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UDE R E ELDLU R I D E ST AKING LL THE TOWN & MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE | SUMMER 2020

BEAUTIFUL B A C K YA R D

TELLURIDE’S BACKYARD

BEYOND THE GALLERY

FARM TO TABLE AND BACK

MOUNTAIN TOWN FASHION


ENCHAN

ING


visittelluride.com / 855.748.9621


For those seeking the uncharted

1327 Elk Run Road, Elk Run

133 Polecat Lane, Mountain Village

4 Beds | 4.5 Baths | $3,995,000

6 Beds | 7.5 Baths | $6,999,000

7 Stonegate Drive, Mountain Village

115 Adams Way, Mountain Village

5 Beds | 4.5 Baths | $3,745,000

3 Beds | 3.5 Baths | $2,995,000

102 Single Tree Ridge, Mountain Village

209 Aldasoro Road, Aldasoro Ranch

4 Beds + Flex Room | 4.5 Baths | $3,595,000

5 Beds | 5 Baths | $2,195,000

Only

Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086 | sally@telluridebroker.com

© MMXIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC.


LUXURY VACATION RENTALS

Exceptional Stays.

EXCEPTIONAL HOMES. EXCEPTIONAL CARE.

SOCIALLY DISTANT ACTIVITIES Remote check-ins Exclusive services available, including pantry stocking and locally raised and prepared meals delivered to your door Touch-free equipment delivery for activities in the great Telluride outdoors and more!

NEW:

HYPERCLEAN

BY EXCEPTIONAL STAYS

CDC-approved Covid-19 cleaning products PPE worn by all property care personnel in homes PPE and cleaning products provided for guest use Longer unoccupied windows between stays and more!

BY

BOOK YOUR EXCEPTIONAL STAY TODAY: EXCEPTIONALSTAYS.COM | 866-507-7336


114 Victoria Drive

14 Valley View Drive 6

$6,195,000

$645,000

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

536 W Pacific Avenue

$3,800,000


114 Autumn Lane

$6,750,000

Ken specializes in connecting buyers and sellers while helping them establish a sense of community in the Telluride region. Ken is committed to building lasting relationships, providing the highest level of service and expertise and helping his clients purchase their dream home or sell their current property.

Ken Grodberg Broker Associate 970.708.5601 ken@grodbergrealestate.com grodbergrealestate.com @grodbergrealestate

67 Josefa Lane 7

$975,000

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

Compass is a licensed real estate broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.


Aspen 970.925.8579

Crested Butte 970.349.5023

Denver 303.399.4564

Steamboat Springs 970.879.9222

Telluride 970.728.3359

Vail 970.949.5500

Fotoimagery.com

interior landscapes that delight the senses

thurstonkitchenandbath.com


WELL 118 PROSPECT CREEK

Private Estate – Easy Ski Access – 6 Bedrooms/6.5 Baths – Sunset and Palmyra Views – $6,500,000

244 BENCHMARK

Ski-In/Ski-Out – 5 Bedrooms/5.5 Baths – 4,896 Square Feet – Expansive Mountain Vistas – $2,995,000

DAKOTA PLACE

Ski-In/Ski-Out at Base of Chair 4 – Unit 6: 4 Bedrooms/4.5 Baths, $2,850,000 – Unit 7: 3 Bedrooms/3.5 Baths, $2,445,000

MADELINE 1302

Ski-In/Ski-Out from Telluride’s Premier Four-Diamond, Full-Service Resort – 2 Bedrooms/2 Baths – $1,229,000

Rick Fusting 970.708.5500

rickf@telluridecolorado.net 137 W. Colorado Avenue Telluride, CO 81435

For virtual tours: rickfusting.com

PERSONAL COMMITMENT PROVEN RESULTS


SL O P E S I D E S K I H O M E

Prestigious neighborhood with slopeside ski access & big views. 141 Sundance Lane - Mountain Village $6,750,000

A U BE R G E R E S O RT S

4 & 5 bedrooms enjoy private ski access, concierge, spa, & more. Auberge Resorts at Element 52 - Telluride $5.2M - $6M

SWE E P ING VIEWS

Mountain elegant, 4-bed golf course home set on 1+ knoll-top acres. 128 Adams Ranch Road - Mountain Village $4,095,000

IN TH E H EART OF D OWNT OWN

A combination of 8 bedrooms steps from skiing, restaurants & shopping. 403 West Colorado Avenue - Telluride $4,995,000

Video Tours at O N e i l l S t e t i n a G r o u p . c o m


Setting a Higher Standard in Telluride Real Estate

EXCL U S IVE N E I G H B O R H OOD

Rare offering on 25+ acres with exceptional views, 15 min. from Town. 175 Raspberry Patch Road - Raspberry Patch $6,995,000

M O DE R N L O G H O M E

Enjoy perfect ski access & mountain views from this 5-bed home. 120 Snowfield Drive - Mountain Village $6,600,000

ONLY ONE RE MAINING

Modern 4 bedroom with views & convenience to everything. Transfer Telluride, LoftHouse 2 - Telluride $4,450,000

C H OIC E AME NIT IES

Steps to ski/golf/gondola with 2 masters, game room, sauna & more. 184 Country Club Drive - Mountain Village $5,950,000

TOGETHER, WE DO MORE FOR YOU. Brian O’Neill, Director I 970.708.5367 I osg@oneillstetina.com Marty Stetina, Broker Associate I 970.708.4504


SUMMER/FALL 2020

CONTENTS REGULAR READS 18

Discover Telluride

20

How to Tellu-Right

21

Two Towns, One Love

64

Kids’ Play

106

Parting Shot

 Community First A Responding to a pandemic with kindness, generosity, camaraderie

31

 ssay Contest / The Winners E Local fifth-graders write about school in Telluride

37

 utdoor Activities O Adventure awaits in Telluride’s summer playground

42  Bewitching Bridal Veil Iconic waterfall is a perfect summertime stop 72 Autumn in Telluride Glorious gold season

42 45

Look Forward to Winter A snow season bucket list

Ryan Bonneau

75

37 Ryan Bonneau

29

24 Ryan Bonneau

IN THE BOX CANYON

Ryan Bonneau

24  Telluride’s Beautiful Backyard There is a lure to these mountains

Ryan Bonneau

COVER STORY

104 Activities Guide

GETTING AROUND 19 Getting Here Flying to Telluride this summer is easy

46 T  elluride Trivia Test your knowledge 79

Flight Map

81

Local Transportation, Parking

12

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

64

Tony Demin

45 Road Trip Driving to Telluride? Read on

29


MOVING FORWARD from where you are, to where you want to be.

Self-reflection on your quality of life and what’s important moving forward are undoubtedly heavy on your mind. Telluride Properties has been a market leader since 1986 and we remain committed to providing you with the necessary tools and proactive guidance required to make informed decisions in the pursuit of your goals.

whit richardson photography

CONNECT WITH US and start moving forward. 970.728.0808 I TellurideProperties.com I 237 S. Oak St. I 560 Mountain Village Blvd., Ste. 103 tellurideproperties

@tellurideproperties

G

A

201 W. Colorado Ave. Ste. 200 / (970) 729-1673 schedule at: tellurideyoga.com DROP-INS WELCOME / many styles and levels

I F E S T

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June 24 - 27, 2021


SUMMER/FALL 2020

CONTENTS 48 The Festival Scene 50 B  eyond the Gallery Public art in Telluride 53 The Scene What’s new in arts & dining

60

55

 rom Farm to Table & Back F Sustainable dining

90 Dining Guide

RETAIL THERAPY

Preston Utley

56 Mountain Town Fashion Local boutique owners on their vibe & more 59

63

Cool Finds A Telluride reading list

98 Shopping Guide

STAY & PLAY 60 Wow Factor Jaw-dropping views from hotel decks 82

Accommodation Guide

Telluride & Mountain Village Official Visitor’s Guide is published twice per year by:

TELLURIDE TOURISM BOARD VISIT TELLURIDE Telluride, Colorado 855.421.4360 | VisitTelluride.com President & CEO MICHAEL MARTELON Director of Marketing & Public Relations KIERA SKINNER Director of Social & Interactive Media ANNIE CARLSON Director of Communications TOM WATKINSON Director of Operations HOLLIE HANNAHS Financial Administrator BEN KALMAN Staff Photographer RYAN BONNEAU

T

C

THE SCENE

TELLURIDE PUBLICATIONS

President JOHN ARNOLD Art Directors LAUREN METZGER / KIM HILLEY

WEDDINGS 63  Magical Telluride Ceremony Special mountains, special wedding

67

103 Venues Guide

Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved.

ABOUT TOWN

14

67

Home Is Where the Heart Is Ashley Hayward & Michael Goldberg

68 Telluride Foundation Celebrating 20 years

HISTORY

70 visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

70 What’s in a Name? In Telluride, quite a bit 76

Historical Walking Tour

Editor ERIN SPILLANE Advertising Sales HILARY TAYLOR Writers SUZANNE CHEAVENS MARTINIQUE DAVIS ELIZABETH GUEST SAGE MARSHALL JESSE JAMES McTIGUE KATIE KLINGSPORN EMILY SHOFF

For advertising opportunities contact: John Arnold 970.596.1291 • john@visittelluride.com 307 Society Drive, Suite D, Telluride, CO 81435 Copyright ©2020 All Rights Reserved Cover and contents must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher.


PAC KAG ES SOUL SAMPLER

2.5 hour

A local favorite. Take a rejuvenating journey with Swedish relaxation 60-minute massage + Aveda 60-minute Customized Facial + Express Pedicure.

telluridespa.com / 970.728.0630 ONLINE BOOKING AVAILABLE NOW

SELF CARE & REJUVENATION 2 hours MEDITATION & REJUVENATING MASSAGE

Take time to experience the deepest relaxation. Learn the art of healthy breathe and presence, while you increase your energy levels and a feeling of vitality. Improve circulation, lower blood pressure and feel everyday stress and anxiety gently float away. Followed by a 60- minute Customized Rejuvenating Massage.

CUSTOMIZED SPORTS MASSAGE 60 - 90 minutes

Great after a day of skiing, you will be provided with a customized massage experience, tailored to your specific needs. Aveda aromas and massage techniques could include a combination of Swedish, relaxation or deep tissue massage, foot reflexology and/or acupressure .

SPA & TONE

2.5hours

An all encompassing Wellness Retreat designed to address needs both inside and out. • Chakra Sensory Journey with guided breathe meditation / 20 minutes • Beautifying Body Scrub / 20 minutes • Bliss Massage & Oil Scalp Treatment / 20 minutes • Hydrating & Rejuvenation Massage / 50 minutes • Customized Firming Facial / 30 minutes

REIKI

Awaken your natural powers of transformation with everything from high-performing skin treatments to meditative body massage + more

50 minutes

Reiki is energy healing for relaxation and stress reduction. Our Reiki Practitioner will use light touch to help your body heal itself. Pain, stress, tension melt away as Reiki energy soothes, nourishes and relaxes you from head to toe.

SPA + SALON + ART

250 West San Juan in the town of Telluride

Located steps from the base of the gondola in Telluride (Next to Telluride Sports)


© Ryan Bonneau

LIV TRANQUIL 130 Highlands Way MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

130 Hidden Valley MOAB, UT

7 Bedrooms / 9 Baths / 8,874 SF / 3 Acres $4,950,000

3 Bedroom Marmol Radzinger Home / 43 Acres $ 1,995,000

Peninsula Lot 27 & 28

West Meadows 860 WAGNER WAY

Franz Klammer Lodge MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Escarpment Views / 7 4 Acres / Great Well / $435,000

12 Acres / Large Pond / Minutes from town $3,450,000

Steps from slopes / 1/20th Fractional Ownership $49,500

John Burchmore 970.708.0667

jburchmore@livsothebysrealty.com telluridefineproperties.com


500 Elk Run Drive TELLURIDE 4 Bedrooms / 6,579 SF / 10+ Acres $6,000,000

LIV ELEVATED

Cabin on the Ridge 3 TUNNEL LANE

135 Palmyra Drive

Directly Trailside / Amazing Views / 4 Bedrooms $3,775,000

6 Bedrooms / 7 Baths / 6,987 SF $7,450,000

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Peaks Resort & Spa CONDOMINIUMS

520 East Columbia TELLURIDE

461 West Galena TELLURIDE

Studio and One Bedroom Units Starting at $169,000

4 Bedrooms with Garage / Bear Creek Views $4,150,000

3 Bedroom with Garage on Cornet Creek / $3,425,000

Lars Carlson 970.729.0160

lcarlson@livsothebysrealty.com larscarlson.com


DISCOVER TELLURIDE

ALTHOUGH WE ARE SMALL, OUR BIG HEARTS, OUR CREATIVITY AND OUR RESILIENCE HAVE COMBINED IN THESE CHALLENGING TIMES ... TO MAKE TELLURIDE BOTH INSPIRING AND COMFORTING.

Tony Demin

COME TOGETHER

W

elcome to Telluride and thank you for picking up the Official Guide to Telluride and Mountain Village. We at the Telluride Tourism Board have worked diligently to ensure that this issue will give you everything you need for a truly special time in our small mountain town. We hope, too, that this issue highlights what an extraordinary place Telluride is. Although we are small, our big hearts, our creativity and our resilience have combined in these challenging times with the solace and space provided by our natural surroundings to make Telluride both inspiring and comforting. The evidence? It is right here on these pages. Take our cover story, “Telluride’s Beautiful Backyard” (p. 24), which reminds us that the

astonishing natural beauty of Telluride is still here, a quiet constant in a chaotic world. Its mountains still stand sentinel over our little town. Its trails still beckon. Its streams, cascades and rivers still flow. The grasses and wildflowers in its high-alpine meadows still dance in the clear high-alpine air. Telluride’s beautiful backyard has the potential to inspire, to afford countless opportunities for adventure and, just maybe, allow a few peaceful hours away from it all. On page 29, “A Community First” recounts the kindness, generosity and compassion of Telluriders, locals and part-time locals, over these past months. It serves as a reminder that our community is small, but mighty, and that only as a collective

do we overcome our most formidable challenges; working together, collaborating, supporting each other, even when we are physically apart. I’ve never been more proud of this community or more thankful that I am a part of it. As I write this, spring is slipping into summer, the slopes greening, the San Miguel River and waterfalls that ring our town — Bridal Veil, Ingram, Bear Creek and Cornet — now in full flow, racing along beneath Colorado bluebird skies. It feels like these wild places are just waiting for us to discover them, perhaps rediscovering ourselves in the process. And all the while, words like thankful and proud keep coming to mind. Indeed, I am profoundly thankful and proud. Thankful to be surrounded by the peace and tranquility of this remote corner of the San Juan Mountains. Thankful for the love that runs deeply throughout our community. Proud of Telluriders near and far, those who live here and those whose hearts and minds live here, for their kindness and generosity. In times like these, we can come together — even while remaining physically apart — and I can think of no better place for that this summer than Telluride.

MICHAEL MARTELON President & Chief Executive Officer Telluride Tourism Board

Want to make your Telluride experience an unforgettable one? Try the welcoming, informative Visitors’ Center. Located beside Elks Park and just across Colorado Avenue from the historic New Sheridan Hotel, this interactive space and its knowledgeable, friendly staff are ready to steer you toward a summer adventure, memorable meal or the perfect boutique.

18

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

Ryan Bonneau

EXPLORE THE VISITORS’ CENTER


Ryan Bonneau

GETTING HERE

TAKE FLIGHT

Flying to Telluride this summer is easy

S

eeking tranquility and wide-open spaces this summer? Telluride, which is tucked in a stunning box canyon high in the San Juan Mountains, among the highest concentration of 13,000- and 14,000-foot peaks in North America, boasts a vast, beautiful outdoor playground just waiting to be explored. And while Telluride is famed for being off the beaten track, this small town remains easily accessible with all but one of Telluride’s regular summer air routes operating in 2020, and a full schedule set to return for 2021. First up, the basics: Telluride is served by two airports, Telluride/Montrose Regional Airport (MTJ), an easy — and wonderfully scenic — 75 minutes away, and Telluride Regional Airport (TEX), just 10 minutes from downtown Telluride and Mountain Village. It’s worth noting that both airports, as well as the airlines serving the destination, are currently implementing safety and physical distancing protocols. This summer, United Airlines will be running three nonstop flights to MTJ, including multiple daily flights from Denver (DEN) that operate year-round, with weekend flights from Houston (IAH) and Chicago (ORD) in July and August. Denver Air Connection, which has an interline relationship with United, will fly from Denver (DEN) to TEX three times a week in June, resuming full daily service from July through mid-September. Denver Air’s flights connect to the United network and are bookable through either United or Denver Air directly. American will be running daily year-round service from Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) to Montrose, while Phoenix (PHX) to Montrose will take a hiatus this summer, returning in 2021. The schedule of flights to Telluride and Montrose airports will continue to adjust throughout the summer, so remember to check flight options on the airline web sites or at coloradoflights.org. And Telluride? Small, friendly and fascinating, this mountain town, basking in the summer sun under the bluebird skies for which Colorado is famous, and surrounded by the serene San Juans and fresh, high-alpine air, will be here, ready to host your summertime adventures.

FLIGHTS YEAR-ROUND

Dallas DFW to Montrose MTJ American Airlines, daily Denver DEN to Montrose MTJ United Airlines, daily Denver DEN to Telluride TEX Denver Air/United, daily

SUMMER 2020

Chicago ORD to Montrose MTJ United Airlines, July & August Houston IAH to Montrose MTJ United Airlines, July & August

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

19


WELCOME TO PLANET T, where we acknowledge there is no Planet B. DO RIGHT BY EACH OTHER We are a small town with a big heart. Let’s do our part to take care of one another. Let’s wash our hands often. Let’s stay at least 6 feet from other people and even farther away from wildlife. Let’s channel our inner Butch Cassidy and cover our mouth and nose with a cloth face cover.

DO THE WORLD RIGHT

DO YOU RIGHT

Let’s work together today for a better tomorrow.

Let’s always be prepared with sunscreen, layers and water.

Let’s say no to single-use plastics. Let’s stay hydrated with our pure Rocky Mountain water from a reusable water bottle. Let’s waste less and enjoy more. Let’s not be trashy — reuse and recycle. Let’s sip beverages from a metal straw. Let’s offset our travel emissions (purchase offsets through Pinheadinstitute.org).

DO THE TOWN RIGHT Let’s travel like a Telluridian while in Telluride and Mountain Village. Let’s ride the free Gondola, a bike, the eco-friendly Galloping Goose, or walk like a local. Let’s conserve the City of Lights by turning lights off when we leave the room. Let’s unplug our minds, electronics and chargers when not in use.

DO THE BOX CANYON RIGHT Let’s take a deep breath, slow down and adjust to T Time (about 5 minutes late). Let’s keep the mountain pristine by bringing out everything that we brought in. Let’s save some water for the mountain. Let’s enjoy the wildlife and natural surroundings without disrupting. Let’s care more about ourselves than the selfie. Let’s always be careful with fire.

Let’s come to see and not be seen.

RIGHT 20

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

Ryan Bonneau

T E L LU-


Ryan Bonneau

GETTING AROUND

TWO TOWNS, ONE LOVE Good things come in twos, right? The twin communities of Telluride and Mountain Village, for instance, each have their own distinct vibe. Together, though, they share a love of community, of the unique people, culture and events here, and of the stunning natural beauty that makes for a perfect summertime playground.

TELLURIDE A National Historic Landmark District, Telluride is steeped in history. The town’s roots run right back to the second half of the 19th century when it was at the center of the mining industry and the place where Butch Cassidy robbed his first bank. Look around town and you will see a wealth of historical homes and buildings — structures that have been carefully preserved over time and which now house gourmet restaurants, chic boutiques and fine-art galleries. MOUNTAIN VILLAGE At 9,545 feet and almost completely enveloped by the Telluride Ski Resort, this hamlet offers visitors and residents alike a more modern, lux feel in a European-style alpine setting. Incorporated in 1995, Mountain Village boasts luxury accommodation, state-of-the-art spas, stylish shops and sophisticated dining options, as well as a wealth of family-friendly activities, like the Telluride Bike Park, all surrounded by the towering mountains that form the highest concentration of 13,000- and 14,000-foot peaks in North America. THE GONDOLA Linking these two communities is the Gondola. The only public transportation system of its kind in North America, the free, environmentally friendly “G” connects Telluride and Mountain Village via a 13-minute ride. It’s also wheelchair, bike, stroller and pet friendly. Some aficionados try for the red gondola cabin, created in 2016 to celebrate the G’s 20th anniversary. Whichever cabin you’re in, with breath-taking views and the uniqueness of the experience, we can promise the Gondola is one journey you will never forget. Go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and information.

8 A

s ute min

B

5

m in ut es

13 minutes

C

Telluride to Mountain Village

A TELLURIDE STATION

South Oak Street | Telluride 8,750 feet

B SAN SOPHIA STATION

Mid-Mountain | Access the resort’s trails, Allred’s Restaurant & Bar, Nature Center 10,500 feet

C MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center 9,545 feet

For Gondola opening/closing dates and times, please visit townofmountainvillage.com/gondola.

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

21


209 Wilson Peak Drive // $6,995,000

119 Palmyra Drive // $5,700,000

The Ultimate in Effortless Ski Access. This 5-bedroom residence’s sense of arrival presents architecture that is uniquely contemporary with a blend of curvature and simplistic linear design which blends seamlessly with its mountainous environment. Upon entry, its slate staircase and glass elevator provide the first hint of the superb mountain contemporary finishes found throughout. A frosted glass flooring from a hallway above streams light to the entry level. White hard maples, integrated color concrete, stainless steel interior sliding glass doors are but a few of the fine finishes utilized throughout. Located with end-of-the-road privacy.

Seamless Ski Access best describes this estate’s location, both departing and arriving on grade from Bridges Ski Trail to its ski room with equipment storage and boot warmers. Recently re-modeled with a mountain contemporary flair, 119 Palmyra is the ultimate retreat for generations of family that comfortably sleeps seventeen within six spacious bedrooms and bunkrooms. Expansive mountainous views from the great room explode at entry through floor-to ceiling windows spilling sunlight upon a two-and-a-half-story great room replete with a steel and glass fireplace.

Exquisite Spaces - In a Resort with a Fraction

228 Russell Drive // $5,950,000

705 Mountain Village Boulevard // $4,450,000

The Best of Both Worlds --- Nestled alongside the third green with convenient ski-in and ski-out access to the Galloping Goose Ski Trail and miles of crosscountry ski trails, this 6-bedroom residence blends perfectly with its mountainous environment. The log and stone exterior pleasingly contrast the architectural elegance of its interior with a more formal and upscale cherry base, case, trim and cabinetry. The main level literally explodes with views to the ski resort within a great room warmed by a massive stone surround, wood burning fireplace.

Breathtaking - The only word that appropriately describes the viewscape from the residence’s two-story great room upon entry. Anchored on a ridge overlooking the Telluride Valley 800 feet below, it is one of a handful of properties possessing double loaded views of the iconic Wilson and San Sophia Mountain Ranges. Bathed in all day sun, extraordi=nary vistas are captured from various living and sleeping spaces. The main level open floor plan flows effortlessly between chef ‘s kitchen, living, dining and breakfast nook areas and master suite with gas fireplace, jetted tub and steam shower conveniently up one-half level. 5 bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms.

TD SMITH | 970.728.1606 | TD@TDSMITH.COM | WWW.TDSMITH.COM CHRIS SOMMERS | 970.728.1603 | CHRIS@CHRISSOMMERS.COM | WWW.CHRISSOMMERS.COM ALEX SMITH | 970.729.2231 | AJSMITH@TDSMITH.COM | WWW.TDSMITH.COM


16 Trails Edge Lane // $3,775,000

Peaks Penthouse // $3,750,000

Nestled in the very private enclave of residences at Trail’s Edge, just a short stroll from the Gondola, Mountain Market and Village Core Amenities, this four bedroom, 4.5 bath residence possesses exquisite mountain contemporary finishes. With an open and free flowing living level bathed in all day sun, 16 Trails Edge is the perfect retreat for generations of family and friends. Accessed by a heated, private road, ski access is virtually a few steps beyond the front door. Its vaulted great room captures the entire viewscape of the San Sophia Ridge with an escape to a spacious exterior deck.

Atop the full-service Peaks Resort and Spa, this eighth floor, four bedroom, four and a half bath penthouse combine contemporary mountain interior finishes and architecture, with a floorplan that accommodates spacious areas for both entertainment and quiet privacy. Its two-story living area with 10 skylights flows seamlessly from a chef’s kitchen to dining and living spaces with fireplaces on both ends. Floor-to-ceiling window openings capture the breadth of the San Sophia Ridge. The grand master suite, with en-suite bath, includes his and hers walk-in closets/dressing rooms, jetted tub, steam shower, private deck and sitting area with fireplace.

of the Density of Other Mountain Communities

113 Joaquin Road // $6,150,000

See Forever Village Penthouse // $4,650,000

The residence’s architect, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, has a reputation for ‘’spaces that that feel at once familiar and inventive.’’ The architecture of this exquisite home is distinguished by the sparse detail of geometric, pavilion-like forms and simple roof lines that enhance the vibrant and comfortable spaces within. Situated on nearly 3 acres of lushly wooded property with end-of-the-road privacy, the residence frames views of surrounding peaks and possesses warm solar exposure. Expansive patios and decking flow seamlessly to the exterior. A perfect mix of both art and architecture for generations of family enjoyment

One of very few corner penthouses with double-loaded views of the Wilson Range and Ski Resort in the Mountain Village’s most sought after location at See Forever Village. This spectacular residence is showcased by floor to ceiling window openings, vaulted ceilings, four fireplaces with steel and stone surrounds, two master bedroom suites, Subzero / Wolf appliances, antique Chestnut hardwood flooring, Alder base and case and much more. The master and two other guest suites are located on the main level adjoining a very spacious great room and living, kitchen and dining areas.


TELLURIDE’S BEAUTIFUL BACKYARD Stunning. Inspirational. Timeless. The astonishing exquisiteness of the mountains surrounding Telluride is apparent to all. BY ERIN SPILLANE

Ryan Bonneau

S

tunning. Inspirational. Timeless. The astonishing exquisiteness of the mountains surrounding Telluride are apparent to all. From the grassy, serene stretches of the Valley Floor, along the aspen- and fir-dappled lower slopes to the highest jagged peaks that stand sentinel above town, there is beauty everywhere. A loveliness that bends with the seasons. And yet, there is also a lure to these mountains that is more than skin deep, a sense of potential, of fulfilment. Long-time Tellurider Josh Borof knows this to be true. Borof says that growing up, he was always “a restless kid”. Then he came to Telluride. “I moved here in 1991 off a phone call from my best friend. He told me he was in the greatest place he’d ever been.” So, the restless kid rolled into town planning to stay for a winter — and is still here after 27 years. “Telluride had the answer that I needed. I didn’t even know that I was looking for it, but I found it here.” Borof isn’t alone. The stories of locals who arrived for a season and stayed forever abound. Dreamers, seekers and adventurers, they all felt the pull of this place and, once here, got outside and started exploring. They became passionate users — and stewards — of the trails, the old mining roads, the rivers and lakes, the slopes and the scree fields. What they found was a place where anything is possible, where adventures and deep, meaningful, sometimes life-changing, connections awaited.


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visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360


Ryan Bonneau

THE VISITORS HAD COME TO TELLURIDE, EAGER TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THEIR GRANDFATHER, WHO HAD LIVED AND WORKED HERE IN THE EARLY 1900S.

Bill Johnston c. 1907. Local guide Clay Greathouse used this photograph to lead the Johnston grandchildren to the location of the photo near Royer Gulch. Credit: Reprinted from ‘The RGS Story’, Homer Reid Collection.

Local Clay Greathouse understands these connections. A few years ago, Greathouse was giving a 4x4 tour to three siblings from New Mexico. The visitors had come to Telluride, eager to learn more about their grandfather, who had lived and worked here in the early 1900s. It was the heyday of the area’s mining industry and the man, Bill Johnston, was a teamster who supplied the mines, driving a team of horses led by his favorite mare, Fanny. Greathouse, a driver for Dave’s Mountain Tours, and his clients were tracing Johnston’s route that day. As they travelled along Tomboy Road, the siblings told Greathouse about an old photo they had of their granddad. “I asked if they brought the photo along, thinking maybe I would recognize where it was taken.” Fearing their precious photograph, an original handed down to them, might get damaged, the visitors said they didn’t have it with

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them. So, Greathouse got them to describe it. Then he reached for his tour book, a binder of photos that he keeps to show clients, and opened it to a page containing the reprint of a photo from 1907. It was the same photo. Recalls Greathouse, “They were really excited. They had wanted to place the location of this photo of their granddad.” He adds that the photo of Johnston was taken in the Royer Gulch area, not too far from the Social Tunnel, and that he did indeed bring the siblings to that very spot that day. “It was very special for them.” And that’s the thing about Telluride. Those meaningful connections, experiences that are once in a lifetime, bucket list activities, mind-blowing adventures. They are all here, right on our very doorstep. Take David Sussman. In 1977, when he was 12,

a virus attacked his spine and he was told that he wouldn’t walk again. The California native had other ideas. He embarked on months of intensive physical therapy, ultimately regaining partial mobility. And he got on with life, including a 1996 trip to Telluride where the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program taught him how to ski. Sussman went on to become a certified ski instructor and then realized his dream — in 2015, he moved to Telluride full-time where he volunteers and serves on the TASP board. Many times over the years, Sussman was told that he would be in a wheelchair by the time he was 40. “And I said to myself ‘we’ll see about that’,” he recalls wryly. In fact, it wasn’t until around the time of his 50th birthday when Sussman saw that the need for a wheelchair was fast approaching. Before that day arrived, though, he wanted to achieve something big, something unforgettable. Luckily there was something big and unforgettable right outside his back door: Telluride’s Via Ferrata.


David Sussman traverses the Via Ferrata at the east end of Telluride’s box canyon.

M’Lin Miller

The Via, a climbing route of fixed cables and stemples that traverses the rock face at the east end of the box canyon, isn’t for the faint of heart, but on July 9, 2017 Sussman (accompanied by guides M’lin Miller, Jon Miller and Derek Nunner, all good friends) realized his dream. “Honestly, it was mind-blowing,” he says. “It was without question the greatest day of my life.” Stories like these illustrate the uniqueness of Telluride’s backyard. It’s a backyard with a lot to offer. These mountains, for instance, are home to the highest concentration of 13,000- and 14,000foot peaks in North America. Hikers and mountain bikers have a menu of trails that range from extreme to a short, pre-breakfast jaunt. Each are characterful with colorful meadows of wildflow-

Ryan Bonneau

SUSSMAN WANTED TO ACHIEVE SOMETHING BIG, SOMETHING UNFORGETTABLE.

ers, cascading waterfalls or fascinating artifacts from the area’s mining history. For 4x4 enthusiasts, Black Bear Road regularly tops the list of the most challenging four-wheel-drive routes in the Lower 48. It’s also jaw-droppingly beautiful (and best explored with a guide doing the driving). Or outdoors enthusiasts can take to the water by fly fishing or stand up paddle boarding, or by just grabbing an inner tube and drifting along the San Miguel on a warm summer’s day. Says Borof, “It’s the place I fell in love with. It’s what the American West is all about — those

wide-open spaces that give us these opportunities for adventure.” It’s an idea — these “opportunities for adventure” — that anyone who has spent time in Telluride can identify with. And as we plot our next hike or bike or climb, whether we are planning an overnight trek, a hair-raising 4x4 trip, a quiet day’s fishing, or a lazy afternoon floating on an alpine lake or river, these beautiful, muchloved, majestic mountains, Telluride’s beautiful backyard, stand waiting, ready for our adventures of a lifetime. Reprinted from summer 2018 issue.

TELLURIDE’S AMAZING VIA FERRATA Courtesy of Mountain Trip

Italy’s original via ferrata (which roughly translates into “iron road”) were built during World War I to help Italian troops move around the Dolomite mountains with a clever system of iron rungs and cables fixed upon vertiginous mountainsides. Telluride’s Via Ferrata was the brainchild of local Chuck Kroger who had climbed one on a European trip. In 2006, Kroger, a master ironworker and passionate hiker and climber, started work on the sheer rockface at the east end of Telluride’s valley. Kroger forged the rungs himself and then scaled the wall to install them, often after dark to keep his venture a secret. Sadly, on Christmas Day 2007, the much-loved Kroger passed away after a battle with cancer. Before he became too unwell, friends helped him finish the route, which locals often refer to as the Krogerata in tribute to a truly great person and his amazing idea.

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MASK

HYGIENE

PHYSICAL DISTANCING 6 ft

6 ft

DO YOUR PART WITH ALL YOUR HEART

Let’s all stay healthy together by following these guidelines: Wear a face mask in all public indoor places (and outside when social distancing is not possible).

STAY HOME

Wash your hands frequently. Maintain social distance of 6 feet. No large group gatherings.

CALL A DOCTOR

Stay home when you are sick. Get tested immediately if you experience symptoms.

Check out visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current guidelines & safety protocol.


A COMMUNITY FIRST

COMMUNITY

Telluriders near and far respond to pandemic with kindness, generosity, camaraderie BY ERIN SPILLANE

Ryan Bonneau

Ryan Bonneau

T

elluride might be a world-class resort, but it is also a caring and close-knit community. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, that community has risen to many challenges, coming together — while staying apart — with kindness, generosity and camaraderie. Telluriders have donated over $1 million to local relief funds. They are also involved in a wide range of initiatives, ranging from supporting Navajo communities in the Four Corners region to making masks and more. One of those mask makers, Maggie McNally, is refusing payment, instead asking recipients to donate to a nonprofit. Others, including Melissa Sumpter, Deb Gesmundo, Kathleen Morgan and Luci Reeve, have been sewing and distributing masks to essential workers, local food banks and others. Says Reeve, “I leave a bowl of masks outside my door if anyone needs one. I just ask that they pay it forward.” The community also recognized that Telluride High School’s class of 2020 was missing out and, led by THS Principal Sara Kimble, swung into action with Adopt-A-Senior; the donation of trees, by nonprofit Seas of Trees, for every senior; virtual prom and scholarship nights broadcast live on KOTO; and a car parade that saw townspeople line Colorado Avenue to cheer the graduates-to-be. Local filmmakers and photographers have been

busy too. Stash Wislocki and Don Hannah created a film of senior speeches, Keith Hill made a slideshow of teachers’ own graduation photos and Jack Plantz took individual photos of each senior on the front steps of the Telluride Elementary School (the traditional location of the senior class photo) and then created a composite, while THS juniors took on the creation of the annual senior slideshow. And graduation? Our seniors graduated on the Gondola, students and their families riding the “G” to the mid-station, where they received their diplomas in a socially distant but quintessentially Telluride ceremony. Megan Murphy made “Miner masks” specially for the ceremony. Telluride businesses have likewise rolled up their sleeves and gotten to work. Trout Lake residents Erin and Jay Dace used the manufacturing connections of their medical distribution business to supply 100,000 donated masks to San Miguel County, high-risk hospitals and three reservations. Telluride Distilling Co. turned their attention from their small-batch vodka, schnapps and whiskey to manufacture free hand sanitizer for the community. Local boutique Two Skirts fundraised for the Telluride Medical Center and the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art donated to the Telluride Foundation and more. Vicki Renda, owner of Vicki’s Fresh Food Movement, a grocery

(Left to right) Angel Baskets’ food bank in Telluride; THS senior parade; graduating by Gondola; locally made hand sanitizer and homemade masks.

delivery service that sources from regional food producers, received funding from an anonymous donor and used it, as well as funds of her own, to donate eggs, milk, cheese, honey, potatoes and meat to Angel Baskets food banks. Renda is now receiving donations from the wider community, enabling the initiative to continue, while Mountain Roots is sponsoring CSA boxes for donation to the food banks all summer. Throughout, we have been reminded that our community stretches beyond the borders of San Miguel County, with second-homeowners accounting for two-thirds of the money raised for the Telluride Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Fund alone, according to TF’s Katie Singer. And then there is Joel Quadracci. A part-timer for 25-plus years, the Wisconsin and Aldasoro resident, who owns the largest printing business in the country, reached out to friend Mike Shimkonis, a long-time local and realtor, with a plan: to manufacture and donate 21,000 masks — each with the logo “San Miguel Strong” — and 400 gallons of hand sanitizer through his family’s Windhover Foundation. Says Quadracci, “We aren’t lucky enough to be able to live in Telluride full time, but we can still be part of the community. And being part of the community is more than just using the amenities there, it’s also about giving back if you can give back.”

Go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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At an elevation of 9500 ft, this automotive and motorcycle concours event will take your breath away.

photo credit: Corey Davis


This year, the Guide asked Telluride’s fifth graders to tell us what they love about school. That’s right, we actually asked kids to tell us what’s fun and interesting about school. These talented writers delivered, responding with essays that were endearing, insightful and, in places, laugh-out-loud funny. Charged with reading this year’s essays were our judges, Mountain Village Mayor Laila Benitez, Telluride Town Councilmember Adrienne Christy, Telluride Middle School humanities teacher Mo Hanna, former San Miguel County Commissioner Joan May, One to One Mentoring Program Manager Kathleen Morgan and Wilkinson Public Library Public Services Manager Jill Wilson. Judging blindly, they managed to find a top four out of the 71 exceptional essays submitted. We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we did.

, E D I R U L L E T N I L O O C S I L O O H C S

MY SCHOOL

I

By R u b y C i ec i u ch

stood nervously at the beginning of the track, the sun blinding me with its magnificent rays, shining down on my skin like a warm blanket. I saw the bikers round the corner pedaling furiously. The biker on my relay team was at the end of the track, but I swelled with excitement anyway. I braced myself to start skiing as soon as my biker touched my sweaty hands. Closer ... closer … almost. I feel my hand get tapped. “Go!” I rocketed out of the gate, skating so hard my thighs were already starting to burn, but magically my Nordic skis flew through the snow, boosting me with confidence. Charging ahead, I was still in the back of the pack, but I was gaining on the other competitors. I could hear my friends cheering me on. Push after push, my arms started to feel like 300-pound weights. I looked at the teachers and students cheering me on with beaming smiles, no matter which team I was on. My teammate stood eagerly waiting for me to tag her. I lunged for her hand and just barely touched it before she dove into action. My friends and teachers hugged me and I returned their hugs, out of breath, but happy about the race, even though nobody cared who won or lost. We were all one big community, friends no matter which team we were on. I slowly made my way to the finish line, overcome with fatigue, to cheer on my remaining teammates in the relay race. A few short minutes passed before we saw the first competitor dashing for the finish line costumed in a cow suit, pink tutu and a neon green wig. He sprinted to the finish line breaking through the light pink ribbon. Then the next contestant came and the next and the next until finally the last contestant came. My team ended last, but I didn’t care. Everyone was cheering and giving hugs. I was just glad I got to experience this with the Telluride Mountain School. My school.

2020 ESSAY CONTEST

ONE OF A KIND By No r a Haskell

G

oing to school in Telluride is a privilege. We are a school district of opportunities, outspokenness and a supportive, safe, encouraging learning environment. It opens you up to many special and one-of-a-kind opportunities. During January and February, we have the option of skiing, snowboarding, climbing and science, or skating and art on Wednesdays. No matter which activity you choose, you have a blast, get a lot of exercise and learn educational and behavioral lessons. Along with Winter PE, we get to ski with the Telluride Adaptive Sports Program, which helps people with disabilities. We got to try a variety of equipment and techniques to get an insight on the good that TASP does. We have been the first people on Earth to see certain films from the Telluride Film Festival and Mountainfilm. It is an experience that is very special and wonderful. We have also had many outdoor learning experiences that have really benefited our education, including Syracuse Bachelor Mine in Ouray, Mesa Verde in Montezuma County and the Ute Indian Museum in Montrose. All were very interesting, memorable and special. In Telluride, we are encouraged to speak our minds and stand up for our beliefs. We are making changes that are benefiting our world. The Telluride Intermediate School alone is the home of three environmental clubs, Earth Guardians, Plastic Pollution Preventers and Fundraiser Fridays. Each has raised awareness continued on page 32 visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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2020 ESSAY CONTEST

A LOVING COMMUNITY

continued from page 31 / One Of A Kind

about problems facing our world and made some important accomplishments. The school district also has an encouraging, safe and supportive learning environment. Peers are constantly pushing each other to do their best. Our teachers and staff are trustworthy and are always there to talk to. We have a very hardworking principal, Sheree Lynn. She is very supportive and constantly says hi and is friendly to anyone and everyone. No matter how busy she is, she always seems to make the time. Our schools provide many opportunities to students and staff that are one of a kind. Our learning environment supports both students and staff and is continuously positive. And, we are outspoken and not scared to stand up for what really matters.

By C r icke t Ke e s

T

elluride Intermediate School is a respectful, loving habitat. Mistakes are made, but they don’t slow us down! Our teachers are friendly and awesome. We have many tools, activities, options and strategies for learning and having fun. Anyways, here are my reasons why this is my opinion. First off, we have lots of tools and utilities. We get pillows and comfy seats whilst reading. Also, we get iPads. iPads are very helpful because we can use learning apps so all individuals can understand the concept of what we are learning. Another reason is we get activities. Since our school is located in a ski town, we get to take ski lessons with Winter PE or ski club. If skiing or snowboarding just isn’t your thing, you can climb. The school has a climbing room near the third-grade section. We take Winter PE every Wednesday for five weeks during the winter. Our ski instructors are welcoming and kind. We get to enjoy the mountain with this wonderful activity. That’s not the only activity we get. We also get field trips. One particular field trip of my liking is the Colorado National Monument. If you want, you can put your child in the dual-immersion so they get to speak Spanish and English. I particularly am in the dual-immersion. It is very helpful and super fun. If you want, you can put your child in the traditional classes to do school the traditional way with all English. We also have plenty of school spirit. Our principal, Mrs. Lynn, hosts a special week, spirit week. Every day you get a theme. You can participate in this enjoyable week by dressing up like the theme. For example, if the theme is surf to school, you could dress up like a person on the beach. Remember, you don’t have to participate. You can wear your own style to school. Every Friday, we have a Miner Meeting. What happens is we represent students who did good things. I hope you now know all the special things the Telluride Intermediate School has to offer, but most importantly, we are a loving community. 32

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GOOD KARMA ALL AROUND By O tto line Squir es

O

ne of the reasons that school in Telluride is cool, is that we have many fundraisers. We have groups who raise money every Friday, Fundraiser Friday, and we also have groups that put together something for only a week. We have donated lots of money to save endangered animals, and one time, we had a food drive! I think donating money makes our school one of a kind, like the most-rare monarch butterfly. Of course, other schools do that too, but not many that I know of. At the time I was writing this, Fundraiser Friday had just raised $160 to donate to polar animals. And this week, since it is Valentine’s Day, our student leaders are selling holiday grams. I love how many people want to gift in my school. It makes me proud that we want to help out, and make animals or people’s lives better. I also love how many people want to donate. There are many people who would want to set up a group, but it takes a lot to give the money you could have been planning to spend after school on something much larger. It’s probably because we are all very caring kids and we want other people to be as fortunate as we are. After all, doesn’t it feel so good to make sure someone is good? Also, I believe it is amazing that our teachers want to assist us in setting these things up. They are giving their time which could be spent eating lunch or chilling. It is very kind of them and it goes to show how much they care about those kinds of things too. In short, I feel as though our school is a very good example of how caring we should be. I always hope that people who see us will want to do something to aid their community. In conclusion, that is one of my favorite things about Telluride schools. We have many more awesome things, but fundraising is one of my favorites.


GO WITH THE FLOW

Get on the fast track in the Telluride Bike Park. Accessible by chairlift and the gondola, freeride through miles of gravity-fed flow trails on manicured, rain-absorbent surfaces, big bank turns and arching bridges.

TellurideSkiResort.com/BikePark

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MADELINE RESIDENCE #1406, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE 1 Bed | 1 Bath | 1,250 SF | $829,900 Tracy Boyce 970.708.0737

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503 WEST COLORADO AVENUE, TELLURIDE 4 Beds | 4 Baths | 2,000 SF | $1,595,000 Jake McTigue 970.708.1451

Member of the Exclusive

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SNOWMOBILE TELLURIDE

PERMITTEE

PERMITTEE

PERMITTEE

970-728-4475 · TellurideOutfitters.com


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

This summer, Telluride’s stunning backyard stands ready to comfort and recharge body, mind and spirit.

ADVENTURE AWAITS

Ryan Bonneau

BIKING Tony Demin

The Telluride region provides a striking backdrop for road and mountain bikers with a variety of terrain for all abilities. Mountain bikers will find challenging trails that explore old mining roads and basins high above the box canyon and moderate trails that link several former railroad tracks throughout the valley. The Telluride Ski Resort’s new bike park is a fun option. Road riding is also popular along the scenic San Juan Skyway. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

WATER SPORTS

Tony Demin

Ryan Bonneau

As the snow melts, area streams and free-flowing rivers become playgrounds for river rafting and kayaking. The solitude and natural beauty of the canyons can be explored by floating their streams. The Telluride area offers an array of river sports with vistas that are second to none. Local outfitters take paddlers on half-day or full-day excursions through class II to III+ rapids. There is also kayaking and SUPing (stand up paddle boarding) on the rivers and alpine lakes, all great ways to soak up the sun while getting a workout. If that sounds like too much hard work, grab an inner tube and meander on the San Miguel River from Town Park downstream on a summer’s afternoon.

ROCK CLIMBING

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4X4 OFF ROAD

Ryan Bonneau

Routes and boulders for all abilities in the greater Telluride region include jagged peaks and extensive wall faces that provide a variety of climbing and bouldering opportunities. From classic routes on Ophir Wall to moderate climbs on Pipeline and the ladder/cable system of Telluride’s own Via Ferrata, the ascents are diverse and plentiful. For those learning the sport or seeking instruction, a number of guide services are available and local maps, information and gear can be found at many sport shops. The Telluride Mountain Club reminds climbers of all abilities that many climbs, in particular the Via Ferrata, require technical climbing abilities and appropriate gear.

Telluride’s mining days carved a string of roads into the San Juan Mountains over 100 years ago. Today, those same routes offer unparalleled access to the high country and its world-famous mining towns. Experienced guides lead tours over mountain passes past ghost towns and high alpine meadows filled with wildflowers and wildlife. Explore the rugged beauty of the area on one of the many 4x4 tours over Imogene Pass to the old mining camp of Tomboy, up over Ophir Pass to the town of Silverton, or traverse Black Bear Pass, one of the more difficult and notorious routes.


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

FLY FISHING

Ryan Bonneau

Fly fishing in the greater Telluride region can challenge experts and entertain beginning enthusiasts. Telluride is an angler’s paradise in every season, offering a different experience for fishing the rivers and lakes in the area. Many locals will tell you that their favorite time to cast is at dusk when the sunset over the river creates a rainbow glow. From the Dolores River to the easily accessible San Miguel River, there is a fishing adventure for everyone. Local guides know the ins and outs of the area’s rivers and streams, offering guided tours and invaluable advice about flies and water complexities.

GOLF

HIKING / RUNNING

Trails weaving throughout the mountains afford hikers a quick jaunt to a nearby waterfall or an opportunity to spend the day traversing high-alpine-terrain, uncovering old mining ruins and viewing wildflowers. The trail system in the region has extensive options, including short strolls, day hikes or overnight backpacking adventures into the high country. Both the towns of Telluride and Mountain Village have trails that lead out of town in all directions, where hikers can experience the cool mountain air and unrivaled scenery.

Playing golf at the Telluride Golf Club is a magnificent experience. The 18-hole course meanders along high-altitude terrain with views of the surrounding mountains. The course has a putting green, practice facilities and four sets of tees for different skill levels, as well as a pro shop. According to science, golf balls fly further at elevation, although the spectacular views and resident wildlife make keeping your eye on the ball tricky.

Tony Demin

HORSEBACK / WAGON RIDES

Horseback riding in the San Juans is a favorite memorymaker for families. Have an Old West experience by riding through aspen groves and alpine meadows on horseback. Outfitters offer guided daytime outings, half-day trail rides and overnight trips. Or try a wagon ride followed by a gourmet dinner served outdoors. Altogether an unforgettable experience.

Ryan Bonneau

Tony Demin

This summer, some outfitters and guides will need to modify their operations due to COVID-19. Please contact the outfitter in advance for the most current information. Also, go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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FAVORITE HIKES

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

The surrounding mountains offer hikers everything from a short jaunt to an all-day, highaltitude adventure. These are some favorites; varied trails for all levels, covering diverse terrain both adjacent to town and farther afield.

RZRs

A relative newcomer to the outdoor adventure scene, RZRs are small recreational off-road vehicles with options for one, two or four riders. They are also a lot of fun. Local outfitters offer half-day tours of the backcountry for first-timers as well as experienced four-wheelers, with activities to suit all tastes and levels. Buckle up and have a blast.

TOWN PARK

LAKE HOPE About 5.5 miles round trip, this trail begins with a meander through a forest broken by streams and meadows of wildflowers. Eventually the track, whose total elevation gain is 1,700 feet, ascends via steep switchbacks to alpine tundra before finishing at Lake Hope, 12,445 feet above sea level. Access the trailhead by driving south on Hwy. 145 and turning left at Trout Lake and then left onto Forest Road no. 627. Ryan Bonneau

A hub of activity year-round, the park is home to family fun in the heart of Telluride. In the summer, you’ll find softball fields, tennis courts, a disc golf course, basketball courts, sand volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, kid’s fishing pond, a skate park, the Imagination Station and a 25-yard, six-lane pool. The hike to Upper Bear Creek Falls can be accessed from the park, and a short walk through the woods behind the softball fields takes nature lovers to Lower Bear Creek Falls. For current information on park and pool access, visit telluride-co.gov/186/Town-Park.

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visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

BEAR CREEK This popular hike is about 4.5 miles round trip. Starting at South Pine Street, the beautiful double track takes you into Bear Creek Canyon, gaining 1,050 feet in elevation on its way to a cascading waterfall at the base of Wasatch Basin, itself a gateway to longer hikes.

JUD WIEBE Starting at the Cornet Creek Bridge on North Aspen, the Wiebe is a 3-mile-long loop that vigorously climbs about 1,200 feet to a summit ridge with, panoramic views that encompass not just Telluride below, but also Bridal Veil Falls, the valleys above Bear Creek and the Telluride Ski Resort. SNEFFELS HIGHLINE At 13 miles long and with an elevation gain of 2,274 feet, the challenging Sneffels Highline is best accessed by getting on the Wiebe at North Aspen, taking the left at the top of the third switchback to Mill Creek and heading north at the sign. Ascend through aspens and steeply crisscross a scree field before topping out at a 12,000-foot ridge and descending through a valley lush with wildflowers.

Before any hike, consult trail descriptions and a map, check weather and be prepared. Also, see trails protocol, p.43.

Ryan Bonneau

Telluride Outfitters

RIDGE TRAIL This trail offers two options. Ride the Gondola to Station St. Sophia and take the trail down to Mountain Village. Or, start in the Village and hike up to Station San Sophia. There you can opt to go higher still via See Forever or use Telluride Trail to head down — steeply at times — to the town of Telluride. Jaw-dropping views and peaceful switchbacks through aspen forest await.


ZILLOW DOESN’T KNOW TRULIA DOESN’T KNOW REALTOR.COM DOESN’T KNOW THE WALL STREET JOURNAL DOESN’T KNOW

CNBC DOESN’T KNOW YOUR ATTORNEY DOESN’T KNOW YOUR ACCOUNTANT DOESN’T KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOR DOESN’T KNOW

YOUR MAGIC EIGHT BALL DOESN’T KNOW

WE KNOW

DWIGHT|MARTIN TEAM

A L E X M A R T I N | 9 7 0 . 7 2 9 . 1 6 9 1 | A L E X @ G O T E L LU R I D E . C O M M A R C I N O S T R O M E C K I | 9 7 0 . 7 0 8 . 4 1 1 9 | M A R C I N @ G O T E L LU R I D E . C O M J O N D W I G H T | 9 7 0 . 7 0 8 . 0 6 9 1 | J O N @ G O T E L LU R I D E . C O M

g o te l l u r i d e . co m


BEWITCHING BRIDAL VEIL Iconic waterfall is a perfect summertime stop BY ELIZABETH GUEST

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ome spring, the melting snows of the peaks Mountain Club and finished last fall, now travels surrounding Telluride send water down1.2 miles from the Idarado mine buildings at the wards via innumerable rivulets, creeks, streams end of the paved road east of town up to the base and, most dramatically, 365-foot Bridal Veil Falls, of the falls. Colorado’s tallest, free-falling waterfall. An iconic “The trail winds through giant talus fields and symbol of the area’s stunning scenery, Bridal Veil forest, breaking out of the woods in a couple of presides over the east end spectacular spots,” says the of our box canyon, with a TMC’s president, Josh Borof. ‘IT ALLOWS FOR A MUCH historic 113-year-old hy“It allows for a much more MORE INTIMATE SENSE droelectric power planet intimate sense of geology and OF GEOLOGY AND THE perched beside the top of the outdoors than you get the falls. from the road.” OUTDOORS.’ In the past, hikers The hike is moderate in JOSH BOROF shared Black Bear Road difficulty, with a dramatic with 4x4 and motorbike enthusiasts in order to finish. Arriving at the waterfall, the cascading alaccess the bottom of Bridal Veil Falls — aptly pine waters create a unique micro-climate that is named for the cascade’s resemblance to a wedhumid and cool, and very unlike anywhere else in ding veil — but not anymore. The new Bridal high-alpine Telluride. It’s not surprising that the Veil Creek Trail, spearheaded by the Telluride trail has been an objective of the TMC for years.


OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

TRAIL ETIQUETTE More than ever, trails and public lands are providing us with exercise, helping us with our physical and mental health and to escape from everyday stresses. The following are important reminders on how best to enjoy the region’s trails. Bridal Veil Falls (left) is Colorado’s tallest free-falling waterfall. At the top of the falls is the Smuggler-Union Hydroelectric Power Plant, built in 1907 to power the SmugglerUnion Mine, and the plant manager’s then-residence. The new Bridal Veil Creek Trail (above) travels 1.2 miles from the Idarado mine buildings to the base of the falls.

Share the trail and remember to  be cognizant and considerate of others. Be nice and say hi. When yielding, stop and move to  the outside of the trail. Hikers and bikers yield to horses, bikers yield to hikers and downhill recreators yield to uphill activity. Avoid muddy trails in order to pre  vent rutting and widening. Be a good steward of the environ  ment by staying on the trail and leaving no trace. Don’t cut switchbacks. 

Ryan Bonneau

Refrain from performing unautho  rized trail work and don’t sabotage others’ recreation experiences.

Says Borof, “We went from 25 years of no trail to a sure thing overnight. It was all about getting everyone on the same page.” According to Borof, the TMC collaborated with the Idarado Mine Company, San Miguel County and the Town of Telluride on land acquisition, easements and funding for the project. Workers from the Southwest Conservation Corps built the trail. Borof also explained that the trail’s completion is just the beginning. Next is a 47-foot suspension bridge that will traverse Ingram Creek. With fundraising complete and construction due to start in the fall, the structure will pass 40 feet above the creek. In the meantime, Ingram Creek is

passable on foot, although water levels vary depending on season and time of day. Hikers should be prepared to hop across rocks. The TMC has other plans in the works, including 40 miles of new trails. “We’re working on trails to add more hiking to Telluride,” says Borof, urging visitors, part-timers and locals alike to learn about and support the TMC’s work by visiting its web site at telluridemountainclub.org. In the meantime, Borof adds that he is looking forward to seeing trail users enjoy the new route. “It’s easily the coolest trail in the area by miles.”

Want to support a healthy trail system in and around Telluride? Visit the Telluride Mountain Club’s web site at telluridemountainclub.org and click on Support Us.

Learn more about trail etiquette by visiting telluridemountainclub.org.

Tony Demin

LOVE TMC

Follow these COVID-19-specific  suggestions: practice physical distancing; observe federal, state and local guidelines; avoid high-risk activities; don’t recreate in public places if you are sick or have been in contact with a positive case; stay alert and communicate; avoid crowds and busy trails; and limit activities with individuals outside your household.

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Telluride’s PreK-12 Independent School Montessori ages 3-6, Experiential and IB Education Join our supportive community!

TE LL R U ISE

Learn, Explore, Excel Contact Tara Barnett (970) 728-1969 x14 or tbarnett@telluridemtnschool.org

www.telluridemtnschool.org Financial Aid Available

EAT LOCAL SHOP LOCAL PLAY LOCAL

Just breathe the mountain air. Va cationTellu r ide.com

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866 . 7 5 4 . 8 7 7 2

VisitTelluride.com/Tellurise

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Ryan Bonneau

No matter where you are coming from, the drive to Telluride is packed with stunning scenery and fun pit stops. The old saying about the journey and the destination? This summer, both will make you smile.

From Denver

GETTING HERE

ROAD TRIP!

Driving to your favorite mountain town this summer?

Taking I-70 west, you should hit Palisade, a hub for fruit growers and vineyards, right around lunchtime. For a perfect midday repast, take exit 42 and follow the Palisade Fruit and Wine Byway, enjoying a picnic lunch in one of the numerous orchards or gardens on the route, or strolling Palisade’s downtown for a good lunch spot. Stock up on locally grown wine and fruit and get back on the road. Soon after, you will turn southward, passing through high-alpine desert en route to Montrose. Stop here for gas and groceries before continuing on to Ridgway, where the film True Grit (think John Wayne, not Hailee Steinfeld) was filmed. This small town beside the Uncompahgre River is also the location of the last traffic light you’ll see on the trip. From Ridgway, begin your climb up into the San Juan Mountains, passing Ralph Lauren’s working ranch as you head up to Dallas Divide, 10,000 feet above sea level. Before you reach the top of Dallas, turn into the viewpoint on the left, perfect for taking in (and photographing) stunning scenery that includes the snaggletoothed Sneffels Range. Hop back in the car and carry on. Telluride is tantalizingly close.

BY ERIN SPILLANE

From Phoenix

A favorite journey of ours because it passes through an enormous range of environments and climates, from low to high desert and, ultimately, high alpine. Drivers feeling hungry as early as Flagstaff should continue on I-17 until it hits Route 66. Turn right onto the famous byway and visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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GETTING HERE

Traveling With Children Made Easy!

Rent full size cribs, highchairs, toys, and more

Specializing in children’s equipment rentals in Telluride since 1996.

Delivery, setup & pickup with no extra fees! 970.318.6543 www.travelinglite.biz 46

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From Texas

Decisions await Texans driving to Telluride. Do the trip in one day or two? Allow for a detour? Leaving I-40 before Albuquerque means a few extra hours on the road, but you could visit enchanting Santa Fe or dramatic Bandelier National Monument, a stunning preserve of volcanic landscapes and archaeological ruins. Or you could stick with the quickest route, via Albuquerque, as far as southern Colorado and then sidetrack to Durango, home of the Durango-Silverton Railroad, or turn left just past Mancos and spend time at the fascinating Mesa Verde National Park. No matter the route, once in southwest Colorado, stop at the Dolores Food Market, famous for its homemade tamales and pot pies. Load up and then enjoy the last leg of the trip. First, historic Rico and then the climb to Lizard Head Pass, with teasing glimpses of the San Juans coming into view now and then. Top Lizard Head at 10,246 feet with the mountains now firmly in view and head downhill, past Trout Lake and the Ophir Needles. Telluride awaits.

Ryan Bonneau

head east to where the road is lined with trendy gastropubs and cafes that make for an ideal refueling stop. Or hold out until you get to the Cameron Trading Post, perched alongside the Little Colorado River Gorge. It’s a touristy spot that includes a hotel, restaurant, shop and gallery of Native American art, but it also contains a hidden gem: a tranquil, flower-filled garden with low sandstone benches perfect for a picnic or to nibble on a to-go Navajo taco. Back in the car, you have twoand-a-bit hours to the Four Corners Monument, a must-see, if only to get the iconic photo of having a hand and foot in four states — Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah — at once. From there, Cortez, Colo., is the perfect grocery and gas stop before you exchange desert scenery for the lush greens and looming peaks of the San Juans … and Telluride.

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW TELLURIDE? Work your brain with some T-ride trivia while on the road.


1

 To celebrate the Gondola’s

20th birthday, a special, commemorative cabin was commissioned. What color is it?

2

How did the Telluride Ski Resort name the ski run Kant-Mak-M?

3

What was Telluride called before it officially became Telluride?

4

What is the longest waterfall in the Telluride area? a. Cornet Creek Falls b. Upper Bear Creek Falls c. Bridal Veil Falls

5

What is the name of the bronze statue of the girl next to the bus stop in front of Telluride Middle/High School?

7

What is the airport code for the Telluride Regional Airport?

8

On June 24, 1889, Butch Cassidy committed a crime in Telluride. What was it?

9

What is the altitude of Telluride?

10

How long does it take to travel from Telluride to Mountain Village on the Gondola?

Telluride is the first place in the world where AC electricity was used. Who made it happen?

be happy

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11

Where is the nearest traffic light to Telluride located?

12

Is there a pool on the Sky Terrace at the Madeline Hotel & Residences?

13

Name one of the festivals typically held in October in Telluride and Mountain Village.

14

What is the name of the Telluride Foundation’s annual fundraiser? When is it held

15

What is the oldest hotel in Telluride?

ANSWERS: 1. Red; 2. Kant-Mak-M was formed using the first letter of the names of former resort owners Ron and Joyce Allred’s children; 3. Columbia; 4. c. Bridal Veil Falls; 5. L.L. Nunn; 6. Sofia; 7. TEX; 8. He robbed his first bank; 9. 8,750 feet; 10. 13 minutes; 11. Ridgway; 12. Yes; 13. Original Thinkers and Telluride Horror Show (Cars & Colors sometimes takes place in September); 14. Rundola, Fourth of July; 15. New Sheridan Hotel.

spread joy

make art!

workshops • online classes • privates • events ahhaa.org / 970.728.3886

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FESTIVALS

TELLURIDE FESTIVALS

Ryan Bonneau

Summertime is festival time. This summer, though, many local festivals are on hold until 2021, with others still going ahead.

BALLOON FEST>>

YOGA FESTIVAL >>

May 15-25, 2020

See you in 2021

See you in 2021

Utterly fascinating and unique, since 1978 Mountainfilm has featured the best films about mountains and mountain culture in the world. This year’s event takes place online, with festivalgoers purchasing a virtual pass to unlock a trove of over 100 films, a symposium and additional presentations.

The event draws hot-air balloons and balloonists to the box canyon for a truly unforgettable sight as the colorful orbs are launched mornings from Town Park to float serenely above the valley. Keep June 4-6, 2021 free, when the balloons return.

An event that manages to be both intimate and world class, this inspirational festival, canceled this year, draws participants to a long weekend that offers intensive trainings, classes, lectures, meditations, music and more. Hold that pose until June 24-27, 2021.

WILD WEST >>

Ryan Bonneau

See you in 2021

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Underserved youth from Boys and Girls Clubs around the country gather in Telluride for a week of youth-centered mentorship and activities. The box canyon will miss this incredible event this year, but is looking forward to next year’s gathering, July 7-13, 2021.

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Ryan Bonneau

MOUNTAINFILM >>

WOW FESTIVAL>> June 11-14, 2020 This boutique-sized fest incorporates everything from yoga to weight training to aerobics all to promote good health and fitness. The event is in the midst of reinventing itself. Keep an eye on the WOW web site, telluridewow.live, for details.

BLUEGRASS >> See you in 2021 The preeminent Americana roots music festival, for nearly 50 years beloved Bluegrass has brought an astonishing range of musicians to the Town Park stage for the summer solstice weekend. Canceled in 2020, this magnificent event returns next year with performances, workshops and musical collaborations galore.


FESTIVALS

WINE FESTIVAL >>

AMERICANA MUSIC >> See you in 2021

See you in 2021 Oenophiles and foodies flock to the box canyon for a celebration of wines and cuisine. This year’s fest is up in the air. As of press time, it had been postponed, possibly until 2021 (when the gathering is scheduled to take place June 24 to 27), but with a hope for some special events this summer. For the latest, visit telluridewinefestival.com.

PLEIN AIR >> See you in 2021 The Sheridan Arts Foundation brings renowned plein air artists to town for a week of painting, exhibits, a quickdraw competition and more, all a fundraiser for the nonprofit. This year’s festival has been postponed.

American songwriters and acoustic music are normally in the spotlight for this event, although organizers have pressed pause on the tunes until next year.

ART + ARCHITECTURE WEEKEND >> July 13-19 The ultimate home tour, the event features local architects, designers, artists and chefs exhibiting their best works, performances and food. Expect this year’s event to be reimagined with smaller and more street-focused activities. Stay tuned to tellurideartandarchitecture.com for further details.

CHAMBER MUSIC >> See you in 2021

Christine Lashley

On hiatus in 2020, this wonderful event returns next year, when it will return to drawing some of the finest musicians in the country for performances at the Palm Theatre and Town Park.

JAZZ FESTIVAL >> See you in 2021!

RIDE FESTIVAL >> See you in 2021

This summer, be sure to check visittelluride.com/play/festivals-events/ for the most updated information before heading to an event. Go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and guidelines.

August 10-16, 2020 Telluride’s most eclectic fest where experts, enthusiasts and scientists explore fungi — edible, toxic and psychoactive. As of press time, the festival is promising a virtual component and the possibility of a live gathering. Stay tuned for further developments via tellurideinstitute.org.

FILM FEST >> September 3-7, 2020 A film lover’s film fest, Telluride manages to be relevant and esoteric with an event that showcases the best in film with screenings, brilliantly crafted retrospectives, tributes, lively Q&As and more. As of press time, the 2020 show has been greenlighted. Be sure to check out telluridefilmfestival.org for the latest.

BLUES & BREWS >> September 18-20, 2020 Telluride’s feisty farewell kiss to its summer season is this rollicking event that features more than 50 microbreweries and 170 brews, a world-class rock and blues lineup and more, including family-friendly activities. As of press time, the festival is a go, but hit up tellurideblues.com for up-todate information closer to the event dates. Ryan Bonneau

This celebration of all things rock ‘n’ roll draws indie acts, emerging musicians and big names to Town Park for a rollicking, memorable experience. The electric guitars and amps may have been stashed for 2020, but they will be back next year for sure.

This most American of art forms may have packed away its saxophones, trumpets and trombones for 2020, but fear not jazz fans, the event, which includes music, Second Line parade and whiskey tasting, is set to return next year — August 13-15, 2021 to be exact. We can’t wait.

MUSHROOM >>

CARS & COLORS >> September 24-27, 2020 Start your engines for this four-day event set against the backdrop of the area’s fall foliage. A must for all who love cars, and the 2020 event promises to be no different. Still, check in via Facebook or online at carsandcolors.com for up-to-date information.

ORIGINAL THINKERS >> October 1-4, 2020 Ready to have your mind blown? This intriguing festival offers a unique blend of art, ideas and film, with diverse and select programming that emphasizes innovative, compelling storytelling. As of press time, the original thinkers among the festival’s organizers are mulling this year’s format, which might be terrestrial, virtual or both. Keep in touch via originalthinkers.com.

HORROR SHOW >> October 16-18, 2020 Colorado’s first and longestrunning horror film festival attracts the latest and best in horror films. Organizers are proceeding as usual with the 2020 event, but check in at telluridehorrorshow.com for up-to-date information as festival-time approaches.

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THE SCENE | ARTS

BEYOND THE GALLERY Public art is art for all to see BY SUZANNE CHEAVENS

W

hen Sofia first made her appearance at the bus stop adjacent to the school campus in Telluride’s west end, night-time bus drivers would sometimes pull over to pick her up, before realizing she was a sculpture. Bronzed and pony-tailed, Sofia has been waiting there since March 2005, when, shouldering a bag and toting schoolbooks, she was unveiled, the first commission of the Art in Public Places Program. Sculptor Richard Arnold envisioned a companion to the children who use the bus stop, one who encouraged interaction. Before long, Sofia could be seen adorned with scarves, capes, Santa hats, even feather boas, depending on the mood of passersby and the seasons. These days, she is sometimes seen clad in a face mask. Established in 1977, the Art in Public Places Program is administered by Colorado Creative Industries and has overseen the installation of artwork by more than 300 artists statewide to the tune of $11 million.

In addition to Sofia, Telluride is home to a few arresting public art installations, like the striking mural on Colorado Avenue. Since 2016, the external wall of the building that overlooks the Ghost Town courtyard has played host to a mural covering the entire two-story surface. The brainchild of Mountain50

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film, the mural is updated most years, usually in

the weeks running up to the Memorial Weekend festival. The current mural is the work of Native American artist Greg Deal of Colorado Springs. Says Mountainfilm’s gallery manager, Drew Ludwig, “Every year, Mountainfilm seeks to bring visual art to festivalgoers. It’s a big part of what we do. A few years ago, the building’s own-

“PUBLIC ART IS INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT. IT’S PART OF WHAT MAKES OUR TOWN UNIQUE.” ers gave us the opportunity to do a mural there, so we did.” The resulting artwork was a success, inserting public art into the local conversation and inspiring Telluride Town Council to update its rules to more easily allow public art. This in turn led to other installations around town, like the Penny Bear. The Penny Bear — officially called Ursa Ravus — is the first project reviewed by the town’s new Public Art Commission. Steven Gluckstern, a longtime local and passionate art-lover, was the impetus behind the gleaming, penny-studded ursine. Gluckstern owned another version of the towering sculpture at his Santa Fe home and thought it would be a good fit for Telluride. “ ‘This would be cool’,” Gluckstern recalls thinking. “ ‘It will be the first example of public art.’ I was happy to go through the process.” The Public Art Commission approved the project unanimously, but there was a snag. The spot along the River Trail, where Gluckstern envisioned the bear looming in the riparian willows and grasses, actually fell under the purview of the Parks & Recreation Commission. That entity, Gluckstern says, ruled against the


All photos by Ryan Bonneau

THE SCENE | ARTS

SOFIA Telluride Middle/High School bus stop at 725 West Colorado Avenue MOUNTAINFILM MURAL Ghost Town courtyard at 210 West Colorado Avenue PENNY BEAR East Colorado Avenue and North Pinion Street

coppery creature, arguing that Penny Bear was a grizzly, which, unlike black bears, are not found in Colorado. Eventually, the Public Art Commission approved the installation on the right-of-way adjacent to Gluckstern’s home at East Colorado and North Pinion. From there, Gluckstern and his wife, Judy, delight in how their commissioned sculpture, created by the artists known as Mr. and

Mrs. Ferguson Art (Robert and Lisa Ferguson), attracts a steady stream of visitors. Lured by its 15-foot height and its coppered skin composed of 187,000 pennies, Penny Bear is a beloved attraction. “I was happy to be the guinea pig to help set up a system,” Gluckstern says. “Public art is incredibly important. It’s part of what makes our town unique. I’m happy to have it here.” visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Art For Home and Self Summer Moving Sale! 970.728.3355

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171 S. Pine St. Telluride

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THE SCENE

OPEN AIR MAIN STREET

LOVE FOOD

Ryan Bonneau

Main Street will have an al fresco feel this summer, with the westbound lane of Colorado Avenue closed to traffic to allow shops and restaurants space to flow onto the sidewalk and street. Additional tables and seating will be placed around town and in pocket parks, so take-out cuisine can be enjoyed in the open air.

TOGETHER!

Working with the Telluride Foundation and Ah Haa School for the Arts, artist Tavares Strachan is launching a striking new community engagement project. Titled Together, it will include construction of a neon sculpture of the words “We are in this together” on the slopes beneath the Gondola above Station Mountain Village. Stay tuned for more on this innovative and timely initiative.

COOL ART

VIRTUAL AH HAA Telluride’s beloved art hub, the Ah Haa School for the Arts, is cutting edge this summer. First, Ah Haa’s summer 2020 programming is embracing alternative formats, including online, private group and oneon-one classes. The nonprofit’s iconic summer fundraiser, the Ah Haa Art Auction, currently scheduled for July 17, is also contemplating new formats with the possibility of holding the traditional event, a virtual auction or a combination. Fans will know that Ah Haa is partway through a move into new digs at the corner of Pacific Avenue and South Fir Street. To support that move and a continuation of programming, as well as stay updated on classes and the art auction, visit ahhaa.org.

FRESH AIR, FRESH FARE Food carts offer scrumptious grab & go! COLORADO AVENUE AT NORTH OAK STREET Gyro Cart Greek treats Diggity Doggs Hot dogs & more COLORADO AVENUE AT ELKS PARK Mountain High Ice Cream Nice & cool for summer

ARTWALK REIMAGINED The clever, creative minds at Telluride Arts have reimagined this summer’s Art Walk series, which will take place on the first Thursday of each month beginning June 4. Galleries will showcase works in their front windows to minimize numbers indoors, while street musicians and artists entertain us outdoors.

NEW MARKET Mountain Village has a light and lovely new supermarket. Located beside Market Plaza Station, the Village Market occupies the same space as its predecessor, but now boasts a new layout with large windows, a fireplace and indoor seating. Expanded offerings include a state-ofthe-art commercial kitchen and deli with cut-to-order meats, fish and shellfish, a sushi bar and bakery.

Grilled Cheese & BBQ As delicious as it sounds TELLURIDE GONDOLA PLAZA Telluride Twisted Treats Pretzels, shaved ice & waffles PhilAm Egg rolls & banana bites HERITAGE PLAZA, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Wok of Joy Homemade Thai street food The Madeline Hotel Cart Hotel chefs dish up outdoors

This summer, it is a good idea to call ahead to restaurants for hours and type of service being offered (dine-in/take-out). Also, check out visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360 53


The Residences at the Fairmont offers hassle-free deeded fractional home ownership in Telluride, and the amenities to make each visit wonderful and relaxing.

Prices range from $20,000 to $495,000. Experience the Lodge before your purchase – inquire about preferred rates. Call or stop by Village Real Estate, located at the base in the Mountain Village. 970.728.2330 • www.telluridevillagerealestate.com


All photos by Ryan Bonneau

FARM TO TABLE & BACK Small-scale food waste projects take root, benefiting local food producers BY ELIZABETH GUEST

E

very day, after her young charges have gone Ossola’s trailer too. home, Montessori preschool teacher Mer“Anything that keeps compostable material edith Schneider loads buckets of scraps into her out of the landfill helps,” Ossola says. “Every decitruck — leftovers, food waste brought in by famsion you make in your house to be better to the ilies and even post-Halloween pumpkins — to environment gets multiplied in a restaurant by feed to the pigs on her farm in nearby Norwood. the volumes of people who come, so we feel like we’re making a difference.” Schneider isn’t alone. As fresh, farm-to-table The contents of the compost trailer are then food grows in popularity, Telluride’s commitment to sustainable dining has extended to sending food transported to Ossola Family Farms, a Montrose farm purchased in 2018 by waste back to area farms for Ossola’s extended family. composting or other uses. There, the nutrient-rich Main Street eatery The THE BRAINCHILD OF compost enriches soil both Butcher and The Baker has MEGAN OSSOLA, THE in the fields and greena compost trailer parked house. Ossola’s nephew, COMPOST TRAILER WAS behind the restaurant Ryan Ossola, runs the farm, ESTABLISHED WITH that collects thousands of growing tomatoes, greens, pounds of food waste. The HELP FROM A TOWN OF peppers, melons and more, brainchild of Butcher’s TELLURIDE GREEN GRANT. with plans to develop owner, Megan Ossola, the worm composting and an receptacle was established heirloom apple orchard. Some of the produce then with help from a Town of Telluride Green Grant ends up back on Butcher’s tables. Ossola takes and is available to other businesses and the public. Neighboring restaurant La Cocina de Luz, for pride in using as much produce as possible from the farm, as well as from other regional growers. instance, has started dumping its food waste into

THE SCENE | DINING

“When it comes to farm-to-table, we’re your team,” Ossola says. “It’s a fun challenge, kind of like the farm where we are about to grow all of our own produce, or at least as much as we can. We’ll always do produce, and get meat, poultry and eggs from neighboring organic farms.” An example, she adds, is Mindy Perkovich’s Mountain Roots Produce out of Mancos, south of Telluride. Ossola says that she swears by their onions and seasonal vegetables, as well as Perkovich’s potatoes, which are used exclusively in the restaurant’s fries, chips and more, explaining, “The cool thing about The Butcher and The Baker and Mindy is their focus is on root vegetable and storage crops, so we can get yearlong produce. I told her about this one-of-a-kind potato, the Kennebec. They planted a huge crop, we bought them all and we used them until we ran out at the end of February.”

Ossola acknowledges that it can be challenging at times to emphasize regional and organic alongside incorporating additional initiatives like the compost trailer and running a busy restaurant, but insists that she is determined to make it work. “These environmental decisions take up space, but they make it easier to sleep at night.”

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, it is a good idea to call ahead to restaurants for hours and type of service being offered (dine-in/take-out). Also, check out visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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RETAIL THERAPY

All photos by Ryan Bonneau

MOUNTAIN TOWN FASHION BY JESSE JAMES MCTIGUE

Twentysomething, single and female in Telluride in the mid-90s, the go-to outfit consisted of Carhartt workman pants (tight in the butt), a tank top (to show off muscular arms) and a Patagonia fleece. Or maybe a T-shirt and ripped jeans — the kind you wear out naturally, not the kind you buy preripped. Since then, young fashionistas have moved to town bringing their style, creating terms like “mountain chic” and sparking the rise of the mountain town boutique.

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SCARPE since 1995

TWO SKIRTS since 2001

Owner: Jen DiFiore Location: 250 East Pacific Ave.

Owner: Kristin Holbrook Location: 127 West Colorado Ave.

DiFiore calls Scarpe “sophisticated” and “fun”. The store is lit by large windows and grounded by weathered hardwood floors, giving it a minimalist vibe. The refined simplicity of the store matches the clothes. “We really believe in finding the everyday basics with gorgeous fabrications and quality — things you can have in your closets for years,” DiFiore says. To stay current, DiFiore travels to New York City and Los Angeles where she “trend spots”, buying what she feels is wearable and practical. She brings back what can be worn anywhere in the world for any occasion, including to the local bars and restaurants in Telluride. “Telluride isn’t what it was 25 years ago. There is more style going on in this town.” Why shop at Scarpe? “Fashion makes us happy.”

“Some people say it’s like walking into a candy store,” Holbrook says, noting that she arranges the clothes by color. “It’s colorful, feminine and fun.” Holbrook started Two Skirts in 2001 to bring a dress shop to Telluride. “I was ahead of my time,” she recalls. Now, Holbrook is in the center of town and packs her boutique full of high-end brands from make-up to jeans to dresses. “I’m a maximist. I like people to have choices.” Like the other boutique owners, Holbrook goes on buying trips to New York City, but also scours social media to stay current and find brands that people are familiar with, as well as those they may have never heard of. Why shop at Two Skirts? “I have changed the way people feel about getting dressed in Telluride. And, I always have a great sale.”


RETAIL THERAPY

SUBLIME since 2014 Owner: Teryl Dahl Location: 126 West Colorado Ave.

Dahl sees Sublime as more edgy and fun, calling the vibe “relaxed” with “SoCal street style”. She started Sublime to provide casual brands and to cater to teens, a niche she noticed was untouched in the Telluride boutique scene. The Sublime style is influenced by Dahl’s buying trips to L.A., where she sees trends that she calls “more hip”. Like the other boutique owners, she doesn’t buy “extreme trends,” but selects for her clientele. “You get to know your customers and as you buy you think ‘so and so would love this’,” she says. With many clients from L.A. and New York City, Dahl says they shop in Sublime because they have time when they’re in Telluride and they’ve become friends. “I’ve lived here 25 years. You get to know people. And I love what I do.” Why shop at Sublime? “It’s nice to get the mom and daughter in here shopping together.”

DOWN TO EARTH since 1994 Owner: Lauren Read since 2017 Location: 236 West Colorado Ave.

Read compares the funky boho vibe of Down to Earth to an Anthropologie store. She notes the rustic yet refined feel of both the space and the clothes. She points out the reclaimed wood and flat steel that cover the walls providing texture, illustrative of what she calls the “down-to-earth vibe”. Buying for the store, Read is influenced by diversity from foreign cultures and local artisans. She travels internationally, to her home state of Louisiana and to L.A. for buying trips. “I like being exposed to different styles,” she says. “There are so many cool things happening elsewhere that haven’t made it to Colorado or Telluride.” Why shop at Down to Earth? As Read looks afar for influences, she also looks close to home. “I try very hard to support local artists,” she says. “I’m way hip to that.”

TELLURIDE TOGGERY since 1972

SOCIETY TELLURIDE since 2018

Owners: Wendy Basham & Todd Tice since 2004 Location: 109 East Colorado Ave.

Owner: Lynn Jansen Location: 109 West Colorado Ave.

The Toggery has been in the same Main Street location, selling clothes to locals and visitors, since 1972. Owners Wendy Basham and Todd Tice make sure it stays true to its roots, while also evolving to meet the increasingly refined tastes of its customers. Basham calls the Toggery “a casual lifestyle clothing boutique” and names brands like Lucky, Free People and Johnny Wass to define the store’s vibe. The vast square footage allows Basham and Tice to fill it with men’s, women’s and children’s clothing, as well as gifts, houseware items and shoes. Basham is proud that they offer something for everybody. It is the store’s appeal to entire families that Basham believes sets it apart from other stores in Telluride. “Families will come in, spread out and spend a lot of time here,” she says, adding that the vintage T-shirts are a huge hit and “a store within a store”. Why shop at Toggery? “It has become a destination when you get to Main Street. We keep the vibe friendly.”

Located in the historic Bank of Telluride building, Society Telluride inhabits a unique and beautiful space and offers women’s and men’s clothing, accessories, jewelry, beauty and gift items, what owner Lynn Jansen describes as “a curated collection of brands from around the world”. Jansen adds that she is “committed to offering a variety of price points, so there is something for everyone.” There is also a focus on experiential retail, meaning that Society Telluride is not just a place to shop, but also to come together to meet, relax and have a cup of coffee or a glass of wine. Says Jansen, “It’s a place where everyone feels welcome.” Why shop at Society Telluride? “Meet a friend for coffee or a glass of champagne then shop. Society Telluride is about the experience.” Additional reporting by Erin Spillane.

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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TEE TIME NEVER SOUNDED SO GOOD

Telluride Ski & Gold Club members receive private morning tee times and unlimited use of the golf practice facility, ski passes, private dining, use of the Spa at The Peaks and a full social calendar.

For membership information, please call 970.728.7302 • TellurideSkiandGolfClub.com


RETAIL THERAPY

COOLfinds AH HAA COOKBOOK

compiled by Ah Haa School for the Arts / $22 BANK JOB: THE STORY OF CD WAGGONER

by Peter Kenworthy / $16

A TELLURIDE READING LIST This summer, escape the digital world and luxuriate in a great read about your favorite mountain town. Choose from any of these Telluride-centric titles, just a sampling of what’s available from beloved local bookshop Between the Covers at 224 West Colorado Ave.

TELLURIDE HIKING GUIDE

by Susan Kees / $18 TOMBOY BRIDE

50th Anniversary Edition by Harriett Backus / $19 IMPROBABLE FORTUNES

by Jeffrey Price / $18 SLEEPING BIG IN SMALLVILLE: A Telluride Story by Jerry Vass /

$22 TAILS OF TELLURIDE: Good to the Bone by Eileen Burns / $35 GOODNIGHT TELLURIDE

by Chris Beavers & Mary Storey / $25 TELLURIDE: TOP OF THE WORLD

by Tom Tatum / $16 TELLURIDE TRAILS: Hiking Passes, Loops & Summits of Southwest Colorado by Don J. Scarmuzzi

/ $24 CONVERSATIONS AT 9,000 FEET

compiled by Davine Pera / $20 VALLEY FLOOR ANTHOLOGY: Writings & Images from the Telluride Community compiled

by Rhonda Claridge / $10 TELLURIDE: THE OUTLAW SPIRIT OF A COLORADO TOWN

Photos & Tales by Ingrid Lundahl / $95 HOLD THE MEAT: Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes

by Eliza Gavin / $60 TELLURIDE: A SILVER PAST, A GOLDEN FUTURE

by Susan Dalton / $60 visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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STAY & PLAY

WOW FACTOR Jaw-dropping views abound from these hotel decks BY ERIN SPILLANE

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elluride’s lodging scene has a lot to offer: luxe in-room comforts, exciting dining options, enjoyable bar scene, relaxing spas and professional, friendly staff located either in the historic, vibrant town of Telluride or its elegant, high-alpine twin, Mountain Village. Many also offer fun and lively decks with views sure to make jaws drop.

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Madeline Hotel and Residences

There are hotel decks and then there’s the Sky Terrace at the Madeline. This stylish, elevated patio, which is reserved for guests and special events, boasts a heated outdoor pool complemented by hot tubs and fire pits. The uniqueness of the setting competes with the views, which stretch west to the Wilsons and north to the San Sophias. With food and beverage options available — including chefs grilling poolside — the scene at the Sky Terrace is fun, delicious and, trust us, absolutely unforgettable. Mountain Lodge

The Peaks Resort and Spa

Nestled between Village Bypass and Double Cabins ski runs, this rustic retreat has a superb deck that features a heated swimming pool in a serene, sun-dappled, sylvan setting. It also happens to offer up some stupendous scenery: the majestic San Sophia mountain range to the north. This summer, the Mountain Lodge is delivering takeout and customized grocery orders directly to guests’ accommodation, meaning guests can enjoy a spectacular poolside picnic while taking in those equally spectacular views.

A Telluride Ski Resort property, the Peaks sits serenely alongside the golf course and has a large deck that offers exquisite and varied 180-degree views of the ski resort to the south, the Wilsons (Mount Wilson, Wilson Peak and Sunshine Mountain) to the west and the San Sophias to the north. It combines these stunning vistas with compelling après and dining scenes that showcase rustic Colorado cuisine enhanced by global influences, festive beverages and an emphasis on sustainable and local. Run, don’t walk.

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TOWN OF TELLURIDE Camel’s Garden Hotel

Serenity is the key word at the Camel’s Garden, which enjoys a tranquil perch on the south side of town, beside the river. There’s a second-floor deck with a 25-foot hot tub and views of Ajax, the iconic peak that presides over the east end of the box canyon. Guests also have the option of breakfast on a separate second-floor deck. This one occupies a sunny spot that faces south toward a beautiful, forested flank of the ski resort. Doubly blissful.


STAY & PLAY

EXCEPTIONAL STAYS INTRODUCES HYPERCLEAN Property management company Exceptional Stays has introduced Hyperclean for its portfolio of properties. Backed by advice from the Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and state and local health guidelines, the initiative provides new practices and standards for cleaning. Exceptional Stays founder/owner Christina Casas says the goal is to ensure that “our Exceptional Stays guests and owners are confident and comfortable when they join us this summer.” She adds that Exceptional Stays is sharing what it has learned through a video course and certification program with the wider Telluride lodging community, which is itself adding COVIDaware protocols to already-robust, existing standards. The Hyperclean initiative is innovative, with a range of clever, evidence-based measures that emphasize cleanliness and the health and wellbeing of arriving guests, property owners, property managers and housekeeping staff. For starters, Exceptional Stays has introduced signage and information packs to guest communication prior to arrival and in-home with phone numbers, resources and information necessary to stay up to date on current restrictions and advice. The property company, which became the preferred Telluride partner of Marriott International in 2019, is placing personal protective equipment, disinfectant and sanitizing products in each property, as well as a gift basket New Sheridan Hotel

This historic Main Street establishment has presided gracefully over downtown for more than 100 years, all the while hosting an outsize share of outlaws, miners, ski bums and celebrities. The hotel’s roof deck takes guests high above bustling Colorado Avenue and deposits them into a sleekbut-laidback outdoor space where the 360-degree views are pretty much guaranteed to astonish. Combine this with a delish bar menu and creative cocktails, and any night of the week spent at the Sheridan’s rooftop bar becomes super special.

with wellness items and niceties. All decorative bedding has been replaced with white duvet covers to allow for bleaching and other commercial cleaning methods between stays. And, a minimum of 54 hours is now required between stays to execute the new cleaning regime, as well as ensure the wellbeing of staff. Measures have also been taken to address physical distancing, such as contactless delivery of meals by Blue Tractor’s Heirloom, with fresh, locally grown ingredients. Explains Casas, “Strategic, luxury partnerships are in place to offer

HYPERCLEAN IS INNOVATIVE, WITH CLEVER, EVIDENCEBASED MEASURES. our guests exclusive pantry-stocking services and safe dining options.” In addition, Exceptional Stays’ reservations and concierge teams will have no in-person interactions with guests or owners. Property managers will have limited contact and avoid visits during guest or owner stays, handling necessary trouble-shooting by phone or online if possible. The housekeeping team will have no contact with shortterm guests and only enter residences four hours after departure. When midstay cleans are needed, protocols are in place to minimize risks. Says Casa, “We researched the most effective cleaning products for this new environment, and have integrated them alongside the new, more stringent cleaning procedures. My staff and I have been briefed and trained on all new policies, including San Miguel County health orders and recommendations, WHO and CDC guidelines. It is our hope that our Hyperclean program will instill a sense of safety and comfort in our guests and homeowners.”

To learn more about COVID-19 protocols that Telluride lodging establishments have implemented, go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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T r e a t Yo u r s e l f t o S p e c t a c u l a r

America’s 100 Best Wine Restaurants W INE

ENTHUSIAST

“Best of” Award of Excellence W INE

SPEC TATOR

Allred’s offers contemporary American cuisine and features one of the best wine selections in the country. Take it all in while admiring the breathtaking view of the town of Telluride from the main dining room.

Located at the top of the gondola at the beautiful San Sophia Station

allredsrestaurant.com | 855.762.5759


SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS

Spectacular mountains set the stage for an unforgettable wedding

A MAGICAL TELLURIDE CEREMONY

BY KATIE KLINGSPORN

Photos © Preston Utley

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aylor Tarr and Ross Walker spent their relatively short courtship far away from one another. She lived in Denver, where she worked in orthopedic device sales, and he bounced between Texas and Oregon, doing investment entrepreneurship. During that time, mountains brought them together. Some of their earliest dates were hikes, and later they enjoyed skiing and getting high into the summer backcountry. Recalls Taylor, “As we were dating, the mountains were just really special to us.”

That’s why, when they got engaged in the fall of 2018, the pair knew they wanted get married amidst Colorado’s peaks. Though Taylor lived in the Front Range, when she shopped around for local mountain venues, nothing was quite right. “It just wasn’t the epic scene that I was thinking in my mind.” One day, someone suggested Taylor check out

Telluride. She googled it. Bingo. unforgettable. The morning of the “San Sophia popped up. I was event started out rainy and cold, ‘THE MOUNTAINS like, ‘oh my gosh. I have never which wasn’t ideal. But wedding WERE JUST REALLY seen something so beautiful. coordinator Meehan Fee with TelSPECIAL TO US.’ I’ve got to go there. I want to luride Unveiled was “phenomenal” TAYLOR TARR get married there’.” at planning for contingencies and When they inquired with the everyone got dressed and ready Telluride Ski Resort, it had one slot available for as planned, with “hair goddess” Megan Keever the couple’s window of time, June 15, 2019, Taylor Murray styling Taylor’s tresses. remembers. “We just locked it in. We committed As the late afternoon ceremony neared, the sight unseen.” weather remained stubbornly crummy, Taylor says, Taylor and Ross planned a visit in March to adding, “Right about the time the ceremony was check out the venue and meet with vendors. When to start, there was this huge wall of clouds moving they arrived, a spring storm had other plans, acin and then it just started reversing. It ended up cording to Taylor. “It was a complete blizzard and working out really well and then we had a beautiful we could not see anything. We couldn’t even go up clear night.” to the overlook it was snowing so hard.” After the ceremony, which was held at the Going into their wedding weekend, then, there stunning San Sophia Overlook on the Telluride were a few unknowns, but magical Telluride did Ski Resort, everyone headed to Allred’s for the renot disappoint. The couple turned their destinaception. There, guests continued to be blown away tion wedding into a multi-day mini-vacation for by the views as they dined, enjoyed cakes by Fig themselves and their 100 guests. Taylor and her and Bloom and danced to tunes spun by DJ Ryan girlfriends enjoyed a private bootcamp class at Smith. The best part? Before they cut the cake, Fuel, followed by a luncheon at the New Sheridan the couple retreated outside with photographer Chophouse, while Walker and his buddies went Preston Utley for a few private sunset shots. rafting with Telluride Outside. Says Taylor, “It was just us and him. It was just a On their wedding day, Ross and Taylor treated really still, quiet moment looking out to the west themselves and their guests to a mountain-top with the sun setting … to just kind of soak in the ceremony and reception that, Taylor says, were reality of our wedding day.” visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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FAMILY ACTIVITIES

KIDS’ PLAY

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BIKE Grab a bike — and recommendations — from a local outfitter and soon you’ll be giggling louder than your kids. In Telluride, start with the River Trail and then head one of two ways: east to the bottom of Bridal Veil Falls, or west to the Valley Floor and out to Society Turn via the paved bike path or single track that follows the river. In Mountain Village, a wealth of family friendly trails or the Telluride Ski Resort’s bike park guarantee two-wheeled fun.

SPLASH The mountains around Telluride are the headwaters of many tributaries and home to crystal-clear alpine lakes where families can add fishing, rafting or standup paddle boarding to their outdoor adventure mix. Kids can fish at the Town Park pond or take their parents tubing on the San Miguel River. Town Park also has a swimming complex with shower facilities and a heated outdoor pool, although be sure to check telluride-co. gov/185/Pool for the latest on opening dates and more.

Tony Demin

For families, summertime in Telluride means sun-drenched, fun-filled days that stretch endlessly with the whole world out there, just waiting to be explored.

HIKE In-town hikes like Bear Creek and the River Trail give families lots of options for exploring the box canyon. Farther afield, the Keystone Gorge Trail that begins in Lawson Hill or the Lake Hope Trail south of town are surefire memory makers. Just remember to consult hike descriptions, check the weather forecast and be prepared with appropriate clothing and, of course, water and snacks.

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360


FAMILY ACTIVITIES

FAMILY FUN IS EASY BEST LIBRARY… ANYWHERE … EVER

Ryan Bonneau

Looking for a kid-friendly indoor venue where you can be in the mountains, but not on the mountain? Go no further than the Wilkinson Public Library, where all ages will find opportunities to play, explore and learn. Our award-winning library embraces Telluride’s kids of all ages. And vice versa. For instance, the summer reading program, Camp Telluride, is accessible and trackable online and open to everyone, even adults. For updated information on this and other summer programming, plus the latest on opening dates and times, go to telluridelibrary.org.

TOUR THROUGH TIME The Telluride Historical Museum brings

Tony Demin

Ryan Bonneau

history to life through family-friendly exhibits and programs. Sitting at the top of North Fir Street, housed in Telluride’s original community hospital, the museum has 10 rooms of permanent collections, each with its own theme, and a large gallery with an exhibit that changes yearly. More than history under glass, the museum offers interactive displays like the popular mining sluice and outdoor mining exhibit. History buffs can enjoy historical and architectural tours. This summer, before visiting, check out telluridemuseum.org for opening dates, times, programs and up-to-date information.

KIDS’ CAMPS & PROGRAMS Adventures for All

For nearly 40 years, Telluride Academy has

been sharing its love for exploration and adventure with kids ages 5 to 17. Founded by long-time local Wendy Brooks, this Telluride institution has grown from humble backyard beginnings to a leader in outdoor and adventure programming for kids. For summer 2020 camp information and updates, visit tellurideacademy.org

Have an Ah Haa Moment Kids looking to

learn a new medium, add to an already robust portfolio or simply have fun with art should head to Telluride’s much-loved arts education hub, the Ah Haa School for the Arts. The 2020 summertime program for kids and teens is embracing alternative formats, including online, private group and one-on-one classes. Visit ahhaa.org for the latest.

Rock On!

Joan Jett was fond of singing “I love rock ‘n’ roll”. Does your budding Heartbreaker share that love? If so, check out the Rock and Roll Academy’s Summer Rock Camp. Weeklong sessions

guide students through the process of being in a band, from choosing music and instruments to giving a concert. For the latest on summer 2020 programs, visit telluriderockandrollacademy.com

Science is Cool In Telluride, the Pinhead Institute makes science

Be Rad

cool with exciting summer programming that brings STEM to life. For summer 2020, the clever folks at Pinhead will offer virtual camps, with the necessary materials, called “camp kits”, provided in advance. For more, visit pinheadinstitute.org.

experienced instructors not only teach young people how to skate in a safe, supportive and totally rad environment, they also emphasize patience, perseverance, focus and respect, qualities that come in handy in real life too. Visit thedropboardshop.com for up-to-date information on summer 2020 camps.

At the Drop Boardshop’s Telluride Skate Camp,

This summer, it’s a good idea to check the relevant web site for up-to-date information. Also, go to visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety to obtain current protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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SPECIAL FROM THE TELLURIDE ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

BOND WITH A

REALTOR

When it comes to local knowledge, one can’t have too much.

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re you ignoring the biggest investment of your life? In the past few turbulent months many of us probably called our financial advisor at least once. We talk about our portfolio and the current state of the stock market, we strategize and make corrections of the course. But how many of us called our local Realtor? Real estate is still the best investment we can make today. The right property will continue to appreciate and perhaps even generate income, not to mention the favorable tax benefits and all-time low interest rates. Unlike the stock market, we have control and our investment can’t disappear overnight. While it’s always a good time to buy the right real estate, many of us will sit on the sidelines and miss an opportunity to act. That is why, now more than ever is the time to get expert advice. There is no one better to help you set roots in the Box Canyon than your Realtor. They are immersed in every aspect of the community. From facilitating growth by helping people find their dream home to giving back and actively participating in the conversation of property rights preservation on local, state and national levels. They volunteer their time and energy on numerous organizations such as One to One Mentors, Just for Kids Foundation, Telluride Aids Benefit, Telluride Fire Department, Search and Rescue, Sr. Luncheon, Adopt-a-Highway, and many more.

Our Realtors also show local support through direct funding. The Telluride Associations of Realtors First Time Homebuyers Assistance Fund is an initiative that since its inception in 2002 has distributed over 500 grants totaling nearly $700,000 and helping 716 individuals achieve their life-long dream of owning a home. The Hoot Brown Memorial Scholarship awards local graduating seniors with outstanding achievements in sports and academics. To date the program has distributed close to $70,000. Additionally, TAR and individual real estate offices contribute to the Colorado Flight Alliance which ensures easy travels to and from the Telluride region from all over the country. Realtors are the trusted experts who have their finger on the pulse of our market and the trends that drive it. So, when it comes to managing the most important, valuable, and long-term investment in your life, your Telluride Realtor has got you covered.

REALTORS ARE THE TRUSTED EXPERTS WHO HAVE THEIR FINGER ON THE PULSE OF OUR MARKET.

telluriderealtors.net

Find a real estate expert in the Telluride region Whether you are a first-time home buyer or a seasoned real estate investor, The Telluride Association of Realtors is here for you. Their website is an excellent resource for buyers and sellers connecting you with a tried-andtrue local agent to work with. A REALTOR® is held to a higher standard of ethics and has an immaculate professional conduct record. He or she has completed extensive education hours and knows the ins and outs of living, buying and selling in San Miguel County. This means that you will be represented with the highest level of integrity, knowledge and professionalism.


HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS

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A ‘JOY IN CURATING ART’

hen Telluride Gallery of Fine Art owner Ashley Hayward arrived in Telluride, it wasn’t merely love at first sight. It was a waterfall: “I felt like I had found a piece of myself that I didn’t know was missing.” A week later, Hayward and her husband, Michael Goldberg, had placed an offer on a house and started brainstorming ways they gallery, and the gallery’s team was remarkable,” could engage meaningfully with the town. As the Hayward explains. “The stars aligned. Purchasdaughter of James Hayward, a famous conteming the gallery was the easiest decision I’ve ever porary abstract artist, Hayward leaned towards made in my life.” opening a gallery. Her husband has an MBA Since acquiring the gallery, Hayward has from Stanford and could run the business side remodeled the space, allowing larger works to of things while she, with a degree in fine arts and be viewed, and added five sliding art wall storage art history, could curate the art. They began to vaults. “The sliding storage is a delightful surprise pop into Telluride’s for our visitors. Just galleries and while when they think they enjoyed all of they’ve seen it all, ‘THE STARS ALIGNED. them, something there’s more.” PURCHASING THE GALLERY spoke to them about Hayward has also WAS THE EASIEST DECISION the Telluride Gallery worked to create close I’VE EVER MADE IN MY LIFE.’ of Fine Art. to 25 artist videos, ASHLEY HAYWARD As luck would have so that visitors to the it, the then-owners gallery know the story Will and Hilary Thompson were looking for of the work they sell. “I want people to know the a way to move on. It was serendipity that they vision behind these pieces. All of these artists, started talking. “The aligned vision going forward whether figurative or abstract, have a passion. They with Bärbel Hacke, long-time director of the have tapped into their deep well of their knowing.”

How Ashley Hayward and Michael Goldberg found Telluride and the Gallery of Fine Art BY EMILY SHOFF

During the interviews, Hayward always asks the same question about how the artist knows when a piece is done. Curiously, they all have a similar answer: A work is finished when it has a life of its own. This is the joy in curating art, Hayward explains, meeting the artists, learning the common goal that many are striving towards, creating something new that vibrates in the world. During the pandemic, the gallery worked to keep a connection with both artists and clients, encouraging their artists to submit smaller pieces. The gallery then offered the works at a discount on its web site through May, and donated a portion of the proceeds to regional COVID-19 relief efforts, an initiative that will continue throughout the summer. The smaller pieces now comprise the gallery’s summer show, titled “Little Gems”. Says Hayward, “These artists normally exhibit on a large scale, so these are not only rare, but truly ‘little gems’.” visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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COMMUNITY

STRONG FOUNDATION As it looks to the future, Telluride Foundation celebrates 20 years BY SAGE MARSHALL

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Clockwise from above: Awardees of Telluride Foundation Strokes of Genius scholarships; pre-schoolers visit the Ah Haa School; a Cooking Matters class organized by Tri-County Health Network; the Local Food Initiative’s Fresh Food Hub; participants in the Rundola.

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community is only as strong as its nonprofits, and the Telluride Foundation has provided critical support to the region for the past 20 years. The organization’s roots extend back to 2000. Hideo “Joe” Morita had become a shareholder in the Telluride Ski Resort and later would buy out long-time owners Ron Allred and Jim Wells. During this time, though, the relationship of Allred and Morita extended beyond simple sales transactions. The pair wanted to ensure the Telluride community thrived and hit on the idea of forming a community nonprofit. So, they pooled some money, began reaching out to fulland part-time residents for donations and hired Paul Major to lead the then-brand-new Telluride Foundation. Major still leads the organization, which he says is centered around the action-oriented guiding values of promoting inclusion, building self-reliance and serving as a change agent.

“We’ve created a lot of stability and sustainability in the nonprofit sector since then,” he reflects. “Our values reflect the communities that we work in. They’re not meant to talk about national issues. We’re focused on the people here.” The foundation has manifested this local focus in many ways. Eschewing the traditional model of endowments like many foundations, the Telluride Foundation instead asks for fouryear commitments from donors, primarily for planning purposes. It’s an approach that has put over $60 million into the community since the foundation’s inception. It is the largest funder on the Western Slope and gives out about $1 million to more than 75 nonprofits each year. The organization also has an annual fundraiser, the Rundola, which sees runners run uphill under the Gondola each year on the Fourth of July. According to Vice President of Programs April Montgomery, though, the organization’s reach extends far beyond financial support. Says


COMMUNITY

TELLURIDE FOUNDATION TO THE RESCUE Earlier this year, the Telluride Foundation sprang into action to address the crisis brought on by COVID-19. Using funds originally set aside for its 20th anniversary celebrations, the foundation focused on getting resources — like grants from the organization’s Good Neighbor Fund — to the region’s most vulnerable people. It also set up emergency grant and low-interest loan programs for area businesses and nonprofits and provided logistical support, like webinars and weekly conference calls with local businesses, banks and local, regional, state and federal officials.

Montgomery, “It’s common with philanthropy to just provide a check, which is really a band-aid that doesn’t get at the underlying causes. We are a little different and try to solve problems, not just apply band-aids.” With this in mind, the foundation not only doles out grants, it also provides support and workshops to help other nonprofits succeed, and gives scholarships to graduating seniors and funding to early childhood education programs. Moreover, when Major and other staff members saw needs that were not being addressed, they took matters into their own hands and created their own initiatives: The Telluride Venture Accelerator has established a culture of entrepreneurship and a diversified economy by bringing early-stage startups into the community. The Local Food Initiative fosters a strong home-grown food system by supporting small farmers and growers and addressing food-access inequality. The Tri-County Health

BUSY FOUNDATION The Telluride Foundation’s endeavors include a number of wide-ranging, innovative initiatives.

Network increases healthcare access by providing health-related preventative education, screenings and dental care to the community. The Broadband Initiative makes sure the region has access to the economic driver that is high-speed internet. The Strong Neighbors Initiative helps the development of rural communities such as Norwood, Nucla and Naturita. The Skills-Based Education and Workforce Development Initiative provides skill training and apprenticeships to those affected by the loss of coal-related jobs in the west end of San Miguel and Montrose counties. The foundation is also launching a teacher housing initiative this summer. Major said he is proud of the foundation’s work over the past two decades, but added that the foundation sees the community as an equal partner in handling the complex issues the region faces. “We need to be smarter and better informed to solve big issues. Everybody needs to really commit to raising their game.”

Telluride Venture Accelerator nurtures a culture of entrepreneurship and a diversified economy by bringing early-stage startups into the community. Local Food Initiative is focused on a strong home-grown food system by supporting small farmers and growers and addressing food-access inequality. Tri-County Health Network increases healthcare access by providing health-related preventative education, screenings and dental care to the community.

Broadband Initiative makes sure the region has access to the economic driver that is high-speed internet. Strong Neighbors Initiative promotes development of rural communities. Skills-Based Education & Workforce Development Initiative provides skill training and apprenticeships to those affected by the loss of coal-related jobs in the west end of San Miguel and Montrose counties.

visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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HISTORY

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

In Telluride, quite a bit. The area’s rich history figures in the names of local establishments BY MARTINIQUE DAVIS

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emnants of Telluride’s early years are scattered throughout the area, perceptible in the architecture of historic homes and manifest in the mining relics slowly weathering in the high basins above town. Yet mementos of Telluride’s past are also preserved in the names of well-known businesses and landmarks of Telluride’s present, offering glimpses into the people and places of yesteryear that helped shape the Telluride of today. As a name, Telluride itself boasts a curious lineage. Some say the town was named for the sendoff “To-hell-you-ride,” given to fortune seekers headed to the remote San Juan Mountains during the region’s mining heyday in the 1880s. But the more accepted version of the naming of this town attests that Telluride was derived from “tellurium,” With fellow members of the Telluride Cornet Band, ‘Tomboy’ Thomas is in the middle row, third from right. A mine, town and Mountain Village eatery all owe their monikers to the nickname bestowed on this popular miner. Photo courtesy of Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved.

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Miners riding a tram bucket at the Smuggler-Union Mine in the 1880s. Photo courtesy of Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved.

a non-metallic element often associated with mineral deposits of gold. (Ironically, no tellurium was found here.) Telluride wasn’t the town’s original moniker anyway, having first been dubbed “Columbia” when the town was incorporated in 1878. Columbia was short-lived, however: The United States Postal Service refused to grant the town its own post office because a town in California had already been given that name. Today, Telluride’s transitory spell as Columbia is remembered at the Hotel Columbia, located at the base of the Gondola and home to the restaurant the Cosmopolitan, a name also borrowed from Telluride’s golden era, when the Cosmopolitan Saloon and Gambling Hall was a popular haunt. A black-and-white photograph of the original Cosmo Saloon now rests above the bar at the Cosmopolitan. Prosperity and prestige came quickly to Telluride during its mining heyday. Mines like the Sheridan, Smuggler-Union and Tomboy pumped millions of dollars into the budding local economy, their contributions leading to the community’s early evolution from dusty mining encampment to flourishing mountain town. The mining era’s contributions haven’t been forgotten, even though the community has found a new source of prosperity in the development of the ski resort. The Sheridan mine was the first claim to be registered around Telluride, and afterwards became the namesake for the New Sheridan Hotel, originally built in 1891 and still a centerpiece of

downtown Telluride. The Sheridan Opera House was actually first called the Segerberg Opera House, after its originator and visionary J. A. Segerberg, who was the manager of the New Sheridan Hotel when the Opera House opened in 1913. It later took on the name of its attached hotel, when it was reopened in the early 1960s after being shuttered for nearly 30 years. The Tomboy mine, which was the inspiration behind the naming of the Tomboy Tavern in Mountain Village, was one of the richest mines in the region. Its name was adapted from an early settler and Telluride personality, Oris Thomas, who became involved in mining efforts in Savage Basin. As the story goes, Thomas was a popular fellow known as “Tom by the Boys,” because the miners had trouble keeping his name straight. Eventually the nickname was shortened to Tomboy, and later adopted as the name for the Savage Basin-area mine and town of Tomboy, now a ghost town on the 4x4 road stretching over Imogene Pass between Telluride and Ouray. The Telluride mine with the rockiest past has to be the Smuggler-Union, now memorialized as both a run on the ski area and as Smugglers Brewpub in Telluride. Miners at the SmugglerUnion went on strike numerous times between 1901 and 1904, resulting in shootouts, assassinations and, ultimately, the arrival of militia men called in by the state to keep the peace. These namesakes represent just a handful of the many sites and personalities that played a role in the creation of present-day Telluride. Take a stroll around town, linger over the exhibits at the Telluride Historical Museum and historic plaques found throughout town, and discover the myriad gems of historical significance hidden throughout present-day Telluride. Reprinted from summer 2015 issue.


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GOLD SEASON

MESMERIZING BY JESSE JAMES MCTIGUE

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Ryan Bonneau

Five Ways to Get Lost in Fall in Telluride


GOLD SEASON

elluride’s spectacular summers are no secret. As August comes to a close, however, and the deep greens of summer give way to the bright yellows of fall, the summer crowd disperses and the town quiets. During September and October, it’s the same box canyon, just sleepier, more intimate and a little disguised as the mountainsides are cloaked in the autumnal hues of yellow, orange and red. They glow under the last light of the setting sun, and during the day, the intense colors hypnotize those who travel on the mountains’ trails.

Ryan Bonneau

Ryan Bonneau

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By Gondola: In

Telluride, the Gondola isn’t just for skiers. It’s a free, green transportation system connecting the town of Telluride to Mountain Village. Appropriately, it takes riders into the mountains, topping out at 10,800 feet before descending the other side. Get out at the top and take advantage of the multiple trails and views, or stay on and enjoy your trip above, and through, the yellowing aspen groves. By Bike: Prospect

Ryan Bonneau

Trail is one of those trails you can ride over and over, yet each time it is different. The trail begins at the top of the Gondola and meanders through wooded

areas of the ski area before taking riders on a gradual climb to the top of Lift 10. In autumn, cyclists glide over fallen aspen leaves and catch views of the surrounding mountainsides that appear ablaze with gold. Follow the descent on svelte single-track, looping back and forth to Mountain Village center. By Foot: Although

the entirety of the box canyon encompasses breathtaking beauty, in the fall it is the north side that inspires. Here the aspen groves are thicker and their golden leaves dance longer in the light of the sun. From town, find the trailheads for

the Jud Wiebe and Mill Creek Trails. Or park just out of town, up Mill Creek Road, and find Eider Creek Trail. Then hike or run and experience the velvet feel of autumn. By Jeep: Perhaps

no season is more conducive to a Sunday drive than fall. In Telluride, this entails a jeep, a mountain pass and, yes, more stunning views. Jeep tours not only allow the chance to view the colors, but also a glimpse into local history as travelers drive through relics of Telluride’s mining days. Check out Tomboy Road, Ophir Pass, Alta Lakes or Last Dollar Road,

and feel free to ask your driver questions about local history — many are part driver, part historian. By Beer: Whatever

you do to enjoy Telluride this fall, heed her call to linger just a little longer and soak in the fleeting gold colors before the last leaves fall and the vibrant colors are erased by winter’s white. Enjoy a local brew at any of the town or Mountain Village’s outdoor spots. Try the rooftop bar at the New Sheridan, the patio at Tomboy Tavern in Mountain Village or the views from the floor-to-ceiling windows at Allred’s at the top of the Gondola.

Reprinted from summer 2017 issue.

This summer, it is a good idea to call ahead to restaurants for hours and type of service being offered (dine-in/take-out), as well as to your outfitters. Also, check out visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety for current protocols and guidelines. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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TellurideSkiResort.com

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WINTER IN TELLURIDE

In Telluride, the potential for epic adventures exists year-round. But there’s something about the slap of cold air on your cheeks and the extra work it takes to get out there that makes wintertime adventures bigger, bolder and more unforgettable. Want to tick off some memorable winter adventures? Plan your Telluride bucket list. HUT IT UP A winter hut trip provides the ultimate escape. That’s because it’s stripped to the essentials: skiing, eating and sharing quality non-technology time with friends and loved ones. By day, ski or snowshoe into the hut, take some runs and drink in the beauty of the winter mountains. By night, gather around a blazing fire for a well-deserved dinner, hit up the sauna or peek outside at the smear of stars overhead. The OPUS Hut near Ophir Pass is the destination for killer backcountry ski terrain. For those who prefer lighter hut-tohut travel, the San Juan Hut System features a string of five huts.

YOUR WINTER ADVENTURE BUCKET LIST

HIKE PALMYRA Sitting at 13,320 feet in elevation, Palmyra Peak is the proud, rocky and beautiful apex of the Telluride Ski Resort. And the fact that skiers can hike to the top of the peak may just be the most awesome perk of the mountain. The hike entails a thigh-burning 2,000-foot bootpack up steep and occasionally loose terrain. But the rewards are ample: skiers get to take in the view as a sea of mountains unfolds in each direction, then strap in and ski the steep, cliff-strewn and spectacular terrain back into Black Iron Bowl.

BY KATIE KLINGSPORN

SCALE FROZEN FALLS Ice climbing might evoke frigid fingers, slippery maneuvering and harsh exposure to the elements, but in reality, kicking crampons and swinging ice axes as you ascend a beautiful wall of frozen water is an experience more ethereal than exacting. Telluride is home to several ice climbing spots, such as Bear Creek Falls and the Ames Wall, but the world-class destination of the Ouray Ice Park, where hoses and sprinklers assist each winter in creating a wonderland of frozen features, is a great option.

GRAB A HELI-DROP There’s no better time to fulfil that bucket list experience you’ve been dreaming about. A trip into the San Juans with Telluride Helitrax will certainly go down as one of the best days of your life. Helitrax has a plethora of options, from full-day heli-skiing to single-drops, backcountry guiding to heli-assisted ski touring. Enjoy dramatic terrain, an all-star guide team and untracked snow for a most favorite day. RIDE FAT TIRES Fat bikes have gained popularity in winter destinations because, simply, they are fun as hell to ride. You can explore your favorite trails under a blanket of white and get a great winter workout. Fat bikes are available to rent all over Telluride. Must-ride trails include the Valley Floor. Reprinted from summer 2018 issue.

Tony Demin visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Historic Walking Tour The Telluride area boasts a rich history and one of the West’s most iconic Victorian area mining towns. In the 1700s, the Ute Indians used the San Juan Mountains and the San Miguel River banks as summer camps. Explorers and survey parties passed through the area in the 1700s and 1800s, but it was the mining industry that brought the first European settlers in 1876 when the Sheridan Mine registered its operation in the Marshall Basin above Telluride. The mountains turned out to be loaded with zinc, lead, copper, iron and silver, but once gold was discovered, the boom was on. In a short, 20-year span, the town grew from a hodgepodge of cabins and shacks to rows of elegant Victorians and stately brick buildings. Today, many of the structures still exist, illustrating the rich history of the town while housing modern boutiques and restaurants. Telluride was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1964, the highest level of historic status given by the US Secretary of the Interior. In an effort to protect the character and authenticity of the area, Telluride established the Historic and Architectural Review Commission (HARC), which reviews new building or remodeling plans before construction begins. The Historic Walking Tour is a self-guided walk through the area’s storied past. 1. SAN MIGUEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE The courthouse was originally built on the south side of West Colorado Avenue in 1886 but burned shortly after construction. The bricks were saved to build the present courthouse less than a year later on the opposite corner (Colorado Ave. and Oak St.). Recently renovated, it is still in use today. 2. NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL & OPERA HOUSE Built in 1891, Telluride’s first hotel was destroyed by fire in 1894 and rebuilt in brick in 1895. At the same time, the Sheridan Bar was built, and it is now one of the oldest bars in the West. The bar has remained unchanged since 1895, boasting its original lead glass divider panels, mahogany wood paneling and filigree light fixtures. Patrons are served beverages on the original hand-carved cherry wood bar that was imported from Austria. The New Sheridan was recently accepted as a member of the National Trust for Historic Hotels of America. In 1913, the opera house was added and named the Segerberg Opera House, after builders J.A. and Arvid Segerberg. The building was eventually named the Sheridan Opera House after its neighboring bar and hotel. 3. THE PEKKARINE BUILDING One of the oldest structures on Colorado Avenue, this building was home to the Pekkarine family. Mr. Pekkarine emigrated to the US from Finland in the late 1800s and opened a boot shop in the basement. On the second floor, he later operated a mercantile store. The Pekkarines lived on the third floor. At the settling of the Pekkarine estate in 1974, valuable artifacts were donated to the Telluride Historical Museum. 4. ROMA BAR BUILDING The Roma Building was home to one of the town’s oldest and most raucous bars. The downstairs still contains the original 1860 Brunswich-Balke-Collender Company bar, which is carved from walnut with 12foot French mirrors. The building was most recently renovated in 2016.

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5. ST. PATRICK’S CATHOLIC CHURCH Reverend J.J. Gibbons, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church-made his first trip to Telluride from Ouray for a baptism, traveling by horseback over the slippery mountain passes. In 1896, he helped build St. Patrick’s Catholic Church of Telluride on Catholic Hill for $4,800. By 1899, the church had 200 parishoners. The wooden figures of the Stations of the Cross were carved in the Tyrol area of Austria. In 2005, the interior of St. Patrick’s was remodeled. 6. OLD WAGGONER HOUSE Charles Delos Waggoner, president of the Bank of Telluride (yellow brick building with pillars on Main Street), contrived a scheme purportedly to save his bank in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Waggoner, aka “Buck,” siphoned money from New York banks to keep his clients from losing their life savings once the Bank of Telluride could no longer pay its creditors. Waggoner testified in court, “I would rather see the New York banks lose money than the people of Telluride, most of whom have worked all their lives for the savings that were deposited in my bank.” Although rumored to be in Mexico or Canada, he was found in New Castle, Wyoming and had only $400 when he was arrested. Waggoner was sentenced to 15 years in prison but was paroled after six years. 7. TOWN HALL The building was constructed on Fir Street and Columbia Avenue in 1883 as Telluride’s first schoolhouse. The one-room structure held one teacher and 53 students and was built for $3,000. After a new school was built, the town offices occupied the building. 8. TELLURIDE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Built in 1896 and named Hall’s Hospital after its first doctor – the building served as the community hospital treating miners and townspeople until it closed in 1964 due to the diminishing population. It reopened in 1966 as the Telluride Historical Museum and was renovated in 2002. Ten rooms and outdoor exhibitions showcase Telluride’s unique and vibrant history with a vast collection of photographs, artifacts and exhibitions. 9. NORTH OAK HOUSE Built in 1900, this house was a survivor of the 1914 flood that careened down Cornet Creek, sweeping through town and depositing mud and debris from the Liberty Bell Mine down to Colorado Avenue. One woman was killed and the Sheridan Bar was filled with mud halfway to the ceiling. This house has been completely restored to its original condition and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Homes. 10. DAVIS HOUSE E.L. Davis who built this stately brick house in 1894, was a mining and real estate entrepreneur. He held an early interest in the Bullion Lode as well as numerous mining claims in the Ingram-Bridal Veil Basin and Bear Creek area. He owned all the land where the former Rio Grande Southern Train Depot now stands, as well as one-third interest in West Telluride. Davis sought to bring business to the town as vice-president of the Telluride Board of Trade. After Davis’s death, the house was sold to Dr. Oshner, who used it as a hospital, particularly during the 1918 flu epidemic. The house was renovated in 1983.


TOMBO

C. Galloping Goose This curious hybrid of auto and train rode Otto Mears’ famous railroad line in the declining years of the Rio Grande Southern. On rails, the Galloping Goose made its last run in 1953. It is now the moniker for Telluride’s public buses. D. Miner’s Union Built by the Western Federation of Miners in 1901 as a result of a period of labor strikes and protests when unionized miners were denied health care at the local hospital. E. Butch Cassidy Robbery Site By most accounts, Butch Cassidy was a minor player in his first bank robbery of San Miguel Valley Bank in 1889. The old bank burned and was replaced by the Mahr Building in 1892. F. Pick & Gad Located in what was once Telluride’s red-light district, patrons were treated to music, food, wine and ladies in this brick “parlour house” if they wore a coat and tie. G. Old Town Jail This stone jail is thought to have been built in 1885 and is now occupied by the Telluride Marshal’s Department. The town’s first calaboose, a wooden structure, was built in 1878 and is now located in Telluride Town Park’s campgrounds. H. Penn Tram Towers At the turn of the century, the east end of the canyon was laced with the cables of aerial trams that lowered ore from the mines to mills. These towers were part of the Penn Tram which conveyed ore from mines above Telluride to the mills below. I. Idarado Legacy Trail Plaques along this interpretive walk recount the mining legacy of Telluride’s east end. The trail ends at the Pandora Mill site with a stunning view of Bridal Veil Falls.

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B. Telluride Elementary School At the time of its construction in 1895, the building was considered to be the most modern of educational facilities. It was completely renovated in 1986, and an addition was built in 2000.

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ALDER

A. Lone Tree Cemetery The cemetery is located on the east end of town on Colorado Avenue and offers a glimpse into Telluride’s history and the perils of its residents during the mining-boom era when avalanches, murders, flu epidemics, mining accidents and labor strikes took many lives.

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11. L.L. NUNN HOUSE On the corner of Aspen and West Columbia, this white Victorian was bought by L.L. Nunn who financed the world’s first commercial A/C power plant, the Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant. Nunn purchased the home for his Telluride Institute, where “pinheads” from Cornell University came to expand their knowledge of the production of power. Today, Cornell University has a “Telluride House” funded by Nunn’s estate. Next door, on the corner of Aspen Street and West Columbia, is the house in which Nunn lived, which was built in 1887 and remodeled extensively in 1980. 12. RIO GRANDE SOUTHERN RAILWAY DEPOT Prior to the arrival of the railroad in 1891, oxen and mule trains, as well as horses, carried all supplies into and out of the area. The introduction of the railroad created a bustling, noisy area surrounded by boardinghouses and warehouses, some of which still stand on San Juan Avenue. Ore was hauled out of the surrounding mines and became a major revenue generator for the Rio Grande Southern Railroad. The Depot, built of wooden siding and shingles, was restored in 1991. 13. FINN TOWN This area was the center of social life for Scandanavian immigrants. On the south side of Pacific Street, Finn Town Flats (originally a boardinghouse), Finn Hall and the smaller Swede-Finn Hall (pictured, and now an Elks Lodge on the corner of Pacific and Townsend) hosted many parties and gatherings where families brought food, bands played and people danced and socialized. Continuing east, detour briefly up South Oak Street to the Dahl House, a miner’s rooming house built in the 1890s, now a private home. 14. POPCORN ALLEY The Senate, Silver Bell, Cribs and madam’s stone residences make up the restored buildings of Pacific Street’s “sporting district.” The Senate was one of the many places bustling with business between the 1880s and 1930s. The saloon and gaming room closed in 1935. The Silver Bell, built in 1890, suffered a disastrous fire in 1923. It operated as one of Telluride’s many “soda parlours” during Prohibition, and its numerous entrances hint at the other services offered there. It closed in 1959, was restored in 1991 and today houses many businesses. The three small Victorian houses standing in a row on Pacific Street, known as the Cribs, are all that remain of the “female boarding houses” that lined both sides of West Pacific Street all the way to Town Park. The Telluride Housing Authority saved these last cribs by renovating them in 1983. visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Leaving on a Jet Plane FLY ON A JET RIGHT INTO TELLURIDE

Enjoy the convenience of a full-service airport, just 10 minutes away from downtown Telluride. Now offering daily jet service on Denver Air Connection. To book, go to United.com or DenverAirConnection.com.

The Telluride destination is served by two airports, Telluride (TEX) and Montrose (MTJ). TEX now offers daily service on Denver Air from Denver (DEN), bookable through United, and MTJ offers nonstop flights from four national hubs on three major carriers this summer. | 855.421.4360 78 visittelluride.com


T R A N S P O R TAT I O N SUMMER 2020 FLIGHT MAP

TENTATIVE SUMMER 2021 FLIGHT PLAN

REGIONAL MAP LOCAL / REGIONAL AIRPORTS Telluride TEX 970. 728. 8600 Montrose Regional MTJ 970. 249. 3203 Cortez Municipal CEZ 970. 565. 7458 Durango/La Plata Cnty DRO 970. 382. 6050 Grand Junction GJT 970. 244. 9100 PRIVATE FLIGHTS Helitrax Mountain Aviation Telluride Air Taxi Telluride Flights NetJets

Miles from Telluride Miles from Telluride Moab......................... 132 Salt Lake City.......... 366

970. 728. 8377 970. 728. 4700 970. 343. 4SKY 970. 728. 1011 877. 356. 5823

AIRPORT SHUTTLES & TAXIS Alpine Luxury Limo 970. 728. 8750 Mountain Limo 888. 546. 6894 Telluride Express 888. 212. 8294 RENTAL CARS Telluride and Mountain Village Hertz Montrose Regional Airport Avis Budget Hertz National

Miles from Telluride Miles from Telluride

970. 369. 4995 800. 331. 1212 800. 527. 0700 800. 654. 3131 800. 227. 7368

Cortez..........................75 Denver...................... 330 Durango.................... 125 Grand Junction....... 127 Montrose.....................67

Flagstaff.................... 341 Scottsdale................ 492 Phoenix..................... 475

Albuquerque............ 320 Farmington............... 144 Santa Fe................... 280

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Location.

R E A L E S TAT E I S A L L A B O U T

W H E N T H E T I M E I S R I G H T, C A L L U S .

We are here to help.

TELLURIDE LUXURY RENTALS & REAL ESTATE, INC. 398 W. Colorado Avenue, Telluride | tellurideluxury.co | 970.729.0567 R O S I E C U S AC K , G R I B R O K E R / O W N E R


T R A N S P O R TAT I O N TOWN OF TELLURIDE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE DAKOTA

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In historic downtown Telluride, solar-powered parking meters are Free oGondola mid-block n main and side streets. $1/hrFree – max 3 hours. Meters accept cards or coins. Parking • Meters are Bus Stop enforced 8am -to 6pmMonday to Saturday (yellow) • Parking is free on Sundays and holidays Free Bus Route • Select side streets allow free 2-hour parking (green)

Bus Stop

No Parking or Permit Only

Free Bus Route

• Bus will drop off/pick up from any corner on the route. • D  etailed schedules posted at bus stops telluride-co.gov/255/Bus-Schedule

PARKING

FREE GONDOLA Telluride & Mountain Village are linked by a spectacular 13-minute ride.

A > $2 per hour; free after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am.

The Gondola is ADA, ski, snowboard, bicycle, stroller and pet accessible.

D > Free 30-minute; no time limit after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am.

• June 15 - October 18, 2020*

E > Free 1-hour parking; no parking 2-6:30 am.  > Free daytime parking 6:30am– F 2am; $25 overnight 2–6:30am, valid for 24 hours G > $2 per hour; $35 max for each 24-hour period 

All meters are payable by Parkmobile app, debit /credit card only; no cash.

Free Parking

Free Daytime Parking

• Designated stops every few blocks

Mtn. Village Center Station

Market Plaza Station

Free Gondola

2-hour Free Parking or Permit Parking

GALLOPING GOOSE BUS LOOP • Loop runs every 15 minutes, 7am to 10pm

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE

Mountain Village Station

Paid Metered Parking

Bear Creek Trail

PARKING Visitors Center

Paid Metered Parking

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 eadows Parking, end of Adams M Ranch Road; Free daytime parking 8am–8pm; No overnight parking without a permit; no RV's, commercial vehicles or trailers MTN. VILLAGE BUS LOOP Free service daily, for more info townofmountainvillage.com/bus DIAL-A-RIDE Free taxi for homeowner 970.728.8888

• Hours are TBD, see web site for info The Gondola has four stations: • TELLURIDE STATION Oak Street in the town of Telluride • SAN SOPHIA STATION Mid-mountain stop providing access to the resort’s trails and Allred’s • MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center • MARKET PLAZA STATION Gondola Parking Garage For more Gondola info, see story p. 21 *Schedule is subject to change. For the most current information see > townofmountainvillage.com/gondola

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ACCOMMODATIONS

A VACATION HOME FOR ALL SEASONS

Telluride Resort Lodging specializes in nightly guest vacation homes, from one-bedroom condominiums in Mountain Village to seven-bedroom luxury homes. Our friendly and thoughtful reservations team offers a personalized vacation home experience for your ultimate Colorado mountain vacation. TellurideResortLodging.com | 866-888-7197

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● ●

■ ● $-$$$$

■ ■

RATES

WI-FI OR INTERNET

HANDICAP FACILITIES

PETS

LAUNDRY

KITCHEN

▲ ■

BREAKFAST INCLUDED

FIREPLACE

SWIMMING POOL

HOTELS AND CONDOS

NUMBER OF UNITS

● all units

▲ on premises ■ some units

HOT TUB / SAUNA / STEAM

ACCOMMODATIONS

Auberge Residences at Element 52 Telluride 970.728.0701

20

Bear Creek Lodge Mountain Village

970.369.4900 or 888.729.0398

31

Camel’s Garden Hotel & Penthouse Condos Telluride

888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

36 ▲ ■

Dunton Townhouse Telluride

877.288.9922

5

Fall Line Condos Telluride

970.728.4274 or 866.728.4274

9 ▲ ● ● ● $-$$

Fairmont Heritage Place, Franz Klammer Mountain Village

888.728.3318

63 yes ▲

● ●

● $$$$

Hotel Columbia Telluride

970.728.0660 or 800.201.9505

21 ■

■ `■ cont ▲

● $$$$

Hotel Telluride Telluride

970.369.1188 or 866.468.3501

59 ▲

● ▲

● $$$

Ice House Condos & Suites Telluride

970.728.6300 or 800.544.3436

17

Inn at Lost Creek Mountain Village

970.728.5678 or 888.601.5678

32 ▲

● cont ●

● $$-$$$$

Lumiére Hotel Mountain Village

970.369.0400 or 866.530.9466

29 yes ▲ ■

■ ■

● $$-$$$$

Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village

970.369.0880 or 866.475.4403

110 yes ▲

■ ■

● $$-$$$$

Manitou Lodge Telluride

970.728.3388 or 888.728.1950

11

Mountain Lodge at Telluride Mountain Village

866.368.6867 or 970.369.5000

130 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

● $$-$$$

Mountainside Inn Telluride

970.728.1950 or 877.376.9769

84 ▲

■ ■ ▲

● $

New Sheridan Hotel Telluride

800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

26 ■

● $$

Peaks Resort & Spa Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

164 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

● $-$$$

River Club Telluride

888.601.4160 or 970.728.3986

24 ▲

● ●

● $$-$$$$

See Forever Village at The Peaks Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

29

● ● ■

● $$$-$$$$

Victorian Inn Telluride

970.728.6601 or 800.611.9893

33 ▲

■ cont ▲ ■

● $

65

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yes

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT COMPANIES Accommodations in Telluride

866.754.8772

Alpine Lodging Telluride / Sea to Ski

970.728.3388 or 877.376.9769 300 ■

Exceptional Stays by Telluride Rentals

800.970.7541 50 ■ ■ ■

■ ■

■ $-$$$$

Invited Home

970.728.8160 or 855.978.7627 65 ■

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Latitude 38 Vacation Rentals

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Silver Star Luxury Properties

970.728.3001 or 800.537.4781

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Lodging in Telluride

888.998.6471 or 970.729.2202

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Telluride Luxury Rentals

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Telluride Resort Lodging

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This summer, contact the accommodation in advance for up-to-date information. For current local guidelines >> visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety

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ACCOMMODATIONS

TELLURIDE’S FINEST LODGING IN TELLURIDE’S PREMIER LOCATION

CONTEMPORARY ELEGANCE IN STONE, STEEL & HAND-CRAFTED CHERRY

LUXURY ROOMS, SUITES & CONDOMINIUMS HOT TUB, SPA, BIKE STORAGE & VALET

Incomparable Location. Exceptional Accommodations.

CAMEL’S GARDEN RESORT HOTEL & CONDOMINIUMS TELLURIDE, COLORADO

(888) 772-2635

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WWW.CAMELSGARDEN.COM

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ACCOMMODATIONS

Authenic Retreat to

Mountain Luxury

Located in the heart of historic downtown, Telluride's premier full-service boutique hotel provides spectacular views in every direction. Start your day with Hotel Telluride's delicious hot breakfast. Lobby dining, by the fireplace, transforms the evening into a casual dining experience. "The Most Comfortable Room in Telluride" offers guests embroidered Harbor Linens, spa robes and slippers, along with fully stocked kitchenettes. All the Beauty of Telluride, Right Outside Your Door

NEWSHERIDAN.COM THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1895. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service.

Awards & Recognitions

Top 50 Hotels

Top 100 Resorts in North America

Top 5 Destinations

970.369.1188

The New Sheridan Hotel has served as Telluride’s social center since 1895. Located on main street, just two blocks from the gondola, the hotel’s location in the heart of Telluride provides an ideal base for visitors. During an expansive renovation completed recently, the hotel’s 26 guest rooms received a luxurious transformation under the guidance of internationally renowned designer Nina Campbell. Each individually designed room captures the historic charm of Telluride in an atmosphere of warmth and comfort. On-site dining options include the renowned Chop House Restaurant & Wine Bar, The Roof, The Parlor and the historic New Sheridan Bar, which was ranked among the world’s top 10 après ski bars by Forbes Traveler. The New Sheridan Hotel was also recognized by the readers of Condé Nast Traveler as one of the Top 5 “Best Places to Ski & Stay in North America” and was awarded the “2020 AAA Four Diamond Hotel” rating. The New Sheridan is proud to be on the Register of National Historic Places.

199 Cornet Street - Telluride, CO 81435

TheHotelTelluride.com

ADDRESS TELEPHONE

231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

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ACCOMMODATIONS

LUXURY BOUTIQUE RESIDENCES W I T H F I V E - S TA R H O T E L A M E N I T I E S

Discover a luxurious side of Telluride when you stay at our award-winning hotel, Lumière with Inspirato, nestled at the base of Lift 4 in Mountain Village. It’s the ideal location to immerse yourself in the splendor of the Rocky Mountains, just steps from hiking and mountain biking trails as well as incredible fishing. Our 18 recently remodeled hotel residences make for a private and comfortable home base, with ample space, high-end chef’s kitchens, and dramatic mountain views.

A LUXURIOUS ESCAPE I N T H E R O C K Y M O U N TA I N S

LUMIEREWITHINSPIRATO.COM | 970.369.0400

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ACCOMMODATIONS

MOUNTAIN LODGE TELLURIDE M TE E LL LL U UR R II D D EE MO OU UN N TT A A II N N LL O OD DG GE E T

RUSTIC RUSTIC ELEGANCE ELEGANCE RUSTIC ELEGANCE WESTERN WESTERN CHARM CHARM WESTERN CHARM DELUXE DELUXE ACCOMMODATIONS ACCOMMODATIONS DELUXE ACCOMMODATIONS LUXURY LOG LUXURY LOG CABINS CABINS LUXURY LOG CABINS COMFORTABLE RETREAT COMFORTABLE RETREAT NEWLY COMFORTABLE RETREAT NEWLY RENOVATED RENOVATED YOUR WINDOW JUANS NEWLY YOURRENOVATED WINDOW TO TO THE THE SPLENDOR OF THE SAN JUANS

YOUR WINDOW TO THE OFoffTHE SANOctober. JUANS Book stay and October. Bookaa future future staySPLENDOR and receive receive 15% through Call on line. line. Call866.430.0415 866.430.0415 or or use use code GUIDE15 if booking on

Book a future stay and receive 15% off through October. www.mountainlodgetelluride.com 457 Mountain 970.369.5000 www.mountainlodgetelluride.com Blvd - 970.369.5000 Call 866.430.0415 or use -code GUIDE15Villlage if booking on line.

www.mountainlodgetelluride.com - 457 Mountain Villlage Blvd - 970.369.5000 visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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A L L T H E T I M E A N D SPAC E IN THE WORLD

TELSKI 2 ACC. FULL Soak it all up—from the stunning panoramic views of the San Juan Mountains, the fresh and healthy casual dining of Altezza at The Peaks, to the golf-in/golf-out access, and personal rejuvenation of The Spa at The Peaks. Topped with spacious accommodations and attentive service, you’ll never forget this experience of renewal and absolute comfort.

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Visit ThePeaksResort.com or call 855.402.3286 to make a reservation.

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. s p i r t y l i a D . s e i r o m e m e m i t e f i L Majestic Rivers Professional Guides Private Waters Wild Trout And no one within 6 feet... make that 600 feet.

E X PE RIE N C E • Q U ALIT Y • S ER VIC E | LO C AL S IN C E 1 9 8 4

ALL 2020 SUMMER ADVENTURES ARE PRIVATE / SCRUPULOUS COVID-19 PROTOCOLS FLY F I S H I N G • 4- W D T O U R S • R A FT I N G • S U P T O U R S

1-800-831-6230 www.TELLURIDEOUTSIDE.com

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DINING & SPIRITS

SAVOR THE

UNPARALLELED CUISINE

WHATEVER YOUR PALATE MAY BE, our tailored menus will serve you. Select from one of our fine establishments and delight in some of the best cuisine in the West. Dine in style at our signature restaurant, the Chop House – world renowned for its USDA Prime Dry Aged Beef. We create our delicious fare using only humanely raised fowl, non-threatened fish species and local ingredients. Pair a red or white from Telluride’s only nitrogen wine bar with a scrumptious meal for an unforgettable experience. FAVORITES FROM BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER CLASSIC EGGS BENEDICT / 17 Canadian Bacon, Poached Eggs, Hollandaise Sauce, Roasted New Potatoes FRENCH TOAST / 16 Fresh Berries, Maple Syrup FRENCH ONION SOUP / 15 Caramelized Onions, Gruyère Cheese ROCKY MOUNTAIN TROUT SALAD / 19 Pistachio Encrusted Trout, Warm Bacon-Sherry & Mustard Vinaigrette, Crostini, Poached Egg CAESAR SALAD / 14 Parmesan Cheese, White Anchovies, Croutons

MAC & CHEESE / 14 Three Cheeses, Bacon Lardons NEW YORK STYLE REUBEN / 17 Housemade Corned Beef, Gruyère Cheese, Coleslaw, Russian Dressing, Marble Rye CHOP HOUSE WAGYU BURGER / 24 Toasted Fresh Baked Bun, Quick Pickles, Ancho Chili Ketchup, French Mustard, Cheese (Blue, Aged White Cheddar, Gruyère) STEAMED PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND MUSSELS / 26 Shallots, Saffron, Garlic, Fennel, Classic White Wine Sauce, Grilled Baguette

Seasonal menu; items and pricing subject to change.

CHEESE & CHARCUTERIE BOARD / 38 Combination of Cured Meats & Artisanal Cheeses SCOTTISH SALMON / 38 Cornmeal Dusted, Broccolini, Pearl Couscous, Sweet Red Pepper Butter Sauce ELK SHORTLOIN / 52 Roasted Cauliflower, Whipped Yams, Bacon Lardons, Black Truffle Vinaigrette ALASKAN KING CRAB 1/2 lb / 1 lb / MP DRY AGED BISON RIBEYE 16oz Bone-In /65 DRY AGED PRIME NEW YORK STRIP 15oz Bone-In / 61

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1895. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service. ADDRESS: 231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride, Colorado 81435 TELEPHONE 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 • NEW SHERIDAN.COM

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DINING & SPIRITS 221 South Oak Modern Bistro 221 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.9507

Clark’s Market Made to order food, full deli 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124

Aemono Fine Foods Deli, Burgers, Pizza, Take-Out, Catering 156 Society Drive, Unit A, Lawson Hill 970.728.2085

Coffee Cowboy Coffee, Baked Goods, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride

Allred’s Contemporary American Cuisine Gondola Station St. Sophia 970.728.7474 Altezza Locally Sourced Indo-European Cuisine Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.2525 Alpino Vino winter only Fine Wines, Italian Delicacies Upper See Forever, Telluride Ski Resort 970.728.7560 Baked in Telluride Pizza, Pasta, Bakery 127 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.4775 Bean Café at the Peaks Coffee, Smoothies, Pastries, Sandwiches Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800 Big Billie’s winter only Family Dining, Ice Cream Bar Base of Lifts 1 & 10, Telluride Ski Resort 970.728.7557 Black Iron Kitchen & Bar Modern Mountain Cuisine Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 855.389.2929 Bon Vivant winter only Classic Country French Cuisine Top of Lift 5, Telluride Ski Resort Brown Dog Pizza Pizza, Pasta, Subs, Sports Bar 110 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8046 Caravan Middle Eastern Fare, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5611 Cindybread Artisan Bakery Bakery, Deli 168 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.369.1116

Cornerhouse Grille American Grill, Sports Bar 131 North Fir, Telluride 970.728.6207 Cosmopolitan Contemporary Seasonal Cuisine 300 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.1292 Crazy Elk Pizza Handmade Pizza, Salads, Sandwiches Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7499 Esperanza’s Casual Mexican 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8399 Floradora Saloon Burgers, Salads, Sandwiches, Steaks 103 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8884 Ghost Town Coffee, Tea, Smoothies 210 West Colorado, Telluride 970.300.4334 Gorrono Ranch winter only Burgers, Sandwiches, Soups, BBQ Mid-Mountain Lift 4, Telluride Ski Resort 970.728.7567 Guiseppe’s winter only New-Orleans-Inspired Fare Top of Lift 12, Telluride Ski Resort High Alpine Coffee Bar Coffee, Baked Goods 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504 High Camp Warming Hut winter only Sandwiches, Soups, Snacks Top of Lift 9, Telluride Ski Resort High Pie Pizzeria & Tap Room Pizza, Salads, Calzones 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2978 La Cocina de Luz Fresh Mexican 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9355

This summer, contact the establishment in advance for up-to-date information. For current local guidelines >> visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety

La Marmotte Contemporary French 150 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.6232 La Piazza del Villaggio Authentic Italian Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8283 La Pizzeria Casual Italian, Wood-Fired Pizza Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0737 Last Dollar Saloon Cocktails 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4800 M Lounge Cocktails, Small Bites Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8989 New Sheridan Bar Cocktails, Pool Hall 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 New Sheridan Chop House & Wine Bar Upscale American, Steaks, Seafood 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100 New Sheridan Parlor Café, Wine Bar, Cocktails 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100 Oak, The New Fat Alley BBQ, Casual American Oak Street, Gondola Plaza, Telluride 970.728.3985 O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at the Moon Live Music, Cocktails 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4100 Over the Moon Gourmet Cheese & Food 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2079 Pescado Sushi, Japanese, Latin-Infused Dishes 115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6025 Poachers Pub American Pub Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.9647

Rustico Ristorante Traditional Italian 114 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4046 Shake 'n Dog Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1565 Show Bar at the Sheridan Opera House Cocktails, Private Events 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363 Siam Thai, Thai Fusion 200 South Davis, Telluride 970.728.6886 Siam’s Talay Grille Contemporary Asian Tapas and Seafood Sunset Plaza, Inn at Lost Creek 970.728.6293 Sidework Contemporary Comfort Food 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5618 Smugglers Casual American, Brewpub 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5620 Snowberry Gelato, Smoothies, Coffee Frank Klammer Breezeway, M. Village 970.519.1389 Starbucks Coffee, Tea, Pastries, Paninis Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8993 Steamies Burger Bar A Modern Burger Joint 300 West Colorado, Telluride 844.the.buns Taco del Gnar Creative Taco Shop 123 South Oak, Telluride 970.626.9715 Telluride Brewing Company 156 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.5094 Telluride Coffee Company Coffee, Breakfast, Lunch, Pastries Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4400

>>

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DINING & SPIRITS

CRAFT BEERS BARREL-AGED COCKTAILS

FOR HOURS, PLEASE VISIT TELLURIDESKIRESORT.COM/DINING

OR CALL 970.728.7467 LOCATED IN THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE CORE

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DINING & SPIRITS Telluride Distilling Company Signature Cocktails Franz Klammer Breezeway, M. Village 970.728.29.10

The National Modern New American 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1063

The Village Table Mediterranean, Spanish Tapas, Catering Centrum Building, Mountain Village 970.728.1117

Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate Chocolate, Ice Cream, Pastries 100 West Colorado Breezeway, Telluride 970.728.9565

The Phoenix Bean Espresso, Sandwiches, Small Plates, Wine 221 West Colorado, Telluride

The West End Bistro at Hotel Telluride Casual American, Cocktails Hotel Telluride, Telluride 970.369.1188

The Alpinist & the Goat Fondue, Dessert, Cocktails 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5028 The Butcher & The Baker Café Fresh Gourmet Deli, Bakery, Take-Out 201 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2899 The Great Room American Bistro, Cocktails Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800 The Liberty Cocktails, Live Music, DJ 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942

The Pick Gourmet Burritos and Bowls Reflection Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.2633 The Rhino Coffee Bar Coffee, Smoothies, Ice Cream, Snacks 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village The Tunnel Fine Dining by Reservation 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.3663 The View Bar & Grill Locally Sourced Comfort Food Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5000 The Village Market 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.633.4700

There... Signature Cocktails, Appetizers 627 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1213 Tomboy Tavern Colorado Comfort Food Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7467 Tracks Café & Bar Casual American, Cocktails Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0677 Wolf Pig Mobile Bar for Hire 970.596.3364 Wood Ear Texas Whiskey Bar with Japanese Fusion 135 East Colorado, Telluride

TELLURIDE FOOD CARTS Gondola Plaza: PhiLam Egg Rolls, Banana Bites, Donut Bites Telluride Twisted Treats Pretzels, Shaved Ice, Waffles, Donuts Oak Street Park on Colorado Avenue: Diggity Dogg Gyro Cart Grilled Cheese/BBQ Mountain High Ice Cream MOUNTAIN VILLAGE FOOD CARTS Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village: Wok of Joy, Thai food Madeline Hotel Cart FARMERS’ MARKET, FRESH PRODUCE Telluride Farmer’s Market South Oak Street, Fridays beginning June 5 Mountain Village Market on the Plaza Heritage Plaza, Wednesdays 11-4 Mid-June (TBD) through early September www. townofmountainvillage.com/explore/ market-on-the-plaza/ Spruce Park, Telluride: Z’s Orchard, Saturdays Mountain Roots Produce, Wednesdays Borden Farms, Thursdays

EATING, DRINKING AND CARRYING ON Say hello to our amazing wine list, locally-sourced food, sustainable fish, and oh… the house made desserts! Plus, Chad, award-winning chef, who speaks fluent Food.

Located in the Hotel Columbia, just steps from the Gondola. Reservations: cosmotelluride.com or 970.728.1292

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DINING & SPIRITS

COLORADO CRAFTED

Located at The Hotel Telluride Bring your family and friends and enjoy a delicious meal in a cozy spot by our lobby fireplace. Reservations: 970.369.1188

199 Cornet Street - Telluride, CO 81435

AT TELLURIDE

A HEALTHY FUTURE BEGINS NOW... DEDICATED TO PROVIDING NATURAL, QUALITY GROCERIES

SAME DAY DELIVERY!

Order today at mountaingrocery.com or call (970) 728-8958 for assistance. THE MARKET AT TELLURIDE: (970) 728-8958 • Open 7am - 9pm daily • 157 South Fir (Pacific and Fir), Telluride SPIRITS OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE: (970) 728-6500 • Open 10am to 9pm daily • Mountain Village Town Hall Plaza MOUNTAIN MARKET IN RIDGWAY: (970) 626-5811 • Open 7am - 9pm daily • 490 Sherman Street • Ridgway

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DINING & SPIRITS

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DINING & SPIRITS

Fondue & Raclette with Grilled Vegetables or a Filet House-made Liqueurs, Craft Cocktails Late Night Menu

ELINOFF DINING FULL

Dine In or Carry Out. www.AlpinistAndTheGoat.com 204 W. Colorado Ave. 970-728-5028

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DINING & SPIRITS

PIZZA, SUBS AND SALADS.

FRESH. HANDCRAFTED. IT’S TIME TO GO CRAZY.

ROLL IT OR BOWL IT Hand-rolled burritos, hearty gourmet bowls, and a “Build Your Own” menu of rotating items that highlight seasonal ingredients.

L O C AT E D I N M O U N TA I N V I L L A G E For hours, please call 970.728.2633 20_VG_CrazyElk_ThePick.indd 1

5/26/20 2:14 PM

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SHOPPING

Gallerists and Jewelers

Telluride Miner’s Pick Jewelry — tons of styles in necklaces, earrings and bracelets. Watch & Jewelry Repair. Custom Designed Jewelry. Elinoff & Co., gallerists and jewelers, 204 W. Colorado Ave, 970.728.5566

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SHOPPING ART GALLERIES

BEAUTY

CLOTHING

Elinoff & Co. Gallerists & Jewelers 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Gallery 81435 230 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Gold Mountain Gallery   135 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3460 Kamruz Gallery 100 West Colorado, Telluride 303.442.7790 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Rinkevich Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village Center 415.516.2055 Schilling Studio Gallery    970.728.1174 (Open by appointment) Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Stronghouse Studios 283 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Telluride Art Headquarters & Gallery 135 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.3930 Telluride Gallery of Fine Art      130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Tony Newlin Gallery    100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8084

Pure Beauty & Wellness Spa / Telluride Salt Cave 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6144 Salon 7 300 Mahoney, Ste. 13C, Telluride 970.369.0050 Spa Boutique at the Peaks Resort 136 Country Club Dr., Mountain Village 970.728.6800 Studio G Total Skin Wellness 145 West Pacific #1E, Telluride 970.728.8700 The Spa and Salon at Madeline 568 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 855.266.9408 The Loft Hair Studio 226 West Colorado, Telluride 704.650.3478 YX Salon 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.708.0270 or 970.708.2308

Society      109 West Colorado, Telluride 970.369.7777 Sublime      126 West Colorado #102A, Telluride 970.728.7974 Telluride Toggery    109 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3338 Two Skirts     127 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6828 Western Rise   100 West Colorado Unit E, Telluride 855.981.7473

BEAUTY AromaSpa, Salon & Boutique   307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Aveda Telluride Spa 250 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.0630 Bliss & Bang Bang Salon 329 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1020 Breathe Skin & Body  Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village 970.728.9772 Healthy Glow Face & Body 222 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.7424 Himmel Pool and Spa Boutique Fairmont Franz Klmr., Mountain Village 970.728.7113 Pearl Aesthetic Medicine 176 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.7939

BOOKS Between the Covers Books 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504

CLOTHING AromaSpa Salon & Boutique 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Black Bear Trading Company          226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6556 Cashmere Red     221 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8088 Down To Earth   236 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9316 Fuel 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Heritage Apparel Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7340 Overland Sheepskin & Leather      100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9700 Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Scarpe      250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Shirtworks of Telluride   126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242

DISPENSARIES Alpine Wellness Center   300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1834 Delilah, LLC   115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5880 Green Dragon  119 West Colorado, Telluride 970.442.1422 Telluride Bud Company 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.239.6039 Telluride Green Room    250 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.7999 *Please visit goodtoknowcolorado.com for info on Colorado marijuana laws.

ELECTRONICS & PHOTO Digitiq 220 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.4142 Elevation Imaging The Beach, Mountain Village 970.728.8058 EYEWEAR Sunglasses HQ & Optical 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119 Telluride Vision 220 East Colorado, Ste. 208, Telluride 970.708.4890 FLORISTS

FURNISHINGS & HOME DECOR Azadi Rugs 217 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4620 Dakota Home Furnishings & Dakota Panhandler 220 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4204 Fine Navajo Weaving 220 East Colorado #1, Telluride 970.708.7368 Hook on a Wall 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1087 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Sage House 220 East Colorado, Telluride 817.909.3959 Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Tweed Interiors 151 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.8186 T.Karn Imports 394 West Colorado, Telluride 918.384.2159

GIFTS Ethos 101 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.0954 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Shirtworks of Telluride   126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242 Telluride Naturals Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Telluride Resort Store Gondola Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7358 Zia Sun     214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

China Rose Florists & Greenhouse 158 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4169 Nested 223 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.1019

>> visittelluride.com | 855.421.4360

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A quirky mix of handcrafted gifts made right here in Telluride For hours, please visit tellurideskiresort.com/shopping or call 970.728.7357. Located in the Franz Klammer Lodge

Everything Telluride. In one place.

DISCOVER MOUNTAIN CHIC

with stylish basics and designer labels Exclusively at Heritage Apparel Located in Mountain Village across from BootDoctors 100 visittelluride.com |

970.728.7340

For hours, please visit tellurideskiresort.com/shopping 855.421.4360

or call 970.728.7358. Located at the Gondola Plaza


SHOPPING GROCERY & MARKETS

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES

PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES

SPORTING GOODS

Clark’s Market 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124 Ghost Town 210 West Colorado, Telluride 970.300.4334 Over the Moon 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2079 The Market at Telluride 157 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.4566 The Village Market 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.633.4700

Telluride Gallery of Fine Art           130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Telluride Naturals Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Zia Sun     214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

PET Telluride   135 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.2095 Telluride Veterinary Clinic   547 1/2 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4461 Tricks & Treats Pet Sitting Service 970.708.5205

Telluride Golf Pro Shop The Peaks, Mountain Village 970.728.2606 Telluride Sports 150 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4477 Camels Garden, Telluride 970.728.3134 Fairmont Franz Klmmr., Mountain Village 970.728.0364 Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8944 The Peaks, Mountain Village 970.728.2606 The Drop Board Shop & Print Lab 123 South Oak, Telluride 970.708.0688 The North Face Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.0332

HARDWARE & BUILDING SUPPLIES Alpine Lumber 140 Society Dr., Lawson Hill 970.728.4388 Kitchen & Bath Designs    398 West Colorado, Telluride 970.249.7200 Timberline Ace Hardware   200 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.364

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES Crossbow Leather     124 East Colorado, Telluride Elinoff & Co.     204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Hell Bent Leather & Silver   215 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6246 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery  171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.3355 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Sunglasses HQ & Optical 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119

PHARMACY LIQUOR STORES Spirits at Mountain Village    455 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.728.6500 Telluride Bottleworks   129 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.5553 Telluride Liquors    123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3380 Wine Mine at Pacific Street Liquors 220 South Davis, Telluride 970-728-WINE

MUSIC Telluride Music Co. 333 West Colorado #2, Telluride 970.728.9592

OFFICE SUPPLIES Digitiq 220 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.4142 Happy Print 970.728.6525   High Country Shipping   456 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.728.1976 Paper Chase 970.728.0235   Ship It/Copy It   125 West Pacific #2B, Telluride 970.728.8111  

PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES Animal Hospital of Telluride 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1082 / 970.708.4359 (after hours) Mobile Unit One Veterinary Service 970.708.1512

Medicine Ranch (CBD) 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Sunshine Pharmacy   333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3601 Sunshine Pharmacy   Franz Klammer Breezeway, Mtn Village 970.728.3601

SWEETS SPORTING GOODS Bootdoctors Le Chamonix Bldg., Mountain Village 888.592.8954 236 South Oak, Telluride 970.369.4240 Box Canyon Bicycles 300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2946 Burton Telluride   Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.6138 Christy Sports  Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1334 Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5267 Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4727 Jagged Edge/Journey Outdoors  223 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9307 Neve Sports/Telluride Sports Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.5722 Paragon Bootdoctors 215 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4525 Patagonia 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4303 Telluride Angler/Telluride Outside 121 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3895

Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate 100 West Colorado Breezeway, Telluride 970.728.9565

THRIFT SHOPS Second Chance Humane Society 335 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1100

TOYS Scarpe      250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Zia Sun     214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

This summer, contact the retailer in advance for up-to-date information. For current local guidelines >> visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety

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SHOPPING

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BAR

AUDIO/VISUAL

Meeting Area

525

50

30

next to gondola

Elks Lodge 970.728.6362

Historic Swede-Finn Hall

1,700

250

200

stage & outdoor deck

Ethos 970.728.0954

Event & Gallery Space on Main Street

1,000

60

40

open event or gallery space

SETTING

Ice House Lodge 800.544.3436 or 970.728.6300

Conference Room

Il Salona 970.728.4046

Event Space

SPECIAL NOTES

IN-HOUSE CATERING

Camel’s Garden 888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

TOWN OF TELLURIDE

SQUARE FOOTAGE

SEATED CAPACITY

STANDING CAPACITY

VENUES

360

25

20

next to gondola

-

150

80

adjoins Rustico Ristorante

30,000

680

680

500

45

35

Michael D. Palm Theatre 970.369.5669

Performing Arts Center

New Sheridan American Room 800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

Victorian-style Room

Nugget Theatre 970.728.3030

Theatre

1,674

-

Sheridan Opera House 970.728.6363

Historic Theatre / Reception Space

1,400

265

Sidework 970.728.5618

Reception Room

900

100

Telluride Elementary School 970.369.1205

Cafeteria

-

-

100

small raised stage

Gym / Auditorium

3,600

500

500

no alcohol or smoking

Telluride Middle/High School 970.369.1205

Multi-purpose and Music Rooms

-

-

125/50

on-site parking

Gym

4,000

-

300

no alcohol or smoking

Telluride Town Park Core & Warming Hut 970.728.2173

Outdoors, Canopy, Picnic Tables

Town Park Pavilion 970.728.2173

Spacious Covered Pavilion

Wilkinson Public Library 970.728.4519, ext. 20

Program Room (small rooms also available)

alcohol with special permit

downtown Telluride

186

quaint, intimate

230

intimate setting for gatherings

liquor license, projector

50

-

-

-

public can’t be excluded

26,000

300

-

available for private events

959

124

72

downtown Telluride

2,000

200

150

wedding packages avail.

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Bear Creek Lodge 970.369.4900

Great Room

Gorrono Ranch 970.728.7446

Mountain Ranch

6,000

-

200

no private vehicles

Madeline Hotel & Residences 866.475.4403 or 970.369.0880

Idarado Ballroom

3,315

270

210

Mountain Village core

Jasper Room

676

45

35

Mountain Village core

Reflection Plaza

6,240

400

200+

outdoor venue

Hospitality Suite

1,800

50+

35+

plus 1,200 sq. ft. deck

Mountain Lodge at Telluride 970.369.5000

Summit Room (summer only)

574

60

40

near Tell. Conf. Center

Mt. Emma Room

500

50

35

easy gondola access

Peaks Resort and Spa 800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

Appaloosa Lounge

1,682

100

40

casual cocktail room

Big Billie Ballroom

2,046

225

140

can divide into 2 rooms

Crystal Room

1,600

163

100

floor to ceiling windows

Great Room Deck

1,440

125

80

off of the Great Room

Legends Restaurant

2,790

250

160

rustic dining venue

Liberty Bell and Golden Slipper Rooms

50

30

can combine for 1,100 sq. ft.

each 551

Mt. Wilson Terrace

7,900

350

200

connects to Crystal/ Legends

Palmyra Deck

1,508

150

100

connects to Palmyra restaurant

Palmyra Restaurant

1,980

225

180

connects to Palmyra deck

Ridge Club’s Great Room 970.708.1515

Multi-purpose Facility and Deck

1,900

175

80

easy gondola access

Telluride Conference Center 970.369.8030

Mountain Village Ballroom

6,069

890

564

22,000 total sq. ft. indoors

Klammer Boardroom

732

60

40

55,000 sq. ft. outdoor plaza

Fallon Room

367

35

20

voice/data circuits

Chipeta Room

312

-

18

voice/data ports

Mezzanine

1,189 100 70 ●

optional reception hall

St. Sophia Ceremony Site 970.728.7446

Top of the Gondola on the Ski Resort

-

outdoor venue

-

-

RUSTIC MOUNTAIN RETREATS Alta Lakes Observatory 970.239.0027

Rustic Mountain Lodge

2,200

75

25

remote lakeside lodge

High Camp Hut 970.728.8050

High Mountain Hut

2,500

35

35

walk 2.5 miles from hwy.

Schmid Family Ranch 970.708.1108

Rustic Setting at base of Wilson Peak

-

-

-

two cabins, summer only

This summer, contact the venue in advance for up-to-date information. For current local guidelines >> visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety

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ACTIVITIES

Ridgway, Colorado Since 2001

fishrigs.com 970.626.4460

GET DISTANCE RESPONSIBLE ADVENTURES - TELLURIDE AND BEYOND

WALK WADE - GOLD MEDAL WATERS - FLOAT FISHING - FULL SERVICE FLY SHOP

We know you're We know you're loving it it here and loving here and already can't wait already can't wait toto come back. come back.

Book your 3-night stay Book your 3-night stay forfor next winter and next winter and get your 4th night free. get your 4th night free. *blackout dates apply *blackout dates apply

Reserve now, callcall 866.846.8021 Reserve now, 866.846.8021 or use code VISIT4 if booking on line. or use code VISIT4 if booking on line.

104

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ACTIVITIES ADVENTURE GUIDES

ADVENTURE GUIDES

CHURCHES

EVENT PLANNERS

Adventure Tour Productions Tandem paragliding, photo/video tours 970.729.0078 Bootdoctors/Paragon Winter — fat tire biking, fly fishing, Nordic ski clinics Summer — fly fishing, hiking, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 800.592.6883 Circle K Ranch Horseback Riding 970.562.3826 Dave’s Mountain Tours Historic off-road 4x4 adventures 970.728.9749 Four Corners Whitewater Kayaking, paddleboarding, river rafting 888.723.8925 High Camp Hut Overnight adventure hut for hiking, nordic skiing, snowshoeing 970.728.8050 Mountain Trip Adventure guides for rock climbing, backcountry skiing, ice climbing 970.369.1153 Opus Hut Backcountry hut 970.708.0092 RIGS, Adventure Co. Flyfishing, water sports 970.708.0092 Roudy’s Horseback Adventures Horseback riding, winter sleigh rides 970.728.9611 San Juan Balloon Adventures Ultralight flights/paragliding 970.626.5495 San Juan Huts Backcountry hut system 970.626.3033 San Juan Outdoor Adventures/ Telluride Adventures Winter — Backcountry skiing, hut trips, ice climbing, snowshoeing Summer — hiking, hut trips, rock climbing, Via Ferrata 970.728.4101 Telluride Academy Summer camps for youth ages 5-18 970.728.5311 Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Winter and summer activities for all ages and disabilities 970.728.5010 Telluride Adventure Center Winter — fat tire biking, flyfishing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling Summer — 4x4 tours, flyfishing, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 970.728.7433 Telluride Avalanche School winter only Avalanche education 970.728.4101

Telluride Guided Mountain Biking 970.708.7848 Telluride Helitrax winter only Helicopter skiing 877.500.8377 or 970.728.8377 Telluride Mountain Guides Winter — backcountry skiing, ice climbing Summer — climbing 14ers, hiking 970.728.6481 Telluride Nordic Center winter only Nordic skiing - classic and skate 970-728-1144 Telluride Offroad Adventures Off-road / 4x4 adventures 970.708.5190 Telluride Outfitters Winter — snowmobiling Summer — ATV tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, RZR tours, rafting Town Hall Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.4475 Telluride Outside/Telluride Angler Winter — fly fishing, photography tours, snowmobile tours Summer — 4-wheel drive tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, photography tours, rafting 800.831.6230 Telluride Paragliding Tandem paragliding flights 970.708.4247 Telluride Snowkite winter only Snowkite instruction 541.490.4401 Telluride Sports Various summer and winter activities 970.728.4477 ext 211 Telluride Wranglers Horseback Riding 970.759.3183 Wild Hare Snowshoe Tours winter only Backcountry snowshoe tours 970.728.5465

St. Patrick's Catholic Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.728.3387 Telluride Christian Fellowship 100 East Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4864

By Sutton 970.209.3593 Polished Fun 970.596.1974 Realize Colorado 970.471.7529 Simplify 970.708.7429 Soirée Telluride 970.708.0297 Telluride Presents 970.708.0870 Telluride UnVeiled 914.830.3238

CHILD CARE Annie’s Nannies of Telluride 970.728.2991 Telluride Sitters, LLC   PO Box 2647, Telluride 970.708.0170 Traveling Lite, LLC   970.318.6543 CHURCHES Alpine Chapel 122 South Aspen Street Telluride 970.728.3504 Christ Presbyterian Church 434 West Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4536 St. Michael’s Episcopal Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.325.4655

CLASSSES & WORKSHOPS FITNESS Ah Haa School for the Arts Creative classes, camps and workshops 300 South Townsend, Telluride 970.728.3886 Pinhead Institute Science-based educational experiences 300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.708.7441 Telluride Rock and Roll Academy Lawson Hill, Telluride 970.728.1186 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519 COMMUNITY Telluride Historical Museum 201 West Gregory, Telluride 970.728.3344 Telluride Town Park & Recreation 970.728.2173 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519 ENTERTAINMENT Club Red / Conference Center 580 Mtn Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.369.5120 Michael D. Palm Theatre 721 West Colorado, Telluride 970.369.5669 New Sheridan Bar 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 Nugget Theatre 207 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3030 O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at Fly Me to the Moon Saloon 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6139 Sheridan Opera House 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363 The Liberty 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942 The Phoenix Bean 221 West Colorado, Telluride

8750ALT 317 East Colorado, Telluride 970.387.8750 Fuel Station 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Kaiut Yoga International 238 E. Colorado, 2nd Floor, Telluride 970.729.2354 Madeline Studio Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village 855.266.9408 Mangala Yoga 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6200 Pedal Den      307 East Colorado #100, Telluride 970.729.0810 Pilates Balance      300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.729.0678 Sequence Pilates and Core Align      700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5003 Studio Telluride Authentic Pilates 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.728.1747 Telluride Crossfit 137 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4622 Telluride Yoga Center      Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.729.1673 The Peaks Resort & Spa    136 Country Club Drive, Mountain Village 970.728.6800 TOURS Historical Tours of Telluride 970.728.6639 Telluride Green Tours Cannabis dispensary tours 970.708.3739 Telluride Sleighs and Wagons Wagon rides, stories and dinner 970.260.2524 This summer, contact the guide or venue in advance for up-to-date information. For current local guidelines >> visittelluride.com/COVIDsafety

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PARTING SHOT RYAN BONNEAU “Telluride is a quiet hideaway, legendary for its old miner’s can-do spirit and for being the rare resort area with a down-home feel ­— as well as the majestic views of the jagged San Juan Mountains piercing the often-bright blue sky.” Forbes Travel Guide


120 Aldasoro Boulevard // $4,155,000 This elegant rustic home was designed to maximize views of the San Juan peaks. Perched above Telluride on a 4.75-acre parcel and bordering open space, the home is secluded but still convenient to restaurants, shopping, and the ski area (14 minutes to gondola parking, 10 minutes to downtown Telluride). The home has 3 bedrooms, 2 flex rooms (an office and a gym, both easily converted to bedrooms), 4 full bathrooms, 2 half bathrooms, a home theater with an 8-ft screen and 7.1 surround sound, a wine cellar, a 3-car heated garage with plumbing and built-in storage for sporting gear and tools, a large unfinished space, and a separate lockable one-bedroom apartment. Experience luxury in a home designed to harmonize with its surroundings and to maximize your enjoyment of mountain living.

297 Gray Head Lane // $1,750,000

Catmando at Gray Head // $9,750,000

Lot 15C-1 is Gray Head’s most secluded parcel with Telluride’s most unique vistas from canyon, 150-foot rock spires, and undulating features which will accomodate the water features of your dreams, to the iconic Wilson Peak and Lizard Head massifs. Gray Head also features ownership in Parcel 17 and access to the Wilderness Preserve, all within 20 minutes from downtown Telluride, where valet parking and Auberge/Element 52 amenities await.

Located on 35 acres within the spectacular Gray Head Wilderness Preserve, Catmando is unsurpassed in craftsmanship and setting. Perched overlooking Telluride’s 13,000-14,000+ peaks , this owner/developer historic renovation is one of a kind. The main living area showcases a Pre-Civil War barn, and the back yard is a miniature resort retreat with ponds, palapa bar and multi-tiered patios.

Haute Residence and Haute Living are proud to have Steve Catsman as the exclusive broker for Telluride.

* Reader demographic average net worth of $25.2M

Scan to search all Telluride real estate listings!

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Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village Summer 2020  

The Official Guide for Telluride and Mountain Village, CO is a great resource for planning a trip to Telluride. This magazine-style guide in...

Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village Summer 2020  

The Official Guide for Telluride and Mountain Village, CO is a great resource for planning a trip to Telluride. This magazine-style guide in...

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