone’s trophy—she’s changing the game. Photography Inez & Vinoodh 216 PLAYING THE FIELD There’s no penalty for being a pretty distraction, at least to England’s footballers. Photography Alasdair McLellan 228 ADRIANA VS. DOUTZEN There’s only one champion in a fight. Watch two supermodels duke it out for the limelight. Photography Mario Testino 240 BODYBUILDING WITH MARILYN A female bodybuilder boasts bold new jewelry. Photography Marilyn Minter 244 PRIVATE DANCER Naomi Campbell leaps into the legs of Tina Turner. Photography Daniele + Iango 250 HOW TO WEAR YOUR TRACK PANTS À LA CARLYNE A guide to the essential pant for working out or working the street. Photography Sebastian Faena 254 THE BIG SHOT Voluptuous vixen Christina Hendricks returns to the role that made her a star, and sets her sights even higher. Photography Cedric Buchet 260 WHAT A FEELING! The golden era of aerobics returns for high-endurance fashion that feels totally now. Photography Benjamin Alexander Huseby 266 SHE BETTER WORK (OUT) Lily Donaldson flexes her fashion muscles in looks that keep working all the way to the party. Photography Sharif Hamza 272 WHERE WERE YOU...PLAYING SPORTS? Michael Kors, Stella McCartney, Valentino, and more share snaps from their sportiest and most memorable moments

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Photography Junichi Ito Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Helmet, bikini, pants Alexander Wang Bracelets (her right) David Yurman Watch (her left) Hermès Ring (her right) Robert Lee Morris Ring (her left) Louis Vuitton


rio de Janeiro sĂŁo Paulo Buenos aires n e w Yo r k Miami Milano roma to k y o

designed by oskar Metsavaht, the clutch wood bag and maillot fish skin are made from a sustainabilit y project by

in the amazon region.


New York 97 Wooster st. - soho MiaMi 1111 LincoLn road - MiaMi Beach


foreword

love, all

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Tina Turner; Hanaa Ben Abdesslem, the first Muslim to model for Lancôme, summons the Flashdance gods; Stephanie Seymour, looking better than ever at 44, is the world’s sexiest scuba instructor; Adriana Lima and Doutzen Kroes go head-to-head in a model face-off; Lara Stone, meanwhile, demonstrates the art of self defense with the Krav Maga moves that she learned in a three-month-long training course. Photographer Nick Knight came up with the concept for this shoot while pondering the safety of his own children. In a very special tribute to her grandmother, Elsa Schiaparelli, Marisa Berenson pens an essay about how she is discovering new aspects of the incredible artist and designer’s personality in preparation for the upcoming Costume Institute exhibition. Other star players in this issue are rounding the bases of success themselves. We dare you to try and keep up with pint-size rapper Azealia Banks, or Christina Hendricks, the red-headed beauty who returns to the role of Joan Harris (née Holloway) in Mad Men this month. Of course it wouldn’t be a sports issue without real-life athletes: we are proud to be able to include such talents as Olympians Aimée Mullins and Jackie Joyner-Kersee, as well as the world’s fastest woman, Carmelita Jeter, alongside Carolina Panthers QB Cam Newton, and tennis great James Blake. So whatever your sports allegiance—be it fashion or home team fanaticism—we hope you find a little something in this issue that delights, inspires, and excites. Game on! Ms. V

Tennis racquet, shorts, watch Louis Vuitton Love bracelet and ring Cartier White gold bangle Van Cleef & Arpels Sweatband Lacoste

Photography Junichi Ito Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Spring is a time of rebirth and renewal. It’s about movement, energy, and evolution. When coming up with a theme for our Spring Fashion issue (one of the biggest of the year), V decided to focus on the art of sports. If you think about it, nothing else is quite as poetic. While we (admittedly) are not the most jocktacular publication in the world, we certainly admire exceptional talent. This summer in London the best athletes on the planet will congregate at the 2012 Olympic Games. It’s will be a high-performance arena with physicality on display in its purest form, descended from the Greeks’ celebration of the union of mind, body, and spirit. We wanted to pay homage to these incredible icons past and present with our own Fashion Olympics. The talents who grace these pages face challenges, obstacles, victory, and defeat in an open forum almost every day. Who knows better about such an endeavor than our cover star, Jennifer Lopez? Over the course of her 20-year career, she has both triumphed and been knocked down, but always gotten back up again. In our story, she wholeheartedly admits to Pulitzer Prize–winning writer Robin Givhan that she’s “been trained like a boxer to go 15 rounds.” It’s no coincidence that her cover shoot (photographed by Mario Testino and styled by Carine Roitfeld) celebrates the cherished sport of boxing, as this summer women’s boxing will make its debut at the Olympics. Models, who are athletes in their own right, fill these pages in the season’s sportiest looks. Naomi Campbell twirls as the great


from the desk of lady gaga

V MAGAZINE GAGA MEMORANDUM No. 6 Date: RE:

MARCH 2012 MORE PEARLS PLEASE

From: To:

M†SS.GAGA STEPHEN GAN

Copy to:

MS. VREELAND YANKEES METS THE BRAIN OF THE INDUSTRY MIKIMOTO

MOLLUSKS CLEOPATRA ALL PLAYERS, COACHES, ALL-STARS, AND CONFUSED VETERANS

“Nobody likes the game that they’ve won over and over again to change.” So for the Sports Issue of V, I suppose some of you wondered if I would vacation for the month. Perhaps I would come up with some benign excuse, or feign some sort of city-girl confusion: write about sportswear? Or sports where? When, in fact, I grew up a huge baseball fan. Google now “Lady Gaga at the Mets game,” and you will find a photograph of a not-so-sober version of Natalie Azua myself flipping the Bronx cheer with my friends. Which deemed problematic, as we weren’t actually in the Bronx.* [See Foot-note.] It was the first time in nearly two years that I was actually being scolded by my father—partly for misbehaving in public and partly for attending a Mets game. But that’s the beauty of baseball, isn’t it? I was able to drown myself in so much whiskey, beer, and Italian sausage that after two years of touring the world I: (A) completely forgot that I am famous, (B) was completely wasted indeed, wearing my costume from the “Telephone” video, and (C) am still confused as to how the paparazzi spotted me. What a lady. Well regardless, this story came to mind when my editor e-mailed me for article copy for this issue and I thought, What a revelation! What a challenge I could rise to and truly show my appreciation for this thing we call “the game.” So, ladies and gentlemen, V readers, this is a theory on competition. The integrity of ambition. A Winner’s Verité. Look out fashionistas, in this issue when talking about sports, even you may catch a few home runs. Yes, I said that, home runs. Let me just put on my sports…where? 2011 was one of the most exciting and difficult years of my life. I made this internal pact with myself when I put out “Born This Way.” This time, when I “win,” I want it to mean something. How can every “win” be a force? Not a tiara, a pat on the back, or the cashing of a check, but how can I look out into the sea of fans and know that our “win” changed the industry and changed each other? I wonder how many thousands of years ago the first pearl was discovered. In fact, I wonder who discovered it. Was it a fisherman? Or did Cleopatra, on her yacht, summon a mollusk? Did her fabulous male makeup artist hang it on a tiny spear and say, “Oh dahhhling, on your ears!” I thought of the pearl during my exploration of “the game” because as an accessory, pearls are the most game-changing and timeless of them all. There’s no crime or conflict surrounding them, they are natural and perfect, and they are gifted as a gesture of elegance and womanhood. For thousands of years they’ve never gone out of style, and to this day no one knows when or how they were discovered. They have no sense of time or beginning. They are cyclical in nature and in existence. Christmas this year was the first time I really bought myself anything nice. I don’t equate money with style, nor do I equate it with happiness. I’m often content hiding in the back of places like Claire’s, schlooping costume jewelry into a basket. Lucia Vanderpool

*The Bronx cheer is a double bird (or when one flips off anyone using both hands) and is a wonderfully typical sign of a devout Yankees fan.

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from the desk of lady gaga

However, it just so happened I was in Japan, and I decided to buy myself a strand of Mikimoto pearls. Why wait for a lover to buy you jewelry, lover yourself! After the year Japan had, and the experiences I’d shared with the people there, I thought it would make for a beautiful memory. The staff from Mikimoto arrived, we cracked open some champagne, and my buddy Brandon and I tried pearls on and swooned. I quickly decided that I couldn’t only buy one for myself. I would feel terrible. So I made it about the girls: one for my mother, my gorgeous and talented sister, and Bo, my best friend. It was to be a sign of our womanhood, a thank you for fostering mine, for my sister a sign of things to come, and for my mother a strand of pearls to represent each of the blessings she had cultured for our family over the years. I lay down on the airplane back from Japan, tossing around some dashi, fondling my pearls. I watched the movie Moneyball for the first time. I began to laugh and smile as [Brad] Pitt talked romantically about the game. I suddenly imagined that my pearls were teeny-tiny baseballs. When a player hits a home run, the baseball is flung into an abyss Cedric Rolando of enigma and screams so great. It travels so far that only rarely is one caught in the bleachers. Where do these balls go? Where do all these wins get encased? Are they in a heavenly baseball land floating around for players who pass to acknowledge? Or do they disappear? By the end of the film, we discover the truth about winning from our hero. It only matters if you’ve changed the game. Being kicked in the teeth is par for the course for this kind of win, a win that not only pisses off the team you’ve beat, but every other team, their coaches, owners, and even some of the greatest baseball players of all time. You’ve made your own set of rules and gone so far on your own talent, no one can possibly crack the truth behind your wins. You were either lucky or were cheating. Nobody likes the game that they’ve won over and over again to change. Pitt expresses this as the central objective to his life, as we see a ter hits and runs, doing what he does normally, running past first to scurries back to first. He’s so focused on the game, so focused on the dirt of the stadium, he doesn’t even realize he’s got a home run. The

flashback to an old Oaks game. Battake second, but trips, falls, and team winning, head so down into the crowd roars, and he’s not sure why.

In this moment I looked down at my pearls, and I saw all the teeny-tiny home runs I’d hit over the past year. I knew some of them were more perfect than others, but I knew only an eye trained in pearls would notice. The thing about music is you’re not in competition with anyone else. You’re in competition with the psychology of the industry as a whole. You’re in competition with you. You must delve deeper and deeper into your creativity, history, and modernity to change not just this moment, but every moment that came before it. How can I hit a home run that will make every player question every run that was ever scored? How can I round third to home plate and bewilder some of the greatest players of all time? How can I change the game, until 30 years goes by and someone changes it again? Sometimes my face is buried so deep in the work I forget to look up. Sometimes I don’t even realize I’ve won, because the stadium is either cheering or screaming so loud it doesn’t even matter. So this season, in the spirit of the Super Bowl and all things sporty, wear your pearls. Wild, cultured, real, or fake, wear them proud. And look up, or rather down, at all of your home runs. (Unless you’ve made them into a crown with a glue gun.) Then look up! In fashion and in life we all deserve more pearls, please. A moment of revelation to remember that we are timeless, we all matter, and every win like this is as important as the next. When you are changing the way people think, your life achievements are working toward the greatest accessory of all time: nerve. So collect your tiny baseballs, string your pearls, and remember that you are as timeless as the pearls on your neck. And if you forgot to be a lady and wear them, then shame on you.

Tom Christophersen


24-hour party people

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Cate Blanchett

Kate Moss Audrey Tautou

Diane Kruger

Jessica Alba François-Henri Pinault

Marianne Faithfull

Salma Hayek

Caroline Sieber

Alexa Chung

Imelda May

Anna Dello Russo

Margherita Missoni

David Sims

Dita Von Teese

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Rachel Zoe Coco Brandolini

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Catherine Deneuve Roman Polanski Lauren Santo Domingo

Miuccia Prada

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Delfina Delettrez Fendi

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Francesco Vezzoli

Leigh Lezark

Jen Brill

Miuccia Prada hosts a dinner and dance party in honor of her collaboration with Francesco Vezzoli and uber-architect Rem Koolhaas on a 24-hour museum at the Palais d’Iena in Paris.

Virginie Courtin-Clarins

Claire Courtin-Clarins

Liz Goldwyn

roman holiday

Louis Vuitton celebrates its new Roman Maison in Lucina Square at the Etoile, the city’s first cinema. 100

Antoine Arnault

Jessica Joffe

Anouck Lepère

tweeding las vegas

Chanel fêtes its new store with the “Numéros Privés” exhibition at the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas.

Photos courtesy Louis Vuitton, Prada and Chanel

Natalia Vodianova

Lily Collins


tick tock THREE OF V’S FAVORITE ARTISTS—IGGY AZALEA, SSION, AND GRIMES–CLOCK SOME SERIOUS TIME IN NEW YORK’S EAST VILLAGE AS PART OF SWATCH’S NEW GENT LACQUERED CAMPAIGN Photography Tyrone LeBon Fashion Anna Trevelyan

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v magazine for swatch


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v magazine for swatch

SSION


v magazine for swatch

Go to vmagazine.com to see our film of Grimes, SSION, and Iggy Azalea and learn about their favorite East Village haunts. Vote for V and enter to win an invitation to a party and private viewing of Swatch from the Streets somewhere in the world for you and three friends! Runners up will win prizes of New Gent Lacquered watches from the multicolored Swatch range.


aimée mullins

AS TEAM U.S.A.'S CHEF DE MISSION FOR THE 2012 OLYMPIC GAMES, AIMÉE MULLINS WILL BE LEADING AMERICANS INTO LONDON’S OLYMPIC STADIUM THIS SUMMER, BUT FOR THE ACCOMPLISHED ATHLETE, ACTOR, SHAKESPEARIAN SCHOLAR, AND NEW FACE OF L’ORÉAL, BEING A FORERUNNER IS NOTHING NEW “I have a friend who told me that my whole career has been a series of ‘you can’t do thats,’” confesses Aimée Mullins over a spot of tea one blustery winter weekend in New York. “Who walks the runways? My whole career is a series of tiny miracles. I’m not supposed to be there.” Mullins, who was born without fibula bones, learned to walk on prosthetic legs—and has never stopped moving forward. While a dean’s list student at Georgetown, she became the first amputee in history to compete in an NCAA sport; a track-and-field standout, she established new records in the 100, 200, and long jump, using revolutionary carbon-fiber prostheses. By 1996 she had reached an Olympic starting block, which naturally led to international interest. Soon she was off to the (fashion) races in London, where she was shot by Nick Knight (who later became a trusted friend) and strutted the runway for the late, great Alexander McQueen. Mullins treasures the hand-carved wooden legs the designer made for her catwalk debut. “He was always taking something that was perceived as ugly or banal and transforming it to make it beautiful,” she says. “That’s what art is.” Today Mullins’s collection of prosthetics has expanded to include 13 pairs of varying heights. “I’m having fun with it,” she confessed during one of her many talks at TED, a global nonprofit organization devoted to developing change through the exchange of ideas. Mullins is a fixture on the TED circuit, and speaks open-mindedly about stigmas associated with the term “disability.” Raised in an Irish family among whom the art of storytelling is an innate gift, Mullins says that of all her talents acting is the one that inspires her the most. “From my earliest memories, it’s what I've felt I needed to do,” she says. Her passion for the craft is so great that she even “treats” herself to intensive two-week Shakespeare workshops in London at least once a year. Her most prominent roles to date have been personas in The Creamaster Cycle‚ artist Matthew Barney’s wonderfully mad dystopian opus. The pair have recently partnered up again—this time for the third (there are seven in total) installment of Barney’s performance piece and upcoming film, Ancient Evenings, adapted from the novel by Norman Mailer. Mullins is reprising the role of Isis, the ideal wife, mother, and caretaker of Greek mythology. Given the goddess’s propensity to inspire (which is one of Mullins’s favorite words, meaning “to breathe new life into something”), the casting seems entirely appropriate. And although she’s giving J.Lo a run for her money in the multi-hyphenate career department, Mullins is still getting accustomed to the perks. The new L’Oréal spokeswoman is now among an elite group of beauty ambassadors including Lopez, Beyoncé, and Gwen Stefani, but when she arrived at the Chateau Marmont the day before the shoot, she thought she had been given the penthouse by mistake. “I was thinking that they accidentally gave me Beyoncé’s room,” she deadpans. This summer Mullins will be in the spotlight once again as she leads Team U.S.A. into the Olympic Stadium in London. It’s just another one of the many roles that she is totally comfortable playing—well, sort of. “I had to go through a media-training day, which is all about how to not say anything too newsworthy,” she laughs. “I’m a talker. That was kind of hard.” Sarah Cristobal Photography Inez & Vinoodh Fashion Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Dress Versace Makeup Wendy Rowe using NARS Cosmetics (Tim Howard Management) Hair Christiaan using Kiehl’s grooming aids Manicure Deborah Lippmann (The Magnet Agency) Lighting technician Jodokus Driessen Digital capture Brian Anderson Photo assistant Joe Hume Stylist assistant Kate Grella Studio manager Marc Kroop Makeup assistant Chisa Takahashi Hair assistant Yoko Sato Printing Box Location Pier 59 Digital Studios Special thanks Tony Jay

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Marisa Berenson, center, on the day of her baptism, surrounded by her grandmother, mother, father, and godparents

Courtesy Marisa Berenson

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elsa schiaparelli

ACTRESS, MODEL, AND AUTHOR MARISA BERENSON PENS AN EXCLUSIVE TRIBUTE TO HER GRANDMOTHER—THE ARTIST AND FASHION INNOVATOR ELSA SCHIAPARELLI— IN HONOR OF THE UPCOMING “ELSA SCHIAPARELLI AND MIUCCIA PRADA: ON FASHION” EXHIBITION AT THE MET'S COSTUME INSTITUTE To really understand my grandmother, you have to know her background. She was brought up in a very strict Catholic family. Education was very important—her father was in politics and extremely intellectual. King Umberto appointed him to be the head of the Royal Library. Her mother, the Marchesa de Dominici, came from an aristocratic family, wore all black, and lived to be 103. She was not very close to her sister, who was very religious and painted frescos in churches. On her father’s side she had an uncle named Giovanni Schiaparelli, an astronomer who discovered canals on Mars. Her other uncle, Ernesto, was the Egyptologist who found Queen Nefertiti’s tomb. He was a director of museums in Florence and Turin. From a young age, my grandmother was very much a rebel and had the spirit of a bird who wanted to be set free. When she was 13, a man asked for her hand in marriage. She would have gone through with it, but the family didn’t want her to leave home when she was so young. She found her life to be stifling. In college she would write erotic and romantic poetry that scandalized the family. She was full of imagination. She never spoke to me about her work or her life, and she hated to be called grandmother. She never wanted anybody to call her Elsa, because she didn’t like her name, so her friends called her Schiap, and my sister and I did too. I’m not sure how old Schiap was when she finally left home, but eventually she went to London and fell in love with a French count named William de Wendt de Kerlor. He was a theosophist and would speak about Buddhism, Hinduism, life after death—all the subjects that she found interesting. She was quite mystical and attracted to the esoteric. She loved this man, who was very good-looking and charming, and married him shortly thereafter. Schiap was not supported by her family, so she went to New York to make it on her own—and that’s where things took off. She found a hand who could knit and started making trompe l’oeil sweaters and then sportswear for women. She did a whole collection of linen dresses, skiwear, and bathing suits. She became quite a success. Her marriage, however, did not last. She left her husband when my mother was two and went to Paris. It was a very difficult time, but she always said that Paris saved her life. It was her home for 40 years. She became friends with wonderful artists like Jean-Michel Frank, Alberto Giacometti, Matta, Jean Cocteau, and Pablo Picasso. They all worked together and inspired each other. My grandmother was much more an artist than a designer. Coco Chanel was a dressmaker and was jealous of her. They were both very strong and independent, but didn’t like each other. Chanel always called my grandmother “the Italian” and did not say very nice things. They each had their own personalities, their own styles. They were daring. Naturally they were very competitive with each other, which is human nature, of course. Eventually, when she started making money, Schiap opened up a boutique called Schiap Shop in the Place Vendôme, which then became the couture house. She also bought this wonderful house on the Rue de Berri that Napoléon had bought for Princess Mathilde as a present. It had a garden and a courtyard. Schiap lived there for 40 years, and became a French citizen. Her whole career and life developed more in Paris, although she loved America too and often went to the States. She licensed a lot of things in America, such as furs, umbrellas, and stockings. During the war the American ambassador told my grandmother to get my mother out of Paris, because the Germans were invading. My grandmother wanted to stay for as long as possible, but eventually moved back to New York for part of the war. German diplomats moved into the house. She closed down the Place Vendôme boutique because no one could really work 111


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“Schiap influenced a whole new era of designers. Pierre Cardin, Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy—they all worked for her, and they all adored her." –Marisa Berenson

Coat, Fall 1953

Dinner Jacket, in collaboration with Jean Cocteau, embroidery by Lesage, Fall 1937

Trompe l’oeil sweater, Summer 1928

She was a pioneer in terms of her clothes and sense of style. She went to Russia and dressed the army. The women were Communists there. My grandmother always said what she thought, and it was not always tender. She told Stalin what she thought of Communism and the repression of women, and he was not happy. Schiap was a very baroque person, bigger than life. She always wore big jewelry, and her house was very eclectic. She would sit at home on her big sofa that was covered in leopard skin and would go up to change every night for dinner. She always got dressed, whether she was alone or with people. I used to find her on that couch in her living room, always reading. She had the most extraordinary library of books and an old television set that sat atop these very old 18th-century encyclopedias. She actually loved to entertain and gave fantastic parties. There was one where she had a huge hot-air balloon in the garden and people were flying around in it. You can imagine, everybody who was anybody in those days was at that party, and everybody who wasn’t wanted to be! I do remember, when I was a tiny little girl, going downstairs in my pajamas to say hello to the guests. The Duke of Windsor insisted that my sister and I come down. So we would go and curtsy to all of my parents’ guests, and then he’d take us back up and tuck us into bed. It was very cute. The first dress that Schiap ever made for herself was for one of her parties. She didn’t know how to sew or draw, so she wrapped herself in this extraordinary long gown and put huge bobby pins everywhere to keep it together. At some point, when she was dancing with someone, everything came apart! I’d never seen my grandmother dance, but I think she liked to have a very good time. She loved parties and having fun—more in those days than when we were little, because then she was not so young anymore. Salvador Dalí used to come to the house a lot. She had a very close relationship with Dalí. We used to go and visit him in Cadaqués, Spain, where he had a house. I was 13 when I went there one summer and he wanted to paint me in the nude. Of course my mother was horrified. It was absolutely out of the question. She thought he was a dirty old man. He said, “But she has hip bones like cherrystones!” I wish he had painted me in the nude. I would’ve loved it. But my mother thought that it was not at all appropriate. My grandmother was extremely protective of me. She was very harsh about my career and didn’t like the way I lived my life or how I dressed. It was the ’60s and the ’70s and we were all in miniskirts with big hair, looking like hippies. She thought it was ridiculous and vulgar, but people told me that she used to

Lobster dress, in collaboration with Salvador Dalí, 1937

Tears evening dress and veil, in collaboration with Salvador Dalí, 1938

look at all my photographs in Vogue and she was very proud. To me, she only criticized and said how awful everything was. She would tell me, “I don’t understand why you cry in all your movies.” Since she lived the life she did, I think she probably wanted the opposite for me. To have a safe, different kind of life. I was very rebellious, just as she had been. I guess it was in the genes. I wish she had spoken to me about her life, her work. She was very shy and secretive. I knew nothing of her private life. She never spoke about her husband, my mother’s father. He was persona non grata in the house. There was a very handsome Scotsman in my grandmother’s life after her husband. In fact, my mother grew up with him in her life, not her own father. He died at some point, and Schiap never spoke to me about any of this. Nor do I know firsthand what her work was like, because I only know what I’ve seen and read in her personal book or what’s been written about her. I experienced a completely different person than the icon that people know. She died in 1973, just before I worked on Barry Lyndon. The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute will open the “Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada: On Fashion” exhibition in May. It’s an incredible idea—a conversation between Prada and my grandmother. These are two extraordinary, strong, independent, innovative, creative women. It’s going to be very interesting. So many people are inspired by her to this day. She was a true original and an artist. Chanel has been wonderfully kept alive and brought back to life by Karl Lagerfeld, who is a genius, with a big company behind him. But now they’re going to bring back my grandmother’s name. Her designs have come full circle. I would want to wear them now. You can’t even believe that they were made in that period of time, they are still so incredibly modern. To know that someone like Diego Della Valle has always appreciated her genius, to the point of buying her name [in 2007], that makes me very happy. I know he is waiting for the right person to bring my grandmother’s company back to life. If I knew then what I know now, I would have talked to her differently. I would have asked a million questions. I don’t know if she would have answered or not, but at least I would have asked. Now, by doing research and going through her personal things, I am getting to discover the other aspects of her inner self, the profound and soulful woman that she really was. It is very moving, actually. Marisa Berenson “Elsa Schiaparelli and Miuccia Prada: On Fashion” is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute from May 10 to August 19, 2012

All images courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art

in Paris anymore. She started traveling and giving lectures all over America. She was very inspirational to women. She also created all kinds of fabrics for a new era. It sort of came out of an era of glamour, which was the 1930s. The films were very glamorous, and she dressed a lot of stars from Hollywood, like Marlene Dietrich, Mae West, and Zsa Zsa Gabor. But then came the whole period of the war, so she started inventing incredibly innovative sportswear for practical women, with zippers and big pockets. She was the first one to do all of those exteriorized practices utilizing parachute fabrics, so that women could drive ambulances or be in a practical mode of life. She created a whole style for women who couldn’t live the glamorous life anymore. Eventually she went back to Paris, but it wasn’t easy. The Germans had taken over, a lot of things were shut down, and there was no money. Life had changed a lot, and she was not able to get back on her feet as a maison de couture, which was quite sad for her. Fashionwise, things started to change, too. Mr. Dior had come in and revolutionized a certain style that was completely different. The New Look had taken over. Schiap was (and still is) relevant in that she influenced a whole new era of designers. Pierre Cardin, Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy—they all worked for her, and they all adored her. Cardin worked for her before anyone else, and he was totally in awe of her. She liked Saint Laurent a lot, and he felt the same way. He would always say that she was a magician. She liked Balenciaga, who is one of the greatest designers of all time. Funnily enough, she liked André Courrèges, who was very innovative and futuristic and different. François Lesage, who recently passed away, did all the embroidery for the couture shows; he told me that he had a box of patterns and designs and everyone was always trying to steal them. Everyone always learned so much from her, she was such a talent. That said, Schiap was not easy on herself or on others. People either absolutely adored her or were a bit afraid of her. I think those strong personalities are fascinating. At least you learn something and you’re inspired. Extraordinary people have an extra dimension that some people can’t possibly understand. She was very motivated to get ahead, and I think that was in part because she had a complex about her physical appearance. As a child she was told that her sister was the beautiful one and she was the ugly duckling of the family. There’s a very famous story about her attempting to plant seeds in her nose and ears because she wanted to have flowers growing out of them. She practically choked to death and was rushed off to the hospital. To imagine that you could grow flowers in your nose and ears and become beautiful is quite extraordinary.

Suede and monkey fur boots by André Perugia for Elsa Schiaparelli, Summer 1938


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jackie joyner-kersee

AS THE WORLD READIES FOR THIS YEAR’S SUMMER OLYMPICS IN LONDON, THE GOLD MEDALIST REMINISCES ABOUT HER OWN UNDEFEATED RECORDS, WHEATIES FAME, AND HER LEGENDARY SISTER-IN-LAW, FLO-JO Jackie Joyner-Kersee is an athlete of another strata. In 1988, she established a world record in the heptathlon with a staggering 7,291 points and a mere five days later set an Olympic long jump record, both of which are still unmatched to this day. She has represented the United States four times at the Summer Olympics, accruing a glamorous assortment of medals: three gold, two bronze, and one silver in four different events. And while her physical prowess is nothing short of legendary, put Joyner-Kersee in a pair of high heels and she’s prone to girlish teetering—and subsequent laughter—rather than long, cheetahlike strides. In fact, the athlete-turned-activist, now a mentor and community leader in her native St. Louis, laughs regularly and easily. Just don’t mention the thought of anyone breaking her records. Derek Blasberg

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JJK East St. Louis is always going to be home for me. It was a solid foundation, but in the beginning I was not one of the fastest girls. In fact, I finished last in my first ever competition [at the age of nine]. Jackie Joyner-Kersee finished last? JJK Dead last. When I was that young I wanted to be on a relay team with my friends, so I had to be good enough to be in the four. There’s a park on the East Side, and my goal was to be able to run around the park without stopping. When I could do that, I knew I had improved, and then it was on to the next challenge. What I stress to young people is that it’s not where you start, it’s where you’re trying to get. You grew up in a tough family. Did playing sports help to relieve some of those stresses? JJK Yes. My grandmother was shot and killed in Chicago by her husband. He came home one day and…I saw a lot of drugs and violence growing up, and I saw how it could tear a family apart. When I was little I didn’t know I had this athletic gift to go and do the things I was going to do, but sports provided me an opportunity to learn a lot about myself and who I am. I was able to set goals, go to college, and see there was a better life out there. Your thought process was if you can get a gold medal, you can keep it together. JJK Exactly. You learn to take the good with the bad. Growing up I learned not to take anything for granted. I don’t underestimate anyone. Even when my numbers say that I’m the best, I still work as if I’m at the bottom of the pile. You were on the covers of a Wheaties box, Jackie! JJK Yeah, that was awesome. Any other highlights from when you were still competing? JJK Definitely Wheaties! I also worked with the President and

Mrs. Obama to help bring the Olympics to Chicago. And I had the opportunity to ride on Air Force One with Bill Clinton. I’ve seen the world, and I’ve met people from all walks of life. I’ve had a lot of moments that I just can’t believe. How has the sport changed since you started? JJK I think female athletes are more respected and appreciated for their great talents. Something else, which is new, is that girls who appreciate fashion can be taken seriously. Now athletes design their own fashion lines. JJK It’s nice to still be taken seriously and take care of the way you look. In my day, if you came out there wearing lipstick, someone would think, Oh, I’m going to beat this cutie-pie. What about your sister-in-law Florence Griffith Joyner’s legendary nails? JJK Florence would do all of our nails, even when we were going to school together at UCLA. She married my brother, who she met through me. It’s funny: Florence and I went to UCLA together, and [my brother] Al went to Arkansas State. I went to visit him and showed him a picture of Florence, and he said, “Oh, that’s the girl I’m going to marry.” I said, “No you’re not.” But he did. Did Florence try and get you to grow your nails long? JJK No, she knew better than that! I loved fashion, but I was much more subtle. I see you have a very bright pink nail polish today. JJK It’s a classic pink. This is not on Flo-Jo’s level, trust me! Jackie Joyner-Kersee in St. Louis, January 2012 Photography Suzy Gorman Fashion Derek Blasberg Dress Michael Kors

Makeup and hair Carmen Currie

Tell the truth: do you still keep an eye on your records, and do you secretly hope no one beats them? JACKIE JOYNER-KERSEE Well, I like to think of it as following the sport. [Laughs] I’m definitely aware of my records and I’m always looking at the potential of athletes who have the ability to break them. It’s been 26 years since my first Olympics, but when you have one of these records and you’ve done it, the thought definitely crosses your mind. You still have the highest record for heptathlon points scored, and you’re the first heptathlete ever to achieve consecutive Olympic wins. JJK People always say records are made to be broken. And I agree with that. Just not mine! Sports Illustrated voted you the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20 th century. What does that mean to you? JJK I wasn’t aware of it until it came out, so it was an honor and a total surprise. When you’re competing, and actually doing those things, you don’t think of accolades. You have tunnel vision. Where do you keep your medals? JJK At home, but I do a lot of school appearances, so I travel with them. Do you let other people wear them, or are you superstitious about that? JJK No, not me. A bunch of people have had them on. I just remind them that you can’t take claim to that sort of honor until you have earned it. Since I left the sport, I’ve done a lot of community work, mentoring programs, and a lot in health and wellness. I heard that you like to speak to students. What do you tell them? JJK I speak from a sense of strength, which comes from sports. I want them to see the balance. Regardless of what field you’re in, you have to have goals you are willing to work toward. The twist in there, for me, is health and wellness. Being able to take care of oneself is important. How did you balance your life? JJK I was fortunate because my husband was my coach. But you really have to carve out time for what makes you feel good. When I was competing I knew I always wanted to do community work, so I would do what I had to do athletically, and then I would find time to visit a school. How did you get involved with sports in East St. Louis?


q&a

speed racers

IN HONOR OF V’S FIRST SPORTS ISSUE, WE ASK THREE ACCOMPLISHED ATHLETES WHAT MAKES THEM TICK

CARMELITA JETER THE WORLD’S FASTEST WOMAN

JAMES BLAKE, PROFESSIONAL TENNIS PLAYER, FASTEST FOREARM IN THE LAND

Motto : Too blessed to be stressed! Lover or fighter: lover Rallying playlist: Jay-Z, Young Jeezy, Gucci Mane, T.I., Lil Wayne Chill-out playlist: Adele, Frank Ocean, Rihanna Secret talent: I am a great chef. My specialty is making cereal! Most treasured possession: my heart Favorite game of all time: holiday family football Sports hero: Muhammad Ali If I wasn’t a football player, then I’d be…a day care owner. My favorite place to play is…Charlotte, NC. (Atlanta, GA, is second.) Football is my...dream job. My critics can.. .continue to make me better. My favorite place in the world is…home. I’d like to go there with...the girl of my dreams. My style is...one of one. Nothing means more to me than…family. When I dream, I dream about…my future.

Motto: I want it all. Favorite race: IAAF World Athletics Final, Greece, 2009 Worst race: World Athletics Championships, Berlin, 2009 Prerace meal: Wheaties Postrace meal: lamb chops Style signature on the track: pink shoes Fashion staple: blazers Prerace superstition: listening to my iPod on the way to the track. Rallying playlist: Jay-Z, Lil Wayne, Aaliyah, Drake… If I wasn’t the world’s fastest woman, I’d be a…track coach and athletic director. My training regimen consists of…gym, track, and gym. I train seven to eight hours a day. When I sleep, I dream about...running and racing. I hope my first Olympic experience is…the Opening Ceremony. The Olympics will be…a memory I’ll never forget. When I want to get inspired, I read…Who Moved My Cheese by Dr. Spencer Johnson. When I am compared to the boys, I…laugh.

Motto: Nothing worthwhile comes easy. Lover or fighter: lover Style: casual Rallying playlist: Notorious BIG, 2Pac, Eminem, 50 Cent, Metallica Chill-out playlist: John Mayer, Gavin Degraw, Alicia Keys Secret talent: useless knowledge Most treasured possession: bracelet from my parents Favorite game of all time: Scattergories Sports hero: Michael Jordan Favorite place to play: Flushing Meadows, Queens Favorite place:  Fairfield, CT If I wasn’t a tennis player, I’d be...a sports marketer. Tennis is my…love and job. When I want to get inspired, I read…Where Men Win Glory by Jon Krakauer Critics can…continue to have their own opinions.po

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Cam Newton photography Chris Graythen/Getty Images Sport Carmelita Jeter photography Andy Lyons/Getty Images Sport James Blake photography Nick Laham/Getty Images Sport

CAM NEWTON, QUARTERBACK FOR THE CAROLINA PANTHERS


flashback

Esquire, 1975

body beautiful

PHOTOGRAPHER JEAN-PAUL GOUDE RECALLS HOW KELLIE EVERTS, A RELIGIOUS FORMER TEEN BEAUTY QUEEN TURNED MISS NUDE UNIVERSE, BECAME ONE OF ESQUIRE ’S MOST TALKED-ABOUT FEATURES OF THE ’70S In the mid ’70s, while leafing through the astutely-named boxing publication Ring Magazine, Jean-Paul Goude, then the art editor of Esquire, came across an ad featuring a former beauty queencum-bodybuilder. Unable to run full nudes, Goude was on the hunt for alluring female characters he could photograph for his highly 118

Cut-up transparencies, New York, 1976

respected but somewhat stodgy literary journal. The request had come at the behest of his editor, and when Goude saw Kellie Everts, all muscle and yearning, he knew he had found a champion. “Bodybuilding was at its lowest at the time,” recalls Goude today. “It had been very big during the ’50s and ’60s, but by the ’70s it was finished, it was nothing. So I looked at that and said, “Wow, this girl looks really nice, let’s check her out.” A former teen beauty queen and 1967 Miss Nude Universe, Everts was in her mid 30s and still striving to be in the spotlight. According to Goude, she had a desperate but very pleasant demeanor. “She was living modestly in Brooklyn,” he says. “At the time she was teaching young Puerto Rican kids about some sort of religion that she had picked up in California when she was living there.” Despite the fact that she moonlighted as an exotic dancer, religion was (and continues to be) paramount among Everts’s beliefs. In fact, by the time she met Goude she had become a minister and was giving sermons in burlesque bars while referring to herself as a “Stripper for God,” which eventually became her preferred moniker. Following the shoot, Goude employed his ninjalike prePhotoshop skills (what he calls “The French correction”), cutting the film strips and rearranging them so that Everts, whose

proportions had not quite retained beauty-queen status, took on an Amazonian quality. “That was the second or third picture I think I’d taken using that particular technique,” says Goude. “Her face and hair were still beautiful, and she had enormous breasts. The only thing I had to do was emphasize the shoulders—which were very narrow—the arms and forearms and the thighs.” His process, depicted above (left), produced a six-page layout for the magazine that pleased both his model and editor to no end. “For about two years she went to a gym and tried to look like the pictures,” says Goude. He photographed her again a year later, and those images (above, right) eventually landed in Playboy. Goude says he pretty much lost touch with Everts after he moved to Europe in the ’80s. “She started sending me letters, very long letters—like 12 pages, handwritten, telling me how she communicated with Errol Flynn every night,” he says. Everts, now in her sixties, has a website that catalogs her life’s history, hawks souvenirs from her heyday, and maintains that she’s “ready to get back into the limelight for whatever opportunities present themselves.” In the year of 2012, anything is possible. Sarah Cristobal Photography Jean-Paul Goude


backstage

Madonna wears Hat Philip Treacy for Givenchy Haute Couture Clothing Givenchy Haute Couture Earrings Bulgari

like a player

WHAT DO YOU WEAR TO PLAY THE BIGGEST SHOW ON EARTH? MADONNA TURNED TO RICCARDO TISCI AND STYLIST B. AKERLUND TO GILD HER IN GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE FOR THE 2012 SUPER BOWL. HERE, THEY EACH DISCUSS WORKING WITH THE QUEEN OF POP For me, Madonna has always been one of the great icons of the world. We first worked together on her Sticky & Sweet tour in 2008. Then, I designed new outfits for the second part of her tour the year after. Since then, we have stayed in personal contact over the years—at Christmas, going out for dinner in New York—so for me, working with her on the Super Bowl was about a personal relationship, not just about fashion and music. It was about sharing ideas and emotions. We began the design process by looking through the archives of two of my Givenchy collections: the Punk/Marine one (women’s) and the Moroccan/Gladiator one (men’s). We worked from there to build something new and modern that felt right for Madonna. Fitting her is always interesting, because she knows her body so well. She really knows exactly what she is talking about in a fitting. She is extremely precise. We are both Leo, so I have respect for this strength and precision! For the Super Bowl, the clothes needed to be seen from far away, Madonna had to feel at ease dancing and performing in them (like an athlete), and they had to also catch light. Watching the performance made me very proud. I had goose bumps, and I don’t get goose bumps very easily! What was interesting and wonderful about this moment was that you could feel the anticipation building. You could feel the love and respect for her. You could feel that people wanted Madonna back. Riccardo Tisci With Madonna, we usually base everything on a character and it spirals from there. The inspiration for this performance came from the Roman empire and channeling a modern-day Cleopatra. The initial concept came from Madonna, and we worked together on all the designs for each character. It was a very collaborative process. “Vogue” was the biggest challenge, because we had to create dancers to look like Roman statues. The Super Bowl halftime show is one of the most anticipated performances in the world due to the amount of people watching. I have been told there are over one billion viewers. We were extremely careful to keep things secret—the anticipation of what Madonna’s costume would be was so high. I was even told that there were bets placed in Las Vegas on whether or not she would wear fishnets! We had strict orders that we could not show any nipples whatsoever, so even the gladiator costumes were designed to cover them up. We did tons of rehearsal to prevent anything from going wrong. We knew it was important to do something Madonna had never done before. To see it all come to life was amazing and sad at the same time. I felt a bit of a loss when it was over, like the world went back to neutral. B. Akerlund

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Sketch by Riccardo Tisci for Madonna’s headpiece by Philip Treacy

Top, bottom, left photos B. Akerlund

Madonna wears Clothing Givenchy Haute Couture


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sports illustrated

FROM REPRESENTATIONS OF OLYMPIC GAMES ON GREEK VASES TO MUYBRIDGE’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF ATHLETES’ MOVEMENTS, SPORTS HAVE INSPIRED ARTISTS FROM THE EARLIEST OF TIMES. HERE ARE A FEW NOTABLE TAKES ON CONTEMPORARY COMPETITION Text Simon Castets

XU ZHEN

Untitled, 2007 For his 2007 exhibition with ShanghArt, Xu Zhen filled the gallery space with remote-controlled weight-lifting equipment. The machines could be turned into viewer-activated sculptures at the touch of a button.

CINDY SHERMAN

Untitled, 2000 The undisputed master of transformative self-portraiture, Sherman has crafted innumerable characters, all as eerily believable as this tattooed, Under Armour–adorned Madonna.

LOUISE LAWLER

Thank You Vito, 2003/4 Louise Lawler’s work observes the way artworks live beyond the studio, from private homes to storage rooms and auction houses. As with her famous Pollock and Tureen (1984), for which she photographed a soup bowl below an abstract expressionist work, Lawler here captures the juxtaposition of the highbrow (a Boetti collage) and the mundane (a soccer poster).

BMW V12 LMR Art Car 15, 1999 For the 15th BMW Art Car, Jenny Holzer applied one of her most famous sentences in stark blue letters on top of the car’s body. “Protect Me From What I Want” acquires a special significance as it zooms around racetracks. The sides of the car read “you are so complex you don’t respond to danger” and “the unattainable is invariably attractive.”

Untitled (the future will be chrome), 2011 One of Cumulus Projects’ sleekest yet most practical outputs, Tiravanija’s table makes for an upgraded ping-pong experience. Who ever thought relational aesthetics could look so good in the backyard?

COLLIER SCHORR BRIAN JUNGEN

Prototypes of New Understanding, 1999 Known for a series of sports items turned into sculptures that look like Native American artifacts, Jungen calls attention to the fetishizing of baseball gloves, basketball shoes, and sports jerseys as placeholders in an increasingly secular world.

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JEFF KOONS

Three Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Two Dr. J Silver Series, Wilson Supershot), 1985 A precursor to Damien Hirst’s submerged sharks and lambs, this famous Koons sculpture evokes the artist’s interest in inflatables. Since the balls aren’t attached to the womblike tank, they slowly move—an NBA version of a surrealist ready-made.

The Rivalry Between Gods and Other Gods, 2002 Recalling Barbara Kruger’s famous axiom that “you construct intricate rituals which allow you to touch the skin of other men,” Schorr’s photographs of wrestlers continue the tradition of displaying heroism while focusing on the intimacy of their subjects’ moves.

Cindy Sherman courtesy of the Artist and Metro Pictures, NY Xu Zhen courtesy MadeIn Company Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society, NY Rirkrit Tiravanija courtesy of the Artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, NY Louise Lawler courtesy of the Artist and Metro Pictures, NY Brian Jungen courtesy of the Artist and Casey Kaplan, NY Jeff Koons © Jeff Koons Collier Schorr courtesy 303 Gallery, NY

JENNY HOLZER

RIRKRIT TIRAVANIJA


discovery

INEZ & VINOODH INTRODUCE A NEW MUSE...

meet loulou

Imagine that we asked the technician at our 3D imaging company the following:

Remember Penélope Cruz in Jamón, jamón? Remember Isabelle Adjani in L’eté meurtrier? Remember Andie MacDowell in Four Weddings and a Funeral? Remember Sandrine Bonnaire in Sans toit ni loi? Remember Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman? Remember Helena Christensen in...everything? And remember Kate Moss naked? Now imagine that he morphed these seven goddesses into one irresistible concoction of feline femininity. Out comes...LouLou—French, 19, and what more could you want? Kisses, Inez & Vinoodh LouLou in New York City, November 2011 Photography Inez & Vinoodh Styling Patti Wilson (Turn to page 176 for more on this incredible beauty.) Top and skirt Emilio Pucci

Makeup Wendy Rowe (Tim Howard Management) Hair Duffy (Tim Howard Management) Model LouLou (MC2 NY) Manicure Gina Viviano using Chanel (Artists by Timothy Priano) Tailor Lucy Payne (Lars Nord Studio) Lighting technician Jodokus Driessen Digital capture Brian Anderson Photo assistants Shoji Van Kuzumi and Joe Hume Stylist assistants Taylor Kim and Eyob Yohannes Studio manager Marc Kroop Makeup assistants Asami Matsuda and Chisa Takahashi Hair assistant Neil Grupp Printing Box Location Pier 59 Digital Studios Catering Nuela Special thanks Tony Jay

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ones to watch

talent

A QUARTET OF YOUNG DESIGNERS ARE SHAKING UP THE FASHION WORLD WITH THEIR FRESH PERSPECTIVE Photography Anthony Maule Fashion Jay Massacret

olivier rousteing

Clothing and accessories Balmain 126

Olivier Rousteing is curled up, catlike, on a sofa at Balmain’s headquarters on rue Pierre Charron. It is a rare moment of downtime for the 26-year-old creative director who, in the last two weeks, has shown his first pre-Fall collection in New York, a second men’s collection in Paris, and delved headfirst into his first solo Autumn effort for the house. Balancing three highly anticipated collections in less than a month is a daunting task. (To wit: the frantic pace and high pressure is what led Rousteing’s predecessor, Christophe Decarnin, to vacate the house amid reports of exhaustion and depression in the spring of 2011.) But the young designer, who is wearing a black T-shirt and quilted jersey trousers (i.e. rockstar sweatpants) is taking it all excitedly in stride. “Is it crazy right now?” he reiterates with a smile. “Yes, and I’m a little freaked out, but I thrive on the adrenaline and the excitement.” Picking up where Decarnin left off was not easy for Rousteing, who was born in the South of France, studied fashion in Bourdeaux, and worked for Roberto Cavalli before joining the Balmain design team. “It was a weird situation,” he says delicately. “I really love Christophe, and he is an amazing person who taught me a lot. So when they told me what happened I reflected, but not whether or not I should take the job, more like what it meant to me. You can love fashion, but when you work at a company it becomes something different.” He took two days to accept. “What made me happy is that I was working with my team. In the end it was a really good decision.” And one that has paid off. The buzz surrounding Rousteing has gone from a whisper to a roar since his debut, which paid homage to all of the body-con elements of the house while also subtly establishing his own footing. Fashion critics were pleased to see less flesh and more embroidery in the collection, which was playfully inspired by an imaginary journey Elvis took through Las Vegas dressed as a Spanish bullfighter. “I want to have fun,” he says jovially. “And then I want to have glamour. I mix that with tailoring and construction, which are hallmarks of the house of Balmain, and something I would never want to turn my back on.” There are still some elements of the job that Rousteing needs to get more comfortable with— like the designer’s bow. “I went out there and didn’t know what to do,” he says of his Spring show. “I was super scared—but super happy.” Derek Blasberg


talent

alistair carr

Clothing and accessories Pringle of Scotland Pre-Fall 2012 128

Alistair Carr’s first interaction with Pringle of Scotland was memorable, to say the least. “I was about seven I think, golfing with my grandparents,” he recalls. “I was so fascinated by the crazy prints and colors of the people on the course (wearing Pringle) that I couldn’t stop staring. My Gram gave me a good smack for that.” It was a harbinger of things to come for Carr, who is now reinvigorating the brand to great effect. Quite a feat, considering Pringle’s predilection for the aforementioned granny golfing knits. “The biggest challenge is changing people’s perspective,” admits Carr. “Everyone thinks golf, which it is, of course, but there is so much more going on.” Now on his third women’s collection, Carr is settling in nicely and making the brand just hip enough to attact a new customer without alienating the twinset regulars. “That’s the last thing I want to do,” he says. “There will always be great knits or else there’s nothing.” It’s incredible to think that Carr had never worked with knitwear before joining the company, coming straight from Nicolas Ghesquière’s studio at Balenciaga. He is appreciative of Pringle’s impressive history (it was founded in 1815) and managed to integrate the iconic argyle into his debut ’60s-charged Spring collection. The play of new ideas, like graphic prints from artist Jeff Depner and neon graffiti, as evidenced during Pre-Fall (left), is giving the label a newfound, punchy cool. Carr’s innate sense of experimentation can be chalked up to a playful nature that was apparent at an early age. “There was a day at school where you could wear whatever you wanted if you paid 60p for charity,” he says. “I showed up in silver pants and a turquoise Junior Gaultier vest. It did not go over well, as you can imagine. I guess I’ve always done my own thing.” With Carr’s artful confidence and excitable ambition—he’s ready to take on fragrance and accessories—we can’t wait to see next season’s argyle. Christopher Barnard


talent

j.w. anderson

Top, pants, shoes J.W. Anderson Mesh top stylist’s own 130

Jonathan William Anderson, 27, whose line is called J.W. Anderson, manifested his label in a roundabout way. He came to New York to study acting, but when that became dull he moved to London to do a menswear course at the London College of Fashion. “It’s the only school that let me in,” deadpans the designer, who has a kinetic energy and fabulous sense of humor. He attributes his untraditional career arc in part to sheer boredom. “In 2008, I started making weird jewelry out of clock parts and forced them on friends and family,” says Anderson. “This went on for a while, and after I received my degree in menswear design I decided to do a show that summer in an old church, and I’ve never looked back.” He branched out into womenswear three seasons ago because, he explains, “I love the dichotomy of a man’s and woman’s wardrobe mashup.” These days his men’s and womenswear lines are two of the London fashion calendar’s most hotly anticipated collections. Last year, Anderson was nominated for a British Fashion Council Award. The designer, originally from a small Irish town called Loup, fondly recalls that fashion is a family pastime. His grandmother would knit many of his childhood outfits, including charming but embarrassing sweaters featuring farm animals and tractors. “I realize now how much I loved the idea that something could be made from nothing,” he says. His design process is as smooth now as his grandmother’s was then. It starts with what he calls a rat’s nest of ideas and ends with a rat’s nest of ideas. Anderson pushes himself to build many layers of concepts before building fabrics and prints. “A collection cannot be real if it has a single concept, or else it becomes costume,” he says. “Life is about lots of layers, and collections have to be built that way too.” DB


talent

felipe oliveira baptista

“There is a Lacoste product sold every two seconds, somewhere in the world,” boasts Felipe Oliveira Baptista, the French label’s new creative director. If that doesn’t give you an idea of the brand’s scale, maybe the four-km assembly line housed just outside of Paris is a better (and more bewildering) indication. “The size of Lacoste is without a doubt the most challenging. Seeing all of the products going into those boxes is pretty impressive, thousands of polos and tracksuits. The structure here is very democratic, since there are so many (literally) moving parts.” Baptista took the reins of the French sportswear label last summer and sent his first ready-to-wear collection down the runway for Spring 2012. “I was trying to look away from sport a bit. To propose a more real, fuller wardrobe. But still rooted in the brand, of course.” The result was a breezy but sexy take on all of the sporty gear you expect from Lacoste. Reimagining a label as recognizable as McDonald’s golden arches is intimidating, but Baptista has taken it on very comfortably. Think Bardot on the tennis lawn or soccer pitch, sultry but ready to play. The Lisbon native is, not surprisingly, a well-rounded athlete. “I snowboard, I work out. I grew up in Lisbon which is 20 minutes from the beach. So sport is very much a part of my life.” His relaxed attitude comes through in the clothes and makes for an easy look that dovetails nicely with Lacoste’s legacy of leisure. It’s a synergy that he credits to designing and producing in Paris, his adopted city. “People have been doing this for generations,” he says. “The know-how and craft here is like nowhere else.” Baptista embodies a cool confidence that will take the megabrand to even greater heights. Expect those two seconds of sales to quickly become one. CB

Dress Lacoste Stockings Fogal 132

Grooming (Alistair, J.W., Felipe) Janeen Witherspoon using M.A.C Cosmetics (Julian Watson Agency) Makeup and grooming (Anouk and Olivier) Adrien Pinault (Management Artists) Hair (Alistair, J.W., Felipe) Panos using Bumble and bumble (CLM) Hair (Anouk and Olivier) Seb Bascle (Artlist) Manicure Hiro (Jed Root) Model Anouk de Heer (IMG) Photo assistants Rob Low and Paul Whitfield Digital technicians Andre Skjegstad and David Marvier Stylist assistants Mara Palena and Samuele Marfia Makeup assistant Keiko Mizuno Retouching by EMPIRE Location Studio 96 bis, Paris Special thanks Spring Studios, London


Photography Jason Schmidt

creation story

PERFORMANCE AND CULINARY ARTIST JENNIFER RUBELL CONNECTS THE CREATION OF ART WITH THAT OF LIFE I had conceptualized a different piece, then I found out I was pregnant, which got me thinking about the passive parts of the creative act: the waiting, the receiving, the miracle of something happening while we’re all just going about our daily lives. This work, Incubation, draws a strong link between the creation of art, the creation of food, and the creation of life. I wanted to make something that cast passivity in a heroic light. Jennifer Rubell Jennifer Rubell in Miami Beach, December 2011 134


frowny face

IN A SERIES OF MIXED-MEDIA WORKS ON PAPER, NICOLE EISENMAN LOOKS SADNESS IN ITS BIG, CARTOONED FACE I’m showing a new series of works on paper at the Whitney Biennial, they are a combination of printing, drawing, and collage. I am returning to working on paper, which I did when I was in the ’95 Biennial but had since abandoned for the past 10 years to focus on painting. There are a few themes running through the work; separation and the accompanying feeling of sadness is one of them. I was thinking about depicting sadness in a very direct, almost ridiculous, cartoony way—there are a lot of big crying eyeballs in this group of pictures.  I have a show of new work opening at Leo Koenig Gallery [New York] in May; the imagery very much reflects my life in 2011. Thank god that fucking annus horribilis is over. Nicole Eisenman Nicole Eisenman in New York, January 2012


french connection

THIS MONTH, LES ARTS DÉCORATIFS CELEBRATES LOUIS VUITTON’S NAMESAKE AND SUPER-DESIGNER MARC JACOBS WITH AN EXHIBITION OF THEIR GREATEST HITS

Marc Jacobs photographed by Inez & Vinoodh, 2011

A 19 th-century poster advertising Louis Vuitton’s Paris flagship at 1 Rue Scribe and its London location on Charing Cross Road

From left: Fall/Winter 1998, 2006, 2009, 2011, and Spring/Summer 2012 Louis Vuitton runway collections designed by Marc Jacobs

From left: Louis Vuitton bed-trunk in Damier canvas, 1891, Les Art Décoratifs © Jean Tholance Keepall 50 in Silver Graffiti Monogram canvas, S/S 2001 Stephen Sprouse collection © Louis Vuitton/Antoine Jarrier Bag in Cherries Monogram canvas, S/S 2005 Louis Vuitton collection © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.

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“We were shocked and happy, of course, but totally freaked out,” recalls Marc Jacobs when asked about his appointment to be the artistic director of Louis Vuitton back in 1997. “We had done a few test projects for them [LVMH], not knowing where it would end up. They chose us, and we were in no position to disagree.” That first collection, a tabula rasa of gray and white, was a conscious erasure of anything that Vuitton had done up to that moment—a zeroing of the previous design sum (mostly brown monogrammed trunks for wealthy travelers). It was a gutsy move, and one that would cement Jacobs’s reputation as the rabble-rouser brought in to shake up the otherwise austere label. Fifteen years later, through numerous collaborations, star campaign turns, and awe-inspiring collections, Jacobs (along with his longtime business partner, Robert Duffy) has continued to build a legacy worth celebrating. This March, Les Arts Décoratifs in Paris will honor both the designer and the brand’s founder in a special two-story exhibit entitled “Louis Vuitton Marc Jacobs.” With a floor devoted to each, the exhibit tells the parallel stories of Vuitton and Jacobs while examining fashion through two important eras—19 th-century industrialization and 21st-century globalization. It will blend the luxurious, old-world details of the brand with Jacobs’s contemporary, madcap creations. “There is no incredible ’70s archive, no amazing ’50s archive to look to for inspiration,” remarks Jacobs. “In a way we had to create a woman...at least outside of what she was carrying.” The results proved to be both creatively and financially compelling, as the Jacobs-helmed Vuitton has seen a quadrupling of profits and queues snaked around its global flagships. His ability to attract art-world all-stars, such as Stephen Sprouse, Takashi Murakami, and Richard Prince, to the design realm established the kind of product that has appealed to a new Vuitton customer. And the sultry, slick campaigns featuring Madonna, Scarlett Johansson, and Uma Thurman lent the right amount of celebrity sheen to liven up the classic company. Running the gamut from Monsieur Vuitton’s original trunks to Jacobs’s bags adorned with Sprouse’s neon graffiti and Murakami’s cartoonish cherry blossoms, the exhibition reveals the ongoing story of two innovators, each rooted in his respective country, who have advanced an entire industry. “We’ve had good seasons, we’ve had bad seasons, but we never didn’t put everything into it,” says the designer. Christopher Barnard

Richard Prince collaboration, Spring 2008


JOVANI.COM


Swimsuit Ralph Lauren Jewelry and belt Kenneth Jay Lane Shoes Manolo Blahnik


Manicure Rica Romain (See Management) Set design Josephine Shokrian Studio Photo assistants David Diesing and Carlos Ruiz Digital technician Annie Powers Stylist assistants Kate Grella, Alban Roger, Matthew Feniger Makeup assistants Maiko Kitamura and Phillip Nathaniel Sanders Hair assistant David Colvin Production Helena Martel Production assistants Spencer Morgan Taylor and Bianca Ambrosio Retouching Picturehouse Location Industria Superstudio, NYC

who

hot to trot

MEGAMODEL AND EQUESTRIENNE KATE UPTON IS TAKING THE FASHION WORLD BY STORM Who’s to say what qualifies as sport? Modeling could be considered a sport: it’s performance-based, highly competitive, demands an elite physique, and is a billion-dollar industry. Let’s say you buy into that idea (which, now that we’re thinking about it: Olympic modeling?), we could then say that 19-year-old model Kate Upton ranks among the top athletes in the world. That, and she’s also a five-time equestrienne champion for the American Paint Horse Association. Born in Michigan and raised in Melbourne, Florida, Upton’s town’s claim to fame is professional surfer Kelly Slater, who also grew up there. But it wasn’t the local bro sport that enticed Upton. “While I was growing up, I wasn’t a great swim-

mer,” she says. “But my sister and I were obsessed with horses. We took lessons and kept getting better. We kept going to the next level.” After being discovered by a model agent at the young age of 12, Upton evacuated the stables to become a show pony herself. Eventually she moved to Miami, and, like any athlete with that innate, destiny-implicating gift, she was booked every day for two and a half weeks, convincing her mother of her potential success. She finished high school via online courses. “People were always like, that’s a lot of responsibility, how could you start so young?” she says. “But I had my own horse, I mucked its stall every day, it was my responsibility. So taking care of myself or another animal was my daily routine.” Looking after herself proved to be advantageous in the long run. On her 18th birthday, she signed with IMG, scored a spot in Sports Illustrated’s coveted swimsuit issue lineup, and a couple of days later a Guess campaign. “It was a good week,” she admits with a smile. Upton functions like a seasoned vet who is accustomed to rigorous travel. “This week, I worked in Belize, then flew to L.A. for a job, then took the red eye to London and got off the plane and went immediately to work,” she says. “But I’m 19 and I’ve seen the whole world, and that’s awesome.”

With her modeling career thriving, and the life of a burgeoning celebrity settling in (paparazzi and dating rumors abound), Upton is certainly ready for her close-up. Her test drive in the world of moving image, a cell-phone video of her doing the Dougie at a basketball game, brought in over three million views on YouTube. Not surprisingly, the competitive field of acting has welcomed her with open arms. Upton had a cameo in Ben Stiller’s comedy thriller Tower Heist, and she’ll play an oxymoronic sexy nun in April’s reinvention of that classic trio of oxlike morons, The Three Stooges. “I’m not scared about anything,” she says. “I feel like I can overcome any kind of pressure. As long as I know who I am and I stay that way, then I can tackle anything.” Elliott David Kate Upton in New York City, January 2012 Photography Sebastian Faena Fashion Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Swimsuit Michael Kors Earrings Kenneth Jay Lane

Makeup Lena Koro for NARS Cosmetics (Tracey Mattingly) Hair Esther Langham (Art + Commerce) 141


hit

Photography Vincent Gapaillard 142

All accessories Anselm Reyle for Dior Clockwise, from left: Bracelet, Bag, Polochon, Wedge

Set design Hervé Sauvage Photo assistant Jean Christophe Giraud Background manipulation Nicolas Choyé Retouching Shin Ono (Pier 59 Digital Studios) Location STUDIO 96 BIS Special thanks Giorgio Martinoli

on tar et

CHRISTIAN DIOR HAS TAPPED GERMAN ARTIST ANSELM REYLE TO GIVE THE HOUSE’S ICONIC ACCESSORIES A COOL CAMOUFLAGE MAKEOVER. MARKED WITH REYLE’S SIGNATURE COLOR TRIANGLE MOTIF, THESE LIMITED-EDITION FASHION-FATIGUE ACCOUTREMENTS WILL HAVE YOU MARCHING TO THE NEAREST DIOR BOUTIQUE


news

NOT SO SILENT SPRING Nite Jewel – One Second of Love (Secretly Canadian) Nite Jewel is the musical nom de plume of Ramona Gonzalez—a California girl who conjures some of the sweetest lo-fi R&B pop ever to grace a mixtape. Guaranteed to warm up your bedroom dance party. Tanlines – Mixed Emotions (True Panther Sounds) NYC duo Tanlines makes pitch-perfect dance music for people who hate dance music but secretly love to dance. It’s the sound of warm vibes captured on tape.

Marni for H&M

Bear in Heaven – I Love You, It’s Cool (Dead Oceans/Hometapes) Brooklyn’s Bear in Heaven crafts electro-tinged pop music that sounds as if it were beamed directly from the future, aimed directly at your heart. You’ll love it, it’s cool.

DVF Hearts Current/Elliott

Nike x Jun Takahashi & Undercover Lab I Gyakusou

TEAMWORK! A trio of designers are getting into the spirit of spring renewal with exciting new collaborations. Diane von Furstenberg is making her first foray into denim by partnering with hip L.A.-based company Current/Elliott. Together, as DVF Hearts Current/ Elliott, they’ve created a plethora of denim styles, from jeans to separates and even a denim wrap dress. All the pieces have been produced in DVF’s signature bold colorways and graphic floral patterns, making it that much easier to be in bloom this season. After hitting it out of the park with Versace last fall, H&M is teaming up with Italy’s queen of quirk, Consuelo Castiglioni of Marni. The Marni for H&M capsule collection of ready-to-wear and accessories includes reproductions of house signatures like full-pleated skirts, dresses, and cropped pants, and lest anyone worry that Castiglioni’s unique appeal was dampened by the H&M machine, there are polka dots and molded-plastic pieces aplenty to choose from. For the athlete, Undercover’s Jun Takahashi once again partners with Nike, this time to create his first-ever women’s running collection, Nike x Jun Takahashi & Undercover Lab I Gyakusou. Don’t be fooled by the wordy label. The sleek line of running gear and sneakers will be a runaway hit. Christopher Barnard

FASHIONABLE 50 This month the Council of Fashion Designers of America is celebrating its golden anniversary with an extensive exhibition at FIT and a glossy coffee-table book to match. Impact: 50 Years of the CFDA, is a double homage to the organization that has lent support to designers of every stripe. In turn, elder statesmen (think Calvin Klein, Oscar de la Renta, Geoffrey Beene), contemporary masters (Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Norma Kamali) and grateful newcomers (Proenza Schouler, Rodarte) are loaning what they believe is their most impactful piece for the exhibition (over 100 pieces in total). Each participant has contributed anecdotes, sketches, and photographs to a commemorative book, which will be published this Spring by Abrams Books, featuring further contributions from CFDA president Diane von Furstenberg, fashion critic Cathy Horyn, and FIT’s Patricia Mears. “Impact is really the story of how being a designer working in New York has changed in the last half century,” says CFDA CEO Steven Kolb, “moving from anonymous pattern- and dressmakers in the back rooms of shops to marquee names on 7th Avenue and eventually global brands.” On view until April 20th at the Museum at FIT, inspiration is sure to strike. Bring your sketchbook. CB

AMENITIES À LA ARMANI The latest jewel in Giorgio Armani’s increasingly diversified crown is the Armani Hotel Milano, situated in Milan’s fashionable Via Manzoni. The luxury digs quickly became a swank crash pad for the fashion pack during the Milan season, as evidenced by the recent men’s and women’s Fall fashion weeks. Elbow-rubbing aside, the most haute experience at the hotel is unquestionably the Armani Spa. There is a full gym and spa treatment facility on the premises, as well as a Thermarium, a chic Milanese take on a Roman bath. The hotel itself is situated above the Armani flagship store, with the spa, on the top floor, providing sweeping views of the ancient Milanese skyline. It’s the perfect respite for the world-weary traveler looking for a quiet and calming break from the runways, be it airport or fashion. CB 144

Flights – Anywhere But Where I Am (Self-Released) Two handsome boys in Nashville who call themselves Flights have created one of the year’s most gorgeously atmospheric records—gently strummed guitars and plaintive vocals wrapped around songs that spread out like a sunrise. M. Ward – A Wasteland Companion (Merge) Freed from the cutesy constraints of She & Him (his side band with Zooey Deschanel), M. Ward gets back to doing what he does best— heartbreak-tinged Americana gussied up by his beautiful guitar playing. Here We Go Magic – A Different Ship (Secretly Canadian) With a little help from Radiohead’s super-producer Nigel Godrich, Brooklyn’s Here We Go Magic has created an almost impossibly luminous record. Space-out jams suitable for making out and freaking out. Black Dice – Mr. Impossible (Ribbon) The granddaddies of freaktacular art noise return with a characteristically schizophrenic album of warped post-rock that is equal parts guitars, homemade samplers, and psychoses. This is music that will melt ice and cause flowers to bloom. Lower Dens – Nootropics (Ribbon, May) Baltimore’s Lower Dens get spooky on Nootropics— an album that explores the meeting of humans and technology by employing guitar sounds from old Cure albums and lyrics that might have been recorded at the bottom of the ocean. In a word, sublime. Expensive Looks – Dark Matters (Group Tightener) The brainchild of producer/musician Alec Feld, Expensive Looks sounds like the head-on collision of bigbeat house music and fuzzy psych rock—a freaky mélange of sounds suitable for soundtracking your next graveyard acid party. T. Cole Rachel


Carnet de bal Second skin teddy with shoulder-to-shoulder plunging neckline. Poplin foundation embellished with pieces of old and contemporary lace, dyed with an infusion of powder-rose and embroidered with beads. Body seconde peau décolleté d’une épaule à l’autre. Base de popeline rebrodée de pièces de dentelle ancienne et contemporaine, teintée d’une infusion rose-poudré et ornée de perles.

ZAHIA FOR V MAGAZINE

PHOTOGRAPHY KARL LAGERFELD

NYMPHETTE


En effleurant le cerisier Gown in illusion tulle strewn with cherry blossom leaves in chiffon and silk tulle and embroidered with Swarovski strass. Robe longue en tulle illusion jonchée de pétales de fleurs de cerisier en mousseline et tulle de soie rebrodé de strass Swarovski.

Mon abri coco Romantic flowing teddy where milk colored pin-tucked organza flounces float, embroidered with apricot blossoms. Body romantique et aérien où flottent des volants d’organza à plis religieuse couleur lait, rebrodés de fleurs d’abricotier.

VÉGÉTAL

HOUPPETTE


Folie bow Handcrafted corset entirely made of rose-cyclamen silk satin bows that fade to black. The back is hemmed with a giant black silk satin bow. Corset artisanal entièrement recomposé de noeuds en satin de soie cyclamen basculant vers un fondu de nœuds noirs. Le dos est ourlé d’un nœud géant en satin de soie noire.

Package Structured cyclamen silk satin teddy decorated with bows so as to resemble a gift. Body structuré en satin de soie cyclamen orné de nœuds pour un effet cadeau.

La caresse folle Dress in illusion tulle, delicately touched with powder puffs of powder-rose marabou duvet. Petite robe en tulle illusion subtilement parsemée de houpettes en duvet de marabout rose-poudré.

CADEAU


ZAHIA FOR V MAGAZINE

Parure complète avec soutien-gorge en corbeille composée de dentelle plissée, faux-cul et culotte tralala en popeline rebrodée de dentelles ancienne et contemporaine, teintée d’une infusion rose-poudré, puis ornée de perlée. Un immense nœud en satin de soie blanche vient ceinturer la taille.

ZAHIA.COM

Manicurist Any Errandonea for Chanel Prop Stylist Stefan Lubrina Retouching Ludovic d’Hardiville

Gourmandise impudique Complete ensemble with pleated-lace balconet bra, bustle and poplin tralala panty embellished with old and contemporary lace, dyed with an infusion of powder-rose and embroidered with beads. A giant white silk satin bow belts the waist.

MANICURIST ANY ERRANDONEA FOR CHANEL PROP STYLIST STEFAN LUBRINA RETOUCHING LUDOVIC D’HARDIVILLE

PHOTOGRAPHY KARL LAGERFELD STYLING BARBARA BAUMEL HAIR SAM MCKNIGHT MAKE UP EMMANUEL SAMMARTINO


ART CRAWL

ACTIVE BEAUTY Athletically charged looks—from striped nails to sopping wet ponytails—dominated the runways for Spring. Get a jump on the season’s sporty chic trend with winning new products like (from left) Essie Nail Polish in Navigate Her ($8, drugstore.com), Ole Henriksen Muscle Comfort Lotion ($28, olehenriksen.com), Deborah Lippmann Nail Polish in On the Beach ($16, deborahlippmann.com), Essie Nail Polish in No More Film ($8, drugstore.com), Davines Natural Tech Detoxifying Scrub Shampoo ($25, davines.com), Lancôme Color Design Eye Brightening All-In-One 5-Shadow & Liner in Vert Tendresse ($49, lancome-usa.com), Oribe Après Beach Wave and Shine Spray ($35, oribe.com), and Chanel Les Exclusifs Jersey Eau de Toilette ($110, chanel.com). Caitlin Gaffey Photography Junichi Ito

KEEP IT KHOL “I’m a makeup junkie,” confesses actress Felicity Jones, the face of Dolce & Gabbana’s new Khol Collection. “You never know when you’ll need that magenta lipstick!” Fortunately for the British beauty and self-proclaimed cosmetics hoarder, the complete Khol line includes a full range of smoldering options. Look for an eye-shadow quad in Femme Fatale, eye pencils in every come-hither shade, and decadently dark nail polishes. The overall feel of the collection is inspired by the golden age of Italian cinema, specifically Sophia Loren in Scandal in Sorrento. “The process of getting ready is very important,” Jones emphasizes. “Going from being you to being someone else. You see the change happen when you’re sitting in the makeup chair.” Sarah Cristobal

Like the concordance of mega-ar t events that occur every summer in Europe (Venice, Documenta, etc., overlapping with the ubiquitous Basel), there’s the occasional New York season where blank-ennials dominate. On February 15th the New Museum’s second triennial opens, and the Whitney Biennial commences on March 1st, so it will be a big month for new and not-so-new names alike. Though both shows seem to have a healthy dose of fresh blood this year, the New Museum Triennial, titled “The Ungovernables” and single-handedly curated by the museum’s Eungie Joo, has more. Thirty-four artists and groups not explicitly “younger than Jesus,” but quite young, constitute a cross-section of political art coming largely from countries outside European and North American art hubs: India (CAMP), Brazil (Cinthia Marcelle), Nigeria (Invisible Borders), and the Philippines (Gary-Ross Pastrana), among many others. The Whitney Biennial is, by contrast, ostensibly a show of American artists, curated by former gallery director Jay Sanders and the museum’s Elisabeth Sussman. Of the 51 artists selected (including Nicole Eisenman, Jutta Koether, and Nick Mauss), it’s notable that many are performing artists (Sarah Michelson, Alicia Hall Moran, and Jason Moran)—yes, that’s “ing,” not “ance”— and filmmakers (Kelly Reichardt, Luther Price). Inclusion of the latter group is largely a result of Thomas Beard and Light Industry’s Ed Halter having consulted with the curators on film and video this year. Frieze’s inaugural New York art fair planned for May is generating a lot of buzz, while March plays host to three veteran fairs: the Armory Show (March 8–11), at the cavernous Piers 92 & 94; the Art Dealers Association of America’s (ADAA) Art Show, at the tony/spooky Park Avenue Armory; and Independent New York (March 8–11), now in its third year, which will return to the former Dia building on West 22nd. Cross a couple oceans and Art Dubai is soon after, running from March 21 to 24. It’s grown into a major stop on the international art circuit, with 75 galleries from 32 countries. The fair’s Global Art Forum will kick off three days earlier a couple hundred miles down the Persian Gulf, in Doha (March 18–19), while the Sharjah Art Foundation’s annual March Meeting (March 17–19) will gather art worlders together for symposia and an ambitious exchange of ideas. Among the museum shows opening in April, Los Angeles’s Santa Monica Museum of Art will mount the first major show for the preeminent, bling-inspired portraitist Mickalene Thomas, on April 14, while on April 4 Tate Modern in London will open a patriotic show you may think has been done to death, but is, in fact, a first: a retrospective of Damien Hirst. Kevin McGarry

Slavs and Tatars, New Museum Triennial

Thom Anderson, Whitney Biennial

David Wojnarowicz, ADAA

Ma Ke, Art Dubai

Mickalene Thomas, Santa Monica Museum of Art

Damien Hirst, Tate Modern

TRAINING DAY Spring’s sneakers get less locker-room and more runway, with plenty of color and kick. See by Chloé (left, $220, chloe.com) high-tops are cool and a bit under the radar in chic, muted colors at just the right height. With the built-in platform, this one is not for the gym. We’ll call it après-hoops. Alejandro Ingelmo teamed up with inimitable colorist Chris Benz for a limitededition run of low-tops in pyschedelic and graphic patterns (center top and foreground, $375, special order, alejandroingelmo.com). These one-offs can be custom-colored via the Web and made to incorporate the fantastic prints Benz has used to great effect in his RTW collections—a match made in sneaker-snob heaven. And leave it to Marc by Marc Jacobs (right, $320, marcjacobs. com), to come up with a brilliantly bold take on the sneaker trend for Spring. It’s Roy G. Biv with a lift to guarantee you won’t lose them at the bottom of your workout bag. CB Photography Junichi Ito


loot

nothin but net

MESH ACCESSORIES ARE MAKING A RUN FROM THE COURTS TO YOUR CLOSET FOR SPRING Photography Vincent Gapaillard Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Set design Angela Campos (Stockland Martel) Photo assistant Rachel Brennecke Retouching Shin Ono (Pier 59 Digital Studios) Location Pier 59 Digital Studios Special Thanks Tony Jay

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From top left: Sandal Giuseppe Zanotti Design Cap Kenzo Shoe Dolce & Gabbana Bag Valentino


beauty

vision quest

LANCÔME’S NEW STAR SERUM SHARES A DELIGHTFULLY FAMILIAR NAME

Lancôme Visionnaire 1.7 oz. ($105)

Photography Junichi Ito Beauty Caitlin Gaffey 148

Photo assistant Kogo Araki

Whether or not Lancôme was trying to make the folks over here at Visionaire headquarters (V’s parent publishing house) blush remains to be seen, but when we heard about the beauty company’s new serum, we couldn’t help it. Engineered to mimic the self-healing properties of plants, Visionnaire contains an active ingredient, LR 2412, that is protected by a whopping 20 international patents. And while the components of this beauty-enhancing molecule may be a secret, the product’s skin-perfecting prowess is not. Upon first delivery, Visionnaire was found to be so adept at fading sunspots and shrinking pores that a legion of fans and Lancôme artistic director Aaron De Mey demanded it be supersized. “It feels hydrating and comfortable, and foundation and concealer blend seamlessly on top of it,” he says. A larger (1.7 oz) version was released in February. We love that Visionnaire is living up to its noble name.  


v-bay

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FROM THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL TO THE DOWNRIGHT BIZARRE, GET AN EYEFUL OF THE SEASON’S ECCENTRIC NEW EAR CANDY

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Photography Adrian Gaut Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

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1 Missoni, $720, 212.517.9339 2 Jil Sander, $420, Saks Fifth Avenue 3 Pamela Love, $255, net-a-porter.com 4 Alexis Bittar, $215, alexisbittar.com 5 Dolce & Gabbana, $445, dolcegabbana.com 6 Mawi, $632, mawi.co.uk 7 Salvatore Ferragamo, $540, 800.628.8916 8 Marni, $175, Neiman Marcus 9 Oscar de la Renta, $395, oscardelarenta.com 10 Jen Kao, $8,999 per earring, 212.239.6515 11 Tom Binns Design, $275, 917.475.1412 12 Prada, $540, prada.com 13 Alexis Bittar, $295, alexisbittar.com 14 Salvatore Ferragamo, $540, 800.628.8916 15 Versace, $525, 888.721.7219 16 Marni, $420, 212.343.3912 17 Valentino, $725, 212.772.6969 150


trophy club

WHETHER YOU’RE A VALEDICTORIAN OR A VARSITY GIRL, EXTRACURRICULAR ENSEMBLES ARE EXTRA-CHIC, THANKS TO SPRING’S STYLISH SPORTSWEAR Photography Benny Horne Fashion Catherine Newell-Hanson

Sissi wears Jacket Moncler Gamme Rouge Top Diesel Black Gold Shorts Stefanel Pants Hudson Jeans Sneakers Converse

Katryn wears Jacket Edun Sweatshirt Reed Krakoff Shirt Uniqlo Skirt Armani Exchange Sneakers New Balance Socks Falke 152

Kori wears Dress Bottega Veneta Jacket G-Star Sneakers Nike

Sissi wears Top Diane von Furstenberg Skirt McQ Sneakers Converse Socks Falke


Makeup Chiho Omae using Chanel Cosmetics (FRANKREPS) Hair Shin Arima using Redken (FRANKREPS) Models Sissi Hou, Katryn Kruger, Kori Richardson (IMG)

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Manicure Tracylee using Chanel Spring/Summer 2012 (Tim Howard Management) Prop stylist Christopher Stone Photo assistant Jake Jones Digital technician Luke Lanter (Capture This) Stylist assistant Alban Roger Makeup assistant Tomomi Kawaguchi Hair assistant Ryosuke Yamazaki Prop styling assistant Emilio Sanchez Production assistant Lorena Campillo Equipment Rental ROOT [PRODUCE] Location Poly Prep Country Day School, Brooklyn Special thanks David Higham

Kori wears Parka Burberry Prorsum Denim jacket J Brand/Christopher Kane Shirt Stefanel Shorts Marc by Marc Jacobs Hat Jil Sander Sneakers Adidas

Katryn wears Swimsuit Diesel Black Gold Jacket Ports 1961 Goggles Speedo

Sissi wears Jacket Versace Sweatshirt Guess Skirt VSP of Vespucci Sneakers Nike Socks Falke

Katryn wears Dress and shirt Jil Sander Navy Sweater Sonia Rykiel Sweater (around shoulders) Theyskens’ Theory Sneakers Adidas Socks Falke


look

holdin pattern

THE DESIGNERS BEHIND THREE OF THE MOST VIBRANT SPRING COLLECTIONS—SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, GUCCI, AND JIL SANDER—SHARE THEIR INSPIRATIONS Photography Miguel Reveriego Fashion Erika Kurihara

tropical florals

“I ENJOYED EXPLORING THE PLAYFUL AND GLOWING SIDE OF A WOMAN WHO THROWS HERSELF INTO THE JOYS OF SUMMER WITHOUT RESERVATION.” –MASSIMILIANO GIORNETTI, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Top and pants Salvatore Ferragamo 156


art deco

“LOUISE BROOKS AND NANCY CUNARD IN THE IMAGES OF MAN RAY. THE OPULENCE OF THE ERA OF HEDONISM. MIRROR EMBROIDERY RECALLING THE SKYSCRAPERS OF A METROPOLIS.” –FRIDA GIANNINI, GUCCI Jacket and bag Gucci Briefs Eres Garter Staerk Tights Wolford Shoes Walter Steiger Clutch Fendi

psychedelic prints

“NEON HIGHLIGHTS THE PAISLEY, MID-CENTURY REFERENCES AND LADYLIKE SHIFT DRESSES ARE RENEWED BY THESE INTENSE COLORS.” –RAF SIMONS, JIL SANDER Dress Jil Sander Bra Deborah Marquit

Makeup Ozzy Salvatierra (Streeters) Hair Peter Gray using Shu Uemura Art of Hair (TheCollectiveShift) Manicure Tracylee (Tim Howard Management) Models Alana Zimmer, Ondria Hardin (Ford NY), Alyona Subbotina (Marilyn) Prop stylist Jesse Kaufmann (The Magnet Agency) Photo assistants Lorenz Schmidl and Astrid Sterner Digital tech James Needham (Dtouch) Stylist assistants Ingrid Dufvander Hellberg and Nikki Igol Hair assistants Rie Hirabayashi and Rob Scott Manicure assistant Angel Williams Prop stylist assistant James Kendi Catering Monterone Retouching Dtouch Casting director Edward Kim (The Edit Desk) Special thanks Splashlight Studios, New York


powerhouse

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Special thanks Patrick Godbout, Hélène Barrette, Christian Gagnon, Amber Patton, Tammy Williams, Alisa Goler, Monica Abbott

FROM THE SWIMMING POOL TO THE STADIUM FIELD, NOBODY UNDERSTANDS THE ART OF COMPETITION LIKE PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES. IN THE SPIRIT OF THIS SUMMER’S OLYMPICS, WE ASK THREE CHAMPIONSHIP TEAMS TO TAKE US BEHIND THE SCENES OF THEIR WONDERFUL WORLD OF SPORTS. LET THE GAMES BEGIN!


canadian synchronized swim team Name of Team: Canadian Synchronized Swimming Senior National Team. Describe your team in three words: unified, fighters, and hard workers. What is the team’s favorite memory of competing or performing together? The Olympic qualification at the 2011 Pan American Games for the 2012 Olympic Games by winning the gold medal in the duet and team events. Where is the strangest place you’ve ever appeared together? We took part in a celebrity pit stop challenge at the 2010 Formula One Grand Prix in Montreal and we won! What is the most fun part of competing? Achieving our goals as a team. What is the hardest part of competing? It’s very physically demanding because of our competition schedule. Is there anyone not pictured who is integral to helping your team to victory? We have three great coaches: Julie Sauvé, head coach who is the heart of the team, and assistant coaches Meng Chen and Anastassia Goutseva who greatly complement her. Do you have any pregame or postgame rituals? We are praying to our mascot, the “synchro God,” before every event! Describe your schedule during an average training period. We train from 6:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday to Friday in the pool, including acrobatic

workshop. Then, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., we are doing weights and flexibility. Saturday, we train from 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. What can’t you compete without? Any strange equipment or products that we might not know? We could not compete without a nose clip, the most important piece of equipment in synchronized swimming. During competition, we keep spare nose clips in our swimsuits. Also, an underwater speaker is really important as it allows us to hear the music while we are swimming. If you could swim anywhere where would it be? In Canada, in our country and in front of our fans! Team Motto: make every day count! W.I.N. (What’s important now!) Opposite page, clockwise from top: Chloé Isaac, Stéphanie Doucher, Gabrielle Cardinal, Marie-Pier Boudreau-Gagnon, Valérie Welsh, Erin Wilson, Tracy Little, Geneviève Bélanger, Élise Marcotte, Jo-Annie Fortin, Stéphanie Leclair, Karine Thomas Photography Alexandre de Brabant


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chicago bandits Name of team: Chicago Bandits Describe your team in three words: hilarious, determined, fun. What is your team’s favorite memory of playing together? Winning the 2011 National Pro Fastpitch Championship and Opening Game at Rosemont Stadium. What is the strangest place you’ve ever appeared together? At a Taylor Swift concert. What’s the most fun part of competing? You never know what is going to happen! One game can be a no-hitter, and the next you can have a game-saving diving catch. There’s nothing more exciting than competing with and against the best women softball players in the world. What is the hardest part of competing? Staying healthy and injury-free. Also playing against top players on a daily basis can get frustrating at times, but there’s never time for a bad day. Is there anyone not pictured integral to leading your team to victory? Our owner, Bill Sokolis, is really good about keeping a positive, upbeat vibe in the organization, and our coaching staff does a great job preparing us for upcoming games. How does diet factor into your training? Most players eat light meals. High protein is always good, with some carbohydrates. The most important thing is to hydrate. Do you have a mascot? Yes, Outlaw is our mascot, the best mascot in the NPF! Describe your average schedule during the training period. We practice for two to three hours on the field, then we hit the gym for another two hours. On game days, we have a hit around in the morning followed by individual gym time and then games in the evening. What can’t you compete without? AbbottPro cleats from Adidas, they’re super comfortable when you’re spending hours and hours on the field. As an athlete it’s very important to take care of your feet! Some of us refuse to step on the field without our mouth guards. If you could play anywhere in the world, where would it be? In the Caribbean, at Wrigley Field, or else in our hometown stadium. Team motto: winning! Top row, from left: Alexis Jager, Jamee Juarez, Shannon Doepking, Dorian Shaw, Monica Abbott, Nikki Nemitz, Amanda Williams, Caitlin Lever, Rachel Folden, Tammy Williams Bottom row, from left: Amber Patton, Christine Knauer, Vicky Galindo, Kristen Shifflett, Alisa Goler, Taryne Mowatt, Megan Wiggins, Donna Bourgeois, Danielle Zymkowitz, Robin Thompson Photography Dina Kwit


u.s.a. women’s water polo Name: U.S.A. Women’s National Water Polo Team Describe your team in three words: competitive, strong, fun. What is the team’s favorite memory of competing together? The final game against Canada at the 2011 Pan American Games to qualify for the 2012 Olympics. We battled hard and won 27-26 after 20 rounds of shoot-outs! We are looking at 2012 as a platform to make history and earn the gold medal. Where is the strangest place you’ve ever appeared together? We haven’t been anywhere strange but we’ve played all over the globe. Our team has competed in China, Australia, Siberia, Italy, Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Mexico. What is the most fun part of competing? Being a part of something bigger than each of us as individuals makes the competition that much more exciting. What is the hardest part of competing? The ever-present chance of failure. Every athlete can admit to the demons in our heads—when you’re striving to be the best of the best, you may stumble on failure. Failure has been present throughout our experience, but we channel it to make ourselves stronger. Is there anyone not pictured who is integral to helping your team to victory? We have an inner circle and an outer circle. The inner circle, the players, needs the outer circle to be complete. Our outer circle consists of our coaches, trainer, manager, media, marketing, families, and fans. Do you have any pregame rituals? Before every game the team gets together and has coffee. How does diet factor into your training? We work with a sports dietician from the U.S. Olympic Committee to make sure we have a proper diet. Another big focus of our team is hydration and recovery. We like Powerbar gel bites or Nesquik chocolate milk, which is a great, all natural recovery drink. Do you have a mascot? Our official mascot is named Shieldy, a giant, animated version of our U.S.A. Water Polo logo that also appears as a cartoon in our magazine. Describe your schedule during an average training period. We practice six days a week with morning and afternoon sessions (except for Wednesdays and Saturdays). Sundays we have off. We will have been in full-time residential training for over a year in our lead-up to London. What can’t you compete without? Our teammates. If you could play anywhere, where would it be? Right here in the United States! When the opportunity arises to play in front of our friends and family it is always special. Back row, from left: Juliet Moss, Tanya Gandy, Betsey Armstrong, Lauren Wenger, Jessica Steffens, Elsie Windes, Heather Petri (in front) Middle row, from left: Melissa Seidemann, Maggie Steffens, Kelly Rulon, Annika Dries, Kami Craig (behind Dries), Sami Hill Front row, from left: Courtney Mathewson, Tumua Anae, Lolo Silver, Brenda Villa Photography Rick Rickman


POP’S HEAVY HITTER INEZ & VINOODH’S NEW MUSE LARA GETS DEFENSIVE A CATWALKING CATFIGHT STEPHANIE’S SCUBA STUNNER HIP-HOP’S BANKABLE NEW STAR GAME DAY WITH BAMBI BODYBUILDING WITH MARILYN MINTER NAOMI CAMPBELL TAKES ON TINA ON TRACK WITH CARLYNE MAD MEN’S BIG SHOT AEROBIC STYLE WORKOUT WEAR AND THE BEST OF SPRING FASHION 2012


the lady is a champ JENNIFER LOPEZ HAS BEEN DUKING IT OUT AS A POP CULTURAL FIXTURE SINCE HER EARLY DAYS AS A FLY GIRL. WITH A SLEW OF NEW PROJECTS IN THE WORKS—NOT TO MENTION A BUDDING ROMANCE WITH A MAN NEARLY 20 YEARS HER JUNIOR TITILLATING THE TABLOIDS—THE NEWLY SEPARATED MOTHER, MUSICIAN, AND MOGUL ADMITS THAT SHE’S LEARNED HOW TO TAKE A HIT OR TWO PHOTOGRAPHY MARIO TESTINO FASHION CARINE ROITFELD TEXT ROBIN GIVHAN 164


Jacket Alexander Wang T-shirt Calvin Klein Necklace David Yurman


Necklace David Yurman On skin, L’Oréal Paris Sublime Glow body moisturizer On eyes, L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Mascara in Carbon Black


“You’re not going to hit the target or the bull’s-eye every time. That’s part of it. At the end of the day, I made those choices. You have amazing moments of recognition and success. But at this point in my life, I try to take it all with a grain of salt.” –Jennifer Lopez

Jennifer Lopez—singer, actress, dancer, paid Fiat aficionado, warm and fuzzy American Idol judge, and unrepentant sparkle addict—has finally gotten on the line to chat about, among other things, her newest role as roving fairy godmother. This comes after no small number of cancellations and postponements, all in all taking weeks to fulfill this promised phone date. Then, just when I am close to giving up, she comes to the telephone with that sing-song voice that is all treble clef, grace notes, and whispers of the Bronx. She giggles. She’s chatty. I’m not quite willing to believe that her reputed diva past is fully over, but I’m willing to just let all the aggravation go. Grudge-holding is bad for the soul. Poof. Today’s newest facet of the Lopez oeuvre, that of international talent hunter, has had her (and her ex, Marc Anthony) visiting 21 Latin American countries searching for unheralded talent that might be tucked away in crowded cities, the rolling countryside, and tiny towns where the population can be counted in a few breaths. During their time on the road with fellow dream-maker and choreographer Jamie King, they collected promising musicians and street performers like so many live-action postcards. At the time that we speak, they’ve just put the finishing touches on the finale: a stage production featuring this panoply of Latin American talent. This glossy, just-finished product is, of course, Q’Viva: The Chosen, a glittery show for Univision in which American Idol meets an anthropology seminar on language and culture. It is meant to be instructive as much as entertaining. “There are so many differences in the Latin community. Someone from Mexico and someone from Puerto Rico have different foods, different traditions,” Lopez says. “There’s an education to be had. Even as I was going through the different countries, there were certain forms of music that I didn’t know about.” Lopez is chatting with me as she’s being hustled from Los Angeles, where she’s been promoting Q’Viva with Anthony, to Las Vegas, where she is taping her second season on American Idol. Let it be noted that her relationship with Anthony during their publicity tour has been civil—at least publicly. Their body language throughout the promotion period was open—complete with friendly hand-touching and smiles. There may have even been hugs. But lest anyone start thinking of a reconciliation, both have been igniting the Twitter-sphere with fulsome mini-messages about new paramours, each nearly 20 years their junior. Anthony has been sending virtual besos

to model Shannon de Lima while Lopez has been retweeting dancer Casper Smart’s missives about the meaninglessness of age in matters of the heart. “I mean, we’re parents and friends first,” she says with a smidgen of exasperation. “That will be the thread that ties us together. I don’t know if people expect it to be negative (Of course they do, Jennifer!) just because the [intimate] relationship didn’t work out.” The professional relationship, however, is chugging lucratively along. On Q’Viva, the dynamic is simple: “We defer to Marc when it comes to musicians,” she says. “When it comes to dance and showmanship, he defers to [King and] me.” Their other joint business venture—dual fashion collections for Kohl’s—is also on financial track, something that must surely give Lopez a special kind of satisfaction, as she recently noted that the failure of her first fashion endeavor in the early 2000s was one of her biggest career disappointments. “That was sad for me,” she told the New York Times last year. “I just felt like I never got a fair chance to do it right. And on top of it, I felt like I was trapped in a situation I couldn’t get out of, and my name was stamped on things that I didn’t believe in.” The past year has served as a kind of righting of Lopez’s rudder, an unveiling of a more of-the-people Lopez that has appealed to the masses and to Hollywood. Her first season on American Idol showed her to be an encouraging, often teary-eyed, mentor to aspiring singers. “One of the greatest by-products of this particular time is this new introduction of Jennifer Lopez to a community that’s always known her but had misconceptions about her,” her manager, Benny Medina, told USA Today. The release of her album Love? with its successful single “On the Floor” returned her to the dance clubs and provided her with a hit video. And her performance on the American Music Awards, wearing a body-revealing spangled catsuit, emphatically reminded everyone that the 42-year-old mother of twins was still quite hot and thus a valuable entertainment industry commodity. Suddenly, the memory of 2010’s not-very-good film The Back-up Plan was erased, along with a sequence of disappointing albums. “You’re not going to hit the target or the bull’s-eye every time. That’s part of it,” Lopez says. “At the end of the day, I made those choices. I’ve been in the business now, I don’t want to say how many years. You have amazing moments of recognition and success. But at this point in my life, I try to take it all with a grain of salt.”

Bodysuit Dolce & Gabbana Robe Everlast


T-shirt (customized by stylist) Emporio Armani Necklace David Yurman On eyes, L’OrÊal Paris Voluminous Smoldering Liner in Black


“I know how to fight! I can take a lot of punches and still keep going. I’ve been trained like a boxer to go 15 rounds.” –Jennifer Lopez

With Q’Viva there is a sense that this show is not just something that she is committed to professionally. It’s also a point of self-definition. The show underscores how she wants the public to view her—beyond her résumé of successful films such as The Wedding Planner and million-selling albums like J.Lo. In the trailer to Q’Viva, which shows Lopez and Anthony ensconced in private jets traipsing from one country to another, dancing in the streets and looking alternately agog and mesmerized, the head-turning beauty notes that the show allows her to proclaim: I am Latina and this is who we are. It’s a curious comment because so much of the Lopez mythology has always centered on her “Jenny from the Block” persona: the Latina girl from the Bronx made good. Her first starring role was in Selena. She has recorded in Spanish. And even her pop songs dabble in Latin rhythms. It has seemed all along that she’s been regularly declaring her heritage. It may be that those proclamations—in beats and cinematography—were never enough; they never matched the degree of importance she attached to being Latina. “It really defines you and makes you who you are. I tried to keep that close to my heart—what I learned growing up. It’s something that I love so much. When doing Q’Viva, it was kind of reinforcing that, showing how important it is to me and staying connected to that and showing my kids what that’s all about.” Now is a particularly fine time to celebrate her heritage. Culturally, socially, and politically, the topic of diversity is a significant part of the conversation in the public square. Lopez astutely avoids talking about the complex politics of immigration and the like. Instead, she lets the simple numbers make her point. The 2010 U.S. census revealed that the Hispanic population grew four times faster than the total population. As a group, Hispanics make up 16.3 percent of the U.S. population. “People realize the strength of the community because of the dollars and the numbers. They’ve always been trying to find a way to crack that because they see opportunity,” Lopez says. “They don’t know how to get in. But people were willing to listen and at the end of the day, as long as it transcends language to feeling, it doesn’t matter the ethnicity.” Inextricable from Lopez’s ethnic pride is her aura of toughness. Her ubiquitous Fiat advertisement plays up her street cred. It includes a sequence in which the car tools along through the streets of the Bronx as Lopez, in voiceover, waxes fondly about how that diverse and unyielding neighborhood fueled her creativity and made her strong. (There was, of course, the uncomfortable revelation that Lopez didn’t actually drive the car through

the Bronx. A body double did that; Lopez filmed her portion in Los Angeles. A busy fairy godmother can’t do everything.) There’s always been a little swaggering urban girl in her designer wardrobe—from the big, round-the-way gold hoop earrings to that famously plunging floral print Versace gown that was about one teasing millimeter away from street corner vulgarity. “I’ve always felt like a tough girl from the Bronx,” she says. “But I have a soft core.” That contradiction has always helped to distinguish her from the pack. Even at her most sexually provocative or breathily feminine, there’s always an undercurrent of aggressiveness, of fistpumping bravado. That duality was there during her in-your-face early days as a Fly Girl on In Loving Color. And it remains in evidence in her video for “On the Floor,” in which she gyrates center stage in a dance hall but also presides over the club from a balcony perch where a waitress pours her Crown Royal—neat. In that same video, she is also seen as the thugged-out girl in a dark hoodie climbing out of a BMW, who pauses in an alleyway to slip on a pair of Swarovski crystal earrings. One of her most memorable film successes was Maid in Manhattan, a reimagined, soft-focus Cinderella story. But she learned how to box for Money Train, one of her first films. And she studied krav maga for Enough. “I know how to fight!” she declares proudly. Lopez posed for a boxer-fighter-survivor photo shoot with Mario Testino for this magazine—a theme symbolic of her career of late. “I can take a lot of punches and still keep going,” she says. “I’ve been trained like a boxer to go 15 rounds.” When given her choice of groin protectors—those daunting don’t-mess-with-me-anatomical cups—in black (the men’s version) or red (the women’s), she preferred the men’s style. “I thought it was more graphic,” she says simply. Was it that straightforward, really? A woman in full-blown menswear even now has an added element of strength. A crossgender image in boxing garb suggests a heightened sense of self-assuredness, power, and swagger. “It did make me feel tougher,” she admits. Yet Lopez also wanted to have big, glamorous, curly hair. But no. Testino and Roitfeld advocated for a slicked-back, more masculine, more aggressive style. It will still be sexy, they assured her. It will still be very Jennifer Lopez. To see a video of this shoot go to vmagazine.com

Jacket Prada


Jacket and shorts Calvin Klein Collection Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design

Makeup James Kaliardos Hair Oribe for Oribe Salon Miami Beach Manicure Tom Bachik (Cloutier Remix) Prop stylist Bill Doig Tailor M’Lynn Hass Digital technician Christian Hogstedt (R&D) Photo assistants Aaron Thomas and Benjamin Tietge Stylist assistant Michaela Dosamantes Makeup assistant William Kahn Hair assistant Judy Erickson Production Jemima Hobson and Michelle Lu On-set production Erick Jussen (GE Projects) Production assistant Alexandra Nataf Videographer Keith Kendall (The Magnet Agency) Video Look Films Location Milk Studios, Los Angeles Catering Love Catering Retouching R&D Special thanks John Gayner, Maysa Marques, Pietro Birindelli, Charlotte Draycott, Shaun Murdock


Jacket Loewe Tank Alexander Wang Necklace David Yurman


pretty much everywhere EMBARK ON A SPIRITUAL AND SPORTING JOURNEY INTO THE GREAT WIDE OPEN WITH INEZ & VINOODH AS THEY INTRODUCE LOULOU TO THE WORLD BY DROPPING HER INTO LOCATIONS FROM THEIR ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS

PHOTOGRAPHY INEZ & VINOODH FASHION CARLYNE CERF DE DUDZEELE

Dress Dolce & Gabbana Earrings Alexis Bittar Bangles CCD’$H$T Shoes Manolo Blahnik 177


Dress Jeremy Scott Earrings, rings, cuffs Kenneth Jay Lane Shoes Manolo Blahnik Bag Patricia Field


Dress and jewelry Anna Sui Scarf and bag CCD’$H$T Shoes Manolo Blahnik


Jacket and hat Trash and Vaudeville Shirt Petit Bateau Jeans Dsquared Jewelry Kenneth Jay Lane Buckle CCD’$H$T Boots Frye


Jacket Daang Goodman for Tripp NYC Briefs Louis Vuitton Veil vintage from Early Halloween Jewelry Blumarine


Sweater Michael Kors Shorts Marc by Marc Jacobs Jewelry Kenneth Jay Lane Cap West Marine Shoes Manolo Blahnik

Makeup Wendy Rowe using Lancôme (Tim Howard Management) Hair Christiaan using Kiehl’s grooming aids Models LouLou (MC2 NY) and Andrés Velencoso Segura (Wilhelmina) Manicure Lena Naomi for Deborah Lippmann (The Magnet Agency) Prop stylist Sophia Rubio Arsenault Lighting technician Jodokus Driessen Digital capture Brian Anderson Photo assistant Joe Hume Stylist assistant Kate Grella Studio Manager Marc Kroop Makeup assistant Chisa Takahashi Hair assistant Yoko Sato Printing Box Location Pier 59 Digital Studios Special Thanks Tony Jay


et back, Dave wears Jacket and pants Tim Coppens Shoes Radii


stay back! NOTHING RUINS A PERFECT EVENING OUT QUITE LIKE AN ONCOMING ATTACKER. HERE, LARA STONE MODELS NOT ONLY THE FINEST COLLECTIONS OF THE SEASON, BUT ALSO THE KRAV MAGA DEFENSE MOVES UTILIZED BY THE ISRAELI ARMY. DON’T BE A VICTIM… PHOTOGRAPHY NICK KNIGHT FASHION CARINE ROITFELD

Lara wears Clothing Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Shoes (throughout) Prada 189


DEFENSE AGAINST BEAR HUG FROM BEHIND (ARMS FREE) Lara wears Clothing Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière Dave wears Jacket Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Church’s


DEFENSE AGAINST BAG SNATCH WITH CONTINUING ATTACKER WHO THEN SLAPS Lara wears Jacket and belt Alaïa Skirt Simone Rocha Briefs Carine Gilson Jewelry Harry Winston Bag Reed Krakoff Dave wears T-shirt Tim Coppens Jeans J Brand Shoes Sergio Rossi


DEFENSE AGAINST ARMS PINNED WHEN ON THE FLOOR Lara wears Sweater Céline Skirt Rick Owens Shrug Legeron Earrings Harry Winston Dave wears Sweatshirt Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Sergio Rossi


DEFENSE AGAINST CLOSE-RANGE KNIFE THREAT TO THE BODY (BEHIND THE ARM) Lara wears Shirt Equipment Cardigan and skirt Prada Earrings Moussaieff Dave wears Jacket Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Sergio Rossi


DEFENSE AGAINST CLOSE-RANGE KNIFE THREAT TO THE THROAT Lara wears Top Calvin Klein Collection Dress Salvatore Ferragamo Jewelry Moussaieff On skin, Estée Lauder Nutritious Vita-Mineral Moisture Crème Dave wears Jacket Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Sergio Rossi


DEFENSE AGAINST CIRCULAR SLAPPING ATTACK Lara wears Clothing Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Sunglasses Cartier Dave wears Clothing Tim Coppens


DEFENSE AGAINST BEAR HUG FROM THE FRONT (ARMS FREE) Lara wears Top, skirt, jewelry Chanel Bag Valentino Dave wears Jacket Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Church’s


DEFENSE AGAINST A STANDING OPPONENT WHEN ON THE GROUND Lara wears Top and skirt Calvin Klein Collection Belt Alexander McQueen Sunglasses Cartier Bag Tom Ford Dave wears Jacket Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Church’s


DEFENSE AGAINST SLAP Lara wears Dress Valentino Slip Carine Gilson Headpiece stylist’s own Dave wears Jacket and pants Tim Coppens Shoes Radii


DEFENSE AGAINST TWO-HANDED CHOKE FROM THE FRONT (AGAINST A WALL) Lara wears Clothing Louis Vuitton On eyes, Estée Lauder Double Wear Zero-Smudge Liquid Eyeliner in Black Dave wears Jacket Tim Coppens Watch his own


Makeup Petros Petrohilos (Streeters London) Hair Marc Lopez (Artlist) Model Lara Stone (IMG) Attacker Dave Slade, Instructor (Institute of Krav Maga U.K.) Krav Maga trainers Jonathan Bullock, Managing Director, Expert Level 1, and Magda Nikitczuk (Institute of Krav Maga U.K.) Manicure Marian Newman (Streeters London) Photo assistants Laura Falconer, Chloe Orefice, James Robotham, Robinson Barbosa, Jeff Yiu Digital capture Adam Ings Digital post Tom Wandrag at Epilogue Imaging Ltd Stylist assistant Michaela Dosamantes Stylist intern Romy Blanga Makeup assistant Louise O’neil Location Park Royal Studios, London Lighting by Direct and filmed on a Canon Special thanks to the Institute of Krav Maga U.K. for all their kind help and instruction, to Lara for her hard work both before and during the shoot

To see an exclusive video of this shoot go to vmagazine.com To see exclusive instructional videos of these defense positions go to SHOWstudio.com


DEFENSE AGAINST SLASHING KNIFE ATTACK (WITH KNIFE CONTROL AND TAKE DOWN TO DISARM) Lara wears Clothing Ralph Lauren Earrings Harry Winston On face, Estée Lauder Signature Satin Crème Blush in Coral Light Dave wears Sweatshirt Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Jeans J Brand Shoes Radii


sea more stephanie ALWAYS THE UNSUSPECTING TARGET OF A PAPARAZZO’S LENS DURING HER BEACH HOLIDAYS, STUNNING SUPERMODEL STEPHANIE SEYMOUR HAS NOTHING TO HIDE AS SHE SHOWS OFF HER IMPRESSIVE PHYSIQUE IN AN UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL SCUBA-INSPIRED SWIMWEAR SHOOT PHOTOGRAPHY SEBASTIAN FAENA FASHION CARLYNE CERF DE DUDZEELE

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Watch (Stephanie’s lower left) Michael Kors All other accessories (throughout) Scuba Network


Swimsuit Osklen


Bikini Y-3 On skin, NARS Cosmetics Balancing Toning Lotion


Swimsuit Speedo


Swimsuit DKNY


Swimsuit Eres

Makeup Lena Koro for NARS (Tracey Mattingly) Hair Esther Langham (Art + Commerce) Model Stephanie Seymour (IMG) Manicure Rica Romain (See Management) Photo assistants David Diesing and Carlos Ruiz Digital technician Annie Powers Stylist assistants Kate Grella, Alban Roger, Matthew Feniger Makeup assistants Maiko Kitamura and Phillip Nathaniel Sanders Hair assistant David Colvin Production Helena Martel Production assistants Spencer Morgan Taylor and Bianca Ambrosio Retouching Picturehouse Location Industria Superstudio, NYC


Swimsuit Michael Kors On eyes, NARS Cosmetics Cream Eyeshadow in Corfu


one in a million BUSTING OUT OF THE 212 WITH RAW RAP TALENT AND A STUNNING SINGING VOICE TO MATCH, AZEALIA BANKS ISN’T OUT TO TAKE ANYONE’S TROPHY—SHE’S HERE TO CHANGE THE GAME. GET READY TO BECOME OBSESSED WITH B-A-N-K-S

PHOTOGRAPHY INEZ & VINOODH FASHION NICOLA FORMICHETTI TEXT PATRIK SANDBERG 212


Top House of Etiquette Skirt Jeremy Scott Sleeves Tripp NYC Hat and ring Funky Bling by Year Zero Headband (on top of hat) Jennifer Behr On skin, M.A.C Cosmetics Mineralized Charged Water Face and Body Lotion On lips, M.A.C Cosmetics Lipstick in Black Knight Opposite page: Top House of Etiquette Skirt Jeremy Scott Gloves Sermoneta Gloves Earrings (throughout) Noir Jewelry


On hair, FrĂŠdĂŠric Fekkai Brilliant Glossing Sheer Shine Mist


Makeup Jeanine Lobell (Tim Howard Management) Hair Didier Malige for Frédéric Fekkai Manicure Lena Naomi for Deborah Lippmann (The Magnet Agency) Lighting technician Jodokus Driessen Digital capture Brian Anderson Photo assistant Joe Hume Stylist assistants Brandon Maxwell, Julien Alleyne, Hayley Pisaturo, Prince Franco Studio Manager Marc Kroop Printing Box Location Pier 59 Digital Studios Special Thanks Tony Jay

Catching up with Azealia Banks might run you ragged. Brought to V’s attention late last summer via a Russian social networking site, we made several attempts to get in touch with the 20-yearold Harlem rapper and singer to little avail. When teased that she’s tougher to get ahold of than Britney Spears, she laughs. “I’m usually at home, in the studio, or at a photo shoot,” she reasons. “I don’t go out. When NME said I was the coolest artist of 2011, I was like really? I’m not that cool. I, like, read my Kindle and eat sushi rolls and hang out with my boyfriend. I stay home and play with my cat.” There’s also a brand new record deal with Universal Music, the ink on which has barely dried at the time of our conversation. “They offered me a deal! And I got a lawyer,” she says. “It’s happening.” A week earlier, she had charmed everyone on the set of her V shoot, including photographers Inez & Vinoodh and style mastermind Nicola Formichetti. The magnitude of her connection with the latter is evidenced by what immediately followed: she joined him in Paris to debut a track at his Mugler menswear show and days later he directed her second music video—his first—for the song “Liquorice.” (In between, Banks managed to squeeze in a private performance at Karl Lagerfeld’s house.) For Formichetti, it marks the most significant artist collaboration since his work with Lady Gaga. ”I love Azealia because we have the same birthday,” he says. “Double Gemini!”

By all accounts, it feels like Azealia Banks is the only girl in the world. Just don’t say it to her face. “Ew,” she replies. “I feel so weird when people say things to me like that because it’s just hype. I never want to be concerned with popularity. I am more concerned with making consistently good music.” If catching up with Banks in person proves to be difficult, just imagine trying to keep up with her verbal flow. Her rapidfire, crystalline raps are astounding in their elasticity, punctuated with clever puns, one-liners, and taunting, confrontational raunch. Sex, realness, and power are trending on her breakout single “212,” which announces at the start, “I can be the answer,” before proclaiming at the close, “What you gon’ do when I appear/ W-When I premiere/ Bitch the end of your lives are near/ This shit been mine, mine!” In between lies roughly three minutes of entrancing rhythm (courtesy of producer Lazy Jay) and unclockable verses, interrupted by an unexpected bridge that spotlights Banks’s showstopping singing voice. There’s a price to pay for such a rapid ascent, and Banks is well aware of her critics. “Everyone’s a racist at the end of the day,” she says bluntly. “I had some random girl on Twitter say ‘Can you just stick to the raunchy raps?’ and I retweeted her to call her out. You know, we’re black, we’re white, we’re whatever, but we all have hearts, lungs, and genitals. We feel the same things. Music is music. Why not pull from the places and the

things that you like to mix it all together and create something new? A lot of people think that rapping is easy but it isn’t, it takes a lot of mental work.” Banks’s defiance toward genre has attracted a diverse fanbase that appreciates her varied musical inclinations (many were surprised to discover her ballad cover of “Slow Hands” by Interpol on YouTube, but its approval rating is resting at a solid 96 percent). That, or her talent is so colossal that it’s tough not to give credit where credit is due. One thing Azealia is keen to make clear is that she isn’t just another rap chick. When it comes to role models, “I don’t have any,” she says, “except maybe Missy Elliott because she is so loved and respected. Everything she puts out is of such quality. To see that is really inspiring.” Could a collaboration with Missy be on the horizon? At the pace Banks is moving, it doesn’t seem far-fetched. She’s already collaborated with Machinedrum and Paul Epworth, and now that she’s been validated by the fashion industry, it’s tough not to see her as bankable. “It’s been really incredible as a person who does not come from fashion, suggesting something I want to do to Nicola and him saying ‘Oh my God, that’s amazing!’ It gives me the best feeling, like, really?! Maybe I know more than I think.” Jeans 7 For All Mankind Jacket Banks’s own For a video from this shoot, go to vmagazine.com


playin the field

THERE’S NO PENALTY FOR BEING A PRETTY DISTRACTION. A GAMINE BEAUTY IN THE SEASON’S LADYLIKE SEPARATES CAUSES A COMMOTION AMONG THE MOST ARDENT OF ENGLISH FOOTBALLERS PHOTOGRAPHY ALASDAIR MCLELLAN FASHION JONATHAN KAYE

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Jacket Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière T-shirt Maison Martin Margiela Skirt Sonia Rykiel Shoes Manolo Blahnik Bag Prada All uniforms (throughout) player’s own


Jacket Patrik Ervell Top Louis Vuitton Skirt Hermès Shoes and socks Marc Jacobs Bag Maison Martin Margiela


Clothing, shoes, socks Marc Jacobs Bag Prada Roman wears Turtleneck Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière Pants Maison Martin Margiela Shoes Church’s


Top Pringle of Scotland On nails, Chanel Le Vernis in Black Pearl


Jacket and bag Prada Top Sunspel Skirt Miu Miu


Jacket Stella McCartney Sweater Sunspel Roman wears Turtleneck Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière Pants Maison Martin Margiela Ryan wears Turtleneck Hermès Jacket Prada


Jacket Rochas Top Proenza Schouler Skirt Burberry Shoes and socks Marc Jacobs Bag Prada


Sweatshirt Louis Vuitton Bag Maison Martin Margiela On eyes, M.A.C Cosmetics Fluidline in Blacktrack Ryan wears Turtleneck Hermès Jacket Prada


Jacket and skirt Loewe Top Louis Vuitton Bag Maison Martin Margiela


Manicure Sophy Robson using Chanel (Streeters) Photo assistants Gareth Powell, Simon Bremner, Lex Kembery Stylist assistant Max Ortega Govela Makeup assistant Louise McCarthy Production Ragi Dholakia Productions Production assistants Alison Tanner and Tim Clifton Green Retouching Picturehouse Special thanks Doncaster Rovers FC; David Morris, Chief Executive; Mickey Walker, Director of Football; Andrew Watson

Makeup Lucia Pica using M.A.C Cosmetics and SkinCeuticals (Art Partner) Hair Syd Hayes using Redken (Premier Hair and Makeup) Models Bambi Northwood-Blyth (Ford NY), Roman Shabodalov, Ryan Coffey


Sweater Céline On lips, M.A.C Cosmetics Lipstick in Beach Sand


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Makeup James Kaliardos Hair Oribe for Oribe Salon Miami Beach Models Adriana Lima (Marilyn), Doutzen Kroes (DNA), Rob Evans (NEXT) All beauty on Doutzen, L’Oréal Paris All beauty on Adriana, Victoria’s Secret Beauty Manicure April Foreman (The Wall Group) Prop stylist Bill Doig Tailor M’Lynn Hass Digital technician Christian Hogstedt (R&D) Photo assistants Aaron Thomas and Benjamin Tietge Stylist assistant Brandon Maxwell and Sophia Phonsavahn Makeup assistant William Kahn Hair assistant Judy Erickson Hair colorist Anthony Palermo (anthonyleonardsalon.com) Production Jemima Hobson and Michelle Lu On-set production Erick Jussen (GE Projects) Production assistant Alexandra Nataf Videographer Keith Kendall (The Magnet Agency) Video Look Films Location Milk Studios, Los Angeles Catering Love Catering Retouching R&D Special thanks John Gayner, Maysa Marques, Pietro Birindelli, Charlotte Draycott, Shaun Murdock

See a video of this shoot at vmagazine.com


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Shoes Cesare Paciotti Jewelry (on floor) Alexis Bittar, (on shoes) David Yurman


Dress Guess Bracelet (worn as necklace, top) Versace Necklace (bottom) Miu Miu Michelle’s left, from left: Ring Versace Bracelets Miu Miu and David Yurman Michelle’s right, from left: Bracelets David Yurman, Gucci, Versace Ring Dior Haute Joaillerie On nails, Chanel Le Vernis in Apri

bodybuildin with marilyn

WHAT’S BIG, SHINY, AND PERFECTLY CUT? IF YOU GUESSED THIS SEASON’S STUNNING JEWELRY, YOU’RE ONLY HALF CORRECT. HERE ARTIST MARILYN MINTER ENLISTS FEMALE BODYBUILDER MICHELLE FALSETTA TO GIVE BIG SPRING BLING A RUN FOR ITS MONEY PHOTOGRAPHY MARILYN MINTER FASHION DEREK BLASBERG 241


Shoes Tom Ford Ring (far left and middle foreground) Dior Haute Joaillerie Ring (middle background) Harry Winston Ring (far right) Alexis Bittar Rings (background) John Hardy Earrings (foreground) and necklaces (on ankles and floor) Bulgari


Makeup James Kaliardos Hair Fernando Torrent using Leonor Greyl (L’Atelier NYC) Manicure Alicia Torello (The Wall Group) Set design Matt Jackson (Brydges Mackinney) Photo assistant Johan Olander Lighting technician Chris Parsons Stylist assistant Alban Roger Makeup assistant William Kahn Set design assistant Johnny Sazko Equipment rental ROOT [PRODUCE] Retouching Sharon Cohen (iPrint, inc.)

Tank Nike Bracelets, from left: David Yurman, Harry Winston, Tom Ford, Gucci, and David Yurman On back, from top: Necklaces Tom Ford, Harry Winston, Bulgari On hair, Leonor Greyl Condition Naturelle


private dancer FRINGED FROCKS AND ROCK-AND-ROLL WORTHY MINIDRESSES ARE SIMPLY THE BEST PIECES FOR NAOMI CAMPBELL AS SHE STYLISHLY EMBODIES THE GREAT TINA TURNER PHOTOGRAPHY DANIELE + IANGO FASHION JOANNE BLADES Dress Gucci On lips, Topshop Lips in Rumor Has It 244


Swimsuit Calvin Klein Leather fringed top Bliss Lau Bracelet (right) Michael Schmidt Bracelet (left, worn throughout) Campbell’s own Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design


Skirt (worn as dress) Marc Jacobs On skin, NARS Cosmetics Pressed Powder in Mountain


Dress Blumarine Metal mesh glove Philippe Audibert Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design


Dress Ralph Lauren Collection Cuffs Philippe Audibert On eyes, Chantecaille Lasting Eye Shade Powder in Smokey Topaz


Hair Luigi Murenu for John Frieda Makeup Hannah Murray (Art + Commerce) Model Naomi Campbell (Marilyn) Manicure Rica Romain using Chanel (See Management) Photo assistants Matt Roady and Anna Bellati Stylist assistants Jessica Bobince and Connie Berg Makeup assistant Aya Komatsu Hair assistants Gonn Kinoshita and Mari Watase Manicure assistant Markita Ferguson Tailor Belkis Soto (Christy Rilling Studio) Digital imaging Lorenzo Irico (Baby Grand Studio) Special thanks The Space Inc., New York

Top vintage Versace from Resurrection Briefs Calvin Klein Underwear Belt with long fringe vintage Christian Lacroix from Resurrection Bangles Cartier Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design


Jacket Tripp NYC Sweatshirt and headband Adidas Hat Y-3 Scarf Trash and Vaudeville Cuffs (both arms), ring, earrings Kenneth Jay Lane Bag and flower cuff (right arm) Chanel

Jacket Tripp NYC Sweatshirt American Apparel T-shirt Adidas Cap and armbands Y-3 Sunglasses Ray-Ban Earrings Alexis Bittar Scarf Trash and Vaudeville Shoes Manolo Blahnik Bag (on hip) Chanel Bag (on arm) Adidas

Sweatshirt American Apparel T-shirt Comme des Garรงons Sunglasses and bag Chanel Hoop earrings Alexis Bittar Watch Rolex Daytona

Jacket RLX Ralph Lauren Sequin top Tripp NYC Hat Adidas Shoes Manolo Blahnik All jewelry Kenneth Jay Lane

Manicure Rica Romain (See Management) Photo assistants David Diesing and Carlos Ruiz Digital technician Annie Powers Stylist assistants Kate Grella, Alban Roger, Matthew Feniger Makeup assistants Maiko Kitamura and Phillip Nathaniel Sanders Hair assistant David Colvin Production Helena Martel Production assistants Spencer Morgan Taylor and Bianca Ambrosio Retouching Picturehouse Location Industria Superstudio, NYC

Jacket, necklace, bag Chanel Sweater Michael Kors Hat and gloves Y-3


HOW TO WEAR TRACK PANTS À LA CARLYNE

STYLE LESSON #1: HOW TO WEAR YOUR ADIDAS TRACK PANTS FROM MORNING TO NIGHT

PHOTOGRAPHY SEBASTIAN FAENA FASHION CARLYNE CERF DE DUDZEELE

Track pants (throughout) Adidas Sweatshirt Adidas Sunglasses Ray-Ban Scarf, bag, bracelets Hermès Watch Rolex Daytona

Makeup Lena Koro for NARS Cosmetics (Tracey Mattingly) Hair Esther Langham (Art + Commerce) Model Maryna Linchuk (Ford Women)

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STYLE LESSON #2:

KEEP IT CHIC AND SPORTY IN CHANEL Manicure Honey (Exposure, NY) Set design Anthony Asaro (11th Street Workshop) Digital capture Luke Lanter (Capture This) Light design Erik Lee Snyder and PJ Spaniol III Stylist assistants Kate Grella, Katelyn Gray, Maddie Raedts Makeup assistants Aya Komatsu and Maiko Kitamura Hair assistants Judy Erickson and Kevin Apple Colorist Anthony Palermo Set design assistants Mark Lockard and Kristina Vazquez Production Helena Martel Production assistants Spencer Morgan Taylor, Gonzalo Romero, Jean-Charles Schildknecht Casting Natalie Joos Casting assistant Andrea Nina Retouching Picturehouse Catering Better Being and Nuela Location Fast Ashleys Studio, Brooklyn

, S Y A S E N Y L R CA “C’EST TOUT ” E M I A ’ J E U Q CE


Clothing, bags, shoes Chanel

Makeup Lena Koro for NARS Cosmetics (Tracey Mattingly) Hair Oribe for Oribe Salon, Miami Beach Models Anais Mali, Cora Emmanuel (Ford Women), Chrishell Stubbs (Supreme), Melodie Monrose (Silent Models), Marihenny Pasible (NY Models)


the bi shot HOLLYWOOD’S RESIDENT BUXOM BEAUTY CHRISTINA HENDRICKS BRACES HERSELF FOR A NEW SEASON OF TV’S BELOVED BLOCKBUSTER MAD MEN. BUT BY TAKING AIM AT ICONIC AND OFFBEAT ROLES, THE SEX SYMBOL SHOWS US SHE’S SETTING HER SIGHTS HIGHER THAN EVER PHOTOGRAPHY CEDRIC BUCHET FASHION CLARE RICHARDSON TEXT MARK JACOBS 254


Christina wears Top Diane von Furstenberg Skirt Balmain Shoes (throughout) Gio Diev Opposite page: Jacket Azzaro Dress Burberry Gloves LaCrasia


“Oh, I can totally go unnoticed. I ran around all day today. Not a mention,” insists Christina Hendricks, star of AMC’s 1960s period series Mad Men. “In Los Angeles you know the neighborhoods where you’re more likely to get noticed. And then you probably put on lipstick.” It’s difficult to accept that after four seasons of embodying Joan Harris (née Holloway)—the efficient, famously voluptuous office manager who thanklessly presides over Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce wearing a parade of wiggle dresses—Hendricks could still enjoy anonymity. Fans will surely be looking for her when Mad Men returns on March 25th, eager to discover more about her character’s unexpected pregnancy. “It probably surprised a lot of people. It certainly surprised me,” she says. “Joan certainly has motherly instincts—at least in a bossy way.” Hendricks is more savvy now than she was when Mad Men introduced its distinctive brand of cerebral, obsessively art-directed drama. For example, she no longer turns black-and-blue from wearing her character’s restrictive girdles and garters. “Now I put moleskin underneath the rubber so it doesn’t rub against my skin,” she says. “I still get a little bruised up, but I’m learning the tricks of the trade.” Born in Knoxville, Tennessee, Hendricks landed her first consequential role in 1999 on MTV’s teen soap Undressed—a Skins precursor that served as a Mickey Mouse Club for maturing

young actors (“Most people in Los Angeles have that on their résumé,” the multiple Emmy-nominee explains with a laugh). She played a college student named Rhiannon who crashes at her aunt’s house with a rapper she meets at a bus station (YouTube can fill in the rest). “I used to play characters more naïve than Joan, who is so sophisticated and...not jaded, but worldlier,” she says. “I’ve definitely learned from playing a character that is so confident and resilient.” Which is not to say that during her rise to fame the radiant natural blonde did not receive her share of industry-issued validation. She can share a proper fashion anecdote dating to her time modeling in the mid ’90s, like walking in a Hussein Chalayan show or inspiring a young Karen Elson to dye her hair a career-boosting red. But because of her work on Mad Men, Hendricks now commands red carpets—and has even orchestrated some bonafide Hollywood bombshell moments, like at the 2011 Golden Globe Awards when she lost an $850,000 bracelet on loan from Chopard, and after an event worker found the ornament and returned it to her, pleaded with security to allow her to leave the auditorium and deliver it to her publicist for safekeeping, whereupon the guard watched as Hendricks pulled the 124 carats of platinum-set diamonds out of her acclaimed cleavage and passed them to her rep through a crack in the door. Bull’s-eye. “I couldn’t put it in my purse,”

“In Los Angeles you know the neighborhoods where you’re more likely to get noticed. And then you probably put on lipstick.” –Christina Hendricks

Jacket Nicole Miller Dress Dolce & Gabbana Belt Versace


Coat Vintage Jean Paul Gaultier from Albright Fashion Library Dress Nicole Miller Belt Burberry Ring David Yurman


Hendricks explains. “Have you seen how tiny those little handbags we all carry are?” But if her primary public persona is a glamorous throwback, Hendricks also makes choices that reveal an endearing playfulness. In the past several years, she has donned a motion-capture suit to star in Need For Speed: The Run, an installment in a massive racing-simulator-video-game franchise; judged an episode of Top Chef Masters (with her husband, actor Geoffrey Arend); appeared as a Latisse spokeswoman for a special project to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation (“I have long, beautiful lashes right now,” she says); and is currently the voice of the Baskin-Robbins “Flavortising” campaign (“I’ve always been a butter-pecan girl”). She has also admitted to enjoying a drive in her PT Cruiser and, it should be noted, appeared twice as Saffron, a seductive outer-space con artist, on Joss Whedon’s 2002 short-lived but slavishly followed Firefly (fanboys never forget). Her brief, scene-stealing turn in last year’s Drive—as Blanche, the shifty stripper with strategically questionable styling—verged on iconic, but in a very different way than Joan does. “The idea was that she kind of look a little terrible. We chose makeup colors that were just a little bit off, lipstick that was a little too purple and colored my hair a pinkish magenta. You’re never going to catch me wearing an acid-wash hoodie any other time,”

she laughs. Perhaps Hendricks will approach director Nicolas Winding Refn about a prequel spin-off to further showcase the character? “It would have to be a prequel, wouldn’t it?” she says playfully (that’s a spoiler). “The second Nicolas calls, I’ll do whatever he asks me to do. So if he wants to do a prequel for poor Blanche, I’d love it.” Moving forward, the woman with her own Mad Men Barbie doll will play a chirpy stepmother in the coming-of-age comedy Struck By Lightning, the feature screenwriting debut of Chris Colfer (Kurt on Glee). Then Hendricks plays her first serious mother role in Bomb, a drama from writer-director Sally Potter (Orlando), set in the ’60s in working-class London, against a backdrop of sexual revolution and nerves about nukes. Hendricks joins Elle Fanning (as her politically rebellious daughter), Annette Bening, Alessandro Nivola, and Alice Englert (daughter of director Jane Campion). “She really wants to make a special piece of art,” Hendricks says of Potter. “It’s so rare that you get to rehearse and actually be creative with a film. It feels like doing a play and a movie at the same time.” “It’s amazing to even get these opportunities,” she continues. “I didn’t have them before Mad Men—it opened up so many doors. I feel like a kid in a candy store and I want to try everything.”

Jacket Void Of Course Top Dolce & Gabbana Pants Giorgio Armani Makeup Vanessa Scali for NARS Cosmetics (Tracey Mattingly) Hair Jen Atkin (The Wall Group) Manicure Elisa Wishan Set design Philipp Haemmerle Photo assistants Alex Salle de Chou and Mark Luckasavage Digital technician Ludovic Nicolas Stylist assistant Ronald Burton Set design assistant Danny Diamond Production (New York) Tina Preschitz (Nex9 Productions) Production assistants Zein Zubi and Chelsea Sillars (Nex9 Productions) Production (Los Angeles) Joy Asbury Productions On-set producer Wonder Serra (Joy Asbury Productions) Equipment rental Smashbox Studios, Los Angeles Catering Love Catering Special thanks BOXeight Studios, Los Angeles


Jumpsuit Patrick Ervell Bra Kiki de Montparnasse Ring David Yurman


what a feelin !

ACTIVEWEAR GETS A SERIOUS WORKOUT WITH HANAA BEN ABDESSLEM, THE GLAMOROUS NEW FACE OF LANCÔME. THIS IS HIGH-ENDURANCE HIGH FASHION. NOW SWEAT PHOTOGRAPHY BENJAMIN ALEXANDER HUSEBY FASHION JAY MASSACRET Top Lanvin Tank Nike Sportswear Headband (throughout) Y-3 260


Sweater ChloĂŠ Bra Issey Miyake Shorts Nike Sportswear Shoes Nike


Sweater Comme Comme Bra Calvin Klein Performance On eyebrows, Lancôme Modele Sourcils Brow Groomer On cheeks, Lancôme Blush Subtil in Shimmer Tamarind


Sweatshirt Marc Jacobs Pants Emporio Armani Shoes Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière


Sweatshirt Céline Bra Issey Miyake Shorts Y-3 Sneakers Balenciaga by Nicolas Ghesquière On legs, Lancôme Hydra Fraichelle Invigorating Body Moisturizer


Makeup Ayami Nishimura (Julian Watson Agency) Hair Christian Eberhard (Julian Watson Agency) Model Hanaa Ben Abdesslem (IMG)

Photo assistants Rasmus Jensen and Henri De Carvalho Digital operator Dimitri Ramazankhani Stylist assistants Olivia Kozlowski and Frederic Chane Production Ruth Adams (REP Ltd) Lighting Equipment RVZ Equipment rental SALA Production Retouching Postmen Special thanks 1112/Garage Redele & Compagnie Paris and Lucinda at JN

Top Stella McCartney Top (underneath) Issey Miyake Shorts Thomas Tait


Turn the kettle on Jumpsuit Yves Saint Laurent Bracelet Cartier Wristbands (throughout) Tim Coppens Gloves Carolina Amato Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design

she better work (out)

DON’T HAVE TIME TO CHANGE FOR THE GYM? DON’T FRET. SPRING’S CHIC AND MINIMALIST LOOKS ARE MADE FOR FLEXING YOUR FASHIONABLE MUSCLES PHOTOGRAPHY SHARIF HAMZA FASHION TOM VAN DORPE


Pump it up Dress (worn as top) and skirt Burberry Prorsum Bracelet Cartier Gloves Carolina Amato On eyes, Chanel BeautĂŠ Ombre Essentielle in Black Star 267


Get a leg up on the competition Top and Pants Giorgio Armani Shoes Cesare Paciotti Bracelet Cartier Gloves Carolina Amato


Don’t be a dumbbell Top Lanvin Bracelet Cartier On lips, Chanel Beauté Rouge Coco Shine in Candeur


Get a grip Jacket, shirt, pants Dior Bracelet and Ring Cartier Shoes Giuseppe Zanotti Design Belt stylist’s own

Makeup Romy Soleimani for Chanel BeautĂŠ (Management Artists) Hair Akki Model Lily Donaldson (IMG) Manicure Markita Ferguson (See Management) Set design Lou Asaro (11th St. Workshop) Digital capture Drew Doggett (BLANK [DIGITAL]) Photo assistants Matthew Hawkes and Myles Blankenship Stylist assistants Maddie Raedts and Nathan Simpson Makeup assistant Mari Susuda Hair assistant Takayoshi Tsukisawa Set design assistant Leis Nelson Production assistant Bianca Ambrosio Equipment rental ROOT [PRODUCE] Retouching BLANK [POST] Location Brooklyn Barbell Club


Stop waisting your time Dress Jil Sander Gloves Carolina Amato On skin, Chanel BeautĂŠ Hydramax Plus Active Serum Moisture Boost


v-buy

album

Yigal Azrouel Playa Negra, Costa Rica, Summer 2011

Erin Wasson Texas, 1997

Giancarlo Giammetti Gstaad, Switzerland, 2007

Stella McCartney Sussex, England, 2003 Tyson Ballou Texas, 1991

Cynthia Rowley Montauk, NY, 2011

Tinsley Mortimer Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy Bradenton, FL, 1994 Valentino Garavani Gstaad, Switzerland, 2007

Michael Kors New York City, 1964

where were you... playing sports?

Tory Burch St. Moritz, Switzerland, 2010

Kelly Klein Wellington, FL, 2009

FASHION FOLKS DON’T JUST STRETCH THEIR LEGS AT THE COLLECTIONS. FRIENDS OF V SUBMIT THEIR FAVORITE ATHLETIC MOMENT FROM THE SLOPES OF GSTAAD TO THE SURF OF COSTA RICA V IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF V MAGAZINE LLC. COPYRIGHT © 2012 V MAGAZINE LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN U.S.A. V (BIPAD 96492) IS PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY BY V MAGAZINE LLC. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: 11 MERCER STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SPEEDIMPEX 35-02 48TH AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY, NY 11101. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, AND ADJUSTMENTS, PLEASE CONTACT SPEEDIMPEX 35-02 48TH AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY, NY 11101, TEL. 800.969.1258, E-MAIL: SUBSCRIPTIONS@SPEEDIMPEX.COM. FOR BACK ISSUES CONTACT V MAGAZINE, 11 MERCER STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL. 212.274.8959. FOR PRESS INQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT ANUSCHKA SENGE AT SYNDICATE MEDIA GROUP TEL. 212 226 1717

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V76 THE SPORTS ISSUE  

Game on!

V76 THE SPORTS ISSUE  

Game on!