Telluride & Mountain Village Visitor's Guide / Winter 2021/22

Page 1

THE TOWN & MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE | WINTER 2021/22

PICKAXE TO

POWDER

SKI RESORT’S VISIONARIES

PRESERVING THE PAST

ON-MOUNTAIN DINING

GREEN COMMUNITY



THE MOST COLORADO PLACE ON EARTH / telluride.com / 855.748.9621


Telluride,

THE ULTIMATE RETRE AT

850 E Columbia Ave 4 Bed | 3 Bath | 2,638 Sq Ft | $4,050,000

Ken Grodberg 970.708.5601 ken@grodbergrealestate.com grodbergrealestate.com @grodbergrealestate

Ken specializes in connecting buyers and sellers while helping them establish a sense of community in the Telluride region.

Compass is a licensed real estate broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


369 E Galena Ave 6 Bed | 7 Bath | 4,376 Sq Ft | $14,500,000


CHANGING the game it’s never been more important to have the right realtor in your corner


“It’s no surprise that the O’Neill Stetina Group is at the top of the pack in the Telluride real estate market. Short on talk...long on results! They work superbly as a team, communicating very well and keeping everyone equally involved throughout the process. Any and all glitches along the way are handled calmly and professionally.” - Recent Seller of a Significant Sale -

The real estate game is constantly changing and evolving, your Realtor should be too. Gone are the days of letting the “friendly local” you met on the ski lift represent your multi-million dollar asset in Telluride. Improving upon the accepted standard has been the driving force behind the O’Neill Stetina Group (OSG) from day one.

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS Headlines of escalating prices with nothing to buy have dominated news feeds for almost 2 years now. During the most challenging buyer’s market most have ever seen, OSG has helped 104 buyers realize their dream of living in the Telluride area. Coaching their clients on expectations and presenting creative solutions are distinctions that make OSG stand out from the pack.

OSG Helped

104

Buyers Call Telluride Home 9/1/2019 - 9/1/2021

OSG Helped

73

AN EXPERIENCED AND STEADY HAND As real estate appreciates, the stakes are higher than ever for sellers. Offers may be plentiful, but unexpected and volatile variables can cost additional time and money, or even kill deals. OSG has the foresight to minimize hurdles from day one, and an experienced steady hand to manage any unexpected twists. Over the past 2 years, OSG has helped 73 sellers move on or move up.

Sellers Move On or Up 9/1/2019 - 9/1/2021

CONNECT WITH US LET’S TALK about the paradigm OSG uses to achieve such a high success rate for our sellers and buyers. Brian O’Neill Director I 970.708.5367 Marty Stetina Broker Associate I 970.708.4504 osg@oneillstetina.com I oneillstetinagroup.com I @luxurymountainproperties


Telluride Real Estate Corp partners with Forbes Global Properties Forbes Global Properties is a luxury real estate marketing platform leveraging the global reach of Forbes to showcase the world’s finest homes and the stories behind them.

407 Benchmark Drive // $12,495,000

Dolores River Ranch // $8,995,000

This 7-bedroom, 7-bathroom (plus 2 half-baths) estate is bathed in the warmth of all day sun. Constructed from massive logs handpicked from Santa Fe National Forest near Cerro Grande Peak the residence possesses the quintessential Rocky Mountain lodge ambiance adjoining 30 picturesque acres of open space with ski access just steps away.

Emanating from a high-elevation watershed with sparkling headwaters near Lizard Head Pass just south of Telluride, the Dolores is fed by a dozen brook, rainbow and brown trout streams upstream from the Dolores River Ranch. History is woven into this lush 318+ acre landscape with a charming 11-bedroom, half-century-old lodge.

7039 Last Dollar Road // $10,995,000

810A Arizona Street // $8,900,000

PARADISE FOUND --- Absolute privacy atop the highest knoll in the Gray Head Wilderness Preserve offers up the ultimate 5-bedroom, 5-bathroom retreat for generations of family. Located on 70 acres with sweeping 360 degree views of the iconic Telluride peaks.

Privately tucked against lush vegetation of Aspen and Spruce, yet dramatically opens upon a high mountain meadow with sweeping views of the San Sophia Ridge. Located near the entry to the Mountain Village, it is convenient to both the Village Core and Town of Telluride. The 5-bedroom, 5.5-bath residence’s bold, yet simplistic, mountain contemporary architecture blends with its natural surroundings.

Co-listed with Steve Catsman // 970-729-0100 // steve@catsman.com.


The Power of Forbes

6.3M

Magazine Readership

#1

Most trusted magazine in the US*

45M

Social Media Followers

58th

Most Popular Website in 2020**

133M

Monthly Global Visitors***

* MRI-Simmons, Fall 2019 | ** Moz Top 500 websites by domain authority, August 2020 | *** Google Analytics, September 2020

Visit: tdsmith.com // chrissommers.com // forbesglobalproperties.com td@tdsmith.com | 970.729.1577 | chris@chrissommers.com | 970.729.2480

685 Wilson Way // $10,150,000

228 Russell Drive // $5,950,000

Painstakingly constructed from three pre-civil war barns, Wilson Way offers a gateway to a lifestyle that captures the allure of the rugged wilderness from its doorstep and beyond to what seems like an infinity of beauty called the San Juan Mountains laced with 14,000 ft. peaks, old growth forests and lush mountain meadows. 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths.

The Best of Both Worlds --- Nestled alongside the third green with convenient ski-in/ski-out access to the Galloping Goose Ski Trail and miles of cross country ski trails, this 6-bedroom home blends perfectly with its mountainous environment. The log and stone exterior pleasingly contrasts the architectural elegance of its upscale interior.

141 Tristant Drive // $4,175,000

Mystic Valley Ranch // $3,600,000

Located within the Villas at Tristant complex, this 4-bedroom, 4-bathroom home with additional media room and private hot tub, offers ski-in/ski-out convenience via a private lift or the Tristant ski bridge to Lower Village Bypass ski run. The views from the residence are extraordinary of the San Sophia Range and of the ski resort.

A 318 acre spectacular alpine valley surrounded by United States Forest Service on three sides offers its owner end of the road privacy amongst abundant populations of elk, deer, bear and soaring bald eagles. Three miles of roads, underground power and well render the property ready to build a mountain hideaway or family compound. In addition, 2.5 cubic feet of water will be conveyed with the ranch.


WINTER 2021/22

CONTENTS ickaxe to Powder P Local visionaries and their plan for a ski area

Outdoor Activities

34 G lee Club Ski and snowboard club mixes fun with practice afe Backyard S Beacon checkers for backcountry enthusiasts

39

eet Holly Palmer M TASP, Burton collaborate with snowboarder

85

Activities Guide

17

Getting Here

20

How to Visit Right

82

Local Transportation, Parking

83

Flight Map

107+ Telluride and Mountain Village Maps

34

107+ Parting Shot

44

42 52

Dining News

46 Arts News 49 Take a Bow Palm Theatre is top notch 51 Merry and Bright Holidays in Telluride, Mountain Village 92

Dining & Spirits Guide

RICH HISTORY 52 Preserving the Past 60 years as a National Historic Landmark 80 Historic Walking Tour

39

George Mays

42 Stronghouse & LittleHouse Distinctive menus and spaces, same exquisite food

Melissa Plantz

THE SCENE 40 High Altitude Cuisine Ski resort’s on-mountain restaurants

22

Melissa Plantz

37

Discover Telluride

19 Getting Around Telluride, Mountain Village & the Gondola connection

MOUNTAIN LIFE 29

15

42 49

51 Melissa Plantz

22

44 44

Senior Mahoney Collection

WELCOME

COVER STORY


T E L LU R I D E , C O L O R A D O

Move beyond your expectations. Nothing Compares

3 0 0 R OY E R L A N E

R I C K F U ST I N G .C O M

6 BEDS | 5 BATHS | 2 HALF BATHS | $2 5,000,000 An extraordinary retreat, this newly-contructed, 6-bedroom modern home was carefully designed to honor and celebrate its singular setting in the heart of Telluride’s iconic box canyon, offering an unrivaled panorama of its soaring peaks and cascading waterfalls. The house is formed by three horizontal glass pavilions stepped into the mountainside, in subtle harmony with its place among the towering aspens, juxtaposed with the breathtaking experience of being entirely enveloped by the canyon’s sheer red rock cliffs and dramatic beauty.

R I C K F U ST I N G PERSONAL COMMITMENT PROVEN RESULTS 970.708.5500 | rickfusting@gmail.com

V I R T U A L TO U R SCAN HERE


WINTER 2021/22

Mary McIntyre

CONTENTS

55 60 Lisa Marie Wright Photography

President & CEO MICHAEL MARTELON Director of Marketing & Public Relations KIERA SKINNER Director of Communications TOM WATKINSON

RETAIL THERAPY 55

ool Finds C With love from Mountain Village

100 Shopping Guide

57 Sweet Dreams Wedding cakes and treats

57

99 Venues Guide

Melissa Plantz

65

71 72

Director of Operations HOLLIE HANNAHS Financial Administrator VICKI LAW Staff Photographer RYAN BONNEAU

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO TELLURIDE & MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Editor & Associate Publisher ERIN SPILLANE

STAY & PLAY

Art Directors LAUREN METZGER / KIM HILLEY

60 The Path Less Traveled Adventurous accommodation options

Advertising Sales HILARY TAYLOR

86 Accommodation Guide Ryan Bonneau

TELLURIDE TOURISM BOARD VISIT TELLURIDE Telluride, Colorado 855.421.4360 | Telluride.com

SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS

Tony Demin

The Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village is published twice per year by:

BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON 62

Business & Property News

65

Eco-Friendly Enterprises

AROUND TOWN 69 Community Green local initiatives 71 Community Characters Kim Montgomery 72

Kids Family activities

77

Summer My perfect day

Writers MARTINIQUE DAVIS LINNE HALPERN JESSE JAMES McTIGUE JENNIFER JULIA SAGE MARSHALL EMILY SHOFF For advertising opportunities contact: Hilary Taylor / 970.417.2589 HilaryTaylorConsulting@gmail.com Copyright ©2021 All Rights Reserved Cover and contents must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher.

The Guide participates in the PrintReleaf reforestation program. For more, see page 68.


celebrating We have navigated the ups and downs of the market and watched big brand names come and go for more than three decades. Through it all, our mission has remained the same, hire the best real estate professionals and provide our clients with the highest standard of service. Buying or selling your home isn’t just about numbers — it’s about relationships and knowing your best interests are being represented in a diligent, forthright manner. As your trusted advisor, we purposefully guide you through the process with the utmost expertise.

Y E A R S on top of telluride real estate

GET MORE OUT OF YOUR REAL ESTATE EXPERIENCE 237 S. Oak St. I 220 E. Colorado Ave., Ste. 102 I 560 Mountain Village Blvd., Ste. 103 970.728.0808 I TellurideProperties.com

tellurideproperties

June 23 - 26, 2022

TellurideYogaFestival.com

@tellurideproperties


THE PEDERSEN BUILDING

With almost 11,000 square feet of livable space, there will never be another residence of this size and caliber in the heart of Telluride located this close to the Gondola, ski lifts and Main Street shops and restaurants. Fully furnished and completely turnkey, experience the unparalleled lifestyle of living a level above it all, yet just steps from everything Telluride.

THE PEDERSEN BUILDING

$29,500,000

PENTHOUSE Residence — 7,187 sq. ft. Living Space // 360-degree Views // 4 Bedrooms 5 Full and 2 Half Bathrooms Personal Office — 1,116 sq. ft. // TV area with pool table and couches Fitness Equipment // Spa with sauna, steam shower and cold tub // Ski Room Garage — 904 sq. ft. 4 Car Garage Outdoor Decks — 2,478 sq. ft. of Outdoor Living Areas

Lars Carlson 970.729.0160 lcarlson@livsothebysrealty.com larscarlson.com


DISCOVER TELLURIDE

W

elcome to the winter 2021-2022 issue of the Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village, and a very warm welcome from the Telluride Tourism Board. We hope that you find everything you need in this current issue of the Guide for a very special time in our very special community. I think it is safe to say that we are living in momentous times that feel historic, but, then,

local dining scene. Not an obvious nod to Telluride’s history, but a favorite of mine because these eateries are a mirror image of our community itself: old and new existing side by side and, well, crushing it. Even our Community Characters profile fits in well with my preoccupation with history, chronicling Mountain Village’s former town manager, Kim Montgomery, whose personal history is intertwined with that of the very

LIVING HISTORY Telluride and Mountain Village have seen many momentous chapters in their long, storied past. It’s a unique and colorful history that has been carefully preserved thanks to Telluride’s status, gained in 1961, as a National Historic Landmark. It’s also a history that has been interwoven throughout the pages of this issue, first with our cover story, which looks at the pivotal time in the area’s past when, faced with the slow but inexorable decline of the mining industry, visionaries within the community hit upon the idea of opening a ski area — and then made it happen. There is also a feature on the 60th anniversary of the National Historic Landmark designation itself, how it came about and why it remains so important. And, there is an article about two new arrivals, Littlehouse and Stronghouse, to the

community that she helped establish. In Telluride and Mountain Village, it would seem that we are living history, as well as preserving it. While writing this, on a sunny, bluebird day in autumn, I am tempted to linger a little longer on the stories, events and characters that make our local history so fascinating. I need for a moment, though, to look forward to this winter with a reminder to please respect the public health guidelines that may exist this season. They are measures designed to keep us all safe and well — and out in Telluride’s beautiful backyard as much as possible. After all, it’s a backyard abundant, not only with relics and references to the area’s past, but also with a wealth of opportunities for adventurers ready this winter to write their own histories. Let it snow!

EXPLORE THE VISITORS CENTER Want to make your Telluride experience an unforgettable one? Try the welcoming, informative Visitors Center. Located beside Elks Park and just across Colorado Avenue from the historic New Sheridan Hotel, this interactive space and its knowledgeable, friendly staff are ready to steer you toward a winter adventure, memorable meal or the perfect boutique.

MICHAEL MARTELON PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Telluride Tourism Board

This powder-day skier, catching air on Colorado Avenue, is not Michael Martelon, except in his wildest dreams. Photo by Melissa Plantz telluride.com | 855.421.4360

15


Aspen 970.925.8579

Crested Butte 970.349.5023

Denver 303.399.4564

Steamboat Springs 970.879.9222

Telluride 970.728.3359

Vail 970.949.5500

interior landscapes that delight the senses

thurstonkitchenandbath.com


GETTING HERE

TOUCH DOWN IN TELLURIDE

Air options that make it easy to hit the slopes

Tony Demin

T

his winter there are numerous air options that put the Telluride Ski Resort within easy reach via the two airports that serve the destination: Telluride/Montrose Regional Airport (MTJ), a scenic 75 minutes away, and Telluride Regional Airport (TEX), just 10 minutes from the slopes. New this season and building off the success of its Denver (DEN)-Telluride jet service, Denver Air Connection will begin operating flights between TEX and Phoenix Sky Harbor (PHX) on Dec. 16. The service, on a 30-seat, Dornier 328 jet, will run daily through April 5. The news is notable on a few fronts: It’s the return of a route that ran from 1993 to 2011, then-served by turbo-props, and it’s the first-ever jet service between Telluride and Phoenix. In addition, Denver Air Connection’s rela-

tionship with United Airlines enables travelers to book connecting flights through the global United network. For DEN-TEX and PHX-TEX flights, travelers need to book directly through the Denver Air Connection website. Given Denver Air’s reputation for excellent customer service, a flight time of just 70 minutes and TEX’s proximity to the slopes, this is good news indeed. Arizonans will also continue to have the option of flying to MTJ on American Airlines, with regular service to Phoenix throughout the season. Other American routes this winter include flights from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD), New York/La Guardia Airport (LGA) and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), all to Montrose.

Meanwhile, Delta will be making its return to several Colorado mountain airports this winter after suspending flights last year. An important and popular returnee is service to Montrose from Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL). Flights will run an average of three to four times weekly through the season, starting on Dec.18. United Airlines’ routes will continue to serve Montrose with daily flights from Denver, Houston/Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH) and Chicago/O’Hare; and flights two to five times weekly from Newark International Airport (EWR), San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and LAX. And, Southwest returns for the season too, with service to Montrose from Denver and Dallas/Love Field (DAL). telluride.com | 855.421.4360

17


T H I S I S T H E R E S E T® YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR.

Set at elevation in the untamed heart of Telluride, Colorado, RESET is the private, ultra-luxury wellness and trekking retreat that proves one week can change your life. RESETTELLURIDE.COM


GETTING AROUND

Melissa Plantz

8 A

s ute min

B

5

m in ut es

13 minutes

C

TWO TOWNS, ONE COMMUNITY

Telluride to Mountain Village

THE GONDOLA A

TELLURIDE STATION South Oak Street Telluride

Welcome to Telluride and Mountain Village. Different in some ways, both have a love for their shared community, of the stunning surrounding natural beauty and the people, culture and traditions that make this place so special.

8,750 feet

B

SAN SOPHIA STATION Mid-Mountain Access the resort’s trails, Allred’s Restaurant & Bar, Nature Center 10,500 feet

C

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center 9,545 feet

Masks are required on the Gondola per state and federal mandate.

Telluride

Mountain Village

The Gondola

A National Historic Landmark District that gourmet restaurants, chic boutiques and fine-art galleries call home, Telluride proudly displays its mining-town heritage with colorful Victorian houses and charming, carefully preserved streets lined with clapboard and brick storefronts. Don’t let the town’s charms fool you, however. Telluride’s heritage is equal parts refinement and Wild West, complete with tales of bank robbers — Butch Cassidy robbed his first bank here — and hardscrabble miners.

At 9,545 feet and almost complete enveloped by the Telluride Ski Resort, this hamlet offers visitors and residents alike a more modern, luxe feel in a European-style alpine setting. Incorporated in 1995, Mountain Village boasts luxury accommodation, state-of-the-art spas and sophisticated dining options, all the while surrounded by the towering peaks that form the highest concentration of 13,000and 14,000-foot peaks in the United States.

Linking these two communities is the Gondola. The only transportation system of its kind in North America, the “G” is free, pet friendly and handicap accessible, connecting Telluride and Mountain Village via a 13-minute ride. With breathtaking views and the uniqueness of the experience, we can promise the Gondola is one “commute” you will never forget. This winter, take time to familiarize yourself with the G’s Covid protocols and follow them.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

19


HOW TO VISIT

RIGHT

Ryan Bonneau

Love Telluride and Mountain Village? Show that love to our community, to all who live, work and play here and to our stunning natural surroundings.

20

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


DO RIGHT BY EACH OTHER

DO YOU RIGHT

We are a small town with a big heart.

Let’s always be prepared with sunscreen, layers and water.

Let’s do our part by observing prevailing public health protocols. Let’s be kind and respectful of our service workers, bus drivers and Gondola staff.

DO THE SLOPES RIGHT

DO THE TOWNS RIGHT

Let’s carve the heck out of every diem, but refrain from skiing like Butch Cassidy running from the law in slow areas.

Let’s travel like a local while in Telluride and Mountain Village. Let’s ride the free Gondola, a bike, the eco-friendly Galloping Goose or walk. Let’s reuse towels and linens and dry them in the clean mountain air. Let’s conserve in the City of Light by turning lights off when we leave the room. Let’s unplug our minds, electronics and chargers when not in use.

DO THE CANYON RIGHT Let’s take a deep breath, slow down and adjust to T Time (about 10 minutes late). Let’s keep the mountain clean by bringing out everything that we brought in. Let’s save some water for the mountain. Let’s enjoy the wildlife and natural surroundings without disrupting. Let’s care more about ourselves and others than the selfie.

DO THE WORLD RIGHT Let’s work together today for a better tomorrow. Let’s waste less and enjoy more. Let’s not be trashy and instead reduce, reuse and recycle. Let’s say no to single-use plastics. Let’s stay hydrated with our pure Rocky Mountain water from a reusable water bottle. Let’s get a java jolt from coffee in a reusable mug. Let’s sip beverages from a metal straw. Let’s offset our travel emissions by purchasing offsets. 21 telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Let’s slalomnly swear to have fun and be kind on the slopes.

Let’s come to see and not be seen. Let’s experience altitude without attitude.


Top left, Frank B. Wilson and a friend with the town of Telluride in the background. Date unknown. Photo courtesy of the Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved.

22

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Ryan Bonneau

D

eb Pera and Jamey Schuler’s childhoods were idyllic. The pair are old friends who grew up in the Telluride of the very late 1950s and 1960s. They remember a childhood spent playing outdoors in summer and skiing a rope tow in winter. It was a small, close-knit community back then. Recalls Pera, laughing, “If there was a stranger in town, we all knew it.” Says Schuler, “The thing I remember most about Telluride in those days is that it was like a dream world for a kid.” When she was in sixth grade, Pera remembers that she began to hear talk at the dinner table and in her parents’ hardware store of something new to their community: a ski area. “I was a kid, so I wasn’t quite sure what that meant, but it sounded exciting,” she says. A few years later, in December 1972, a ski area in Telluride opened, but how that momentous event went from dinner-table talk to reality is a story that began decades earlier and has its root in the unshakeable belief of a group of locals that their backyard had all the makings of a world-class ski resort. >>


The visionaries who built on Telluride’s mining past to create its ski town future BY ERIN SPILLANE


They based that belief on their deep knowledge of and love for that backyard. After all, though they worked hard in the mine and elsewhere, many spent much of their free time skiing these mountains every chance they got. In Telluride, it wasn’t that there were miners before the first skiers, it’s that the miners were the first skiers. FIRST TRACKS Early in Telluride’s history, mine workers, often Scandinavian, used skis to move around the high-elevation mining camps and travel to town. Johnnie Stevens, a central figure in the development of the ski area, notes that it was in the 1920s when skiing here began to transition into a leisure activity: “There was a guy, a champion ski jumper in around 1923. He came to Telluride and said there could be a nice ski club because of the elevation and the beauty. There was another fella who ran the drug store. He was a big character

around here and his name was Frank Wilson. He was skiing with the Telluride Ski Club back in the 1920s up on Lizard Head Pass.” In the 1930s, a local teacher built a rope tow behind the Beaver Pond near Town Park. “He got Billy Mahoney and his brother skiing on that thing,” Stevens says, adding, “There was some recreational skiing from the 1930s onward for sure.” In the early 1960s, a group of locals put an old car on blocks in Town Park to the right of Firecracker Hill. They modified the rear wheel to act as a sheave and ran a rope up the hill to another wheel fixed to a tree above Bear Creek Road. Says Stevens. “We skied that rope tow every Saturday and Sunday in the winter.” Later, the mining company provided an electric motor and they moved the car to the bottom of Kids’ Hill to erect two rope tows. In those days, Telluriders also skied towed behind cars — Stevens was once towed all the way to Rico, 30 miles away — and enjoyed backcountry skiing, often

‘ THERE WAS SOME RECREATIONAL SKIING FROM THE 1930s ONWARD.’ Jo hnni e S t e v e ns

24

in groups led by Senior Mahoney. “He was a few years older than me and he’d call my mom and ask if I could go out. We’d go in the spring and summer and we’d climb up and ski these mountains.” Stevens points out that these years were instrumental in creating a small culture of skiing that in turn got some locals dreaming of a ski area. Chief among those dreamers was Senior Mahoney. ‘ANYPLACE THERE WAS SNOW’ It is impossible to talk about the founding of the Telluride Ski Resort without talking about Senior Mahoney. Mahoney was 2 years old when he and his family moved to Telluride. He was one of five boys who, the story goes, took their dad’s old skis

This page, top, Beth Batcheller skiing on the roof of her house at Tomboy Mine, c. 1907; inset left, Frank B. Wilson and two intrepid skiers c. 1920; main photo, skiers at Sunnyside Mine, 1910. Opposite, bottom, Rope tow c. 1960. Photos courtesy of the Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved. Opposite, top, Bill Mahoney, Jr., skiing towed behind a car on Main Street. Photo courtesy of the Senior Mahoney Collection. Many of these fascinating historical photos are available for purchase from the Telluride Historical Museum’s website at telluridemuseum.org/shop.


and found another pair and between them skied everything they could: snowy streets in town, rope tows, behind cars and, of course, the backcountry. “Sneffels to Imogene Pass to Bridal Veil Basin, over to Columbine Lake and all the valleys in the Ophir area. Any place there was snow,” Mahoney says in Senior: 82 Winters in Telluride, a 2018 film by Ben Knight and Travis Rummel. When he wasn’t skiing, Mahoney worked in the mine, beginning as a tram loader at the age of 15 and progressing over the years to mine foreman. The idea of a ski area seems to have crystallized for Mahoney in the late 1950s, according to his son, Bill Mahoney, Jr. “My mom and I don’t recall that it had anything to do with worrying about the mine closing,” he remembers. “Dad just loved skiing. He grew up skiing and us kids grew up skiing and he thought a ski area in Telluride would be a really great thing.” He wasn’t alone, Jamey Schuler points out. “There was a whole group of people — Billy Mahoney, Doyle and Betty Ruth Duncan, Deb’s parents, my parents and others in the community — who envisioned and supported the development of the ski area.” In 1958, locals created Telluride Ski, Inc. With funds donated by the local Elks Lodge, Pete Seibert, well known for developing Vail, came down for a day to assess the area’s suitability for a ski area, but without a financial backer, the effort subsequently fizzled out. Stevens recalls another initiative from the mid1960s. “Folks said, ‘maybe if we could just get one chairlift.’ They got money together and went to a company out of Denver to design a lift that would go up to Camel’s Garden, where Lift 8 goes now. Whoever the consultant was, he absconded with the money and not a damn thing happened.” The dreamers remained undaunted, which

was just as well, because Telluride’s fortunes were about to change. ENTER JOE ZOLINE Joern and Louise Gerdts found their way to Telluride in the early 1960s. Much taken with its beauty, they bought a summer home here and even wrote an article in Skiing magazine extolling its potential as a ski area. The piece, which ran in 1967, finished with the question “Is there a financier in the audience?” As it turns out, there was and, amazingly, he was seated next to Joern Gerdts on a flight soon after. His name was Joe Zoline, a successful California lawyer and businessman and the owner of an Aspen cattle ranch. In the air, Gerdts talked passionately about Telluride, in particular the Gorrono Ranch, according to Zoline’s daughter, Pam Lifton-Zoline. Located in the middle of what would become the ski area, the tract was about to be broken up and sold as smaller parcels. Says Lifton-Zoline, “All the land that would be necessary for a ski area base was about to be sold off.” Adds her husband, John Lifton-Zoline, “Joern told Joe that if that sale took place and if ownership was broken up that way, there would never be a ski area. And Joe did something that was entirely unlike himself, he went and bought the entire ranch sight unseen. They [Joe and his wife, Janice “Jebby” Zoline] drove down to Telluride to see what they had bought and immediately realized that although it was a critical piece of property, it was only a tiny piece.” Over the next several months, Zoline went on to acquire over 4,000 acres in 17 different transactions, including, significantly and fortuitously, the vast Adams Ranch tract in what is now Mountain Village.

‘ MY MOM AND I DON’T RECALL THAT IT HAD ANYTHING TO DO WITH WORRYING ABOUT THE MINE CLOSING. DAD JUST LOVED SKIING.’ B ill Mah on e y, Jr.

MUSEUM CELEBRATES SKI HISTORY Want to explore further Telluride’s transition from mining town to ski resort? The Telluride Historical Museum has a permanent exhibit in its newly updated Mahoney Gallery, where visitors can examine artifacts from this fascinating period in local history and view We Skied It, a film that looks at the history of skiing in the area from the 1920s to the 1970s. In addition, museum staff are currently putting together next year’s annual exhibit, scheduled to open in the summer, which celebrates the Telluride Ski Resort as it approaches its 50th birthday on Dec. 22, 2022. For more, go to telluridemuseum.org.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

25


A community’s loss This page, top left (l-r) Joe Zoline, Senior Mahoney and ski area employee Al Bridges. Opposite, inset lower right, cutting the ribbon on the new Telluride Ski Area, Dec. 22. 1972. Photos courtesy of the Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved. This page inset below, Senior Mahoney and Emile Allais on the soon-to-be Telluride Ski Area, 1971. Photo courtesy of the Senior Mahoney Collection. Bottom, Johnnie Stevens skiing in Lena Basin in the backcountry south of Telluride 1968. Photo courtesy of Johnnie Stevens.

BIG MOMENTS Zoline also wanted to get to ‘JOE DID SOMETHING know Telluride, and here Bill THAT WAS ENTIRELY honey, was the first). Says Mahoney, Jr., takes up the story. UNLIKE HIMSELF, HE Bill Jr., “I remember, my “My mom remembers that Joe sister, myself and my mom WENT AND BOUGHT went down to the Roma, which were all home and Dad came THE ENTIRE RANCH was one of the few businesses in and said that he had been SIGHT UNSEEN.’ at the time, and went in to offered a job with the ski get something to eat. He was J o hn L i f t o n- Z o l i ne area and was going to quit talking to the owner, Kate the mine. That was a pretty Mulvey, about who he should big moment that I will never forget. My mom said, talk to and she said, ‘Well, you should talk to Bill ‘You know, Billy, this is going to change everything Mahoney because he really knows more about here.’ And he said, ‘You’re right.’ ” skiing here than anyone.’ They met and it just Zoline also brought in Emile Allais, a Frenchwent from there.” man and champion skier who had become a ski For a period after that, Senior Mahoney worked area designer, for advice. The Lifton-Zolines say days in the mine and every other waking moment Allais and Senior Mahoney skied together day as a consultant for Zoline. Then, in the summer of after day. “We think they were testing each other,” 1970, he left the mine to become the nascent ski says John Lifton-Zoline, chuckling. “Emile to see area’s second employee (his wife, Twylla Mahow Billy would stand up to Olympic standards and Billy to see how Emile would stand up to the vagaries of the mountain.” Another piece of the puzzle was obtaining the necessary U.S. Forest Service permissions. Senior Mahoney had this task and Stevens, who was another of the ski area’s earliest employees, remembers some quick thinking by Mahoney when a Forest Service official asked him to indicate on a map the boundaries. “I give Billy credit,” says Stevens. “He took a yellow pen and drew the permit boundary that 26

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Sadly, three of the giants of this pivotal period of Telluride history passed away in the past year or so. On Oct. 17, 2020, Robert “Bucky” Schuler died at his Tucson home, just days after his 83rd birthday, survived by his wife of 64 years, Pat; his four children, including Jamey Schuler; and seven grandchildren. A third-generation Tellurider, former town councilmember and volunteer firefighter, Schuler was a highly respected business owner who sold a key property, the Transfer Warehouse, to Joe Zoline and donated the land at the top of Lift 9 where Giuseppe’s sits today. On the very same day that Schuler passed away, the Telluride community lost another prominent member: Jack Pera at his Telluride home, also at the age of 83. Pera was survived by his mother, Allene; his wife of 64 years, Davine; three daughters, including Deb Pera; six grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. Pera is remembered for his passionate support of the Telluride High School basketball teams; his founding of Sheep Mountain Alliance, a local conservation nonprofit; his association as both participant and organizer of the Imogene Pass Run; the colorful columns he wrote for the local newspaper; and the hardware store that he and Davine opened in 1969. And, in January 2021, Senior Mahoney passed away at the age of 92, leaving his wife of more than 70 years, Twylla; two children, including Bill “Junior” Mahoney; three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Lauded as the driving force behind the successful founding of the ski resort and the embodiment of Telluride’s mining past and its ski resort present, Mahoney, who was the ski area’s first mountain manager and served on Telluride Town Council for a number of years, was inducted into the Colorado Ski Hall of Fame in 1997. The highest run on the Telluride Ski Resort bears his name, a gnarly double-black known simply as “Senior’s”.


‘MY DAD WAS JOYOUS. I THINK HE FELT LIKE IT WAS A HUGE ACCOMPLISHMENT.’ Pam Lifton -Zo l i ne Ryan bonneau

went up to the top of Plunge Lift, up to the top of Gold Hill and Palmyra Peak, down the west side of Prospect Basin and Bald Mountain. Once he did that, it meant that we could be world class because of all the terrain. That, to me, was a miracle.” A FLURRY OF ACTIVITY Beginning in the summer of 1970, a number of locals that included the Mahoneys, Stevens, Jim Gowdy, Alan Ranta, Ed Bowers and more began cutting trails. Says Stevens, “We were obsessed with getting runs cut and maybe somehow Telluride would become a good ski resort.” Bill Mahoney, Jr., recalls early trail work on terrain today served by Lifts 2, 4 and 10, as well as on the “front side”, the Telluride side, of the mountain, in part to facilitate snowcat skiing, which the still-developing ski area offered in the winters of 1970-71 and 1971-72. Then came the summer of 1972. The ski area was scheduled to open the following December and Bill Mahoney, Jr., describes a magical, but tiring, time: “When the whole thing was happening and the chairlifts were ordered and we were cutting lift lines and digging holes for foundations and the companies came in to build the chairlifts

and we had some French-Canadian loggers come in to help with trails and we were building the day lodge, the excitement was incredible. The fact that we got five chairlifts up and operational in one summer and hired all the people necessary for a ski area — we all worked very hard, but I think Dad’s enthusiasm just rubbed off on the rest of us.” OPENING DAY The Telluride Ski Area, as it was then called, opened on Dec. 22, 1972 with a ribboncutting ceremony. It was a momentous day. “When those first chairlifts starting going around and people were getting on them and skiing, that was a very exciting moment for Dad, for all of us,” Bill Mahoney, Jr., says. Recalls Pam Lifton-Zoline, “My dad was joyous. I think he felt like it was a huge accomplishment. An awful lot of people who start these visionary projects don’t have the stamina to carry them through, but my dad had the smarts and the grit.” Like so many others, Johnnie Stevens had spent the last few years doing pretty much anything needed to get the ski area open. (Stevens would go

on to work as a ski patroller, then patrol director, before rising through the ranks to ultimately become chief operating officer in later years — roles that would earn him a place in the Colorado Ski Hall of Fame.) “I’ll never forget Opening Day,” he says. “It was emotional, incredible.” Stevens muses on that time and adds, “We were so lucky. The fact that Joe was able to buy all of the land and had a vision for a ski area. The fact that we who were raised here had such a passion for this project because we knew this was an opportunity that would allow us to stay in the place we loved. We worked damn hard to make it happen. And what a ride it was.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

27



OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

BEST-EVER BACKYARD This winter, enjoy these offmountain adventures in our big, beautiful backyard You may have come to ski or snowboard the Telluride Ski Resort, but keep a day free for an off-mountain adventure to remember. For a complete listing of outfitters, turn to page 85 or go to telluride.com.

FAT TIRE BIKING Fat tire bikes enable cycling enthusiasts to pursue their passion year-round, even in snow. Half-day or full-day rentals and tours are available. The Valley Floor: The 3-mile stretch of open space at the entrance to town contains the only trails with a groomed track set just for fat bikers. The social rider can exit at the far west end for a stop at the Telluride Brewing Company, Telluride Distilling Company or delish eatery Counter Culture, all in the Lawson Hill neighborhood, before a mellow pedal back to town.

Telluride Golf Course: The undulating groomed trails Melissa Plantz

that ribbon over the golf course in Mountain Village are multi-use trails open to dogs, bikes, hikers, snowshoes and Nordic skiers. Enjoy the views of the San Sophia ridge to the north and Wilson range to the west as you catch your breath between the dips and climbs. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

29


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

BACKCOUNTRY HUTS

HORSEBACK & SLEIGH RIDES

Mary McIntyre

Slip on your cowboy boots and Stetson and enjoy a sleigh or horseback ride in the winter wonderland of the San Juans. Ride under a cobalt blue sky or bundle up and star gaze during a dinner sleigh ride, all while embracing the spirit of the Wild West.

Skiing in the backcountry of the spectacular San Juan Mountains is a real memory maker. Explore and marvel at some of the country’s most spectacular off-resort mountain terrain while skiing to a hut or lodge, each stocked with the amenities necessary for a comfortable night’s stay. Travel to a single hut or tour hut to hut. Local outfitters can help you plan the adventure of a lifetime.

Visiting Telluride in winter doesn’t mean leaving rods and reels behind. Many of the region’s streams and rivers are prime for fishing year-round. In March and April, the San Miguel River often provides excellent fishing opportunities, while farther afield the Uncompahgre River fishes well all winter. Or try ice fishing on the area’s lakes and reservoirs. Local outfitters can guide you.

Ryan Bonneau

Tony Demin

FISHING

Need a break from downhill? Nordic skiing in the area offers a change of scene and a great workout. Try the groomed tracks in Telluride Town Park, on the Valley Floor, on the golf course in Mountain Village, at Trout and Priest Lakes and on the ski resort. The Nordic Center in Town Park and the Telluride Nordic website at telluridenordic.com are superb resources for trail conditions, lessons and gear rentals.

30

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Tony Demin

NORDIC SKIING


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

SNOWMOBILING Get your motor running on an extensive network of trails that has created a snowmobiler’s paradise. Explore stunning landscapes, as well as ghost towns and relics from Telluride’s mining days. Local outfitters offer half-day or full-day tours for all abilities.

Melissa Plantz

ICE CLIMBING Feeling truly adventurous? Strap on crampons and grab an ice axe because the alpine setting of the San Juan Mountains offers world-renowned ice climbing. Regional waterfalls turn to cathedrals of ice once the temperatures hold below freezing. Hiring a local guide is highly recommended and lessons are available through outfitters.

Ryan Bonneau

SNOWSHOEING

Tony Demin

When the whole family wants to go for a walk in the woods, don’t let the deep powder stop you. Snowshoes offer the freedom to explore many snow-covered places. Easy to learn and fun to do, snowshoeing is an activity for all ages. Choose between a leisurely sightseeing outing or an uphill trek for the perfect cardio workout. Guided adventures are available from outfitters.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

31


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

KITE SKIING

Telluride Ski Resort

Melissa Plantz

Snow sport enthusiasts wanting an extra challenge can soar across the snow and up or down slopes with the pull of a kite. The sport is done with downhill ski or snowboard equipment and a colorful kite. Kite skiers fly through the meadows at Lizard Head Pass, full of wide-open spaces and gorgeous views. Check with a local outfitter for more.

SNOW BIKING

Melissa Plantz

Want to discover the ski resort in a unique way? Try snow biking. A knowledgeable instructor will teach all aspects of riding a snow bike, which has skis instead of wheels. Rentals and certification courses are available through the ski resort’s Telluride Adventure Center.

HELICOPTER SKIING In continuous operation for over 35 years, Telluride Helitrax is Colorado’s ultimate heli-ski adventure. With access to over 200 square miles of pristine terrain, Helitrax operates at some of the highest elevations in North America, skiing off summits and in high-alpine basins and cirques. The family-owned guide service’s proven formula of small groups, exclusive terrain and seasoned staff deliver an unforgettable experience that exceeds expectations while remaining committed to the highest safety standards.

32

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Telluride Helitrax/Brett Schreckengost

ICE SKATING Wanna-be Michelle Kwans and Wayne Gretskys can enjoy ice skating at any of three rinks. In Telluride Town Park, there’s a professional-grade indoor hockey rink as well as an outdoor rink. Or head to the Madeline Hotel and Residences’ delightful outdoor rink in the Mountain Village Center. Ice skate rentals are available at both locations.


SNOWMOBILE TELLURIDE

• ALTA LAKES GHOST TOWN • DUNTON HOT SPRINGS BOOK • BARLOW CREEK NOW! • HALF & FULL DAY TOURS

970-728-4475 TellurideOutfitters.com

Promo code for discount: TVG22


MOUNTAIN LIFE

GLEE CLUB

Ski & Snowboard Club’s winning formula mixes fun with practice BY MARTINIQUE DAVIS

“W

hen you have fun in a sport, you want to do it more. When you do it more, you get better. And when you get better, you have more fun,” says Telluride Ski and Snowboard Club Executive Director Justin Chandler. Those three interconnected strands of fun, practice and success are the essence of the club. The popular youth program has been a Telluride institution for 35-plus years and in that time has nurtured a love of sport for innumerable skiers, snowboarders, Nordic athletes and ice skaters. The winter of 2020-21 marked the largest enrollment ever, with more than 465 kids participating in the various TSSC disciplines. Chandler says this winter is shaping up to be another big season and notes that the program’s enduring popularity owes much to its focus on fun. “You really have to make it all about the kids and for them the first priority is to have fun,”

he says, noting that safety is at the forefront as well. That spirit of fun is evidenced in the buzz of excited chatter that envelopes the groups of kids gathered at the base of the slopes most weekends in winter. Coaches lead these sessions with a goal of providing “miles of smiles”, while adeptly incorporating training drills too. Chandler says, “When you talk to the best skiers in the world, that’s what they say — it’s all about fun. It may become work as they get older, but because they love doing it, it doesn’t feel like work.” He adds that skill acquisition also plays a role, especially for the older age groups. As TSSC athletes get older, their training volume increases, from one day a week for the youngest participants to multiple weekly sessions for the oldest. The club’s model has reaped rewards, with some TSSC-trained skiers and riders successfully competing in the uppermost echelons of

‘THE FIRST PRIORITY IS TO HAVE FUN.’

34

Melissa Plantz

J u s tin Chandl er

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


MOUNTAIN LIFE

Telluride’s Olympic hopefuls HAGAN KEARNEY Snowboardcross A visit to Telluride at the age of 9, piqued Kearney’s love of snowboarding. He joined TSSC after his family moved to the area. As a student at the Telluride Mountain School, Kearney trained and competed at progressively higher levels, with a first breakout performance at the Aspen XGames in 2014. Kearney won his first World Cup in 2016, brought home a World Championship medal in 2017 and made his first Olympic team in 2018. Kearney has garnered a whopping 21 top-10 World Cup finishes and most recently won silver and bronze in World Cup SBX events in Europe.

‘YOU REALLY HAVE TO MAKE IT ALL ABOUT THE KIDS.’ J us tin Ch an dle r

LUCAS FOSTER Snowboard Halfpipe

After winning silver in Sochi, Kenworthy, who came out in 2015, became prominent as a champion of LGBTQ+ rights. Following a successful career competing for the United States that included his Olympic silver, AFP World Championship titles, World Cup wins and an X Games medal, Kenworthy opted in 2019 to compete for Great Britain, his birthplace and home country of his mother. In February 2020, Gus won his first World Cup gold medal as a GB Snowsport athlete in the halfpipe and will compete in his third and final Olympics for Team GB this winter in Beijing.

their disciplines in recent years, with three (and potentially a fourth in 2022) participating in the Olympics and a dozen or so named to U.S. national teams. In 2014, freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy made his hometown proud as the first Telluride-bred Olympic medalist, thanks to an impeccable performance in the 2014 Sochi Games, where he won a silver medal as part of the first-ever U.S. Olympic slopestyle ski team. Then, in 2018, tiny Telluride sent three Olympians to the games in South Korea: Kenworthy, snowboardcross athlete Hagen Kearney and freestyle skier Keaton McCargo. This winter, there are three TSSC alumni potentially heading to the

Adam Rippon

Skiing Slopestyle, Halfpipe, Big Air

Beth Bailis

GUS KENWORTHY

Beth Bailis

At just 22 years old, TSSC-trained snowboarder Foster was named to the U.S. Ski Team in 2019 and has since landed top-10 finishes at the World Cup event in Calgary in 2020 and the Aspen US Grand Prix in 2021. This is ever-the-more impressive considering Foster grew up riding slopestyle, not halfpipe. “It took me a really long time to find my groove competing with no halfpipe where I grew up. It required patience and resilience to finally make things click,” he says.

Olympics: Kenworthy, Kearney and snowboarder Lucas Foster, with U.S. Ski and Snowboard’s squad announcement scheduled for mid-November. Chandler deflects credit away from the club and toward the athletes, but acknowledges that “having three Olympians, and now possibly a fourth, from such a small town is quite unique. Creating an environment for these athletes to succeed is a testament to the town. In addition to these extraordinary athletes’ gifts, hard work and talents, it took the local school systems, their teachers, families and their coaches to make it happen.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

35


HELI-SKI CAMP It doesn’t get bigger than this.

Discover the ultimate San Juan big mountain experience. Helitrax, Colorado’s premier heli-ski company, flies right out of the base area of The Peaks Resort & Spa. With your guide and instructor, you’ll get to explore deep, pristine terrain of expansive alpine bowls, gladed slopes, and classic mountain couloirs. A one-of-a-kind experience for advanced skiers with a thirst for big thrills and unlimited powder.

To check out our other specialty camps visit tellurideskiresort.com/ski-school/specialty-camps

Family-Friendly A D V E N T U R E

Give your skis a break and delight in a cool winter activity with your kids. Snowshoe in the San Juan Mountains, take a Snowbike lesson, or enroll your children in Kids Snow Camp—the Adventure Center has the perfect option for everyone.

Open daily from 8:30am–5pm adventure@telski.com | 970.728.7433


MOUNTAIN LIFE

A SAFE BACKYARD Funding beacon checkers for those accessing the backcountry BY EMILY SHOFF

T

he Telluride backcountry just got a little Club and PI Fund, adding that backcountry use safer thanks to a new initiative from the has been steadily increasing over the last several Telluride Mountain Club that will see beacon years, especially in our region. checkers installed at a handful of area locations. Lauterbach is particularly thrilled about the Funded collaboratively through the Peter Inglis Lizard Head Pass location as it is a place that sees Avalanche Education Fund (or more novice backcountry users, PI Fund), which is a subsidiary of including students of avalanche the Telluride Mountain Club, and education classes. “The checker is THE INITIATIVE local retailer Jagged Edge, the new a perfect reminder to stop, check IS JUST ONE checkers will do exactly what their beacons and talk with your partners OF SEVERAL name suggests: check the beacons about your plan for the day.” PROGRAMS. of potential backcountry users. A Backcountry users often wear green light means you’re on and beacons, but, unfortunately, either battery-charged, while a red ‘x’ means it’s time to the battery is dead or the beacon isn’t switched on. do some beacon adjustment before you head out “Our hope is to create a culture where group beathe gate. con checks become the norm,” Lauterbach says, Starting this winter, the automated checkers will reflecting on the myriad of reabe stationed at various locations on the Telluride sons why backcountry travelers Ski Resort, including pivotal backcountry access might fail to switch on or check points such as the top of Lift 12, Bald Mountain the batteries in their beacon. and the top of Gold Hill. With support from the “The beacon checkers provide an Telluride Tourism Board, there will also be one opportunity for people to slow off the resort, at Lizard Head Pass. In addition to down and have a conversation being able to assess a beacon’s signal, the signs will about their backcountry ski plan also contain information about potential avalanche while checking the integrity of red flags, such as snow instability, weather, terrain their equipment.” and crowds. “We’re excited to finally be able to The beacon checkers initiative provide this service to the community,” says Heidi is just one of several programs Lauterbach, the director of the Telluride Mountain that the PI Fund supports

in the name of avalanche safety. The fund was established in honor of Peter Inglis, a long-time Telluride ski patroller and avid backcountry skier, a founder of the Telluride Mountain Club and a San Miguel Search and Rescue volunteer. Inglis died in 2015 while guiding when a cornice collapsed in Alaska’s St. Elias Range and the Pi Fund provides avalanche education scholarships to students and hosts monthly avalanche education forums, Backcountry Chats. The PI Fund also teams up with Jagged Edge to help fund radio rentals to backcountry groups. “Radios are an essential tool for people to communicate within a group and from one group to another,” Lauterbach explains, noting that they have proven to be helpful in various close-call situations across the San Juan Mountains in recent years. All of the initiatives, she says, tie in with the PI Fund’s mission of creating increased “opportunities for avalanche education and backcountry user awareness.”

ARE YOU SEEING ANY OF THESE RED FLAGS RIGHT NOW?! New Snow? Recent Avalanches? 24-Hour Temperature Rise? Collapsing/Cracking? Snow Transport By Wind? Rain On Snow?

THE BACKCOUNTRY IS ALWAYS TELLING US A STORY: ARE YOU LISTENING?

IN THE BACKCOUNTRY you are exposing yourself to Avalanche Danger. SNOWPACK, WEATHER, and TERRAIN are all factors that contribute to the Avalanche Danger. As a group of HUMANS choosing to travel into this uncertain environment, ask yourselves these essential questions.

WHAT PROBLEM(S) IN THE SNOWPACK DID THE CAIC FORECAST TODAY?

WHAT WEATHER FACTORS COULD AFFECT AVALANCHE ACTIVITY?

WHAT TERRAIN ARE WE AVOIDING TODAY AND WHY?

PASS THIS CHECKPOINT ONE AT A TIME WITH 10-FOOT INTERVALS BETWEEN EACH OTHER.

FRIENDS of the

SAN JUANS

www.thesanjuans.org

SPONSORS

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

GREEN “O” = YOU ARE TRANSMITTING. RED “X” = YOU ARE NOT TRANSMITTING.

WHAT ARE OUR GROUP GOALS AND OBJECTIVES TODAY AND HOW MAY THEY BE AFFECTED BY OUR ACTIONS, BEHAVIORS, CHOICES AND DECISIONS?

THIS BEACON CHECK POINT: DOES NOT test avalanche beacon battery life.

DOES NOT guarantee proper beacon function.

IS NOT a check-in/check-out device. This checks the transmission of your beacon at THIS MOMENT ONLY!

BACKCOUNTRY AWARENESS INFORMATION

Melissa Plantz

37

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

37


WE LIVE HERE. WE WORK HERE. WE PLAY HERE. BOUTIQUE VACATION RENTAL MANAGEMENT

100% Locally Owned & Operated Request your free rental projection today.

lodgingintelluride.com | info@lodgingintelluride.com | 888-998-6471, ext. 1 Georgie Bishop, Owner

YOUR VACATION STARTS WITH US

Telluride is a special experience—nothing should be missed. With Telluride Express, you’ll never have to worry about how you’ll get to your next adventure. We offer premier airport shuttle transportation, wine tours, group and charter services, and private concierge transport. Upgrade a step beyond with our Platinum Ride Service.

BOOK ONLINE AT LETSRIDE.CO OR CALL 970-728-6000


MOUNTAIN LIFE

W

Photos courtesy of Telluride Adaptive Sports Program

hen we think about our best days on the mountain, there is likely a magical dynamic involving those we are with. These are the days we feel support and inspiration from those around us. These are the days when we exceed what we thought ourselves capable of. These are also the days that inspire 16-year-old Australian snowboarder Holly Palmer. And, like all good ski stories, hers starts in Telluride. Holly was born with achondroplasia, a common form of dwarfism. Holly refers to her condition as having short stature and explains, “I am smaller than people my age, but I can do everything you can do. I just sometimes find it a little more difficult.” A 2011 visit to family in Telluride connected Holly to the folks at the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program, which provides outdoor therapeutic recreation to individuals with disabilities. The then-5year-old asked of them: “What can you do?” The answer to that question would evolve over the next decade and offer astounding possibilities and experiences to everyone involved. On Holly’s first-day skiing, however, all those years ago, there was no hint of future success. Because of her shorter limbs, her ski boots came up beyond her knees, causing pain. The day ended in tears. TASP’s team — which included Pete Garber and David Westveer — went back to the drawing board. They tried snowboard boots, softer than ski boots and with a lower cuff, and put Holly on an adaptive snowboard with a rider bar and tethers to help with balance and stability. “That decision was transformational,” Holly says. “I have loved every minute on the snow ever since.” This alleviated the initial challenges but, according to TASP Program Director Tim McGough, everything equipment-related needed to be recon-

sidered. The nonprofit acquired a Burton Learn-To-Ride snowboard and custom-mounted the bindings to better match Holly’s natural stance. And they kept fiddling. Says McGough, “She gave us all of her trust. Anything we wanted to try, she wanted to do.” Eventually, Holly was able to ride independently. “It really was amazing going down a hill unassisted for the first time,” she says. Despite this progress, though, the equipment still wasn’t perfect. And this is where the story moves beyond this small mountain town. Enter one of TASP’s incredible volunteers, Ken Bailey, an award-winning outdoor filmmaker. Bailey started documenting Holly’s story and sent a short film to Burton in hopes of an equipment sponsorship. Through luck, karma and connections, the request initiated more than a sponsorship. It inspired a collaboration between Burton and software giant Microsoft, so designers at Burton could better engineer a custom snowboard and apparel for Holly. After over a year of online meetings and collaboration between TASP in Telluride, Holly and her family in Sydney and the Burton team in Vermont, the gear was ready. “The people in Vermont were so into it,” Holly says of the design process. “They really appreciated that my body is not suited to the equipment they produce for others and have built everything from scratch to match my needs.” Now sponsored by Burton and even featured on a billboard in Manhattan’s Times Square, Holly was slated to debut her new gear in Australia this past summer. Although that has been delayed by Covid, Holly’s enthusiasm is undiminished. “I am so excited. I love everything about snowboarding. It gives me freedom and the feeling I get is so great. The fact that I get to do it with people I love makes it even better.”

MEET HOLLY PALMER TASP and Burton collaborate with young boarder for an inspiring outcome BY JESSE JAMES McTIGUE

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

39


HIGH ALTITUDE CUISINE

THE SCENE | DINING

Much like its terrain, the Telluride Ski Resort’s on-mountain dining options are varied, exquisite and sure to please a range of tastes.

ON THE SLOPES ALPINO VINO

ALTEZZA

BIG BILLIES

BON VIVANT

Traditional Northern Italian

Casual mountain dining

Family friendly favorites

Country French cuisine

At 12,000 feet, Alpino Vino is one of the highest restaurants in North America and lives up to this uniqueness by offering simple, elegant food in an inviting atmosphere. Favorites include handmade pastas and organic tomato and gorgonzola bisque. Evening diners are whisked to the restaurant in a luxurious snowcat for a prix fixe Italian wine dinner.

Savor breakfast, mid-day and dinner menus that emphasize regionally sourced ingredients deliciously prepared. The panoramic views from both the restaurant and outdoor deck will astonish, while Altezza’s slopeside perch means a dining option that is both delicious and convenient.

Families love to gather at Big Billies, which serves soups, chilis, burgers, hot dogs, quick-grab deli sandwiches, beverages and snacks. Non-skiers can take the Chondola from Mountain Village to join the fun.

In a setting like nowhere else, Bon Vivant perfectly combines fun and fine dining. Think incredible views, sunshine and stunning cuisine. A signature dish is the Alpine Wild Mushroom soup, which has a brie base infused with Courvoisier and is served under a puff pastry.

Below Lift 14 on See Forever

40

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

The Peaks, beside the Meadows

Bottom of Lifts 1 (Chondola) and 10

Top of Polar Queen Express (Lift 5)


Melissa Plantz

Tony Demin

THE SCENE | DINING

STEPS FROM THE SLOPES Tomboy Tavern Casual American

Crazy Elk Pizza Pizza, sandwiches, salads

Tracks Sandwiches, rice bowls and more

Tony Demin

The Pick Customized burritos

Village Table Delicious Mediterranean fare La Piazza & La Pizzeria Authentic Italian, upscale or casual Shake N Dog Hot dogs, shakes and salads

Tony Demin

GIUSEPPE’S New Orleans-themed menu Giuseppe’s is a locals’ favorite whose much-loved potato and black bean sauté has been drawing famished skiers and boarders to the spot for years. Nowadays, the mountain-top kitchen continues to serve delicious Big Easy fare best enjoyed at a sunny picnic table where jaw-dropping views compete with the food for a memorable experience. Top of the Plunge Lift (Lift 9)

Poacher’s Pub grub favorites Black Iron Kitchen Modern mountain cuisine Los Buenos Tacos The real deal

GORRONO RANCH & THE SALOON Casual and smokehouse favorites Go old-school and enjoy the classic ski-lodge menu, including ski resort owner Chuck Horning’s famous chili, smokehouse favorites and the best salad bar on the mountain. The casual menu is matched by the laidback atmosphere enjoyed on the big deck or legendary beach. On Misty Maiden (Lift 4)

Visit tellurideskiresort.com or download the Telluride Ski Resort app for up-to-date information on Covid protocols.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

41


Melissa Plantz

Melissa Plantz

Melissa Plantz

George Mays

George Mays

THE SCENE | DINING

STRONGHOUSE With distinctive menus and spaces, new eateries share focus on exquisite food, friendly vibe

George Mays

BY LINNE HALPERN

42

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

C

heck out the intersection of Pacific Avenue and South Fir Street and you may be surprised by this little corner’s culinary and artistic renaissance. Along with the opening of the new Ah Haa School for the Arts building and buzz of the Telluride Transfer Warehouse come two new eateries that have quickly become hubs for local gathering. Enter Stronghouse and LittleHouse. Juxtapositions between old and new, historic and modern, abound in this town — and these two establishments continue that storied dynamic. LittleHouse, on West Pacific Avenue, is a new concept by Telluride’s own Ross Martin and Erich Owen, owners of the National. Best friends for over 20 years, Martin and Owen are on a mission to fill all the gaps in Telluride’s foodie map. Housed in a brand-new building with a sleek, glass exterior, LittleHouse boasts a casual but contemporary feel. The restaurant, with its delicious deli-style menu, makes for an all-day

cafe that caters both to the busy local on a lunch break and the family of visitors seeking an easy dinner beyond pizza and burgers. The menu, developed by Executive Chef Will Nolan, features European influences and a bit of South‘I WANTED ern flair. Dishes like TO PRESERVE shrimp & grits, mac THIS PIECE OF ‘n’ cheese du jour, TELLURIDE and vegan butternut HISTORY.’ squash lasagna round out grab-and-go-style Vi cto ri a Chapus salads and sandwiches. This winter, the team is upping their homestyle takeout selection. Martin notes that visitors to Telluride (and local families alike) can place orders for large-format, group dinners like Caesar salad, meatloaf and au gratin potatoes to enjoy at home. The building’s front features a retractable


THE SCENE | DINING

Melissa Plantz

& LITTLEHOUSE restoration was called for. The walls were reinforced and the interior stripped back to its original glory. Today, a mahogany Brunswick bar from the 1880s anchors the space, alongside a manual lift and oversize scale that are original to the building. Chapus brought on local brewmaster Sam Enders, who has developed four core beers with an additional seasonal selection. Lagers, IPAs and a signature Honey Ginger Blonde Ale are the most popular orders. And though the brews are the focus, the food here is not to be overlooked. The menu, from Executive Chef Mike Moran, features alpine comfort food with fresh, local ingredients. Pub mustard and beer cheese (to accompany the stellar homemade pretzels) are made from Stronghouse brews, as is Moran’s delectable coconut porter brownie. Says Chapus, “It’s about making connections and celebrating people, friendships, and adventures.”

Melissa Plantz

door that creates an unbeatable indoor/ outdoor setup. Summer days see the patio bustling with energy and during the winter, skiers can walk up Oak Street, enjoy an exquisite, gourmet lunch and be back on the slopes in 30 minutes. “It makes for a fun neighborhood spot,” Martin says. “And on those March days when everyone is itching for warmth, the sun starts coming across our deck and it feels incredible.” Around the corner on South Fir Street, friendly Stronghouse Brew Pub makes its home in Telluride’s historic Stronghouse Building, built in 1892. Stronghouse owner and longtime part-time resident Victoria Chapus knew it was meant to be when the historic stone structure — home to a slew of different businesses over the years — came up for sale. “I wanted to preserve this piece of Telluride history,” she says. “The building was always part of the fabric of town. Our goal was to make the brewery just as much a part of the community.” A major

‘ IT MAKES FOR A FUN NEIGHBORHOOD SPOT.’ Ros s Mar tin

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

43


THE SCENE | DINING

EXQUISITE FOOD, ANYWHERE

Haley Ortiz Photography

Backcountry Catering’s Jeff Donaldson and Stefanie Moscufo have added a new dimension to their in-demand catering company with the addition of a custom-made mobile kitchen that has a Chicago Brick Oven wood-fired pizza oven and an Ole Hickory CTO Smoker. Donaldson notes that now “we can go anywhere and do anything. It’s great for catering weddings and large events.” The highly regarded Donaldson worked in Telluride’s best kitchens for close to a decade before founding Backcountry Catering to focus exclusively on catering and working as a private chef. A winner of Telluride’s own Top Chef competition, Donaldson says, “I enjoy making menus specific for each event and exactly what the client is looking for. I do a range from high-end fine dining to top-notch barbecue. Whatever the client wants, I go above and beyond, but still give them exactly what they want.”

What We Are Drinking

WINTER WARMERS SPANISH COFFEE 10-year Torres Brandy, espresso double shot, cream and cane sugar, steamed and served with a cinnamon stick

Village Table

APEROL BLITZ Winter twist on a summer fave with Aperol, Stronghouse lager, fresh lemon juice, bitters

Stronghouse Brewpub

HOT SPIKED CIDER

PERFECT POT BROWNIES

44

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Big B’s Spiced Cider, spicy cinnamoninfused Coloradomade Fireside Bourbon Whiskey and lemon

Butcher & Baker

FLATLINER MARTINI Telluride Distilling Co. vodka, Bailey’s Irish Cream, Kahlua and cold-brew espresso for a local classic

New Sheridan Melissa Plantz

Kensey Quigley

Goldilocks liked her porridge just right, not too hot, not too cold — kind of like the fans of Hot Box Mix, a newcomer to the marijuana edibles market. The brainchild of local entrepreneur Stephanie Jacobson, the bake-at-home mix makes whipping up a batch of yummy pot brownies easy and ensures the perfect amount — not too much, not too little, just right — of THC per delicious square. Available at local dispensaries, Hot Box Mix even provides a template for cutting your brownies into the correct size for the amount of THC you want. Just as good, Hot Box Mix is a homegrown enterprise, headed up by Jacobson and co-founder Toni Nash, who together lead a kick-ass team of local women that handle the baking, distribution, design, marketing and more. Says Nash, “We are having so much fun with Hot Box Mix and you will too. A great activity for dinner parties, a night on the town or to take camping. Hot Box Mix has everything you need. Just add water.”


THE SCENE | DINING

JOY TO THE WORLD

Fans of the Wok of Joy are celebrating. The owners of the uber-popular Thai food cart, Joy Itthithepphana and Jason Smith, have opened a bricks-andmortar takeout restaurant on South Fir Street, in the charming space tucked behind the Patagonia store. With the same focus on fresh and flavorful southeast Asian cuisine that made the Mountain Village cart a favorite, the eatery, which is open for lunch and dinner and has a menu that changes weekly, is already a hit. Our favorites? Joy’s Pad Thai or her spicy curry of the day, enjoyed with a signature tamarind margarita. Yum.

reserve your seat tonight

Photos Trang Pham


THE SCENE | ARTS

BOX CANYON BOOKSHELF This winter, be sure to check out these new titles by uber-talented Telluriders. The perfect holiday gift? A page-turner for the plane? One to curl up with on a snowy day? We’ll let you decide. All are available at Between the Covers bookstore on Main Street.

MARINA & THE MERMAIDS

TELLURIDE UNVEILED

TANDEM ROWING

Telluride Unveiled is a collection of photos by highly regarded local photographer and Guide contributor Ryan Bonneau of Telluride and its surroundings. Through the medium of black and white photography and captured over 20 years exploring every nook and cranny of this corner of the San Juans, Bonneau unveils a raw and peaceful beauty made even more stunning by the contrasting light, dramatic contours and striking textures unique to this region. Says Bonneau, “I moved to Telluride on a youthful whim in search of light, fluffy powder and long vertical ski descents. What I didn’t realize was that this transition would change my life forever and ultimately satiate my soul with the richness of an unrivaled tiny mountain town surrounded by a truly dramatic and seemingly endless landscape.” Also available at Slate Gray Gallery.

Author Susan Kees, well known for local hikers’ bible The Telluride Hiking Guide, has penned a memoir, Tandem Rowing: More Than a River (A Long Way to Row for a Taco). The book recounts Kees’ and husband Bill’s 2001 adventure rafting 1,800 miles from the headwaters of the Colorado River in Wyoming to its terminus in Mexico’s Sea of Cortez. The pair, who travelled in a customized raft with two sets of oars so they could row in tandem, had been married 30 years at the time. (Kees, who reflects in the book on relationships, quips that when comparing the journals each kept on the trip, Bill asked “were we on the same trip?”) With Bill now battling terminal cancer, Kees says she was motivated to write the book for him to read, as well as “to inspire the average person to step out of his comfort zone.”

46

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Telluride might be a long way from any coast, but this children’s book by local writer Linne Halpern will bring the sea a little closer for young readers. Marina and the Mermaids tells the tale of Marina, who lives near the ocean and yearns to swim in the sea like a mermaid. Marina’s fear of the ocean, however, keeps her feet firmly on dry land. When her lucky bracelet ends up in the water, Marina realizes it’s time to face her fears and dive in. Charming and beautifully illustrated by the very creative Halpern, Marina teaches “young explorers the value of diving into new experiences,” according to Halpern. “I was a child who was afraid of a lot of things. I liked my comfort zone and often needed coaxing to challenge myself outside of it. Since moving to Telluride, the book’s lessons of gaining confidence through adventuring and learning to feel comfortable in the unknown feel truer than ever.”

ECOQUEEN Has local activist and environmentalist Joanna Measer Kanow created the perfect superhero for our time? We think so. Her name is EcoQueen, otherwise known as Kora, a 17-year-old biracial teenager with the power to reverse the effects of climate change. In EcoQueen, Kanow’s wonderful work of teen fiction, we follow Kora, who, empowered by her abilities and accompanied by her autistic twin brother, Rio, sets out to protect the people and ecosystems threatened by rising sea levels, catastrophic weather events, droughts and wildfires across the globe. As young Kora learns to control her gifts, she realizes the impact of environmental changes caused by humans, fossil fuels and pollution. “I wrote the book to get kids inspired to start taking bold climate action now, since us adults have been dragging our feet,” says Kanow. “I want readers to feel that they can become part of solutions to the climate change problems we all currently face.”


THE SCENE | ARTS

Photos Melissa Plantz

Beatnik Prints

Nugget news

It’s a wrap Last winter, refurbished Gondola cabins dotted around the center of Mountain Village made for unique dining pods. This year, the Town of Mountain Village, the Telluride Mountain Village Owners’ Association and Telluride Arts have collaborated on a unique project. The trio of entities invited local artists to design vinyl wraps for a number of the cabins, turning a Covid-era solution for safe dining into a stunning, wildly inventive public art installation that will outlive the pandemic.

‘Charlie’ at TEX

Bill and Katrine Formby, longtime owners of the Nugget Building, have sold the 129-year-old structure, bringing to a close the couple’s 21-year effort to restore this grand dame of Telluride’s main street to its former grandeur. The sale, to the Telluride Film Festival for an undisclosed amount, was completed in March and included a $2.5 million donation by the couple to help the festival acquire the building. Shortly after that, work finished on the final phase — restoration of a tower that stood on the southeast corner of the building from its original construction in 1892 until sometime in the early 1900s — when workers installed the tower’s finishing touches, including an 8-foot finial covered in gold leaf. Last summer, the Formbys were recognized with the first-ever Historic Landmark Award. Given by Telluride’s Historic and Architectural Review Commission, the commendation recognizes outstanding contribution to the preservation of a local landmark. While preservation awards are handed out bi-annually, Historic Preservation Director Jonna Wensel explains that this time around the commission opted to create something new to stress the couple’s herculean and sympathetic efforts to save and restore the Nugget Building. “This is really unlike any other preservation project we’ve seen in Telluride,” she says of the work that Katrine and Bill Formby have described as a “labor of love”.

Ryan Bonneau

There’s a new piece of artwork gracing the entrance to the terminal at the Telluride Regional Airport. The piece, a bronze sculpture titled “Charlie”, was created by local artist Richard Arnold, who also sculpted the Sofia statue at the bus stop beside the Telluride Intermediate School. It was commissioned by the Telluride Regional Airport Authority, a tribute “to the youthful passion for aviation shared by all pilots,” according to current airport manager Kenny Maenpa. It’s a passion shared by the artist himself; Arnold served as the airport’s manager from 1988 to 1992 and is widely considered the visionary responsible for what the airport is today. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

47


ESCAPISM DISCOVERING THE TRUE MEANING OF UNLIMITED ROAMING

Crisp Colorado summer air and no distractions. Take a break from your devices and crank out some long overdue family time in the TELLURIDE BIKE PARK. With camps and guides available for all abilities, you’ll soon be freeriding through miles of gravity-fed flow trails on manicured, rain-absorbent surfaces, bank turns and arching bridges.

www.tellurideskiresort.com/bikepark


THE SCENE | ARTS

W

TAKE A BOW

hen the Michael D. Palm Theatre first opened its doors in 2005, it was a unique hybrid: a school building that housed a community’s performing arts center. “These days,” Palm Managing Director Kathy Jepson explains, “you’ll find several towns THE PALM doing the same, but back then it was a rarity to have a regional facil- CONTINUES TO ity working collaboratively with a EVOLVE AS BOTH high school.” Film Festival, the Bluegrass ITS NEEDS AND As it turned out, such a visionFestival’s NightGrass series and TECHNOLOGY ary combination worked on several the Ride, to name just a few. CHANGE. fronts. First, it allowed the school “During non-Covid times, we to offer a top-notch performance typically present five to seven space to students. Dancers had access to a sprung major shows in addition to simulcasting events floor, protecting them from injury, while actors such as the Metropolitan Opera and London’s and actresses had a sophisticated stage with HolNational Theater,” Jepson says. lywood-level sound and lighting systems and a fly That the Palm exists at all is the result of tower. But the performers weren’t the only ones several generous factions. Looking for a way to to benefit. In its 16 years, the Palm has trained commemorate Michael D. Palm, a cherished dozens of students to be theater technicians, local musician and philanthropist who died running the lightning and sounds for shows, from complications related to AIDS in 1998, the cultivating “home-grown talent,” as Jepson puts Gluckstern family offered both time and some it. “Technician training is the kind of thing you initial funds to build a performing arts center find in larger cities,” Technical Director Michael in his name. A bond initiative to build it was Wingfield says. “It’s great to be able to offer it to approved by the town in 2002 and under the kids in a town of this size.” leadership of Ron Gilmer and Mary Wodehouse By day, the school has access to the theater, and with the support of the Johnson Family but after school and on weekends, the Palm Foundation, the Michael Palm Foundation and flings open its doors to the wider community, the Lucky Star Foundation, advocates launched hosting national and international touring coma capital campaign, raising nearly $2 million to panies, as well as Mountainfilm, the Telluride help make the theatre a state-of-the-art facility.

Palm Theatre is a top-notch performing arts hub BY EMILY SHOFF

These days, it operates financially without the assistance of tax dollars. Instead, fundraising, grants and rental income help cover operating and programming costs. “We can offer quality shows to the town and garner the funds to help subsidize rental fees for local nonprofits such as Telluride Theatre, Telluride Dance Collective and others,” Jepson notes. The Palm continues to evolve as both its needs and technology change. In 2014, a smaller black-box theater was added, providing a flexible space that can be reconfigured easily depending on need. It was christened the Bob Theatre in honor of “Glider” Bob Saunders, a local, beloved theater and flying enthusiast who passed away in 2016. And, more recently, the theater overhauled its lighting, adding LED lights and undertaking a digital upgrade, making the lighting more environmental and cost-effective. “We want to continue to grow,” Jepson says of the future, while Wingfield adds, “Our hope is to provide high level arts for the region at large as well as Telluride.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

49


with all your heart

GET VACCINATED!

WEAR A MASK SICK? STAY HOME & GET TESTED


All Images Melissa Plantz

The holidays in the box canyon offer charm, sparkle and a chance to breathe BY JENNIFER JULIA

E

very season in this box canyon of ours holds something special and unique, but if I had to pick a favorite season, there’s just something about the holidays. It is the time of year when our community can’t help but pull out its extra stash of charm and sparkle, the season when the mountains themselves seem to stand a little taller in their winter whites. The holidays are also when Telluride and Mountain Village, merry and bright, wrap their arms around you and hold you close, whispering in your ear, “Breathe deeply and enjoy what matters most.” This year on Dec. 1, Noel Night is the unofficial start to the holidays, a night when Tellu-

THE SCENE | ARTS

MERRY & BRIGHT

a favorite local tradition. Christmas Day is a whirlwind in our house, the exchange of gifts often taking a backseat to a fun and relaxing day of skiing together. The holidays pick up speed on Dec. 26 with the kick-off of ride’s shops and restaurants, the Holiday Concert Series at ablaze in twinkling lights, the historic Sheridan Opera THERE’S NEVER offer special discounts, fun House, a weeklong extravaA SHORTAGE OF games, tasty nibbles and an ganza of entertainment that OPTIONS FOR A abundance of cheer. It’s the culminates on Dec. 31 with SPECTACULAR NIGHT starry evening we also get to the Opera House’s annual OF CELEBRATION. witness the annual lighting New Year’s Eve Gala. Rumor of the Ski Tree in Elks Park, a has it that they’re planning signal that winter is here and it’s time to indulge something extra special for 2021. in all the lovely offerings our mountain commuMany of the local bars and restaurants in Tellunity provides. ride and Mountain Village offer entertainment and On Dec. 11 and 12, we head to Mountain Vilspecial meal offerings for New Year’s Eve. There are lage with our kids for the family-friendly Holiday also numerous soirees, so there’s never a shortage Prelude to sit with Santa and his elves, snag a ride of options for a spectacular night of celebration. on the train, partake in sledding, ice skating and a And, in case you missed the first one, there’s ancurling demo, and take in a graceful figure skating other Torchlight Parade on New Year’s Eve, as well performance. By mid-December it’s time to put as a fireworks display in Mountain Village. up the tree, so we love to go to historic Schmid As for me and my family, we’ll do our best to Ranch for hot cocoa, to take in the stunning stay up ‘til midnight (at least, our kids will beg views and to decide as a family which tree we us to) and maybe this year we just might make want. It’s a discussion that can sometimes grow it. However we choose to ring in the new year, heated, but which generally ends harmoniously. I know I will take a moment to reflect on all the On Christmas Eve, we bundle up to watch challenges, triumphs and moments of joy the last the Torchlight Parade, a nighttime tradition on year has awarded us. It’s been an unpredictable the Telluride Ski Resort where a brave gang of time, but we leap into the next one with trust, locals trade their poles for blazing torches. It’s hope and gratitude. telluride.com | 855.421.4360 51


RICH HISTORY

T

PRESERVING THE PAST Telluride celebrates 60 years as a National Historic Landmark BY EMILY SHOFF

elluride proudly boasts a colorful and carefully preserved history, but in 1961, even with the town’s heyday as a mining hub winding down and the ski resort still a decade away, it was cutting edge too. That year, the National Park Service declared Telluride a National Historic Landmark, a designation that was then still maturing. “What’s interesting about Telluride is that it was really ahead of the curve in terms of getting recognized,” says Telluride Historic Preservation Director Jonna Wensel, explaining that it wasn’t until the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act in 1966 that America accelerated and formalized the landmark process. She added, “The Department of Interior saw the outstanding contributions mining towns such as Leadville, Silverton, Cripple Creek and Telluride had made in America. They decided to save them before they vanished.” Bestowed by the National Park Service, the designation recognizes landmarks that honor America’s history, including buildings, sights, structures, objects and districts, like Telluride. In short, it is an acknowledgement that the place is significant. And while the Park Service can bestow a designation, it’s up to local governments and local people to set about doing the work of preserving the place. In 1972, roughly 10 years after the landmark award, Telluride went about doing just that and created a preservation ordinance and commission. Its

MUSEUM EXAMINES OUTBREAKS In addition to its fascinating permanent exhibits and engaging programming, the Telluride Historical Museum is currently hosting the Smithsonian’s Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World. The exhibit is a customized version of a larger display developed by the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of Natural History and the work of the museum’s former director of programs and exhibits, Theresa Koenigsknecht. She collaborated with other community organizations, including the San Miguel County Health Department, Telluride Medical Center and Pinhead Institute, to research and develop content that tells the story of this area’s past experiences with contagion, accounts that were then cleverly woven into the Smithsonian’s exhibit. For more, go to telluridemuseum.org.

52

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


RICH HISTORY

‘ THE NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK DESIGNATION IS SO IMPORTANT.’ K ier n a n L a n n o n

Top right photo is from the Telluride Historical Museum’s searchable online store and is featured on the special Instagram account, @telluridelandmarks. From 1912, it shows a horse-drawn school bus outside what was then Telluride High School, nowadays the Telluride Elementary School. Photo courtesy of the Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved. Main and top left photos by Melissa Plantz. Bottom right photo by Tony Demin.

goals were straightforward: to establish a historic district, to preserve and protect landmark structures and to create conformity for new structures. Explains Wensel, “The ski area had just been developed and the town could see the handwriting on the wall. There would be housing pressure and pressure for new businesses. The town had to set some guidelines.” The original ordinance from 1972 again reveals that Telluride was quite progressive in efforts to preserve its historical character. Early advocates stressed that preservation measures were “necessary for the welfare of the town” and that they were a “public necessity” that reflected the town’s “cultural, social, economic and political” history, as well as its architectural value. Among obvious requirements, such as keeping historic structures intact, the commission required new buildings to qualify for a certificate of appropriateness. Telluride recognized early on that any new buildings had to complement the style of older structures in order to create a cohesive streetscape. Over time, the commission evolved into the Historic and Architectural Review Commission, which established regular meetings and further tightened guidelines for both historical buildings and new construction. To celebrate the momentous milestone, the Department of Historic Preservation has been collaborating with the Telluride Historical Museum on projects including summer walking tours of Telluride’s most famous historic buildings and a commemorative magazine. A special Instagram

account, @telluridelandmarks, has also been set up and each week, Wensel and her colleagues post historical photos, many from the museum’s online trove. “The National Historic Landmark Designation is so important,” says Museum Executive Director Kiernan Lannon. “Because of the designation, all these incredible historic buildings are still standing and can serve as windows into Telluride’s past. They all have a story to tell, and I’m glad that these resources are around to tell their stories. And for the museum, it just makes our job that much easier. We are an organization whose mission it is to bring the area’s history to life for current and future generations and I cannot think of a better environment in which to do that work. The past is so vividly present here and that’s due in large part to the landmark designation. We are thrilled to work with Jonna and the Town to shine a light on this momentous anniversary.”

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

53


PAC KAG E S

telluridespa.com / 970.728.0630 ONLINE BOOKING AVAILABLE

NEW WINTER TREATMENTS ULTIMATE STRESS-FIX MASSAGE 75 - 90 minutes

Clinically proven to reduce feelings of stress, combining the power of Swedish and deep tissue massage, acupressure points, and foot reflexology to leave you feeling rejuvenated. This massage begins with a relaxing foot bath, a cup of AVEDA delicious liquorice tea and a consultation.

PLANT STEM CELL FACIAL 75 - 90 minutes

Visibly transform your skin with high-performance facial treatments powered by dual plant technology: a fusion of plant stem cells and rejuvenating massage techniques. The magic is in AVEDA’s plant stem-cell technology with face serums that are backed by clinical results.

SOUL SAMPLER

Awaken your natural powers of transformation with everything from high-performing skin treatments to meditative body massage + more

2.5 hour

A local favorite. Take a rejuvenating journey with Swedish relaxation 60-minute massage + Aveda 60-minute Customized Facial + Express Pedicure.

SELF CARE & REJUVENATION 2 hours MEDITATION & REJUVENATING MASSAGE

Take time to experience the deepest relaxation. Learn the art of healthy breathe and presence, while you increase your energy levels and a feeling of vitality. Improve circulation, lower blood pressure and feel everyday stress and anxiety gently float away. Followed by a 60- minute Customized Rejuvenating Massage.

SPA + SALON + ART

250 West San Juan in the town of Telluride

Located steps from the base of the gondola in Telluride (Next to Telluride Sports)

DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE WITH CUPPING 60 - 90 minutes

Great after a day of skiing, you will be provided with a customized massage experience, tailored to your specific needs. Aveda aromas and massage techniques could include a combination of deep tissue and cupping techniques .


RETAIL THERAPY

WALK IN THE PARK acrylic and pastel on canvas by Margaret Rinkevich / Rinkevich Gallery / $5,000

PUZZLE Telluride Room / $35

PILLOW Heritage Apparel / $55

COOLfinds Mountain Village’s independent shops & galleries have unique finds that range from fun to fabulous

CUSTOM, HANDMADE SKIS Wagner Custom Skis, design by Beatnik Prints / from $2,295 Melissa Plantz

BASEBALL CAP Telluride Brewing Co. Brewpub / $30

HAND-CRAFTED NECKLACES Heritage Apparel / from $1,650

COPPER MUG & VODKA Telluride Distilling Co. Tasting Rooms / $25 and $22 telluride.com | 855.421.4360

55


Discover a new tier of luxury in Telluride this winter AUBERGERESORTS.COM/MADELINE | 970. 369.0880

HEARTY MOUNTAIN CUISINE AT ITS’ MODERN BEST

RESERVATIONS bikb@aubergeresorts.com 970.369.8949

T I M B E R RESERVATIONS timberroom@aubergeresorts.com 970.369.8948

R O O M THE SOCIAL HUB OF TELLURIDE


SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS

SWEET DREAMS Local talents make exquisite, personalized wedding cakes and treats BY ERIN SPILLANE

T

KELLY GRAY

Heidi Chowen

elluride and Mountain that I can focus my attention Village feature talented on creating luxury custom ‘I LOVE THAT I CAN cake designers, bakers and FOCUS MY ATTENTION cakes tailored to each indiartisans passionate about vidual client,” she says. ON CREATING LUXURY creating something exceptionFor Susan Johnston of CUSTOM CAKES al for weddings, with unique Sweet Creations Telluride, TAILORED TO EACH and delicious options ranging making wedding cakes that INDIVIDUAL CLIENT.’ from the wedding cake itself to perfectly fit the clients’ brief sweet treats for celebration-gohas at times meant making K e l l y Gray ers to enjoy. more than one cake. Take Kelly Gray is a local wedHouston couple Rachael and ding cake artist and owner/principal of Kelly John Montgomery, who were married in 2016 at Gray Cakes. Gray formerly operated the very Gorrono Ranch on the Telluride Ski Resort. The popular Fig & Bloom, but rebranded when she pair asked the sought-after Johnston to make two adopted a new design style. Says Gray, “I am cakes: a traditional lemon cake with raspberry now specializing in sugar art designs for wedding filling, as well as a Porsche cake of triple cakes, with every single element of my designs chocolate that reflected John’s affection made from sugar by hand.” It’s a cake design elefor the iconic German car brand. Says ment that clearly generates enthusiasm — both Rachael, “We wanted to choose a for the in-demand artist and her clients. “I love design and flavors as unique as our venue … and Susan was up for the challenge.” For her part, Johnston says, “I enjoy creating memorable and delicious cakes that reflect the couple’s style and passion.” Abby Herman of The Golden Crumb is a skilled artisan baker with a wide repertoire that includes cakes, cupcakes, cookies, pies and mini desserts, and a style that focuses on simple, elegant and delicious. She >> Madison Ifland Photography

ABBY HERMAN

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

57


gift certificates, beauty products & gifts

Spend a Relaxing, Rejuvenating Day at the Spa SPA DAY/MONTHLY PASS & PAIN RELIEF PASS AVAILABLE

day spa Massage Luxury & Active Facials Frotox & Cryo Aesthetics Lash Extensions Professional Make Up Cryo Sculpting/Slimming

wellness spa Salt Cave Therapy Essential Oil Oxygen Lounge Far Infrared Sauna Therapy Colon Hydrotherapy Lymphatic Massage Cryotherapy Pain Management

Located on Telluride’s Main Street: 333 West Colorado Avenue purebeautytelluride.com | 970 239 6144 phone

telluride | colorado

fa r m f r e s h d e l i c at e s s e n

dine-in + ta k e - o u t eatery

11

am

to 9

pm

preorder family style take-out www.

Little H ouse E ats. c om 219 West Pacific Ave


SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS SUSAN JOHNSTON Kaycee Joubert/Real Life Photographs

‘WE LOVE A WEDDING.’ Ch e r y l Lo ebe

Lisa Marie Wright Photography

CHERYL LOEBE

remarks that much professional satisfaction comes from feedback received from happy clients. “I like for the bride and groom and guests to remember tasting how delicious the cake was,” she says. One standout memory? The rave reviews Herman received from a groom who didn’t even like cake until he tried hers. “He said it was the best he had eaten.” Artisan baker Cheryl Loebe of custom cake company Peace of Cake has been making wedding cakes for over 10 years. Loebe is a talented cakemaker, who happens to also be a big fan of weddings themselves. “What an honor to be involved in such an important day,” she says. “A wedding is one of the biggest days in a person’s life — to marry a love — and is taken very seriously at Peace of Cake. We love a wedding.” Loebe also offers couples a sweets table with offerings ranging from scrumptious hand-held apple or mixed berry pies and cupcakes to elegant chocolate-dipped macaroons and Italian wedding cookies. Other local artisans also offer sweet treats that make fun additions to a wedding celebration. Telluride Truffle does a bespoke chocolate table for wedding celebrations with a selection of truffles, chocolates, cookies and other yummies. And then there’s Baked in Telluride donuts. Yep, wedding couples looking for a fun, delicious indulgence can order a selection of the bakery’s famed donuts. It seems to us that the fried dough confections — or, really, any of the sweets mentioned on these pages — are perfect for wedding guests about to burn some calories on the dance floor.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

59


STAY & PLAY

F

or hearty adventurers, the Telluride area offers one-of-a-kind mountain huts and funky hostels, unique options that combine pared-down ruggedness with stunning surroundings. To access these off-the-beaten-path places to stay, visitors may need to skin (a mode of uphill skiing) or snowmobile to reach their accommodation, and there may not be internet or cable TV. A warm fire, camaraderie, memorable scenery and outdoor adventure just outside the front door await, however, along with the experience of a lifetime.

Adventurous accommodation options abound in Telluride BY JESSE JAMES MCTIGUE

60

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Inspired by full-service European alpine huts, local Bob Kingsley started building the Opus Hut in 2005 on a mining claim 11,700 feet atop Ophir Pass. After five years, he opened his eco-friendly backcountry ski haven to those willing to put in the time and energy to get there. Indeed, the Opus Hut rewards integrity. In winter, guests skin or snowshoe the 3.5 miles or 1,800 vertical feet to the hut, which is fully stocked, so they can travel light. A hut master provides breakfast, afternoon soup and dinner, and serves as bartender and snow shoveler. The hut’s craftsmanship is only usurped by the natural beauty of the surrounding 13,000-foot peaks and basins. Right out the door, backcountry skiers can descend through the trees or down chutes, or skin into the basin above. Opportunities also abound for hardcore alpinists to rack up the vertical, ascending and descending accompanying ridges and exploring adjoining basins on all-day epic tours. The hut, says Kingsley, “was built for backcountry skiers, mountaineers, hikers and mountain bikers … [It] was designed to blend with the mountain environment and encourage guests to connect with the natural world. Guests are immediately impressed by the setting.” Mary McIntyre

THE PATH LESS TRAVELED

Mary McIntyre

Opus Hut


STAY & PLAY

Cindy Farney

High Camp If mountain huts were classed like ski runs, High Camp would be a double green, enjoyable for everyone. The access road is located about 15 miles from Telluride, on the southern side of Lizard Head Pass nestled behind Sheep Mountain. A snowcat hauls in the gear while guests snowshoe, hike or skin the 2-mile, snow-packed route to the serene meadow where High Camp presides. The potbelly stove, sauna and rustic hot tub are wood fueled and cozy. The bathroom is an outhouse, lights are solar powered and the stovetop is propane. The common room’s long rectangular dining room table and cluster of comfy couches encourage gatherings perfect for recounting the day’s adventures. Outside, the opportunities for sledding, hiking and Nordic skiing are endless in the vast, stunning backcountry. “This is an unplugged hut that inspires conversations and laughter,” owner Cindy Farney says. “It is not an epic hut; it’s a place you feel nurtured.”

The Bivvi If you’ve ever backpacked through Europe, you understand the beauty of hostels, budget-friendly places where strangers become fast friends through the exchange of tales of adventure. This is the vibe two ski bums strived to emulate with the Bivvi hostel, 20 minutes’ drive west of Telluride. At the Bivvi, options range from an affordable bed in a six-bed, dorm-style room to private suites. The accommodation is clean and simple. It’s not the thread count, but the conversations and connections that matter most. Other attractions are the communal spaces — a backyard firepit, bar, pool table, kitchen, outdoor hot tub and Great Room — and the interactions that happen there. Says general manager Balazs Jarai, “Guests who just met come across as best friends. The open-minded, adventurous traveler is going to feel right at home here.”

Alta Lakes Observatory

Tony Demin

Off Prospect Lift, in Alta Lakes Basin and accessible from the Telluride Ski Resort or by skinning or snowmobiling up Alta Lakes Road, there is a large, dilapidated mining trestle and the tall, proud structure of Alta Lakes Observatory, appropriately named because on clear nights the stars seem closer and clearer there. Constructed in 1975 by locals Jim and Sally Russell, it became popular for epic backcountry skiing, colorful storytelling and legendary celebrations. Its location allows for quick access to epic powder lines and its interior, anchored by a 5-foot stone hearth, insists visitors mingle and imbibe. Its amenities, including electricity, a modern kitchen, internet, indoor bathrooms and comfy duvets, differentiate it from other huts as does its soul. “She’s got a lot of heart,” says current owner Mattie Bowling. “We talk about the love she is given and the love she gives. There is a lot of history there ranging from the craziest stories to the most heartwarming. The experience is whatever you make it.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

61


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

MEXICAN R E S TA U R A N T BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

Mexican & Southwestern cuisine with whole foods and contemporary influences.

SHINING BRIGHT What began as a lockdown hobby has turned into a new business, Zephyr Candle Co., for Telluride native Hannah Daley, 26. Daley uses all-natural soy wax, phthalate-free fragrance oils and lead-free cotton wicks to make her beautiful candles, which are available online at Etsy. Inspired by her love for her hometown, she also designed a Telluride-specific collection with bespoke scents and names like Local’s Loop and Valley Floor exclusively for local retailer Hook, located at 226 W. Colorado Ave. We want!

VEGETARIAN, VEGAN & GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS

Call us for take-out orders, or go to lacocina.dineblast.com OPEN EVERY DAY 8AM–9PM

CASUAL FAMILY-STYLE

970-728-9355

LACOCINATELLURIDE.COM

123 EAST COLORADO AVENUE

FINDING HOUSING SOLUTIONS Local businesses, governments and nonprofits are taking action to address the acute lack of affordable housing in the area. The Cosmopolitan’s owner/chef, Chad Scothorn, for example, has added employee housing behind his home in Ski Ranches and, in nearby Norwood, is putting the finishing touches on one housing project and launching another. He follows the New Sheridan, Ajax Cleaning and others in finding affordable housing solutions. The issues surrounding the affordable housing crunch can be complex. One, though, is relatively straightforward: the need for more rentals in the long-term market. One Telluride business has found a unique way of rewarding property owners who rent long term to locals. The Butcher and the Baker has initiated a “gold customer” program. Let staff at the restaurant know you rent in the long-term market and you can jump the queue at the popular Colorado Avenue bakery and restaurant. Owner Megan Ossola, herself a landlord in the long-term market, notes that the initiative, which had attracted 30 participants by summer’s end, seeks to reward those renting to locals, while also raising awareness of the crisis. “I think it’s important that we put our heads together to help the situation in the immediate term,” she says. Meanwhile, the towns of Telluride and Mountain Village, along with San Miguel County, have initiatives and construction projects underway, while nonprofits the Trust for Community Housing and the Telluride Foundation are also working to get locals into housing they can afford.


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

FASHION + FUNCTION

Last year, Telluride Education Foundation launched the Compassion Campaign to raise funds for the school district and promote compassion, kindness and gratitude during the pandemic. TEF successfully raised nearly $90,000 to assist with pandemic-related needs, such as PPE, as well as morale boosts for students and teachers and funding to help with expenses like childcare, first-time home-buying and obtaining a master’s degree. Local businesses got a boost too, with funds earmarked for teacher and staff appreciation in the form of community dinners, faculty luncheons and wellness packages, and gift cards for students to local establishments. This year, the Telluride Compassion Campaign is also focused on community building. “It is critical for our community to find ways to reconnect, be social and share the love,” says Toni Nash, foundation president. “We hope to come together as locals, part-time homeowners and visitors who all share a passion for Telluride. If you work, play or live in Telluride, you are part of our community.” For more or to donate, go to tellurideeducation.org/tcc.

Wilder Love Photography

Founded in 2020 by Jennifer Ogilvie and Sutton Schuler, women’s golf apparel company Ladies Only is grabbing attention on two fronts: First is its emphasis on both performance and fashion, with golf attire designed to function well on the course, while keeping the wearer looking great. In addition, Ladies Only is based in Telluride, with the design work taking place here and the manufacturing in Los Angeles. Ogilvie and Schuler are both keen golfers who longed for “fashion forward, performance-based golf attire for women” — something, they note, their male counterparts have had for a while. From that desire, Ladies Only was born and with it a high-quality line of sportswear that, the pair emphasize, works for women golfing at all levels who want to look and play fabulously. And, Ogilvie stresses, “Ladies need not be golfers to don the chic styles.” Says Schuler, “In our active communities, both the athletic and luxury knitwear pieces translate to any and all activities, such as tennis, pickleball, hiking and even your everyday errands.”

COMPASSIONATE COMMUNITY

Michael Mowery Media

REALTORS GIVE BACK Realtors give back to the local community in a variety of ways, volunteering as first responders and mentors, serving on local government councils and committees and through a range of initiatives. The Telluride Association of Realtors’ Adopt-a-Highway program, for instance, sees TAR members hitting area roadsides to pick up trash and keep things looking tidy. Members also participate in the association’s Adopt-A-Trail program, picking up litter and working to maintain the region’s trails network through a series of trails workdays. And, there is the First-Time Homebuyers Assistance Fund, which has been helping new local purchasers with closing costs for almost 20 years, with realtors donating a portion of each closing to support the fund. Says TAR President Steve Patterson, “In my 17 years on the board of the association, easily the most rewarding of accomplishments is the fund that has enabled so many to get a foothold and become permanent residents. Locals make a community.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

63


The premier source for all things Telluride.

OPEN DAILY 9am–6pm 970.728.7358 Located at the Gondola Plaza

Affordable luxury in Telluride, centrally located in the heart of Mountain Village!

Selling fractional fee-simple interests for 25 years! We are experts in all types of real estate in the Telluride region.

VILLAGE

REAL ESTATE LLC

Offices located in the Mountain Village Plaza telluridevillagerealestate.com 970.728.2330


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

ECO-FRIENDLY ENTERPRISES Spectacular natural environment inspires green practices BY JENNIFER JULIA

W

hen you live in a place like Telluride, surrounded by this spectacular natural environment, it stands to reason that the pristine beauty inspires one to go the extra mile to protect it. This is our hope for all who live and visit here, and it’s the credo maintained by many of our local businesses that are incorporating green and sustainable practices, bold steps towards protecting our environment locally and globally. Take GoodLight Candles for instance. Seeking to create a cleaner, safer alternative to

paraffin-wax candles, David Callicott, along with two friends, founded GoodLight Candles in 2010. David and his wife, Sarah, are now at the company’s helm, making affordable, plantbased candles from sustainably-sourced palm oil. GoodLight candles contain no phthalates, synthetic fragrances or chemicals, and the company is plastic-free, using recycled and recyclable paper and plant-based inks for their packaging, as well as using pure cotton wicks. Through their membership with the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and partnerships

with the not-for-profit organizations Wild Asia and the Orangutan Land Trust, GoodLight works to promote sustainable palm oil production among smallholder farmers. Altruism also drives their business: GoodLight donates 1 percent of their annual revenue to nonprofit organizations through their membership with One Percent for the Planet, spreading good light — literally and figuratively. >>

GOODLIGHT WORKS TO PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE PALM OIL PRODUCTION AMONG SMALLHOLDER FARMERS.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

65


FIGHT FUND EDUCATE TellurideAIDSBenefit.org

Hat and leather bag available at OVERLAND

FEB 17 18 19 Moussy Jeans, Tess pearl wrap necklace and Gucci sunglasses available at TWO SKIRTS

Denim Blouse available at TELLURIDE TRAPPINGS & TOGGERY // Location: CAMPV in Vancorum, Colorado


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

Ryan Bonneau

If you’ve spent any time on the streets of Telluride, chances are you’ve seen Mark Sturdevant of Dirty Sturdy’s Mountain Compost on his electric tricycle and trailer rig, pedaling from house to house collecting compostable household waste from his 100-plus clients. Utilizing this eco-friendly and inventive mode of transport, Sturdevant composts an average of four tons of waste per month. “By keeping this waste out of the landfills, I’m diverting greenhouse gases,” Sturdevant says, explaining that when food waste is dumped into landfills, it rots and creates methane, a potent greenhouse gas. “Instead of creating a harmful gas, I’m creating a healthy, useful substance.” Dirty Sturdy’s teams with community gardens, regional food growers and organic farms in a symbiotic relationship: the farms provide the composting space and in return receive half of the compost (the other half is given to clients). Sturdevant’s joy in his work is palpable. “The most important aspects of this work for me are community, connection and education.”

As for Rob Wagner, when the longtime local became a Colorado State University-certified Colorado Gardener, he knew he wanted to do more than just landscape, he wanted to do so in a green, sustainable way. Teaming up with like-minded partner Billy Schwengel, the duo set forth to create Telluride Eco Lawn & Garden, a landscaping business with an environmentally-based mission.

quiet,” Wagner explains with a grin. “No bothering the homeowners or their neighbors.” The company uses all-organic, Colorado-based fertilizers, and they compost 100 percent of the yard waste. “It was pretty serendipitous that we formed our LLC on Earth Day,” Schwengel notes of what seems like an enthusiastic thumbs up from Mother Earth. And then there’s The Butcher and the

‘BY KEEPING THIS WASTE OUT OF THE LANDFILLS, I’M DIVERTING GREENHOUSE GASES.’ Mar k S tu r de van t

Every piece of equipment in the company’s fleet, including lawn mowers, leaf blowers, string trimmers and garden cultivators, is electric battery powered. This means no emissions, no exhaust and, best of all, no noise. “Because we are entirely battery powered, we are very

Baker. Step into this much-loved main street

Ryan Bonneau

bakery and cafe and you’re liable to be seduced by their fresh salads, juices and baked treats. The eco-friendly aspects of its offerings are just as delicious, though. In 2019, owner Megan Ossola received a Telluride Green Grant, funding from the Town of Telluride that is administered by Telluride Eco Action Partners to “reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency, renewable energy and other innovative means”. Ossola utilized her grant to purchase a dump trailer, which she makes available for community composting. She and her team process the compostable waste at her farm in Montrose, using it to grow produce that in turn is used at the eatery. In addition to a farm-to-table menu that emphasizes sustainable, regional ingredients, “Butcher” uses compostable packaging and has implemented carpooling measures among staff. “Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world,” Ossola says, quoting Howard Zinn. “That’s most definitely my mantra.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

67


Daily trips. Lifetime memories.

New 4- stroke sleds!

A sustainable Guide The Official Guide to Telluride and Mountain Village has taken an important step toward sustainability by enrolling in Print Releaf. The initiative is clever. With the slogan “You print one, we’ll plant one”, Print Releaf has worked closely with industry experts in print and forestry to develop standards for measuring, offsetting and verifying the successful reforestation of paper consumption. The results? Through partnerships with certified reforestation programs around the world, new trees are planted to offset the amount of paper used in each print run of the Guide. Says Telluride Tourism Board President and CEO Michael Martelon, “We believe that communities and organizations cannot thrive without a healthy planet, so it makes sense to us to take steps like this that minimize our own impacts on the environment and promote sustainability. In addition, we see sustainability as a business opportunity, not a cost or burden, and Print Releaf fits that vision really well.”

GS NUO WIMDO BEILDE

TOURS

E XP E RI E NCE • Q U ALITY • S ERVIC E | L OCA L SINCE 1 984 FLY FISHING • 4-WD TOURS •RAFTING •SUP TOURS

1-800-831-6230 www.TellurideOutside.com

Come play in the mountains. VacationTelluride.com

|

866 . 754 . 8772

|


COMMUNITY

GREEN MOUNTAINS Local governments set sustainability goals and initiatives to achieve them BY MARTINIQUE DAVIS

Tony Demin

T

elluride, Mountain Village and San Miguel County are stunningly beautiful, with a diverse, pristine backcountry that provides locals and visitors alike with a multitude of options for outdoor recreation. Less poetically, the region’s economy depends heavily on this pristine backcountry and its opportunities for outdoor recreation. So, as the impacts of climate change become a sobering reality for communities across the globe, including the Telluride region, it’s no wonder that local governments here have heeded the call. Initiating meaningful change for more sustainable futures can be a daunting challenge, but local governments have committed to carbon neutral, zero waste and other environmental goals in the coming decades, and are in the process of putting projects and programs into place to realize those goals. To reach its carbon neutral goals, as well as improve efficiencies and decrease costs, San Miguel County recently partnered with the state Department of Local Affairs and the Colorado Energy Office in launching an energy performance and solar installation project for county facilities. “Becoming carbon neutral will give us long-term stability and ensure quality of life as climate change is becoming more apparent,” says County Manager Mike Bordogna of the program, which will see the installation of on-site solar photovoltaic and battery systems at key county facilities, as well as

identify facility improvements that will reduce enprograms designed to help residents take steps ergy usage. All told, these improvements will result towards more green behaviors are available, inin a total reduction of 7,704 tons of carbon dioxide. cluding a Compost Incentive Program, where reIn Telluride, the citizen-led Ecology Commiscipients receive a free home-composter unit; the sion has been hard at work updating the comSmart Building Incentive program, where those munity’s Carbon Action Plan, hiring consulting building a new home can qualify for up to 100 company Cascadia to crepercent building fee waiver; ate an updated plan that and a Solar Incentive Program, ‘ BECOMING CARBON will serve as the town’s where the town partnered with NEUTRAL WILL GIVE US sustainability roadmap. the Telluride Mountain Village The plan highlights sourc- LONG-TERM STABILITY.’ Owners Association and nones of carbon emissions profit Solar United Neighbors Mik e B or dogn a and ways to reduce and to create a solar energy co-op. eventually eliminate them, and outlines some of A total of 15 local families received up to a $5,000 the expected impacts climate change will have rebate to install solar panels on their homes in on the community in the coming years. Says 2021, thanks to the program. Commission Chair Kiersten Talbert, “Our hope To help manage these programs and seek grant is that the updated CAP will guide the actions funding for future sustainability projects, the town of the town government in order to reduce our has hired an environmental efficiencies and grant contribution to greenhouse gas emissions and coordinator. Lauren Kirn, who began in August, the effects of climate change, and to prepare our points out that green practices are as much about community for some of the changes that are protecting the environment as they are about propredicted for our region.” moting innovation. “We are constantly researching The commission has also focused on reducing environmental efforts and developing relationships single-use plastics and is in the process of creating a to understand and evaluate the best path forward reusable takeout container pilot program. for our community,” says Kirn. “One of my perMountain Village, meanwhile, has put its monsonal goals is to demonstrate that environmental ey where its mouth is when it comes to promoting efficiencies and sustainability efforts coincide with environmental stewardship. A slate of incentive economic growth and productivity.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

69


Bring a piece of Telluride home with you.

Open Daily 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. | 970.728.7357 | Located in the Franz Klammer

CREATE find you r spar k ahha a.or g


Photos by Melissa Plantz

COMMUNITY CHARACTERS

VILLAGE VOICE

‘ SPENDING TIME IN THE GORGEOUS ENVIRONMENT SURROUNDING US IS ONE OF MY TOUCHSTONES.’

I

t’s not a stretch to say that the lives of Kim Montgomery and Mountain Village are wonderfully intertwined. When the Southern California native arrived to the area in 1987, she only intended, like so many others, to stay for a season and enjoy the life of a ski bum. As for Mountain Village, it wasn’t even a town back then. Enchanted by the surrounding natural beauty and lack of lift lines, Montgomery stayed. She got a job with the ski resort and ended up Telluride Ski & Golf ’s corporate secretary, working closely with Ron Allred and Jim Wells, then the resort’s primary owners. The pair were the driving forces behind the incorporation of the Town of Mountain Village in 1995, which means Montgomery was too. At Wells’ encouragement, Montgomery took a job with the nascent town, her professional life progressing as Mountain Village grew from a clutch of buildings at the base of the ski resort into the vibrant, year-round community it is today. Montgomery started as the Town’s grant administrator, then became town clerk, then director of administration and, in 2011, town manager. She was, she says, motivated by her deep passion for the community and the people that make it special. “I’ve been here for 32 years and I still think ‘wow’ every day.” And while she stepped down from the town

Kim Montgomery is practically synonymous with Mountain Village BY SAGE MARSHALL

manager role in October, Montgomery’s legacy in Mountain Village lives on. Notoriously modest, however, colleagues often referred to her as the woman behind the curtain, the one who kept everything running smoothly. “I was responsible for implementing town council policy decisions,” Montgomery explains. “I directed the town operations to make sure they were efficient. One of the most important things to me was creating an organizational culture that valued the employees, but also resulted in the delivery of really great municipal services for our residents, visitors and businesses.” Today, Montgomery cites the success of the Gondola as an accomplishment of which she is particularly proud of having been a part of during her long career. She took part in the project during its conception, as well as later, when she worked for the Town. “When we started the Gondola projects, we all kind of bit our nails wondering if anybody

was going to get out of their car and ride on this thing,” she recalls. “Fast forward to today and it’s transporting more than 3.4 million riders a year.” Montgomery points to her skill at building relationships as a driver in her professional life, but also recognizes her husband, Russ, a local contractor, for his support. “We’ve been married since 1995,” she says. “He’s just a rock … and his fingerprints are all over this place. I did a lot on paper, he does a lot that he can actually point to and say ‘look, I built that’.” Now that she has stepped down from her role in Mountain Village, Montgomery says she is excited to spend time with her husband enjoying all the San Juans have to offer. “Spending time in the gorgeous environment surrounding us in this magical place is one of my touchstones. Russ and I are also lucky enough to own some property to the south where we spend many weekends on the water, which hearkens back to my early years in Southern California. We basically have the best of all worlds.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

71


FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Away from the slopes, magical family-friendly adventures await for curious kids and their grown-ups

72

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Photos Tony Demin

KIDS’ PLAY


FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Ice Follies Skaters can make their way to ice rinks in Telluride Town Park or at the Madeline Hotel and Residences in Mountain Village. Town Park’s Nordic Center in the park and the Madeline have skate rentals.

Nordic Fun Nordic skiing opens up new outdoor options for the whole family with trails in Town Park, on the Valley Floor and more. The Nordic Center offers guided tours and lessons.

Sled Time Firecracker Hill, at the southern edge of Telluride Town Park, offers sledding to suit any adrenaline level. Rent sleds at the Nordic Center, or purchase one from Timberline Ace Hardware.

Snow Season Skateboarding When the snow fills Town Park’s Grindline-designed skatepark or the minipark on East Pacific, try The Drop Boardshop for winter camps and lessons on an indoor ramp specifically designed for introduction and progression.

Tony Demin telluride.com | 855.421.4360

73


TA K E FLIGHT tellurideskiresort.com/canopyadventure

ZIPLINES

AERIAL BRIDGES

RAPPELLING

ADRENALINE


FAMILY ACTIVITIES

Take the Scenic Route

Ah Haa!

Hop aboard the free Gondola that connects Telluride and Mountain Village for breathtaking views and the coolest journey ever. This very unique trip is one that you and the kiddos won’t soon forget.

Telluride’s beloved Ah Haa School for the Arts can help creative kids find their inner Monet or Kahlo with wintertime classes, camps and other kid-friendly programs.

History Lesson

We Love Our Library The award-winning Wilkinson Public Library houses an impressive collection of books, DVDs, music and more and loans cool non-traditional items like snowshoes and karaoke machines. There is also a variety of programming for all ages, including story times, after-school programs, events for teens and more.

Telluride Theatre @ the Library

Experience the area’s colorful past at the Telluride Historical Museum, where interactive exhibits and exciting programming make history come alive for enthusiasts young and old.

And More Need more excitement? Try the ski resort’s Adventure Center for memorable outdoor activities or the Sheridan Opera House or Palm Theatre for family-friendly performing arts. And, of course, sometimes the best activity is none at all. Telluride is the perfect place to snuggle up indoors and watch the snow fall.

This winter, check ahead to get up-to-date Covid-related protocols and information.

Ryan Bonneau

Ryan Bonneau

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

75


ENCHAN

ING

THE MOST COLORADO PLACE ON EARTH / telluride.com / 855.748.9621


SUMMER IN TELLURIDE

MY PERFECT SUMMER DAY BY LINNE HALPERN

I

’d never been a summer girl, until I moved to reminded of the fact that this beauty exists within Telluride. I’ve always preferred the quiet joys of my own extended backyard. falling snow, the coziness of cashmere sweaters If it’s Wednesday, I swing by the Mountain Viland the thought of a long afternoon curled up with lage Farmers’ Market on Heritage Plaza to pick a book and blanket. But here? Without the menac- up the essentials: fresh flowers, local veggies and ing humidity I’d come to know a loaf of crusty bread. Life’s simple on the East Coast, I jubilantly pleasures seem to be in such abunawait that fateful day when you dance during Telluride summers. LIFE’S SIMPLE can first feel summer’s warmth I grab tacos and street corn from PLEASURES SEEM — when the box canyon returns Los Buenos Tacos at the Telluride TO BE IN SUCH to its luscious green, the lakes Brewing Company Brew Pub and ABUNDANCE. begin to thaw and an iced coffee head home to finish the work day is calling your name. from my deck, not wanting to miss Specifically, an iced latte with oat milk from a moment of the breezy sunshine. Coffee Cowboy, where my day usually begins. As Around 4 p.m., I officially close the laptop and someone who works from home, my morning load my SOL paddle board (locally made) on top walk to the coffee cart gives me structure and of my truck. I drive up to Trout Lake, with the something to look forward to. Along Main Street, windows down and bluegrass music blasting the I wave to friends and acquaintances, relishing whole way. I paddle out across the lake, working in the town’s slower pace before the weekend’s my arms, disconnecting my mind and breathing festivities pick up. in the alpine air. Golden hour hits across the After checking some items off my to-do list, I mountains and, in the middle of the lake, I lie meet a friend for a quick hike around the Keydown on my back, pulling a book out of my pack. stone Gorge Loop Trail, west of Telluride. It’s the The wind makes ripples in the water and I let the perfect length for a good catch-up and just the board gently rock me, overcome by a feeling of right amount of incline for a mid-day challenge. complete and unwavering calm. Listening to the rush of the river, I’m in awe, Once I’m finally able to drag myself back to the

car, I head home to shower and get ready for the evening. Donning a floral sundress and cowboy boots, I wander to Sidework on South Pine Street, where I share a meat and cheese board with a friend, before gallivanting over to the Telluride Transfer Warehouse. One of my favorite local bands, Birds of Play, is playing. As the sun sets to the west, the sweet sounds of mandolin, violin, guitar and bass wash over the crowd. The band sings “Fate of Saints,” a love song between the San Juan Mountains and the San Miguel River. I revel in the truth of their melodies and the gratitude — this time my own — for the love I feel toward this home I’ve found. A writer for the Guide, Linne Halpern lives in Mountain Village. She is also the author of a children’s book, Marina and the Mermaids. See page 46 for more on recent, locally relevant book releases. telluride.com | 855.421.4360 77


SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

H

‘Try the Wheel’ Singles Mixer Ah Haa School for the Arts

November 19

Gondola Opens

November 20

Emily Scott Robinson Show Colorado songwriter, Sheridan Opera House

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

November 24

Donation Day Telluride Ski Resort

H

November 25

Opening Day Telluride Ski Resort

Nov. 29 - Dec. 2

Tech Week Young People’s Theater, Sheridan Opera House

N OV E M B E R

H H

Thanksgiving

28 29 30

H SUNDAY

MONDAY

H TUESDAY

DECEMBER

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 2 3 4

H

H

H

H

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

H

H

H

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

H

H

H

H

H

DECEMBER

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

H

H

H

H

H

H

Christmas

26 27 28 29 30 31 1

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

New Year's Eve

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

H 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

J A N U A RY

NOVEMBER November 12

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

78

EVENTS CALENDAR

H 30 31

H

December 1

Noel Night Downtown Telluride, p. 51

December 1

World AIDS Day Dance Party Telluride AIDS Benefit, location TBD

December 2

Annual Cup & Bowl Show Opening Ah Haa School for the Arts

December 3-5

Bye Bye Birdie Young People’s Theater, Sheridan Opera House

December 3-5

Fire Festival

December 7

Telluride Historical Museum Opens

December 10-12

Telluride Arts Holiday Bazaar Location TBD

December 11-12

Mountain Village Holiday Prelude p. 51

December 11

Ivalas Quartet Innovative classical music, Palm Theatre

December 11

Met Opera: Eurydice Palm Theatre

December 15-19

Telluride Theatre Holiday Show (for adults) Sheridan Opera House

December 16

Art Walk Downtown Telluride galleries

December 17-19

The Nutcracker Palm Theatre

December 17-23

Telluride Theatre Holiday Show Sheridan Opera House

December 24

Torchlight Parade Telluride Ski Resort, p. 51

Dec. 26 - Jan. 1

Holiday Concert Series Sheridan Opera House

December 28

Telluride Theatre’s The Downlow Palm Theatre

December 29

‘Cup of Love’ Cocktails & Fundraiser Ah Haa School for the Arts

December 31

New Year’s Eve Countdown Courthouse on Colorado Ave. (Main St.), Telluride

December 31

Torchlight Parade Telluride Ski Resort, p. 51

UP-TO-DATE CALENDAR >> Telluride.com Know Before You Go: Before attending an event, check the event or organization website for updated information.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


EVENTS CALENDAR

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 2 3 4 5

H

JANUARY

H

H

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Met Opera: Cinderella Palm Theatre

January 6

Art Walk Downtown Telluride galleries

January 28

KOTO Lip Sync Sheridan Opera House

January 28

Jamestown Revival with Mipso & Robert Ellis Americana/folk, Club Red

January 29

Met Opera: Rigoletto Palm Theatre

FEBRUARY February 3

Art Walk Downtown Telluride galleries

February 4-6

Oklahoma! Young People’s Theater, Sheridan Opera House

February 10-11

Telluride AIDS Benefit Student Fashion Show Palm Theatre

February 12

Chocolate Lovers’ Fling San Miguel Resource Center Benefit, Sheridan Opera House

February 14

Ailey 2 Modern dance, Palm Theatre

February 17-19

Telluride AIDS Benefit Gala Fashion Show Telluride Conference Center

February 17-20

Comedy Festival Sheridan Opera House

February 19

Telluride Arts Snow Ball Transfer Warehouse

H

H

H

H

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

H

H

H

H

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

F E B R U A RY

January 1

H

H

Presidents' Day

27 28

H

H

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 2 3 4 5

H

H

H

H

H

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

H

H

H

H

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

H

Feb. 26 - March 5 Gay Ski Week

H

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

MARCH Art Walk Downtown Telluride galleries

March 3-6

Telluride Theatre Original Show Palm Theatre

March 10-13

Telluride Theatre Original Show Palm Theatre

March 10-13

Spring Break Concert Series Sheridan Opera House

March 11

Blue Party Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Benefit Telluride Conference Center

March 19

One to One Mentoring Cardboard Sled Derby Telluride Ski Resort

March 19

Met Opera: Ariadne Auf Naxos Palm Theatre

March 23

Anders Osborne and Jackie Greene Acoustic show, Club Red

March 23-26

Burlesque Telluride Theatre Sheridan Opera House

March 26

Met Opera: Don Carlos Palm Theatre

H MARCH

March 3

H

H

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

27 28 29 30 31

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

1 2

H 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

H 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

APRIL KOTO Spring Street Dance Colorado Ave. (Main St.)

April 1

Date Auction One to One Mentoring Benefit Last Dollar Saloon

April 3

Closing Day and Pond Skim Telluride Ski Resort

April 3

Gondola Closes Re-opening May 26, 2022

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

APRIL

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

April 1

79

H

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

79


HISTORIC WALKING TOUR The Telluride area boasts a rich history. In the 1700s, the Ute Indians used the San Juan Mountains and the San Miguel River banks as summer camps. Explorers and survey parties passed through the area in the 1700s and 1800s, but it was mining that brought the first European settlers in 1876 when the Sheridan Mine registered its operation in the Marshall Basin above Telluride. In just 20 years, the town grew from a hodgepodge of cabins and shacks to rows of elegant Victorians and stately brick buildings, many of which exist today. Telluride was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1961 and the Town later established the Historic and Architectural Review Commission to further protect its character and authenticity. The Historic Walking Tour is a self-guided walk through Telluride’s storied past. 1 | San Miguel County Courthouse The courthouse was originally built on the south side of West Colorado Avenue in 1886 but burned shortly after construction. The bricks were saved to build the present courthouse less than a year later on the opposite corner (Colorado Ave. and Oak St.). Recently renovated, it is still in use today.

5 | St. Patrick’s Catholic Church Reverend J.J. Gibbons, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, made his first trip to Telluride from Ouray for a baptism, traveling by horseback over the mountain passes. In 1896, he helped build St. Patrick’s Catholic Church of Telluride on Catholic Hill for $4,800. By 1899, the church had 200 parishioners. The wooden figures of the Stations of the Cross were carved in the Tyrol area of Austria.

6 | Old Waggoner House Charles Delos Waggoner, president of the Bank of Telluride (the yellow brick building on main street), contrived a scheme purportedly to save his bank in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Waggoner siphoned money from New York banks to keep his clients from losing their life savings once the Bank of Telluride could no longer pay its creditors. Waggoner, who was sentenced to 15 years and served six, testified in court, “I would rather see the New York banks lose money than the people of Telluride, most of whom have worked all their lives for the savings that were deposited in my bank.”

7 | Town Hall The building was constructed on Fir Street and Columbia Avenue in 1883 as Telluride’s first schoolhouse. The one-room structure held one teacher and 53 students and was built for $3,000. After a new school was built, the town offices occupied the building.

2 | New Sheridan Hotel & Opera House Built in 1891, Telluride’s first hotel was destroyed by fire in 1894 and rebuilt in brick in 1895. At the same time, the Sheridan Bar was built, and it is now one of the oldest bars in the West. The bar has remained unchanged since 1895, boasting its original lead glass divider panels, mahogany wood paneling and filigree light fixtures. Patrons are served beverages on the original hand-carved cherry wood bar that was imported from Austria. The New Sheridan was recently accepted as a member of the National Trust for Historic Hotels of America. In 1913, the opera house was added and named the Segerberg Opera House, after builders J.A. and Arvid Segerberg. The building was eventually named the Sheridan Opera House after its neighboring bar and hotel.

3 | The Pekkarine Building One of the oldest structures on Colorado Avenue, this building was home to the Pekkarine family. Mr. Pekkarine emigrated to the US from Finland in the late 1800s and opened a boot shop in the basement. On the second floor, he later operated a mercantile store. The Pekkarines lived on the third floor. At the settling of the Pekkarine estate in 1974, valuable artifacts were donated to the Telluride Historical Museum.

4 | Roma Bar Building The Roma Building was home to one of the town’s oldest and most raucous bars. The downstairs still contains the original 1860 Brunswich-Balke-Collender Company bar, which is carved from walnut with 12-foot French mirrors. The building was most recently renovated in 2016.

80

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

8 | Telluride Historical Museum Built in 1896 and named Hall’s Hospital after its first doctor, the building served as the community hospital treating miners and townspeople until it closed in 1964 due to a decline in the population. It reopened in 1966 as the Telluride Historical Museum and was renovated in 2002. Ten rooms and outdoor exhibitions showcase Telluride’s unique and vibrant history with a vast collection of photographs, artefacts and exhibitions

9 | North Oak House Built in 1900, this house was a survivor of the 1914 flood that careened down Cornet Creek, sweeping through town and depositing mud and debris from the Liberty Bell Mine down to Colorado Avenue. One woman was killed and the Sheridan Bar was filled with mud halfway to the ceiling. This house has been completely restored to its original condition and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Homes.

10 | Davis House Entrepreneur E.L. Davis who built this stately brick house in 1894, held an early interest in the Bullion Lode, as well as numerous mining claims in the area. He owned all the land where the former Rio Grande Southern Train Depot now stands, as well as one-third interest in West Telluride. After Davis’s death, the house was sold to Dr. Oshner, who used it as a hospital, particularly during the 1918 flu epidemic.


HISTORIC WALKING TOUR TOMBO

Y RD.

8

GREGORY

N

9

The cemetery is located on the east end of town on Colorado Avenue and offers a glimpse into Telluride’s history and the perils of its residents during the mining-boom era when avalanches, murders, flu epidemics, mining accidents and labor strikes took many lives.

B

11

7

10

D

A

COLUMBIA

Lone Tree Cemetery

C COLORADO AVE.

1

2

4

E

I

Start Here Historical Plaque

3

Historical Plaque

B | Telluride Elementary School

C | Galloping Goose This curious hybrid of auto and train rode Otto Mears’ famous railroad line in the declining years of the Rio Grande Southern. On rails, the Galloping Goose made its last run in 1953. It is now the moniker of Telluride’s public buses.

D | Miner’s Union Built by the Western Federation of Miners in 1901 as a result of a period of labor strikes and protests when unionized miners were denied health care at the local hospital.

E | Butch Cassidy Robbery Site By most accounts, Butch Cassidy was a minor player in his first bank robbery of San Miguel Valley Bank in 1889. The old bank burned and was replaced by the Mahr Building in 1892.

F | Pick & Gad Located in what was once Telluride’s red-light district, patrons were treated to music, food, wine and ladies in this brick “parlor house” if they wore a coat and tie.

12

H

D GON

OLA

Historical Plaque

PINE

FIR

OAK

13 PACIFIC

ASPEN

14 TOWNSEND

At the time of its construction in 1895, the building was considered to be the most modern of educational facilities. It was completely renovated in 1986, and an addition was built in 2000.

ALDER

5 6

GALENA

SPRUCE

A | Lone Tree Cemetery

WILLOW

More Historic Sites & Buildings

G

F

SAN JUAN

11 | L.L. Nunn House On the corner of Aspen and West Columbia, this white Victorian was bought by L.L. Nunn who financed the world’s first commercial A/C power plant, the Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant. Nunn purchased the home for his Telluride Institute, where “pinheads” from Cornell University came to expand their knowledge of the production of power. Today, Cornell University has a “Telluride House” funded by Nunn’s estate. Next door, on the corner of Aspen Street and West Columbia, is the house in which Nunn lived.

12 | Rio Grande Southern Railway Depot Prior to the arrival of the railroad in 1891, oxen and mule trains, as well as horses, carried all supplies and ore into and out of the area. The introduction of the railroad created a bustling, noisy area surrounded by boardinghouses and warehouses. Ore was hauled out of the surrounding mines and became a major revenue generator for the Rio Grande Southern Railroad.

G | Old Town Jail

13 | Finn Town

This stone jail is thought to have been built in 1885 and is now occupied by the Telluride Marshal’s Department. The town’s first calaboose, a wooden structure, was built in 1878 and is now located in Telluride Town Park’s campgrounds.

This area was the center of social life for Scandinavian immigrants. On the south side of Pacific Street, Finn Town Flats (originally a boardinghouse), Finn Hall and the smaller Swede-Finn Hall (pictured, and now the Elks Lodge on the corner of Pacific and Townsend) hosted many social gatherings. Continuing east, detour briefly up South Oak Street to the Dahl House, a miner’s rooming house built in the 1890s.

H | Penn Tram Towers At the turn of the century, the east end of the canyon was laced with the cables of aerial trams that lowered ore from the mines to mills in the valley below. These towers were part of the Penn Tram which conveyed ore from mines high above Telluride to the mills beyond Pandora.

I | Idarado Legacy Trail

81

Plaques along this interpretive walk recount the mining legacy of Telluride’s east end. The trail ends at the Pandora Mill site with a stunning view oftelluride.com Bridal Veil Falls.| 855.421.4360

14 | Popcorn Alley The Senate, Silver Bell, Cribs and madam’s stone residences make up the restored buildings of Pacific Street’s “sporting district.” The Senate was one of the many places bustling with business between the 1880s and 1930s. The Silver Bell, built in 1890, suffered a disastrous fire in 1923. It operated as one of Telluride’s many “soda parlors” during Prohibition, and its numerous entrances hint at the other services offered there. The three small Victorian houses standing in a row on Pacific Street, known as the Cribs, are all that remain of the “female boarding houses” that lined both sides of West Pacific Street.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

81


TRANSPORTATION TOWN OF TELLURIDE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE DAKOTA

GREG

ORY

CURTIS DR

COLU E

Visitors Center

O

NE

W

A

MBIN

LAU REL

PINON

ail y Tr

Leg

AVE

il

Tra iver

R

SAN JUAN

ONE WAY

Gondola Station Telluride

In historic downtown Telluride, solar-powered parking meters are Free oGondola mid-block n main and side streets. $1/hrFree – max 3 hours. Meters accept cards or coins. Parking • Meters are enforced 8am to 6pm Monday to Saturday (yellow) Bus Stop • Parking is free on Sundays and holidays Free Bus Route • Select side streets allow free 2-hour parking (green)

Free Bus Route

• Bus will drop off/pick up from any corner on the route. • D etailed schedules posted at bus stops telluride-co.gov/255/Bus-Schedule

D > Free 30-minute; no time limit after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am. E > Free 1-hour parking; no parking 2-6:30 am. > Free daytime parking 6:30am– F 2am ; $25 overnight 2–6:30am, valid for 24 hours G > $2 per hour; $35 max for each 24-hour period eadows Parking , end of Adams M Ranch Road; Free daytime parking 8am–8pm; No overnight parking without a permit; no RV's, commercial vehicles or trailers

MTN. VILLAGE BUS LOOP Free service daily, for more info townofmountainvillage.com/bus

DIAL-A-RIDE

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Bus Stop

No Parking or Permit Only

• Designated stops every few blocks

A > $2 per hour; free after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am.

All meters are payable by Parkmobile app, debit /credit card only; no cash.

Free Parking

Free Daytime Parking

• Loop runs every 15 minutes, 7am to 10pm

PARKING

Market Plaza Station

Free Gondola

2-hour Free Parking or Permit Parking

GALLOPING GOOSE BUS LOOP

Mtn. Village Center Station

Mountain Village Station

Paid Metered Parking

Bear Creek Trail

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE

82

K

River Trail

E

No Parking or Permit Only

HEMLOC

MBIN

2-hour Free Parking or Permit Parking

Trail

Free 4-hour Parking

PARKING Visitors Center

Paid Metered Parking

acy

Leg

River Trail

Paid Day Parking

PARKI NG ZONES DEPOT

ee our ng

PARKI NG ZONES

SHADOW LN

E. COLORADO AVE.

E

S

PACIFIC

Free Day Parking

River Trail

W

N

Y

ac

VE.

MAPLE

ALDER

ONE WAY

COLU

S. TOMBOY

LAU REL

K

PINON

HEMLOC

ONE WAY

Free Daytime Parking

WILLOW

Main Street

W. COLORADO AVENUE

NDORA

BLACK BEAR RD

SPRU CE

ath

ER

SHADOW LN

PINE

GL

FIR

eP

CT

DAVIS ST

R Y D

UG

OAK

ONE

SM

PANDORA

COLUMBIA

Bik

PE

ASPEN

TOWNSEND

DAVIS

MAH

OS

CORNET

PR

GALENA

Free taxi for homeowners 970.728.8888

FREE GONDOLA Telluride & Mountain Village are linked by a spectacular 13-minute ride. The Gondola is ADA, ski, snowboard, bicycle, stroller and pet accessible. • November 19, 2021 - April 3, 2021 • Hours are 6:30 am to midnight* The Gondola has four stations: • TELLURIDE STATION Oak Street in the town of Telluride • SAN SOPHIA STATION Mid-mountain stop providing access to the resort’s trails and Allred’s • MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center • MARKET PLAZA STATION Gondola Parking Garage For more Gondola info, see page 19. *Schedule is subject to change. For the most current information see > townofmountainvillage.com/gondola


TRANSPORTATION WINTER 2021-22 FLIGHT MAP

REGIONAL MAP

LOCAL / REGIONAL AIRPORTS Telluride TEX 970. 728. 8600 Montrose Regional MTJ 970. 249. 3203 Cortez Municipal CEZ 970. 565. 7458 Durango/La Plata Cnty DRO 970. 382. 6050 Grand Junction GJT 970. 244. 9100 PRIVATE FLIGHTS Helitrax Mountain Aviation Telluride Air Taxi Telluride Flights NetJets

Miles from Telluride Miles from Telluride

970. 728. 8377 970. 728. 4700 970. 343. 4SKY 970. 728. 1011 877. 356. 5823

Moab......................... 132 Salt Lake City.......... 366

Cortez..........................75 Denver...................... 330 Durango.................... 125 Grand Junction....... 127 Montrose.....................67

AIRPORT SHUTTLES & TAXIS Telluride Express 888. 212. 8294 Alpine Luxury Limo 970. 728. 8750 Mountain Limo 888. 546. 6894 RENTAL CARS Telluride Regional Airport: Hertz Montrose Regional Airport: Avis Budget Hertz National

Miles from Telluride

970. 369. 4995 800. 331. 1212 800. 527. 0700 800. 654. 3131 800. 227. 7368

Miles from Telluride Flagstaff.................... 341 Scottsdale................ 492 Phoenix..................... 475

Albuquerque............ 320 Farmington............... 144 Santa Fe................... 280

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

83


Expanding Horizons

Denver Air now flying Phoenix and Denver to Telluride (TEX)

Phoenix – Telluride flights are back, and for the first time on a jet! Denver Air also offers daily, year-round service from Denver to Telluride. Enjoy ski country’s easiest air when you fly from PHX and DEN to TEX, just 10 minutes away from Telluride, Mountain Village and the slopes National travelers can connect with United’s global network and fly straight into TEX by booking at www.United.com. For local flights from DEN and PHX to TEX, book at www.DenverAirConnection.com.


ACTIVITIES ADVENTURE GUIDES

ADVENTURE GUIDES

CHILD CARE

EVENT PLANNERS

Adventure Tour Productions Tandem paragliding, photo/video tours 970.729.0078 Bootdoctors Winter — fat tire biking, fly fishing, Nordic ski clinics Summer — fly fishing, hiking, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 800.592.6883 Circle K Ranch Horseback Riding 970.562.3826 Dave’s Mountain Tours summer only Historic off-road 4x4 adventures 970.728.9749 Four Corners Whitewater Kayaking, paddleboarding, river rafting 888.723.8925 High Camp Hut Overnight adventure hut for hiking, nordic skiing, snowshoeing 970.728.8050 Mountain Trip Adventure guides for climbing 14’ers, rock climbing, backcountry skiing, ice climbing 970.369.1153 Opus Hut Backcountry hut 970.708.0092 Reset Telluride Ultra-luxury wellness and trekking retreat 970.239.6090 RIGS, Adventure Co. Flyfishing, water sports 970.708.0092 Roudy’s Horseback Adventures Horseback riding, winter sleigh rides 970.728.9611 San Juan Balloon Adventures Ultralight flights/paragliding 970.626.5495 San Juan Huts Backcountry hut system 970.626.3033 San Juan Outdoor Adventures/ Telluride Adventures Winter — Backcountry skiing, hut trips, ice climbing, snowshoeing Summer — hiking, hut trips, rock climbing, Via Ferrata 970.728.4101 Telluride Academy summer only Summer camps for youth ages 5-18 970.728.5311 Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Winter and summer activities for all ages and disabilities 970.728.5010 Telluride Adventure Center Winter — fat tire biking, flyfishing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling Summer — 4x4 tours, flyfishing, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 970.728.7433 Telluride Avalanche School Avalanche education 970.728.4101

Telluride Guided Mountain Biking 970.708.7848 Telluride Helitrax Helicopter skiing 877.500.8377 or 970.728.8377 Telluride Moto Adventure motorcycle tours and school 230 Front Street, Placerville 970.797.3385 Telluride Mountain Guides Winter — backcountry skiing, ice climbing Summer — climbing 14ers, hiking 970.728.6481 Telluride Nordic Center Nordic skiing - classic and skate 970-728-1144 Telluride Offroad Adventures summer only Off-road / 4x4 adventures 970.708.5190 Telluride Outfitters Winter — snowmobiling Summer — ATV tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, RZR tours, rafting Town Hall Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.4475 Telluride Outside/Telluride Angler Winter — fly fishing, photography tours, snowmobile tours Summer — 4-wheel drive tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, photography tours, rafting 800.831.6230 Telluride Paragliding Tandem paragliding flights 970.708.4247 Telluride Snowkite Snowkite instruction 541.490.4401 Telluride Sports Various summer and winter activities 970.728.4477 ext 211 Telluride Wranglers Horseback Riding 970.759.3183 Wild Hare Snowshoe Tours Backcountry snowshoe tours 970.708.1374

Annie’s Nannies of Telluride 970.728.2991 Telluride Sitters, LLC PO Box 2647, Telluride 970.708.0170 Traveling Lite, LLC 970.318.6543

By Sutton 970.209.3593 Polished Fun 970.596.1974 Realize Colorado 970.471.7529 Simplify 970.708.7429 Soirée Telluride 970.708.0297 Telluride Presents 970.708.0870 Telluride UnVeiled 914.830.3238

CLASSSES & WORKSHOPS

FITNESS

Ah Haa School for the Arts Creative classes, camps and workshops 970.728.3886 Pinhead Institute Science-based educational experiences 300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.708.7441 Telluride Rock and Roll Academy Lawson Hill, Telluride 970.728.1186 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519

Fuel Station 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Kaiut Yoga International 238 E. Colorado, 2nd Floor, Telluride 970.729.2354 Madeline Studio Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village 855.266.9408 Mangala Yoga 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6200 Pedal Den 307 East Colorado #100, Telluride 970.729.0810 Pilates Balance 300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.729.0678 Practice Telluride 317 East Colorado, Telluride 970.316.3097 Sequence Pilates and Core Align 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5003 Studio Telluride Authentic Pilates 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.728.1747 Telluride Crossfit 137 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4622 Telluride Yoga Center 201 West Colorado, Suite 200, Telluride 970.729.1673 The Peaks Resort & Spa 136 Country Club Drive, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

CHURCHES Alpine Chapel 122 South Aspen Street Telluride 970.728.3504 Christ Presbyterian Church 434 West Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4536 St. Michael’s Episcopal Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.325.4655 St. Patrick’s Catholic Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.728.3387 Telluride Christian Fellowship 100 East Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4864

COMMUNITY Telluride Historical Museum 201 West Gregory, Telluride 970.728.3344 Telluride Town Park & Recreation 970.728.2173 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519

ENTERTAINMENT Club Red / Conference Center 580 Mtn Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.369.5120 Michael D. Palm Theatre 721 West Colorado, Telluride 970.369.5669 New Sheridan Bar 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 Nugget Theatre 207 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3030 O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at Fly Me to the Moon Saloon 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6139 Sheridan Opera House 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363 The Liberty 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942 The Phoenix Bean 221 West Colorado, Telluride

TOURS Historical Tours of Telluride 970.728.6639 Telluride Green Tours Cannabis dispensary tours 970.708.3739 Telluride Sleighs and Wagons Wagon rides, stories and dinner 970.260.2524

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

85


Set apart ACC. from the rest…

AD SPACE

TELLURIDE’S PREMIER FULL SERVICE CONDO PROPERTY

RUSTIC ELEGANCE WESTERN CHARM D E L U X E A C C O M M O D AT I O N S L U X U RY L O G C A B I N S C O M F O R TA B L E R E T R E AT

View our Webcam at

MountainLodgeTelluride.com

H E AT E D P O O L & H O T T U B S • C O M P L I M E N TARY S H U T T L E • C O N C I E R G E S E RV I C E S • P E T F R I E N D LY • F R E E W I- F I F I T N E S S C E N T E R & S T E AM R O O M • FAM I LY F R I E N D LY • M E E T I N G & E V E N T FA C I L I T I E S • T H E V I E W R E S TA U R AN T S K I-I N S K I- O U T • O N- S I T E S K I R E N TAL S H O P

86

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

457 Mountain Village Boulevard • Telluride, Colorado • (866) 846-8021


ACCOMMODATIONS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Accommodations in Telluride

866.754.8772

Alpine Lodging Telluride / Sea to Ski

970.728.3388 or 877.376.9769

Exceptional Stays by Telluride Rentals

800.970.7541

Invited Home

970.728.8160 or 855.978.7627

Property Management of Telluride

970.369.1275 or 877.332.1275

Silver Star Luxury Properties

970.728.3001 or 800.537.4781

Lodging in Telluride

888.998.6471 or 970.729.2202

Telluride Luxury Rentals

970.728.0461

Welcome to Telluride

970.728.7049

Vacasa / Latitude 38 Vacation Rentals

970.728-8838 or 877.450.8838

$$$$

■ ■

$ - $$$$

■ ■

$$$ - $$$$

RATES

ADA FACILITIES

PETS

LAUNDRY

KITCHEN

▲ ■

BREAKFAST INCLUDED

FIREPLACE

● all units

▲ on premises ■ some units

SWIMMING POOL

NUMBER OF UNITS

HOTELS AND CONDOS

HOT TUB / SAUNA / STEAM

Vivid Vacation Rentals 970-708-0930

Auberge Residences at Element 52 Telluride 970.728.0701

20

Bear Creek Lodge Mountain Village

970.369.4900 or 888.729.0398

31

Camel’s Garden Hotel & Penthouse Condos Telluride

888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

36 ▲ ■

Dunton Townhouse Telluride

877.288.9922

5

Fall Line Condos Telluride

970.728.4274 or 866.728.4274

9 ▲ ● ●

$-$$

Fairmont Heritage Place, Franz Klammer Mountain Village

888.728.3318

63 yes ▲

● ●

$$$ - $$$$

Hotel Columbia Telluride

970.728.0660 or 800.201.9505

21 ■

■ `■ cont ▲

■ $$$$

Hotel Telluride Telluride

970.369.1188 or 866.468.3501

59 ▲

■ $$$

Ice House Condos & Suites Telluride

970.728.6300 or 800.544.3436

17

$$ - $$$

Inn at Lost Creek Mountain Village

970.728.5678 or 888.601.5678

32 ▲

● cont ●

$$ - $$$$

Lumiére with Inspirato Mountain Village

970.369.0400 or 866.530.9466

29 yes ▲ ■

■ ■

$$$ - $$$$

Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village

970.369.0880 or 866.475.4403

110 yes ▲

■ ■

$$ - $$$$

Manitou Lodge Telluride

970.728.3388 or 888.728.1950

11

Mountain Lodge at Telluride Mountain Village

866.368.6867 or 970.369.5000

130 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

Mountainside Inn Telluride

970.728.1950 or 877.376.9769

84 ▲

■ ■ ▲

■ $

New Sheridan Hotel Telluride

800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

26 ■ $$

Peaks Resort & Spa Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

164 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

$$ - $$$

River Club Telluride

888.601.4160 or 970.728.3986

24 ▲

● ●

$$ - $$$$

See Forever Village at The Peaks Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

29

● ● ■

$$$ - $$$$

The Bivvi Placerville

970.797.3404

14

$

Victorian Inn Telluride

970.728.6601 or 800.611.9893

33 ▲

■ cont ▲ ■ $

yes

yes

yes

cont

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

$$$$

$$ $$ - $$$

87


ACCOMMODATIONS

88

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


ACCOMMODATIONS

Authenic Mountain Chic

NEWSHERIDAN.COM

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1895. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service.

The Beauty of Telluride, Outside Your Door Where Rocky Mountain Chic meets an European alpine ski lodge. Anticipating every need, we offer a downtown boutique lodging experience with clean & safe standards. Discover your outdoor adventure while enjoying Telluride’s premiere, full-service, award winning hotel.

Reserve Your Authentic Telluride Getaway Today!

TheHotelTelluride.com • 970.369.1188

The New Sheridan Hotel has served as Telluride’s social center since 1895. Located just two blocks from the gondola, the hotel’s location in the heart of downtown Telluride provides an ideal base for visitors. During an expansive renovation completed recently, the hotel’s 26 guest rooms received a luxurious transformation under the guidance of internationally renowned designer Nina Campbell. Each individually designed room captures the historic charm of Telluride in an atmosphere of warmth and comfort. On-site dining options include the renowned Chop House Restaurant & Wine Bar, The Rooftop Bar, The Parlor and the historic New Sheridan Bar, which was ranked among the world’s top 10 après ski bars by Forbes Traveler. The New Sheridan Hotel was also recognized by the readers of Condé Nast Traveler as one of the Top 5 “Best Places to Ski & Stay in North America” and was awarded the “2022 AAA Four Diamond Hotel” rating. The New Sheridan is proud to be on the Register of National Historic Places.

ADDRESS TELEPHONE WEB

231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 newsheridan.com

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

89


ACCOMMODATIONS

Telluride’s Most Luxurious Boutique Residences W I T H F I V E - S TA R H OT E L A M E N I T I E S

Rugged natural beauty meets luxury accommodations at the award-winning Lumière with Inspirato, a boutique hotel nestled at the base of Lift 4 in Mountain Village. Enjoy custom on-site Black Tie ski services, including ski valet, personalized fittings, and on-site equipment rentals as well as ski-in, ski-out access before unwinding in our cozy lounge at the end of the day. Our 18 recently remodeled hotel residences make the perfect home base, with ample space, high-end chef’s kitchens and dramatic mountain views.

Conde Nast readers choice awards: “ T O P 1 0 C O L O R A D O S K I H O T E L” US Today: “ T O P 6 S K I H O T E L S I N T H E U S A ” Tripadvisor: “A W A R D O F E X C E L L E N C E 7 Y E A R S R U N N I N G ”

LU M I E R E W I T H I N S P I R ATO. C O M

90

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

|

970.369.0400


ACCOMMODATIONS

AT YOUR PEAK

THE PEAKS RESORT & SPA invites you to join us this season for unmatched hospitality, relaxation and an enviable ski-in/ski-out experience. The Spa at The Peaks philosophy is guided by complete wellness designed just for you, with your transformative journey nurtured by the beauty of the San Juan Mountains. Altezza at The Peaks offers casual mountain dining with regionally-sourced ingredients and panoramic sunset views of the Mt. Wilson Range.

Visit ThePeaksResort.com or call 888.696.6734 to make your reservation.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

91


DINING & SPIRITS

SAVOR THE

UNPARALLELED CUISINE

WHATEVER YOUR PALATE MAY BE, our tailored menus will serve you. Select from one of our fine establishments and delight in some of the best cuisine in the West. Dine in style at our signature restaurant, the Chop House – world renowned for its dry aged USDA Black Angus. We create our delicious fare using only organic free range fowl, non-threatened fish species and local ingredients. Pair a red or white from Telluride’s only nitrogen wine bar with a scrumptious meal for an unforgettable experience. FAVORITES FROM BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER CLASSIC EGGS BENEDICT / 17 Canadian Bacon, Poached Eggs, Hollandaise Sauce, Roasted New Potatoes

MAC & CHEESE / 16 Three Cheeses, Bacon Lardons

PRIME NEW YORK STRIP / 69 15oz

TURKEY CLUB / 16 Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato, Onion, Rémonlade

DRY AGED BONE-IN BISON RIBEYE / 72 16oz

FRENCH ONION SOUP / 16 Carmelized Onions, Gruyére Cheese

CHOP HOUSE WAGYU BURGER / 25 Cheddar, Gruyère or Blue Cheese

CAESAR SALAD / 16 Parmigiano Reggiano, White Anchovies, Orange Zest & Crostini

STEAMED PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND MUSSELS / 26 Shallots, Saffron, Garlic, Fennel, Classic White Wine Sauce

ELK SHORTLOIN / 64 Apple Celery Root Pureé, Baby Carrots, Crispy Brussels Sprouts Leaves, Molasses Glaze

FRENCH TOAST / 16 Fresh Berries, Maple Syrup

ROCKY MOUNTAIN TROUT SALAD / 19 Spinach, Warm Bacon, Sherry & Mustard Vinaigrette, Crostini & Poached Egg

JUMBO GULF SHRIMP / MP Peeled, Cocktail Sauce, 1/2 Pound

DRY AGED BERKSHIRE PORK CHOP / 59 Fingerling Potatoes, Crispy Fried Onions, 12oz CRISPY TOFU / 29 Peppers, Carrots, Onion, Broccoli, Snap Peas, Bok Choy, Jasmine Rice, Sesame, Chili Sauce Seasonal menu. Items and pricing subject to change.

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1891. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service. ADDRESS: 231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride, Colorado 81435 TELEPHONE 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 • NEW SHERIDAN.COM

92

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


DINING & SPIRITS MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

MELISSA PLANTZ

CATERING

221 South Oak Catering 970.708.1437 Aemono Fine Foods & Catering catering@aemonofinefoods.com

LOCAL SPIRITS

Backcountry Catering 609.760.5678

Buckel Family Wine Tasting Room 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.729.2869

Bertrand’s Catering 970.708.2661 Bon Appétit Catering 970.209.5217

Altezza Locally Sourced Indo-European Cuisine Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.2525

Siam’s Talay Grille Contemporary Asian Tapas and Seafood Sunset Plaza, Inn at Lost Creek 970.728.6293 Starbucks Coffee, Tea, Pastries, Paninis Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.0880

Bean Café at the Peaks Coffee, Smoothies, Pastries, Sandwiches Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

Telluride Coffee Company Coffee, Breakfast, Lunch, Pastries Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4400

Black Iron Kitchen & Bar Modern Mountain Cuisine Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8949

The Brew Pub Telluride Brewing Beer, Tasty Good Tacos Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.1120

Crazy Elk Pizza Handmade Pizza, Salads, Sandwiches Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7499

The Great Room American Bistro, Cocktails Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

El Rhino Taco & Coffee Bar Coffee, Smoothies, Ice Cream, Snacks 456 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village

The Pick Gourmet Burritos and Bowls Reflection Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.2633

La Piazza del Villaggio Authentic Italian Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8283 La Pizzeria Casual Italian, Wood-Fired Pizza Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0737 Poachers Pub American Pub Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.9647 Shake ‘n Dog Hot Dogs, Salads, Shakes Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1565

Last Dollar Saloon 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4800

Counter Culture 970.239.6211 Mountaintop Catering 970.708.8656

New Sheridan Bar Cocktails, Pool Hall 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351

Pescado Catering 970.708.0640 Telluride Private Catering 970.729.3620

O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at the Moon Live Music, Cocktails 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6139

The Amend Collective 214.641.9409 Zest Catering 970.708.3663

Show Bar at the Sheridan Opera House Cocktails, Private Events 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363

FOOD CARTS

Tellurado Studio Wine Tasting Events 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6440

MELISSA PLANTZ

Allred’s Contemporary American Cuisine Gondola Station St. Sophia 970.728.7474

Telluride Brewing Company 156 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.5094 Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.1120 Telluride Distilling Company Signature Cocktails Franz Klammer Breezeway, M. Village 970.728.2910

The View Bar & Grill Locally Sourced Comfort Food Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5000

Gondola Plaza, S. Oak Street. Telluride Telluride Twisted Treats

The Village Table Mediterranean, Spanish Tapas, Catering Centrum Building, Mountain Village 970.728.1117

Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village Place de Crepes Grilled Cheese a la Cart Latin Creations

Tomboy Tavern Colorado Comfort Food Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7467

Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village Finnegan’s Z’s Street Eats

Timber Room Cocktails, Small Bites Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8943

Conference Center Plaza, Mountain Village Porky Romanos Gyro Cart

Wolf Pig Mobile Bar for Hire 970.596.3364

Tracks Café & Bar Casual American, Cocktails Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0677

The Liberty Cocktails, Live Music, DJ 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

93


DINING & SPIRITS

Delicious SURROUNDINGS Soak in the dramatic views of Palmyra Peak while enjoying a French country menu paired with world-class French wines for an unforgettable on-mountain experience.

Indulge in a unique European-inspired dining experience that rises above any other.

94

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

At nearly 12,000 feet, enjoy the quaint hütte ambience and take in breathtaking views of the Wilson Range on the deck of North America’s highest elevation fine-dining restaurant. In evening, make a reservation for a private snowcat ride to enjoy an intimate five-course Italian alpine gourmet dinner and world class wine list.


DINING & SPIRITS 221 South Oak Modern Bistro 221 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.9507

La Cocina de Luz Fresh Mexican 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9355

Baked in Telluride Pizza, Pasta, Bakery 127 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.4775

La Marmotte Contemporary French 150 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.6232

Brown Dog Pizza Pizza, Pasta, Subs, Sports Bar 110 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8046

Littlehouse European-style Organic Dine-in and Take-out 219 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.7020

Caravan Middle Eastern Fare, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5611

Lunch Money Salads, Grain Bowls, Wraps 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6383

Clark’s Market Made-to-Order Food, Full Deli 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124

Mountain Gate Teahouse & Gallery 101 West Colorado Unit B, Telluride 303.842.4660

Coffee Cowboy Coffee, Baked Goods, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0294

New Sheridan Chop House & Wine Bar Upscale American, Steaks, Seafood 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100

Cornerhouse Grille American Grill, Sports Bar 131 North Fir, Telluride 970.728.6207

New Sheridan Parlor Café, Wine Bar, Cocktails 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100

Cosmopolitan Contemporary Seasonal Cuisine 301 Gus’s Way, Telluride 970.728.1292

Oak, The New Fat Alley BBQ, Casual American Oak Street, Gondola Plaza, Telluride 970.728.3985

Esperanza’s Casual Mexican 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8399

Over the Moon Gourmet Cheese & Food 223 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.2079

Floradora Saloon Burgers, Salads, Sandwiches, Steaks 103 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8884

Pescado Sushi, Japanese, Latin-Infused Dishes 115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6025

High Alpine Coffee Bar Coffee, Baked Goods 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504

Rustico Ristorante Traditional Italian 114 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4046

High Pie Pizzeria & Tap Room Pizza, Salads, Calzones 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2978

Siam Thai, Thai Fusion 200 South Davis, Telluride 970.728.6886 Sidework Contemporary Comfort Food 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5618 Smugglers Casual American, Brewpub 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5620

MELISSA PLANTZ

TOWN OF TELLURIDE

Steamies Burger Bar A Modern Burger Joint 300 West Colorado, Telluride 844.the.buns

The West End Bistro at Hotel Telluride Casual American, Cocktails Hotel Telluride, Telluride 970.369.1188

Stronghouse Brewery Alpine Comfort Food, Brewpub 283 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2890

There... Signature Cocktails, Appetizers 627 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1213

Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate Chocolate, Ice Cream, Pastries 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.9565

Wok of Joy Authentic Thai Cuisine 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0149

The Alpinist & the Goat Fondue, Dessert, Cocktails 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5028

Wood Ear Texas Whiskey Bar with Japanese Fusion 135 East Colorado, Telluride 970.852.0469

The Butcher & The Baker Café Fresh Gourmet Deli, Bakery, Take-Out 201 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2899 The National Modern New American 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1063 The Phoenix Bean Espresso, Sandwiches, Small Plates, Wine 221 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 The Tunnel Fine Dining by Reservation 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.3663 The Village Market Full Service Grocery Store 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.633.4700

REGIONAL Cindybread Artisan Bakery Sandwiches, Bakery 168 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.369.1116 Counter Culture Sandwiches, Burgers, Fries 156 Society Drive, Unit A, Lawson Hill 970.239.6211 Telluride Coffee Roasters 164 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.369.0060 Telluride Sleighs and Wagons Colorado and Basque Influenced Menu Aldasoro Family Ranch 970.260.2524

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

95


DINING & SPIRITS

The Village Market is a full-service grocery store offering fresh produce, quality fresh-made deli, in store seating area with fabulous views, full-service butcher and seafood counter, complete grocery selection including natural and organics, health and beauty/vitamins/supplements, and fresh floral dept.

We also offer a large selection of beer, wine and spirits at Spirits at Mountain Village, located adjacent to the Village Market. (970) 633-4700 • Open 365 Days-A-Year 455 Mountain Village Blvd • Mountain Village, Colorado

Go to thevillagemarkets.com for online ordering options. Putting good food on your table since 1967.

96

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


DINING & SPIRITS

DELICIOUS FOOD. IMPECCABLE SERVICE. Dine In. Take Out.

cosmotelluride.com, 970.728.1292

cosmo official visitors guide 2022.indd 1

9/16/21 2:45 PM

Located at the Mountain Lodge Telluride, The View Restaurant offers unique cuisine in a relaxed rustic setting with stunning views of the San Sophia Mountains.

ELEVATED ALL-AMERICAN CUISINE SLOPESIDE ACCESS SUNDAY BRUNCH WITH A VIEW UNPARALLELED EVENT VENUE

970.369.6021 457 MOUNTAIN VILLAGE BOULEVARD TELLURIDE

mountainlodgetelluride.com

h c n u l y h t l a e h easy L U N C H M O N E Y TAKEAWAY 126 West Colorado | LunchMoneyTelluride.com

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

97


DINING & SPIRITS

Chef Johnny Gerona is a 35 + year Telluride local. His creative and healthy menu emphasizes Mediterranean and Spanish cuisine. OFFERING 3 COURSE MENU OR A LA CARTE. Indoor and limited outdoor seating. Here is a sampling of 2021/22 winter menu. COVID SAFE RESTAURANT

Tapas House Marinated Olives Spanish Marcona Almonds Patatas Bravas Boquerones – White Anchovies Grilled Artichoke Hearts Salt Cod Croquetas Smokey Paprika Chorizo Albondigas Meatballs Sliced Jamon Serrano, Spanish Ham Spanish Potato and Egg “Tortilla” Pan Roasted Garlic Shrimp BBQ Baby Back Ribs Hummus Dip With Pita Triangles Spanish Cheese Plate

Soups and Salads SOUP OF THE DAY CAESAR romaine lettuce, anchovies, Parmigiano Reggiano, croutons, Caesar dressing WARM GOAT CHEESE organic mixed greens, breaded rosemary goat cheese croquettes, tomatoes, pickled red onions, dried figs, peperoncini, balsamic vinaigrette BELGIAN ENDIVE Belgian endive, organic mixed greens, apples, walnuts, valdeon blue cheese, tomatoes, radishes, sherry vinaigrette Dressing Choices: Caesar, ranch, blue cheese, balsamic, sherry vinaigrette, Russian, oil and vinegar

Entrées

Drinks

Full bar cocktails, wines by the glass, 120 bottle wine list N.Y. STRIP STEAK FRITES Grilled SnakeBlending River Farmsthe N.Y. strip steak, ingredients with Asian freshest shallot confit, maitre d butter, house cut fries haricot verts Homemade Desserts spices and herbs, Siam’s dishes awaken Spanishwill chocolate mousse, BRAISED LAMB SHANK cous cous, Moroccan spice, pomegranate syrup. your taste buds with theBerry exotic flavors apple cobbler of a la mode GRILLED SALMON cucumber coriander mint salad, cous cous Strawberry enhanced Shortcake, coffee, Thai cuisine. A culinary experience RED TROUT polenta, haricot verts, brown butter caper sauce Cordials andaliqueurs by striking mountain sunsets and DUCK RIGATONI PASTA duck sausage, wild mushrooms, truffle oil, cocktail menu unlike any other in Telluride. sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, shallots, fresh herbs, light cream sauce The Village Table To Go ROASTED CHICKEN breast or leg + thigh, herbs de Montrose, MOST OF OUR MENU IS olive tapenade, oven roasted tomato, basil oil AVAILABLE TO GO. WILD SHRIMP PAELLA saffron bomba rice, wild head on white To Go a la carte menu available online. shrimp, peas, vegetable sofrito, lobster OPEN fumet stock Bottles of7:30–11AM, wine available To Go! DAILY FOR BREAKFAST, Gift cards available. MALLORCAN TUMBET RATATOUILLE potatoes, zucchini, bell DINNER, 5–9PM. AND peppers, eggplant, onions, tomatoes, onion, arbequina olive GLUTEN FREE AND/OR VEGAN MENU oil, couscous, balsamic drizzle, Marrakesh spice LOCATED IN THE INN AT LOST CREEK OPTIONS AVAILABLE. VALET PARKING • 970.728.6293

Open Tues-Sun @ 4:30 • Closed on Monday • 970.728.1117 • Reservations recommended • thevillagetablerestaurant.com • opentable.com • 618 Mountain Village Blvd

CRAFT BEERS

BARREL-AGED COCKTAILS

OPEN 11AM KITCHEN CLOSES AT 9PM DRINKS UNTIL 10PM LOCATED IN THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE CORE

970.728.7467 98

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


AUDIO/VISUAL

SPECIAL NOTES

96

outdoor/indoor rooftop space

50

30

next to gondola

Historic Swede-Finn Hall

1,700

250

200

stage & outdoor deck

Ethos 970.728.0954

Event & Gallery Space on Main Street

1,000

60

40

open event or gallery space

Ice House Lodge 800.544.3436 or 970.728.6300

Conference Room

360

25

20

next to gondola

Il Salona 970.728.4046

Event Space

-

150

80

adjoins Rustico Ristorante

Michael D. Palm Theatre 970.369.5669

Performing Arts Center

30,000

680

680

alcohol with special permit

New Sheridan American Room 800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

Victorian-style Room

500

45

Nugget Theatre 970.728.3030

Theatre

1,674

-

Sheridan Opera House 970.728.6363

Historic Theatre / Reception Space

1,400

265

Sidework 970.728.5618

Reception Room

900

100

Ah Haa School for the Arts 970.728.3886

Event, Gallery & Wedding Space

Camel’s Garden 888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

Meeting Area

Elks Lodge 970.728.6362

Telluride Town Park Core & Warming Hut 970.728.2173

Outdoors, Canopy, Picnic Tables

Town Park Pavilion 970.728.2173

Spacious Covered Pavilion

Wilkinson Public Library 970.728.4519, ext. 20

Program Room (small rooms also available)

35

BAR

120

525

SETTING

IN-HOUSE CATERING

STANDING CAPACITY

762+

TOWN OF TELLURIDE

SEATED CAPACITY

SQUARE FOOTAGE

VENUES

downtown Telluride

186

quaint, intimate

230

intimate setting for gatherings

liquor license, projector

50

-

-

-

public can’t be excluded

26,000

300

-

available for private events

959

124

72

downtown Telluride

2,000

200

150

wedding packages avail.

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Bear Creek Lodge 970.369.4900

Great Room

Gorrono Ranch 970.728.7446

Mountain Ranch

6,000

-

200

no private vehicles

Madeline Hotel & Residences 866.475.4403 or 970.369.0880

Idarado Ballroom

3,315

270

210

Mountain Village core

Jasper Room

676

45

35

Mountain Village core

Reflection Plaza

6,240

400

200+

outdoor venue

Hospitality Suite

1,800

50+

35+

plus 1,200 sq. ft. deck

Mountain Lodge at Telluride 970.369.5000

Summit Room (summer only)

574

60

40

near Tell. Conf. Center

Mt. Emma Room

500

50

35

easy gondola access

Peaks Resort and Spa 800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

Appaloosa Lounge

1,682

100

40

casual cocktail room

Big Billie Ballroom

2,046

225

140

can divide into 2 rooms

Crystal Room

1,600

163

100

floor to ceiling windows

Great Room Deck

1,440

125

80

off of the Great Room

Legends Restaurant

2,790

250

160

rustic dining venue

Liberty Bell and Golden Slipper Rooms

50

30

can combine for 1,100 sq. ft.

each 551

Mt. Wilson Terrace

7,900

350

200

connects to Crystal/ Legends

Palmyra Deck

1,508

150

100

connects to Palmyra restaurant

Palmyra Restaurant

1,980

225

180

connects to Palmyra deck

Ridge Club’s Great Room 970.708.1515

Multi-purpose Facility and Deck

1,900

175

80

easy gondola access

Telluride Conference Center 970.369.8030

Mountain Village Ballroom

6,069

890

564

22,000 total sq. ft. indoors

Klammer Boardroom

732

60

40

55,000 sq. ft. outdoor plaza

Fallon Room

367

35

20

voice/data circuits

Chipeta Room

312

-

18

voice/data ports

Mezzanine

1,189 100 70 ●

optional reception hall

St. Sophia Ceremony Site 970.728.7446

Top of the Gondola on the Ski Resort

-

outdoor venue

-

-

RUSTIC MOUNTAIN RETREATS Alta Lakes Observatory 970.239.0027

Rustic Mountain Lodge

2,200

75

25

remote lakeside lodge

High Camp Hut 970.728.8050

High Mountain Hut

2,500

35

35

walk 2.5 miles from hwy.

Schmid Family Ranch 970.708.1108

Rustic Setting at base of Wilson Peak

-

-

-

two cabins, summer only

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

99


SHOPPING

Art For Home and Self

Toys for All Ages 970.728.3355 100

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

• Enter through Gallery

214 W. Colorado Ave. Telluride

lustregallery.com


SHOPPING TOYS

CLOTHING

Ethos 101 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.0954 Scarpe 250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

HOME DECOR

Azadi Rugs 213 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4620 Bella Fine Goods 213 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2880 Fine Navajo Weaving 220 East Colorado #1, Telluride 970.728.1443 Hook on a Wall 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1087 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 On Main 359 East Colorado, Telluride 970-708-7716 Sage House 220 East Colorado, Telluride 817.909.3959 Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Tweed Interiors 151 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.8186 T.Karn Imports 394 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.4350

MUSIC Telluride Music Co. 333 West Colorado #2, Telluride 970.728.9592

EYEWARE

ART GALLERIES

Sunglasses HQ & Optical 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119

Elinoff & Co. Gallerists & Jewelers 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Gallery 81435 230 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Gold Mountain Gallery 135 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3460 Kamruz Gallery 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0135 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Red Dirt 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.729.2869 Rinkevich Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village Center 415.516.2055 Schilling Studio Gallery 970.728.1174 (Open by appointment) Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Stronghouse Studios 283 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Tellurado Studio 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6440 Telluride Art Headquarters & Gallery 135 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.3930 Telluride Gallery of Fine Art 130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Tony Newlin Gallery 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8084

GIFTS

AromaSpa Salon & Boutique 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Black Bear Trading Company 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6556 Cashmere Red 221 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8088 Down To Earth 236 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9316 Fuel 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Heritage Apparel Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7340 On Main 359 East Colorado, Telluride 970-708-7716 Overland Sheepskin & Leather 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9700 Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Patagonia 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4303 Pepporium 136 East Colorado, Telluride pepporium@gmail.com Scarpe 250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Shirtworks of Telluride 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242 Society 109 West Colorado, Telluride Moving to 126 East Colorado, Telluride 970.369.7777 Sublime 126 West Colorado #102A, Telluride 970.728.7974 Telluride Toggery 109 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3338 The North Face Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.0332 Two Skirts 127 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6828 Western Rise 100 West Colorado Unit E, Telluride 855.981.7473

Ethos 101 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.0954 Hook on a Wall 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1087 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Mountain Pick Gifts 217 West Colorado, Telluride Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Shirtworks of Telluride 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242 Telluride Room Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Telluride Resort Store Gondola Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7358 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES Crossbow Leather 217 East Colorado, Telluride Elinoff & Co. 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040

Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Sunglasses HQ & Optical 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119 Telluride Gallery of Fine Art 130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Telluride Room Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

101


SHOPPING

102

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


SHOPPING BOOKS

LIQUOR STORES

Between the Covers Books 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504

SPORTING GOODS GROCERY & MARKETS

Bootdoctors Le Chamonix Bldg., Mountain Village 970.728.8954 236 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.4581 Box Canyon Bicycles 300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2946 Burton Telluride Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.6138 Christy Sports Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1334 Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5267 Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4727 Jagged Edge/Journey Outdoors 223 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9307 Neve Sports/Telluride Sports Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.5722 Patagonia 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4303 Telluride Angler/Telluride Outside 121 West Colorado, Telluride 800.831.6230 Telluride Sports 150 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4477 Camels Garden, Telluride 970.728.3134 Fairmont Franz Klmmr., Mountain Village 970.728.0364 Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8944 The Peaks, Mountain Village 970.728.0339 Telluride Wax Guru Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village The Drop Board Shop & Print Lab 123 South Oak, Telluride 970.708.0688 The North Face Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.0332

Clark’s Market 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124 Over the Moon 223 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.2079 Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.9565 The Market at Telluride 157 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.8958 The Village Market 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mtn. Village 970.633.4700

PHARMACIES Medicine Ranch (CBD) 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Sunshine Pharmacy 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3601 Franz Klammer Breezeway, Mtn. Village 970.728.3601

Spirits at Mountain Village 455 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mtn. Village 970.728.6500 Telluride Bottleworks 129 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.5553 Telluride Brewing Company 156 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.5094 Telluride Distilling Company Franz Klammer Breezeway, M. Village 970.728.2910 Telluride Liquors 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3380 Wine Mine at Pacific Street Liquors 220 South Davis, Telluride 970-728-WINE

DISPENSARIES Alpine Wellness Center 300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1834 Delilah, LLC 115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5880 Green Dragon 119 West Colorado, Telluride 970.442.1422 Telluride Bud Company 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.239.6039 Telluride Green Room 250 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.7999

OFFICE SUPPLIES

PET SUPPLIES

Happy Print 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6525 High Country Shipping 456 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.728.4792 Paper Chase 206 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.0235 Ship It/Copy It 125 West Pacific #2B, Telluride 970.728.8111

Animal Hospital of Telluride 6785 Park Drive, Ilium 970.728.1082 / 708.4359 (after hours) Dirt Dawg 215 East Colorado, Unit 1, Telluride 970.239.6448 Mobile Unit One Veterinary Service 970.708.1512 PET Telluride 238 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2095 Telluride Veterinary Clinic 547 1/2 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4461 Tricks & Treats Pet Sitting Service 970.708.5205

THRIFT SHOPS Second Chance Humane Society 335 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1100

PHOTOGRAPHY Elevation Imaging The Beach, Mountain Village 970.728.8058

FLORISTS China Rose Florists & Greenhouse 158 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4169 Flowers by Ella 359 East Colorado, Telluride 720-900-7488

BEAUTY

Alchëmy Salon 300 Mahoney, Ste. 13C, Telluride 970.708.8048 AromaSpa, Salon & Boutique 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Aveda Telluride Spa 250 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.0630 Bliss & Bang Bang Salon 329 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1020 Breathe Skin & Body Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village 970.728.9772 Hair 9 Salon 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.7139 Healthy Glow Face & Body 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.7424 Himmel Pool and Spa Boutique Fairmont Franz Klmr., Mountain Village 970.728.7113 Moxie Loft 226 West Colorado, Telluride 480.270.2864 Pearl Aesthetic Medicine 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.7939 Pure Beauty & Wellness Spa / Telluride Salt Cave 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6144 Spa Boutique at the Peaks Resort 136 Country Club Dr., Mountain Village 970.728.6800 Studio G Total Skin Wellness 145 West Pacific #1E, Telluride 970.728.8700 The Spa and Salon at Madeline 568 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.369.8961 YX Salon 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.708.0270 or 970.708.2308

HARDWARE Alpine Lumber 140 Society Dr., Lawson Hill 970.728.4388 Timberline Ace Hardware 200 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3640

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

103


SHOPPING

Gallerists and Jewelers Gallerists and Jewelers

T-pick Jewelry • Watch & Jewelry repair • Custom designs Elinoff & Co — Fine Art, Fine Jewelry — 204 W Colorado Ave, 970-728-5566

T-pick Jewelry • Watch & Jewelry repair • Custom designs, patents pending Elinoff & Co — Fine Art, Fine Jewelry — 204 W Colorado Ave, 970-728-5566

104

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


SHOPPING

MAKE 2022 A COLORFUL YEAR

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

105


DISCOVER SHOPPING ADS MOUNTAIN with stylish basics and designer labels. CHIC Located in Mountain Village across from BootDoctors

970.728.7340

106

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Exclusively at Heritage Apparel


for the exceptional

66 Salt Trail, Cornerstone Club, Montrose 5 BD | 9 BA | 7,464 SF | $3,950,000 Furnished | TheCornerstoneHome.com Jason Raible 970.729.0720


1130 Elk Run Road, Telluride

200 Cortina Drive, Mountain Village

Specie Wilderness Ranch, Placerville

6 BD | 8 BA | 7,288 SF | $7,995,000 Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086

6 BD | 6.5 BA | 5,144 SF | $7,295,000 Dan Dockray 970.708.0666

LAND | 548 ACRES | $5,900,000 Jason Raible 970.729.0720 TheTellurideRanch.com

732 E. Columbia Avenue, Telluride

Willeford Ranch, Ridgway

71 South Point Road, Placerville

5 BD | 2.5 BA | 2,503 SF | $4,595,000 Teddy Errico 970.708.5959 EastTellurideHome.com

LAND | 1,160 ACRES | $4,500,000 Jason Raible 970.729.0720 TheColoradoRanch.com

4 BD | 2.5 BA | 4,194 SF | $2,150,000 Mark & Terrie Dollard 970.708.0854

Black Bear Manor B&B, Ouray

Lot #20 Elk Run Road, Telluride

Madeline Residence #1206, Mountain Village

10 BD | 10 BA | 4,986 SF | $1,675,000 Jason Raible 970.729.0720 BlackBearManor.com

LAND | 4.39 ACRES | $1,395,000 Jason Raible 970.729.0720 TellurideLot.com

1 BD | 1 BA | 935 SF | $795,000 Tracy Boyce 970.708.0737

Visit us at one of our office locations in the Town of Telluride & Mountain Village T E L LU R I D ESOT H E BYS R E A LT Y.CO M | 970.7 2 8 . 14 0 4

Member of the Exclusive


HIGH TIMES AT

HIGH ALTITUDE

Support

LOCALLY OWNED

Businesses!

25 0 S. F I R 970-728-7999

ONE BLOCK EAST OF THE TELLURIDE GONDOLA STATION

S. F IR

BOU TIQUE CANNABIS AT 8,750’ TGR

SA N JUA N AV E.


PA R T I N G S H OT RYA N B O N N E AU “Telluride isn’t just a ski area; it’s a way of life.” - New York Times


Anxious your home will be damaged when you return next summer?

INVITED HOME

1 in 5 homes were affected by winter weather last year.

111

Forward-Thinking Strategies for Luxury Property Management telluride.com | 855.421.4360

970.233.3913

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

108


Telluride Real Estate Corp

now partners with Forbes Global Properties Founded in December 2020, Forbes Global Properties is a luxury real estate marketing platform leveraging the global reach of Forbes to showcase the world’s finest homes and the stories behind them.

The Power of Forbes

6.3M

Magazine Readership

#1

Most trusted magazine in the US*

45M

Social Media Followers

100+ Years In Business

133M

Monthly Global Visitors**

* MRI-Simmons, Fall 2019 | ** Google Analytics, September 2020

Visit: telluriderealestatecorp.com // forbesglobalproperties.com