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STORIES OF DESIGN ACROSS ALL MEDIA

1871 Dairy:

S P R I N G 2 0 17

Requiem for Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow

Pushing the Envelope Skating at the Edge

of a Media Blitz

Walt Disney:

Celebrating the Man Behind the Mouse

Our Clients, Ourselves Everything You Need to Succeed Vectors, Visions & 5ive Minute Logos


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FROM THE EDITOR PUBLISHER

Everything Old Is Cool Again! Retro is all the rage this spring, starting with our cover story on Rule29’s subtly stylish packaging and promotion for 1871 Dairy (page 28). Real glass milk bottles and a logo that pays tribute to Mrs. O’Leary’s poor scapegoated cow (now there’s a combination) come together to make us feel like it’s the

Visual Media Alliance EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Sabine Lenz MANAGING EDITOR

Clay Hamilton EDITOR

Aaron Berman

1940s all over again. The consistent black-and-white branding is smart, sassy

COPY EDITOR

and particularly appealing in a multicolor world.

Marisa Solís

Those monochrome sensibilities are also at the heart of the cross-media promotions Juice Design used to bring professional skateboarding to life for the marketing of the documentary Away Days (page 24). Shirts, tickets, scarfs and an exciting, photo-packed book give you the feel of the wind in your hair and the vibrating board beneath your feet–you can practically hear the ’80s-era security guard yelling at you to scram before he calls the police. Good times. And no trip to the past would be complete without a visit to a beloved childhood institution or in this case, the author of one: Walt Disney. Design firm 300FeetOut did wonders by not only redesigning the website for San Francisco’s Walt Disney Family Museum but also crafting outdoor advertising, too– all without using images of his most famous creations! (Find out why on page 12). Cooking up some cross-media wonders and delights of your own? Please don’t keep them to yourself– drop me a line at editor@vmastoryboard.com and let me know all about them!

SABINE LENZ, editor-in-chief

editor@vmastoryboard.com

ART DIRECTOR

Jane Tracy PRODUCTION ARTIST

Jane Tracy ADVERTISING SALES

Jim Frey jfrey@vma.bz 415-271-0714 Shannon Wolford shannon@vma.bz 415-710-0568 Storyboard is a professional journal published for the cross-media communications industry: advertising, marketing, design, print, Web, photography, illustration and paper. © 2017 by Storyboard magazine. All rights reserved. Contents of this magazine may not be reproduced in any manner without written consent from the publisher. Mention of any product or opinions expressed in bylined articles do not constitute the endorsements or the opinions of the magazine or its owners. Information obtained by Storyboard magazine is from sources believed to be reliable. However, while every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, Storyboard magazine is not responsible for any errors or omissions or the results obtained from the use of such information. Storyboard magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and reserves the right to reject any editorial and advertising submissions.

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CONTENTS

Case Stories

12

Walt Disney: Celebrating the Man Behind the Mouse 300Feetout

24

Skating at the Edge of a Media Blitz

28

1871 Dairy: Requiem for Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow

Juice Design

Rule29

24

12

10 Departments ASK THE Expert

Clients, Ourselves 06 Our DAVID SHULTZ You Need 8 Everything to Succeed TOMORROW PARTNERS

18 360˚ Pushing the Envelope MARC FRIEDLAND

Q+A 10 Vectors, Visions & 5ive Minute Logos VON GLITSCHKA

32 OUTSIDE THE Box Pizza with Extra Beats

SPRING 2017

5


EXPERT

OUR CLIENTS, OURSELVES MANAGING CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS WHILE GROWING A DESIGN STUDIO CAN BE TRICKY BUSINESS By DAVID SHULTZ

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Young designers come out of school looking to do amazing design projects, but often they don’t appreciate how critical client relationships are to doing just that.

If someone leaves a client and goes to another company, they often take us with them. It’s how we’ve added several of our new clients.

It is important to recognize that clients are taking risks alongside us. Focusing on those relationships and understanding the value you represent to your client is just as important as creative aesthetics. If you nurture your client relationships, you can come to a deeper understanding of their business and that can translate into consistent and compelling work.

Budget is, of course, a critical component of every project. Clients really hate receiving change orders or going back to ask for more money. So during a project, we look at the relationship holistically and are willing to absorb something or put in extra work in order to make things right. When you prove that you can deliver and that you’re not out to gouge a client, you earn their trust.

IN IT FOR THE LONG TERM

THE T/E RATIO

Each time a new client is hiring us, we try to look at things from their point of view. They’re rolling the dice because whatever we do reflects on them. So we always try to think through what we can do to make them successful. If we make their job easier, they stick with us.

If we take on new work, it can’t be at the expense of existing clients. With a young firm that’s expanding, I’m faced with balancing how much we stretch and take on. We need to push ourselves, but that involves risk of failure. And we keep growing, which has its own challenges. Both can be exciting and, at times, scary.

Level of service is critical—one of our core attributes is the level of service we offer. Client service and attention to detail builds trust and helps to establish a bond. Design work is certainly an important component, but the level of detail you provide in project management, and over time, institutional knowledge, can be invaluable. If you foster your client relationships, people tend to take you with them as they rise into new roles in the organization. Projects can get more interesting as they move into senior positions. And when a new person joins their team, your institutional knowledge can ease their transition and accelerates their ramp-up.

When we evaluate opportunities, we joke about something we call the T/E ratio. On any given day, are we more terrified or excited? Is the project a challenge or the workload daunting? Are the opportunities tantalizing? And how is the team doing? If we have to turn down a project we really liked, we try to stress how interested we were but that we didn’t feel we could do it at the level we would expect to deliver. If an existing client brings a new project, it’s much harder to turn down. You want to maintain a big picture view of all their communications. Expanding and helping an existing client grow is always much easier than onboarding a new client.

Ultimately it’s your team that is the constraining factor on new work. It’s a challenge to find people that fit into your system. You have to have a team that you trust at every level and in every role, because there are interactions at all levels of your organization. And office culture isn’t something that’s easily changed—it’s organic and your team has to trust one another. But when you find the right people and you have a team that works as one, everyone becomes invested in outcomes and is proud of where the company is going.

BOTTOM LINE Successful long-term client relationships require a delicate balance of being terrified by how much you’re pushing yourself and being excited about the projects and the growth of your team. By earning a client’s trust early on, they’ll allow you to do things that they might be a little afraid of. And building that relationship over time brings increasingly interesting projects and helps you develop a portfolio of work. If you get it right, the work flows in and you can focus on what you love doing. Your team, along with the client, will flourish.

DAVID SHULTZ founded Perspective Lab in 2011 to help Silicon Valley innovators elevate their brand and design experiences. Clients include technology firms, Fortune 500 companies and financial businesses.

SPRING 2017

7


EXPERT

Everything You Need

TO SUCCEED by Aaron Berman

When San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee needed help simplifying the byzantine bureaucracy the Bay Area’s 65,000-plus small businesses faced in dealing with the city, he turned to Tomorrow Partners. Their solution: the San Francisco Business Portal, an online one-stop shop that makes finding vital information for starting, managing and growing a business as easy as ordering a book on Amazon. But the project had many moving components. So how did Tomorrow Partners accomplish it?

FOCUSING ON HUMAN NEEDS “We actually looked at this from their constituents’ perspective first,” says Tomorrow Partners Founder and Chief Designer Gaby Brink. “What are their needs? Not what are the forms they need, but when they start a business what are the pain points? What’s difficult?” The result is something extremely rare in our uber-hyperlinked world—a website that feeds you only what you need to know, one nugget at a time. “Going into it we recognized there’d be a massive amount of information and a lot of different uses we needed to be able to address,” says Jeremy Kaye, a partner at Tomorrow Partners. “Really what we had to do was to get smart quick.”

GETTING THE CITY ON YOUR SIDE Launching or managing a small business can conceivably involve a dozen departments in your municipality, yet the people in those departments rarely have the opportunity to understand how their different functions come together for the constituent, which means that constituent really doesn’t see the big picture. To create a smooth, snag-free path for small businesses, “We actually brought together people from 12 departments in one of our workshops, and these were people who had been there 15, 20, 30 years but who had never met,” says Brink. “They saw how the work they were doing impacted other departments and the people starting businesses. We orchestrated a bunch of different exercises in eliciting information from them but also engaging them in the process, making them our allies, because we knew whatever we did could not be imposed from the outside.”

ASSESSING PUBLIC NEEDS With the knowledge gained from these government-wide sessions, Tomorrow Partners then talked to the people who would use the site—aspiring and existing business owners.

8

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“We had deep conversations with them, either in their place of business or, in certain cases, at dining room tables where they were actually planning their new businesses,” says Kaye. This covered everything from restaurants to manufacturers, says Brink. “And some of the big takeaways we heard were, ‘It’s really difficult because I can’t see the whole process. I can’t see from beginning to end how long it is going to take …’ ” This feedback was hardly surprising, but it was vital in informing Tomorrow Partners’ design of the portal—one that emphasizes transparency and an overview of the whole process from start to finish.

PROVIDING CONTEXT The resulting San Francisco Business Portal is friendly and nonthreatening. The first words you see? “Everything you need to succeed.”

From there you’re presented with three links: Start a Business, Manage a Business, and Grow Your Business. Click on the first and you’re presented with the nine steps you need to take—from creating a business plan to hiring employees—and links to important information for each option. And whichever step you’re on, you see a timeline showing you where you are in the process; the whole site works this way. “What we knew was that people in the process were overwhelmed by how much information there was,” Kaye says. “And we knew we would only succeed in this effort if we contextualized information for them in a way that was relevant to their needs at a particular point in the process.” While they admit that this is probably one of the most sophisticated websites they’ve developed for a client and are rightly proud of it, they don’t hesitate to give credit where it’s due in the city government.

“Quality assurance on the content side was really owned by the client team,” says Brink. “I think it was a lot of pressure for them, especially because they aggregated content from across various departments at the city, county, state and federal levels. They had to set up systems that they now have to currently check to make sure the other entities, when they’re updating it, notify the client team. That’s really the huge investment the city of San Francisco made.”

TOMORROW PARTNERS Tomorrow Partners helps organizations achieve greater impact through design. Its people-centered design approach makes teams more effective, customers more receptive and clients just plain happy.

SPRING 2017

9


Q+A

Vectors, V 5ive M Designer/illustrator VON GLITSCHKA is a twogun cowboy in a one-gun vocation—the double threat that agencies throw at a client project when it requires fun and functional vectors and a cool design sense. From Adobe and Neenah Paper to Planters’ iconic Mr. Peanut, his Glitschka Studios has tackled it all, and all with a sense of fun.

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, Visions & e Minute Logos Do you have any tips for creating a logo

What are the biggest changes you’ve

With everything moving to mobile now,

that looks great at any size?

seen since getting into this business

do you have any thoughts on how best

I can look at a thumbnail and immediately recognize a problem in terms of what might become a readability issue as we develop and build it out. The key test for me is to print out a mark as small as I can and judge it from that standpoint. Negative space is far more critical than positive shapes. That said, nothing is going to be ideal as a favicon (16 x 16 pixels), for example, so you do the best you can.

in 2002, and what have you done to

to adapt your design and creativity to

remain competitive?

that space?

Some of the best advice I ever got was from another designer and illustrator, Craig Frazier, who told me in 2003, “You get the work you show.” I’m sure for him it was just a passing comment, but for me it’s proven to be very true. The key, at least for me, has been pursuing creativity outside the context of work. This has helped me to expand my potential and led to new work opportunities. Here is one example: I was asked by the local TEDx to design its event logo. The theme was “Fearless” and was all about pursuing your passion without fear, trying new things, et cetera. So I made a rule for myself: I couldn’t design a logo digitally, I had to do it by hand. This led me to hand-painting letterforms until I had a nice unique logotype. (Of course I digitized it at that point.) But this process of stepping out of my comfort zone helped me to see a new way to work. I created a set of hand-painted brushes and started experimenting with them, developing a new style I call vector painting. Showing this new work landed me some projects working in that style.

With mobile, including high-definition screens that are actually higher resolution than offset printing, I’m not too worried about translating to a new medium. If anything, it’ll be easier. This is why I love vector-based artwork—it’s resolution independent. I can design it and port it out for pretty much any context with relative ease. I used to loathe digital printing—it looked cheap. But with new methods like the HP Indigo press, it’s better than offset now and has all the flexibility of digital that also breaks all the rules of what you shouldn’t do as well. I like that.

In today’s do-it-yourself world of digital, do you think every designer is going to have to bring another skill to the table if he or she wants to remain competitive?

Not all designers need to be illustrators, but all designers should be drawing. Drawing improves cognition, which makes for better ideas and development of those graphics needing a more illustrative flair. Drawing improves digital—it improves craftsmanship and expands your design potential to execute a variety of ideas that go beyond the limits of software tools and pull-down menus. For many you will always be the 5ive Minute Logo guy. What inspired that?

It started as a sarcastic tweet. Right before Black Friday [2012] I tweeted that, for the next 24 hours, if anyone paid me $5 via PayPal I’d take five minutes and draw a logo on my iPad for them. About 30 people took me up on that, and it led to the site 5minutelogo.com. I’ve done a little over 5,000 craptacular logos since I initially launched it. I like to refer to it as a brand parody service for cheap-ass clients. Most get the sarcastic humor. Some don’t, though, which makes it even funnier. I still average about eight orders a week. It’s a way to entertain myself and

At last count I think you had your work on six social media platforms. Do you have a social media strategy?

Social media marketing is like fishing. Lots of casts, many bites, but you don’t always catch something. I’ve landed work via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, but as far as I can tell not Dribbble yet. So my strategy is to cast a lot but make sure I’m using good bait, which is equivalent to engaging information and work, be it client-driven or personal. For general work, I post on my site. I support that by posting one image from it on all my social sites to drive traffic to my primary site for the full context. If you follow me on social media, you’ll experience who I am. I don’t plan my tweets, I don’t pre-write or produce slick images for Instagram. I just share my thoughts and things I see or work on. And I refuse to like my own Facebook pages!

fund my coffee habit.

SPRING 2017

11


CASE STORY

12

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Walt Disney:


Celebrating the Man Behind the Mouse BY AARON BERMAN

The Walt Disney Company has gone from strength to strength for generations with nary a stumble; not so Walt Disney the man. His personal story of setbacks and innovations is an inspiring one and serves to remind us how precious creativity is, precisely because it can be so maddeningly ephemeral.

SPRING 2017

13


CASE STORY

DD

isney’s experience is one of the stories that his daughter, Diane Disney Miller, wanted to tell when she opened The Walt Disney Family Museum (waltdisney.org) in San Francisco’s Presidio. To publicize the exhibits on offer, the institution

engaged the services of 300FeetOut. The branding firm soon became another link in the chain of the animator’s long history.

Come Along and Join the Fun!

An Oswald Interlude

Walt Disney parlayed a childhood love of drawing into a

The development of the website can better be appreci-

multimedia empire that currently generates nearly $50 bil-

ated by understanding the ups and downs faced by

lion annually, yet few know much about the man or his life.

Disney himself.

That was something his daughter was determined to change. Diane Disney Miller founded The Walt Disney Family

Though best remembered for Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and others, the animated critter that truly set the

Museum in 2009. A non-profit organization not affiliated

course for his success was a rabbit called Oswald, perhaps

with The Walt Disney Company, the museum was owned

Disney’s greatest misstep.

and operated by the Walt Disney Family Foundation until

Created by Disney and animator Ub Iwerks in the

it achieved 501(c)3 status in the last couple of years. The

1920s, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit became a smash hit

resulting 40,000-square-foot museum entertainingly pieces

for Universal Studios, but the pair lost the rights to the

together the man’s legacy.

character, which would be handled by other producers and

Getting people in the door was partially done by a website, which was initially pretty basic. The museum asked 300FeetOut to improve it.

animators for years. Disney and Iwerks were more careful with their next creation: a mouse called Mickey. “So that’s why Walt Disney and Hollywood now have incredibly strict, tight contracts,” says 300FeetOut CEO Barbara Stephenson. “And that’s one of the reasons why we were very involved with [the company’s legal department] before we launched the site.”

14

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All of the Museum at Once

Show, Don’t Tell (But Don’t Show)

Working closely with the communications director and the

Stephenson and co. were still up to their eyeballs in site

interim museum director, 300FeetOut began building the

development when the communications director came to

new site in 2011.

them to develop a holiday campaign for the museum. The

“We wanted people to be able to get lost and to find little

result: a marketing blitz comprised of outdoor signage,

pieces of information,” Stephenson says. “It had

banner ads and print design that 300FeetOut crafted … in

features nobody had ever built before; everything had to

a weekend. And because of usage restrictions, they weren’t

be coded from scratch.”

allowed to use any of Disney’s characters.

Chief among its accomplishments was the “Explore”

What they came up with were three campaign designs

feature, which was a place for users to interact with Walt

in three eye-catching colors, all cleverly using language and

Disney’s story, innovations and accomplishments.

imagery that evoked those beloved characters without actu-

“You could click on one of the radio widgets and you would hear audio of Walt talking,” Stephenson remembers.

ally showing them. For all its ups and downs, The Walt Disney Family Muse-

“You could click on a TV widget and watch a video ...” It was

um experience was a special one for 300FeetOut. Everybody

similar to experiencing the museum without being there.

has a connection to Disney, says Stephenson.

Changes

we grew up with,” says Stephenson. “We didn’t have TV like

During the two years it took to develop, there were two

kids do now. We had two shows and maybe Saturday morning

executive directors and three communications heads; at one

cartoons and that was it. Disney was on Sunday night, 7 o’clock.

point the project was shelved for a quarter.

That was my experience with television,” she laughs.

When it finally launched, it was very well received by

“Personally it was Disney and the Muppets—that’s what

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Nina Dietzel

CEO

Barbara O. Stephenson

ART DIRECTOR

Greg Ciro Tornincasa

DESIGNERS

Hsuan Yang Ben Lovejoy Carolyn Ashburn

DESIGN INTERN Joey Hodera

CTO

Reilly Sweetland

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Rex Vokey

DEVELOPERS

Joren Mathews Remington Woo Keith Ensign

As for the original website 300FeetOut created for

the public, picking up multiple awards. Yet shortly after

the museum, it lives on now only in their own creative

launch, the museum wanted to change it, ultimately remov-

vault—one more artifact in the long and eventful history

ing the very features that had made it stand out.

of Walt Disney.

The fate of the website seemed to mirror the ups and downs of Disney’s own creative life.

SPRING 2017

15


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are exploring and creating, real inspiration that

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continuing collaborate on futurer.vH, projects the feel of wine together.

tickets available at 2017.sfdesignweek.org.

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LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

CM

STARTING JUNE 3RD

LOVE

MY

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INERTECH: How do you explain more efficient, affordable and reliable data centers to non[ LEMNIS: Celery developed engineers? Celery packaging from recycled paper that refolds into a helped get the stylish modern lampshade so that buying the future message across of lighting didn't feel like anything that came before. through Web and external messaging.

WHERE YOU

LIVE

K

W I N T E R 2 0 15

STORIES OF DESIGN ACROSS ALL MEDIA

Reduce electricity consumption

TO EDITOR ECTOR/PHO ART DIR NIFER MORLA JEN RAPHER PHOTOG AN SANG EDA ERIC ZEP

STYLIST

FALL

SLAVIN SARA

2016

33

MANAGER

T PROJEC SUSMILCH ARLENE

3

360º STUDIO

Reduce greenhouse gases

HINRICHSSave water

VDM

M

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Be on the lookout for flyers that state when we will come to your door.

JOIN US!

GREEN CITY FORCE IS LAUNCHING THE

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

Visual Media Alliance presents a full-day conference featuring stories of design across all media. Come be inspired by some of the industry’s most creative thinkers as they share practical strategies you can

panel of speakers have fascinating stories to tell that will inspire and educate. Topics span:

Reduce electricity consumption Reduce greenhouse gases

GREEN CITY FORCE: Celery Rebranding Renews provided design for the group’s the Life in

Save water Help to preserve public housing and the planet

ERICA AITKEN

put to use right now to enhance your skills and

RODS AND CONES

drive new business.

AARON DRAPLIN THE DRAPLIN DESIGN CO.

Be on the lookout for flyers that state when we will come to your door.

BRIAN DOUGHERTY CELERY DESIGN

Babylon 4 The mix of modern and rustic imparts the essence of what a stay at North Block has in store for its guests.

JOIN US!

Questions? Call Green City Force at 646-681-4711 La traducción de este documento está disponible en la Oficina de Administración de su residencial.

successful “Love Where You Live” The street address Lifewater campaign, which cut electricity use in oneinspirapublic housing building is used as an by an astounding 20 percent. tional element for the design of the brand and collateral. Maria Giudice Website to App Nearables Project from Hell

[ GREEN CITY FORCE: Celery provided design for the group’s successful “Love Where You Live” campaign, which cut electricity use in one public housing building by an astounding 20 percent.

. RAKAFUKI FRIENDS: A fresh approach to marketing energy efficiency. Instead of focusing on global warming, people are invited to play with a paper pig.

.

5

From a wall in the lobby to print pieces, keys appear throughout the designs.

StoryboardMagazine.com

FALL 2015

WINTER 2015

productivity hacks, UX, UI, analytics, and more.

Wednesday, June 3rd and continuing through the months of June and July, Green City Force will visit your apartment to install free energysaving light bulbs and provide tips on how to save energy and water! Corps Members are young NYCHA residents in training for sustainability careers. Learn more about the challenge:

The nightmarish Ebola epidemic may have captured headlines of late, but the greater threat facing Africa and the rest of the developing world is a lack of clean drinking water. So when Rule29 set out to refresh the branding of Christian nonprofit water-development organization Lifewater, they made communicating this need to new generations—using modern means—their top priority.

creativity, innovation, case studies, social media, marketing, web, AR, strategy, design thinking,

INERTECH: How do you explain more efficient, affordable and reliable data centers to nonengineers? Celery helped get the message across through Web and external messaging.

WHERE YOU

LIVE

K

RAKAFUKI FRIENDS: A fresh approach to marketing energy efficiency. Instead of focusing on global warming, people are invited to play with a paper pig.

34

BY SABINE LENZ

,

LOVE

CY

CMY

A Whole New Sport

[

SPEAKERS Get your creative juices flowing. Our esteemed

STARTING JUNE 3RD

CHALLENGE AT FARRAGUT HOUSES!

MY

Questions? Call Green City Force at 646-681-4711 La traducción de este documento está disponible en la Oficina de Administración de su residencial.

GRID:

. GREEN GRAPHIC DESIGN: Celery drew from ten years of work to write this engaging survey of sustainable design that helps to reframe the way designers think about the work they create.

C

CM

Help to preserve public

WHAT IS housing and the planet & Why Should You Care?

Wednesday, June 3rd and continuing through the months of June and July, Green City Force will visit your apartment to install free energysaving light bulbs and provide tips on how to save energy and water! Corps Members are young NYCHA residents in training for sustainability careers. Learn more about the challenge:

STUDIO PORTFOLIO

,

CHALLENGE AT FARRAGUT HOUSES!

ER JENNIF

DESIGNCONF.VMA.BZ

LEMNIS: Celery developed packaging from recycled paper that refolds into a stylish modern lampshade so that buying the future of lighting didn't feel like anything that came before.

CASE STORY

DESIGNER MORLA

TICKETS + DETAILS ONLINE

GREEN GRAPHIC DESIGN: Celery drew from ten years of work to write this engaging survey of sustainable design that helps to reframe the way designers think about the work they create.

35

33

LAUREN ELLIOT WICKED GOOD PRINT PARTNERS

DAVA GUTHMILLER NOISE 13

NEAL HAUSSEL IGGESUND PAPERBOARD

DAVID HOGUE GOOGLE

Everything from knowing when to apply a “less is more” approach to jump-starting inspiration and designing for impact to finding consistency within your brand and harnessing the power of storytelling (and so much more) is on offer in these jam-packed, leading-edge sessions. Lunch will be served and exhibitors will be on-hand throughout the day to

COREY LEWIS BLACK FLAG CREATIVE

MICHAEL OSBORNE MICHAEL OSBORNE DESIGN

MARK SCHWARTZ SOCIAL MEDIA TRACKERS

SANTIAGO SINISTERRA ZOOKA CREATIVE

BARBARA STEPHENSON 300FEETOUT

NEIL STEVENSON IDEO

PELEG TOP PELEG TOP

CINDY WALAS WALAS YOUNGER, LTD.

showcase the latest design industry technology.

EVENT HOST

OFFICIAL EVENT

EXHIBITORS Check out new trends and capabilities being showcased by our exhibitors who help make this event possible.

CONTACT LAURA VARGAS • 1.800.659.3363 • LAURA@VMA.BZ

2017 Design Conf - Storyboard Ad - v14.indd All Pages

M A G A Z I N E

4/5/2017 11:17:46 AM


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tickets available at 2017.sfdesignweek.org.

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ing restaurant, Redd Wood, graphics by

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STUDIO PORTFOLIO

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9 AM – 5:30 PM

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storyboard-mag-8.875x11.375-feb15-ol.pdf 1 2/27/2015 4:21:02 PM

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GREEN CITY FORCE IS LAUNCHING THE

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

CM

STARTING JUNE 3RD

LOVE

MY

CY

CMY

INERTECH: How do you explain more efficient, affordable and reliable data centers to non[ LEMNIS: Celery developed engineers? Celery packaging from recycled paper that refolds into a helped get the stylish modern lampshade so that buying the future message across of lighting didn't feel like anything that came before. through Web and external messaging.

WHERE YOU

LIVE

K

W I N T E R 2 0 15

STORIES OF DESIGN ACROSS ALL MEDIA

Reduce electricity consumption

TO EDITOR ECTOR/PHO ART DIR NIFER MORLA JEN RAPHER PHOTOG AN SANG EDA ERIC ZEP

STYLIST

FALL

SLAVIN SARA

2016

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MANAGER

T PROJEC SUSMILCH ARLENE

3

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Reduce greenhouse gases

HINRICHSSave water

VDM

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Y

Be on the lookout for flyers that state when we will come to your door.

JOIN US!

GREEN CITY FORCE IS LAUNCHING THE

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE

Visual Media Alliance presents a full-day conference featuring stories of design across all media. Come be inspired by some of the industry’s most creative thinkers as they share practical strategies you can

panel of speakers have fascinating stories to tell that will inspire and educate. Topics span:

Reduce electricity consumption Reduce greenhouse gases

GREEN CITY FORCE: Celery Rebranding Renews provided design for the group’s the Life in

Save water Help to preserve public housing and the planet

ERICA AITKEN

put to use right now to enhance your skills and

RODS AND CONES

drive new business.

AARON DRAPLIN THE DRAPLIN DESIGN CO.

Be on the lookout for flyers that state when we will come to your door.

BRIAN DOUGHERTY CELERY DESIGN

Babylon 4 The mix of modern and rustic imparts the essence of what a stay at North Block has in store for its guests.

JOIN US!

Questions? Call Green City Force at 646-681-4711 La traducción de este documento está disponible en la Oficina de Administración de su residencial.

successful “Love Where You Live” The street address Lifewater campaign, which cut electricity use in oneinspirapublic housing building is used as an by an astounding 20 percent. tional element for the design of the brand and collateral. Maria Giudice Website to App Nearables Project from Hell

[ GREEN CITY FORCE: Celery provided design for the group’s successful “Love Where You Live” campaign, which cut electricity use in one public housing building by an astounding 20 percent.

. RAKAFUKI FRIENDS: A fresh approach to marketing energy efficiency. Instead of focusing on global warming, people are invited to play with a paper pig.

.

5

From a wall in the lobby to print pieces, keys appear throughout the designs.

StoryboardMagazine.com

FALL 2015

WINTER 2015

productivity hacks, UX, UI, analytics, and more.

Wednesday, June 3rd and continuing through the months of June and July, Green City Force will visit your apartment to install free energysaving light bulbs and provide tips on how to save energy and water! Corps Members are young NYCHA residents in training for sustainability careers. Learn more about the challenge:

The nightmarish Ebola epidemic may have captured headlines of late, but the greater threat facing Africa and the rest of the developing world is a lack of clean drinking water. So when Rule29 set out to refresh the branding of Christian nonprofit water-development organization Lifewater, they made communicating this need to new generations—using modern means—their top priority.

creativity, innovation, case studies, social media, marketing, web, AR, strategy, design thinking,

INERTECH: How do you explain more efficient, affordable and reliable data centers to nonengineers? Celery helped get the message across through Web and external messaging.

WHERE YOU

LIVE

K

RAKAFUKI FRIENDS: A fresh approach to marketing energy efficiency. Instead of focusing on global warming, people are invited to play with a paper pig.

34

BY SABINE LENZ

,

LOVE

CY

CMY

A Whole New Sport

[

SPEAKERS Get your creative juices flowing. Our esteemed

STARTING JUNE 3RD

CHALLENGE AT FARRAGUT HOUSES!

MY

Questions? Call Green City Force at 646-681-4711 La traducción de este documento está disponible en la Oficina de Administración de su residencial.

GRID:

. GREEN GRAPHIC DESIGN: Celery drew from ten years of work to write this engaging survey of sustainable design that helps to reframe the way designers think about the work they create.

C

CM

Help to preserve public

WHAT IS housing and the planet & Why Should You Care?

Wednesday, June 3rd and continuing through the months of June and July, Green City Force will visit your apartment to install free energysaving light bulbs and provide tips on how to save energy and water! Corps Members are young NYCHA residents in training for sustainability careers. Learn more about the challenge:

STUDIO PORTFOLIO

,

CHALLENGE AT FARRAGUT HOUSES!

ER JENNIF

DESIGNCONF.VMA.BZ

LEMNIS: Celery developed packaging from recycled paper that refolds into a stylish modern lampshade so that buying the future of lighting didn't feel like anything that came before.

CASE STORY

DESIGNER MORLA

TICKETS + DETAILS ONLINE

GREEN GRAPHIC DESIGN: Celery drew from ten years of work to write this engaging survey of sustainable design that helps to reframe the way designers think about the work they create.

35

33

LAUREN ELLIOT WICKED GOOD PRINT PARTNERS

DAVA GUTHMILLER NOISE 13

NEAL HAUSSEL IGGESUND PAPERBOARD

DAVID HOGUE GOOGLE

Everything from knowing when to apply a “less is more” approach to jump-starting inspiration and designing for impact to finding consistency within your brand and harnessing the power of storytelling (and so much more) is on offer in these jam-packed, leading-edge sessions. Lunch will be served and exhibitors will be on-hand throughout the day to

COREY LEWIS BLACK FLAG CREATIVE

MICHAEL OSBORNE MICHAEL OSBORNE DESIGN

MARK SCHWARTZ SOCIAL MEDIA TRACKERS

SANTIAGO SINISTERRA ZOOKA CREATIVE

BARBARA STEPHENSON 300FEETOUT

NEIL STEVENSON IDEO

PELEG TOP PELEG TOP

CINDY WALAS WALAS YOUNGER, LTD.

showcase the latest design industry technology.

EVENT HOST

OFFICIAL EVENT

EXHIBITORS Check out new trends and capabilities being showcased by our exhibitors who help make this event possible.

CONTACT LAURA VARGAS • 1.800.659.3363 • LAURA@VMA.BZ

2017 Design Conf - Storyboard Ad - v14.indd All Pages

M A G A Z I N E

4/5/2017 11:17:46 AM


360ยบ

Pushing the

Envelope

BY CLAY HAMILTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY AUBRIE PICK

Marc Friedland uses storytelling to transform event communications into keepsakes.

MARC

18

StoryboardMagazine.com

FRIEDLAND

|

LOS

ANGELES,

CA


H e ’s b e e n c a l l e d t h e “ s t a t i o n e r t o t h e s t a r s ” for good reason. In a career spanning three decades, Marc Friedland has helped the most recognized brands, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey and organizations celebrate events with imaginative invitations and original communications. Through it all, he’s differentiated himself by pouring love and passion and labor into his designs. Friedland and his teams at Couture Communications and Creative Intelligence Inc. (his experiential branding agency) are designers and creators of integrated experiences, from the first “Save the Date” to the place card holders on tables. They do everything from concepting moods or creating identities to design and fabrication. No facet is too small—Friedland’s staff has even gone to the post office to hand cancel invitations. As he says, “Love is in the details.” Most famously, he created the first customdesigned envelopes and announcement cards for the Academy Awards in 2011. (For unknown reasons, the Academy redesigned Friedland’s design this year, perhaps contributing to the biggest snafu in Oscars history.) “Everything we’ve done since the beginning was about how to celebrate the relationship between a giver and a receiver, and all these communications—whether for the Oscars, nonprofits, or private parties—is really to celebrate and mark the moment,” says Friedland. “Anybody can throw a party, but people will forget what they ate. If you create something unique, they’ll have the experience as a lifelong memory.” And the pieces he creates are the treasured reminders. Underlying all his designs is the art of storytelling. “Believe it or not, as storytellers, it’s really hard to convey and articulate what we do,” says Friedland. “People say, ‘Oh, you do invitations?’ I answer, ‘Well, we do and we’re known for that, but it’s more. It’s really about bringing social graces into communications and creating pieces of communication art that really celebrate the relationship.”

Friedland has been in his studio space since 1991. When people walk in, he wants them to feel inspired, engaged and excited— almost like walking into one of his invitations.

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A classic Ingo Maurer Zettel’z 5 Chandelier provides the perfect accent for Friedland’s office. “I wanted the space to feel like an homage to the creative process,” he says. A favorite quote of Friedland’s, one that is at the heart of what his team does, comes from Maya Angelou: “People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But they’ll never forget how you made them feel.”

3

The studio has archives of all their pieces going back 30 years. Favorite works can be found throughout the space and are regularly rotated.

4

The creative team physically makes everything they design. “We get our papers, we have all our dies made—we don’t just turn things over to a printer. All the handwork, the turned edges and the paper engineering, we do in house.” SPRING 2017

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STUDIO PORTFOLIO

. The envelopes Friedland designed from 2011 to 2016 for the Oscars were meant to reflect the golden age of Hollywood while also being timeless. The pieces had to look great on camera while also being functional.

[ For an event in Tuscany, an invitation was designed that arrived in a box containing three plates, so that the whole piece could become a keepsake commemorating the event.

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StoryboardMagazine.com

. Nonprofit galas are a big part of the studio’s work. For Conservation International, Friedland used the story of “leaving no stone unturned” to create an emotional experience communicated through different mediums.


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CASE STORY

24

StoryboardMagazine.com


Skating on the Edge of a Media Blitz By Tamara E. Holmes

For skateboarders, the right pair of shoes can mean the difference between a flip and a fall. Already known for giving other types of athletes an edge, Adidas set out to transform the skateboarding experience. To inspire the next generation of skateboarders, Adidas dreamed up Away Days, a full-length feature film that offers a peek inside skateboarding culture and a close look at the tricks of the trade. And to promote the film, the company called on San Francisco advertising and media studio Juice Design to showcase a few tricks of its own.


Photography: Sem Rubio © 2016 adidas AG. adidas, the trefoil logo and the 3-Stripes mark are registered trademarks of the adidas Group.

LUCAS PUIG

SWITCH FRONTSIDE HEELFLIP

LUCAS PREMIERE ADV ADIDAS.COM/SKATEBOARDING

Inside the Skateboarder’s Life

Photography: Mike O’Meally, Zander Taketomo & Sem Rubio © 2016 adidas AG. adidas, the trefoil logo and the 3-Stripes mark are registered trademarks of the adidas Group.

“Away Days is about a team of creative skateboarders who put themselves out there exactly how they envisioned,” says Juice Design Creative Director Matt Irving. “While that may sound easy, it takes a lot more courage, dedication and tenacity than most could ever imagine.” The film does a great job capturing the literal highs and lows of skateboarding life, but that was only one part of the Juice Design campaign. A photo book provides a visual tour of the filming process, a web series displays behind-the-scenes footage and print and social media campaigns helped to drum up excitement. The book was designed both to get people excited about the film and to stand alone as a work of art. It features the photography of Sem Rubio, the principal photographer for the Adidas Skateboarding brand. “Sem’s photos are raw and candid, and those not entrenched in the sport will find them beautiful and compelling even with no skateboarding background,” says Juice Design Art Director Tory Ford. The book also comes with a download code for the film.

MILES SILVAS

KICKFLIP

ADI-EASE PREMIERE ADIDAS.COM/SKATEBOARDING

26

#AWAYDAYS

MAY 2016

StoryboardMagazine.com

#AWAYDAYS

Juice Design also created seeding kits that were distributed to the team, media and influencers, as well as to core skate shops. The kits contained a copy of the book, along with an Away Days jersey, scarf and premiere tickets. “These items tied back to Adidas’ rich heritage in soccer as well as the phrase ‘away days,’ which is a [British] term used to describe traveling to an away match and representing your home team,” explains Juice Design Project Director Ane Jens. A one-day social media blitz took place six months before the film’s premiere. Everyone who worked on the project received images to post. However, to ensure that the photographs had the maximum effect, each team member was given handpicked images that would resonate most with their social audience. Other social media posts announced key events related to the launch, such as a social media contest and a 24-hour free YouTube film premiere. All of the print ads had the same look and feel, and included the hashtag #AwayDays. The first round of those ads announced the project and the skate team, the second featured more action-oriented ones, and the third announced the premiere tour and sale on iTunes. To expand the reach of the project, the Juice Design team shared exclusive images with editorial partners and invited them to come along on filming trips. As a result, the film was featured on seven skateboarding magazine covers and boasted more than 650 pages of editorial coverage.


CREATIVE DIRECTOR Brett Critchlow Matt Irving

GLOBAL BRAND DIRECTOR–ADIDAS ACTION SPORTS Ellie Gail

ART DIRECTOR Tory Ford

PROJECT DIRECTOR

Going Beyond Skateboarding Culture To tie the campaign together, a single image was used to promote the film across all platforms, including social, print and digital. It features Adidas Skateboarding team rider Raul Navarro shot from above in a crosswalk in Barcelona. The image is particularly fitting because “Adidas is ‘the brand with the three stripes’ and the stripes in the crosswalk worked perfectly as a discreet secondary message,” says Juice Design Creative Director Brett Critchlow. Fonts, logos and photography were also treated the same throughout all media. The entire project took about three-and-a-half years to put together; the biggest challenge was the management of all of those moving parts. “Between the skateboarding team, the media team, the film, the web series, the book, the seeding kits, editing, social media and premieres, we stayed quite busy,” says Critchlow. But it was well worth the effort. The campaign was a hit among the skateboarding community and everyone else who can appreciate the art of athleticism. “Away Days was the single biggest defining moment for Adidas Action Sports, which came to life globally with hundreds of different people following the lead that we established,” says Irving. Ellie Gail, global brand director for Adidas Action Sports, agrees, saying, “It clearly defined the brand point of view through synchronized marketing efforts that connected to skate culture across the globe in a true and authentic way.” And you don’t have to know your flips from your ollies to appreciate that.

Photography: Ben Colen & Sem Rubio © 2016 adidas AG. adidas, the trefoil logo and the 3-Stripes mark are registered trademarks of the adidas Group.

ANE JENS

SILAS BAX

SILAS VULC

SPRING 2017

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CASE STORY

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1871 Dairy

StoryboardMagazine.com


ry: Requiem for

Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow BY TAMARA E. HOLMES

Chicago brings to mind many things for many people; chances are milk is not one of them. You can thank Mrs. O’Leary’s cow for that. After touching off the Great Chicago Fire in 1871 by allegedly kicking over a lantern, cows became bovinus non grata overnight, putting a devastating end to the Windy City’s milk industry.

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CASE STORY

Fast forward 141 years: Self-professed milk nerd Travis Pyykkonen decided to bring locally sourced milk back to the area in 2012 by developing a line of dairy products that are organic and derived from grass-fed cows. Dubbing his new venture 1871 Dairy, he knew he was on to something good but wasn’t quite sure how to market his “micro dairy.” As Rule29 would soon show him, one of the surest ways to stick out in a plasticobsessed, color-choked world is to ditch your Pantone palette and take milk back to its glass-bottle roots. ‘All Milk Is Not the Same’ Since 1871 Dairy was little more than a gleam in Pyykkonen’s eye, its needs ran the gamut from a logo and packaging to a website and promotional materials. Before the company could take care of any of this, Rule29 had to convey what 1871 Dairy was all about. What separated the venture from its competitors was the type of cows Pyykkonen used–those that were grass-fed and well taken care of. “All milk is not the same,” is how Rule29 Founder Justin Ahrens sums it up. To emphasize this, designers included “touches of the grass into the mark, and made sure that we highlighted the fact that (our client makes) a dairy product that is focused on the old, healthy ways of doing things.” Rule29 then added “an old-world, authentic typeface that we felt would be contemporary and look good for many, many years.” Once they had the logo, they came up with images that reflected the different environments that an 1871 Dairy cow might find itself in and that could be used in other materials such as on the website and social media channels. An image of Chicago’s skyline, for example, highlighted the fact that the cows are raised in a farm setting, not that far away from the city. “One of the things really important to the brand is that this is a Chicago-based company,” Ahrens says. In creating a quality dairy product, 1871 Dairy is celebrating Chicago’s history as a dairy producer. Many dairy companies opt for colorful packaging, but Ahrens saw his client differently, “We kept coming back to the fact that what’s truly simple is just black and white,” he says. By using clear glass bottles featuring black and white images and text, the milk itself becomes the most prominent feature. “We let the milk be the hero.”

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CCREATIVE REATIVE DDIRE DIRECTOR IRECCTOR JUSTIN AHRENS

DESIGNER DDE ESIGN GNER ER

SUSAN HERDA

COPY

BOB DAVIDSON KELLY REED

PPHOTOGRAPHY HOTOG OGRA RAPPHY

WONDERKIND STUDIOS

‘Each Step Builds off the Other’ While it was important to ensure that there was brand consistency with the different elements of the campaign, each medium offered a different opportunity. When designing the website, Rule29 brought in other colors to liven it up, as well as to potentially be used in the packaging of other dairy products in the future. When developing the website, they also had to make sure that it would translate well on mobile devices, so “they created iconography that would be easy to see in a mobile environment,” Ahrens explains. The icons that best conveyed the company’s message: the city, the farm and the milk bottle.

Printed materials, such as brochures, were ideal for showcasing even more color. Rule29 also looked for other ways to make promotional materials stand out. While most business cards feature black type on a white background, for example, 1871 Dairy’s cards feature white ink and a grazing cow against a black backdrop. The first phase of the campaign–coming up with the logo and identity–took about four months. Once the foundation was set, Rule29 spent another six months working on the rest of the materials. “We look at it as climbing up stairs,” says Ahrens. “Each step builds off the other.” With bottles of milk flying off shelves, the campaign has helped put Chicago back on the dairy map, and at last cleared the good name of Illinois’ cows.

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Photos Courtesy of Novalia

OUTSIDE THE BOX

Pizza with Extra Beats

Pizza Hut Restaurants UK developed these limited-edition pizza boxes that connect to your smartphone or laptop via Bluetooth, effectively allowing you to play and mix music by touching the printed “controls” on the cardboard. Powered by Novalia’s print connectivity technology, the boxes got a workout in a video promotion in which DJ Vectra spun “10/10” and “Dun Know” by P Money. A good cheese that you can dance to … Check out the video: bit.ly/djcheese

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Photos Courtesy of Novalia


Kick-ass Customer Service. It’s not a department. It’s an attitude. Calitho

www.calitho.com

VMA Storyboard - Spring 2017  

VMA's newest resource comes in the form of a quarterly magazine mailed to 8,000 visual media professionals; also available online at vmastor...

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