Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village Summer/Fall 2021

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UDE R E ELDLU R I D E ST AMOUNTAINS KING OF YOUTH LL THE TOWN & MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE | SUMMER 2021

70 IS THE TELLURIDE’S NEW 30 BACKYARD 1

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

NEW CANOPY BEYOND THE ADVENTURE GALLERY

ELEVATED FARM TO TABLE SHOPPING AND BACK

CREATIVE LOCAL MOUNTAIN ENTREPRENEURS TOWN FASHION


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THE MOST COLORADO PLACE ON EARTH / telluride.com / 855.748.9621

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$16,500,000

1 27 E CO LUM BI A AVE , TE L LU R I D E

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$4,050,000

85 0 E COLU M B I A AVE , TE L LU R I D E

$1,650,000

CASS I DY R I D GE B 3 01 , M OU N TA I N VILL AG E

Telluride, Ken specializes in connecting buyers and sellers while helping them establish a sense of community in the Telluride region.

THE ULTIMATE R E T R E AT Ken Grodberg 970.708.5601 ken@grodbergrealestate.com grodbergrealestate.com @grodbergrealestate

Compass is a licensed real estate broker in Colorado and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage.

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Noteworthy Sales OSG had record sales volume in 2019 & 2020, including: 222 South Oak Street Town of Telluride $10,000,000 425 East Galena Avenue Town of Telluride $9,500,000 529 Benchmark Drive Mountain Village $8,650,000 Transfer Telluride SanJuan 5 Town of Telluride $8,200,000 235 East Columbia Avenue Town of Telluride $7,625,000 302 North Willow Street Town of Telluride $7,150,000 Bayless Ranch Dolores $6,500,000

YOUR PROPERTY GOES HERE

175 Raspberry Patch Road Raspberry Patch $6,222,500 YOUR PROPERTY GOES HERE ... be the next to sell

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Learn More at

ONeillStetinaGroup.com


Setting a Higher Standard in Telluride Real Estate

A main & guest home of modern design nestled on 12+ peaceful acres. 8091 Preserve Drive - The Preserve $9,474,000

Steps from the gondola & core, these .82 acres are zoned mixed-use. Lot 109R, Mountain Village Blvd. - Mountain Village $7,450,000

Prestigious neighborhood with slopeside ski access & big views. 141 Sundance Lane - Mountain Village $6,750,000

3-bed townhome & 2-car garage within the social/recreation scene. Lena Street Commons 3B - Ridgway $855,000

TOGETHER, WE DO MORE FOR YOU.

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Brian O’Neill, Director I 970.708.5367 I osg@oneillstetina.com Marty Stetina, Broker Associate I 970.708.4504


MOUNTAINS OF EXPERIENCE Nobody knows Telluride or the market better than Team TD Smith.

TD Smith has been a Telluride local since 1971, and co-founded Telluride Real Estate Corp. in 1981. Celebrating 50 years of market experience, over $1 billion in sales and now with modern firepower, it’s no wonder there are reviews from clients like this one: “When we first looked in Telluride about 15 years ago, we did our research to find the broker who knows the market best, which naturally led us to TD. Over the past 15 years of buying and selling houses with Chris and TD, our relationship has organically grown into a friendship. TD knows the market better than anyone because he has seen the complete evolution from the beginning. He was patient with us and he really listened to us, and the end result was the perfect home for our family. When it was time to sell, TD navigated this expertly as well, resulting in a price much higher than we had expected. We look forward to working with him again.” - multiple-time buyer and seller since 2006

THE ORIGINAL MARKET MAKERS W H E N YO U WA N T T H E M O S T E X P E R I E N C E , S TA R T YO U R S E A R C H W I T H U S

T D S M I T H | 9 7 0 . 7 2 9 . 1 5 7 7 | T D @ T D S M I T H . CO M | W W W. T D S M I T H . CO M C H R I S S O M M E R S | 9 7 0 . 7 2 9 . 2 4 8 0 | C H R I S @ C H R I S S O M M E R S . CO M | W W W. C H R I S S O M M E R S . CO M


Dolores River Ranch // $9,500,000 ‘’Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it’’ (N. Maclean). And that river is the Dolores, dubbed by Trout Unlimited as being one of the ‘’Top 100 Trout Rivers in America.’’ Emanating from a high-elevation watershed with sparkling headwaters near Lizard Head Pass just south of Telluride, the Dolores is fed by a dozen brook, rainbow and brown trout streams upstream from the Dolores River Ranch. History is woven into this lush 318+ acre landscape with a charming 11-bedroom, half-century-old lodge at the base of the now defunct, but delightfully skiable, Stoner Ski Area (3 trails, 1220+ feet vertical). Other improvements include an early 1900’s historic ranch manager’s cabin, preserved barn and other sheds and outbuildings. Year-round recreational opportunities for family and friends abound, both on private land that is 70% irrigated and in the adjoining San Juan National Forest. One need only to step outside to embrace mountain biking, hiking, Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, paddle boarding, rafting and hunting --- and, of course, storied fly fishing.

1422 Wagner Way // $7,995,000

228 Russell Drive // $5,950,000

A place where you can get away from it all and still be just around the corner from why you came here. Privacy and seclusion in the West Meadows, with 360 degree views of mountains piercing the crystal blue skies, are the trademarks of this property just minutes from all resort amenities. Perched on a knoll top, a 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath with bunk loft, artfully designed cabin with Fortenberry Construction impeccable craftsmanship, affords the perfect getaway or the permitted first stage larger compound custom designed and built for its new owners.

The Best of Both Worlds --- Nestled alongside the third green with convenient ski-in and ski-out access to the Galloping Goose Ski Trail and miles of crosscountry ski trails, this 6-bedroom residence blends perfectly with its mountainous environment. The log and stone exterior pleasingly contrast the architectural elegance of its interior with a more formal and upscale cherry base, case, trim and cabinetry. The main level literally explodes with views to the ski resort within a great room warmed by a massive stone surround, wood burning fireplace.

The surrounding landscape embraces a bubbling back yard stream, pond and waterfall to a pond below the homesite, all made possible by deeded water rights. Surrounded on three sides by open space, the property also includes a heated barn, a deeded well and is served by a domestic water system. Conveniently located next to nothing and everything.


SUMMER/FALL 2021

CONTENTS COVER STORY

WELCOME

22 70 Is the New 30 Telluride’s older generation is crushing it

15 Discover Telluride 17 Getting Here 19 Getting Around Telluride, Mountain Village and the Gondola connection

MOUNTAIN LIFE

80 Local Transportation, Parking

29 Outdoor Activities Telluride’s beautiful backyard stands ready

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107+ Maps

35 Opt-In for Trails Supporting our priceless network

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Backcountry Bookshelf

Activities Guide

107+ Parting Shot

RICH HISTORY 40 Hike Into History Scenic hikes, sparkling history with the museum 78

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Historic Walking Tour

Be Festival Ready

44 Arts News 46 Arts Community Pivots A scintillating summer awaits 49 Open Air, Fresh Fare Local dining scene looks outward 50 Dining News 92

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Dining & Spirits Guide

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Telluride Historical Museum, all right reserved.

THE SCENE 42

Ryan Bonneau

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Ryan Bonneau

39 Summer fun Telluride Ski Resort’s new canopy tour

Brett Schrenkengost

37 Geotagging Keeping special places special

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Ryan Bonneau

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Flight Map


celebrating

Y E A R S on top of telluride real estate

GET MORE OUT OF YOUR REAL ESTATE EXPERIENCE 237 S. Oak St. I 220 E. Colorado Ave., Ste. 102/104 I 560 Mountain Village Blvd., Ste. 103 tellurideproperties

@tellurideproperties

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970.728.0808 I TellurideProperties.com

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We have navigated the ups and downs of the market and watched big brand names come and go for more than three decades. Through it all, our mission has remained the same, hire the best real estate professionals and provide our clients with the highest standard of service. Buying or selling your home isn’t just about numbers — it’s about relationships and knowing your best interests are being represented in a diligent, forthright manner. As your trusted advisor, we purposefully guide you through the process with the utmost expertise.

June 24 - 27, 2021

TellurideYogaFestival.com


SUMMER/FALL 2021

Melissa Plantz

CONTENTS RETAIL THERAPY 52 Shopping, Elevated Mountain Village’s retail scene 55 Cool Finds For enjoying the outdoors

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100 Shopping Guide

SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS 56 Weddings, reimagined Local wedding planners pivot

Nicole Franzen Melissa Plantz

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Kaycee Joubert

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Venues Guide

STAY & PLAY 59 Luxury mountain living Madeline transformation celebrates Telluride 84 Accommodations Guide

BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON 60 Business & Property News 63 Creative local entrepreneurs Exciting new ventures abound

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Telluride Characters Lee Zeller

68 Kids Family activities

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Ryan Bonneau

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TELLURIDE TOURISM BOARD VISIT TELLURIDE Telluride, Colorado 855.421.4360 | Telluride.com President & CEO MICHAEL MARTELON Director of Marketing & Public Relations KIERA SKINNER Director of Social & Interactive Media ANNIE CARLSON Director of Communications TOM WATKINSON Director of Operations HOLLIE HANNAHS Financial Administrator VICKI LAW Staff Photographer RYAN BONNEAU

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO TELLURIDE & MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Editor & Associate Publisher ERIN SPILLANE Art Directors LAUREN METZGER / KIM HILLEY

AROUND TOWN

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The Official Guide to Telluride & Mountain Village is published twice per year by:

Community Telluride Academy

75 Gold Season Treading lightly while enjoying the foliage 77

Winter in Telluride The perfect day

Advertising Sales HILARY TAYLOR Writers MARTINIQUE DAVIS JENNIFER JULIA SAGE MARSHALL JESSE JAMES McTIGUE EMILY SHOFF

For advertising opportunities contact: Hilary Taylor / 970.417.2589 HilaryTaylorConsulting@gmail.com Copyright ©2021 All Rights Reserved Cover and contents must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher.


THIS IS THE RESET® YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR.

Set at elevation in the rugged heart of Telluride, CO, RESET is the private, ultra-luxury wellness and trekking retreat that proves one week can change your life.

coming spring 2022 resettelluride.com


MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Live Music in Village Center DAILY June 16 - September 18 2-4 p.m. & 5-7 p.m.

Market on the Plaza WEDNESDAYS June 16 - September 1 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Farmers market featuring fresh produce, handmade gifts and kids activities

Sunset Stroll

THURSDAYS June 17- September 16 5-7 p.m. Featuring live music in the plazas and specials at participating restaurants and bars

Music on the Green* FRIDAYS June 4- September 10 5-7 p.m.

Movies Under the Stars* SATURDAYS Dates TBD Sundown

*events subject to change

Scan QR Code for more info

Visit townofmountainvillage.com/events for the latest information 14

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PHOTO © MATT KROLL LIFE FEELING PHOTOGRAPHY


Melissa Plantz

W

elcome to Mountain Village and Telluride and to our little corner of the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. To be honest, I have never been more grateful for these mountains. Since March 2020, they have provided us with wide-open spaces, fresh air and beauty when we needed them most. They have served at times as personal trainer, muse and therapist and given us solace and harmony in some pretty challenging times. After this past year and more, it’s impossible not to embrace these mountains as medicine, with the power to help keep us sound in body, mind and spirit. It’s a theme reflected, I think, in this summer’s issue of the Official Guide to Telluride and Mountain Village. Our cover story, for example, looks at Telluride’s over 70s, an extraordinarily active bunch whose fountain of youth is clearly this area’s wondrous backyard. Reading of their exploits as hikers, runners, bikers and more both exhausted and inspired me. I enjoyed too the history feature. It examines a Telluride Historical Museum program, Hike into History, that engagingly details our colorful and fascinating history during hikes into the backcountry. And there’s an article on Telluride Academy. This beloved summer camp has spent the last 40-plus years getting kids outdoors, exploring, learning and having fun. What more can I say? Mountains as medicine. I sat down to put these thoughts on paper in mid-spring and to me it seemed then as though Mother Nature and current events were in a period of synchronicity. Our natural

DISCOVER TELLURIDE

MOUNTAINS AS MEDICINE

surroundings, much like we as a society, were in a state of hushed expectancy; snows were retreating, trees budding, the days growing warmer and the sun higher with each passing day, but still with the possibility of chilly nights and springtime snow. Let’s just say that hope was in the air, but we hadn’t put away the snow shovels, or the masks, quite yet. Now, with summer underway, I encourage visitors, part-timers and locals alike to respect the existing public health guidelines. They are sure to evolve over the summer months and are designed to keep our close-knit community safe and healthy. Protecting our community brings me to another thread woven throughout this issue: protecting our natural environment. It has provided us with so much, especially of late, and perhaps now it’s time for us to return the favor by giving it a bit of breather. We can do this by observing good trails etiquette, following Leave No Trace priniciples and by participating in local initiatives such as Live Like a Local, Tag Responsibly and Opt-In for Trails, all of which are detailed on these pages. These mountains sure have given us an awful lot of love. This summer, let’s make sure we love them back.

MICHAEL MARTELON PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Telluride Tourism Board

EXPLORE THE VISITORS CENTER Want to make your Telluride experience an unforgettable one? Try the welcoming, informative Visitors Center. Located beside Elks Park and just across Colorado Avenue from the historic New Sheridan Hotel, this interactive space and its knowledgeable, friendly staff are ready to steer you toward a summer adventure, memorable meal or the perfect boutique.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Aspen 970.925.8579

Crested Butte 970.349.5023

Denver 303.399.4564

Steamboat Springs 970.879.9222

Telluride 970.728.3359

Vail 970.949.5500

interior landscapes that delight the senses

thurstonkitchenandbath.com


Ryan Bonneau

GETTING HERE

TIMELESS TELLURIDE

This summer, flying to your favorite mountain town is easy

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here certainly have been lots of changes over the past year and a half. One constant, though? Telluride and Mountain Village and the serene timelessness of this enchanting corner of southwest Colorado. If this summer all you want are outdoor adventures amid stunning scenery, clear mountain air and sunshine, then this is the place to be. Happily, Telluride remains easily accessible with a summertime range of air options that are a mix of new and familiar. First, the basics: There are two airports that serve the destination: Montrose Regional Airport (MTJ), a scenic 65-mile drive away, and Telluride Regional Airport (TEX), just 10 minutes from both Telluride and Mountain Village. And those familiar air options? All good news. Denver Air will continue to serve TEX from Denver International Airport (DEN) daily, offering connections nationwide through a codeshare with United Airlines and bookable at United.com or DenverAirConnection.com. In addition, United will operate its usual, multiple daily flights between Montrose and Denver, as well as daily service from Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD) and Houston’s George H.W. Bush International Airport (IAH). American Airlines’ daily flights between Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX) are back on the schedule this summer, along with twice-daily flights from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to Montrose. Meanwhile there are some new developments too. After a successful winter launch, Southwest Airlines will continue service this summer to MTJ, with daily Denver service and Saturday and Sunday flights from Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL). In other news, the folks at the Telluride Regional Airport have been busy, with some outstanding results. TEX has become the first Colorado fixed-base operator to offer sustainable aviation fuel to its customers. The greener fuel is interchangeable with traditional jet fuel and produced using sustainably sourced, renewable waste and residue materials like used cooking oil. The upshot? Every 7,600-gallon truckload represents a 22-tonne reduction in CO2 emissions over the load’s lifecycle, the equivalent to the amount of carbon sequestered by 28.7 acres of American forests per year. Adding to the feel-good factor, prominent industry publication Aviation International News recently named TEX one of the top airports in the Rocky Mountain region in its 2021 survey. With abundant air options, moves toward sustainability and award-winning airports, the summer looks good for visitors seeking timeless Telluride and Mountain Village.

YEAR-ROUND FLIGHTS Denver DEN to Telluride TEX Denver Air/United — daily

Denver DEN to Montrose MTJ United Airlines — daily

Dallas DFW to Montrose MTJ American Airlines — daily

SUMMER 2021 FLIGHTS Chicago ORD to Montrose MTJ United Airlines — daily

Houston IAH to Montrose MTJ United Airlines — daily

Phoenix PHX to Montrose MTJ American Airlines — daily

Denver DEN to Montrose MTJ Southwest Airlines — daily

Dallas Love Field DAL to Montrose MTJ Southwest Airlines — Saturdays & Sundays telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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ART SHOW

THE INNER CHILD JOURNALS

artist, Darla Loomis JUNE – SEPTEMBER 2021

Telluride ArtWalk Thursdays June 3 , July 1 & August 5

What’s happening this summer at the spa:

telluridespa.com / 970.728.0630 ONLINE BOOKING AVAILABLE NOW

Create soulful, authentic & successful life Become inspired as you restore & regain your ability to dream. Dreams don’t have limits when given the proper support all people can achieve their dreams. This potential to society is great! Darla shows the way through the clarity of her example and experience of over 30 years as an award-winning entrepreneur, teacher, and artist. She teaches how to be in the flow and surrender to the arms of the Creative. A flow that puts you in touch with your original nature and allow you to become an instrument of that nature in the world.

July 11-13

Awaken your natural powers of transformation with everything from high-performing skin treatments to meditative body massage + more

S PA + S A LO N + A R T

3-DAY SERIES (9–12 PM each day)

September 12-14 3-DAY SERIES (9–12PM each day)

250 West San Juan in the town of Telluride

Located steps from the base of the gondola in Telluride (Next to Telluride Sports)


Ryan Bonneau

GETTING AROUND

Good things come in twos, right? The twin communities of Telluride and Mountain Village, for instance, each have their own distinct vibe. Together, though, they share a love of community, of the unique people, culture and events here, and of the stunning natural beauty that makes for a perfect summertime playground.

8 A

s ute min

B

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TELLURIDE m in ut es

13 minutes Telluride to Mountain Village

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TELLURIDE STATION South Oak Street Telluride 8,750 feet

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SAN SOPHIA STATION Mid-Mountain Access the resort’s trails, Allred’s Restaurant & Bar, Nature Center 10,500 feet

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MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center 9,545 feet

TWO TOWNS ONE LOVE

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A National Historic Landmark District, Telluride is steeped in history. The town’s roots run right back to the second half of the 19th century when it was at the center of the mining industry and the place where Butch Cassidy robbed his first bank. Look around town and you will see a wealth of historical homes and buildings, structures that have been carefully preserved over time and which now house gourmet restaurants, chic boutiques and fine-art galleries.

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE At 9,545 feet and almost completely enveloped by the Telluride Ski Resort, this hamlet offers a more modern, lux feel in a European-style alpine setting. Incorporated in 1995, Mountain Village boasts luxury accommodation, state-of-the-art spas, stylish shops and sophisticated dining options, as well as a wealth of family-friendly activities, all surrounded by towering mountains that form the highest concentration of 13,000- and 14,000foot peaks in the United States.

THE GONDOLA Linking these two communities is the Gondola. The only public transportation system of its kind in North America, the free, environmentally friendly “G” connects Telluride and Mountain Village via a 13-minute ride. It’s also wheelchair, bike, stroller and pet friendly. Some aficionados try for the red gondola cabin, created in 2016 to celebrate the G’s 20th anniversary. Whichever cabin you’re in, with breathtaking views and the uniqueness of the experience, we can promise the Gondola is one journey you will never forget.

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© Ryann Bonneau

For those who seek an exceptional life


Specie Mesa Ranch LOT 11-3 Incredible Wilson Views / Lake Frontage / 122 Acres / $1,346,000

Only one real estate brand holds the keys to your most exceptional home and life.

Franz Klammer Lodge MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Peninsula Lot 27 & 28

Three Bedroom / Steps from slopes / 1/10th Fractional Ownership / $102,000

Escarpment Views / 7 4 Acres / Great Well / $445,000

John Burchmore 970.708.0667

jburchmore@livsothebysrealty.com telluridefineproperties.com

Lars Carlson 970.729.0160

lcarlson@livsothebysrealty.com larscarlson.com


70 IS THE

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Melissa Plantz

NEW


Telluride’s older generation is crushing it BY ERIN SPILLANE

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Dorian Gray had his portrait and Benjamin Button his clock. For Ponce de Leon, it was a mythical spring in Florida, while Don Ameche, Wilfred Brimley and Jessica Tandy had the swimming pool in Cocoon.

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elluride’s older generation? They have their own fountain of youth, this corner of the San Juan Mountains with its spectacular, vertiginous surroundings. The area’s backcountry makes it the perfect match for an adventurous community that values intense outdoor activity and athleticism to a degree unusual in other places. And, seemingly, those values don’t diminish with age. THEY DO WHAT? So, what exactly does older Telluride get up to? Unsurprisingly, skiing in the winter and hiking and biking in the summer form the backbone of this cohort’s adventure mix. Take Erik Fallenius. A Realtor who has lived in Telluride for 43 years, the 67-year-old celebrated turning 60 with an Ironman triathlon (his fourth) and is planning another to celebrate his 70th birthday. He also regularly takes his bike on a lap of the San Juan Skyway, a 220-plus-mile loop that

includes multiple high-altitude passes like Red Mountain at 11,018 feet. Fallenius notes that he typically stays the night in Durango, the midway point, adding drily, “I call it the almost death ride because we do it in two days instead of one.” Jane Watenpaugh, 72, has lived in Telluride for 48 years. A former Nordic ski instructor and member of the Telluride Ski Patrol, she and her husband owned and ran Sunshine Pharmacy for 40 years. Since retiring, Watenpaugh seems not to have slowed down. In summers, she hikes daily and twice a week does “something longer”, like the Sneffels Highline, a 13-mile hike with an elevation gain of about 2,300 feet and a summit of 12,000 feet above sea level. This past winter, Watenpaugh racked up 75 days on the Telluride Ski Resort, mentioning casually, “I didn’t do the peak this year, but I did do lots of Quails and Baldys.” So, while this grandmother of three may not have hiked to ski Palmyra Peak,

which tops out the ski resort at 13,150 feet above sea level, she was regularly hiking the ridgeline of Black Iron Bowl (12,250 feet) and dropping into the extreme terrain there, like Mountain Quail, as well as nearby Bald Mountain. She adds, “I am addicted to my Fitbit. I pretty much can’t go to bed without my minimum 10,000 steps, 5 miles and 10 floors. It’s just a kind of gauge that tells me if I sat around too much that day.” A recently retired bookkeeper and one of the first female ski instructors at the Telluride Ski Resort, Katie Jewett has lived in Telluride since 1973. In the winter, she is part of a group of long-time locals in their 60s, 70s and 80s who ski together every Friday. The “Skeezers” (as their kids affectionately call them) can usually be seen ripping it up on the Gold Hill chutes and other notoriously gnarly spots on the mountain. In the summers, Jewett plays tennis daily, hikes some afternoons and golfs on the weekend — an itinerary that might exhaust someone half Jewett’s age in any other community. “We just don’t see it that way here,” she says, laughing. ‘DON’T LET THE OLD MAN IN’ Talk to this group and repeatedly they will tell you that their active lifestyles are “part of who we are” and “it’s just what we do”. Retired teacher Vicki Eidsmo, also a member of the Skeezers, was born and raised in Telluride, the granddaughter of immigrants who arrived in the area in the early 1900s. Eidsmo recalls growing up in the waning years of the area’s role as a mining hub. “As kids, we didn’t hike, we just played out in the mountains. We didn’t think about it as special or different. I think it’s been a way of life for me for so long — the outdoor activity — that I don’t really ever think ‘oh wow, I’m amazing’. It’s just a way of life for me.”

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Page 22, Erik Fallenius. Page 23, (l-r) longtime locals Marilyn Siegel, Marcia Millar, Peggy Schmeltz and Sally Whitehead pause mid-hike for a photo by Vicki Eidsmo. Opposite page, front row (l-r): Franny Cohn, Joni Knowles, back row (l-r) Chris Newman, Wendell Thompson, Carol Hyatt, Jane Watenpaugh. Below, Erik Fallenius; right, Katie Jewett; far right, Tom ‘Socko’ Sokolowski. Courtesy photos

‘THE BIGGEST MOTIVATION FOR US IS WHERE WE LIVE.’ Katie Jewett

Fallenius echoes Eidsmo — “It’s just a part of who I am,” he says. — and cites an interview with Clint Eastwood: “The interviewer asked him ‘What keeps you going?’ and Eastwood replied: ‘I get up every day and I don’t let the old man in.’ That really resonated with me. So much of getting older has to do with our spirit. If you have a young spirit, if you don’t ‘let the old man in’, you’re just going to do much better for a longer period of time and your quality of life will be so much better.” THE SOCIAL NETWORK Then there’s the social aspect. For Eidsmo, hiking means time with friends: “I think one of the really important aspects of why we do what we do is that it is how we socialize. It’s how we see each other. We don’t sit down in a coffee shop and have coffee, instead we go for a walk or a hike to connect.” She adds, “We all grew up here, whether we were born here or came here when we were in our 20s, and we all share that love of being outdoors and exploring. There’s the activity and the scenery, but the socializing is so important.” And, time spent outdoors now has a particular poignancy, and purpose, for Eidsmo whose husband, Ivar, passed away in spring 2020. In a town of exceptional athletes, Ivar stood out, even >>

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‘WHENEVER I COULD GET UP INTO THE BACKCOUNTRY, I HAD TO GO.’ J oh n Mansfi el d

Top, John Mansfield; above, Tori, Vicki, Ivar and Lisa Eidsmo. Opposite page, (l-r) Patrice DePagter, Tami Huntsman, Susie St. Onge, Sue Lincoln, Marilyn Siegel, Carlotta Horn on a hike with Eidsmo. Courtesy photos

into his 70s, as an extreme athlete and passionate steward of the outdoors. His passing left Vicki, their two daughters and the wider community grieving deeply. She agrees that time spent in the backcountry that her husband loved so much has been a balm. Watenpaugh, too, emphasized that time with friends is as important as the workout. “The social aspect of these activities is just as important to me as the physical rewards. I am so fortunate to have a group of really great girlfriends who are just as fit as I am, or more so, who keep me motivated. They act as my champions, my critics, my competition, my life coaches, my spiritual advisers. The outdoors is my church ... all conditions, all terrain. It invigorates me, it humbles me, it makes me a better person.” WORK AND WORKING OUT Sometimes it’s their professions that either motivate or enable these Telluriders to stay uber fit. With nearly 50 years on the mountain, Tom “Socko” Sokolowski is the longest-serving seasonal

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employee at the ski resort. He started in 1972 doing trail work before joining the Telluride Ski Patrol the following year, where he still works today. Sokolowski agrees that maintaining a high degree of fitness has played an important role in his long tenure as a patroller and describes a routine that involves Pilates and, in the summer, daily uphill hikes and bike rides. “I usually get in about 500-600 miles on my bike in a summer. When you compare that to other people here who really ride, it’s probably not much. I know a guy who rides about 8,000 miles each summer. But, when you compare it to other 75-year-olds in other places, it’s probably a good amount.” For Jewett, it was her work for a local tour company that led to new avenues for outdoor adventure. “I didn’t get paid, but I did get a free trip every year. That started in 1998 and I have taken a trip a year.” Jewett’s friends (and soon their spouses) began joining her on these multi-day, high-alpine treks on well-known and challenging routes across Europe, including the Tour du Mont Blanc and the Italian Highline, strenuous, high-adrenaline adventures that only wound down when Jewett retired last year. The area’s older set also mixes this culture of athleticism with their extracurricular lives. Fallenius, for example, has a long history of advocating for local youth, serving as a founding board member and past president of kid-centric nonprofits the Telluride Academy, One to One Mentoring and Just For Kids. He and his wife founded the 100mile Mountains to Desert Ride, that nowadays is Just For Kids’ primary annual fundraiser. Says Fallenius of the popular ride: “Josephine and I decided that a cycling event was the right way to go because of my passion for cycling. It’s been fun to start something and then step away and see it thrive.” SLOWING DOWN (A LITTLE) It turns out that these super humans are not, in fact, entirely superhuman, with all acknowledging getting a little slower with age and citing some combination of yoga, Pilates, stretching, weights and calisthenics to maintain the level of fitness needed for their endeavors.


‘I DON’T REALLY EVER THINK “OH WOW, I’M AMAZING”. IT’S JUST A WAY OF LIFE.’ Vick i E ids mo

Says ski patroller Sokolowski: “You do have to learn how to pace yourself. On a powder day, you may want to go out and kill it, but you have to slow down. Sometimes I remember that I still have six hours to go on my shift and I take it a little easier.” John Mansfield, 77, is a 50-year local who spent his career working in juvenile diversion and co-founded One to One Mentoring. John is passionate about supporting San Miguel County’s youth. He’s also passionate about mountain biking, taking to his bike almost daily. Mansfield says that he has switched to an e-bike to make exploring the dirt roads and tracks on Wright’s Mesa near his Norwood home just a little easier. “The e-bikes allow us to not just keep riding, but to have fun riding. And it means we can still go to all the places we used to go.” Katie Jewett wryly notes that many of her peers are crushing it on local trails, tennis courts and golf courses courtesy of joint replacements. “A lot

of my friends have new hips or knees or shoulders. There’s a whole bunch and I think one of the reasons why many of us are still active is because of these surgeries.” THE BEST ‘GYM’ Unanimously, this group credits their active lifestyles in part to having a pretty engaging backyard. Mansfield, who is also a talented artist with sculptures on display in the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., insists, “It is absolutely a motivation … 100 percent, 200 percent.” He recalls his first summer in Telluride, back in 1969. “We spent weeks just wandering the backcountry. There were so many mysteries and so much history up there. It was all so beautiful and interesting and that started it for me. Whenever I could get up into the backcountry, I had to go.” Eidsmo likewise says that the beauty and interest of the high country is part of what gets her outside and up high. “I love the wildflowers. We

go up to the basins at a certain time of the year because we know that the columbines and the king’s crowns and queen’s crowns will be in bloom. It’s a motivation because you know you are going to see something so beautiful.” The Telluride native adds that sometimes she and her friends will take a book on Telluride’s history up into the basins above town where they can spend time among the ruins of the area’s mining past. “It’s fun to use your imagination and think about what life was like for the men and women who lived up here.” Says Jewett: “The biggest motivation for us is where we live. You walk outside and there’s Ajax and there are all the mountains. I could play tennis and golf somewhere else, but I would be doing it for the tennis and golf and not the scenery. Every day here when I am outside, I look up and see something incredible. “My friends and I, we don’t take any of this for granted.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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SATISFY YOUR NEED FOR ADRENALINE CANOPY ADVENTURE

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tellurideskiresort.com/bikepark


MOUNTAIN ADVENTURES

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

Now more than ever, Telluride’s beautiful backyard stands ready to comfort and recharge body, mind and spirit.

FISHING Telluride is an enthusiast’s paradise in every season, offering a different experience for fishing throughout the region. From the Dolores River to the easily accessible San Miguel River to the many area ponds and lakes, there is a fishing adventure for everyone. Local guides know the ins and outs of the area’s rivers and streams, offering guided tours and invaluable advice about flies and water complexities.

Photos by Ryan Bonneau

For a full list of outfitters and guides, go to page 83.

4X4 OFF ROAD Telluride’s mining days carved a string of roads into the San Juan Mountains over 100 years ago. Today, those same routes offer access to the high country as experienced guides lead tours over mountain passes past ghost towns and high alpine meadows filled with wildflowers and wildlife. Explore the rugged beauty of the area on one of the many 4x4 tours over Imogene Pass to the old mining camp of Tomboy or over Ophir Pass to the town of Silverton. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

WATER SPORTS

TOWN PARK A hub of activity year-round, Telluride Town Park is home to family fun in a beautiful setting. In the summer, you’ll find softball fields, tennis courts, the Imagination Station, a skateboard park, a six-lane pool. and more. Walks to upper and lower Bear Creek Falls can be accessed from the park, which is also the venue for many of the town’s festivals.

Josh King Photography Noah Gregory

Ryan Bonneau

Melissa Plantz

Tony Demin

As the snow melts, area lakes, streams and rivers become playgrounds for river rafting, kayaking and tubing.

HORSEBACK / WAGON RIDES Horseback riding in the San Juans is a favorite memory-maker for families. Have an Old West experience by riding through aspen groves and alpine meadows on horseback. Outfitters offer guided daytime outings, half-day trail rides and overnight trips. Or try a wagon ride followed by a gourmet dinner served outdoors. Altogether an unforgettable experience.

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OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

BIKING The Telluride region provides a striking backdrop for road and mountain bikers with a variety of terrain for all abilities. Mountain bikers will find challenging trails that explore old mining roads and basins high above the box canyon and ski resort, as well as moderate trails on former railroad tracks. Another exciting option is the newly expanded bike park on the Telluride Ski Resort. Road riding is popular along the scenic San Juan Skyway.

Ryan Bonneau

Melissa Plantz

ROCK CLIMBING Routes and boulders for all abilities in the greater Telluride region include jagged peaks and extensive wall faces that provide a variety of climbing and bouldering opportunities. For those learning the sport or seeking instruction, a number of guide services are available and local maps, information and gear can be found at many sport shops. The Telluride Mountain Club reminds climbers of all abilities that many climbs, in particular the Via Ferrata, require technical climbing abilities and appropriate gear. Ryan Bonneau telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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RIDGE TRAIL This trail offers

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

two options. Ride the Gondola

FAVORITE HIKES

Photos by Ryan Bonneau

to Station St. Sophia and take the trail down to Mountain Village. Or, start in the Village and hike up to Station San Sophia. There you can opt to go higher still via See Forever or use Telluride Trail to head down — steeply at times — to the town of Telluride. Jaw-dropping views and peaceful switchbacks through aspen forest await.

JUD WIEBE Starting at the Cornet Creek Bridge on North Aspen Street, the Wiebe is a 3-mile-long loop that vigorously climbs about 1,200 feet to a summit ridge with rewarding, panoramic views that encompass not just Telluride below, but

HIKING / RUNNING

also Bridal Veil Falls, the valleys

Trails weaving throughout the mountains afford hikers a quick jaunt to a nearby waterfall or an opportunity to spend the day traversing high-alpine-terrain, uncovering old mining ruins and viewing wildflowers. The trail system in the region has extensive options, including short strolls, day hikes or overnight backpacking adventures into the high country. Both the towns of Telluride and Mountain Village have trails that lead out of town in all directions, where hikers can experience the cool mountain air and unrivaled scenery.

above Bear Creek and the Tellu-

Before any hike, consult trail descriptions and a map, check weather and be prepared. Remember, too, to take good care of Telluride’s beautiful backyard by disposing of pet waste and trash properly and avoiding single-use plastics, which are more likely than reusables to be left behind.

gateway to longer hikes.

ride Ski Resort.

BEAR CREEK This popular hike is about 4.5 miles roundtrip. Starting at South Pine Street, the beautiful double track takes you into Bear Creek Canyon, gaining 1,050 feet in elevation on its way to a cascading waterfall at the base of Wasatch Basin, itself a

SNEFFELS HIGHLINE At 13 miles long and with an elevation gain of 2,274 feet, the challenging Sneffels Highline is best ac-

Courtesy of Telluride Outfitters

cessed by getting on the Wiebe at North Aspen, taking the left at the top of the third switchback

RZRs

to Mill Creek and heading north

RZRs are small recreational off-road vehicles with options for one, two or four riders. They are also a lot of fun. Local outfitters offer half-day tours of the backcountry for first-timers as well as experienced four-wheelers, with activities to suit all tastes and levels. Buckle up and have a blast.

at the sign. Ascend through aspens and steeply crisscross a scree field before topping out at a 12,000-foot ridge and descending through a valley lush with wildflowers.

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MOUNTAIN LIFE

SUPPORTING OUR TRAILS

Opt-In for Trails raises funds for priceless network BY JESSE JAMES McTIGUE

T

hink of a favorite memory in Telluride. Let me guess. You’re on a trail. For many of us, major life moments, or the act of processing them, have happened on trails — dates, engagements, connecting with friends, grieving, considering careers, developing ideas, analyzing parental choices. Trails are an integral part of mountain life and that’s aside from the physical benefits, the workouts, the training, the racing, the summits and the PRs we reach on them. We can’t put a price tag on our trails, which has never been clearer than in the last year when we turned to them for all the reasons listed above, plus for a bit of normalcy, a bit of sanity. The fact is, though, the creation and maintenance of the trails network in and above this valley require funding. According to Heidi Lauterbach, the director of the Telluride Mountain Club, a nonprofit that advocates for outdoor recreation, “It can cost upwards of $35,000 to construct 1 mile of trail. People don’t realize how expensive these trail projects are. And, in the Telluride area, there is no

perpetual funding source for trails.” Lauterbach explains that the costs for trails extend well beyond the build; that’s actually the easy part. Just to propose a trail, different organizations work together to research, plan and flag. Additionally, she notes, trails on public lands must go through review under the National Environmental Policy Act, which includes public comment before the trail is even approved. The mountain club, for instance, is currently working with the United States Forest Service to build a replacement bridge on the eastern part of the popular Jud Wiebe trail where it crosses Cornet Creek. The estimated cost is $160,000. Funding for trails comes from a host of entities, governmental and private, including grants, but Lauterbach emphasizes that none is a perpetual source of funding. To address this problem, the mountain club examined what other mountain communities did to make up for the shortfall. The best example they found, says Lauterbach, was Crested Butte’s 1-percent additional sales tax allocated for trails and open space, which is voluntary. In other words,

patrons have the right to opt out. The mountain club has launched a flexible model for Telluride, the Opt-In for Trails initiative, that encourages local businesses to choose to opt in in a way that works best for them. Look at what participating local businesses are doing and it’s evident they’re getting pretty creative to support trail projects in Telluride. Stronghouse Brew Pub, for example, donated $1 for every pint of beer sold on Tuesdays during the winter. Box Canyon Bicycles offers a “round up” option, which allows the customer to round their bill up to the next dollar on all bike rentals. Jagged Edge Mountain Gear sells mountain club hats and donates the proceeds. And, the Telluride Tourism Board and Between the Covers donate proceeds from the sale of the Telluride calendar. Says Lauterbach, “The hope for the Opt-In for Trails program is that if we all work together, we’ll be able to improve and maintain the place we love well into the future.” For more information on participating businesses and the work of the Telluride Mountain Club, go to telluridemountainclub.org/opt-in-for-trails/.

SHOW THE LOVE Want to show our local trails some love while enjoying the outdoors? The Telluride Tourism Board has partnered with the Telluride Mountain Club to organize a series of clean-up weekends for trails June 18-20, July 9-11, July 30-Aug. 1, Aug. 6-8 and Aug. 20-22 with Aug. 21 specific to Mountain Village. Stop by the mountain club’s booth at the Telluride Farmers’ Market on the Fridays of these weekends for gloves and trash bags. For more information, go to telluride.com/community-clean-up. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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BACKCOUNTRY BOOKSHELF A number of books have the ability to transport readers into the backcountry surrounding Telluride and Mountain Village and its colorful and riveting history. For fascinating first-hand accounts of life in the mining communities high above Telluride, try Tomboy Bride by Harriett Backus; or Conversations at 9,000 Feet by Davine Pera. Susan Dalton’s Telluride: A Silver Past, a Golden Future traces, beautifully, the area’s history to the present day. All are available from local booksellers Between the Covers, where a wealth of Telluride-related titles can be found.

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MOUNTAIN LIFE

A

t some point, most social media users have felt a thrum of yearning while viewing a photo posted online of a jaw-dropping landscape and thought, “I want to go there.” Telluride provides a multitude of post-worthy visual candy, from selfies on Main Street to no-filter-needed shots of pristine backcountry. Sharing these images on Instagram or Facebook seems innocent enough, yet posting exact locations on such sites, using features that document precise GPS coordinates, can have far-reaching effects that in some instances have caused harm to pristine places. Says Telluride Mountain Club Director Heidi Lauterbach, “When people geotag a location with their photo and that place becomes popular, it can cause a lot of harm to the surrounding environment. The reality is that in some locations, a summer’s worth of degradation could take a decade to recover.” The growth of geotagging, which is the process of adding geographical identification data to media shared online, has in recent years been blamed for a surge in traffic to landscapes across the world. An uptick in social media geotags has often coincided with a slew of adverse impacts to delicate landscapes, such as overcrowding, trail damage and increases in litter. Such

was the case at a once-little-known alpine lake in Grand Teton National Park, which prompted the local tourism board there to develop an awareness campaign in 2018. Other national parks, nature preserves and resort destinations have followed suit with similar public outreach initiatives designed to encourage visitors to be mindful of the impacts their social media tags can have. The City of Aspen, for instance, asks visitors to tag responsibly in their “Aspen Pledge” campaign and a similar initiative

TECHNOLOGY HAS ELIMINATED ONE OF THE BEST ASPECTS OF THESE PLACES: THE ADVENTURE THAT COMES IN FINDING THEM.

has been introduced by the city of Bend, Ore. Now, the Telluride Tourism Board and the Telluride Mountain Club, an advocacy group that seeks to preserve and enhance the area’s outdoor recreation resources, hope to increase awareness about the potentially negative impacts of geotagging with the Tag Responsibly, Keep Telluride Beautiful campaign. The initiative encourages guests to simply tag locations generally as “Tellu-

ride, Colo.”, if they must include a location, and to use #keeptelluridebeautiful. It is an issue that many area residents are hoping to bring into the spotlight. Longtime local photographer Brett Schreckengost, who has regularly contributed to nationally known publications like Powder Magazine, and Patagonia, says that he has witnessed a rise in visits to local, revered spaces in the last three to four years. Schreckengost says he believes it is due largely to the increased attention those places have received on social media. “Some places that used to exist in relative obscurity — places people would have to work to find — now are easy to locate from a pin drop,” he says. In a sense, Schreckengost adds, GPS technology has eliminated one of the best aspects of these places: the adventure that comes in finding them. The mountain club’s Lauterbach agrees: “Arguably, it’s more special when you actually have to find a place, through research or talking to locals at a coffee shop, instead of just clicking on a geotag and seeing where it is. That’s taking away the sense of adventure.” In a perfect world people wouldn’t geotag at all, Lauterbach continues. But understanding that may not be realistic, she suggests, when visiting lesser-known destinations, using more general tags like “Telluride, Colo.” or “San Juan Mountains”. And, if in doubt, leave the tag out.

KEEPING SPECIAL PLACES SPECIAL Ryan Bonneau

Locals work to increase awareness of ‘geotagging’ and its negative impacts By Marti ni que Davi s telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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MOUNTAIN LIFE

SUMMER FUN New canopy tour and bike park mean lots of on-mountain activity BY MARTINIQUE DAVIS

H

istorically, the disappearance of snow on the slopes at the Telluride Ski Resort coincided with a vanishing of most activity on the mountain, but the opening of the Telluride Bike Park in 2019 and the unveiling of the Canopy Adventure tour this summer together herald a new and exciting era for summer season activity on the Telluride Ski Resort. Canopy Adventure will take participants through a course of five ziplines, two aerial bridges and two rappels, spanning various terrain in the Village Express area. Reaching a maximum height of 140 feet above the forest floor, with zipline spans as long as 1,800 feet, the fully-guided, approximately three-hour tour will provide a fully interactive experience, with instruction in ziplining and rappelling appropriate for most people of average physical ability, according to Telluride Ski Resort Mountain Operations Director Scott Pittenger. “The Canopy Adventures is an excellent family activity,” Pittenger says. “There’s a little bit of

something for everybody. It’s safe but thrilling at the same time. It’s an adrenaline rush in a controlled environment, while also allowing you to take in the beauty of the Telluride area. All the zip lines and towers are in spots where you are seeing an entirely different part of the ski resort that you wouldn’t see if you were hiking or skiing. You get up high and see some amazing vistas.” The suspended bridges, aerial towers and heavy-duty wire ziplines that comprise Canopy Adventure were planned, engineered and installed by one of the industry’s leading canopy tour developers, Bonsai Design of Grand Junction. The course was created to give participants a fully immersive outdoor experience that also highlights the views Telluride is known for, Pittenger explains. The addition of the canopy tour adds to the buzz generated by the opening of the bike park the summer before last, which “blew our expectations out of the water,” says Pittenger. Mountain bike enthusiasts revel in the over 30 miles of interconnected, lift-accessed trails, which weave a network of freeride, technical and cross-country routes for almost every level of rider. Pittenger says the resort plans to incrementally expand the existing 13-trail bike park, with an emphasis on creating more “flow” trails appropriate for the green- or blue-lev-

el rider. The existing routes tie into established U.S. Forest Service trails as part of the greater Telluride trails network. “Our focus has been to create a network of trails, as opposed to just a bike park,” Pittenger notes. He adds that providing more on-mountain activities enriches the visitor experience, but it also supports the local business community. ‘IT’S AN “It really spills over into more vibranADRENALINE cy for restaurants, RUSH IN A retail and the farmers’ CONTROLLED market,” Pittenger ENVIRONMENT, says. “I think the WHILE ALSO Mountain Village ALLOWING YOU vibe has turned into TO TAKE IN THE something that complements Telluride, BEAUTY OF THE TELLURIDE where people can come up to MounAREA.’ tain Village and S cott Pitte n ge r experience something different and unique with all the restaurants and the activities on the mountain. Mountain Village has a lot going on, which is great.” For more information or to book a tour, visit tellurideskiresort.com. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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RICH HISTORY

SCENIC HIKES, SPARKLING HISTORY Telluride’s rich past comes to life with museum’s Hike into History series BY MARTINIQUE DAVIS

W

ith its striking vistas and dramatic landscapes, the Telluride region is known to conjure awe. Dig beneath the picturesque surface, though, and the real power of place comes alive when told through its history. The Telluride Historical Museum’s pursuit of bringing history to life is made evident in one of its most popular programs, Hike into History. As Director of Programs and Exhibits Theresa Koenigsknecht explains, these jaunts to locales around Telluride deliver stunning scenery with an added dose of historical context. “When you can stand in a place and have something to envision — like walking a trail and knowing that it’s the same trail that hundreds of men used to walk to get to the Liberty Bell Mine for example ... it all comes together in this beautiful package,” she says. The museum has been organizing summer hikes to historically significant locations in the region since 2006, with three unique hikes typically planned throughout the summer. The 2020 schedule was truncated due to the pandemic, but Koenigsknecht and her colleagues anticipate being able to bring the full Hike into History schedule back this summer, with unique adventures tentatively scheduled for July, August and September. Hikes vary from easy to difficult and are led by specially selected guides. “With the right leader, it can be about so much more than history,” Koenigsknecht says, explaining that the museum aims to select expert guides who can bring insights in 40

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


RICH HISTORY History comes to life (photos, l-r): Bear Creek Falls; Hike into History participants returning from Liberty Bell basin; Liberty Bell mill buildings; the Rio Grande Southern Railroad. Photos courtesy of the Telluride Historical Museum, all rights reserved.

‘WITH THE RIGHT LEADER, IT CAN BE ABOUT SO MUCH MORE THAN HISTORY.’ T h e r e s a Koe n igsk n e ch t

subject matter ranging from native plants to geology to natural history, in addition to sharing a site’s historical background. Museum Director Kiernan Lannon says the popularity of the program largely stems from the historical richness of the region, with spectacular scenery an added bonus. “There is always some element that brings history home in the physical sense; something you can point to and say, ‘This is where history happened,’ and you can see that,” Lannon explains. Previous summers’ Hike into History participants have journeyed to the remains of high-alpine mines, hiked along the Galloping Goose train route to the coal chutes in Ilium Valley and into the aspen forests of area mesas to hunt for 1930s-era arborglyphs (artistic inscriptions carved into trees) to name just a few. Some hikes take participants to off-the-beatenpath locales, while others bring history to life on

Telluride’s more popular trails. Historically rich remnants of the past are hiding along the popular Bear Creek Trail, for example, which is actually an old mining road. These kinds of hikes can provide a new perspective on old favorite places even longtime locals may not know the history of, according to Lannon. “You can really get the best of both worlds, with stunning scenery but then with a little digging you find there’s history there too.” He adds that Hike into History encourages engagement in the museum in an unconventional way, by bringing people outside the traditional framework of visiting a museum housed within four walls. “Hiking is not something you necessarily think about when you think about a museum, but this isn’t your grandparent’s history museum. We love the challenge of being unconventional.” For museum information and programming, including Hike into History, visit telluridemuseum.org.

MARVELOUS MUSEUM Explore the area’s incredible history at the marvelous Telluride Historical Museum on North Fir Street. The museum has permanent collections, an annual exhibit and interactive displays, as well as lots of cool programming. Visit telluridemuseum.org for more. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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FESTIVAL READY? WE ARE From May through October, Telluride and Mountain Village traditionally hum to the beat of live music, glow in the flickering lights of film projectors and play host to celebrations of mushrooms, yoga, hot-air balloons and more. The pandemic may have punked festivarians last year, but now the festivals are back, with varied formats to keep us safe and well, while giving us back our much-loved, muchmissed celebrations. We’re ready for festival season 2021. Are you?

Cody Hudson, Artist

THE SCENE | FESTIVALS

MOUNTAINFILM MAY 28-31; ONLINE: MAY 31-JUNE 6 Utterly fascinating and unique, since 1978 Mountainfilm has featured the best films about mountains and mountain culture in the world, widening its scope over the years to include social, cultural and environmental issues. This year’s Telluride event is predominantly outdoors with limited capacity, but festivarians can still catch up at Mountainfilm Online. Either way, the festival promises a program where descriptors like “mind-blowing”, “life-changing” and “exhilarating” don’t seem like hyperbole.

BALLOON FEST

BLUEGRASS

JUNE 4-6

JUNE 11-13 & 17-20

The event draws hot-air balloons and balloonists to the box canyon for a truly unforgettable sight as the colorful orbs are launched mornings from Town Park to float serenely above the valley. Expect a modified, but still utterly enchanting, gathering in 2021.

The preeminent Americana roots music festival, this summer Bluegrass has turned lemons into sweet, sweet lemonade with seven — yes, seven — days of music over the traditional Solstice weekend plus the weekend before. The result? Another unforgettable Bluegrass experience.

YOGA FESTIVAL JUNE 24-27 A gathering that manages to be both intimate and world class, this inspirational festival draws participants to a long weekend that offers intensive trainings, classes, lectures, meditations, music and more. This year, look for reduced capacity program events that are held mostly outdoors or in airy tents. Perfect.

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Photos by Ryan Bonneau

This summer, be sure to visit the event websites for updated information.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360


THE SCENE | FESTIVALS Marc Anderson, Artist

PLEIN AIR

RIDE FESTIVAL

JUNE 28-JULY 4

JULY 2-11 Oh yeah. This celebration of all things rock ‘n’ roll, draws diverse acts, emerging musicians and big names to the box canyon for a rollicking, memorable experience. This year, it’s a win-win for music lovers with more intimate gatherings in seven venues stretched across 10 days.Jon Randall and Jessi Alexander.

American acoustic music is the focus at this festival, which has partnered with eminent singer-songwriter Jack Ingram and partners Jennifer Stevens and Kevin Howard. The trio will curate the music and coordinate VIP experiences with artists at the event. A highlight is the Sheridan Opera House benefit on July 18.

ART + ARCHITECTURE WEEKEND JULY 12-18 The ultimate home tour allows everyone to experience the region’s art and architecture and features the work of local architects, designers, artists and chefs, along with their best designs, performances and creations. This year’s theme, “What is Home?”, explores the concept of home in light of the pandemic.

Corey Davis

For its largest summer fundraiser, the Sheridan Arts Foundation brings artists from around the country to paint the charming local architecture and surrounding natural beauty. The 18th annual event includes a competition, cocktail party and three-day exhibition and sale, with proceeds supporting the nonprofit that owns and operates the Sheridan Opera House.

AMERICANA MUSIC JULY 14-18

MUSHROOM

FILM FEST

AUGUST 18-22

SEPTEMBER 2-6

Telluride’s most eclectic fest where experts, enthusiasts and scientists explore fungi — edible, toxic, psychoactive and more. This year, the event’s theme is the supremely relevant “Reconnecting”, while the event’s format promises to emphasize the outdoors and more intimate gatherings, while remaining quirky, informative and fun.

A film lover’s film fest, the Telluride Film Festival manages to be both esoteric and relevant; seven times in the last decade, the Oscar winner for best picture premiered at TFF. As of press time, organizers were busy contemplating a safe, in-person event that promises, as always, to showcase the very best in film.

BLUES & BREWS SEPTEMBER 17-19 Telluride’s feisty farewell kiss to summer is this lively event that features microbreweries and brews, a world-class rock and blues lineup and more. As of press time, organizers are working on a celebration of music that keeps us well.

AUTUMN CLASSIC SEPTEMBER 23-26 Formerly Cars and Colors, the Autumn Classic remains a celebration of cars and colorful fall foliage, but now includes excellence in craftsmanship and engineering.

WINE SEPTEMBER 23-26 The event’s move to this particular date means Wine Fest favorites like the Grand Tasting, Toast of Telluride and Sunday Brunch now pair with the Autumn Classic.

WILD WEST FEST AUGUST 2-7

JAZZ FESTIVAL AUGUST 13-15

The Sheridan Arts Foundation invites underserved youth from the West End and Boys and Girls Clubs around the country, at no cost, to gather in Telluride for an empowering week of mentorship programs and esteem-building activities that celebrate Western arts, culture and custom. A much-loved annual event.

Since 1977, the true American art form has been celebrated in Telluride with Jazz Fest. As of press time, the event’s organizers are planning an event that emphasizes safety, but which still brings together acclaimed artists, Grammy winners, legends, upand-comers and the best student bands in the country for a truly transformative experience.

ORIGINAL THINKERS

HORROR SHOW

SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 3; ONLINE: SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 31

OCTOBER 15-17

Great ideas aren’t born, they’re made. Original Thinkers gathers us under the glowing aspens of fall for an immersive and intimate gathering featuring thought-provoking speakers, film and art that tell stories from all walks of life. Programming encourages engagement, will inspire, but not overwhelm, and provide time to connect with the ideas and stunning landscape.

It isn’t just that it’s Colorado’s first and longest-running horror film festival, or that its Instagram feed gives us sweaty palms, or even that MovieMaker named it one of the coolest film festivals. No, what makes this one of our faves is its passionate fans, who descend on our little town each fall for a mix of horror, suspense, fantasy, sci-fi and dark comedy. Organizers are currently working on a format that keeps us safe, while still scaring the pants off us.

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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THE SCENE | ARTS

ART AUCTION ALERT!

Melissa Plantz

We can’t wait for the Ah Haa School for the Arts’ summer fundraiser, its iconic art auction. Virtual again this year, viewers and bidders can check out what’s on offer via Ah Haa’s website (ahhaa.org) from July 16 until Aug. 5 — an end date that coincides very nicely with the August Art Walk. The artwork will also be exhibited in the SilverJack building, located at Pacific Avenue and Fir Street, for the duration of the event. Supporters of Telluride’s local arts education hub will know that Ah Haa is putting the finishing touches on its new home at the SilverJack, one of many exciting developments that include the arrival of new Executive Director Marty Wollesen and a diverse and compelling summertime program of classes.

savor every bite

TELLURIDE ROCKS Take a closer look around town and you might notice colorful painted rocks in random places. The brainchild of longtime local Luci Reeve, Telluride Rocks encourages anyone who is feeling a little creative to paint a rock and leave it in a place where it might catch a child’s eye, bring cheer to someone having a bad day, or figure in a photo perfect for Telluride Rocks’ Facebook page.


THE SCENE | ARTS

THE ABCs OF TELLURIDE

Melissa Plantz

WALK THIS WAY

On the first Thursday of each month is Art Walk, a popular and lively Telluride Arts initiative that sees more than 20 participating galleries and venues throw open their doors for an evening of art, conversation and refreshments. This summer, fans can expect organizers to make inventive use of outdoor spaces so that compelling, relevant works of art can be viewed in tandem with the stunning scenery — surely a win-win for eventgoers.

ART + WINE

Terroir is the key word in an exciting collaboration between Gunnison-based Buckel Family Wine and Telluride artist Eunika Rogers. New venture Red Dirt Studio and Gallery + Buckel Family Wine has taken over the former Telluride Truffle spot on North Fir Street to offer a tasting room, art gallery and artist’s studio. The Buckel family prides itself on making wines with minimal intervention, which in turn allows the terroir (in oenology, the term refers to the natural environment, including soil and topography) of their Colorado-grown grapes to truly express itself. And Rogers paints with clays of all colors and types for stunning works inspired by nature and the land. Says Shamai Buckel, “It really is a terroir-driven space.”

Hot off the presses this summer is The Telluride Alphabet, the creation of locals Jill Wilson and Abby J. Fox. This clever and colorful book links the ABCs to the people, wildlife, places and events that make this corner of the San Juans so special and unique. The publication, a hardcover book due for release on July 11, was the brainchild of Wilson, an educator and much-loved Wilkinson Public Library librarian. “One night I had a dream about it,” she says. “I could not go back to sleep. I was thinking of all the letters and Telluride things — Astonishing Ajax, Booming Bridal Veil, Captivating Columbines — I love the alliterative nature of words and I kept going through the alphabet in my head.” Wilson gave up on sleep that night, eventually getting up and making notes. She then put the concept on the back burner for a few years before reaching out to Fox, a friend and highly regarded local artist. The pair successfully applied for a 2020 Telluride Arts grant and got to work, Wilson fleshing out her notes with lively and informative descriptions to accompany each letter and Fox providing beautiful, highly detailed and engaging illustrations. Says Fox, “It was a challenge in a way to make it a book that would be good for children and of interest to tourists and accurate for locals.” The Telluride Alphabet certainly does that, at once eminently accessible, fun and educational for young readers courtesy of its age-appropriate format, but genuinely enlightening and entertaining for grownups too, thanks to the well-researched text and illustrations that even got the thumbsup from the Telluride Historical Museum for their authenticity. The hard work complete, Wilson and Fox say they are looking forward to the July launch of their book, which, as of press time, will be available for purchase at Between the Covers, Hook and the Telluride Historical Museum, as well as online at thetelluridealphabet.com. Brava! telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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THE SCENE | ARTS

A SCINTILLATING SUMMER AWAITS Local arts community pivots beautifully, creatively BY EMILY SHOFF

Chromasonic — Fluid State

Courtesy of Chromasonic

C

Jason Hicks of Jason and Daris Photography

Telluride AIDS Benefit

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ovid might be lingering like a couch-surfing ski bum, but the Telluride arts community has pivoted beautifully and creatively for summer, leading to innovation in everything from theater to fashion to film to visual arts. In other words, get ready for a scintillating summertime arts scene. The local nonprofit arts council, Telluride Arts, for instance, has made great use of its open-air Transfer Warehouse, the historic building at the corner of Fir Street and Pacific Avenue. By reducing capacity from 480 to 135 guests, it has been able to host small-scale films and concerts over the past year. This summer, it plans to continue these, as well as serve as the venue for streamlined versions of Mountainfilm, Telluride Mushroom Festival, Wilkinson Public Library programming, an expanded music series and more. Executive Director Kate Jones says that the need to reduce the size of gatherings has made them more intimate, “mandating something that we want to continue.” In-person audience sizes might be smaller, but local radio station KOTO has plans to live broadcast many of the warehouse’s events, expanding overall reach. Says Jones, “I’m so excited that we’re teaming up with KOTO. This is something we’ve been dreaming about for years.” Telluride Arts also collaborated with the Original Thinkers festival; artists’ collaborative Deep Creek Experimental; Deep Creek Mine, a former mine west of town that is now an arts space; and Studio Chromasonic to secure a National Endowment for the Arts grant. The funding will support two installations, an expanded installation at the mine of Chromasonic — Fluid State, and a new one at the Transfer Warehouse with sculptor and artist Johannes Girardoni and sound artists Orpheo McCord and Joel Shearer combining a real-time algorithmic process with light and sound


THE SCENE | ARTS

Telluride Theatre’s Shakespeare in the Park

Alexei Kaleina

‘IT’S GOING TO BE A LITTLE AWKWARD IF THE MACBETHS CAN’T TOUCH.’ — Colin S u llivan

Alexei Kaleina Josh Laydon

“Shifting TAB outdoors is a secret dream I’ve had for quite some time,” confesses Executive Director Jessica Galbo. “It’s going to be really stunning, with the beauty of the mountains matching the beauty of the fashion being displayed.” As for the Sheridan Arts Foundation’s Young People’s Theater, not only did they pull off productions throughout Sheridan Arts Foundation’s Young People’s Theater the spring, they ran multiple shows. Now, Artistic Director for a stunning experience. Leah Heidenreich says her talented young thespiTelluride Arts isn’t the only one pulling a 180 ans will participate in two camps this summer that in the terrain park this summer. Typically a winter will lead to productions of 101 Dalmatians July 19event, the Telluride AIDS Benefit will instead host 23, and A Year with Frog & Toad July 26-30, both at its iconic Gala Fashion Show on the actual runway the Sheridan Opera House. “In a year of so much at the Telluride Regional Airport in late June.

uncertainty, where our kids have been robbed of so much, it’s been really important for us to keep theater going for them,” she says. Keeping theater alive has been the mantra for Telluride Theatre as well, which pivoted last summer to pull off a free outdoor production that became a model for theater companies elsewhere. “Our plans for this summer are the same as they were last year — to work with [public health officials] to run the best show we can while keeping everyone safe,” says Colin Sullivan, the organization’s executive director. He admits, though, that he is hoping he can get actors a little closer together during Macbeth, this summer’s Shakespeare in the Park. “It’s going to be a little awkward if the Macbeths can’t touch.” Adds Sullivan, “If Shakespeare pulled off The Tempest during the Black Plague, we can do anything.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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THE SCENE | DINING

OPEN AIR, FRESH FARE

FAB FOOD CARTS COLORADO AVENUE AT NORTH OAK STREET Gyro Cart Greek treats

Diggity Doggs Hot dogs galore

COLORADO AVENUE AT ELKS PARK Mountain High Ice Cream Cool for summer

Two great tastes …

TELLURIDE GONDOLA PLAZA Telluride Twisted Treats Pretzels, shaved ice, waffles

PhilAm Egg rolls, banana bites

HERITAGE PLAZA IN MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Finnegan’s Sandwich Grill Creative menu options like ribeye, pork roll

Z’s Street Eats

Grilled Cheese a la Carte Traditional + gourmet options

BY ERIN SPILLANE

A

l fresco is all the rage this summer with multiple ways to enjoy the fresh and innovative cuisines of the local dining scene outdoors. Whether it’s family friendly, graband-go or elegant fine dining, options abound for enjoying wonderful food in the fresh mountain air. In Mountain Village, there are opportunities galore for outdoor munching, with the Village Center’s sun-drenched plazas a good start. Heritage Plaza is lively with a bunch of family friendly restaurants that front onto the action. At Sunset Plaza, you can go highbrow or casual with multiple options. Many Mountain Village eateries boast stupendous views from restaurant patios that rival the inventive menus. There some unique options too. The Village Center is dotted with offline Gondola cars where you can Ryan Bonneau

Waffles, fried chicken, fish ‘n’ chips

Local dining scene is al fresco this summer

Ryan Bonneau

Latin Creations Tamales, empanadas y más

Melissa Plantz

Grilled Cheese & Barbecue

bring takeout and enjoy a fun, memorable dining experience. And, many restaurants have charming heated and lit tents perfect for cool alpine evenings. Meanwhile, in Telluride, restaurants in town have a plethora of outdoor spaces for in-restaurant dining while enjoying the great outdoors. These range from sidewalk tables perfect for people watching to spacious, sunny patios and fun and lively decks. Some have created expanded outdoor seating with creative parklets, decks right on Main Street in what were once parking spaces. Or grab to-go from anywhere, with takeout options that run the gamut from the delish food carts on the Gondola Plaza and on Colorado Avenue at Elks Park to a wide variety of restaurants; this summer, even some of the swankiest eateries in town have takeout menus. Then head to Town Park at the east end of Main Street to enjoy a picnic with panoramic views of the north side of the box canyon, Ajax and into Bear Creek Canyon. There are also amenities galore to entertain the kiddos, including playgrounds, tennis and volleyball courts, a skateboard park and more. Other picnic spots include Spruce Park beside the Butcher and the Baker or Elks Park beside the visitor’s center. One final option? On Friday’s, try the unmissable Telluride Farmers’ Market, where food vendors dish up incredible fare. Just remember to bring your appetite. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Ryan Bonneau

THE SCENE | DINING

TASTY TACOS Tacos in Telluride range from traditional to trendy, with the freshest ingredients and fresh thinking, too. Here are five of our faves.

KOREAN BBQ Outside-the-box thinking with barbecue pork, kimchi + mango chutney.

SUPPER BY STARLIGHT Telluride Sleighs and Wagons offers a unique experience. Owner Ashley Story is a fifth-generation Tellurider whose forebears were shepherds that immigrated to the area from Spain’s Basque region. She begins the evening by regaling visitors with local lore on a horsedrawn wagon ride at her family’s historic Aldasoro Ranch and follows this up with dinner in a rustic tent where the menu features Colorado ingredients inspired by the American West and the family’s Basque history.

Taco del Gnar

TEX-MEX Enjoy the homemade tomatillo sauce, whether you go Tex-Mex with crunchy shells or stick with authentic soft tortillas.

Esperanza’s

AL PASTOR

Melissa Plantz

Ryan Bonneau

HBD, COSMO

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A quarter century ago when talented chef Chad Scothorn opened the Cosmopolitan restaurant in the Hotel Columbia, its surroundings were a little different. San Juan Avenue was a dirt road, the Gondola’s Station Telluride was under construction (as was the Gondola itself) and the adjacent ski resort ticket office occupied a trailer. A lot has changed since then, but not the enduring quality of the fare Scothorn and his team serve at this much-loved eatery. Over the years, they have won countless awards and rave reviews, all the while remaining a locals’ favorite with a legendary happy hour scene. And this year, Scothorn earned a new accolade when the Colorado tourism industry recognized him as a Top Frontline Tourism Worker for transforming his restaurant into “an innovative hub of dining flexibility and creativity” during the pandemic.

Scrumptious classic best paired with a brew at this Telluride Brewing Co. spot.

Los Buenos Tacos

CARNE ASADA Grilled, marinated skirt steak with caramelized onions + roasted poblano chiles on a locally made tortilla. Wow.

La Cocina de Luz

AVO TACOS Perfectly ripened avocados make for a fresher-thanfresh treat.

Baked in Telluride


Ryan Bonneau

THE SCENE | DINING

NEW COUNTER CULTURE CATCH THE GANJALA

Latitude Studio

Counter Culture is a new restaurant in the Lawson Hill neighborhood and we’re excited. The team behind the eatery are Steve Hertzfeld, Taylor Landry and Grace Mayer, three pros highly regarded on the local dining scene. The trio, who also offer catering and private chef services, are dishing Counter Culture’s delish fare, which emphasizes fresh and regionally sourced, from the former Aemono space beside the Telluride Brewing Co. Much-loved Aemono closed its Lawson Hill location in April after 17 years with owners Mike Guskea and Sophia Kyriakakis looking forward to new adventures, including continuing the catering arm of Aemono.

Want a tasty, Telluride-born marijuana edible? Try a Ganjala, a chewy and tangy confection containing 10 mg of THC. They’re available at local dispensaries in six fruit flavors, and come in handy single servings that are perfect for your next elevated experience.

CASUAL FARE ELEVATED Newbie Lunch Money is already a favorite. Located at 126 W. Colorado Ave. and the brainchild of locals Cynthia Sommers and Sheila Phinny, the lunchtime spot opened earlier this year and has become the go-to for quick, healthy takeaway offerings like salads, grain bowls, wraps, sandwiches and a la carte proteins, with both vegan and gluten-free options. Says Phinny, “Cynthia and I long wanted a quick, healthy lunch option in town and we finally just said to one another, ‘why don’t we do it?’ ” She adds that support from the dining community has been “lovely”. “The local love has been really incredible and exciting.”

Ryan Bonneau telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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SHOPPING, ELEVATED

Mountain Village’s retail scene is pretty much perfect BY ERIN SPILLANE

W

e are all in this summer on Mountain Village’s retail scene, which combines unique, independent retailers and a friendly, relaxed vibe to make it pretty much perfect. First there’s the set-up. Mountain Village’s stores sit on a handful of sun-drenched, pedestrianized plazas that make for the ideal place to let the kiddos run, play or enjoy an ice cream, while parents engage in some retail therapy in a stunning high-alpine setting. Then there’s the ambiance. All summer long, the Village Center is abuzz with live music, bikers, hikers and people-watchers lounging in the sun, food carts and even a bungee swing — without a traffic jam or big-box store in sight. It’s even a common consumption area, meaning shoppers 52

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can browse the retail outlets with a cocktail, mocktail or microbrew in hand. Bliss. And, of course, there are the friendly, funky retailers whose offerings range from sophisticated to sporty to souvenirs. For sophisticated, shoppers should make a beeline for Heritage Apparel. A Telluride Ski Resort-owned boutique, this trendy spot offers women’s, men’s and children’s apparel, as well as jewelry, fragrances, items for the home and, for the kids, toys, books and puzzles. “We have something for everyone,” store manager Pamela Simms notes, adding that favorites include clothing by Rag and Bone and Peter Millar, along with jewelry by much-loved local designer Tony Finocchio of MetalRock Designs.

Ryan Bonneau

RETAIL THERAPY

Another popular place is the ski resort’s Telluride Naturals, which offers a range of lovely, and often locally made, accessories, gifts and items for the home, including Pendleton woolens decorated with the Telluride logo. For more gifts and souvenirs, try the Resort Store, located beside the Gondola’s Station Mountain Village, and choose from a fun selection that ranges from reusable water bottles to fridge magnets, hoodies and more. Other options for very-cool gifts and souvenirs are the Telluride Distilling Co. and Telluride Brewing Co. tasting rooms, both of which offer fun, branded schwag, and Sunshine Pharmacy, which has the usual offerings of a pharmacy, plus T-shirts, mugs and postcards. Summertime in Mountain Village is all about


RETAIL THERAPY

Jake Niece

Ryan Bonneau

THE FINAL PIECE IN MOUNTAIN VILLAGE’S RETAIL MIX IS A MUST-VISIT: ITS FARMERS’ MARKET

the outdoors and there is a clutch of retailers whose speciality is getting you out on a trail, river or lake in style. Check out the sportswear and gear on offer at Telluride Sports, North Face, Bootdoctors, Christy Sports, Neve and Burton, as well as the paddleboard, bike and 4x4 rentals at Mountain Adventure Equipment. Head to Wagner Skis to watch master craftspeople handmake bespoke high-performance skis and boards, and maybe put in an order of your own. For unique treasures, a

talented local artist Colleen Thompson, who will be selling pieces from her line Moon Bear Jewels. Thompson collaborates with fellow Telluride artists Christopher Beaver and Ava Nelson and with Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Jewel on her line Songlines by Jewel and will be offering a mix of stunning jewelry at her booth. Summertime shopping in Mountain Village? Let me grab sunscreen, a margarita and my credit card.

Melissa Plantz

Melissa Plantz

Summer shopping in Mountain Village. Opposite page: The Gondola descends into Mountain Village at sunset. Above (l-r): more interested in ice cream than shopping; fresh produce at the Mountain Village farmers’ market; artist Colleen Thompson and her jewelry, also at the farmers’ market. Right (l-r): Unique and beautiful offerings at Heritage Apparel and the Rinkevich Gallery.

wonderful option is the Rinkevich Gallery, where Telluride artist Margaret Rinkevich showcases her exquisite abstract paintings and tribal sculpture. The final piece in Mountain Village’s retail mix is a must-visit: its farmers’ market. This outstanding outdoor bazaar operates on Wednesdays all summer long and offers fresh, regionally grown fruit, vegetables and artisanal food products, as well as clothing, crafts and more. One exciting option at the farmers’ market this summer is

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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T r e a t Yo u r s e l f t o S p e c t a c u l a r

America’s 100 Best Wine Restaurants W INE

ENTHUSIAST

“Best of” Award of Excellence W INE

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Allred’s offers contemporary American cuisine and features one of the best wine selections in the country. Take it all in while admiring the breathtaking view of the town of Telluride from the main dining room.

Located at the top of the gondola at the beautiful San Sophia Station

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allredsrestaurant.com | 855.762.5759


REUSABLE WATER BOTTLE Telluride Resort Store $30

RETAIL THERAPY

FOLDABLE, EASYTO-PACK SUN HAT Sublime / $230

SOL HANDCRAFTED PADDLE BOARDS Jagged Edge, Telluride Outside, Telluride Outfitters, Mountain Adventure Equipment from $699

TIM’S NATURALS SKIN SURVIVAL KIT Studio G, T.Karn, Ethos, Pedal Den $75

COOLfinds Local retailers have what we need to enjoy the outdoors this summer

COLORADO-MADE DAY PACK Jagged Edge $85

SKATEBOARD The Drop / from $126

HAT & SOCKS Box Canyon Bicycles $25 and $13 TELLURIDE HIKING GUIDE BY SUSAN KEES Between the Covers / $18 telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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a lex + kev in

WEDDING

M e e h an F e e T e llu ride Un v e ile d L isa M arie W righ t P h ot ograph y

ha nna h + te d d y W e n dy Jacobs Hampt on Soire e T e llu ride A bie L iv e say P h ot ograph y

j e ssie + je ff Mary Ellen Hudson S i m p l i f y Te l l u r i d e M i c h a e l Mo r s e Ph o to g r a p h y

WEDDINGS, REIMAGINED BY JENNIFER JULIA

T

he hallmarks of a good wedding planner are the abilities to pivot, problem-solve and MacGyver her way out of any issue that arises. And thinking outside of the box? Well, that’s a wedding planner’s superpower. Telluride boasts some of the most skilled and resourceful planners, yet perhaps nothing has tested them more than Covid-19. While pulling off personal and important celebrations mid-pandemic is no small feat, these couples, and their planners, still found safe and special ways to say “I do”. ALEX AREY & KEVIN ROGERS By the time Alex and Kevin’s celebration took place in fall 2020, wedding planners like Telluride Unveiled’s Meehan Fee had become practiced at weaving Covid protocols into events. Fee’s experience paid off as Alex and Kevin’s luxurious and intimate dinner party retained a “sense of normalcy. It felt effortless and easy,” according to Fee. Taking full advantage of Telluride’s beautiful autumn weather, the couple exchanged vows at San Sophia Overlook, then enjoyed a sumptuous dinner at the resort’s Tomboy Tavern with wine pairings. This leisurely, intimate wedding served as proof that despite Covid in the passenger’s seat, love always takes the wheel. 56

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HANNAH KEOGH & TEDDY GATES Recognizing that a 250-guest celebration would not be immediately possible, Hannah and Teddy postponed their planned affair and forged ahead with a sweet and sentimental courthouse wedding attended by their closest family members. Under the guidance of Wendy Jacobs Hampton of Soiree Telluride, a planner described by the couple as “superhuman”, Hannah and Teddy exchanged vows at the historic San Miguel County Courthouse and enjoyed a sumptuous dinner at 221 South Oak. The couple will celebrate with a large-scale gathering later this year, says Jacobs Hampton. “The sweetness of this wedding allowed my clients to remain emotionally fulfilled and to stay excited about their upcoming event. It was a celebration of the future.”

JESSIE HORNNES & JEFF BOHN Sometimes downsizing on size means upsizing on intimacy, connection and fun. Such was the case for Jessie and Jeff, who switched gears from a large, one-day wedding to a cozy, multi-day celebration at Alta Lakes Observatory with their Covid pod. “This wedding didn’t end after the couple said ‘I do’,” recounts their planner, Mary Ellen Hudson of Simplify Telluride, “it continued for three days straight. The family enjoyed hiking, paddle boarding and telling stories.” Hudson, who explains that she relishes in creating events unique to each couple, notes that many of her clients are still finding much to be grateful for, even in a pandemic: “After the initial disappointment, couples look back at their reimagined weddings with a lot of gratitude.”


SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS

LESLIE FRIEDMAN & DEVIN BOYCE With a 300-person reception on hold until next year, Leslie and Devin proceeded with their nuptials in a colorful, intimate affair on the historic Aldasoro Ranch at Telluride Sleighs and Wagons. Coordinated by Polished Fun’s Amy Palamar Puckett, a destination event planner raised in Telluride, the small-scale, 22-person event allowed for more customized, unique details and specificity in its creation. Puckett designed vibrant, elegant tent interiors to satisfy the bride’s penchant for color. Flowers by Bridal Veil Floral added to the vivacious mood. Says Palamar Puckett, “I wanted Leslie and Devin to look at their photos years from now and not see a ‘Covid wedding’, but a very special ceremony that reflected their personal tastes in the most beautiful way.”

l esli e + d evi n

ELENA KELTNER & BOBBY DORMAN Adhering to health and safety protocols was a priority for Elena, Bobby and their families, so planner extraordinaire Meehan Fee of Telluride Unveiled pulled out all the stops. From the testing of all guests to careful placement of chairs and tables and switching to an outdoor venue, every element of the wedding was intentionally designed. “We guide the planning process to reflect on the clients’ unique love story,” Fee remarks. “In this case, we also crafted the experience to make sure that everyone felt safe and stayed healthy.” It was, she adds, a day that unfolded full of laughter and love.

AMBER KUCKLEMAN & JAKE REYNOLDS There’s something to be said for spontaneity, and that’s what makes Amber and Jake’s wedding story so special. When Covid forced her to scrap plans for a large Texas wedding, Amber contacted Kathleen Cole of Telluride Presents to design a simpler, more streamlined affair in Telluride. “I received her email at 5:30 a.m. and by 6 we were planning a wedding to take place in less than a month,” Cole says. “We planned the whole thing in two weeks.” The planner, who enjoys “connecting people to the brilliance of Telluride,” helped the couple produce a boutique wedding with an abundance of style, charm and lightheartedness, like the masks worn by the bridal party and guests that proclaimed: “This is my party mask!”

SAN JUAN CELEBRATIONS

Amy P alamar P ucket t Polish ed Fun Me g a n W y nn Ph o to gr aphy

el ena + bobby M eeha n Fee T elluride Unveiled K a y c ee J oubert Phot ogra phy

am ber + j ake K a t hleen Cole T elluride Present s Abie Livesa y Phot ogra phy

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Help the Telluride Mountain Club preserve and enhance Telluride’s outdoor recreation resources. Learn more and donate at telluridemountainclub.org/donate


STAY & PLAY BY EMILY SHOFF

S

tep into the Madeline Hotel & Residences in Mountain Village and you’ll find a space infused with light and decorated with natural wood and fibers, a far cry from the dark furniture and antlers redolent of ski lodges in the past. According to General Manager Bryan Woody, that is exactly the intention. “The new renovations have completely transformed the hotel, truly bringing to life our modern approach to luxury mountain living.” Designed by Liubasha Rose of Rose Ink Workshop, a design firm based in Miami whose goal is to “weave stories into spaces [that] make people smile”, the changes to the Madeline are evident as soon as you walk into the lobby. Explains Woody, “We’ve crafted an entrance that makes our visitors feel as comfortable as they would in their own living rooms.” To that end, the metal of the front desk contrasts with wooden skis dating from the 30s and 40s, creating a vibe that is at once rustic and contemporary. This is echoed in the great room’s furnishings and lighting, the couches and ottomans

Unique spaces. Below, billiards in the Great Room; bottom, a lightfilled, but cozy space off the main lobby; main photo, the communal fireplace in the Great Room. Photos by Nicole Franzen

decorated with beautiful fabrics and in a variety of inviting textures — the hand-hewn wooden tables and vases and the lamps and chandeliers that emit a relaxed glow. These are complemented by nature-based art: geometric paintings, stone bowls and planters that look as if they’ve been carved by the sea, the wooden recesses carved like a lattice of branches and the hanging garden of plants interspersed with pine-cone sculptures. The changes to the common spaces are just the beginning. There’s also a newly updated Timber Room, a vibrant indoor-outdoor après ski bar and lounge, with booths punctuated by mountain landscapes, an ornate oak bar inspired by folkloric alpine design and an outdoor space that leads into Reflection Plaza, one of the most picturesque settings in Telluride. There’s also the Recovery Ski Lounge, designed by Telluride Olympian Gus Kenworthy, which offers a range of advanced post-workout recoveries and includes a hydration station with charcoal-filtered water. Guests can even carry home a bit of the Madeline’s aesthetic in a gift shop that features the hotel’s signature art and decorations. In

keeping with the Telluride spirit, much of the work here is produced by local artists, including leather goods by Crossbow Leather’s Macy Pryor. One of the most exciting things about the transformation is that the overall experience at the hotel now mimics the welcoming vibe of the renovations. Guests are greeted with a complementary Telluride Brewing Co. microbrew or glass of Champagne upon arrival. The Timber Room features a long list of creative cocktails, many with nods to local flavors, including one called the Steaming TNT, a rocking combination of Telluride Distilling Co. whiskey, Montenegro, Steaming Bean Telluride coffee, shaken cream and fresh grated nutmeg. The bar is poised to become the most sought-after gathering place in Telluride, with staff sounding an alphorn each afternoon to herald the start to après and passing out glasses of bubbly. At every level, the hotel strives to make guests feel relaxed. Says Woody of the Madeline’s transformation: “In this panoramic alpine setting, we have created one-of-a-kind experiences that celebrate the best ski mountain in the U.S.”

LUXURY MOUNTAIN LIVING

Madeline Hotel & Residences’ transformation celebrates Telluride

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

TF’S MAJOR TO STEP DOWN

In the early 2000s, as Hideo Morita discussed the purchase of the Telluride Ski Resort from then-owners Ron Allred and Jim Wells, he and Allred hit on the idea of forming a community nonprofit. Together, the pair pooled some money, began building a network of donors and hired Paul Major to lead the brand-new Telluride Foundation. With Major at the helm, the foundation has become a giving juggernaut. The largest funder on the Western Slope, it has put over $60 million into the community since its inception and played a key role in supporting local families, businesses and nonprofits during the pandemic. Now, with two decades under his belt, Major has announced he will be stepping down, sparking a search for a new head. In announcing Major’s decision, the foundation’s board chair, Daniel Tishman, praised the former ski industry executive and national ski team coach and manager, adding, “He leaves big shoes to fill.”

REACH, ROAM, RECHARGE

Josh King Photography

RESET Telluride, an ultra-luxury trekking and wellness retreat offering breakthrough experiences, opens in May 2022. Created by Telluride locals Dylan Bates and Holli Owen, RESET’s infinitely personalized programming combines treks through our stunning backcountry with indulgent recovery therapies and the highest level of service. Says Owen, “For the ultimate reset, you need the ultimate setting. That’s Telluride.”

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REALTORS FIND REWARDS IN VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTING

Lars Carlson, a broker with LIV Sotheby’s International Realty and Telluride Association of Realtors 2020 Realtor of the Year, moved to Telluride in 1985. Carlson said his love for the community drove him to get involved as much as possible. Twenty-one years ago, he joined the Telluride Volunteer Fire Department and is currently a member of the Telluride Town Council. Has his role as a volunteer firefighter for two decades been a rewarding experience? “Absolutely,” he says. “I think the most rewarding aspect is when you are helping people. A few years ago, I helped to save a guy’s life and he still gives me hugs on the street. Those are the things you remember.” Independence Day, when local firefighters put on a barbecue for the community, is a highlight, says Carlson, who chuckles recalling that the event gives him the opportunity to make his clients feel at home by treating them to a beer from the fire department’s beer booth. “It helps them feel very connected to the community.” A number of Realtors have worked for the Telluride’s fire department over the years, including recently retired chief David Wadley, a broker associate with Coldwell Banker Distinctive Properties, and Scott Bennett of Telluride Real Estate Brokers, another former chief, whose father also headed up the department and whose brother is the current chief. Another volunteer was Compass broker associate Jim Lucarelli, the current Telluride Association of Realtors president-elect, who says he found a family when he joined the TVFD in the early 1990s. The longtime local, a former department captain, served for more two decades, giving him plenty of time to accumulate treasured memories. One of those reminiscences involves the late Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, who owned a home in the Telluride area for many years: “Gen. Schwarzkopf, his last Fourth of July in Telluride, called up our then-chief, Jamie Schuler, and said ‘I want to spend the day with the firefighters.’ So, he came to the barbecue and came up on the hill with us for the fireworks. He was invited to every big event there was on July 4th, but he just wanted to be with the firefighters.” Lucarelli, who has since retired, remains involved as a board member and remarks that the fire department serves as a link to the area’s mining past. “When I joined, the fire department was the old timers … It was Gary Bennet, Joe Smart — guys left over from the mining days with a lot of great traditions, a lot of social functions that were so important in our small community. There was that real connection to Telluride’s past. It was very special. It still is very special.”


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

Local property management company Latitude 38 has gained a high-profile partner. Vacasa, a leading vacation rental management platform, has linked with Latitude, which was founded in 2009 by longtime local Kevin Jones. The move sees Vacasa assuming management of more than 185 area vacation rentals while maintaining the Latitude 38 brand and local operations. Jones, well known in the community where he also serves as a volunteer firefighter, says he intends to join Vacasa in a management role.

Melissa Plantz

LATITUDE 38 PARTNERS WITH VACASA

TWO SKIRTS AT 20

Since 2001, Two Skirts has dressed locals, part-timers and visitors alike with beautiful pieces that run the gamut from fun to fabulously elegant. The hip boutique began life in cozy digs on Pacific Avenue before moving to its current spot, a wonderful 1,200-square-foot space on Main Street’s sunny side. Two Skirts is more than just a pretty face, though. With a deep commitment to service, owner Kristin Holbrook, a former Telluride Citizen of the Year, is involved in a number of community efforts, including the annual Clutch for a Cause fundraiser, which sees women donate purses and bags that Two Skirts then resells to benefit the San Miguel Resource Center.

Kiki Dickson

Ryan Bonneau

Josh King Photography

INSPIRING NEW BUSINESSES Do the stunning San Juans provide inspiration for budding entrepreneurs? Judging from the fresh crop of local startups, the answer seems to be a resounding yes. Humans looking for a new ‘do can head to newcomers Hair9 Salon (in the Nugget Building on West Colorado Ave.) and Alchëmy Salon, located adjacent to Lift 7 in the West End. Pooches with a similar need can visit newbie Dirt Dawg on East Colorado for pet supplies, grooming and washing services. Yoga devotees should try Practice Telluride, a new yoga studio with a tranquil and welcoming vibe, while art lovers should check out Tellurado Studios for fine art, fine wine and provisions. In addition, two co-working facilities have opened recently: Alt Space, located above Clark’s Market, and Spark Telluride in Lawson Hill. Those looking for a novel outdoor adventure can contact Telluride Moto for guided motorcycle tours. And then there’s Dirty Sturdy’s Mountain Compost, where owner Mark Sturdevant provides composting solutions and logistics. Lots of bright ideas in this box canyon. telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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lodgingintelluride.com | info@lodgingintelluride.com | 888-998-6471, ext. 1 Georgie Bishop, Owner


BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON HIGH ROAD VANS JEFF LYGA & ANDY WARD

Photos by Ryan Bonneau

It makes sense that two professional woodworkers, one who arrived in Telluride in a Westfalia van named Desert Storm, and the other who spent his first 10 years in the area living in a yurt in Ophir, would build a business creating the ultimate camping van. Craftsmen and adventurers, Jeff Lyga and Andy Ward (who are also related through marriage) started High Road last year. Says Lyga, “We had been talking about this for two to three years. I wanted to do the same thing as what I was doing, but with a different medium, and have my job site in one place.” Both wishes have come true. Lyga’s workplace is now a garage a mile out of Telluride, along the Valley Floor at the Shell gas station, where he and Ward craft custom vans instead of custom cabinets. The pair work on clients’ personal vans, installing the electrical and other necessary infrastructure in van shells and prototyping the ultimate van able to remain in remote places for longer periods. This requires a solar battery system, heating and water storage, as well as storage for outdoor toys like mountain bikes, skis, climbing gear and kiteboards. “As soon as we had a van parked out front, people started coming in,” Lyga says. “The inspiration was the lifestyle — camping, road-tripping — I love it all.” highroadvans.com

CREATIVE LOCAL ENTREPRENEURS

Exciting new ventures abound in these mountains BY JESSE JAMES McTIGUE

Author Henning Menkell wrote, “What doesn’t exist you have to create for yourself.” Four teams of Telluride entrepreneurs have taken that message to heart, creating diverse new businesses.

Photos by Melissa Plantz

CAMP BIRD HATS KIM LAKE Kim Lake likes beautiful things. She studied art, and she paints and sculpts. She has worked in interior design and in couture retail fashion. But, Lake insists, she doesn’t like trends; and she doesn’t like waste. As an artist, Lake knew she wanted to make something that was beautiful and creative, but she also wanted it to last. A few years ago, she finally discovered that thing — custom beaver felt hats. With some exploration, Lake learned to craft high-quality hats, the kind that keep their shape and can stand up to the Telluride lifestyle and weather. For this, she explains, she needed felted beaver fur and hard-to-find machines. “Beaver is the best,” she says. “It’s water-resistant, it breathes. You can wear it in all of the elements.” As for acquiring the machines needed for steaming and branding, Lake had to hustle. “You have to find someone who is going to fix broken old ones and help you get what you need,” she says. She found them, bought them and hauled them back to Telluride where she has set up shop in a vacant historic mining cabin at the top of North Oak Street. Lake’s goal is to create a hat that mirrors the most inspiring qualities of its owner and which will last forever. “I meet with each client and get an idea of their personality and vibe. I make one hat for one person.” She adds, “Business is good. I need to get faster because I’m so busy.” campbirdtelluride.com >>

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Discover a new tier of luxury in Telluride this summer AUBERGERESORTS.COM/MADELINE | 970. 369.0880

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BUSINESS IN THE BOX CANYON

CAMP V NATALIE BINDER, BRUCE & JODIE WRIGHT

Drive 50 miles west of Telluride on Highway 145 and you arrive at Naturita, an old uranium mining town with a population 486. You may not even notice it. But if Natalie Binder and Bruce and Jodie Wright (known as the StudioVille Crew) have anything to do with it, you will. They not only want you to stop; they want you to stay and explore its wild spaces and their project, Camp V. Camp V is the creative collaboration of Binder and the Wrights in their quest to “push the limits” of hospitality and architecture. The trio stumbled upon Vancorum, a 120-acre plot of land with 17 historic cabins and purchased it in 2017. They loved its history — it was built by the Vanadium Corporation in 1942 to house the engineers who worked at the local uranium mill. And they loved the surrounding area with its 300 miles of trails, the confluence of the San Miguel and Dolores rivers and a trippy, high-desert, red-rock landscape. The team renovated the rustic cabins and added yurts, airstreams, a “Magic Bus” and good old-fashioned campsites. But the real draw is the community, culture and the interplay between art and adventure. There are art installations, artists in residence, community conversations, events and workshops. The vibe is a little Marfa, a little Burning Man, a little Baja and a little old-school Moab. “We provide artful accommodations for the spirited traveler,” Binder says. “We believe art brings people together.” campv.com

THE PEPPORIUM PEPPER RAPER CONTILLO

It’s a match made in creative heaven. There’s Telluride, a town that loves costumes and dress-up for any occasion. And then there’s long-time collector and lover of vintage clothing Pepper Raper Contillo, a creative who has volunteered over the years for nonprofits like Telluride Arts and Telluride Theatre and who currently serves as vice chair of Telluride’s arts commission. Now, the two have combined beautifully with the unique and colorful Pepporium, Raper Contillo’s new vintage, costume and consignment goods store on Telluride’s Main Street. “I have been collecting vintage clothes forever,” Raper Contillo explains. “It was a hobby in college. I love to shop and I love old things and I come from a family of collectors.” From these beginnings, Raper Contillo started, a number of years ago, doing pop-up shops locally that featured her vintage pieces. Then came the chance to move to bricks and mortar and the Atlanta native went for it. Good thing she did. The Pepporium is wonderful. Situated in a historic building at 134 E. Colorado Ave., the space is light and lovely with exposed brick walls, stamped-tin ceiling and large windows. Raper Contillo has stocked her new venture with a mix of fun, funky and fashionable items, handpicked and curated personally. Thrilled to be able to turn her eye for good vintage into a day job? Yes, says Raper Contillo, “I joke that I’m so lucky, I basically get to sit in my closet all day, but really, I love what I do.” thepepporium.com

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TELLURIDE CHARACTERS

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ee Zeller and her late husband, Dennis, were fresh out of college in Ashland, Ore., when they heard about the skiing in Telluride. Says Zeller, “A friend told us, ‘If you like the skiing in Ashland, but want something twice as big, go to Telluride’.” But when they arrived in town in 1978, the couple faced the same problem that many newcomers face: a shortage of housing. “Even back then,” Zeller says, “there weren’t many houses to

sipping gin and tonics. Idarado, the operators of the mine, refused to sell it.” Like most longtime Telluride residents, Zeller worked many jobs before starting, in 2004, the property management company that she still owns and runs today, Accommodations in Telluride. “My jobs evolved with the town. I worked in ski shops, Lannings and Pacific Street Skis; the Roma, Sofio’s Mexican Restaurant and the Buck; and was advertising manager for the Telluride

munity. All you have to do is find your pocket of people to call it home.” And, Zeller says, she is always amazed by how Telluride’s influence spans the globe and by how many people maintain a bond with this place. The town’s popularity has even translated into her approach with her children and their friends, who are now in their twenties. “Wherever I go, I invariably bump into someone who knows and loves Telluride,” she explains.

A LONGTIME LOVE FOR TELLURIDE Lee Zeller reflects on 40-plus years in her favorite place By Emily Sh of f

Melissa Plantz

be found. The mine had closed, opening up the Times under Catherine Otto miners’ cabins at the end of the valley, but housing and Rudy Davidson.” was still really tight.” Eventually she and Dennis Eventually, the Zellers heard of a place for built a house Down Valley and rent out by the mine in the east end of the box had two children. “I already canyon. When they called the owner, longtime loved this town, but having chillocal George Cappis, he explained that there was dren bumped it up to a whole someone coming by to inquire other level. This about the house at 8:30 the folis without a doubt ZELLER’S JOBS lowing morning. Determined one of the best EVOLVED WITH to beat out the other potential places on earth renters, Zeller showed up at to raise kids.” THE TOWN 8:15, checkbook in hand: Reflecting “I ended up paying him several months’ rent, just on her favorite things about so we’d have something through the winter.” Telluride, Zeller confesses that She adds, referencing a well-known group of her list isn’t surprising. “After colorful local skiers, “We beat the Flying Epoxy all these years, I still love the Sisters by 15 minutes to get that house.” skiing in the winter and the That began the next 14 years of their life out hiking in the summer. And when it’s all said and by the mine, before they had to leave because of done, a drink with friends at Oak.” impending mitigation work. “We lived there until Zeller has a hard time listening to people gripe the town forced us out. I tried to buy the plot about the changes that have come to Telluride. of land where we’d lived. I loved it out there — To her, those changes don’t undermine what she the views, the sound of the wind, watching the still loves best about the town: its people. “There avalanches in the spring with neighbors, while are so many layers to this town and to this com-

“Of course, I give a little advice when any of the Telluride kids head to some place new. Before they leave, I always remind them that they’re only a phone call away from Telluride. It’s the truth. You could be in Istanbul and there’s bound to be someone who knows Telluride, in case they get in a pinch. The town’s ripples run wide.” telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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FAMILY ACTIVITIES

FUN FOR ALL

Tony Demin

Tony Demin

For families, summertime in Telluride means sundrenched, fun-filled days spent exploring together.

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FAMILY ACTIVITIES

HIKE In-town hikes like Bear Creek and the River Trail give families lots of options for exploration. Farther afield, the Keystone Gorge Trail that begins in Lawson Hill or the Lake Hope Trail south of town are surefire memory makers. Just remember to consult hike descriptions, check the weather forecast and be prepared with appropriate clothing, water and snacks. BIKE Grab a bike, and recommendations, from a local outfitter and soon you’ll be giggling louder than your kids. In Telluride, start with the River Trail and then head one of two ways: east to the old mill building, or west to the Valley Floor. In Mountain Village, a wealth of family friendly trails or the Telluride Ski Resort’s bike park guarantee twowheeled fun.

Ryan Bonneau

SPLASH The mountains around Telluride are home to crystal-clear alpine lakes where families can add fishing, rafting or stand-up paddle boarding to their outdoor adventure mix. Kids can fish at the Town Park pond or take their parents tubing on the San Miguel River. Town Park has a fab swimming complex (check telluride-co.gov/185/Pool for more).

KIDS’ CAMPS & PROGRAMS ADVENTURES FOR ALL

AN AH HAA MOMENT

For 40 years, Telluride Academy has been sharing its love for exploration and adventure with kids ages 5 to 17. Founded by longtime local Wendy Brooks, this Telluride institution has grown from humble backyard beginnings to a leader in outdoor and adventure programming for kids.

Kids looking to learn a new medium, add to their portfolio or simply have fun should head to Telluride’s arts education hub, the Ah Haa School for the Arts. This summer, programming embraces a variety of formats, including in-person camps and private group and one-onone classes.

For summer 2021 camp information and updates, visit tellurideacademy.org.

Check out ahhaa.org for the latest.

ROCK ON!

SCIENCE IS COOL

BE RAD

Have a budding Joan Jett or Dave Grohl? If so, check out the Rock & Roll Academy’s Summer Rock Camp. Weeklong sessions guide students through the process of being in a band, from choosing music and instruments to giving a concert.

The Pinhead Institute, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, makes science cool with exciting summer programming that brings STEM to life. This summer, crowd favorites include outdoor-focused, in-person camps like Flora, Crazy Contraptions and Bridge Camp.

At the Drop Boardshop’s Telluride Skate Camp, experienced instructors not only teach young people how to skate in a safe, supportive and totally rad environment, they also emphasize patience, perseverance, focus and respect, qualities that come in handy in real life too.

For the latest on summer programs, head to telluriderockandrollacademy.com.

For more, visit pinheadinstitute.org.

Visit thedropboardshop. com for the lowdown on summer 2021 camps.

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Ryan Bonneau

Ryan Bonneau

Ryan Bonneau

FAMILY ACTIVITIES

FAMILY FUN IS EASY BEST LIBRARY … ANYWHERE … EVER Looking for a kid-friendly spot where you can be in the mountains, but not on the mountain? Go no further than the Wilkinson Public Library, where all ages will find opportunities to play, explore and learn. Our award-winning library embraces Telluride’s kids of all ages and vice versa. For instance, the summer reading program, Tales & Tails, is accessible and trackable online and open to all. For updated information, including outdoor summer programs for kids and teens, go to telluridelibrary.org.

Ryan Bonneau

TOUR THROUGH TIME The Telluride Historical Museum brings history to life through family-friendly exhibits and programs. Sitting at the top of North Fir Street, housed in Telluride’s original community hospital, the museum has 10 rooms of permanent collections each with its own theme and a large gallery with an annual exhibit. More than history under glass, the museum offers interactive displays like the popular mining sluice, outdoor mining exhibit and a scavenger hunt for kids. History buffs can enjoy historical and architectural tours. This summer, before visiting, check out telluridemuseum.org for up-to-date information.

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ADVENTURE TIME The Telluride Ski Resort’s Adventure Center offers a full range of activities for the entire family. From fast-paced full-day adrenaline adventures, like the new Bike Park Camps, to shorter experiences that allow you to take in the serenity and beauty of the Telluride area, the Telluride Adventure Center has you covered. The fun and friendly child care center will also operate this summer. Check out tellurideskiresort.com for more information.


WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO DOING MOST THIS SUMMER?

ME:

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COMMUNITY

HAPPY CAMPERS

Telluride Academy’s 40-plus years of outdoor exploration and adventure BY SAGE MARSHALL

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here’s nothing more “Telluride” than Telluride Academy, which has been drawing local and visiting kids together to explore the outdoors in the region — as well as international locales — for four decades. But when Wendy Brooks started the program in 1981, she was simply a single mom looking for a summer daycare option. Then, Brooks organized a group of five boys, including her 8-year-old son, Dylan, for an informal camp. Each day, they took the Brooks’ family pickup truck on a nearby adventure. Tuition was 10 bucks for a week. To say that the program has grown and evolved from there is an understatement. Today, the organization hosts hundreds of kids each week all summer long for dozens of week-long camps. Brooks emphasizes that the roots of the Telluride Academy remain strong. Today’s camp is surprisingly similar to its earliest versions: Each camp group has no more than 12 kids, each within a two-year age range, and runs four days

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a week with a Wednesday overnight. There is a sliding fee scale so that every local child can go to camp. “I could not be prouder,” says Brooks of the 40-year milestone. “The academy is kind of like my fourth child — still growing, changing, adapting to the times and getting more amazing with each passing year.” Luke Brown became the academy’s executive director in May 2017. He grew up in Dolores, south of Telluride, and jumped at the chance to return to the region after teaching for several years in Denver. Brown notes that one of the academy’s greatest assets is the area’s diversity, which offers kids the opportunity to explore everything from high-alpine tundra to low-desert canyons, all within a reasonable drive. Brown adds that the academy pivoted as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic in a way that brought it back to its roots. “We started off 2020 with all of these plans


COMMUNITY

‘THE ACADEMY IS MORE AMAZING WITH EACH PASSING YEAR.’ W e nd y B ro o ks

Alli Weitzel

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for special programming, as well as outreach to the local Latino community. He also envisions securing a “forever home … somewhere to put up some yurts, classrooms and staff housing.” But, ultimately, Brown emphasizes that what really makes the program stand out is the people. “Telluride Academy has really been built on an incredible history of passionate staff — educators, characters, artists, musicians. The amount of people that have come through our doors as field instructors, interns and specialists is pretty incredible. It would be hard to meet anyone that has lived in Telluride for a number of years that doesn’t have a direct connection to the Telluride Academy as a former employee or knows somebody who does.”

Rohanna Mertens

and ideas to celebrate four decades of outdoor programming in the community,” he recalls. Instead of hosting any big events, though, the academy opted to run nine weeks of programming, serving about 50 percent of the kids it normally does. Still, Brown considers last summer a success. “Our priority became ensuring that we could be a great option for local and visiting families to emerge from the pandemic and give their kids an opportunity to reconnect with friends and nature. We really shifted to focus on the core of our mission. In a way, it was kind of an incredible way to celebrate 40 years.” Moving forward, Brown says he hopes to bring more kids into Telluride Academy’s fold by inviting regional school districts and youth groups



AUTUMN IN TELLURIDE

GLORIOUS GOLD SEASON Enjoy the area’s fabulous fall foliage while treading lightly

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all in Telluride is fleeting, but fabulous, as groves of aspens set the box canyon aglow with stunning gold foliage that contrasts beautifully with the green of neighboring firs. Everywhere you turn, a stunning scene beckons and all the while Telluride and Mountain Village are themselves more mellow and intimate, making for a wonderful and memorable experience. Protecting and preserving this natural splendor, then, is pretty important. With that in mind, here are a trio of low-impact ways to enjoy the San Juan Mountains’ glorious gold season. LEAVE NO TRACE The area’s trails network provides endless opportunities for hikers and bikers to leaf peep, as well as benefit from physical activity, fresh air and sunshine. The key here is to exercise good trail etiquette, including leaving no trace; staying on the trail and never cutting switchbacks; bikers yielding to hikers and downhill recreators yielding to uphill activity; avoiding muddy trails to prevent rutting and widening; refraining from performing unauthorized trail work and remembering to be cognizant and considerate of others. Keeping these simple guidelines in mind will keep local trails as beautiful and unspoiled as those splendid autumn panoramas.

DESTINATION MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Telluride’s high-altitude twin offers multiple options for outdoor adventures and stunning views in settings designed to work in tandem with the natural environment. For two-wheeled fun, head to the Telluride Ski Resort’s Bike Park to enjoy over 30 miles of interconnected, lift-accessed trails, 13 in total. Or go high at the resort’s new Canopy Adventure, which takes thrill-seekers through a course of ziplines, aerial bridges and rappels that reach a maximum height of 140 feet, resulting in a heady mixture of adrenaline and amazing vistas. USE A LOCAL GUIDE Local outfitters offer guided 4x4 trips into the basins above Telluride, combining an exciting journey into the high country with an outdoor history lesson that takes in the ghost towns, ruins and relics from the area’s days as a mining hub. In the fall, there is the added bonus of stunning gold season landscapes that evolve with every switchback and elevation gain. The best part? Our local guides are expert at balancing exploration and adventure with good backcountry etiquette for a low-impact outing you won’t soon forget.

THE BEST TIME TO CATCH THE REGION’S FALL FOLIAGE AT ITS PEAK IS GENERALLY THE LAST TWO WEEKS OF SEPTEMBER AND THE FIRST WEEK OF OCTOBER.

Ryan Bonneau

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here’s 6 inches of fresh snow in town and even more on the mountain. I help my dad shovel the deck, grab my skis and walk to Lift 8, stopping along the way at Baked In Telluride to grab a coffee and a cake donut with sprinkles. I meet up with my friends at the lift line. Everyone’s giddy with excitement. Up on the mountain, we rip a couple of laps on 9 before going over to 6, where the snow is soft and the lift line small. Our legs are wobbly and tired by noon. We get spaghetti and meatballs at Guiseppe’s to refuel for the afternoon. Telluride Ski Patrol opens Gold Hill after some mitigation work. It’s a gold rush on Andy’s Gold, which is my favorite run. Today, it’s steep and deep. We lap Gold Hill for the rest of the afternoon, then head over to Gorrono for a day’s end drink and some nibbles. We enjoy our drinks and listen to live music. Our faces are red from perspiration and the cold, but it doesn’t matter. Life is good. The fun doesn’t stop in the evening. I head over to Hanley Rink in Telluride Town Park for a game of pick-up hockey. I play with my former Telluride Lizard Head teammates and other members of the community. We dish the puck to each other and stride through the ice ignoring the burning in our legs from a long day of skiing. The puck flows between us and so do the smiles. We lose track of the score and celebrate each goal, regardless of which team the goal-scorer is on. I head back home. My dad’s already gotten the wood stove going. The whole house is toasty. My little brother and I head to the garage and wax our skis—there’s more snow in the forecast. If we were staying in, my mom might make her trademark linguine with white wine and clam sauce for dinner before walking our dog, Leo, around the block. Tonight, though, we visit Rustico Ristorante, where I order the delectable mushroom risotto. Later that evening, I meet back up with my friends at the bar at the New Sheridan. It feels like a Telluride High School reunion. Everyone’s there, not just from my year, but several years above and below me. We hang out and catch up at the poker table that sits up above the bar. Then we go over to the pool tables. I’m normally a pretty average pool player, but tonight I run the table. When we eventually filter out of the bar, there’s already a new coating of fresh snow, which shimmers effervescent in the night. We don’t want the day to end, and yet we’re looking forward to tomorrow and more fresh powder and time with friends and family. A writer for the Guide, Sage Marshall was raised in Telluride.

WINTER IN TELLURIDE

MY PERFECT WINTER DAY BY SAGE MARSHALL

WE LAP GOLD HILL FOR THE REST OF THE AFTERNOON, THEN HEAD TO GORRONO.

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HISTORIC WALKING TOUR The Telluride area boasts a rich history. In the 1700s, the Ute Indians used the San Juan Mountains and the San Miguel River banks as summer camps. Explorers and survey parties passed through the area in the 1700s and 1800s, but it was mining that brought the first European settlers in 1876 when the Sheridan Mine registered its operation in the Marshall Basin above Telluride. In just 20 years, the town grew from a hodgepodge of cabins and shacks to rows of elegant Victorians and stately brick buildings, many of which exist today. Telluride was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1964 and the Town later established the Historic and Architectural Review Commission to further protect its character and authenticity. The Historic Walking Tour is a self-guided walk through Telluride’s storied past. 1 | San Miguel County Courthouse The courthouse was originally built on the south side of West Colorado Avenue in 1886 but burned shortly after construction. The bricks were saved to build the present courthouse less than a year later on the opposite corner (Colorado Ave. and Oak St.). Recently renovated, it is still in use today.

5 | St. Patrick’s Catholic Church Reverend J.J. Gibbons, pastor of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, made his first trip to Telluride from Ouray for a baptism, traveling by horseback over the mountain passes. In 1896, he helped build St. Patrick’s Catholic Church of Telluride on Catholic Hill for $4,800. By 1899, the church had 200 parishioners. The wooden figures of the Stations of the Cross were carved in the Tyrol area of Austria.

6 | Old Waggoner House Charles Delos Waggoner, president of the Bank of Telluride (the yellow brick building on main street), contrived a scheme purportedly to save his bank in the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Waggoner siphoned money from New York banks to keep his clients from losing their life savings once the Bank of Telluride could no longer pay its creditors. Waggoner, who was sentenced to 15 years and served six, testified in court, “I would rather see the New York banks lose money than the people of Telluride, most of whom have worked all their lives for the savings that were deposited in my bank.”

7 | Town Hall The building was constructed on Fir Street and Columbia Avenue in 1883 as Telluride’s first schoolhouse. The one-room structure held one teacher and 53 students and was built for $3,000. After a new school was built, the town offices occupied the building.

2 | New Sheridan Hotel & Opera House Built in 1891, Telluride’s first hotel was destroyed by fire in 1894 and rebuilt in brick in 1895. At the same time, the Sheridan Bar was built, and it is now one of the oldest bars in the West. The bar has remained unchanged since 1895, boasting its original lead glass divider panels, mahogany wood paneling and filigree light fixtures. Patrons are served beverages on the original hand-carved cherry wood bar that was imported from Austria. The New Sheridan was recently accepted as a member of the National Trust for Historic Hotels of America. In 1913, the opera house was added and named the Segerberg Opera House, after builders J.A. and Arvid Segerberg. The building was eventually named the Sheridan Opera House after its neighboring bar and hotel.

3 | The Pekkarine Building One of the oldest structures on Colorado Avenue, this building was home to the Pekkarine family. Mr. Pekkarine emigrated to the US from Finland in the late 1800s and opened a boot shop in the basement. On the second floor, he later operated a mercantile store. The Pekkarines lived on the third floor. At the settling of the Pekkarine estate in 1974, valuable artifacts were donated to the Telluride Historical Museum.

4 | Roma Bar Building The Roma Building was home to one of the town’s oldest and most raucous bars. The downstairs still contains the original 1860 Brunswich-Balke-Collender Company bar, which is carved from walnut with 12-foot French mirrors. The building was most recently renovated in 2016.

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8 | Telluride Historical Museum Built in 1896 and named Hall’s Hospital after its first doctor, the building served as the community hospital treating miners and townspeople until it closed in 1964 due to a decline in the population. It reopened in 1966 as the Telluride Historical Museum and was renovated in 2002. Ten rooms and outdoor exhibitions showcase Telluride’s unique and vibrant history with a vast collection of photographs, artefacts and exhibitions

9 | North Oak House Built in 1900, this house was a survivor of the 1914 flood that careened down Cornet Creek, sweeping through town and depositing mud and debris from the Liberty Bell Mine down to Colorado Avenue. One woman was killed and the Sheridan Bar was filled with mud halfway to the ceiling. This house has been completely restored to its original condition and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Homes.

10 | Davis House Entrepreneur E.L. Davis who built this stately brick house in 1894, held an early interest in the Bullion Lode, as well as numerous mining claims in the area. He owned all the land where the former Rio Grande Southern Train Depot now stands, as well as one-third interest in West Telluride. After Davis’s death, the house was sold to Dr. Oshner, who used it as a hospital, particularly during the 1918 flu epidemic.


HISTORIC WALKING TOUR TOMBO

Y RD.

8

GREGORY

N

9

The cemetery is located on the east end of town on Colorado Avenue and offers a glimpse into Telluride’s history and the perils of its residents during the mining-boom era when avalanches, murders, flu epidemics, mining accidents and labor strikes took many lives.

B

11

7

10

D

A

COLUMBIA

Lone Tree Cemetery

C COLORADO AVE.

1

2

4

E

I

Start Here Historical Plaque

3

Historical Plaque

B | Telluride Elementary School

C | Galloping Goose This curious hybrid of auto and train rode Otto Mears’ famous railroad line in the declining years of the Rio Grande Southern. On rails, the Galloping Goose made its last run in 1953. It is now the moniker of Telluride’s public buses.

D | Miner’s Union Built by the Western Federation of Miners in 1901 as a result of a period of labor strikes and protests when unionized miners were denied health care at the local hospital.

E | Butch Cassidy Robbery Site By most accounts, Butch Cassidy was a minor player in his first bank robbery of San Miguel Valley Bank in 1889. The old bank burned and was replaced by the Mahr Building in 1892.

F | Pick & Gad Located in what was once Telluride’s red-light district, patrons were treated to music, food, wine and ladies in this brick “parlor house” if they wore a coat and tie.

12

H

D GON

OLA

Historical Plaque

PINE

FIR

OAK

13 PACIFIC

ASPEN

14 TOWNSEND

At the time of its construction in 1895, the building was considered to be the most modern of educational facilities. It was completely renovated in 1986, and an addition was built in 2000.

ALDER

5 6

GALENA

SPRUCE

A | Lone Tree Cemetery

WILLOW

More Historic Sites & Buildings

G

F

SAN JUAN

11 | L.L. Nunn House On the corner of Aspen and West Columbia, this white Victorian was bought by L.L. Nunn who financed the world’s first commercial A/C power plant, the Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant. Nunn purchased the home for his Telluride Institute, where “pinheads” from Cornell University came to expand their knowledge of the production of power. Today, Cornell University has a “Telluride House” funded by Nunn’s estate. Next door, on the corner of Aspen Street and West Columbia, is the house in which Nunn lived.

12 | Rio Grande Southern Railway Depot Prior to the arrival of the railroad in 1891, oxen and mule trains, as well as horses, carried all supplies and ore into and out of the area. The introduction of the railroad created a bustling, noisy area surrounded by boardinghouses and warehouses. Ore was hauled out of the surrounding mines and became a major revenue generator for the Rio Grande Southern Railroad.

G | Old Town Jail

13 | Finn Town

This stone jail is thought to have been built in 1885 and is now occupied by the Telluride Marshal’s Department. The town’s first calaboose, a wooden structure, was built in 1878 and is now located in Telluride Town Park’s campgrounds.

This area was the center of social life for Scandinavian immigrants. On the south side of Pacific Street, Finn Town Flats (originally a boardinghouse), Finn Hall and the smaller Swede-Finn Hall (pictured, and now the Elks Lodge on the corner of Pacific and Townsend) hosted many social gatherings. Continuing east, detour briefly up South Oak Street to the Dahl House, a miner’s rooming house built in the 1890s.

H | Penn Tram Towers At the turn of the century, the east end of the canyon was laced with the cables of aerial trams that lowered ore from the mines to mills in the valley below. These towers were part of the Penn Tram which conveyed ore from mines high above Telluride to the mills beyond Pandora.

I | Idarado Legacy Trail

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Plaques along this interpretive walk recount the mining legacy of Telluride’s east end. The trail ends at the Pandora Mill site with a stunning view oftelluride.com Bridal Veil Falls. | 855.421.4360

14 | Popcorn Alley The Senate, Silver Bell, Cribs and madam’s stone residences make up the restored buildings of Pacific Street’s “sporting district.” The Senate was one of the many places bustling with business between the 1880s and 1930s. The Silver Bell, built in 1890, suffered a disastrous fire in 1923. It operated as one of Telluride’s many “soda parlors” during Prohibition, and its numerous entrances hint at the other services offered there. The three small Victorian houses standing in a row on Pacific Street, known as the Cribs, are all that remain of the “female boarding houses” that lined both sides of West Pacific Street.

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TRANSPORTATION TOWN OF TELLURIDE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE DAKOTA

GREG

ORY

CURTIS DR

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River Trail

Visitors Center

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MBIN

LAU REL

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Trail

Free 4-hour Parking

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SAN JUAN

ONE WAY

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Gondola Station Telluride

In historic downtown Telluride, solar-powered parking meters are Free oGondola mid-block n main and side streets. $1/hrFree – max 3 hours. Meters accept cards or coins. Parking • Meters are enforced 8am to 6pm Monday to Saturday (yellow) Bus Stop • Parking is free on Sundays and holidays Free Bus Route • Select side streets allow free 2-hour parking (green)

Free Bus Route

• Bus will drop off/pick up from any corner on the route. • D etailed schedules posted at bus stops telluride-co.gov/255/Bus-Schedule

D > Free 30-minute; no time limit after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am. E > Free 1-hour parking; no parking 2-6:30 am. > Free daytime parking 6:30am– F 2am ; $25 overnight 2–6:30am, valid for 24 hours G > $2 per hour; $35 max for each 24-hour period eadows Parking , end of Adams M Ranch Road; Free daytime parking 8am–8pm; No overnight parking without a permit; no RV's, commercial vehicles or trailers

MTN. VILLAGE BUS LOOP Free service daily, for more info townofmountainvillage.com/bus

DIAL-A-RIDE

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

Bus Stop

No Parking or Permit Only

• Designated stops every few blocks

A > $2 per hour; free after 6pm; no parking 2–6:30am.

All meters are payable by Parkmobile app, debit /credit card only; no cash.

Free Parking

Free Daytime Parking

• Loop runs every 15 minutes, 7am to 10pm

PARKING

Market Plaza Station

Free Gondola

2-hour Free Parking or Permit Parking

GALLOPING GOOSE BUS LOOP

Mtn. Village Center Station

Mountain Village Station

Paid Metered Parking

Bear Creek Trail

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE PARKING & FREE BUS SERVICE

80

K

2-hour Free Parking or Permit Parking

HEMLOC

River Trail

E

Paid Metered Parking

acy

Leg

E. COLORADO AVE.

E

PARKING Visitors Center

PARK I NG ZO NES

SHADOW LN

PARKING ZONES DEPOT

ree our ing

No Parking or Permit Only

N S

PACIFIC

Free Day Parking

River Trail

Ah Haa Paid Day Parking

W

Y

Tr acy

AVE.

MAPLE

ALDER

MBIN

LAU REL

K

PINON

HEMLOC

ONE WAY

ONE WAY

COLU

S. TOMBOY

Free Day Parking

Free Daytime Parking

WILLOW

Main Street

W. COLORADO AVENUE

NDORA

BLACK BEAR RD

SPRU CE

ath

ER

SHADOW LN

PINE

GL

FIR

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DAVIS ST

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SM

PANDORA

COLUMBIA

Bik

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ASPEN

TOWNSEND

DAVIS

MAH

OS

CORNET

PR

GALENA

Free taxi for homeowners 970.728.8888

FREE GONDOLA Telluride & Mountain Village are linked by a spectacular 13-minute ride. The Gondola is ADA, ski, snowboard, bicycle, stroller and pet accessible. • May 27 - October 17, 2021 • Hours are 6:30 am to midnight* The Gondola has four stations: • TELLURIDE STATION Oak Street in the town of Telluride • SAN SOPHIA STATION Mid-mountain stop providing access to the resort’s trails and Allred’s • MOUNTAIN VILLAGE STATION Mountain Village Center • MARKET PLAZA STATION Gondola Parking Garage For more Gondola info, see page 19. *Schedule is subject to change. For the most current information see > townofmountainvillage.com/gondola


TRANSPORTATION SUMMER 2021 FLIGHT MAP

REGIONAL MAP

LOCAL / REGIONAL AIRPORTS Telluride TEX 970. 728. 8600 Montrose Regional MTJ 970. 249. 3203 Cortez Municipal CEZ 970. 565. 7458 Durango/La Plata Cnty DRO 970. 382. 6050 Grand Junction GJT 970. 244. 9100 PRIVATE FLIGHTS Helitrax Mountain Aviation Telluride Air Taxi Telluride Flights NetJets

Miles from Telluride

970. 728. 8377 970. 728. 4700 970. 343. 4SKY 970. 728. 1011 877. 356. 5823

Miles from Telluride Moab......................... 132 Salt Lake City.......... 366

Cortez..........................75 Denver...................... 330 Durango.................... 125 Grand Junction....... 127 Montrose.....................67

AIRPORT SHUTTLES & TAXIS Telluride Express 888. 212. 8294 Alpine Luxury Limo 970. 728. 8750 Mountain Limo 888. 546. 6894 RENTAL CARS Telluride Regional Airport: Hertz Montrose Regional Airport: Avis Budget Hertz National

Miles from Telluride

970. 369. 4995 800. 331. 1212 800. 527. 0700 800. 654. 3131 800. 227. 7368

Miles from Telluride Flagstaff.................... 341 Scottsdale................ 492 Phoenix..................... 475

Albuquerque............ 320 Farmington............... 144 Santa Fe................... 280

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Leaving on a Jet Plane FLY ON A JET RIGHT INTO TELLURIDE

Enjoy the convenience of a full-service airport, just 10 minutes away from downtown Telluride. Now offering daily jet service on Denver Air Connection. To book, go to United.com or DenverAirConnection.com.

The Telluride destination is served by two airports, Telluride (TEX) and Montrose (MTJ). TEX now offers daily service on Denver Air from Denver (DEN), bookable through United, and MTJ offers nonstop flights from four national hubs on three major carriers this summer.

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ACTIVITIES ADVENTURE GUIDES

ADVENTURE GUIDES

CHILD CARE

EVENT PLANNERS

Adventure Tour Productions Tandem paragliding, photo/video tours 970.729.0078 Bootdoctors Winter — fat tire biking, fly fishing, Nordic ski clinics Summer — fly fishing, hiking, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 800.592.6883 Circle K Ranch Horseback Riding 970.562.3826 Dave’s Mountain Tours Historic off-road 4x4 adventures 970.728.9749 Four Corners Whitewater Kayaking, paddleboarding, river rafting 888.723.8925 High Camp Hut Overnight adventure hut for hiking, nordic skiing, snowshoeing 970.728.8050 Mountain Trip Adventure guides for climbing 14’ers, rock climbing, backcountry skiing, ice climbing 970.369.1153 Opus Hut Backcountry hut 970.708.0092 RIGS, Adventure Co. Flyfishing, water sports 970.708.0092 Roudy’s Horseback Adventures Horseback riding, winter sleigh rides 970.728.9611 San Juan Balloon Adventures Ultralight flights/paragliding 970.626.5495 San Juan Huts Backcountry hut system 970.626.3033 San Juan Outdoor Adventures/ Telluride Adventures Winter — Backcountry skiing, hut trips, ice climbing, snowshoeing Summer — hiking, hut trips, rock climbing, Via Ferrata 970.728.4101 Telluride Academy Summer camps for youth ages 5-18 970.728.5311 Telluride Adaptive Sports Program Winter and summer activities for all ages and disabilities 970.728.5010 Telluride Adventure Center Winter — fat tire biking, flyfishing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling Summer — 4x4 tours, flyfishing, mountain biking, paddleboarding, rafting 970.728.7433 Telluride Avalanche School winter only Avalanche education 970.728.4101

Telluride Guided Mountain Biking 970.708.7848 Telluride Helitrax winter only Helicopter skiing 877.500.8377 or 970.728.8377 Telluride Moto Motorcycle tours, skills development 138 Society Drive, Unit D, Telluride 970.797.3385 Telluride Mountain Guides Winter — backcountry skiing, ice climbing Summer — climbing 14ers, hiking 970.728.6481 Telluride Nordic Center Nordic skiing - classic and skate 970-728-1144 Telluride Offroad Adventures Off-road / 4x4 adventures 970.708.5190 Telluride Outfitters Winter — snowmobiling Summer — ATV tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, RZR tours, rafting Town Hall Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.4475 Telluride Outside/Telluride Angler Winter — fly fishing, photography tours, snowmobile tours Summer — 4-wheel drive tours, fly fishing, mountain biking, photography tours, rafting 800.831.6230 Telluride Paragliding Tandem paragliding flights 970.708.4247 Telluride Snowkite winter only Snowkite instruction 541.490.4401 Telluride Sports Various summer and winter activities 970.728.4477 ext 211 Telluride Wranglers Horseback Riding 970.759.3183 Wild Hare Snowshoe Tours winter only Backcountry snowshoe tours 970.728.5465

Annie’s Nannies of Telluride 970.728.2991 Telluride Sitters, LLC PO Box 2647, Telluride 970.708.0170 Traveling Lite, LLC 970.318.6543

By Sutton 970.209.3593 Polished Fun 970.596.1974 Realize Colorado 970.471.7529 Simplify 970.708.7429 Soirée Telluride 970.708.0297 Telluride Presents 970.708.0870 Telluride UnVeiled 914.830.3238

CLASSSES & WORKSHOPS

FITNESS

Ah Haa School for the Arts Creative classes, camps and workshops 970.728.3886 Pinhead Institute Science-based educational experiences 300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.708.7441 Telluride Rock and Roll Academy Lawson Hill, Telluride 970.728.1186 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519

Fuel Station 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Kaiut Yoga International 238 E. Colorado, 2nd Floor, Telluride 970.729.2354 Madeline Studio Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village 855.266.9408 Mangala Yoga 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6200 Pedal Den 307 East Colorado #100, Telluride 970.729.0810 Pilates Balance 300 South Mahoney, Telluride 970.729.0678 Practice Telluride 317 East Colorado, Telluride 970.316.3097 Sequence Pilates and Core Align 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5003 Studio Telluride Authentic Pilates 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.728.1747 Telluride Crossfit 137 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4622 Telluride Yoga Center 201 West Colorado, Suite 200, Telluride 970.729.1673 The Peaks Resort & Spa 136 Country Club Drive, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

CHURCHES Alpine Chapel 122 South Aspen Street Telluride 970.728.3504 Christ Presbyterian Church 434 West Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4536 St. Michael’s Episcopal Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.325.4655 St. Patrick’s Catholic Church 301 North Spruce Street, Telluride 970.728.3387 Telluride Christian Fellowship 100 East Columbia Avenue, Telluride 970.728.4864

COMMUNITY Telluride Historical Museum 201 West Gregory, Telluride 970.728.3344 Telluride Town Park & Recreation 970.728.2173 Wilkinson Public Library 100 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4519

ENTERTAINMENT Club Red / Conference Center 580 Mtn Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.369.5120 Michael D. Palm Theatre 721 West Colorado, Telluride 970.369.5669 New Sheridan Bar 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 Nugget Theatre 207 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3030 O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at Fly Me to the Moon Saloon 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6139 Sheridan Opera House 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363 The Liberty 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942 The Phoenix Bean 221 West Colorado, Telluride

TOURS Historical Tours of Telluride 970.728.6639 Telluride Green Tours Cannabis dispensary tours 970.708.3739 Telluride Sleighs and Wagons Wagon rides, stories and dinner 970.260.2524

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Escape to the mountains this summer… TELLURIDE’S PREMIER FULL SERVICE CONDO PROPERTY

RUSTIC ELEGANCE WESTERN CHARM D E L U X E A C C O M M O D AT I O N S L U X U RY L O G C A B I N S C O M F O R TA B L E R E T R E AT

Book your stay at Mountainlodgetelluride.com and use the code

4FREE

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H E AT E D P O O L & H O T T U B S • C O M P L I M E N TA RY S H U T T L E • C O N C I E R G E S E R V I C E S • P E T F R I E N D LY • F R E E W I - F I F I T N E S S C E N T E R & S T E A M R O O M • FA M I LY F R I E N D LY • M E E T I N G & E V E N T FA C I L I T I E S • T H E V I E W B A R & G R I L L

457 Mountain Village Boulevard • Telluride, Colorado • 866.846.8021


ACCOMMODATIONS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Accommodations in Telluride

866.754.8772

Alpine Lodging Telluride / Sea to Ski

970.728.3388 or 877.376.9769

Exceptional Stays by Telluride Rentals

800.970.7541

Invited Home

970.728.8160 or 855.978.7627

Latitude 38 Vacation Rentals

970.728-8838 or 877.450.8838

Property Management of Telluride

970.369.1275 or 877.332.1275

Silver Star Luxury Properties

970.728.3001 or 800.537.4781

Lodging in Telluride

888.998.6471 or 970.729.2202

Telluride Luxury Rentals

970.728.0461

Telluride Resort Lodging

800.778.8581

Welcome to Telluride

970.728.7049

$$$$

■ ■

$ - $$$$

■ ■

$$$ - $$$$

RATES

ADA FACILITIES

PETS

LAUNDRY

KITCHEN

▲ ■

BREAKFAST INCLUDED

FIREPLACE

● all units

▲ on premises ■ some units

SWIMMING POOL

NUMBER OF UNITS

HOTELS AND CONDOS

HOT TUB / SAUNA / STEAM

Vivid 970-708-0930

Auberge Residences at Element 52 Telluride 970.728.0701

20

Bear Creek Lodge Mountain Village

970.369.4900 or 888.729.0398

31

Camel’s Garden Hotel & Penthouse Condos Telluride

888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

36 ▲ ■

Dunton Townhouse Telluride

877.288.9922

5

Fall Line Condos Telluride

970.728.4274 or 866.728.4274

9 ▲ ● ●

$-$$

Fairmont Heritage Place, Franz Klammer Mountain Village

888.728.3318

63 yes ▲

● ●

$$$ - $$$$

Hotel Columbia Telluride

970.728.0660 or 800.201.9505

21 ■

■ `■ cont ▲

■ $$$$

Hotel Telluride Telluride

970.369.1188 or 866.468.3501

59 ▲

■ $$$

Ice House Condos & Suites Telluride

970.728.6300 or 800.544.3436

17

$$ - $$$

Inn at Lost Creek Mountain Village

970.728.5678 or 888.601.5678

32 ▲

● cont ●

$$ - $$$$

Lumiére Hotel Mountain Village

970.369.0400 or 866.530.9466

29 yes ▲ ■

■ ■

$$$ - $$$$

Madeline Hotel & Residences Mountain Village

970.369.0880 or 866.475.4403

110 yes ▲

■ ■

$$ - $$$$

Manitou Lodge Telluride

970.728.3388 or 888.728.1950

11

Mountain Lodge at Telluride Mountain Village

866.368.6867 or 970.369.5000

130 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

Mountainside Inn Telluride

970.728.1950 or 877.376.9769

84 ▲

■ ■ ▲

■ $

New Sheridan Hotel Telluride

800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

26 ■ $$

Peaks Resort & Spa Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

164 yes ▲

■ ▲ ■

$$ - $$$

River Club Telluride

888.601.4160 or 970.728.3986

24 ▲

● ●

$$ - $$$$

See Forever Village at The Peaks Mountain Village

800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

29

● ● ■

Victorian Inn Telluride

970.728.6601 or 800.611.9893

33 ▲

■ cont ▲ ■ $

yes

yes

yes

cont

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

$$$$

$$ $$ - $$$

$$$ - $$$$

85


ACCOMMODATIONS

TELLURIDE’S FINEST LODGING IN TELLURIDE’S PREMIER LOCATION

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CAMEL’S GARDEN RESORT HOTEL & CONDOMINIUMS TELLURIDE, COLORADO

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Authenic Retreat to

Mountain Luxury

Located in the heart of historic downtown, Telluride's premier full-service boutique hotel provides spectacular views in every direction. Start your day with Hotel Telluride's delicious hot breakfast. Lobby dining, by the fireplace, transforms the evening into a casual dining experience. "The Most Comfortable Room in Telluride" offers guests embroidered Harbor Linens, spa robes and slippers, along with fully stocked kitchenettes. All the Beauty of Telluride, Right Outside Your Door

NEWSHERIDAN.COM THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1895. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service.

Awards & Recognitions

Top 50 Hotels

Top 100 Resorts in North America

Top 5 Destinations

970.369.1188

The New Sheridan Hotel has served as Telluride’s social center since 1895. Located on main street, just two blocks from the gondola, the hotel’s location in the heart of Telluride provides an ideal base for visitors. During an expansive renovation completed recently, the hotel’s 26 guest rooms received a luxurious transformation under the guidance of internationally renowned designer Nina Campbell. Each individually designed room captures the historic charm of Telluride in an atmosphere of warmth and comfort. On-site dining options include the renowned Chop House Restaurant & Wine Bar, The Roof, The Parlor and the historic New Sheridan Bar, which was ranked among the world’s top 10 après ski bars by Forbes Traveler. The New Sheridan Hotel was also recognized by the readers of Condé Nast Traveler as one of the Top 5 “Best Places to Ski & Stay in North America” and was awarded the “2021 AAA Four Diamond Hotel” rating. The New Sheridan is proud to be on the Register of National Historic Places.

199 Cornet Street - Telluride, CO 81435

TheHotelTelluride.com

ADDRESS TELEPHONE

231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

87


ACCOMMODATIONS

Become our partner, we’ll take care of everything. As a full-service vacation property management and luxury rental company, we strive to protect your investment and enhance your property, as well as its profitability. Proactive property visits ensure that your vacation home is thoroughly maintained, and our extensive, hospitality-driven booking program benefits both the homeowner and guest. Partner with us to receive superior service, a greater return, and the ultimate peace of mind while you’re away.

Latitude38VacationRentals.com

877.450.8838

Telluride Resort Lodging specializes in nightly guest

PAIRS WELL WITH A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE

vacation homes, from onebedroom condominiums in Mountain Village to sevenbedroom luxury homes. Our friendly and thoughtful reservations team offers a personalized vacation home experience for your ultimate Colorado mountain vacation. TellurideResortLodging.com 866-888-7197


ACCOMMODATIONS

Telluride’ s Most Telluride’ s Most Luxurious Boutique Luxurious Boutique Residences Residences AO R THEO L EANMI TE INEIST I E S W I TW H I FT IHV EF -I SVTEA- SR T H L TAEM

Rugged natural beauty luxury accommodations the awardRugged natural beauty meetsmeets luxury accommodations at theatawardwinning Lumière with Inspirato, a boutique nestled winning Lumière with Inspirato, a boutique hotel hotel nestled at theat the base 4 in Mountain Village. through wildflower-filled base of Liftof4Lift in Mountain Village. Hike Hike through wildflower-filled meadows, mountain bike on challenging or in soak in natural meadows, mountain bike on challenging trails,trails, or soak natural hot springs unwinding our lounge. cozy lounge. Our 18 recently hot springs beforebefore unwinding in ourincozy Our 18 recently remodeled residences the perfect with ample remodeled hotel hotel residences makemake the perfect homehome base, base, with ample high-end kitchens and dramatic mountain space,space, high-end chef’schef’s kitchens and dramatic mountain views.views.

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I E IRTEHW I R. A 0 .. 0 34 60 90 .0400 L U M ILEURM EW I NI TSHP II N RS AP TO C TOOM. C| O9M 7 0| . 39 67 9

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A L L T H E T I M E A N D SPAC E IN THE WORLD

Soak it all up—from the stunning panoramic views of the San Juan Mountains, the fresh and healthy casual dining of Altezza at The Peaks, to the golf-in/golf-out access, and personal rejuvenation of The Spa at The Peaks. Topped with spacious accommodations and attentive service, you’ll never forget this experience of renewal and absolute comfort.

Visit ThePeaksResort.com or call 855.402.3286 to make a reservation.


IN-HOUSE CATERING

BAR

AUDIO/VISUAL

Meeting Area

525

50

30

next to gondola

Elks Lodge 970.728.6362

Historic Swede-Finn Hall

1,700

250

200

stage & outdoor deck

Ethos 970.728.0954

Event & Gallery Space on Main Street

1,000

60

40

open event or gallery space

Ice House Lodge 800.544.3436 or 970.728.6300

Conference Room

360

25

20

next to gondola

Il Salona 970.728.4046

Event Space

-

150

80

adjoins Rustico Ristorante

Michael D. Palm Theatre 970.369.5669

Performing Arts Center

30,000

680

680

alcohol with special permit

New Sheridan American Room 800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351

Victorian-style Room

500

45

Nugget Theatre 970.728.3030

Theatre

1,674

-

Sheridan Opera House 970.728.6363

Historic Theatre / Reception Space

1,400

265

Sidework 970.728.5618

Reception Room

900

100

Telluride Elementary School 970.369.1205

Cafeteria

Gym / Auditorium

Telluride Middle/High School 970.369.1205

Multi-purpose and Music Rooms

Gym

Telluride Town Park Core & Warming Hut 970.728.2173

Outdoors, Canopy, Picnic Tables

Town Park Pavilion 970.728.2173

Spacious Covered Pavilion

Wilkinson Public Library 970.728.4519, ext. 20

Program Room (small rooms also available)

35

SPECIAL NOTES

SETTING

Camel’s Garden 888.772.2635 or 970.728.9300

SQUARE FOOTAGE

TOWN OF TELLURIDE

SEATED CAPACITY

STANDING CAPACITY

VENUES

downtown Telluride

186

quaint, intimate

230

intimate setting for gatherings

liquor license, projector

50

-

-

100

small raised stage

3,600

500

500

no alcohol or smoking

-

-

125/50

on-site parking

4,000

-

300

no alcohol or smoking

-

-

-

public can’t be excluded

26,000

300

-

available for private events

959

124

72

downtown Telluride

150

wedding packages avail.

TOWN OF MOUNTAIN VILLAGE Bear Creek Lodge 970.369.4900

Great Room

2,000

200

Gorrono Ranch 970.728.7446

Mountain Ranch

6,000

-

200

no private vehicles

Madeline Hotel & Residences 866.475.4403 or 970.369.0880

Idarado Ballroom

3,315

270

210

Mountain Village core

Jasper Room

676

45

35

Mountain Village core

Reflection Plaza

6,240

400

200+

outdoor venue

Hospitality Suite

1,800

50+

35+

plus 1,200 sq. ft. deck

Mountain Lodge at Telluride 970.369.5000

Summit Room (summer only)

574

60

40

near Tell. Conf. Center

Mt. Emma Room

500

50

35

easy gondola access

Peaks Resort and Spa 800.789.2220 or 970.728.6800

Appaloosa Lounge

1,682

100

40

casual cocktail room

Big Billie Ballroom

2,046

225

140

can divide into 2 rooms

Crystal Room

1,600

163

100

floor to ceiling windows

Great Room Deck

1,440

125

80

off of the Great Room

Legends Restaurant

2,790

250

160

rustic dining venue

Liberty Bell and Golden Slipper Rooms

50

30

can combine for 1,100 sq. ft.

each 551

Mt. Wilson Terrace

7,900

350

200

connects to Crystal/ Legends

Palmyra Deck

1,508

150

100

connects to Palmyra restaurant

Palmyra Restaurant

1,980

225

180

80

connects to Palmyra deck

Ridge Club’s Great Room 970.708.1515

Multi-purpose Facility and Deck

1,900

175

easy gondola access

Telluride Conference Center 970.369.8030

Mountain Village Ballroom

6,069

890

564

22,000 total sq. ft. indoors

Klammer Boardroom

732

60

40

55,000 sq. ft. outdoor plaza

Fallon Room

367

35

20

voice/data circuits

Chipeta Room

312

-

18

voice/data ports

Mezzanine

1,189 100 70 ●

optional reception hall

St. Sophia Ceremony Site 970.728.7446

Top of the Gondola on the Ski Resort

-

outdoor venue

-

-

RUSTIC MOUNTAIN RETREATS Alta Lakes Observatory 970.239.0027

Rustic Mountain Lodge

2,200

75

25

remote lakeside lodge

High Camp Hut 970.728.8050

High Mountain Hut

2,500

35

35

walk 2.5 miles from hwy.

Schmid Family Ranch 970.708.1108

Rustic Setting at base of Wilson Peak

-

-

-

two cabins, summer only

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DINING & SPIRITS

SAVOR THE

UNPARALLELED CUISINE

WHATEVER YOUR PALATE MAY BE, our tailored menus will serve you. Select from one of our fine establishments and delight in some of the best cuisine in the West. Dine in style at our signature restaurant, the Chop House – world renowned for its USDA Prime Dry Aged Beef. We create our delicious fare using only humanely raised fowl, non-threatened fish species and local ingredients. Pair a red or white from Telluride’s only nitrogen wine bar with a scrumptious meal for an unforgettable experience. FAVORITES FROM BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER CLASSIC EGGS BENEDICT / 17 Canadian Bacon, Poached Eggs, Hollandaise Sauce, Roasted New Potatoes FRENCH TOAST / 16 Fresh Berries, Maple Syrup FRENCH ONION SOUP / 15 Caramelized Onions, Gruyère Cheese ROCKY MOUNTAIN TROUT SALAD / 19 Pistachio Encrusted Trout, Warm Bacon-Sherry & Mustard Vinaigrette, Crostini, Poached Egg CAESAR SALAD / 15 Parmesan Cheese, White Anchovies, Croutons

MAC & CHEESE / 14 Three Cheeses, Bacon Lardons FRENCH DIP / 16 Provolone, Horseradish Sauce, Au Jus, Hoagie Roll CHOP HOUSE WAGYU BURGER / 24 Toasted Fresh Baked Bun, Quick Pickles, Ancho Chili Ketchup, French Mustard, Cheese (Blue, Aged White Cheddar, Gruyère) STEAMED PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND MUSSELS / 26 Shallots, Saffron, Garlic, Fennel, Classic White Wine Sauce, Grilled Baguette

SCOTTISH SALMON / 38 Maple Glazed, Squash, Radicchio, Brussels Sprouts ELK SHORTLOIN / 52 Roasted Cauliflower, Whipped Yams, Bacon Lardons, Black Truffle Vinaigrette JUMBO GULF SHRIMP / 24 ALASKAN KING CRAB 1/2 lb or 1 lb, Clarified Butter / MP DRY AGED BISON RIBEYE 16oz Bone-In /69 DRY AGED PRIME NEW YORK STRIP 15oz Bone-In / 69

Seasonal menu; items and pricing subject to change.

THE NEW SHERIDAN HOTEL has shared in the rich history of Telluride, Colorado since 1895. Offering modern amenities paired with historic ambiance, the New Sheridan invites you to experience a new level of old world service. ADDRESS: 231 West Colorado Ave., Telluride, Colorado 81435 TELEPHONE 1.800.200.1891 or 970.728.4351 • NEW SHERIDAN.COM

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DINING & SPIRITS FOOD CARTS

MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Elks Park, Telluride Diggity Doggs Grilled Cheese & Barbecue Gyro Cart Mountain High Ice Cream

MELISSA PLANTZ

Telluride Gondola Plaza PhilAm Egg Rolls Telluride Twisted Treats

Allred’s Contemporary American Cuisine Gondola Station St. Sophia 970.728.7474

Siam’s Talay Grille Contemporary Asian Tapas and Seafood Sunset Plaza, Inn at Lost Creek 970.728.6293

Altezza Locally Sourced Indo-European Cuisine Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.2525

Starbucks Coffee, Tea, Pastries, Paninis Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.0880

Bean Café at the Peaks Coffee, Smoothies, Pastries, Sandwiches Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

Telluride Coffee Company Coffee, Breakfast, Lunch, Pastries Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4400

Black Iron Kitchen & Bar Modern Mountain Cuisine Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8949

The Brew Pub Telluride Brewing Beer, Tasty Good Tacos Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.1120

Crazy Elk Pizza Handmade Pizza, Salads, Sandwiches Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7499

The Great Room American Bistro, Cocktails Peaks Resort & Spa, Mountain Village 970.728.6800

El Rhino Taco & Coffee Bar Coffee, Smoothies, Ice Cream, Snacks 456 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village

The Pick Gourmet Burritos and Bowls Reflection Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.2633

La Piazza del Villaggio Authentic Italian Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8283 La Pizzeria Casual Italian, Wood-Fired Pizza Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0737 Poachers Pub American Pub Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.9647 Shake ‘n Dog Hot Dogs, Salads, Shakes Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1565

The View Bar & Grill Locally Sourced Comfort Food Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5000 The Village Table Mediterranean, Spanish Tapas, Catering Centrum Building, Mountain Village 970.728.1117

Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village Finnegan’s Sandwich Grill Grilled Cheese a la Carte Latin Creations Z’s Street Eats

LOCAL SPIRITS Buckel Family Wine Tasting Room 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.729.2869 Last Dollar Saloon Cocktails 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4800

FARMERS’ MARKETS Mountain Village Farmers’ Market Wednesday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Telluride Farmers’ Market Oak St., Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Big Mountain Farms Spruce St., Thursdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Mountain Roots Produce Spruce St., Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Z’s Orchard Spruce St., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

CATERING 221 South Oak Catering 970.708.1437 Aemono Fine Foods & Catering catering@aemonofinefoods.com Bertrand’s Catering 970.708.2661 Bon Appétit Catering 970.209.5217 Counter Culture 970.239.6211 Mountaintop Catering 970.708.8656

Tomboy Tavern Colorado Comfort Food Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7467

Pescado Catering 970.708.0640

Tracks Café & Bar Casual American, Cocktails Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.0677

The Amend Collective 214.641.9409

Telluride Private Catering 970.729.3620

New Sheridan Bar Cocktails, Pool Hall 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 O’Bannon’s Irish Pub at the Moon Live Music, Cocktails 136 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6139 Show Bar at the Sheridan Opera House Cocktails, Private Events 110 North Oak, Telluride 970.728.6363 Telluride Brewing Company 156 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.5094 Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.1120 Telluride Distilling Company Signature Cocktails Franz Klammer Breezeway, M. Village 970.728.2910 The Liberty Cocktails, Live Music, DJ 121 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2942 Timber Room Cocktails, Small Bites Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.369.8943 Wolf Pig Mobile Bar for Hire 970.596.3364

Zest Catering 970.708.3663 telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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DINING & SPIRITS

Located at the Mountain Lodge Telluride, The View Bar & Grill offers unique cuisine in a relaxed rustic seting with stunning views of the San Sophia Mountains. SERVING BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER DAILY INDOOR & OUTDOOR DINING LARGE SCREEN TVS FOR SPORTS EVENTS CATERING & PRIVATE EVENTS

970.369.6021 457 MOUNTAIN VILLAGE BOULEVARD • TELLURIDE

mountainlodgetelluride.com

EATING, DRINKING AND CARRYING ON SAFELY ...INSIDE OR OUTSIDE

“To find one of the best meals in Colorado, drive to Telluride— and it’s totally worth it. Just across the street from the gondola sits Cosmopolitan Telluride 5280 (The Denver Magazine)

Reservations: www.cosmotelluride.com In Hotel Columbia 301 Gus’s Way | Telluride, CO 970.728.1292 | cosmotelluride@gmail.com summer visitors guide 2021.indd 1 94 Cosmo adtelluride.com | 855.421.4360

4/26/21 9:41 AM


DINING & SPIRITS TOWN OF TELLURIDE 221 South Oak Modern Bistro 221 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.9507

High Pie Pizzeria & Tap Room Pizza, Salads, Calzones 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2978

Baked in Telluride Pizza, Pasta, Bakery 127 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.4775

La Cocina de Luz Fresh Mexican 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9355

Brown Dog Pizza Pizza, Pasta, Subs, Sports Bar 110 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8046

La Marmotte Contemporary French 150 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.6232

Caravan Middle Eastern Fare, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5611

Littlehouse European-style Organic Dine-in and Take-out 219 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.7020

Clark’s Market Made-to-Order Food, Full Deli 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124

Lunch Money Salads, Grain Bowls, Wraps 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6383

Coffee Cowboy Coffee, Baked Goods, Smoothies 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0294

Mountain Gate Teahouse & Gallery 101 West Colorado Unit B, Telluride 303.842.4660

Cornerhouse Grille American Grill, Sports Bar 131 North Fir, Telluride 970.728.6207

New Sheridan Chop House & Wine Bar Upscale American, Steaks, Seafood 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100

Cosmopolitan Contemporary Seasonal Cuisine 301 Gus’s Way, Telluride 970.728.1292

New Sheridan Parlor Café, Wine Bar, Cocktails 231 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9100

Esperanza’s Casual Mexican 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8399

Oak, The New Fat Alley BBQ, Casual American Oak Street, Gondola Plaza, Telluride 970.728.3985

Floradora Saloon Burgers, Salads, Sandwiches, Steaks 103 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8884

Over the Moon Gourmet Cheese & Food 223 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.2079

Ghost Town Coffee, Tea, Smoothies 210 West Colorado, Telluride 970.300.4334

Pescado Sushi, Japanese, Latin-Infused Dishes 115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6025

High Alpine Coffee Bar Coffee, Baked Goods 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504

Rustico Ristorante Traditional Italian 114 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4046 Siam Thai, Thai Fusion 200 South Davis, Telluride 970.728.6886 Sidework Contemporary Comfort Food 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5618

Smugglers Casual American, Brewpub 225 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.5620

The Village Market Full Service Grocery Store 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mountain Village 970.633.4700

Steamies Burger Bar A Modern Burger Joint 300 West Colorado, Telluride 844.the.buns

The West End Bistro at Hotel Telluride Casual American, Cocktails Hotel Telluride, Telluride 970.369.1188

Stronghouse Brewery Alpine Comfort Food, Brewpub 283 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.2890

There... Signature Cocktails, Appetizers 627 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1213

Taco del Gnar Creative Taco Shop 123 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.7938

Wok of Joy Authentic Thai Cuisine 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0149

Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate Chocolate, Ice Cream, Pastries 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.9565

Wood Ear Texas Whiskey Bar with Japanese Fusion 135 East Colorado, Telluride 970.852.0469

The Alpinist & the Goat Fondue, Dessert, Cocktails 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5028

REGIONAL

The Butcher & The Baker Café Fresh Gourmet Deli, Bakery, Take-Out 201 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2899 The National Modern New American 100 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1063 The Phoenix Bean Espresso, Sandwiches, Small Plates, Wine 221 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4351 The Tunnel Fine Dining by Reservation 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.3663

Cindybread Artisan Bakery Sandwiches, Bakery 168 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.369.1116 Counter Culture Sandwiches, Burgers, Fries 156 Society Drive, Unit A, Lawson Hill 970.239.6211 Telluride Coffee Roasters 164 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.369.0060 Telluride Sleighs and Wagons Colorado and Basque Influenced Menu Aldasoro Family Ranch 970.260.2524

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DINING & SPIRITS

COLORADO CRAFTED

Located at The Hotel Telluride Bring your family and friends and enjoy a delicious meal in a cozy spot by our lobby fireplace. Reservations: 970.369.1188

TheHotelTelluride.com

199 Cornet Street - Telluride, CO 81435

Chef Johnny Gerona is a 35 + year Telluride local. His creative and healthy menu emphasizes Mediterranean and Spanish cuisine. OFFERING A 3 COURSE DINNER MENU. We provide casually elegant dinner service with indoor and outdoor seating . Here is a sampling of our 2021 Summer menu.

Tapas House Marinated Olives Spanish Marcona Almonds Patatas Bravas Boquerones – White Anchovies Grilled Artichoke Hearts Salt Cod Croquetas Smokey Paprika Chorizo Albondigas Meatballs Sliced Jamon Serrano, Spanish Ham Spanish Potato and Egg “Tortilla” Pan Seared Quail Salad Roasted Garlic Shrimp BBQ Baby Back Ribs Hummus Dip With Pita Triangles Grilled Calamari Steak Spanish Cheese Plate

Soups and Salads SOUP OF THE DAY CAESAR romaine lettuce, anchovies, Parmigiano Reggiano, croutons, Caesar dressing WARM GOAT CHEESE organic mixed greens, breaded rosemary goat cheese croquettes, tomatoes, pickled red onions, dried figs, peperoncini, balsamic vinaigrette BELGIAN ENDIVE Belgian endive, organic mixed greens, apples, walnuts, valdeon blue cheese, tomatoes, radishes, sherry vinaigrette Dressing Choices: Caesar, ranch, blue cheese, balsamic, sherry vinaigrette, Russian, oil and vinegar

Entrées FILET STEAK grilled filet with haricot verts, house cut fries, maitre d’ butter cracked tellicherry pepper, fleur de sel GRILLED SALMON cucumber coriander mint salad, cous cous RED TROUT polenta, haricot verts, brown butter caper sauce DUCK RIGATONI PASTA duck sausage, wild mushrooms, truffle oil, sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, shallots, fresh herbs, light cream sauce ROASTED CHICKEN breast or leg + thigh, herbs de Montrose, olive tapenade, oven roasted tomato, basil oil WILD SHRIMP PAELLA saffron calaspara rice, wild head on white shrimp, peas, vegetable sofrito, lobster fumet stock MALLORCAN TUMBET RATATOUILLE potatoes, zucchini, bell peppers, eggplant, onions, tomatoes, onion, arbequina olive oil, couscous, balsamic drizzle, Marrakesh spice GLUTEN FREE AND/OR VEGAN MENU OPTIONS AVAILABLE.

Drinks

Full bar cocktails, wines by the glass, 120 bottle wine list

Homemade Desserts Spanish chocolate mousse, Berry apple cobbler a la mode Strawberry Shortcake, coffee, Cordials and liqueurs

The Village Table To Go MOST OF OUR MENU IS AVAILABLE TO GO.

To Go a la carte menu available online. Bottles of wine available To Go! Gift cards available

Open Mon-Sat @ 4:30 • 970.728.1117 • Reservations recommended • thevillagetablerestaurant.com • opentable.com • 618 Mountain Village Blvd 96

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DINING & SPIRITS

T. BREWING DINING FULL

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DINING & SPIRITS BH-110

L U N C H M O N E Y TAKEAWAY

M E X I C A N R E S TA U R A N T & C AT E R I N G C O M P A N Y FRESH · LOCAL · SUSTAINABLE BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

CHEESE/CHARCUTERIE PANTRY HOME

easy healthy lunch 126 West Colorado | LunchMoneyTelluride.com

••• VISIT US AT OUR NEW LOCATION 223 S PINE ST • TELLURIDE CO OVERTHEMOONTELLURIDE@GMAIL.COM OVERTHEMOONTELLURIDE.COM 970-728-2079

The Village Market is a full-service grocery store offering fresh produce, quality fresh-made deli, in store seating area with fabulous views, full-service butcher and seafood counter, complete grocery selection including natural and organics, health and beauty/vitamins/supplements, and fresh floral dept.

We also offer a large selection of beer, wine and spirits at Spirits at Mountain Village, located adjacent to the Village Market. (970) 633-4700 • Open 365 Days-A-Year 455 Mountain Village Blvd • Mountain Village, Colorado

Go to thevillagemarkets.com for online ordering options. Putting good food on your table since 1967.

98

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Casual family-style Chips & Salsa bar Margaritas, Beer & Wine Coffee Drinks & Fresh Juices Hand-made ice cream mostly organic & television-free since 1997

123 E. COLORADO, TELLURIDE OPEN DAILY 8AM–9PM 970-728-9355 lacocinatelluride.com


DINING & SPIRITS

Fondue & Raclette Grilled Vegetables, Organic Salmon & Fillet Craft Cocktails — Late Night Menu

New — Outside dining www.AlpinistAndTheGoat.com 204 W. Colorado Ave. 970-728-5028

Alpinist-VG-21.indd 1

5/10/21 1:08 PM

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SHOPPING

RPe

, MEN'S, BOUTIQUE

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LURIDE

PERTIES

100

of Telluride

IORE

Selling The Ultimate Souvenirs

telluride.com | 855.421.4360

-Real Estate and Wardrobes-


SHOPPING TOYS

CLOTHING

ART GALLERIES

Elinoff & Co. Gallerists & Jewelers 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Gallery 81435 230 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Gold Mountain Gallery 135 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3460 Kamruz Gallery 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.0135 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Red Dirt 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.729.2869 Rinkevich Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village Center 415.516.2055 Schilling Studio Gallery 970.728.1174 (Open by appointment) Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Stronghouse Studios 283 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.3930 Tellurado Studio 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6440 Telluride Art Headquarters & Gallery 135 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.3930 Telluride Gallery of Fine Art 130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Tony Newlin Gallery 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8084

MUSIC

HOME DECOR

Telluride Music Co. 333 West Colorado #2, Telluride 970.728.9592

Ethos 101 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.0954 Scarpe 250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

THRIFT SHOPS Second Chance Humane Society 335 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1100 AromaSpa Salon & Boutique 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Black Bear Trading Company 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6556 Cashmere Red 221 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8088 Down To Earth 236 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9316 Fuel 205 East Colorado, Telluride 970.708.1590 Heritage Apparel Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7340 Overland Sheepskin & Leather 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9700 Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Patagonia 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4303 Pepporium 136 East Colorado, Telluride pepporium@gmail.com Scarpe 250 East Pacific, Telluride 970.728.1513 Shirtworks of Telluride 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242 Society 109 West Colorado, Telluride 970.369.7777 Sublime 126 West Colorado #102A, Telluride 970.728.7974 Telluride Toggery 109 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3338 The North Face Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.0332 Two Skirts 127 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6828 Western Rise 100 West Colorado Unit E, Telluride 855.981.7473

EYEWARE Sunglasses HQ & Optical 219 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119

GIFTS Ethos 101 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.0954 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Paradise Resort Wear 218 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.8786 Shirtworks of Telluride 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6242 Telluride Naturals Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Telluride Resort Store Gondola Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7358 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

Azadi Rugs 217 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4620 Fine Navajo Weaving 220 East Colorado #1, Telluride 970.728.1443 Hook on a Wall 226 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1087 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040 Sage House 220 East Colorado, Telluride 817.909.3959 Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Tweed Interiors 151 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.8186 T.Karn Imports 394 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.4350

BOOKS Between the Covers Books 224 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4504

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES Crossbow Leather 217 East Colorado, Telluride Elinoff & Co. 204 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5566 Lustre, an Artisan Gallery 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3355 Medicine Ranch 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Mixx 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.797.4040

Slate Gray Gallery 209A East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3777 Sunglasses HQ & Optical 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9119 Telluride Gallery of Fine Art 130 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3300 Telluride Naturals Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.7357 Zia Sun 214 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4031

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SHOPPING

TELSKI DISCOVER MOUNTAIN with stylish basics and FULL designer labels. SHOP CHIC Located in Mountain Village across from BootDoctors

970.728.7340

Exclusively at Heritage Apparel

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SHOPPING SPORTING GOODS

Medicine Ranch (CBD) 615 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.6084 Sunshine Pharmacy 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3601 Franz Klammer Breezeway, Mtn. Village 970.728.3601 Bootdoctors Le Chamonix Bldg., Mountain Village 970.728.8954 236 South Oak, Telluride 970.728.4581 Box Canyon Bicycles 300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.2946 Burton Telluride Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.6138 Christy Sports Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.1334 Mountain Lodge, Mountain Village 970.369.5267 Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.4727 Jagged Edge/Journey Outdoors 223 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9307 Neve Sports/Telluride Sports Madeline Hotel, Mountain Village 970.728.5722 Patagonia 200 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4303 Telluride Angler/Telluride Outside 121 West Colorado, Telluride 800.831.6230 Telluride Sports 150 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.4477 Camels Garden, Telluride 970.728.3134 Fairmont Franz Klmmr., Mountain Village 970.728.0364 Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.728.8944 The Peaks, Mountain Village 970.728.0339 The Drop Board Shop & Print Lab 123 South Oak, Telluride 970.708.0688 The North Face Heritage Plaza, Mountain Village 970.369.0332

HARDWARE Alpine Lumber 140 Society Dr., Lawson Hill 970.728.4388 Timberline Ace Hardware 200 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3640

BEAUTY

PHARMACIES

GROCERY & MARKETS Clark’s Market 700 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3124 Ghost Town 210 West Colorado, Telluride 970.300.4334 Over the Moon 223 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.2079 Telluride Truffle Artisan Chocolate 171 South Pine, Telluride 970.728.9565 The Market at Telluride 157 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.8958 The Village Market 455 Mtn. Village Blvd, Mtn. Village 970.633.4700

LIQUOR STORES Spirits at Mountain Village 455 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mtn. Village 970.728.6500 Telluride Bottleworks 129 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.5553 Telluride Liquors 123 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.3380 Wine Mine at Pacific Street Liquors 220 South Davis, Telluride 970-728-WINE

DISPENSARIES Alpine Wellness Center 300 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1834 Delilah, LLC 115 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.5880 Green Dragon 119 West Colorado, Telluride 970.442.1422 Telluride Bud Company 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.239.6039 Telluride Green Room 250 South Fir, Telluride 970.728.7999

OFFICE SUPPLIES

PET SUPPLIES

Happy Print 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.6525 High Country Shipping 456 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.728.4792 Paper Chase 206 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.0235 Ship It/Copy It 125 West Pacific #2B, Telluride 970.728.8111

Animal Hospital of Telluride 6785 Park Drive, Ilium 970.728.1082 / 708.4359 (after hours) Dirt Dawg 215 East Colorado, Unit 1, Telluride 970.239.6448 Mobile Unit One Veterinary Service 970.708.1512 PET Telluride 150 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.2095 Telluride Veterinary Clinic 547 1/2 West Pacific, Telluride 970.728.4461 Tricks & Treats Pet Sitting Service 970.708.5205

FLORISTS

Alchëmy Salon 300 Mahoney, Ste. 13C, Telluride 970.708.8048 AromaSpa, Salon & Boutique 307 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.9515 Aveda Telluride Spa 250 West San Juan, Telluride 970.728.0630 Bliss & Bang Bang Salon 329 East Colorado, Telluride 970.728.1020 Breathe Skin & Body Centrum Bldg., Mountain Village 970.728.9772 Hair 9 Salon 201 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.7139 Healthy Glow Face & Body 100 West Colorado, Telluride 970.708.7424 Himmel Pool and Spa Boutique Fairmont Franz Klmr., Mountain Village 970.728.7113 Moxie Loft 226 West Colorado, Telluride 480.270.2864 Pearl Aesthetic Medicine 126 West Colorado, Telluride 970.728.7939 Pure Beauty & Wellness Spa / Telluride Salt Cave 333 West Colorado, Telluride 970.239.6144 Spa Boutique at the Peaks Resort 136 Country Club Dr., Mountain Village 970.728.6800 Studio G Total Skin Wellness 145 West Pacific #1E, Telluride 970.728.8700 The Spa and Salon at Madeline 568 Mtn. Village Blvd., Mountain Village 970.369.8961 YX Salon 135 South Spruce, Telluride 970.708.0270 or 970.708.2308

PHOTOGRAPHY Elevation Imaging The Beach, Mountain Village 970.728.8058

China Rose Florists & Greenhouse 158 Society Drive, Lawson Hill 970.728.4169 telluride.com | 855.421.4360

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Art For Home and Self

Toys for All Ages 970.728.3355 104

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Enter through Gallery

214 W. Colorado Ave. Telluride

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SHOPPING

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SHOPPING

Gallerists and Jewelers

T-pick Jewelry • Watch & Jewelry repair • Custom designs Elinoff & Co — Fine Art, Fine Jewelry — 204 W Colorado Ave, 970-728-5566

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HIGH TIMES AT

HIGH ALTITUDE

Support

LOCALLY OWNED

Businesses!

25 0 S. F I R 970-728-7999

ONE BLOCK EAST OF THE TELLURIDE GONDOLA STATION

S. F IR

BOU TIQUE CANNABIS AT 8,750’ TGR

SA N JUA N AV E.


BEAUMONT HOTEL, OURAY

1130 ELK RUN ROAD, TELLURIDE

SLIPPERY ROCK RIVER RANCH, DOLORES

15 Rooms | BeaumontOuray.com | $7,750,000 Teddy Errico 970.708.5959

6 BD | 6/2 BA| 7,288 SF | Price Upon Request Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086

DoloresRiverRetreat.com | $6,200,000 Teddy Errico 970.708.5959

158 SAN JOAQUIN ROAD, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

BASQUE BLVD, LOTS #113 & #114A, ALDASORO RANCH

6 BD | 5.5 BA | 5,707 SF | $5,790,000 Corie Chandler 970.708.9610

Land | 10.3 Acres | $3,950,000 Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086

PINE MEADOWS #124, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

LAUGHING DOG ROAD, LOTS #4-2 & #12-1, PLACERVILLE

237 RUSSEL DRIVE, LOT #533, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Land | 154 Acres | $1,995,000 Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086

Land | 0.53 Acres | Ski In/Ski Out | $1,695,000 Teddy Errico 970.708.5959

4 BD | 4.5 BA | 3,220 SF | $3,275,000 Banks Brown 970.729.1100

SPRUCE MOUNTAIN RANCH, RIDGWAY

3 BD Home | $1,600,000 | Lots Starting at $219,000 Sally Puff Courtney 970.728.3086 Teddy Errico 970.708.5959

Visit us at one of our office locations in the town of Telluride & Mountain Village 970.728.1404 | telluridesothebysrealty.com Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC.

Member of the Exclusive


For those who seek an exceptional life Your home should be as exceptional as you are, and as you are going to be. Oak at the Gondola, a mountain modern assemblage like no other available in Telluride, is located in the coveted Oak Street corridor just steps from the Gondola and Lift 8. This newly constructed jewel offers a rare opportunity to create a unique compound to house and entertain extended family, friends or business colleagues.

Only

OAK AT THE GONDOLA, TELLURIDE | OAKATTHEGONDOLA.COM | SALLY PUFF COURTNEY 970.728.3086 UNITS A, B & C: 9 BD | 9 FULL BA | 3 HALF BA | $14,795,000 UNITS B & C: 6 BD | 6 FULL BA | 2 HALF BA | $9,600,000 UNIT B: 3 BD | 3 FULL BA | 1 HALF BA | $4,750,000 109

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© MMXIX Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


PA R T I N G S H OT RYA N B O N N E AU “In fact, at 8,700 feet above sea level, you could say you’re a little closer to heaven.” - Jordan Riefe, Orange County Register


Own Telluride.

The Best of Gray Head // $10,150,000

The Best of Aldasoro Ranch // $3,965,000

SOLD S T E V E C AT S M A N | 9 7 0 . 7 2 9 . 0 1 0 0 | S T E V E @ C AT S M A N . C O M

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