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YEARS VALLEY COUNTY AND

THE

CITY OF CASCADE

1917-2017


Photo courtesy of Visit Idaho

Big adventure. Small town charm. Always the perfect temperature.

VISITMCCALL.ORG The McCall Area Chamber is proud to be a part of the Centennial Magazine team Happy 100 years Valley County and the City of Cascade!


Greetings, In the spring of 2016, the Valley County/City of Cascade Centennial Committee was formed to plan and carry out activities and events for a year-long 2017 Centennial Celebration. The Committee consists of volunteers who have a deep passion for and desire to share the rich history, events, and “nuggets” of the area in which they live. Under the expert guidance of the team that publishes the Visit McCall magazine, the committee embarked on an exciting project to provide this free centennial publication for the residents and visitors of the communities of Valley County. Our slogan is

1 Valley, 100 Years, 100 Days of Fun! It is our hope that you will enjoy the rich historical, natural, cultural, and recreational features of this great valley as you explore this publication. We trust you will gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of the communities and people of Valley County.

Sincerely, The Centennial Committee

Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

Table of Contents COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY . . . 6 The Primary to the Backcountry Communities

VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY. . . . . . . . 38 From logging to agriculture

NATURAL RESOURCES. . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Valley County’s abundant resources

100+ DAYS OF FUN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 A year of events in Valley County

VALLEY COUNTY’S TIMELINE. . . . . . . 84 From 1860 to today

VALLEY COUNTY MAPS . . . . . . . . . . . 90

CENTENNIAL MAGAZINE credits

Cities, early towns and recreation

Editor in Chief | McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

THROUGH THE LENS OF GEORGE NOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

Assistant Editors | Theresa Perry, Lucy Chronic, Kelly Felton, and Shauna Arnold Contributing Writers | Lucy Chronic, Barbara Nokes Kwader, Sharon Bixler, Ken Arment, Christopher Dail (Midas Gold), Duane Petersen, Theresa Perry, Kaylee Arnold, Stephanie Rosen, Mike Wissenbach (Bureau of Reclamation), McKenzie Christensen Kraemer, McCall Historic Preservation Commission, Steve Barrett, PhD, Bill Willey, Elt and Trudi Hasbrouck, Bill Leaf, Rick Fereday, Valley County Planning and Zoning, American Legion Post 60 Communication Committee, Kelly Felton, Jake Felton, Shauna Arnold Design | Dawg Haus, Inc

CENTENNIAL LOGO ARTISTS . . . . . . . 92 TRADITIONAL REMEDIES. . . . . . . . . . 93 VALLEY COUNTY & CASCADE CELEBRATIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Printing | KM Sales Agency, Inc The editorial and photographic content of this Centennial Magazine is produced in this printed format by Dawg Haus, Inc. and KM Sales Agency, Inc., on behalf of the Valley County Centennial Committee who claims all right to the design of the publication. The images and advertisements contained herein are licensed for use by the Valley County Centennial Committee. The licensed content in this published format of the Centennial Magazine is protected by U.S. and International copyright law and may not be copied, used, reproduced or transmitted, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the Valley County Centennial Committee.

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Communities of Valley County TAKE A WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE AND ENJOY A GLIMPSE OF LIFE IN VALLEY COUNTY A CENTURY AGO.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Valley County was once a landscape dotted with small towns, settlements, and homesteads. Through the years, many changes worked to consolidate these scattered towns into the cities we know today. The railroad, boom and bust periods in mining and logging, and the emergence of Valley County as a recreation destination have had a dramatic impact on the communities of the area.

Photo courtesy Mc

6

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Call Public Librar

y


Cascade By Duane Petersen

Before the railroad came to Long Valley, a valley of small towns dotted the landscape. Travel between towns was difficult: some towns were cut off from one another during high water in the spring, and most of the area was completely cut off from the rest of the state during winter snows. Cascade popped up in 1913, when the railroad was built and bypassed the nearby towns of Thunder City, Van Wyck, and Crawford. Billy Patterson, who owned the land and lived in Crawford, had the idea to create a new town along the railroad tracks. Patterson laid out the town and sold lots west of the railroad tracks. In 1914, two new stick houses had been built in Cascade. One was the Jess LaFever home on Pine Street (which is still being lived in today), and the other was the railroad manager’s home along the tracks. LaFever moved his barber shop from Van Wyck to Main Street in Cascade. Today, the building which used to be the barber shop sits on Front Street.

Over the next year, the town of Cascade increased in size when several buildings were brought in from Van Wyck on skids. Buildings from Crawford and Thunder City were much harder to move as they had to be brought across the river, although a few were successfully transferred from Thunder City to Cascade on skids by crossing the river in the winter. For the most part, major buildings in Crawford, Thunder City, and Van Wyck (including the old Merits store and Odd Fellows Hall) were torn down and rebuilt in Cascade, board by board. One hundred years later, many of these original buildings are still in use. By 1914, the Boise Payette Lumber Company had set its sights on logging the vast virgin timber in the area. In July of 1917, Cascade became an incorporated town and the County Seat for the brand new “Valley County.” During this same time, a large logging camp was under construction on the south side of the river, just north of the town of Cascade (where the Water’s Edge campground is today). Due to the location of the shops and warehouses at the camp, a new logging bridge was built across the river to start bringing in timber from logged areas. From here the logs were brought into Cascade and then transported by railroad to the sawmill in Emmett. Continued page 8

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

7


Photo courtesy Idaho State Historical Society

The logging camp had a dramatic impact on the new town of Cascade, almost doubling its size. The newly appointed Cascade City Council decided they needed to annex the camp into the city to start collecting taxes. When they approached Boise Payette Lumber Company about the annex; however, they were met with stiff resistance. The Company warned Cascade that if they tried to annex the camp it would be moved out of town. Thinking the company was bluffing and wouldn’t go to the trouble to move all of the buildings, the City annexed the logging camp. Soon thereafter the Boise Payette Lumber Company moved the entire camp seven miles south to a new location called Cabarton, named for C. A. Barton, the president of Boise Payette Lumber Company. In addition to the equipment shops, a large commissary store was built, along with a school and company houses for workers. A water system and electric plant were also built. This company town lasted until the early 1930s, when logging almost shut down during the Great Depression. In 1935, the company town of Cabarton was moved two miles south of Donnelly and was called MacGregor. In 1939, the same town was moved to New Meadows. Many of the buildings from the Cascade, Cabarton, and MacGregor logging camps are still standing in what is called Company Town on the south side of New Meadows in Adams County. Despite the loss of the Boise Payette Lumber Company logging camp, Cascade continued to grow. In 1922, Joe Dion from Emmett started building a new sawmill along the river on the 8

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo courtesy McCall Pub

lic Library

south end of Cascade. Soon after the mill went into operation, it was purchased by Eccles Lumber Company of Sumpter, Oregon. Eccles brought a large work force with equipment and a small, narrow gauge steam engine. With local help they built a railroad track across the river and up to Beaver Creek to access timber. This gauge engine brought the logs to the mill. In addition to the track built to Beaver Creek, a short track was added on Pearsol Creek. A few trucks from Sumpter were also brought in to haul the easy logs from Pearsol. In 1928, Eccles sold the mill to Hallack & Howard Lumber Company from Colorado. Competition with the Boise Payette Lumber Company for timber areas accessible to trains forced Continued page 10


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Hallack & Howard to move away from the valley floor. This brought Percy Rutledge and Zest Tindle into the logging operation because they could drive trucks to haul logs. About this same time, Hallack & Howard started improving the mill and added a planer. With no need for the small narrow gauge logging engine, they built it into the mill to be used for back up steam when the big boiler was down for repair. Because they used the river for the log pond, the mill had to shut down each winter when the river froze over. Ownership of the mill by Hallack & Howard resulted in many benefits to the town of Cascade. They provided five new houses on Front Street for their managers to live in, plus several more to rent on the next block. They also made updates to the milling operation, which brought in more loggers to meet the mill’s demands, thus growing Cascade’s population.

AMERICAN LEGION POST 60: AN IDAHO LEGACY In October of 1919, The American Legion Post 60 was chartered with 29 members, and early in 1920, Luke L. Moore became the First Commander. After World War I, community organizations including the American Legion would meet upstairs in the old LL Moore Dry Goods and Furniture Store on Main Street in Cascade. In May of 1918, Frank E Spickelmire from Valley County entered the Army. He was killed in November of 1918 at the Battle of the Argonne Forest. Post 60 was later named “Frank E. Spickelmire” in his honor because he was the first Valley County Veteran killed in World War I. Today Post 60 is thriving. The Post is located in its new building, which was built in 1992, and currently has over 150 legion members and over 60 members serving in its Auxiliary. The building not only serves as the American Legion, but it also serves as the Valley County Veterans’ War Memorial, representing those who have served from Valley County and those who made the ultimate sacrifice. The Post is a focal point for many Cascade activities and events that support veterans, youth, and the community.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

In 1953, Boise Payette Lumber Company purchased the Hallack & Howard Mill in Cascade. Soon after their merger with the Cascade Lumber Company of Yakima, Washington, the Boise Cascade Corporation Lumber Company was born. Boise Cascade sold the five Hallack & Howard manager houses, which are now scattered around Cascade. Boise Cascade’s ownership of the mill assured a steady supply of timber that ran full time. In the years before Boise Cascade purchased the mill, most of the timber logged in Valley County had been processed in Emmett. It wasn’t until the 1953 purchase of Hallack & Howard that the logs started coming into Cascade Mill. At the same time log processing was moved to Cascade, the planer was closed down and green lumber went to Emmett to be dried and finished. In the years that followed, the old mill was torn down and an all new 10

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

electric sawmill was built. It was one of the highest producing mills owned by Boise Cascade. The mill stayed in operation until 2001, when it was closed and torn down, thus ending Cascade’s trademark of being a sawmill town since 1924. The small narrow gauge steam engine originally brought to Cascade by Eccles Lumber Company was donated back to Sumpter Valley Oregon Railroad by Boise Cascade when the mill was closed. Today it is one of the three engines that pull a tourist train during the summer in Sumpter, Oregon.


The sawmills in both Cascade and McCall were a major employer in the county. With more loggers and better logging equipment, the timber industry moved deeper into the Idaho mountains. Even though logging was seasonal, the saw mills operated year-round, giving towns like Cascade a good base for businesses to thrive. Adding to this was the work force of U.S. Forest Service personnel who were needed to help keep the timber industry viable. They provided support for timber management, and a fire fighting force kept wildfires at a minimum. This all added to the population of Cascade and to its tax base. Timber sales also provided income for the area. This money was used for road maintenance and schools. Because 90 percent of Valley County is Federal land, the money from timber sales was received in lieu of taxes. When the timber industry slowed down in the 1980s and the mill closed in 2001, this income was lost. Logging wasn’t the only major influence on Cascade’s history. In the 1930s Cascade was the supply center for the mines strung throughout the backcountry east of Cascade. Then when World War II started in 1941, the Stibnite mining operation swung into action. Located 83 miles east of Cascade, the Stibnite mine supplied much needed antimony and tungsten for the war effort. The town of Stibnite needed supplies every day for close to a thousand residents, the school, and the hospital. Ore, supply, mail, and grocery trucks became big business. A warehouse complex was built in Cascade to handle the ore being loaded on railroad cars and shipping machinery to the mine. The 83 miles of road over two summits had to be maintained during the summer and winter, which added a big boost to local employment. The State of Idaho Highway Department took over the snow plowing of the road to Yellow Pine during the war years. After the war a private contractor took over the ore trucks and the snow plowing until the mine closed in 1952. Cascade capitalized on the logging and mining booms that brought people to town. At one time Cascade had thirteen clubs with booze and gambling, and slot machines were prevalent throughout Valley County. It is rumored that one man said that a “lone nickel slot machine brought in five hundred dollars per year in taxes for the city, county and schools.” Slot machines were taxed

by the amount it took to play them. When gambling was stopped in the early 1950s, the schools were the first to feel the loss of this solid tax revenue. In 1946, construction on the Cascade Dam commenced. Many families were forced to sell and move because their land was in the flood path created by the damming of the river. Stories go both ways about how the families forced to sell their farms and ranches felt about the construction. For some it was heartbreaking to lose what their family had worked so hard to build, and for others the dam became a chance to start fresh. Coming out of the Great Depression, most small families were struggling to pay the bills. The government buyout proved to be an opportunity to improve their lives. Some families moved to other locations, but some simply changed occupations with a little extra money in their pockets. The earth dam was completed in 1947, and Cascade started to see a change in the economy. When the lake finally filled with water in the early 1950s, a new business came to Cascade… recreation. Home sites along the lake were sold, and summer homes became popular. Cascade has endured over the last century, and the town continues to thrive as the heart of Valley County.

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

11


Happy 100 birthday Cascade! th

From Kelly’s Whitewater Park


Cascade School District

The early settlers in Round and Long Valleys not only brought with them a rich heritage, but also a love and respect for education. From the earliest accounts of permanent families, the establishment of schools for their children was a priority in their lives. As the number of homesteaders grew, so did the number of schools. By 1912, the valley was dotted with many schoolhouses which would eventually be consolidated into what are presently the Cascade School District and the McCall-Donnelly School District. Though the small scattered schoolhouses are gone, the education students earned there will forever influence the history of Valley County and the State of Idaho. The first homestead was filed in Round Valley in 1884, by John Jarvis. He was followed by other settlers with families, and the first post office was established in Round Valley at Clear Creek by the summer of 1888. As additional post offices were established, towns and schools sprang up. At one time or another, there were about thirteen schools operating in the central and southern ends of Long and Round Valleys. Upper Alpha was the first school to be formed. It was in operation prior to 1888, according to the diary accounts of William Humphries, an early homesteader of Round Valley. Lower Round Valley School was another of the earliest schools in the valley. In a diary entry dated May 20, 1895, Humphries noted that he had worked on building the Round Valley School and that it would be ready to open on the next Monday. There was also a small log school operating north of Thunder City prior to 1893, but the Thunder City School was not constructed until 1907. Lower Alpha School, also known as the Humphries-Herrick school, was built in 1908. It was short-lived, however, and ceased to exist after 1920. The Upper Round Valley School began in 1915. This school continued to be a viable educational institution until 1950. Other than Yellow Pine, this was the last one-room schoolhouse in Valley County.

Specific information on most of the small one-room schools’ beginnings and endings are sketchy at best because few of the early homesteaders left written records like those of William Humphries. We do know, however, that schools existed at Cabarton, Crawford, Van Wyck, Scott Valley, Upper and Lower Beaver Meadows, and Arling. In some cases, before the buildings were erected, a teacher would be brought up from the Boise Valley or Canyon County to teach a winter session in a home. At other times home schooling was conducted when teachers were not available or classes were taught in buildings that served other purposes, as recalled by Horace Patterson who first attended school in an old drug store building in Crawford. Teacher pay was low, and each family would take a turn boarding the school teacher. The teacher was typically a young woman or an “old maid” who had finished her high school education but had no formal training in teaching. What was taught, how it was taught, and how discipline was carried out was wholly dependent on the teacher. Molly Jarvis Kerby, an early teacher at Van Wyck, Crawford, and Round Valley, began teaching when she was fourteen. It was said, “She had order, and learning was the rule of the day.” However, that was not always the case. The first teacher at Alpha #2 was “an old maid who was as hard of hearing as she was kind of heart. That deafness gave rein to a lot of mischief,” recalled William Humphries. Many old-timers remember the paddling that was a part of the “assertive discipline” program of the day. The old song, “school days, school days, good old Golden Rule days; reading and ‘riting and ‘rithmetic” taught to the tune of the Hick’ry Stick” was certainly true for early Round Valley and Long Valley Schools! Do you remember games they played at school? Games like: “Steal Sticks”, “Where Ya From?”, and “Ole Witch”. Continued page 14

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

13


INTERESTING FACTS: Taylor Bowlden, Class of 1977, served in

Washington, D.C., as the Legislative Assistant to U.S. Senator Steve Symms. Chris Crutcher, Class of 1964, is the published author of several books. “We were all famous in our own way,” stated Randy Redmon, Class of 1972.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

In 1914, the arrival of the railroad caused nearly the entire towns of Crawford, Van Wyck, and Thunder City to move to the newly formed town of Cascade. The Baptist Church building was moved from Van Wyck and became the first school in Cascade. When Cascade Dam and Reservoir were completed in 1947, more small communities and schools disappeared from the Long Valley scene. Some of the original school buildings were salvaged; however, the Centre School building now stands on Hillcrest Street in Cascade and served as the L.D.S. Church until recently. The old Van Wyck School building now sits on a lot in the Thunder Mountain Estates subdivision east of Cascade. As the small one-room schoolhouses closed, they became the feeder schools to the Cascade School District, which was established on July 11, 1916. Bonds were sold to construct the main building, which was completed in 1918. In 1919, the district became Independent School District No. 1. In 1936, a new five-room building adjoining the main building was constructed due to the efforts of Superintendent A.B. Anderson. This addition was occupied by the junior and senior high school classes. Carl C. Kitchen taught the first graduating class of 1921, which consisted of five students.

Donnelly The death of Roseberry was the birth of Donnelly. The Idaho Northern Pacific Railroad Company came to the valley and bypassed several of the established communities, including Roseberry. E.H. Dewey and Colonel Dewey, who owned the railroad, purchased the townsite of Donnelly and named the community for a close friend, Peter Donnelly. The partners then provided town lots to businesses and families. Many of the businesses that had been established in Roseberry moved their buildings and businesses to Donnelly, including the State Bank and the Long Valley Advocate newspaper. The bank building is still standing in present-day Donnelly and is home to the Silver Tip Hat Company. The first hotel was built in 1912, and the first school was built in 1914. By 1916, the population was 200. Because of the town’s central location and proximity to farms, within just a few years Donnelly became a lively community boasting a hotel, sawmills, a blacksmith shop, a dry goods company, an attorney, a barbershop, a veterinarian, and a Catholic church. Due to the growth of the new town, a committee consisting of businessmen from Roseberry, Donnelly, Norwood, and Arling posted advertisements in the Payette Lakes Star newspaper offering $5,000 to the County Commissioners to locate the county seat in Donnelly. Eventually Cascade offered to build the courthouse, 14

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

and the Commissioners chose to locate the county seat in Cascade. During the 1930s, weekends and evenings in Donnelly were very lively. Civilian Conservation Corps members from McCall, loggers from the MacGregor Logging Camp two miles out of town, and migrant workers at the Richmond & Samuel Pea Company all converged on the pool room and dance halls. Bootleggers enjoyed a robust business until prohibition ended in 1933. Today Donnelly is still thriving and is an important hub for the agricultural industry in Valley County due to its central location.


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Mccall

By the McCall Historic Preservation Commission

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

The history of McCall is entwined in the ebb and flow of four overlapping elements: recreation, mining, forestry, and agriculture. Mining had an early and direct influence on the development of the area for settlement. With the discovery of gold in the Salmon River mountains, miners hurried along the hazardous Packer John and Warren trails that followed the west side of Payette Lake two-miles north of the river outlet. At that time there was no permanent settlement on the south shore of the lake; however, the area near the outlet of the river was a communal fishing and hunting ground for Native American tribes in the summer months for many years. For the tribes the lake was a sacred and spiritual place where they could peacefully rendezvous with others. In 1874, N.B. Willey, a correspondent with the Warren Times newspaper and later Idaho’s second governor, created broad interest in the area when he wrote, “This piece of country is worth looking after. The lakes and streams abound with fish at this time of the year and the game is plentiful.... The Payette Lake, a beautiful sheet of water 12 miles long, in places is dotted with richly wooded inlets set like emerald gems on the bosom of the liquid mirror.” Chinook and white fish were so abundant that several commercial fisheries operated above the lake and sent 16

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

fresh, salted and dried fish to the mining camps and south to the Boise-Weiser areas. As demands for heavier mining equipment grew so did the need for a road. The Meadows-to-Warren trail, one of the several pack trails in which goods were transported to and from Warren, was enhanced in sections from the north and south and became the Warren Wagon Road by 1891. This may have prompted Charles Clifford to build the Statehouse Hotel, complete with a U.S. Post Office, at the junction of the road and lakeshore (which is the current site of Mugs Davies’ home). The hotel accommodated freight wagons and stage coaches. The roads, which provided a southwest approach from Meadows to Payette Lake and the Salmon River, set the stage for the role of the southern lakeshore as a vital mining, recreational, forestry, and agricultural center for central Idaho. These four elements became


Round Valley. When too steep for brakes, trees dragged behind the wagons held them back. Through Long Valley they followed the route of a company of Cavalry sent out from Fort Boise. Camp was made on the west side of the lake near the present Hays’ property (The current site of “Elevation 5000” condominiums). They had no boats, but built a raft from which to fish—a great sport for the young people. All enjoyed many red fish from the upper lake.” They returned home by way of Meadows Valley, crossing the Weiser River 36 times, stopping in Meadows for a dance and in Salubria for a chicken dinner with friends. Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

the basis for the creation and continuing development and expansion of the unique community that is McCall. Following in the tradition of the tribal rendezvous, the lake has been a recreational destination from the beginning. The first tourist campers on record were families who came to the southwest shore in 1883, from Emmett and the nearby Marsh-Ireton Ranch. A total of fourteen people arrived in several covered wagons with four-horse teams and saddle horses. One lady even insisted on having her “buggy” and driver along. According to Nettie Ireton Mills in her book, All Along the River, “They followed the first road into Long Valley... It went up the five-mile hill above Ola, across High Valley, down Tripod Creek to the river’s ford, thence over the steep hill beyond, to the

In the following two decades, several commercial camps, hotels, private clubs, and church camps provided recreational opportunities for visitors, enhanced by scenic tours of the lake on “Jewsharp” Jack Wyatt’s 30-foot steamboat. During the same timeframe, The Club Division (consisting of 500 building sites), Ontario Club, Sylvan Beach, Pilgrim’s Cove, Shady Beach, Lakeview, and Newcomb’s beaches were developed, including several individual cabins which were constructed along the lakeshore. The catalyst for creating the town of McCall was an immigrant family from Ohio and Missouri. Tom and Louisa McCall were nearing their 50s when they decided to strike out West for a new life. They knew farm life including all of its hardships and harvests and were looking forward to beginning again. Louisa had borne nine children, three of whom had died. Their son Continued on page 18

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

17


The 40 years following 1890, were a time of rapid growth, and the McCalls and their colleagues established a firm basis for the town’s character. Tom bought the Warren Gold Dredging Company sawmill and established his lumber business a block west of his home on the lakeshore. This and subsequent mills supplied lumber for the burgeoning homes, hotels, and business buildings.

Homer was in poor health most of his life, and the western climate seemed to hold hope for his improvement. Arriving in Boise in 1888, they stopped for several months at the MarshIreton Ranch near Emmett (where Homer then died) to gather equipment and supplies for the trek to Long Valley. Tom and Louisa and three sons, Ben, Dawson, and Ted, set off in the spring of 1889, for Long Valley with two wagons and horse teams, 25 head of cattle, numerous chickens, and household supplies for their new home. Pulling in at the south end of Payette Lake in June, they discovered a single resident, Sam Devers, who had squatter’s rights to 160 acres of prime shoreline property. He was eager to move on and agreed to trade his rights and cabin to Tom for a wagon, team, and harness (which is the current site of the Hotel McCall). Other settlers soon proved up their land which hugged the southern shore, and Tom plotted a town site of four blocks out of his original homestead. Earlier Tom McCall appropriated the abandoned Lardo U.S. Post Office, originally located ten miles south of the lake, and the area was briefly known as “Lardo.” W.B. Boydstun acquired the Lardo Post Office in 1903, and moved it and the name to his homestead west of the river. Honoring Tom as the father of the town, citizens changed the name to “McCall.” The Town of McCall was officially incorporated on July 19, 1911.

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COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Tom was a landowner, realtor, hotel owner, postmaster, sawmill owner, merchant, and councilman, as well as the respected founding father of the town. With the coming of the railroad in 1914, McCall was established as a commercial center for the surrounding area. According to Idaho Magazine, “The shore of the lake...is thickly gemmed with the grandest spots for building purposes around the entire lake - sites equally adapted for the use of a summer cottage - or business enterprise, and the Messrs McCall will hold out exceptional inducements to those who will build on their lake sites next spring and summer.” Forestry became an important influence in McCall when people recognized the value of the new Payette Forest Reserve created in 1905, by President Theodore Roosevelt. The Reserve’s headquarters were then at Meadows, but Tom managed to have it moved to McCall in 1908, by providing office space in his new building (which is the current site of Lake Street Station) and paying $80 for moving expenses for the supervisor and his family. Tom’s son, Dawson, became the ranger for what is now the McCall Ranger District. Dawson’s younger brother Ted was appointed deputy ranger for the Chamberlain Ranger District. The Forest Service and its Smokejumper Base has maintained a prominent place throughout the history of McCall and continues to be a major Continued on page 21


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contributor to its life. The addition of an airport in 1930, not only served the smokejumper program but also provided easier access to backcountry landing strips. The McCalls experienced more sadness when their son Ted passed away in 1911, at the age of 28. When Louisa was asked whether she was discouraged by the hard life, she replied, “Why no, of course not. I had my family with me. Besides, there was always the lake and the mountains, the grand trees and the sunshine. And when I got a little discouraged, I used to walk out to a place just above the lake and look across that glorious beauty—that was all I needed.” Tom and Louisa laid the foundation for the next generation of leadership, but they were not alone. Carl and Ida Brown and their family owned and operated a successful sawmill, which gained them influence in the sawmill industry and resulted in sawmills and timber becoming a major contributor to the economy of the town and Central Idaho. Carl was originally from New England, where his family owned an important sawmill and lumber business. With this background and armed with a degree in business, Carl extended his reach beyond the

NORTHWEST PASSAGE Hollywood comes to McCall! In the summer of 1939, Spencer Tracy, Robert Young, Walter Brennan and the Metro Golden Mayer crew descended on McCall to film Northwest Passage along the shores of Payette Lake. Sylvan Beach Resort, near present day “Charlie’s Garden,” served as headquarters for the film crew while various beaches along the lake and Payette River were transformed into elaborate movie sets. Over 150 movie extras from the local area were cast in the film and paid $5 per day with an extra $5 per day for anyone who had a beard. While little evidence of the movie sets can be seen today, the scenic shores of Payette Lake remain.

community to serve as state senator for Valley County in the Idaho Legislature and later as an Idaho Democratic National Committeeman. The Boise-Cascade Company acquired the Brown mill in 1964, and closed operations in 1977, removing the “backbone” of McCall’s economy. The lumber business ceased to exist in McCall, and the sawmill burned to the ground in 1984. In 1905, several private lumber companies started a cooperative venture to protect the forests from fire and disease. Over the next ten years this developed into a formal organization, The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA). Members included private timber companies, the State of Idaho, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In the 1930s, SITPA managed some of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps in the McCall area. One of the many building projects by the CCC was the headquarters compound for SITPA on State Street in McCall. Following the Finnish techniques for construction, Finn craftsmen from the valley supervised the construction of these log buildings which are on the National Historic Register and currently house the Central Idaho Historical Museum. The town has maintained its village charm through the good times of progress, the excitement of MGM filming Northwest Passage, the addition of the Shore Lodge and the Yacht Club to an already interesting town center, the discovery of a deep water creature in the lake named “Sharlie”, and a magic that touches all who come to its forests and shores. If a positive spin can be attributed to fire, many of the hotels, stores, and businesses were leveled only to be rebuilt or replaced by modern facilities. After decades of fairly moderate growth, McCall has been “discovered” as a desirable resort destination by private investors and the development industry. The increasing growth rate of Boise’s Treasure Valley, 100-miles to the south, has resulted in even more focus on McCall for resort and vacation home developments in recent years.

Photos courtesy McCall Public Library

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

21


Southern Gateway To Valley County

High Valley

Smiths Ferry The area near Smiths Ferry had long been an important Native American gathering place, and achieved even greater importance when G. Meyers established a ferry in 1887, which allowed folks a safe crossing on the Payette River and access to the area east of the Payette River in Long and Round Valleys. The road from the ferry went over the ridge and into Round Valley at Fern and then north to Alpha, Thunder City, and Crawford. This route also provided access to the mining district near Thunder Mountain. Mr. Meyers later sold the ferry enterprise to Jim Smith in 1891, for whom Smiths Ferry is named. Because of the establishment of the ferry and the location of first the trails and then the roads, Smiths Ferry became the gateway to Long Valley and the rest of the backcountry for the flood of miners and settlers that entered this area.

High Valley is a lovely area that once boasted more than 100 homesteads on the route from Emmett between Ola and Smiths Ferry. Homesteaders first settled in the area in 1897. It was the main route into the southern end of Long Valley until the road was built along the Payette River from Horseshoe Bend.

Photo cour tesy McCall Public

Another road to the west part of the valley went north from near Smiths Ferry, entered Long Valley near Cabarton, continued along the river north to where Cascade is now, and then proceeded over to Van Wyck and up to Beaver Meadows. Smiths Ferry served as a stagecoach stop for many years where the team of horses were fed and rested, and folks could take a meal at the restaurant or overnight at the hotel on the east side of the river. This route

Library

(Emmett, Montour, Sweet, Ola, High Valley, Smiths Ferry, Round Valley, Van Wyck) was driven by some of the most skillful and courageous reinsmen ever produced. Regular railroad service came to the area in 1913. Ferry services were discontinued in 1919, when a bridge was built across the Payette, and the area is now home to several residences and Cougar Mountain Lodge. The lodge opened for business in 1941, and still provides services to recreation enthusiasts who come to the area to hunt, fish, hike, whitewater raft, and snowmobile.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

22

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo cour te

sy Cougar M

ountain Lodg

e


Warm Lake Warm Lake is a 640-acre lake located 26 miles east of Cascade and is the largest natural lake in the Boise National Forest. The lake was discovered during the gold rush. The Warm Lake Lodge, which is closed now, was established in 1911, on the northeastern shore of the lake. In 1917, William Ben Rice came to the area as a U.S. Forest Service Ranger. Rice Peak is now named after him, and his legacy lives on at the Boy Scout camp he helped to establish at Warm Lake. The first cabins around the lake were built in 1933, by Sylvester Kinney and Gordon Blinn, and from 1940-1960 Warm Lake had a post office. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCCs) established a camp at the lake in that same year (which is now the Baptist Church Camp). The CCCs also built the water system and the swimming pool west of Warm Lake on the South Fork of the

Deadwood

Today Warm Lake is a hot spot for recreationalists. Many people come year-round to visit the lodge and enjoy Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, fishing, camping, and other outdoor activities in the area.

DEADWOOD DAM

In the summer of 1863, the miners in Idaho were discovering gold placers in the Deadwood Basin. By the summer of 1864, Deadwood City was established west of the Deadwood River. The next summer a prospector named Nathan Smith discovered a better area for operations and established a new Deadwood Mining District in 1867. By 1868, miners began locating quartz outcrops, which later led to the discovery of the lead-zinc deposits; however, many miners left for the Loon Creek gold discoveries the next year, all but abandoning Deadwood by 1876. In 1921, Deadwood mine was resurrected, and from the time of its reopening to 1932, the mine was considered one of the largest and most important mines in south central Idaho due to the vast amount of lead, zinc, copper, silver, and gold extracted. By June of 1932, supplies were removed from the property, options to claims were forfeited, and the mine shut down. A lease was obtained on the Deadwood Mine in 1940, and the mine was reopened to mine for strategic metals for the war effort. From 1946 to 1948, Deadwood City had an established post office. By 1947, one million dollars in lead and zinc had been extracted. In 1950, the mining company forfeited their corporate charter and reported to the Idaho Mines Inspector that “the underground workings were all abandoned and the surface rights had been sold to third parties.” Today Deadwood is considered a “ghost town,” and the area is used by recreationalists. Photo courtesy WaterA

Salmon River, which opened in 1936; however, the pool was Photo cour tesy McCall Public Library closed and filled with soil at the end of 1973 by the U.S. Forest Service. The North Shore Lodge, built in 1936, on the northern shore, still operates year-round.

rchives.org

Deadwood Dam was part of The Boise Project and approved for construction in October of 1928. The damsite is located in an isolated area on the western slope of the Sawtooth Mountains, in a narrow canyon where the Deadwood River has cut into the granite bedrock, approximately 25 miles southeast of Cascade. The project was a difficult proposition for contractors, but it provided many jobs during The Great Depression. After widening the roads, erecting a construction camp and sawmill, building a temporary diversion flume for the river, and excavating the foundation area, work was shut down for the winter in December of 1929, leaving only maintenance crews who received supplies via planes landing on skis. When spring approached, dam workers arrived on snowshoes or by dog sled. Two of the biggest challenges at this point were snow removal and then providing a constant supply of cement until the 25-footwide concrete sections which ran the full thickness of the dam were completed in November of 1930. Grouting of the contraction joints was completed by government forces in March of 1931, and the dam was ready for spring runoff—just in time! Deadwood Reservoir, formed by Deadwood Dam, is three-and-one-half miles long, covers 3,180 acres with 21 miles of shoreline, and is managed by the Boise National Forest. Today the area is commonly used for hiking, camping, canoeing, boating, water skiing, fishing, and more. The Idaho state record Atlantic salmon was taken in 1995, from Deadwood Reservoir, and that’s not just another fishing tale! Continued on page 24

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

23


The Route East of Payette River

Alpha

In 1888, during a particularly harsh winter when the cumulative snowfall reached eight feet, a post office was established at the James Horner Homestead. The new community was named Alpha, after the first letter of the Greek Alphabet. Mrs. Sisk, who provided the name, hoped that as other communities were established folks would continue the Greek tradition; however, that was not to be as the next town established in Long Valley was designated Lardo. Alpha was an important social center for settlers in Round Valley. The town centered around the home of whoever held the position of postmaster at the time. The last site of Alpha is on the Herrick homestead.

Photo cour tesy

Photo courtesy Idaho State Historical

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Museum at Ro

seberry

One of the first sawn lumber buildings in Valley County was in Alpha. It was also the first to sport a coat of paint. Other buildings included were two schools, the Lower Alpha School and the Upper Alpha School, served the homestead children in the area. The building that can be seen from Highway 55 is the Upper Alpha School, which became the Alpha Grange in 1935.

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry

24

Valley County

Society


Thunder City

Thunder City was a product of gold fever. Gold was discovered in the late 1800s east of Yellow Pine. Freighters with teams of up to ten horses pulled supplies from Boise through High Valley, across Smiths Ferry, and along this route to the mines, and they returned by the same route with ore. Thunder City was an important stop for freighters who divided and redistributed loads in this location to be carried to the mines by pack train. There was a saloon, dry goods store, grocery, rooming house, livery, blacksmith, and even a sweet shop with ladies furnishings. When the railroad came through Cascade a few miles northeast of Thunder City, many of the buildings were moved to Cascade on skids. Larger buildings were torn down for salvage.

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry

Fern

A post office, stage stop, and small store comprised the town of Fern, which was located at the bottom of the Round Valley grade and east of the hill from Smiths Ferry. Cream produced by several families was carried from Fern by stage to Emmett, and then sent by rail to Portland. The Fern post office was moved to Smiths Ferry in 1913.

Crawford

Crawford was built along what is now the beginning of the Warm Lake Highway, just east of the Payette River. The community served the Photo courtesy McCall Pub lic Library many homesteads east of the river and was also a juncture for freight business to the mines near Yellow Pine. By 1912, Crawford had a population of 200 people and included a post office, a stage station, Crawford Mercantile Company, a bank, a blacksmith, a hotel, and a livery stable. In 1913, the decision to locate the railroad west of the main town of Crawford spelled doom for the community. Many of the buildings were moved, including the post office, and the new, bigger school in Cascade attracted families to that area. The few buildings that are left are now part of the Davis family ranch. Photo cour tesy McCall Public

Library

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

25


The Route West of the River

Van Wyck

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum

at Roseberry

Levi Kimball laid out the town site of Van Wyck, named it after a friend, and became its first postmaster. By 1912, Van Wyck had a population of 220, Baptist and Catholic churches, a few saloons, a confectionary, a blacksmith, a doctor, a clothing store, a drug store, a furniture store, and a building materials center. The town was unincorporated in 1917, soon after the railroad came through to the east and north. Many buildings were moved to what is now the city of Cascade. The site of Van Wyck was flooded by the Cascade Reservoir in 1948.

26

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library care of Roy Shaw

Beaver Meadows Beaver Meadows was the area of the valley south of Tamarack Falls, now covered by the reservoir. Sugarloaf Island is the only part of the area still above the reservoir; a short climb up this elevated spot in the days before the reservoir would have provided a view of the homes of over 100 families. During the drought in 2001, the reservoir dropped 18 feet by September, and a great deal of the Beaver Meadows area could be seen for the first time since the dam was built and the reservoir was created.

Photo courtesy Chester Matthews


Back Country Communities

Roosevelt This little community, named for President Roosevelt, was founded in 1902, and served the miners of the Thunder Mountain Mining District. An assay office, a claim recording office, seven saloons, two general stores, a post office, a school, a blacksmith shop, boarding houses, and a newspaper office that published the weekly Thunder Mountain News reflected the resident population of, some say over 2,000 miners.

Photo courtesy Mc

Call Public Librar

y

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

28

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry

By June of 1909, the population had decreased as the gold deposits also dwindled. In 1908, after a wet winter and a warm spring with heavy rains, a mudslide descended in the canyon west of the town. The slow-moving but massive mudslide blocked Marble Creek, and the water gradually rose and flooded the town, creating Roosevelt Lake. The community recovered their belongings but not their buildings. For many years the logs and lumber from the disaster floated on the lake, and buildings and fences on the lake bottom could be seen through the clear water.


Thunder Mountain Thunder Mountain received its name from the Caswell brothers who prospected the district starting in 1894. Rainbow Peak, the highest point in the area, attracts a good deal of lightning and acts as an excellent sounding board; the ground does not actually tremble, but the thunder is so loud that it seems to. Slides of soft, disintegrated rhyolite were common in the area. Prospectors and miners dug around in the mud flows, since the flows had some especially rich gold deposits near the surface. Prospectors in the area had the notion that Thunder Mountain (or at least the rhyolite mud slides on it) was a mountain of gold. Well the mountain of gold turned out to be a mountain with gold skin; there was a great rush there in 1902, but the entire district in the early days produced only about $350,000 from the Dewey Mine on Thunder Mountain. This community, in the deep valley cut by Marble Creek, fared better than Roosevelt, but was short-lived, since it was entirely

Photo courtesy Valley Cou

nty Museum at Roseberry

dependent on the boom and bust cycles of mining. Saloons and boarding houses rose up briefly to take advantage of the miners as they passed through during the gold rush, but the community faded fairly quickly after the rush.

Yellow Pine

Edwardsburg

Yellow Pine dates back to 1906, and is a quiet, rustic community except during the annual Music and Harmonica Festival, when it becomes quite lively with hundreds of visitors. Located at the junction of Johnson Creek and the East Fork of the Salmon River, 70 miles into the back country from Cascade, Yellow Pine was a convenient center for the many miners that swarmed the mountains to the east and north.

Prices in many of the small, remote, mining communities were high, and supplies were scarce. The miners were at the mercy of the owners and freighters who traversed the steep country on meager roads. In the winter the roads were impassable. Due to these hardships, only a few of these mining communities still exist. Edwardsburg, in the Big Creek area, was one of the few mining communities to survive the bust cycles, and mail is still delivered there two days a week.

Photo courtesy Idaho State Historical Society

The origianl road to Yellow Pine scales up and over Cabin Creek Summit, a steep route that climbs roughly 3,000 feet out of Warm Lake Valley. A better route was built through the Landmark Station in 1923, but it still posed lots of problems to the freighters and remained impassable in winter. A lowerelevation route, along the South Fork of the Salmon River, was eventually built which allowed mining vehicles and supplies to be transported throughout the year to the population in Yellow Pine and the mining communities beyond. Continued on page 31

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

29


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Northern Long Valley Communities

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry

Arling/Center Arling and Center were small, pioneer, farming communities consigned to an underwater grave when the rising water in Cascade Reservoir created Lake Cascade. In the early 1900’s, a diphtheria epidemic was especially devastating to Arling as several families lost children to the disease.

Roseberry

Photo cour tesy

In 1910, Roseberry was the largest town in Long Valley and a bustling settlement with a population of 200, a five-sided hotel, two blacksmith shops, a restaurant, a lumber mill, a marching band, several schools, banks, and the largest creamery in Long Valley. In 1914, the railroad line carved through the valley a couple of miles to the west of Roseberry. Like several other Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Valley County

Museum at Ro

seberry

communities in the valley that were also bypassed by the railroad, Roseberry’s prosperity began to fade. Buildings were torn down or relocated to abut the rails at the newly developed town of Donnelly, which was developed by the railroad adjacent to the tracks. Families moved, businesses faltered, and bit by bit Roseberry shrank until it became a ghost town with a small remnant population and a few aging buildings resting at a dusty crossroads surrounded by pasture. In 1973, a small group of dedicated volunteers laboriously moved the historic Methodist-Episcopal Church building back to its original home in Roseberry and founded a museum. Continued on page 32

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

31


Photos courtesy Valley Cou

nty Museum at Roseberry

Little by little the group of volunteers known as the Long Valley Preservation Society, with enthusiastic support from the greater community, obtained other buildings and brought them to Roseberry to be restored and preserved. Some, like the church, were original to Roseberry, but others of architectural or historic significance were donated or purchased from around the valley. In 1990, Roseberry was designated by Valley County Commissioners as the official Valley County Museum, governed by the Long Valley Preservation Society. The site represents over 40 years of volunteer labor and community support. The museum at Historic Roseberry harbors 24 structures that tell the story of the settlement of Long Valley, Idaho. Several of the historic buildings make up the Finnish Heritage Center, provide a look at typical Finnish homesteads, and represent the largest collection of Finnish buildings in the Pacific Northwest.

Spink Spink began with a family homestead in 1896, four miles north of Roseberry. In 1903, a post office was established in Mrs. Spink’s house. The Spink School served a few local families. The Spink family owned a large, horse-drawn threshing machine, brought to their home via Goose Creek Road and Meadows Valley. They went up and down the valley from August until snowfall with their crew working for other farmers.

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COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Other buildings include a one-room schoolhouse, a carriage house, an original and unique twostory homestead cabin, and a wonderful restored 1913 barn, which is used as a performance and event center and to host parties and rustic weddings. The McDougal General Store and the village center lawn area, now known as the Nasi Commons, were purchased by the museum in 2015. The Nasi Commons were named in honor of a local family whose generosity led to the Nasi Trust, a fund dispersed by Valley County for parks in the county and used to purchase the store and lots.


Valley County, Idaho Established February 26, 1917 at 9:30 a.m. Big Creek &

Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness

Payette National Forest

At 2.367 million acres it is the largest contiguous wilderness area in U.S. outside of Alaska and includes portions of multiple counties.

Roosevelt 1902 – pop. 3000 1908 – flooded by landslide

Post Office 1906

1893 - Gold discovered in Thunder Mountain area

Sawmills 1896 – 1977 Lardos Post Office est. 1889

Prior to gold rush of 1860’s, Native Americans spent summers in Round & Long Valleys and wintered in the canyons of the Salmon River drainage

Gold, antimony, tungsten, and mercury

Highest point at 9705’

est. 1914 Tamarack Resort est. 2001

Roseberry – in early 1900s was the largest town in Long Valley until bypassed by railroad

9,862 population in 2010 Boise National Forest

Van Wyck

.

3,678 square miles 2,354,048 acres

Dam completed in 1948 - County Seat Railroad Depot 1913 Sawmill 1923 - 2001

8.8 % is private land (206,065 acres)

- logging company town in early 1900s, pop. 500 Deadwood Mines

8

st

- 1883 - 1 sawmill in county

Original entry to area prior to highway

Silver Creek Plunge

1st Valley County Officials, 1917

Valley County Officials, 2016


THE LONG VALLEY FINNISH CHURCH Valley Photo cour tesy at County Museum Roseberry

Norwood Norwood was not a town defined by streets and corners, but instead it consisted of a store, a post office, and a little cluster of Finnish homesteads located near the current site of Lake Fork, where the train stopped for ranchers to load cattle and for farmers to ship crops.

Lake Fork

One of the most iconic buildings along Farm to Market Road is the Finn Church. In addition to its age and picturesque qualities, the Long Valley Finnish Church is a wonderful, well-preserved example of a simple frame church in an unspoiled rural setting that has been meeting the needs of the community for over one hundred years. The Finnish Church has even greater significance as the best-kept remaining artifact of the Finnish settlement in Long Valley. It is a testimony to the collective efforts of early immigrants to erect and maintain a building where they could meet and hold religious services. In the early 1900s, Finnish families typically met in various homes for their worship services, which were often lead by elders or by visiting Finnish Lutheran Ministers. In 1904, Rev. William Eloheimo became the local Finnish Lutheran Pastor and with his encouragement plans were set into motion to erect a Lutheran Church for religious services for the many Finnish families living in the upper Long Valley area. It was during the years of 1906 to 1908 that the Finnish Ladies’ Aid was established. This group would lead the fundraising efforts for the new church. In 1913, Uriel Kantola donated a corner of his property as the location for the new church. John Kumpula sold property for the cemetery across the lane to the church for two dollars. John Heikila, Nick Ranta, and John Ruska were contracted as carpenters, along with John Lapinoja as the principal builder. Construction costs were just over $1,800.

Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry

This small community had a post office in 1906, with a postmaster named William Manning. It had a store, service station, Finn Hall, café, and bar. Lake Fork and Elo were the main towns which serviced and were occupied by Finnish settlers in Long Valley.

On several occasions after construction was underway, local farmers and ranchers would gather to assist with work requiring many hands and strong shoulders. The Finnish Lutheran Church of Long Valley was finally completed and officially dedicated during the summer of 1917. In 1967, the Board of Directors officially changed the name to the Long Valley Finnish Church. The church is on the National Register of Historic Places and still has a functioning Board of Directors and an active women’s auxiliary group: The Finnish Ladies Aid. The building continues to be used for special religious services, weddings, and funerals. The cemetery, located just north of the church, is now administered by the Long Valley Cemetery District. The headstones in the cemetery identify many of those early Finnish immigrants and their descendants.

Photo cour tesy Valley County

34

Museum at Roseberr y

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

Plans are now underway to erect a Centennial Pavilion on the property to pay tribute to and recognize those early ancestors. Commemorative pavers are being sold to help fund the project.


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Elo Elo was one of the Finnish towns in Long Valley and was built by and named after an early minister, Reverend Eloheimo, whose family had arrived in 1902. Reverend Eloheimo wrote letters to Finnish publications in the United States and Finland advertising the desirability of homesteading in Long Valley. The result Photo courtesy Valley County Museum at Roseberry was a concentration of Finnish homesteaders, many of whom had previously had other occupations in other parts of the country, including mining. Other Finnish immigrants thrived as farmers, loggers, and skilled builders of log structures. These immigrants relocated to Elo after fleeing their homeland during the late 19th century due to the Russification of the Grand Duchy of Finland.

Lardo

Located west of the Payette River and incorporated into present-day McCall, Lardo was one of the earliest communities in Long Valley. In 1886, Lardo sprang up as a community that serviced the gold mines to the north. It is said that Lardo got its name when a wagon load of flour and lard overturned and mixed together to create a “lard dough.� While there is no evidence to prove the truth of this event, it does make a great story!

Several Finnish names grace roads and landmarks in the area. Some Finn families changed their names to more Americanized versions; for example, Rintakangas became Johnson and Hangalia became Hently.

The town boasted two blacksmiths, a stable, a meat market, a restaurant, a harness maker, two hotels, a post office, a general store, and the first newspaper in the area, the Long Valley Advocate. In 1891, G.F. Trock was postmaster and owned the general store. Sometime between 1912 and 1913, the population had swelled to 50 people, and a daily stage service ran between Lardo and Meadows for a fare of $1.75. But despite its early success, Lardo was eventually assimilated into McCall.

Photo courtesy McCal

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

l Public Librar y

COMMUNITIES OF VALLEY COUNTY

37


VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Valley County was established on February 26, 1917, after much debate as to the boundary lines. The new county was carved from territory previously assigned to Idaho and Boise Counties. Valley County is the fifth largest county in Idaho and is comprised of 3,678 square miles of land – larger geographically than the states of Delaware or Rhode Island but much more sparsely populated. The valley includes only three incorporated cities: McCall in 1911, Donnelly in 1914, and Cascade (the county seat) in 1917. Many other communities have come and gone over time, including Alpha (the first settlement), Arling, Cabarton, Crawford, Lardo, Roseberry, Roosevelt, Spink, Thunder City, and Van Wyck. Current unincorporated population hubs include Big Creek, High Valley, Lake Fork, Smiths Ferry, Tamarack, Warm Lake, and Yellow Pine. Much of Valley County is steep mountainous terrain abundant with timber and contains three national forests: Payette, Boise, and Challis, along with the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area. Only 8.7% of the area is private land; the remaining lands are owned by federal, state, and local governments. The diverse landscape and natural resources brought many Native Americans, miners, farmers, loggers, and recreationists to the area even prior to the existence of the official boundary lines. Early inhabitants of the area were the nomadic Northern Shoshoni (Sheepeater) Tribe. Although fur trappers passed through the area between 1815 and 1840, it was the Idaho Gold Rush that brought the first influx of white settlers to the area. Thunder Mountain brought thousands of miners and investors to the remote mountains in the early 1900s. An estimated 3,000 people worked in the Roosevelt area, the largest city of the mining district. But the hard winters, remoteness, difficult travel conditions, and lack of easily accessible gold led to a dramatic depopulation. Discovery of antimony, tungsten, and mercury in the Stibnite area led to mining booms during both World Wars I and II. In the 1940s, Stibnite was a company town, home to worker housing, a school, a hospital, a dance hall, and a bowling alley. But by the mid-1950s, the site was virtually abandoned. Interest in the Thunder Mountain and Stibnite areas continues due to rising mineral prices.

Many homesteaders, via the Homestead Act, settled the area on farms and ranches. Although winters could be long and harsh, grass grew well and provided healthy pasturelands on which homesteaders could graze their cattle and sheep. The homesteaders who successfully “proved up” their homesteads stayed, but many could not make a living on their small pieces of property. As a result smaller homesteads were abandoned and later absorbed by much larger farms or ranches. The establishment of sawmills and lumber companies also led to the growth of Valley County. Due to the plentitude of trees and a demand for cut lumber and railroad ties, small mills were built in almost every community; the first mill arrived in 1883, at Smiths Ferry. McCall’s mill, founded in 1902 on Payette Lake, survived several fires and changes in ownership before closing in October 1977. Cascade’s mill was built in 1923, on the bank of the Payette River and provided economic stability to the area until closing in 2001. While the railroad was a boon to the timber industry, it also meant the end to many pioneer towns because it circumvented those communities. Merchants in Van Wyck, Crawford, and Thunder City moved their businesses, buildings and all, which helped to establish the new town of Cascade. The community of Roseberry declined, and Donnelly emerged when the railroad was built approximately one mile to the west of Roseberry. The construction of Cascade Dam in the 1940s for downstream irrigation and flood control reduced some of the rich farmland but created the opportunity for a significant recreational fishing and boating industry. The power plant below the dam also supplies power to nearby communities. Residents and visitors have always enjoyed the various natural resources in Valley County – from fisheries and wildlife to minerals to timber to beautiful lakes and rivers. As the ranching, mining, and lumber industries have declined, recreational tourism has increased in importance with regard to the County’s economy. People continue to come to Valley County for its incredible beauty and year-round recreational activities.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

38

VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library


Photo courtesy the Idaho State Historical Society

Photo courtesy the Idaho State Historical Society

Common Hunting Grounds

Photo courtesy the Idaho State Historical Society

By Steve Barrett, Ph.D. The story of Valley County’s Native Americans begins in the distant past and in the Arctic north, as does the story of all of our nation’s indigenous peoples. However, contrary to what many of us may have been taught as youngsters, recent genetic and archaeological research suggests that Siberian hunters and their dependents did not so much “cross” a “land bridge” between Asia and North America 15,000 or more years ago as settled for generations on a broad, new landscape. The so-called land bridge was in fact a habitable expanse 600 to 1000 miles wide north-tosouth and endless in extent east-to-west. Only an ice sheet two miles thick, not the geography, prevented these intrepid hunters and gatherers from proceeding into North America. Paleontologists refer to this region as “Beringia”. Of course, it is all under the Bering Sea today, but for thousands of years before and after the height of the last Ice Age, about 24,500 years ago, Beringia was dry, scrub tundra, much like the Alaskan interior today. For as many as 10,000 years, Beringia may have been home to generations of hunters and gatherers who were no longer Asian, but not yet American, either. The evidence for such a scenario resides in two places—in the archaeology of the region and in the DNA of prehistoric Northeast Asians and present-day Native Americans. Genetically speaking, the ancestors of today’s Native Americans separated from their Northeast Asian forebears about 25,000 years YBP (years before the present). This coincides with the date of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 24,500 YBP, the period when nearly all of the planet’s freshwater was locked in glacial ice. This also jives with the archaeology, which finds no human beings whatsoever in Northeast Asia immediately before or after the

LGM. So it would seem Ice Age Asians had vacated Northeast Asia altogether. Where did they go? South into Asia and east into North America, by way of Beringia, it would appear, but to date no archaeological artifacts older than 14,000 YBP have been uncovered anywhere in Alaska. Where then were these eastbound Asians between 25,000 YBP, when they separated from their Asian forebears, and 14,000 YBP, when they began to arrive in significant numbers in North America? Scientists now believe that they may have been in Beringia. It was only later--as Earth warmed, glaciers began to melt, sea levels began to rise, and Beringia began to sink into the sea again--that these proto-Native Americans may have begun migrating into Alaska. From there, they would have followed the Yukon River into the Canadian interior, where a corridor was opening between retreating ice sheets, north to south along the Rockies, into what is today the western United States. Sometime before 11,500 YBP, the descendants of these first Americans entered the landscape we now call Idaho. Evidence of these first Idahoans is as widely dispersed as Hatwai, located on the north bank of the Clearwater River, near Lewiston, and Wilson Butte Cave in Jerome County. In more than fifteen prehistoric sites statewide, one finds habitation sites, animal kill and processing sites, temporary encampments, flint and other lithic prospects and quarries, caches, petroglyphs and pictographs, and human burials from this and later Paleo-Indian prehistory. In closest proximity to today’s Valley County are the Hetrick site, located in the Weiser River Valley in Washington County, and the Cooper’s Ferry site, on the Salmon River, south of Cottonwood. Continued on page 40

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In North Idaho, egress may have been from both east and west: Nez Perce is a Sahaptian language (North Idaho, Montana, and Washington) and Coeur d’Alene, a Salishan language (North Idaho, Washington, and British Columbia). By 3,000 YBP the Salmon River seems to have provided a convenient boundary between two distinct cultures—a Basin culture to the south, along the Snake River, characterized by flat grinding stones, clay pottery, and brush shelters and tipis, indicative of predominantly desert life, and a Plateau culture to the north, characterized by harvests of salmon, big game, and roots, the use of concave mortar stones rather than flat ones, gabled housing, and the weaving of cornhusk basketry. The Payette River valley, including today’s Valley County, provided rich hunting grounds for both the Nez Perce and other North Idaho peoples, and the Shoshoni and other native peoples from the south. This seasonal intermingling of tribes seems to have been peaceful, as evidenced by annual, intertribal meetings at the convergences of the Snake with the Boise, Malheur, Owyhee, Payette, and Weiser rivers. As early as 8,000 YBP, proto-Native American culture had transitioned from the pursuit of big game to an annual cycle of migration, harvesting camas, sego, bitterroot, and kouse (“biscuit root”) when in season, then fishing for salmon and/or hunting buffalo. Winter village sites begin to appear in the archaeological record during this period. Photo courtesy the Idaho State Historical Society

Some of the finds at both sites radiocarbon date to 11,000 YBP and 11,500 YBP, respectively. At Hetrick, archaeologists uncovered the butchered and charred skeletal remains of elk, deer, rabbits, aquatic birds, and salmon and other fish. The salmon bones are evidence of some of the earliest consumption of that species in Idaho. Bone and flake tools and projectile points were discovered, as well. The same climate change that had opened the Americas to early modern humans simultaneously doomed their largest prey—mammoths and mastodons, giant bison, horses, camels, and giant sloths—to extinction. In fact, paleontological evidence of human harvests of these prehistoric behemoths is relatively rare in North America.

Two developments changed Native American cultures in Idaho— and Valley County-- forever. The first was the introduction of the horse. The Shoshoni were among the first Native peoples on the continent to acquire the horse, from their Comanche kinsmen on the Great Plains. Of course the Comanche acquired the horse from the Spanish. This dramatically changed how the Northern Shoshoni completed their annual hunting and harvesting cycle, for with the horse the Shoshoni adopted horse culture, made most evident perhaps by their acquisition of the tipi and travois, which revolutionized Shoshoni mobility, and by their adoption of the feathered headdress and other features of Great Plains dress

Excavations suggest that hunters from the Great Plains, where many of the few harvests of mammoths and mastodons are clustered, may have been the first to enter Idaho, entering from the south and progressing eastward along the Snake River plain. Pursuing herds of prehistoric bison, camels, horses and smaller fauna, with Clovis- and Folsom-pointed spears in hand, they traversed wide, lush grasslands growing along the roiling, leaping, tumbling glacial waters of the Snake. These earliest peoples occupied caves and rock shelters and left scant evidence of their lives—primarily the accoutrements of hunting and skinning game, as at Hetrick. 40

VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY

Photo courtesy the Idaho State Historical Society


and commemoration. The Nez Perce, too, acquired the horse sometime before Lewis and Clark encountered them, bred what became known as the Appaloosa horse, and became accomplished buffalo hunters. The second development devastated traditional Nez Perce and Northern Shoshoni culture—the infiltration of white miners, then settlers onto traditional Nez Perce and Shoshoni lands. Famously, Thomas Jefferson had predicted that it would take the U.S. one hundred generations to fulfill what he believed was the nation’s destiny to occupy North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. By 1890, just a little over two generations after Jefferson’s death, the U.S. had effectively realized his ambition.

Within a single generation of Jefferson’s death, the vast territory in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington occupied, utilized, and stewarded by the Nez Perce—13 million or more acres--would be reduced to the current confines of the Nez Perce reservation centered at Lapwai—a mere 780,000 acres! In South Idaho, the Bannock, Northern Paiute, and Northern Shoshoni would be forcibly removed hundreds of miles to the east, to Fort Hall near Idaho Falls. With the exception of a small band of Northern Paiutes in Duck Valley, Southwestern Idaho Native Americans would be driven off their traditional lands altogether. One of the few bands of any Idaho nation to avoid relocation was the so-called Weiser Shoshoni band led by Eagle Eye.

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This small group of forty or so men, women, and children retained their traditional culture first in the Council and Indian valleys, then in Dry Buck basin, west of Banks, for an additional thirty years after other Northern Shoshonis were displaced to Fort Hall. How did they do this? Though drawn into Oregon’s “Snake War” (1866-1868) and General O.O. Howard’s campaign against Buffalo Horn during the so-called Bannock War (1878), Eagle Eye avoided Native-white conflicts as much as possible, and in fact avoided unnecessary contact with whites altogether. Out of sight, out of mind was the policy, and through the end of Eagle Eye’s life (1896) the policy worked. In fact, after his death and through 1900, the Weiser Shoshoni avoided forced removal to Fort Hall, and contact with whites, when it occurred, was on the band’s terms—as when they engaged in mining and timber businesses with select settlers. Even after removal to Fort Hall, descendants of the band emerged as leaders there. “Many Northern Shoshoni had gained prominence through their success in developing large mounted bands that impressed early trappers and settlers by their size and power,” wrote Idaho State Historian Dr. Merle W. Wells. “Many other Northern Shoshoni, particularly mountain Shoshoni [e.g., Eagle Eye and the Weiser Shoshoni], chose a less spectacular way of life. Eagle Eye’s people represent those who followed a more conservative approach, but who finally adapted more successfully because they avoided reservation life and retained their ancient homeland with a tenacity characteristic of their mountain Shoshoni heritage.” Continued on page 43


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Explorers & Settlers Long before explorers found Valley County, Native American people, particularly the Shoshoni, found the area ideal for their summer settlements. Hunting and fishing in the area was rewarding during the summer months, but the winters proved too cold and snowy, forcing the native people to areas of lower elevation during the winter months. The first European explorers came to the West in search of plentiful resources, wide open spaces, and to find their fortunes. Fur trappers found the area abundant in wildlife and made their living traveling back and forth from Idaho to settlements in the East. Many people arrived seeking their fortunes in gold, but others found value in other natural resources. Ranchers utilized the area as summer grazing land for their cattle, and timber was harvested from Valley County for use in the cross-country railroad. The first recorded European explorers of Valley County were members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. They ultimately chose to bypass the area, but they did provide reports in which the valley was identified as having an abundance of wild game. News of the rich resources prompted hunters and fur-trappers to seek out the area. Trappers utilized trails made by Native Americans to establish routes, and for a short time between 1815 and 1840, the area was busy with French and English trappers. Some of the first people to stay in the Valley County area year-round found themselves in conflict with the Shoshoni Tribe members (also known as Sheepeaters). This led to the 1879 Sheepeater Campaign. When the campaign came to an end, Valley County area became a destination for homesteaders, particularly for those looking to establish ranches. From 1880 to 1890, many families and single men claimed sections of land and built homes, farms, and ranches. The winter of 1889-1890, was long and cold with heavy snowfall. Many farmers and ranchers lost cattle and horses, and some families left the area the following spring to settle in locations with milder winters. Those that remained learned to stock up on hay, wood, and supplies for the long, cold winters. Finnish settlers arrived in the Valley County area in 1889. Some of the first Finn families were the Kamplas, Eloheimos, Nasis, Heikkolas, and Makis. Together these families founded the community of Elo, where there was a flour mill, a store, and a school. Members of these families were skilled builders and are responsible for many houses and barns, and for supervising the construction of U.S. Forest Service buildings in the Valley County area. Other groups who settled in Valley County were the Basques, who brought their sheepherding knowledge and skills with them to the area, and the Chinese, some of whom were drawn to the mining opportunities and some who worked as laborers for the railroad.

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Mining

Stibnite

By Ken Arment & Christopher Dail, Midas Gold

Photo courtesy Long Valley Preservation Society

World War II put Stibnite on the national map due to the production of two key metals needed for the war effort. The first was antimony, which was known to exist with gold and silver deposits in the area, first discovered during the 1900 Thunder Mountain gold rush. In addition to antimony, tungsten was also discovered in the area as a result of a national search effort. With extensive help from the government, discovery of significant new deposits of antimony and tungsten at Yellow Pine provided supplies to meet the increased war time demand for these strategic metals after Japan invaded China and seized the major sources of these metals. Both minerals were classified as essential to the national defense effort, and all tungsten and antimony ores and concentrates were governed, produced, and distributed under the authority of the War Production Board. The War Department funded transportation, equipment, mining supplies, and mine improvements, and it even supplied coal miners to ramp up immediate production. Tungsten was used as a hardener with other metals to withstand extremely high temperatures. It was used for armor piercing shells, in the filaments of lamps, radio, radar and x-ray tubes, and for highspeed tools. Antimony was used primarily as a hardening and strengthening ingredient in lead alloys. Its war uses included explosives, ammunition, shrapnel, bearings, and storage batteries. Antimony’s strong flame-resistant qualities were also used to treat wooden flight decks of aircraft carriers and for fire retardant fabrics. 44

VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Stibnite was the country’s most productive antimony and tungsten source during World War II. At its peak Stibnite included no-rent company houses and apartments, a store, a school including high school studies - unheard of in the backcountry, a hospital, a restaurant, a bowling alley, a dance hall, a night club, a gymnasium, and other facilities. The miningrelated facilities included an airport, a mill, a long water pipeline for a power plant, buildings for various ore extraction processes, truck shops, and offices. Tungsten ore was exhausted at Stibnite in 1945, and activities were significantly reduced following the successful war results.


World War II and Korean War era mining operations ceased in 1952, but milling operations continued through 1956. The town of Stibnite was abandoned as the mining activity halted and much of the equipment was dismantled. One hundred twenty-six houses were relocated to towns from McCall to Bruneau, and buildings which were not relocated to Yellow Pine or other areas of Valley County were torn down and salvaged. In the late 1960s through the early 1970s, mining operations at Stibnite were revived when major oil companies began to conduct exploration in the Stibnite area as increased interest in gold exploration occurred after the development of new processing methods by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (“USBM�), which allowed for recovery of gold from low-grade ores. By the mid1980s, explorers had discovered significant gold mineralization at Stibnite and began the process of developing a mine that went

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

on to produce nearly 450,000 ounces of gold and significant silver during the period from 1982 through 1997. In the late 1990s, operations shut down when easily recoverable oxidized gold ores, amenable to the heap leach method developed by the USBM 30 years earlier, were depleted and metal prices simultaneously dropped, making operations unprofitable. Subsequent reclamation activities by the operating companies and state and Federal agencies continued through 2010.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library care of Mickey Fortin

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Today the former giant at Stibnite is reawakening. Midas Gold Corporation acquired patented and other mining claims and has initiated the Stibnite Gold Project. The project includes new mineral exploration and mine development, cleanup of the historic open-pit mine and tailings, and a cooperative effort with public agencies to restore anadromous fish runs upstream from Stibnite.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY

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Logging

the Brown Family

From a lumbering family in New Hampshire, Carl Brown arrived in McCall in 1910. He had already assessed mines in Edwardsburg and had bought and sold the Shiefer Ranch on the Salmon River. He then contracted to deliver mail from Lardo to Warren and McCall to Cascade. When the snow piled too high for horses, a sled team with four dogs was used to get the mail through. When the mail contract ended in 1914, Carl joined Theodore Hoff as a partner in his lumber mill, putting $3,000 down as his equity stake. That same year Hoff and Brown Lumber secured a contract for railroad ties. McCall was growing, and the demand for lumber was increasing. This resulted in a need for more men, and soon, the mill was running double shifts just to meet demand. The depression in 1929, caused a split of the Hoff and Brown Lumber business, with Carl keeping the mill and renaming it the Brown Tie and Lumber Company. The years during the Great Depression were tough on the lumber industry; prices slumped and bills went unpaid. When Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal went into effect, the Civilian Conservation Corps came to McCall and set up camp in 1933, providing the mill with much-needed orders. In 1940, modern band saws were installed to replace the old circular saws. That same year the boiler backfired and the sparks ignited a stack of sawdust and burned the mill to the ground. With the mill gone and McCall’s largest employer suddenly out of business, the urgency to rebuild was acute. In 1941, Joe Kasper, the millwright, and Carl’s son, Warren, redesigned and rebuilt a new mill farther north on the lakeshore which generated the largest payroll in the northern part of Valley County.

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By 1946, Warren had become Vice President of Brown Tie and Lumber. Conscious of the economic effects the winter temperatures had on his business, he set out to design a log pond that would keep the water and logs from freezing. By 1952, using one-inch pipes filled with compressed air to keep the water circulating, Warren found success. In addition to the new pond, a 125x40 foot steam shed was constructed to ride on floats in the open water. A frozen log left in the shed for three to four hours would thaw and be usable for milling. These improvements resulted in financial stability for the mill and its workers, allowing year-round operation. The mill continued to be profitable under the ownership of the Brown family until they sold the mill to the Boise Cascade Corporation in 1964. The mill operated under the Boise Cascade banner until it closed in 1977. In addition to being a vital part of McCall’s economy, the Brown family was also well-known for their generosity to the community. In 1937, the company deeded 80 acres of land to the Forest Service. Under the supervision of the Forest Service, volunteers and workers from the Civilian Conservation Corps worked to clear three initial ski runs and built a lodge, creating the Little Ski Hill. To ferry skiers up the hill, Warren and Joe Kasper designed a 1,200-foot-long lift with two toboggan sleds. Not knowing much about running a ski hill, Warren hired Corey Engen as the manager. Engen was just 17 years-old at the time. Fast-forward to 1961. Warren formed a partnership with Cory Engen and Jack Simplot to develop the Brundage Mountain ski area. Because he had logged in much of the surrounding mountains, Warren knew the area well. After extensively exploring the mountains, Warren and Corey settled on the 7,600-foot Brundage Mountain in the Payette National Forest. Brundage Mountain Resort opened for Thanksgiving weekend in 1961. Today Brundage is still owned by the Brown/DeBoer family.

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All photos courtesy McCall Public LIbrary


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Ranching the Willey Ranch

By Bill Willey

Willey Ranch The Willey family settling in Long Valley parallels the history of western expansion in the United States. As Oregon began to become more populated, there was a backwash into rural areas that still had free land. The Willeys came west in 1882, from Iowa to the Grande Ronde Valley in Oregon (La Grande). In the spring of 1889, Marion and Blanche Willey Davis; John and Ettie Willey Flannery; Charley and Molly Flannery Willey; and the Willey’s parents, Bray and Mary Willey, came to Long Valley and took up homesteads. The homesteads bordered each other on the eastern foothills, now known as Grouse Knoll (which is the site of the present Valley County transfer station). Emory Willey stayed in La Grande, and so my grandfather Claude grew up there. In 1908, he married Mary Spicklemire, and they came to Long Valley on their honeymoon to visit his relatives. While they were here, they bought his Uncle Charley’s homestead for $1,500. During their travels they came by train to Evergreen and then to McCall by wagon. My father and mother, Hugh and Sara, bought the ranch in 1947, and after their deaths my wife Nancy and I have continued to run the ranch with the help of our children and grandchildren. Our five grandchildren are the sixth generation to live on the Willey Ranch. The Willey family shared the same experiences with virtually all of the early farmers. They raised hay and grain (mostly for fuel for their work horses and feed for the milk cows and hogs). The Barter System was alive and well, as cash was hard to come by. Cream was sold or churned into butter, and the skim milk was fed to the hogs. They raised a big garden of root vegetables and chickens for meat and eggs. They cured hams and bacons so the meat would keep without refrigeration, and they purchased enough coffee, salt, flour, and supplies in the fall to get them through long winters. Every family had a root cellar and a smoke house, and they canned lots of vegetables and fruits and berries. Wild game was a vital part of their food supply, and so was running trap lines in the winter to earn extra cash. Very little beef was eaten because it could be sold, whereas venison was free. A lot of farmers like my father and Grandfather Duncan worked in the woods as gypo sawyers, getting paid for what they cut. They would do their farm work in the evenings and on weekends. Of course, they got a lot of help from their wives and children.

Claude & Mary Willey wedding photo

Hugh Willey cutting firewood.

Continued on page 52

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Sara Willey and 5th generation Kim feeding a baby calf. Now life is much easier physically with modern equipment. Nevertheless, making a living as a rancher/farmer is still challenging in Valley County. I followed my dad’s advice when he told me, “Take what the land will give you, and if you think you need more, rather than borrowing money, go get a job.” Our ranch has been a good home for the Willey family.

Four of the eight children Claude and Mary raised on the ranch. Their daughter Vada is riding the milk cow, while her sister, Mary, and brothers, Hugh and Emory, are holding milk buckets.

Bill Willey (4th generation) with daughter Jill (5th generation) and grandkids Charlie & Josie (6th generation) riding horses.

Hugh and Sara Willey standing in the middle of their oats. In the background is Grouse Knoll. All photos courtesy of the Willey Family

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VALLEY COUNTY INDUSTRY


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Agriculture

the Hasbrouck Ranch

By Elting and Trudi Hasbrouck

Herman Jacob Hasbrouck, originally from Nebraska, was an attorney in Idaho Falls. In 1919, he was hired by Valley County to set up property ownership for homesteads. He traveled with his son Eltinge to Valley County on horseback and discovered that the majority of the homesteads were abandoned. Eltinge fell in love with the area, and he and his father purchased seven separate homesteads in the Alpha area of Cascade. These homesteads constitute the present day Hasbrouck property in Valley County. After Eltinge graduated from Oregon State University, he married Mable Madden from the town of Van Wyck. They moved to the family farm to start their own farming operation at the base of the foothill adjacent to Cabarton Road. Their first crops were brome and clover seed, which proved so successful they were able to pay off the farm. They later purchased dairy cows and hogs and raised grass hay and oats. All of the crops were harvested by hand with large crews. Hay not fed to the cows was sold in loose stacks for $12 a ton. Eltinge and Mabel had three children: Willa, John, and Rowena. After graduating from the University of Idaho, John married Leilani Nock from Cascade. John served for four years in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, and then returned home to the family farm. He became the third generation to manage the property. It was John’s dream to add a beef cow/calf herd to the farming operation and to purchase equipment to streamline the farming process. With this new equipment, hay could be baled and the oats, combined to increase production. 54

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With the addition of the cow herd, the farm was transformed into a ranch. The harsh winter conditions in Valley County were tough on the cattle. In 1958, an opportunity arose to purchase another ranch in Horseshoe Bend. With a milder climate, the new property was an ideal place to winter the cattle and pasture pregnant cows during calving season in the spring. Each June, the cattle were trucked back to Cascade where they grazed during the summer and fall months on the beautiful rolling pastures adjacent to the shores of Clear Creek and the North Fork of the Payette River. John and Leilani had six children: Jane, Connie, Nancy, Elting, John, and Sue. All of their children learned the value of hard work while living on the ranch. Elting (Elt) returned to the ranch after graduating from the University of Idaho and became the fourth generation to continue the farm/ranch operation. Elt’s dream was


to increase the cattle herd and terminate the dairy operation. He designed and installed an underground irrigation system for flood irrigating, which proved successful for increasing the crop yields. With times changing it was difficult to find help to harvest, and Elt made the decision to upgrade the farming equipment, thereby decreasing the amount of manpower required to harvest the crops. The Hasbrouck Ranch had a reputation for top quality grass hay. For several years large quantities of the crop were sold on the international hay market. Word of the grass hay’s quality spread throughout Idaho over the years, and the hay became popular with horse owners in Idaho; today all of the hay raised on the ranch is sold only in Idaho. Elt and his wife Trudi have three daughters: Angela, Sarah, and Jessica. All three girls worked on the ranch while growing up. Now they return with their families to the ranch seasonally to carry on the long tradition of this family-owned and operated ranch.

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l a r u Nat ources s e R By Kaylee Arnold and Stephanie Rosen

Abundant natural resources in Valley County are important not only for human uses and recreation, but for conservation and research. Some of the many resources found in the county are water, wildlife, plants, and minerals. The rugged geology and geography of the area makes it diverse in plant and animal life as well as other resources.

Within the mountains of Valley County are many fire lookout towers. Some of these towers are staffed in the summer months by individuals who watch for and report wildfires. Over time, Valley County has been home to approximately 67 lookouts. Today 37 are still active or used as camps and museums. Valley County’s lookouts are managed by the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association and Boise and Payette National Forests. Tripod Peak Lookout, 1921 Photo courtesy US Forest Service Fire Lookout Museum

56


Glacial Features

During the last ice age, more snow built up in the winters than could melt in the summers, leading to the formation of glaciers across North America. When the ice age ended, the glaciers began to melt and move along existing river valleys, wearing down the rock floors and widening the valleys. Glaciers formed in the area now known as Valley County, Idaho, one feeding into the northern part of Long Valley, where Payette Lake is now, and several in the adjacent mountains. As the glaciers melted, they left deposits of large granite boulders and piles of sand that form today’s hills within the valley. Though some areas contain basalt, most of the county is underlain by Idaho Batholith granite. A batholith is a large area of rock formed by magma that cooled and hardened underneath the Earth’s crust. Valley County is home to many mountain ranges – one of the most visible is the West Mountain Range. This range runs from New Meadows to Horseshoe Bend, lies in four counties, and is

Valley County contains several recreational hot springs including the following:

Photo courtesy Mike Huston

approximately 75 miles long, 15 miles wide, and reaches consistently above 7,000 feet. The tallest mountain in the range is Snowbank, which has a peak elevation of 8,322 feet. West Mountain is made up of a complex assortment of rocks, including granite, basalt, and various metamorphic rocks. Because it is packed with snow for several months each year, the West Mountain range is an important water source for the region. Many lakes and streams can be found on West Mountain’s slopes, and the range is the source of the Weiser River. Much of the land that makes up this beautiful mountain range is managed by the Boise and Payette National Forests.

• Trail Creek Hot Springs – a 115º Fahrenheit spring with two small pools. • Molly’s Hot Springs and Molly’s Tubs – a 120º Fahrenheit spring with several pools. • Vulcan Hot Springs – a 105º Fahrenheit spring accessed via an easy 1.7-mile hike. The source of the spring can be accessed by foot, and the water there reaches temperatures over the boiling point. • Gold Fork Hot Springs – six pools varying in temperature. One of the few developed hot springs in Valley County.

Hot Springs

Valley County abounds with natural hot springs, which are popular destinations for travelers. A hot spring is any spring with water significantly warmer than the surrounding air temperature. Most hot springs are geothermally heated groundwater, and many are known to contain thermophilic (heat-loving) bacteria, which are important for scientific processes such as DNA replication. In some cases, a hot spring can be utilized to heat a building. This use of the natural hot water for heat or power is called geothermal energy. Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

NATURAL RESOURCES

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A Vision FOR VALLEY COUNTY’S

next 100 years From the Payette Land Trust Congratulations to Valley County and the community that has developed here over the past 100 years! As President of the Payette Land Trust’s Board of Directors, I enjoy reflecting upon all that this region has experienced in the past century. While much of the area has remained relatively unchanged – open spaces, scenic vistas, and clear blue waters – the county has grown and developed in remarkable ways as well. The Payette Land Trust was founded as a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization in 1994. The land trust’s mission is to preserve and protect the open spaces of our Valley County region. We believe that open spaces that can be used by wildlife, recreationists, farmers, ranchers, and loggers are the keystones of the area’s unique beauty and pristine environment. In the past few decades since our founding, nearly 3,000 acres have been brought under various forms of protection through the work of the land trust. During that time, I have also seen the region continue to grow. In my travels throughout the county, I have found evidence of increased development each and every year. This frequent reflection on Valley County’s past and the possibilities for its future is what inspired me to join in the Payette Land Trust’s mission of preserving and protecting open spaces in the West Central Mountains.

Two members of the Payette Land Trust’s Board of Directors meet with landowners during a stewardship visit.

58

NATURAL RESOURCES

So as Valley County celebrates the history and heritage of its first century, the team at the Payette Land Trust is excited to share with the community a vision for its future. At the Payette Land Trust, we envision a region in which family ranches can protect their dreams for their land’s future. We envision a community that values and preserves its working agricultural properties and timberlands. We envision maintaining the region’s unique pristine rivers and streams, lush meadows, alpine lakes, forested mountains, and critical wildlife corridors for the generations who follow. This is our vision for Valley County, and we invite you to share in this vision. In 2017, we are excited to embark on a new outreach campaign, and we look forward to engaging with the entire Valley County community, from Yellow Pine to Cascade. Look for us around town, at community events, and on the web. We look forward to connecting with you and hearing your vision for Valley County’s next 100 years! For more information and to contact us, you can find the Payette Land Trust at www.payettelandtrust.org.

Rick Fereday

President of the Board of Directors, Payette Land Trust Top photo: A property under conservation easement, Boon Family Trust.

Blackhawk in the River near McCall, Idaho Top photo: A property under conservation easement, Boon Family Trust.


LAND MANAGEMENT

Valley County’s natural resources are protected and managed in several ways. Some designated management areas in the county include state parks, wilderness areas, and national forests. Valley County is one of the few counties in Idaho to be the home of two state parks. These are Ponderosa State Park, in McCall, Idaho, and Lake Cascade State Park, which is headquartered in Cascade, Idaho. Ponderosa State Park was established in 1973. It is located north of McCall, Idaho, and occupies a large peninsula into Payette Lake. The park offers opportunities and amenities for many types of recreation, including camping, hiking, biking, boating, swimming, and cross-country skiing. Ponderosa State Park is home to a variety of wildlife. The most common animals include Canada geese, osprey, Bald Eagles, Wood Ducks, mallards, songbirds, owls, deer, moose, foxes, beavers, muskrats, pine martins, ground squirrels, and black bears. Ponderosa State Park is 1,515 acres in size and sits at an elevation of 5,050 feet. The park is diverse in its topography, and contains sagebrush flats, forest, marshland, and cliffs. It also is home to a diversity of plant life, most notably the Ponderosa pine tree for which the park is named.

Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

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NATURAL RESOURCES

Lake Cascade State Park is unique among Idaho State Parks in that its numerous recreation sites are scattered around its namesake lake, some near the city of Cascade and some near the city of

Photo courtesy Visit Idaho


Donnelly and Tamarack Resort. Lake Cascade State Park offers a variety of recreational activities, including camping, swimming, beach use, water sports, boating, fishing, hiking, and biking, as well as snowmobiling and cross-country skiing during the winter months. The park contains six boat ramps and fifteen campgrounds and day use areas, all located on Federal land on the shores of Lake Cascade. Lake Cascade State Park functions in partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Department of Interior agency that built Cascade Dam and developed the Lake in the 1940s.

Photo courtesy Tamarack Resort and Skyler Nokes

Designated in 1980 by the United States Congress, the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness is the second largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states at approximately 2.4 million acres. Located partially in Valley County, the Frank Church wilderness contains the Main and Middle Forks of the Salmon River and sports canyons deeper than the Grand Canyon. Although extensively explored by rafters, hikers, and horse packers alike, roughly 1.5 million acres of the wilderness lacks any trail systems. It is home to many of Idaho’s distinctive plants and animals. The University of Idaho’s Taylor Wilderness Research Station, an important research facility for natural resources, is located within the Frank Church Wilderness and Valley County. Some of the research done there includes monitoring wildlife and weather, aerosol research, and re-establishment of Bluebunch Wheatgrass. Three national forests can be found in Valley County: Boise, Payette, and Salmon-Challis. The Boise National Forest was created in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt to “protect timber and watershed resources in southwestern Idaho.” It is about 2.6 million acres in size and contains 9,600 miles of streams and 15,400 acres of lakes. The Payette National Forest was established in 1944, with its headquarters in McCall, Idaho. It is over 2.3 million acres in size. The Salmon-Challis National Forest is 4.3 million acres in size, with 1.3 million acres belonging to the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Officially established in 1998, the Salmon-Challis National Forest is a gem not often attributed to Valley County.

Photo courtesy Jayme Schnider

Historically, parts of the Boise, Salmon-Challis, and Payette National Forests were used as rangeland. Among the first European settlers in Valley County were ranchers who found the area suitable for raising livestock. Many of the native grasses in the area are resistant to drought and cold, making them ideal for grazing. Sheep, cattle, and horses were the most common animals to graze the range in the national forests. Overgrazing affected much of the rangeland in the valley, and efforts have been made since the 1930s to restore rangeland in the national forests. Today, ranchers still use Valley County as a place to graze cattle in the summers, though most of the land used for this purpose today is privately owned. Continued on page 62 Photo courtesy Jayme Schnider

NATURAL RESOURCES

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FAUNA

Valley County is home to a great variety of wildlife and is a popular area for hunters, fishermen, photographers, and others who enjoy observing wild animals. Among Valley County’s wildlife are several predators, including mountain lions, grey wolves, bobcats, and many birds of prey. The birds of prey are an important group of predators in Valley County. Those commonly seen include osprey, Bald Eagles, Golden Eagles, Red-tailed Hawks, Rough-legged Hawks, and a variety of owls. Osprey and Bald Eagles can be spotted near the many rivers and lakes of the county, where they take dramatic dives into the water to catch fish. Golden Eagles and hawks are most often seen hunting for mice and other small animals in the fields and meadows of Valley County. Their sharp eyes can detect movement from great distances. This, in addition to their powerful beaks and talons, make them fierce predators. At night, the hoots and calls of owls can be heard in the forests. Valley County wildlife species that find themselves prey to these birds include mice, rats, squirrels, rabbits, fish, bats, and songbirds. Valley County is also home to many non-predatory mammals, including herbivores like deer, elk, moose, beavers, mountain sheep, and scavengers, such as red fox and black bears. The ungulates (hooved mammals) in Valley County include deer, elk, moose, and pronghorn. These animals are important for land management in the county, as their grazing activity helps to reduce fire risk. Two of the most commonly seen ungulates in the county are mule deer and whitetail deer. Both of these kinds of deer are residents of county forests and towns alike. Often, traffic comes to a standstill in town because a deer is crossing the road. Elk are also commonly seen in the county. 62

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Scavengers are important members of the ecosystem as well, as they help to clean up dead plants and animals. Some of the scavengers that can be seen in Valley County are foxes, bears, and raccoons. American Black Bears live in the forest areas of the county. These omnivorous scavengers are solitary animals, though cubs remain with their mothers for up to two years. Black bears hibernate in the winter, though they may not in areas with warmer winters. Despite their name, black bears vary in color and can be black, brown, cinnamon, or blond. The state of Idaho and Valley County are important for many migratory birds, including birds of prey, waterfowl, and songbirds. Idaho lies between the Pacific and Central flyways, both of which are major migration pathways traveled by birds every spring and fall. Valley County is home to many important and protected birds that use these flyways. Sandhill Cranes migrate to Valley County in the spring, where they nest, lay eggs, and raise their offspring. They leave the area in the fall and migrate to the southernmost parts of North America. Tree Swallows also choose Valley County as their


nesting ground in the spring and summer months. They are a common sight along the shores of Lake Cascade, where they find plenty of their main food source: insects. Tree Swallows migrate in large flocks, when thousands of individuals can be seen flying

together. They are cavity nesters and are known to occupy abandoned woodpecker holes and nest boxes. A pair of Tree Swallows raises one or two broods every summer, each consisting of four to seven young swallows. Another bird that spends its summers in Valley County is the Townsend’s Warbler. Males arrive in late spring, and they establish their territories by singing. When females arrive, they form monogamous pairs, and establish clutches of three to five eggs. Townsend’s Warblers winter along the coast of California and in Mexico. One of the most well-known migratory waterfowl species that resides in Valley County is the Canada goose. Canada geese thrive in the wetlands of the county, where they raise broods of four to seven goslings. These geese are seen migrating in the classic “V” formation, and their distinctive honking can be heard from great distances. Continued on page 64

David O’Brien

Dwight Jividen

Karolyn Plehal

Tami Brown

Trudi Hasbrouck

Proudly serving Valley County since 1980 with over 119 years of experience (208) 382-4921

www.CascadeLakeRealty.com 204 N. Main PO Box 612 Cascade, Idaho 83611


Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

FLORA

The forests in Valley County are dominated by several types of conifer or softwood trees. These include lodgepole pine, western hemlock, western larch, western white pine, Douglas-fir (red fir), Ponderosa pine, western red cedar, and grand fir. These species vary in traits like wood color, cone size, and fire resistance, but all are important for lumber production and create habitat for a great variety of wildlife. These trees are important resources for Valley County and all of Idaho, as the timber industry is historically one of the largest industries in the county, and continues to be an important source of income and jobs in the state. The softwood trees found in Valley County are also important for paper production. These types of trees have long cellulose fibers, which are utilized to make strong, thick paper.

Photo courtesy Stephanie Rosen

Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

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NATURAL RESOURCES

Valley County springs and early summers are made even more beautiful by the abundance of wildflowers that grow in the meadows and forests of the area. These flowers are important not only for beauty, but for the survival of pollinators like the honey bee. The same bees that depend on wildflowers to survive in the spring will pollinate crops later in the year, making the existence of wildflowers essential to human survival as well. One important flower for honey bees is clover, which can be seen in large patches all over Valley County, both in the wild and in the yards of residents. Both warm and cool-season grasses thrive in Valley County. One of the many grass species native to the county is Idaho Fescue. Fescue is a tuft grass that can reach two feet in height. It is an important grass for pasture and hay, but is susceptible to overgrazing. Idaho Fescue is tolerant to cold, drought, and shade,

MINERALS

Another important natural resource to the county is the great variety of minerals found in the area. Though several types of minerals and gemstones are found in Valley County, most mines are hobby projects. The largest and most historic mine in the county is Stibnite, where antimony and tungsten were mined. These metals were essential to the United States in World War II. Other minerals found in Valley County include copper, gold, silver, and lead. This Gem State county is also a source of a wide variety of gemstones, including opal, ruby, sapphire, and topaz..


QUALITY ANTIQUES SINCE 2005

as are many other species of grass found in Valley County. These hardy grasses are important resources for livestock producers who use the county for grazing or hay production. They are also an important food source for many wildlife species.

Open April - December

(hours vary by season, please call)

(208) 630-4929

A popular pastime in Valley County is foraging for huckleberries and morel mushrooms. Both of these delicacies grow in the mountains surrounding Cascade, Donnelly, and McCall, and are sought out by humans and animals alike. Huckleberries are a favorite treat for bears, mule deer, and elk, while squirrels are among those who enjoy morels.

283 N. Main Street Donnelly, Idaho 83615

f

Continued on page 67

cmchd.org

ONE BLOCK FROM MOST MAJOR HOTELS

DINING

SUN-THURS 5:30 - 10PM FRI-SAT 5:30 - 11PM

FOR RESERVATIONS

634-7683

LOCATED 326 N. 3RD STREET (HWY 55) MCCALL, IDAHO


LAKES & RIVERS

Valley County is home to an estimated 300 lakes, most of them remote mountain lakes accessible only by hiking. Many of these alpine lakes are stocked with fish, providing excellent backcountry fishing opportunities. The most popular lakes for recreation are Payette Lake, Lake Cascade, Warm Lake, Horsethief Reservoir, and Deadwood Reservoir. Payette Lake is a 5,300-acre natural lake adjoining the town of McCall. The lake bed was scoured out by a glacier. Payette Lake is a popular destination for water enthusiasts; anglers, boaters, and families. The lake is also the site of several annual events in McCall and home to the fictional monster Sharlie. Much of the land surrounding Payette Lake is State of Idaho endowment land called “cottage sites.” These sites are leased to private parties who may build cabins on them. The revenue from the lease or sale of endowment land goes toward the funding of public schools and other State of Idaho institutions. Lake Cascade, formerly known as Cascade Reservoir, was created with the construction of Cascade Dam, which was completed in 66

NATURAL RESOURCES

1948 by the Bureau of Reclamation. Lake Cascade was authorized by Congress primarily for irrigation and Federal hydroelectric power production purposes. Recreation and fish and wildlife are also recognized values of the Lake that are protected and enhanced as much as possible after meeting Reclamation’s fundamental irrigation and power commitments. Over 20 miles long, Lake Cascade has a surface area of more than 40 square miles and offers about 86 miles of shoreline for recreational opportunities. Lake Cascade is one of the most popular fishing


Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

destinations in Idaho due to its abundance of yellow perch, coho salmon, and rainbow trout. The Bureau of Reclamation manages Lake Cascade and nearly 7,000 acres of surrounding land for the protection of water and other related resources.

Fork of the Payette feeds both Lake Cascade and Payette Lake. The river runs through a wide range of elevations, making it diverse in fish and other wildlife. The Payette River is a popular destination for rafting, kayaking, and other water sports.

There are two major river systems in Valley County. In the west and south area of the county lies the North Fork of the Payette River and other Payette River tributaries which eventually form the Main Payette River, a tributary of the Snake River. The North

In the eastern side of the county lie many tributaries, which eventually drain into the Main Salmon River. Waterways such as Johnson Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River feed into the South Fork of the Salmon River, whereas Big Creek, Marble Creek, Indian Creek, Pistol Creek, Sulphur Creek, and Bear Valley Creek feed into the Middle Fork of the Salmon River.

Photo courtesy Salmon Raft

All of these natural resources are important to Valley County. Some of them, such as timber and minerals, contribute to the economy of the area. Others, like water and plants, are important for other industries like ranching. All of these natural resources contribute to the stunning beauty of Valley County, which makes it highly desirable for residences and a popular destination for visitors who enjoy year-round recreational opportunities.

NATURAL RESOURCES

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Photo courtesy McKen

zie Christensen Kraem

er

JANUARY 14, 2017 IN CASCADE

8TH ANNUAL YOUTH ICE FISHING DAY from 10am-3pm at Horsethief Reservoir. This is an educational event for the whole family. A fishing license is not required during the hours of the event. For more information go to idahoyouthoutdoors.org.

ourtesy Photo c blic Library Pu ll McCa

Photo cour tesy

JANUARY 14, 2017 IN MCCALL

RAIL JAM-OR-SLOPESTYLE at the Little Ski Hill. For more information visit

littleskihill.org. Gary Er tter

JANUARY 14-15, 2017 IN MCCALL

BEER & GEAR FESTIVAL at Brundage is a two-day celebration of ski culture featuring hand-crafted beers from local breweries, the very latest demo gear available on-site, and great food and live music around the fire pits! For more information visit brundage.com.

JANUARY 19, 2017 IN CASCADE

SHOW BRAZIL! begins at 7pm at the Cascade American Legion. Come enjoy an evening of Brazilian music and dancing. Desserts and drinks will be provided. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.

JANUARY 1, 2017 IN CASCADE

VALLEY COUNTY AND CITY OF CASCADE CENTENNIAL KICK-OFF CELEBRATION

from 6-8pm at Lake Cascade State Park in the Van Wyck Unit. Join us for an evening of S’mores, bonfires, Chinese lanterns, and centennial ideas to take home to implement throughout the year-long celebration. For more information visit parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/lake-cascade.

JANUARY 4, 2017 IN MCCALL

CREATIVE CAMPUS BEGINS! Paint, draw, design, cook, create, dance, and learn with the McCall

Arts and Humanities Council Cabin Fever Series. Visit mccallarts.org to view the full class schedule and register for classes.

JANUARY 5, 2017 IN MCCALL

JANUARY 20 - 22, 2017 IN MCCALL

Idaho Junior Steelheads vs. Seattle. Join us for some great hockey Friday and Saturday evenings at 7pm or Sunday at 2pm at Manchester Ice & Event Centre. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.

JANUARY 21 & 22, 2017 IN MCCALL

5TH ANNUAL MCCALL RE-MASTERED NORDIC EVENT at Ponderosa State Park is a freestyle Nordic ski event. Races begin at 10am. For more information visit mccallremastered.com.

JANUARY 27-FEBRUARY 5, 2017 IN MCCALL

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL. Enjoy famous snow sculptures, Torchlight and Mardi Gras Parades, live music, and much more. For more information visit mccallchamber.org/winter-carnival.

HOT WAX NIGHTS from 6-8:30pm at Salmon River Brewery. Bring

your skis and boards and pay $10, and the Payette Lakes & Tamarack ski patrol will skillfully hot wax your rippers! Contact Salmon River Brewery at 208-634-4772 for more information.

JANUARY 27-28, 2017 IN MCCALL

JANUARY 7, 2017 IN MCCALL/ CASCADE

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY VS. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. Join us at 7:30pm at Manchester Ice & Event

IDAHO FREE SKI DAY sponsored by Ponderosa State Park and

Centre to watch these two hockey teams battle it out. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.

Lake Cascade State Park. Join Cascade community partners for free equipment demos, beginner lessons, hot drinks and goodies, and drawings for a variety of recreational prizes at Hasbrouck Ranch. For event details call 208-634-2164 (Ponderosa) or 208-382-6544 (Cascade).

JANUARY 11, 2017 IN CASCADE

BRAZILIAN FAMILY NIGHT with Community Drumming and

Dancing from 6-8:30pm at Cascade Schools. Come enjoy an evening of learning about Brazilian art, costume/dress, language, storytelling, drumming, and dancing. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.

Photo courtesy Steve Jones

JANUARY 28, 2017 IN MCCALL

Friday and Saturday evenings at 7pm or Sunday at 2pm at Manchester Ice & Event Centre. Tickets will be available at the rink or at Albertsons prior to the event.

HOMETOWN RACES. A variety of fun ski racing events for all ages and abilities will be open to the public at Little Ski Hill and Bear Basin Nordic Center with an after ski party (included in ticket price). Proceeds benefit McCall Winter Sports Club. For more info visit mccallwintersportsclub.org.

JANUARY 14, 2017 IN SMITHS FERRY

JANUARY 29, 2017 IN MCCALL

JANUARY 13 - 15, 2017 IN MCCALL

IDAHO JUNIOR STEELHEADS VS. SOUTHERN OREGON. Join us for some great hockey

ANNUAL COUGAR MOUNTAIN SNOWMOBILE CLUB FUN RUN! Be at Wellington

Recreation Park (Area 43D) to register from 9am to Noon with a $5 donation per card. Enjoy a day of great snowmobiling and win cash and door prizes too! Contact Robert Workman for more information at 208-870-0214.

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JANUARY 28, 2017 IN CASCADE

The 5TH ANNUAL HARDWATER CLASSIC is a one-day ice fishing tournament held on Lake Cascade. Registration, weigh-in, dinner, and award ceremony are held at the Cascade American Legion. Registration opens at 6am. For more information visit hardwaterclassic.com or call 208-391-5348.

100 DAYS OF FUN

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY VS. UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO ALUMNI GAME. Join us at 7:30pm at Manchester Ice & Event Centre to find out which of these two hockey teams will claim the win. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.


FEBRUARY 2, 2017 IN MCCALL

HOT WAX NIGHTS from 6-8:30pm at Salmon River Brewery. Bring your skis and boards and pay $10, and the Payette Lakes & Tamarack ski patrol will skillfully hot wax your rippers! For more info contact Salmon River Brewery at 208-634-4772.

FEBRUARY 3, 2017 IN MCCALL

HERITAGE NIGHT at the Little Ski Hill. Friday night dinner with torchlight parade and fireworks. For more information visit littleskihill.org.

FEBRUARY 3-5, 2017 IN CASCADE

VALLEY HOME COMPANION at the Roxy Theatre. Two-hours jammed full of good-ol’ music, funny stories, radio drama, laughs, and warm fuzziness for the whole family. Benefits your choice of a local charity! Two evening performances and a matinee to choose from. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.

FEBRUARY 4, 2017 IN MCCALL

Photo cour tesy Little Ski Hill

FEBRUARY 11, 2017 IN MCCALL

DIVA DAY at Brundage. For more information visit brundage.com.

SLOPESTYLE at the Little Ski Hill. For more information visit littleskihill.org.

FEBRUARY 8-11, 2017 IN MCCALL

THE FRONT PAGE. Come see The Front Page, a 1920’s Chicago Press Room Drama put on by the Drama Club beginning at 7pm at McCall-Donnelly High School. This show is best suited to audiences age 12 and older. Tickets are available for purchase at the High School front office. Call 208-634-2218 for more information.

FEBRUARY 11, 2017 IN CASCADE

FEBRUARY 10-12, 2017 IN MCCALL

FEBRUARY 14, 2017 IN MCCALL

IDAHO JUNIOR STEELHEADS VS. OGDEN. Join us for some great hockey Friday and

SKI TO THE MOON from 5:30-8:30pm at Hasbrouck Ranch. Enjoy a moonlit evening of groomed cross-country and snowshoe trails along with a trail-side buffet and dessert. For more information visit svcrec.org.

Saturday evenings at 7pm or Sunday at 2pm at Manchester Ice & Event Centre. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.

VALENTINE’S DAY DINNER EVENTS. Treat your sweetheart to a night of delicious food from restaurants including Shore Lodge, Rupert’s at Hotel McCall, or Brundage Mountain Resort. To find who is serving up Valentine’s Day specials visit mccallchamber.org/events.

FEBRUARY 11, 2017 IN MCCALL

FEBRUARY 17-19, 2017 IN MCCALL

HIDDEN VALLEY HOEDOWN at Brundage. The annual MWSC Big Mountain Competition. For

more information visit brundage.com.

IDAHO JUNIOR STEELHEADS VS. LAKE TAHOE. Join us for some great hockey Friday and Saturday evenings at 7pm or Sunday at 2pm at Manchester Ice & Event Centre. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.

FEBRUARY 18, 2017 IN CASCADE

CASCADE’S ANNUAL WINTER JAMBOREE. Every year on the Saturday of President’s Day weekend, riders come from miles around for the snowmobile fun run, auction, and feed! This is the largest fundraiser for our Thunder Mountain Days Celebration. For more information visit cascadechamber.com.

FEBRUARY 18-19, 2017 IN CASCADE

THE CASCADE CUP ICE FISHING DERBY. The cost is $10 per person. The biggest three perch of catch and biggest single trout determines placement. The top five places for adults are awarded prizes, and the top three youth are awarded prizes. Weigh-in is from 8am-5pm on Saturday and 8am-3pm on Sunday. For more information contact Tackle Tom at 208-382-4367.

FEBRUARY 23, 2017 IN MCCALL

VINTAGE SNOWCAT OPEN HOUSE at the Little Ski Hill. For more information visit

Photo cour te

sy Jayme Schn

ider

littleskihill.org.

FEBRUARY 25 & 26, 2017 IN VALLEY COUNTY

VALLEY COUNTY CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. Torch ceremonies and community celebrations throughout Valley County. Torch Ceremonies will start on February 25th, thus kicking off our countywide celebrations on February 26th. For an official schedule of events, visit www.co.valley.id.us.

100 DAYS OF FUN

69


APRIL 2, 2017 IN MCCALL

CELEBRATE FAMILY DAY at Brundage. Purchase one full-day adult lift ticket, and the rest of the family skis for free. For more information visit brundage.com.

APRIL 2, 2017 AT TAMARACK

Photo cour te

sy Brundage

sort Mountain Re

STATE OF IDAHO POND SKIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS at Tamarack Resort. Come one, come all to the most ultimate pond skimming! In celebration of closing weekend of the ski season, competitors will test their mettle by trying to cross icy waters on their skis and snowboards. For more information visit tamarackidaho.com.

Photo courtesy Tamarack Resor t

APRIL 7, 2017 IN CASCADE

ALZAR SCHOOL VALLEY COUNTY SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT from 5-7pm at the Alzar School. Support our Valley County high school students and the transformative programming the Alzar School provides. Admission is by donation and includes a variety of snacks and the chance to win some amazing raffle items. For more information visit facebook.com/AlzarSchool.

APRIL 8-9, 2017 IN MCCALL MARCH 2, 2017 IN MCCALL

HOT WAX NIGHTS from 6-8:30pm at Salmon River Brewery. Bring your skis and boards and pay $10, and the Payette Lakes & Tamarack ski patrol will skillfully hot wax your rippers! For more info contact Salmon River Brewery at 208-634-4772.

MARCH 3-5, 2017 IN MCCALL

13TH ANNUAL CHIX WITH STIX TOURNAMENT will be hosted by the McCall Women’s Hockey Association at Manchester Ice & Events Centre. Thirteen teams will participate in this all women’s hockey tournament, including teams from California, Utah, Montana, Washington, and Idaho. Visit manchestericecenter.com for more information.

MARCH 4, 2017 IN MCCALL

NEW BLUES CRUISE at Brundage. Short days of winter got you down? Sport your Brundage blue and join us for our newest event. Cruise all of our blue runs with games and prizes along the way. For more information visit brundage.com.

MARCH 11, 2017 IN MCCALL

BRUNDAGE GIVES. Ski or ride for a cause at Brundage. This vertical tracking event will test your

stamina and allow you to raise money for your favorite local non-profits. For more information visit brundage.com.

APRIL 14, 2017 IN CASCADE

ROSE BOWL at the Cascade Community Church from 11am-2pm. A $10 donation will provide guests with a hand-crafted pottery bowl and all you can eat soup, bread, drink, and dessert. All proceeds benefit victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in Valley County. For more information contact ROSE Advocates at 208-382-5310.

APRIL 16, 2017 IN MCCALL

EASTER EGG HUNT at Brundage. A Brundage Family Tradition for kids on skis or in snow boots! The Easter Bunny hides more than 500 eggs on Easy Street for your little ones to find. For more information visit brundage.com.

APRIL 16, 2017 IN DONNELLY EASTER EGG HUNT. For more information visit donnellychamber.com.

APRIL 16, 2017 IN CASCADE

MARCH 18, 2017 IN MCCALL

BANKED SLALOM/BIG AIR at the Little Ski Hill. For more information visit littleskihill.org.

EASTER EGG HUNT. Lots of fun from 10am-Noon at Armstrong Park. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.

MARCH 18, 2017 IN MCCALL

APRIL 20-29, 2017 IN MCCALL

MARCH 26, 2017 IN MCCALL

from 9am-7pm daily with more than 500 other quilters. There will be prizes for participants, activities, and more! For more information or a map of all 12 participating shops located in SW Idaho and NE Oregon, visit treasureshophop.blogspot.com.

MARCH 2017 AT TAMARACK

APRIL 29 & 30, 2017 IN CASCADE

TOGA SNOWGA PARTY at the Activity Barn. For more information visit activitybarn.com.

GIMME A BREAK DAY at Brundage. In honor of Spring Break, kids 17 and under get free lift tickets! For more information visit brundage.com. BREW-SKI at Tamarack Resort. Enjoy an afternoon of tasty brews, live music, and skiing with the

Tam Fam for Brew-Ski. For more information visit tamarackidaho.com.

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CRAZY DAZE & NEW – HAZY DAZE at Brundage. Come join us Saturday, as brave skimmers shoot the chilly 100-foot pond! Plus we’ll hold our traditional Treasure Hunt, Poker Run, Costume Contest, and Beer Relay. Sunday marks our inaugural “ultimate Sunday Funday”; join us for BAR— Brundage’s Assessment of Radness! For more information visit brundage.com.

100 DAYS OF FUN

Saw yer Davis with Jud ith Nissula as the Easter Bunny

17TH ANNUAL TREASURE QUILT SHOP HOP! Visit Granny’s Attic or Huckleberry Patches

Howdy’s Gas and Grub ANNUAL FISHING TOURNAMENT. Family fishing tournament on Lake Cascade. For more information visit Howdy’s at 503 N. Main St. in Cascade.


Rediscover hometown charm and friendly service at Watkins Pharmacy - only blocks from the shores of beautiful Lake Cascade. More than just a pharmacy... Dawson Taylor coffee Smoothies Slushies Italian Sodas Clothing Unique Gifts Jewelry Souvenirs Located at 104 North Main Street Cascade

208.382.4204

Idaho Gemstones Garnet • Opal • Jasper

207 E. Lake St. Downtown McCall (208) 634-GEMS (4367) McCallJewelryCompany.com


MAY 5, 2017 IN CASCADE

7TH ANNUAL “TASTE OF JAZZ” CONCERT. Put your dancing shoes on and get ready for some fun! The concert begins at 7pm and features band and choir students from Cascade High School. Tables can be reserved by calling 208-630-6057 and general admission tickets can be purchased at the door. Proceeds benefit Cascade Schools Music Department.

MAY 6, 2017 IN CASCADE

4 SUMMIT CHALLENGE BIKE TUNE UP begins at 10am at East Market Street between Watkins and D-9. The first 50 basic bike tune ups are sponsored by the 4 Summit and are free; all other tune ups are $25. For more information email info@4summitchallenge.com.

MAY 6, 2017 IN CASCADE

CINCO DE MAYO. A traditional Mexican fundraising dinner and live auction starts at 5:30pm at the Cascade American Legion. For more information visit post60news.com.

MAY 13, 2017 IN MCCALL

MIGRATORY BIRD DAY at Ponderosa State Park. For more information phone 208-634-2164 or visit parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/ parks/ponderosa.

MAY 13, 2017 IN CASCADE

MAY 4, 2017 VALLEY-WIDE

IDAHO GIVES. Bringing nonprofits, supporters and fans together for a 24-hour online giving blitz! A great day to support your favorite cause and give back to the community. For more information, visit idahogives.razoo.com.

DUO ANNUAL CRAB FEED. Enjoy a crab feast, silent/live auction, and raffle from 6-9 pm at Trinity Pines. For more information contact Glenn Brewer at 208-382-3423.

MAY 14, 2017 IN MCCALL

MOTHER’S DAY CRUISE in McCall. Take your Mother out on beautiful Payette Lake and see McCall like you’ve never seen it before while cruising on board “The Idaho” with McCall Lake Cruises. For more information visit mccalllakecruises.com.

MAY 20, 2017 IN CASCADE

ARMED FORCES DAY CEREMONIES begins at 10am at the Cascade American Legion. For more information visit post60news.com.

MAY 29, 2017 IN CASCADE

SAINT KATHERINE DREXEL YARD SALE, AND HOMEMADE PIE AND ENCHILADA SALE. For more

information call Tina Shaw at 208-382-3251 or visit ollidaho.org.

MAY 29, 2017 IN CASCADE

elevated comfort food in a casual environment

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONIES. Memorial flags will be posted at each veteran’s grave site as follows: Crown Point Cemetery at 9:30am; Margaret Cemetery at 10:15am; Alpha Cemetery at 11am; Kelly’s Whitewater Park at Noon; and American Legion Post 60 at 1pm. For more information visit post60news.com.

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JUNE 10, 2017 IN IDAHO

FREE FISHING DAY. Idaho’s Free Fishing Day is an annual event held the second Saturday of June. All anglers, residents, and nonresidents, can celebrate the day by fishing Idaho’s waters without a license. Stop by Fischer Pond in Cascade or the Northwest Passage Pond in McCall, where volunteers can help first-timers discover the joys of fishing. For more information visit idfg.idaho.gov/events/free-fishing-day.

JUNE 10 & 11, 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

COWBOY TRADE DAYS. Roseberry comes alive with Cowboy Trade Days. This annual event celebrates the local ranching heritage of Valley County. Guests enjoy cowboy themed wares, which include saddles, bits, spurs, boots, hats, old Western photos, and much more. For more information visit historicroseberry.com.

JUNE 17, 2017 IN MCCALL

Photo courtesy Melissa Shelby

TASTE OF MCCALL at the River Ranch from Noon-3pm. The Taste of McCall is McCall’s largest fundraising event of the year, hosted by the McCall-Donnelly Education Foundation. Indulge in menu samplings from our best local restaurants and craft brews from our local breweries, as well as amazing Idaho wines. For more information visit tasteofmccall.com.

Cascade Hardware

The RED line bus is a FREE bus serving the City of McCall operating 7 days a week (except Thanksgiving Day & Christmas Day) The GREEN line bus is a Commuter Express Route connecting McCall, Lake Fork, Donnelly & Cascade, operating Monday - Friday Please contact us at:

(208) 382-5200 113 S. MAIN STREET CASCADE, ID 83611

Located across from D-9 Market

208.634.0003 mountaincommunitytransit.com


Photo courtesy McCall Arts and Humanities Counci

l

JUNE 24, 2017 IN MCCALL

KALEIDOSCOPE. This fun, free, outdoor arts festival provides children of all ages with many opportunities to engage in hands-on creativity. Each year Kaleidoscope features a variety of booths which have included clay-building, painting, gyotoku printing, art history, dance, woodworking, music, weaving, and much more! For more information visit mccallarts.org/kaleidoscope. 2ND ANNUAL MOUDY MOUNTAIN SUMMER FESTIVAL. It’s a community yard sale with craft vendors, food, and live music from 7am-10pm at the Moudy Ranch. For more information email tumbleweedtrails@gmail.com. Photo courtesy MCPAWS Regi

PONDEROSA PARK RUN. This family-friendly fun run event benefits Payette Lakes Ski Club, The Little Ski Hill, and Bear Basin Nordic Center. Food, music, and an awards ceremony follow the race. On-site childcare is provided for parents wishing to run together. For more information visit littleskihill.org/ponderosa-park-run.html.

onal Animal Shelter

JUNE 17, 2017 IN MCCALL

JUNE 24, 2017 IN CASCADE

BARK IN THE PARK. Leash up your pooch for a great outing through the scenic meadows and

forests of Ponderosa State Park on this fun 3k walk to benefit MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter. Come for the contests and prizes, picnic, live music, and more! For more information visit mcpaws.org.

ALPHA DAYS lasts from 10am-2pm. Enjoy free hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, salad, beans, drinks, music by George Greenfield, and wagon rides, pulled by Clydesdale horses. For more information visit alpha-nursery.com.

Where families cometoplay and leave

renewed.

MOUNTAIN VIEW HOMESITES Measured in the number of trees per lot. We do things differently here!

www.HiddenTrailsEstates.com

208.382.4230

STEPPING STONES is a fundraiser for the 2018 Valley County Arts Festival (June 15-17, 2018). View work by our local artists, enjoy hands-on-demonstrations, make your own stepping stone, watch short outdoor skits, and enjoy good food and local music starting at 2:30pm at the Red Cabin Gallery. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.

JUNE 2017 IN CASCADE

NW CHALLENGE ARCHERY EVENT at Tamarack Resort. Come for the fun of shooting on the mountain or test your skills in competition. Six unique courses are available during this weekend event with an open class, bowhunter class, and youth class. For more information visit nwmountainchallenge.com. IDAHO FREE TRAPPERS BACKWOODS RENDEZVOUS in Cascade. Held on Kennedy Ranch near Cascade, the annual rendezvous is a celebration of those dedicated to preserving the way of life experienced by pre-1840s buck skinners, fur trappers, traders and Native Americans. Participate in council fire activities, shooting competitions, a potluck, and much more. For more information visit idahofreetrapper.org.

CASCADE CUP REGATTA. The biggest Southern Idaho Sailing Association (SISA) event of the year, with great racing, food, and prizes on Lake Cascade! For more information visit idahosailing.com.

SALES • PARTS • SERVICE (208) 634-5550

13850 Highway 55 McCall, Idaho 83638

JUNE 2017 IN MCCALL

SEVEN DEVILS PLAYWRIGHT CONFERENCE in McCall. Theater artists from around the country gather in McCall at the Alpine Playhouse for free playwriting workshops. All conference events are open to the public at all times and offered free of charge including fully-staged readings, seated readings, workshops and even rehearsals. For more information visit idtheater.org/seven-devils.html.

100 DAYS OF FUN 75


Photo courtesy Mc

Kenzie Christensen

Kraemer

Photo courtesy McKenzie

MONTH LONG IN ROSEBERRY

JULY 8, 2017 IN MCCALL

Roseberry Barn starting at 6:30pm. Bring your dinner and enjoy an evening sitting outside and listening to good music. For more information visit historicroseberry.com.

more information visit payettechildrensforest.org.

JULY 1-2, 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL. Produced by The McCall Folklore Society, the Summer Music Festival at Roseberry is one of Idaho’s most popular music festivals! Every year for almost 4 decades, great artists and musicians have traveled from near & far to perform for an energetic crowd in the majestic mountains of central Idaho. For more information visit thesummermusicfestival.com.

FREE WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERTS at Roseberry. Join us each Wednesday in July at the

ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR. Enjoy fine arts and crafts from Idaho and the Northwest, sample local

food, and visit the historic townsite of Roseberry, Idaho. The event is sponsored by the Long Valley Preservation Society. For more information visit historicroseberry.com.

JULY 4, 2017 IN CASCADE

PAYETTE CHILDREN’S FOREST SUMMER EVENT at Northwest Passage Fish Pond. For

JULY 13-15, 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

THUNDER MOUNTAIN DAYS. Celebrate the Fourth of July with the annual Thunder Mountain Days Festivities, including the Buckaroo Breakfast, Main Street Parade, BBQ in the park, and the “Best Show in Idaho” fireworks display over Lake Cascade at dusk. For more information visit cascadechamber.com.

SAINT KATHERINE DREXEL ANNUAL HOMEMADE PIE AND ENCHILADA SALE will occur in downtown Cascade before, during, and after the Fourth of July parade. For more information visit ollidaho.org or contact Tina Shaw at 208-382-3251.

JULY 4, 2017 IN MCCALL

LAKESIDE LIBERTY FEST. Enjoy free fun for the entire family, including bounce houses, water slides, competitions, face painting, artists, local activity tents, music, and more. Fireworks over Payette Lake start at dusk! SUMMIT CAT TRACK 10K at Brundage. Starting at our iconic Bluebird Quad, runners will ascend 3.1 miles to the breathtaking summit. Runners will then take a moment to enjoy the views before turning around and descending down the Cat Track to the finish line. Post-race awards, raffle, live music, and beer follow the race! For more information visit brundage.com. 76

Christensen Kraemer

100 DAYS OF FUN

Photo courtesy McCal

l Music Society


JULY 16-23, 2017 IN MCCALL

MCCALL MUSIC SOCIETY SUMMERFEST. SummerFest is a week-long

festival of classical chamber music and pops concerts held at several venues in and around McCall, Idaho. This festival is sponsored by the McCall Music Society and brings world renowned musicians to our community. For more information visit mccallmusicsociety.org/summerfest.

JULY 24-30, 2017 IN MCCALL

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT. The Annual McCall Golf Club Amateur tournament brings the top golfers to McCall each July. The tournament includes junior, women, and men divisions. For more information visit mccallgolfclub.com.

JULY 28-30, 2017 IN MCCALL

13TH ANNUAL PAYETTE LAKE ANTIQUE AND CLASSIC WOODEN BOAT SHOW at Shore Lodge. For more information visit payetteclassicboats.com.

JULY 29, 2017 IN CASCADE

4 SUMMIT CHALLENGE BIKE RIDE. Join us for the 4 Summit Challenge Bike Ride or Thunder’s Family Ride. For more information visit 4summitchallenge.com.

Photo cour tesy McCall Folklore Society

JULY 17, 2017 IN CASCADE

BBQ IN THE PARK—CITY OF CASCADE CELEBRATING 100 YEARS at Armstrong Park. Come and enjoy an afternoon of Good ole Fun! For more information visit cascadeid.us.

Photo cour tesy 4 Summit Cha

llenge

JULY 22, 2017 IN CASCADE

PIONEER DAY BREAKFAST from 8-10am on the LDS Church lawn. For more information contact Rachel Huckaby at 208-271-6448.

JULY 2017 AT TAMARACK

SUNSET CONCERT SERIES at Tamarack. Each Saturday in July, lay out your blankets, unfold your chairs, and enjoy a free concert at the Tamarack Amphitheater. Bring a beverage and picnic dinner, and listen to great music as the sun goes down! For more information visit tamarackidaho.com.

JULY 2017 IN CASCADE

CAT ATTACK REGATTA in Cascade. Watch the race as these amazing boats cruise around Lake Cascade. Stick around for the post-race social…just bring your own meat to grill and drinks to enjoy! Potluck style sides provided! For more information visit idahosailing.com.

PUBLIC SKATE FIGURE SKATING HOCKEY CURLING EVENTS

19TH ANNUAL GOLF RALLY FOR BREAST CANCER

200 E Lake Street McCall, Idaho

208.634.3570

manchestericecenter.com Breakfast • lunch • dinner starbucks Espresso smoothies • beer & wine Sandwiches • salads • wraps bento boxes • to go orders

in Cascade. Co-ed 18-hole scramble. For more information Contact Carolyn Yamamoto at 208-630-3698.

JULY 2017 IN MCCALL

MILE HIGH SWIM in McCall. Hit the water at McCall’s annual Mile High Mile open water swim race in stunning Payette Lake. For more information visit mccall.id.us/departments/parks-and-recreation. CRUIZ’N MCCALL CAR SHOW in McCall. The McCall Auto Club’s annual community car show exhibits stunning cars, motorcycles and all sorts of motorized vehicles while raising money for McCall youth programs. For more information visit mccallautoclub.com. SHEPHERD’S HOME GOLF TOURNAMENT in McCall. This fun tournament is a 4-man scramble with great prizes, dinner, and an auction. All money raised benefits the Shepherd’s Home in McCall. For more information visit shepherds-home.org.

200 E Lake Street, mccall - at the ice rink -

208.634.8558 tjscuttingedgecafe.com

100 DAYS OF FUN

77


FIRST WEEKEND IN MCCALL

THE MCCALL JAZZ FESTIVAL includes two evening concerts. The first, Jazz by the Lake, is hosted at Rupert’s at Hotel McCall, and the second, Jazz on the Mountain, is hosted by Jug Mountain Ranch. Visit facebook.com/McCallJazzFestival for more information.

AUGUST 21, 2017 IN CASCADE Photo courtesy Cu

rtis Stigers

FIRST FULL WEEK IN CASCADE

VALLEY COUNTY FAIR AND RODEO. For more information phone 208-382-7190 or email

valley@uidaho.edu.

THIRD WEEKEND IN MCCALL

PAYETTE LAKE FINE ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR has brought unique local and national artists to the City of McCall, Idaho for over 25 years. Over 75 artists, live music, and food vendors will be present. Find log furniture, oil painting, metal work, stained glass, pottery, fiber arts, inlay, and many other treasures. For more information visit payettelakesartfair.com.

MONTH LONG IN ROSEBERRY

FREE WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERTS in Roseberry. Bring your dinner and enjoy an evening sitting outside and listening to good music each Wednesday in August at the Roseberry Barn starting at 6:30pm. For more information go to historicroseberry.com.

AUGUST 4-6, 2017 IN YELLOW PINE

THE YELLOW PINE MUSIC AND HARMONICA FESTIVAL. For more information go to

yellowpinemusicandharmonicafestival.org.

AUGUST 5, 2017 IN CASCADE

24TH ANNUAL ARTISANS’ FAIRE. Unique hand crafts by guests and instructors at Arrowhead RV Park in Cascade. For more information call 208-382-4534.

AUGUST 5-6, 2017 IN LAKE FORK

FINN CHURCH 100-YEAR CELEBRATION. The celebration is on Saturday, and the rededication of the Church is on Sunday. For more information contact Bill Leaf at bill.leaf@citlink.net or 208-630-4299.

AUGUST 11-13, 2017 IN DONNELLY

HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL is a fun-filled weekend with vendors, a parade, a 5k Huckleberry Trot, a pie eating contest, a huckleberry breakfast, a rodeo, and more! For more information go to donnellychamber.com.

AUGUST 19, 2017 IN CASCADE

WATER HOOLIGAN RACE at Lake Cascade State Park. For more information, call 208-382-6544 or visit parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/lake-cascade.

AUGUST 20, 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

PIONEER PICNIC. Join us from 11am-2pm for a potluck dinner and presentation of the history of the Yensen family. For more information go to historicroseberry.com.

AUGUST 20, 2017 IN MCCALL

XTERRA WILD RIDE OFF-ROAD TRIATHLON at Ponderosa State Park. To register and find additional information visit wildrockiesracing.com.

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100 DAYS OF FUN

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE. Cascade is a prime viewing area for the eclipse! Come and set up your scope at one of our prime locations: Wellington Snow Park (MP. 97 off SH55 near Smiths Ferry) or Kelly’s Whitewater Park (in Cascade). Partial eclipse starts at 10:11am, total eclipse is at 11:26am, and final eclipse ends at 12:45pm. For more information contact the Valley County Astronomical Society at vcasobs@gmail.com.

AUGUST 25-26, 2017 IN MCCALL

STAR PARTY. Join the Boise Astronomical Society at Ponderosa State Park on the morning of August 26th. Come and gaze through telescopes that will be available for viewing the sun.

AUGUST 26, 2017 IN CASCADE

8TH ANNUAL CHALK ON THE WALK will be held in downtown Cascade on Main Street on Saturday from 9am-2pm. For more information visit horizonsicehouse.org.


Photo courtesy Huckleberr y Jam

AUGUST 26, 2017 IN CASCADE

CORN AND TOMATO FEED at 6pm at the Cascade Sports Park Ball Fields. Bring a potluck dish to share, and come ready to play ball. For more information contact Rachel Huckaby at 208-271-6448.

AUGUST 26, 2017 IN MCCALL

DASH AND SPLASH at Ponderosa State Park. Support the McCall-Donnelly High School cross-country team at this race event!

SEPTEMBER 2, 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

HUCKLEBERRY JAM at Tamarack Resort is a two-day outdoor music festival with great views,

exceptional music, and fun for the whole family! Visit thehuckleberryjam.com for the 2017 lineup and dates.

ICE CREAM SOCIAL AND ANTIQUE CAR SHOW from noon-4pm. Enjoy an afternoon of free ice cream, a hotdog lunch, an antique and classic car show, a quilt show, hayrides, and other great demonstrations and activities. For more information visit historicroseberry.com or contact Lucy Chronic at 208-634-9421.

AUGUST 2017 IN CASCADE

SEPTEMBER 11, 2017 IN CASCADE

AUGUST 2017 AT TAMARACK

41ST ANNUAL GARDNER MEMORIAL AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT.

PATRIOT DAY begins at 8:46am at the steps of the Valley County Courthouse. The program includes remembering the victims of the terrorist attack and honoring Valley County First Responders. For more information visit post60news.com.

A two-day tournament at Cascade Golf Course. For more information visit golfcascade.net.

AUGUST 2017 IN MCCALL

MCCALL MOUNTAIN BIKE FESTIVAL. This festival includes demo bikes from major brands, shuttles, clinics, group rides, suggested rides, food, and beer. McCall is now a Silver Ride Center by the International Mountain Bicycling Association (CIMBA).

SEPTEMBER 30, 2017 IN CASCADE

ALPHA NURSERY FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL offers free

MCCALL AIRPORT FLY IN AND OPEN HOUSE. Family fun at the McCall airport includes live demonstrations, hands-on activities for the kids, helicopter rides, and more! For more information go to mccallairportevents.weebly.com.

hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, salad, beans, and drinks from 10am-noon. Music is by George Greenfield and free wagon rides are pulled by Clydesdale horses. For more information visit alpha-nursery.com.

SEPTEMBER 2017 IN CASCADE

JUDGE’S FISHING DAY in Cascade. Join us for a fun, positive, social, fishing-experience with outstanding role models in the community. For more information and to register for the event, contact Cindy Goodwin at 208-634-5652.

RUSTIC OUTLET A VINTAGE HOME DÉCOR MARKETPLACE

TUES-SAT 10AM - 5PM • SUNDAY 11AM - 4PM • CLOSED MONDAY

14118 HWY 55, MCCALL | RUSTICOUTLETMCCALL.COM

fl

100 DAYS OF FUN

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Photo courtesy McKenz

ie Christensen Kraemer

OCTOBER 14, 2017 IN CASCADE

SUPER SATURDAY occurs from 10am-2pm at the LDS Church. Come and have fun crafting, eating, and socializing. For more information contact Rachel Huckaby at 208-271-6448.

OCTOBER 14 & 15, 2017 IN MCCALL

LITTLE SKI HILL SKI SWAP at Payette Lake Middle School. For more information visit

littleskihill.org.

OCTOBER 28, 2017 IN MCCALL

HAUNTED HOUSE at the Little Ski Hill is suitable for all ages. Hot food and beverages will be for sale. For more information visit littleskihill.org.

OCTOBER 31, 2017 IN MCCALL

TRUNK OR TREAT and Flash Mob at

Alpine Village.

OCTOBER 31, 2017 IN DONNELLY

HALLOWEEN in Donnelly. For more information visit donnellychamber.com.

OCTOBER 31, 2017 IN CASCADE

TRUNK OR TREAT in the D-9 Parking lot

starting at 5pm. Photo courtesy Alpine Village McCall

OCTOBER 7, 2017 IN MCCALL

9TH ANNUAL OKTOBERFEST. Oktoberfest is a favorite family-friendly, fall tradition in McCall. Join MCPAWS and friends at Alpine Village for great food, cold local brews, live music, dancing, a fabulous raffle, fun craft vendors, and more! For more information visit mcpaws.org.

ANNUAL FINNISH LADIES AID AUCTION begins at 7pm at McCall Senior Center. Auction items will include handmade arts, crafts, sweets, and plenty of Finn Bread! For more information contact Capella Ikola at 208-634-5529.

OCTOBER 8, 2017 IN MCCALL

TAILS ON TRAILS. The 3rd annual dog-friendly trail running event hosted by and benefiting MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter, offers two distinct routes on the mountain bike trails of Brundage Mountain Resort. Brundage will host an outdoor BBQ and beer garden at the main lodge after the race. For more information visit mcpaws.org.

OCTOBER 13, 2017 IN CASCADE

ALZAR SCHOOL FILM FESTIVAL at The Roxy Theatre. Join us for a selection of short, outdoorbased films that highlight the six founding principles of the Alzar School. Admission is by donation and goes towards scholarship opportunities for Valley County high school students. For more information visit facebook.com/AlzarSchool.

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100 DAYS OF FUN

OCTOBER 2017 IN MCCALL

ROCKTOBERSPIEL CURLING TOURNAMENT at Manchester Ice Center. For more information visit mccallcurling.com.

OCTOBER 2017 IN ROSEBERRY

BARN DANCE at the barn at Valley County Museum in Roseberry.

For more information visit historicroseberry.com.


www.intermountainpowersportrentals.com · Propane · ID Parks & Rec Permits · Fishing Boats · Pontoon Boats · Dirt Bikes · Ski Boats · ATVs CASCADE: 382-4388

· Canoes · Stand Up Paddleboards · Snowmobiles · UTVs · Jet Skis · Kayaks NAMPA: 467-6944

Since 1939

Small town friendliness State of the Art Digital Projection and Sound System (208) 382-5560 theroxyidaho.com Cascade, Idaho


American Legion Hall Post #60 Cascade, Idaho

We support our Veterans, Youth, and Community

Friendly Family Dining Home of the Famous “Lardo” Burger & Fries Prime Rib Baked Fresh Daily Homemade Spaghetti Open Daily @ 11:30am lardogrillandsaloon.com

600 W. Lake St. 208-634-8191

SERVING VALLEY COUNTY FOR OVER 75 YEARS

Post 60 has many year-round events. See our website for current happenings.

WWW.POST60NEWS.COM


DECEMBER 1-4, 2017 IN MCCALL

2ND ANNUAL MOUDY MOUNTAIN CHRISTMAS. Join us afternoons from noon to 6pm for four days of “old time” holiday fun, including craft vendors, sledding, a snowman contest, an interactive Santa Land, and live music. For more information email tumbleweedtrails@gmail.com.

DECEMBER 2, 2017 IN MCCALL

St. Luke’s Hospital Auxiliary’s HOLIDAY HAPPENING at Shore Lodge. Please call 208-634-3996 for more information.

DECEMBER 16, 2017 IN CASCADE NOVEMBER 11, 2017 IN CASCADE

VETERANS DAY CEREMONIES starting at 10am at the Cascade American Legion. For more information visit post60news.com.

VISIT WITH SANTA DAY beginning at 1pm at the Cascade American Legion. Free to the community—free gifts, snacks, and pictures with Mr. and Mrs. Claus. For more information visit post60news.com.

DECEMBER 16-17, 2017 IN MCCALL

THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE SKI MOUNTAINEERING RACE at Brundage. For more

NOVEMBER 18, 2017 IN CASCADE

Cascade Medical Center Auxiliary ANNUAL HOLIDAY BAZAAR will be held at The Ashley Inn. For more information call Robie at 208-382-3242.

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 IN CASCADE

THANKSGIVING DINNER will be served from 1-3pm at the Cascade American Legion. All are welcome for a free community dinner of roasted turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, dressing, green beans, dinner rolls, and pumpkin pie. For more information visit post60news.com.

NOVEMBER 24, 2017 IN MCCALL

PRAY FOR SNOW PARTY at the Activity Barn. For more information visit activitybarn.com.

NOVEMBER 24-25, 2017 IN MCCALL

FESTIVAL OF TREES AND HOLIDAY BAZAAR will occur at the Northfork Lodge. This spectacular holiday show is filled with decorated Christmas trees available to purchase by silent auction bid PLUS…local, one-of-a-kind creations at the bazaar. For more information visit mccallchamber.org.

information visit brundage.com.

DECEMBER 21, 2017 IN CASCADE

Cascade Schools’ RAMBLER CHRISTMAS CONCERT begins at 6pm in the High School gym. The concert will feature students from grades K-12. Sugar cookies, fudge, and other goodies will be for sale. You will have the opportunity to sing Silent Night with the choir as the band plays and see Santa at the close of the concert. For more information visit cascadeschools.org.

DECEMBER 25, 2017 IN MCCALL

SANTA at Brundage and The Activity Barn. For more information visit brundage.com or activitybarn.com.

DECEMBER 30, 2017 IN MCCALL

LIGHT UP THE NIGHT AND NEW YEAR’S EVE PRE-FUNK at Brundage. For more information visit

brundage.com.

DECEMBER 30, 2017 IN DONNELLY

Donnelly Snowmobile Club’s 30TH ANNUAL FAMILYFRIENDLY FUN RUN (Unit 43A)! Registration begins at 9am. Come snowmobile for cash prizes (adults) and gift certificates (youth). There will be six check stations and food concessions. Visit donnellysnowmobileclub.com.

DECEMBER 2017 IN MCCALL

4TH ANNUAL SNOW BALL is a formal event with dinner and dancing, and it benefits the Little Ski Hill and Bear Basin Nordic Center. For more information visit littleskihill.org.

Photo courtesy McKenzie Christensen Kraemer

Photo cour tesy

Brundage Moun

tain Resort

SANTA PAWS in McCall. Capture the “purr”fect picture this holiday season with MCPAWS’ Santa Paws! Bring your pet for a photo with Santa and take home a professional photo card with frame for just $5 each! For more information visit mcpaws.org.

100 DAYS OF FUN

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1860s

• Packer John Welch established a camp on Gold Fork Creek and a bush cabin on Clear Creek. He also established a freight station near the current location of the city of Cascade.

1889

• Tom and Louisa McCall arrived in what would be known as the city of McCall and traded a wagon, team, and harness to Sam Devers for his squatters rights on 160 acres of prime Payette Lake shoreline property.

1870s

• Prospectors and miners started to settle in Valley County. The Clara Foltz mine opened on the Paddy Flats. • Two salmon fisheries operated seasonally on Payette Lake.

1884

• L.S. Kimble moved to Van Wyck and started the first blacksmith business in the region.

1886

• Jack Jasper established a homestead in what would be called Roseberry.

1888

• Jack Jasper, Mark Cole, and the Blankenship and Pattenger families founded Roseberry. • The first U.S. Post Office was established in Van Wyck (March 14), and the next opened in Alpha (July 12). 84

VALLEY COUNTY TIMELINE

• The post office in Lardo opened. • W.H. Boydstun established a freight station, which served to increase the mining activity in Warren Meadows.


1890s

1917

1902

• The school system in the newly formed Valley County had 749 pupils and 40 teachers. Schools were spaced every two or three miles because children walked or rode horses to get to school.

• Census records show 538 residents in the Van Wyck precinct and 110 residents in the Alpha precinct.

• 3,000 miners came to seek their fortunes and establish Roosevelt.

• Valley County was created by the Idaho State Legislature, with the county seat in Cascade.

1908

• A mudslide on Thunder Mountain blocked the creek and flooded Roosevelt.

• The United States joined its allies in World War I. Two hundred twelve people from Valley County served in the war; 11 died. • The Boise-Payette Lumber Company sold its first milled boards in Long Valley. • The only downhill skiing in Long Valley was at Blackwell Hill, east of what is today McCall’s public golf course.

1918

1914

• Idaho Northern Pacific Railway arrived in McCall, with a route that circumvented Van Wyck, Roseberry, and other towns. Donnelly and Cascade were new towns that were built adjacent to the railroad and flourished. Many businesses from the other towns moved to Donnelly and Cascade rather than perish.

• The Boise-Payette Lumber Company Headquarters, the logging camp just north of Cascade, moved south to the MacGregor Ranch after Cascade expanded its city limits. The camp was known as Cabarton, after C.A. Barton who was the Superintendent of the company.

1918-1919

• Over 200,000 sheep grazed in Valley County.

1916-17

• The Finnish Church was built for $1,900 on land donated by Uriel Kantola. By that time there were 85 Finnish families in Valley County.

Photo cour tesy McCall Public Libra

ry and Alvin Fulton

VALLEY COUNTY TIMELINE

85


1920

1936

1920s

1937

• The Idaho State Land Board leased vacation home sites along Payette Lake.

• Bradley Mining Company developed mines at Stibnite, producing gold, antimony, and cinnabar.

• The land for the Little Ski Hill (Adam’s County) was deeded by Carl Brown to the Forest Service.

• Big Creek Lodge was built. The lodge was located 12 nautical miles northeast from Yellow Pine and served as the gateway to the Frank Church Wilderness of No Return.

1923-29

• The area around McCall was logged using Shay Railroads— temporary railroads that hugged the terrain.

1938

• Bradley Mining Company began open-pit mining at Stibnite. • The Little Ski Hill in Adams County was developed, with help from the WPA and CCC.

1924

• The first McCall Winter Sports Carnival was held.

1929

• The stock market crashed, and the Great Depression began.

1933

• The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established by President Franklin Roosevelt as part of the New Deal.

1934

• Drake’s Lodge at Knox burned, and a new lodge was built.

Photo courtesy Mc

• Construction began along Highway 15, following the dirt road along the Payette River. This road was later named Highway 55.

86

VALLEY COUNTY TIMELINE

y

1938-1939

• The movie Northwest Passage was filmed in McCall. It employed 900 “white persons” and 360 “Indians”.

1935

• The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) established 25 camps in Valley County. In nine short years, they built roads, bridges, water systems, lookouts, and buildings throughout the county. They also laid 1,500 miles of telephone line and fought forest fires.

Call Public Librar

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

Photo cour

tesy McCall

Public Librar

y


1939

1944

• The last active buildings in Roseberry, the school and the store, were closed.

1945

• The Roxy Theatre, the most technologically advanced theatre in Idaho, was built for only $25,000 and opened with The Lady Gambles in July.

• The National Forest Service revised forest boundaries, consolidating the old Payette National Forest with the Boise National Forest.

• Mrs. Thelma Stonebreaker shot and killed her husband George near Cascade. She was found not guilty in her trial.

1941

• On December 8, the day after Japanese forces attacked the American military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the United States declared war with Japan.

1942

• Rationing during the war limited supplies like gasoline, meat, and sugar, and the first war blackouts darkened Valley County. • Lake Cascade Dam construction project commenced. The project involved moving the highway and the railroad, and the Dam created a reservoir which resulted in the flooding of 27,000 acres of homesteaded land.

1946

• Idaho Power bought the Long Valley Cooperative Electric System.

1942-1945

1948

• Stibnite was the largest United States producer of the strategic war metals tungsten and antimony. At its peak 1,500 people were employed. They had a hospital, school, dining hall, library, and many other amenities at this remote location.

1943

• The Shore Lodge opened in McCall.

1949

• After being interrupted by WWII, the Lake Cascade Dam was finally finished in 1949.

1952

• The Bradley Mining Company closed its tungsten and antimony mining operations in Stibnite. Photo courtesy McCal

l Pub

lic Librar y • The United States Forest Service established the McCall Smokejumper Base with an initial contingent of five smokejumpers.

1954

• The Lodge at Little Ski Hill burned, along with 200 pairs of skis, poles, and boots. The present lodge was built.

VALLEY COUNTY TIMELINE

87


1955

1977

1956

1979

1959

1980s

1961

1994

• The many small school districts in Valley County were consolidated into three larger districts.

• The Boise Cascade Mill in McCall closed.

• The Idaho Fish and Game opened the McCall Fish Hatchery.

• McCall Memorial Hospital was built for $225,000. It had 13 beds.

• Several houses from Stibnite were trucked out over Lick Creek Summit to communities in southeast Idaho on flat bed trailers. McCall gained over 20 of these homes.

• Brundage Mountain Ski Area, located in Adams County, was developed and opened. It had a tremendous effect on local tourism.

• Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary was founded in the early 1980s, became a non-profit organization in 1989, and specializes in the rehabilitation of local wildlife.

• Lightning started several fires on Payette and Boise National Forests, including the Blackwell Complex adjacent to Payette Lake and fires near Warm Lake.

1997

• McCall and Cascade were isolated for 10 days because of landslides and flooding along the major highways. • The recreation facilities and public land at Lake Cascade, previously managed by the Bureau of Reclamation, opened as Lake Cascade State Park.

Photo courtesy McCall Public Library

1966

• Ponderosa State Park opened to the public with 1,600 acres and 100 campsites.

1971

• Heavy, wet snow collapsed the roof of the McCall High School gymnasium. A wrestling match had been cancelled, and the chairs where viewers would have been seated were destroyed. 88

VALLEY COUNTY TIMELINE

Photo courtesy Mike Huston

1998

• The Idaho Northern and Pacific Railroad (INPR) service to the mill in Cascade was suspended. The INPR ran a tourist line called the Thunder Mountain Line from Cascade to Smiths Ferry for three years.


2001

2016

2003

2017

• The closure of the Boise Cascade Mill in Cascade was a blow to the economic health of the community.

• Manchester Ice and Event Center opened. Hockey and other on-ice activities started to flourish almost immediately.

2004

• Tamarack Ski Area opened; however, the ski area with base buildings was never fully developed. Five years after opening, the area went through bankruptcy and sales of property including the sale and removal of one of the high-speed chair lifts.

2010

• Kelly’s Whitewater Park, one of the premier whitewater parks in the nation, opened in May. The park was built in an area that had been a diversion dam for the Boise Cascade Mill log ponds located in Cascade.

• Cascade Aquatic and Recreation Center opened.

• Valley County and the City of Cascade celebrate 100 years—1 Valley, 100 Years, 100 Days of Fun!


VALLEY COUNTY 1 Alpha 2 Arling/Center 3 Beaver Meadows 4 Big Creek 5 Cascade 6 Crawford

7 Deadwood 8 Donnelly 9 Edwardsburg 10 Elo 11 Fern 12 High Valley 13 Lake Fork

CITIES & EARLY TOWNS

14 Lardo 15 McCall 16 Norwood 17 Roosevelt 18 Roseberry 19 Smith’s Ferry 20 Spink

21 Thunder City 22 Thunder Mountain/ Marble City

23 Van Wyck 24 Warm Lake 25 Yellow Pine

BIG CREEK 4 EDWARDSBURG 9 17 ROOSEVELT

COUNCIL

LARDO 14 15 McCALL 10 ELO 13 LAKE FORK NORWOOD 16 20 SPINK

25 YELLOW

PINE

22 THUNDER MOUNTAIN/

MARBLE CITY

18 ROSEBERRY 8 DONNELLY

LAKE CASCADE

24 WARM LAKE

2 ARLING/CENTER 6 CRAWFORD 3 BEAVER MEADOWS 23 5

CASCADE

VAN WYCK

21 THUNDER CITY 1 ALPHA

11 FERN 19

HIGH 12 VALLEY

PAYETTE

90

VALLEY COUNTY MAP

DEADWOOD 7

SMITH’S FERRY STANLEY

BANKS


4

3 2 NEW MEADOWS

Recreation Areas

5

PAYETTE LAKE

9

8

7

6

McCALL

1

McCall Area

11

1 Activity Barn

LAKE FORK

2 Bear Basin 3 Brundage Mountain Resort 4 Burgdorf Hot Springs

DONNELLY

5 Little Ski Hill 6 Manchester Ice and Event Center 7 McCall Golf Course 8 Ponderosa State Park 9 Whitetail Club

Donnelly Area 10 Gold Fork Hot Springs

10 12

11 Jug Mountain Ranch 12 Tamarack Resort

Cascade Area 13 Cascade Golf Course 14 Fischer Pond 15 Hasbrouck Ranch (off Cabarton Road) Nordic only

LAKE CASCADE

16 Kelly’s Whitewater Park 17 Lake Cascade State Park

17

13 16 14

CASCADE

15

91


Through the Lens of George Nock George Nock was a photographer in Cascade, Idaho, who pioneered the use of the panoramic camera and photo coloring. George and his family moved to Cascade in 1930, and opened the Nock Store on Main Street (which is now the D-9 parking lot). He sold Kodak cameras and supplies and also had a photo studio. He made his home in Cascade until his death at the age of 78 in 1961. One of the earliest photos in the Nock photo collection is dated 1907, and features the boomtown of Roosevelt in the Thunder Mountain mining area. In the Long Valley area alone, Nock traveled hundreds of miles lugging heavy photographic equipment to capture images of Valley County. George Nock’s pictures can be found on display throughout Valley County in places such as the Valley County Courthouse and Cascade Lake Realty.

Centennial Logo Artists

In May of 2016 the Centennial Committee conducted a Valley County youth centennial logo contest. Twenty-two submissions were received for the two age categories and voted on by the Centennial Committee. Eight semifinalists were chosen and awarded $25. From the semifinalists, Harmony Perry was chosen a Grand Prize winner; she received $75. The award winning logo will be utilized in promotions throughout the year. Award money for the contest was generously provided by the Kit Worthington Foundation—The GIG.

Artist: Harmony Perry Congratulations to Harmony, the grand prize winner of the Centennial Youth Logo Contest! Harmony is 12 years old and has lived in Cascade, ID for 10 years. She is a homeschooler in the 7th grade. Harmony is involved in 4-H, Horizons’ Lifestyle and Education Team, and AWANA. She loves to read and ride bikes. She has a passion for all God’s creatures and aspires to be a marine biologist. 92

VALLEY COUNTY LOGO

Information obtained from writings by Richard Parker Robinson, George’s grandson.

Guest Artist: Hannah Hoke Hannah currently lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, but her younger years were spent in McCall, Idaho. Hannah has her degree in Aviation Management. She is passionate about the industry and has enjoyed exploring the backcountry of Idaho by air.


Traditional Remedies

Toothache

The recom mended cure for a oil. In add toothach ition to co e was to a al oil, som swatch, sa pply coal e times a cle turated in an cotton a solution to the de of ammo fective to nia, was a oth. This re momenta pplied medy oft ry laughte e n resulted in r by the p ammonia atient bec fumes. ause of th e

Long before you could swing by the drugstore to pick up cold medicine or pain reliever, the residents of Valley County had go-to recipes to solve just about every ailment. These common recipes were compiled from notes made in old books, diaries, cookbooks and even an old family bible!

Stomach A

Infections A common remedy for infections was known as “white liniment.” It was made by combining eggs, turpentine, and vinegar then applying the mixture to the infected area.

Frostbite

If you were suffering from frostbite, raw s, potatoes were peeled, sliced into strip This . area en tbitt fros and applied to the was done before any attempt was made to warm up the affected skin.

Chest Cold

Mustard p laster was a popular Another c remedy fo ure said to r the ches have bee flannel dip t cold. n used was ped into b to apply a oiling wa turpentin te r e to the c and sprin hest. kled with

Sore Throat

recipe, one While perhaps not the most common g a long takin ther account described his grandmo out the ing bbb feather, dipping it in coal oil, and swa at. thro throat of anyone complaining of a sore

Whooping Cough

of granulated Recipe found from 1912: Mix one pint stir for two sugar with the half pint of water, and of Pinex minutes. Put two and one half ounces add the sugar (fifty-cent wor th) in a pint bottle then poon ever y teas a syrup, this will keep perfectly. Take one, two, or three hours.

Head Lice

ilment

Fried flou r was a co mmon cu had to be re for diarr used whe hea, how n dosing would res ever, care the fried fl ult in con o ur. Too m stipation. be used w uch Another re as huckle medy rum berr y juic ored to e.

Asthma

One account noted that a muskrat skin next to the body worn over the lungs with the fur side could ease asthma symptons.

Chapped Hands

and drying Powdered starch applied after washing ture was also hands was a quick cure. This same mix ing and stick used to keep sewing needles from becoming rusty.

Lip Gloss Recipe

oil, 1/8 teaspoon 2 Tablespoons beeswax, ¼ c almond r low heat, stir in ove carmine, 1 drop oil of rose, melt wax and oil of rose. Carnine and gradually add almond oil

bine coal oil and An old cure for head lice was to com lard then apply to the patient’s hair.

93


Valley County Centennial Celebration February 25-26, 2017

Torch Ceremonies and community celebrations throughout Valley County. Torch Ceremonies will start on February 25 and will kick off our countywide celebrations on February 26th. Valley County’s official celebration on February 26th will be at The Roxy Theatre from 2-4 pm. Activities will include: • Cascade Rambler Band and Choir singing and playing 100 year-old songs • Silent skit by the Cascade Rambler Drama Department • Slide show depicting 100-years of Valley County • Words from our centenarians (or almost)

Centennial Events

• And more! For an official schedule of events visit www.co.valley.id.us.

BBQ in the Park

City of Cascade Celebrating 100 Years July 17, 2017 at Armstrong Park. Come and enjoy an afternoon of good ole fun! An afternoon of fun for the whole family: • 100 year-old family games • Music • BBQ in the park • Eating a piece of a 100' cake • Reading of the congressional record • Words from a State speaker • Costume contest • Reading of historical snippets of Cascade’s past by “Old Father Cascade” • Unveiling of the Centennial Memorial For more info visit www.cascadeid.us.

94

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS


SHOP 路 DINE 路 CHILL 路 RENT TOYS 路 BUY SUPPLIES

(208) 634-8605

www.MILEHIGHMARINA.com


RESTORE THE SITE

At Midas Gold we are moving from exploration to designing and permitting the Stibnite Gold Project, and we are starting with the end in mind. We have a plan to restore the Stibnite site, and our work to take care of the environment and our community is already underway. Learn more at MidasGoldIdaho.com.

Tel 208.901.3060 13181 Hwy 55 Donnelly, ID 83615

www.MidasGoldIdaho.com

midasgoldidaho @MidasIdaho

Centennial Magazine  

Celebrating 100 years of Valley County, Idaho and Cascade, Idaho.

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