September 2021

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magazine Publisher Tammy Clark tmclark225@gmail.com Editor Heather Page heather@vipmagsc.com Office Manager Tiffany Skipper jtskipp35@gmail.com Advertising Executives Julie C. Tyler juliectyler@yahoo.com Creative Design Tuesday Taylor Ashley Rogers Marketing Consultant Bethany Rau

Contributing Photographers Erin Daniel Rebecca Giese Phillip Guyton Fred Salley Bethany Rau Contributing Writers Brian Blaker, MD Mark W. Buyck, III Cynthia Ford Rebecca Giese Farrah Hughes, MD Brock McCallister Leah Milton Sam Rahman, MD Allie Segars Doug Smith

Serving Florence, Hartsville, Darlington, Marion, Mullins, Lake City and the surrounding areas 2011-B Second Loop Rd, Florence, SC 29501 FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For advertising rates, call 843-687-4236.

COVER CONCEPT

Clean and crisp is what we’re looking forward to this September. Wendi Norris, co-owner of FloorBoys in Florence, shares what sparked her creative side many years ago and how she incorporates it into her business (page 18). Along with design inspiration, this issue also features some delicious recipes! Bethany Rau shares a scrumptious guacamole recipe in honor of celebrating National Guacamole Day on September 16th (page 20) and Rebecca Giese gets us ready for fall with an apple tart recipe (page 22). Happy reading! (And happy eating!)

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CONTENTS

ISSUE 70

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SEPTEMBER 2021 BUSINESS 10 Mark W. Buyck II: Colonial South Carolina 12 3-2-1 Selfie 14 Sandpiper Candles 18 Artist Spotlight: Wendi Norris

HOME

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20 National Guacamole Day! 22 Rebecca's Corner: Apple Tart 24 Doug Smith: Cucumber Salad

LIFESTYLE 26 Florence One Schools: State Of The Arts 28 September 2021 Calendar 30 Teacher Tips For A "Normalish" School Year 32 Music Man 34 Around Town: Forget Me Not 5K 35 Around Town: Grateful Dog Bike Rally

38 HEALTH & WELLNESS 36 Because You Are Worthy Enough To Live 38 McLeod Health: Filtering Out The Risk of Stroke 40 HopeHealth: Assessing Your Relationship 42 MUSC: Devices That Make A Difference 44 FloTown Fitness: Eat. Sleep. Move. 46 Newsworthy 48 VIP's Book Club: The Southern's Book Club Guide To Slaying Vampires

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52 Drink of the Month: Dark N Stormy



BUSINESS BUSINESS

Colonial

South Carolina story by Mark W. Buyck, III

F

rom its inception, the state of South Carolina

has been divided geologically, geographically, and socially into two distinct regions. The Sandhills running roughly from Aiken to Cheraw is generally accepted as the dividing line between the upstate and the low country. The fall line also marks the point where streams and rivers are generally not navigable. Early settlements in South Carolina centered around the seaport of Charleston and the plantations with sailing access to the Ashley and Cooper Rivers. During the 100 or so years between the settlement of Charleston and the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, the colony experienced steady growth both among the white population but especially among the enslaved. Throughout most of the Colonial Period, the South Carolina slave population was second only to Virginia among all of the colonies. It’s estimated that by 1700, the population of the colony was a total of 5700 persons, nearly 2500 of those were slaves. By 1708 enslaved African Americans outnumbered whites in the colony. By 1770 the colony had grown to a population of 130,000 of which 80,000 were enslaved and in 1780 the total population was 180,000. In 1712 the British colony of Carolina was separated into the provinces of South Carolina and North

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Carolina. Georgia was later settled in the 1730’s. The South Carolina back country became the “agricultural frontier” for the colonies. The low country’s proximity to St. Augustine and Spanish Florida also caused great angst among the colonists, the vast majority of which identified as British. In Europe the relationship between Protestant England, and Catholic France and Spain continued to fester. These rivalries continued in North America. Throughout the Colonial Period, the colonists engaged in Wars with the Spanish and their Native American allies. In particular, the Yamasee War from 1715-1717 nearly saw the complete annihilation of the colony. So concerned was the Colonial Assembly that it ordered slaves enlisted and equipped to join the whites in the field. The sight of armed slaves marching through Charleston further unnerved many white settlers. By the end of the inconclusive war the colony had lost 7% of its population. The resolution of the Yamasee War also led to further colonists’ fractures with the Lord’s Proprietors. The Proprietors had essentially refused the colonists’ request for aid during the war. Beginning in 1719, the Colonial Assembly began refusing to recognize the Proprietary governor. By 1729 South Carolina officially became a crown colony.


The colony’s commitment to religious toleration also was a magnet for early settlers. The first English settlers were members of the Church of England. In 1707 the Anglican Church became the established church in the colony. French Protestants, the Huguenots, who were persecuted by the French Catholic government were early settlers of the colony. A group of Puritans from Dorchester, Massachusetts, established a congregational church in 1696 in what is now Dorchester County. Other denominations organizing in Charleston were English Baptists, Quakers, and Jews. Charleston had the largest Jewish population of any American city as late as 1820. In the 1730s and 1740s, Lutheran German-Swiss settled in the present Lexington, Calhoun, Orangeburg, and Newberry counties. In 1740 the upper Pee Dee became the home to a number of Welsh Baptists from Pennsylvania. The largest influx of white settlers was the Scots-Irish who began arriving in numbers in the 1750s. The Scots-Irish had originally settled in Pennsylvania but over several decades had been migrating South through the Shenandoah Valley and into North Carolina. The Pennsylvania connection is evident in the present South Carolina counties of Lancaster, York, Chester, and Chesterfield, all Scots-Irish communities in Pennsylvania. By 1775 it is estimated that there were 40,000 of these fiercely independent Scots-Irish in the colony, most of these hardscrabble farm families in the Carolina back country. These Presbyterians had very little regard for England or its church, nor were they particularly fond of the Charleston political elite.

Business Law, Litigation, Real Estate, and Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys 248 West Evans Street | Florence, SC | 843.662.3258 2050 Corporate Centre’ Drive, Suite 230 Myrtle Beach, SC | 843.650.6777

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BUSINESS

3-2-1 Selife

story and photography by Erin Daniel

Whether you’re a social media fanatic or just looking for something fun to do with a group of friends, 321 Selfie is your “One Stop Selfie Shop”!

Owner, Lashana Cunningham, has created a fun space in Downtown Florence for people of all ages to enjoy, even if you’re not an avid Instagramer! Lashana was born and raised in Kingstree, South Carolina, but currently resides in Charlotte, North Carolina. Her background is in Business Management and she has a heart for entrepreneurship. Aside from her full-time job working as a Human Resources Assistant, she also owns her own catering business. She visits Florence often to spend time with her father and siblings. One night while visiting her father, Dwayne, Lashana mentioned the idea of opening a selfie museum, after being inspired by other themed museums around the world, such as the Museum of Ice Cream in New York or The Egg Museum in Austria. Being that she lives in a heavily populated city, she tossed around the idea of bringing her pop-up museum to another location where her idea would stand out. After her visit, she was about to head back home; her father stopped her and said, “Where are you going? We’ve got to go find you a building for your business!” She was slightly shocked, but was excited for the support he extended and gladly took him up on the offer! After spending an afternoon searching, they found the perfect location right in the heart of Downtown, Florence. Lashana and her father immediately went to work transforming the space! Her mother who lives in Virginia even came down to assist. After her family’s helping hands, a 12

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few contractors, and a couple of gallons of paint, they finally had an innovative, fully functioning selfie museum! Lashana expressed much gratitude for her younger sister, Kristina Brayboy, who has helped her get this business up and running. Her sister helped come up with the business name, 321 Selfie, and designed her logo. She also assists with bookings and social media content. 321 Selfie has a total of 11 photo booths, all with their own theme. Some are feminine, others are more masculine, but all are fun, colorful, and interactive! Each has its own ring light to help give you the most flattering lighting possible! Lashana plans to keep a few of the most popular themes around for a while, but has plans to change out the others every few months! She’s especially excited to theme some around holidays, such as Halloween, which she says is her favorite! The selfie museum is open to visitors of all ages and welcomes both walk-ins and reservations. Larger groups of up to 20 people can rent out the entire studio for up to three hours for events like birthday parties, girl's night out, corporate team building events, and other private events. Online reservations can be made through their website www.321-selfie.com and are the best way to guarantee admission! Professional photographers are also welcome to accompany guests, as long as they’ve purchased their admission ticket as well!

321 Selfie is located at 170 W Evans Street in Downtown Florence and is open Thursdays through Sundays, from 10:00 am to 10:00 pm, making it the perfect weekend activity for those seeking fun in town! Lashana is excited to see you and all your fun photos!

Lashana Cunningham

September 2020

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BUSINESS

change the ATMOSPHERE How Sandpiper Candles Became a Business story by Leah Milton / photography by Fred Salley It’s interesting the passions we discover during our walk of life. Many of them are not being discovered until much later in life. Some may pick up sewing while others tackle consistently exchanging a tennis ball across a net to a partner. For Jeannette and Larry Barefoot, their equally intriguing interest came in delightful scents and eye-appealing containers that they have come to know as Sandpiper Candles. Nearly a year ago, Jeannette began testing and experimenting with wax and different fragrance oils. When she paired a good one, she’d give them to friends and family members. Of course, they would tell her how wonderful they were and suggest she start selling them. “From day one I’ve kept a journal on every formula, percentage, and supplier that we have used,” said Jeannette. “We only use suppliers that are known for having safe and nontoxic oils, products, and USA-made Soy Wax. Therefore, our products are natural and safe.” A nice touch to our slightly new, aggressive, eco-friendly state of mind. Sandpiper Candles most commonly come in an aesthetically pleasing glass jar sealed with a bamboo lid or a seamless tin can. Larry has even created a handcarved wooden bowl that Jeannette fills with appealing scents for an even larger home statement piece. Larry and Jeannette share in the responsibilities of the business. Jeannette does the wicking, mixing, pouring, and cleaning of the candles. “My passion lies here, in

creating!” she says. She also handles the business side which includes orders, supplies, spreadsheets, and even website design - a task she had to jump many hurdles to complete but one she is super proud of herself for finishing. Larry makes the melts, labels the products, does packaging and handles shipping and inventory. “I have also made a few tabletop wood display shelves for the candles to sit on,” he said. “Anything that needs to be done, I can do, well not fly a plane, I can’t do that!” Jeannette describes their partnership in this new adventure as a true blessing. “I never imagined we would end up making candles together, but I’m glad we do and are enjoying it!” Although working hard towards a goal and deadlines can become stressful, “Larry has a way of adding humor to everything and on those stressful days, he is my calm,” she says. Larry agrees with Jeannette’s description and adds, “I love the time we spend together, no matter what we are doing, making candles is no different. In this business, we share a partnership where neither of us is the boss, and we have mutual respect for each other’s time and wellbeing.” Jeannette and Larry are no strangers to partnering in a business. For 25 years they taught shag lessons together. They taught “The Basic” steps at Poyner Adult Education and intermediate steps at several locations across the Pee Dee, including the Circle Fountain in Florence.

FUN FACT - Where did the business name come from? Choosing our company name was an easy decision. Our beach trips and vacations were spent on the East Coast where the Sandpipers are found. They’re small shorebirds that run in the sand on the water's edge, chasing the waves back and forth, just like kiddos do! They remind me of our daughters and grandchildren playing on the beach!

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LARRY & JEANNETTE, OWNERS OF SANDPIPER CANDLES'

With all of their many talents and long careers in accounting for Jeannette and management for Larry, marketing experience was never something they spent time in. However, after taking one glance at their self-built website, it’s easy to see they’ve mastered it as well. The couple does their own photography where they set up props in and outside of their home using natural elements for posing. “I personally love that part, the artistic side,” explains Jeannette. “I love taking pictures to describe the product, after all, sometimes it is hard to tell what a candle will smell like by reading a scent name. It’s for that very reason, we have named most of our candles to describe the notes.” Some of Jeannette’s favorite scents include anything beachy or fresh, “It’s a tossup between Peaches and Cream and Coastal Linen.” Larry’s favorites are anything fresh, outdoorsy, or different. “It’s hard to pick just one,” he says, “I like them all! My top three would be Under the Lemon Tree, Into the Woods, and Tobacco Vanilla Spice.” With the holidays quickly approaching, the couple has already been creating signature scents that will add warmth to our living spaces and encourage us to get in the holiday spirit. “We have six fall scents that are currently available on our website: Apple Orchard, Pumpkin Spice Latté, Roasting Marshmallows, Maple Coffee Bean, Cinnamon and Orange Peel, and Amber Leaves.” Christmas scents will soon be added too.

Sandpiper Candles’ tagline rings the truth, “Change the Atmosphere.” Scents can lift your mood, encourage relaxation, energize a space, deliver a romantic ambiance, and even provoke a memory. A richly scented candle is a wonderful addition to any home or work atmosphere. If you are looking for a unique gift for a teacher, friend, or loved one in the coming months, consider Sandpiper Candles. You’ll be supporting a local's passion while delivering a treat that everyone will enjoy.

TO ORDER

SANDPIPER CANDLES: www.sandpipercandles.com info@sandpipercandles.com

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ARTIST SPOTLIGHT Interviewed by Bethany Rau

"I just want people to love their homes as it changes the way you live."

WENDI NORRIS For this month’s Artist Spotlight, Vip sat down with a local interior decorator and design service specialist at Floorboys Flooring Professionals of Florence, Wendi Norris. Floorboys was started by Wendi's cousin nearly 20 years ago in Lexington, South Carolina. Wendi and her husband of 29 years, Robbie, decided to open their own branch in Florence almost a year ago. Continue reading below to learn more about Wendi's passion for design and how she incorporates it into the business.

DO YOU REMEMBER HOW YOU FIRST KNEW YOU WERE INTERESTED IN ART AND DESIGN? My mom loved to decorate, and she would do everything herself…cook, bake, sew, hang wallpaper, paint, refinish furniture, design flower beds (and plant everything herself), rearranged furniture constantly….. pretty much everything. I am so much like my mom. My dad, as a commercial contractor, had a drafting table in his office and taught me how to read blueprints and use all of the tools at an early age. I loved drawing floor plans of my bedroom, my classroom, my friend’s rooms and adding the furniture we wanted which was usually hideous. He would ask my opinion about design and then tell me how it wouldn't work. Now we have collaborated on several projects.

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GROWING UP, WAS YOUR FAMILY INVOLVED IN THE ARTS? Actually, my family was more musical. We all play instruments (or at least used to). I would wake up to my parents singing while they were cooking breakfast. I don’t think I even knew art classes were a thing when I was a kid. I had three brothers and we lived in the country. We had horses, go-carts, a big barn to play in; we built forts, ramps, playhouses (or “clubhouses”); we cleared out paths in the woods to ride bikes, horses, four wheelers, even riding lawnmowers….we were very creative and handy with tools. Art class in elementary school was more of a “craft class.” I loved to color, but it never occurred to me that one could be taught to draw. I thought it was a talent you were born with and I knew I didn't have that.


DID YOU ATTEND COLLEGE? I went to Winthrop University because I wanted to study Interior Design. It was there that I had my first art classes and was shocked that I actually could draw and paint. I had to take a lot of art classes being an Interior Design major as well as drafting. I learned that you actually can teach people how to draw, paint, and, more importantly, how to see things. I met Robbie one summer and left Winthrop to transfer to Francis Marion University, got married, and graduated with a degree in Early Childhood Education. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN DOING INTERIOR DESIGN AS A PROFESSION? I am not a designer as I don’t have a degree in Interior Design. The title of “Decorator” or “Interior Stylist” would be a more accurate term for what I do. I just want people to love their homes as it changes the way you live. When you love your home you will invite people over, engage with people, be able to enjoy sitting in a room that brings peace instead of constant niggling of the list of the things you need to do to the room to make it right. I have found that most times it is a lot less than what you think. It can be something simple like hanging a guitar on the wall so that you can easily play it if you only have a few minutes while waiting on a ride. Or creating an outdoor space so that you will want to go outside. A well-designed space changes the way you do life. So to answer the question…I have been helping people with their homes for as long as I can remember and I am not sure when people started paying for my help. I still don't think of it as my profession, but as something I just help people do because I love it. WHAT INSPIRED YOU AND ROBBIE TO OPEN A FLOORBOYS IN FLORENCE? I would buy flooring from my cousin and especially a lot of rugs for my clients so he encouraged us to open a branch in Florence. I am still surprised we did it. Now, I get to help people pick out floors, which can be very overwhelming, but it's something I love to do. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN STYLE? My personal style is probably “transitional." I love so many different things. When I am working with clients I try to use as many of their things as possible. Items can be arranged differently, turned upside down, painted, or used in ways not intended and will often feel new. It is like a puzzle to me, I love trying to figure out how to put a

WENDI'S FAVORITE QUOTES:

Leopold I, King of the Belgians, wrote a letter to Queen Victoria in which he warned her, “Be aware of artists, they mix with all classes of society and are therefore the most dangerous.” “I feel there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.”-Van Gogh

room together using what you have, then adding things if you need it. It doesn't always line up with style per se, but I have found when you apply the principles of design, it is surprising how good even ugly stuff can look. WHAT DO YOU DO TO GATHER INSPIRATION FOR A PROJECT? I start by asking, 'How do you want to use this room?' I try to figure out what someone truly likes (or dislikes) and very often they don’t know. My friend Tommy Bolger says I have to squint my eyes in a room for a while before I come up with a plan and he’s right. I also look at rooms done by my favorite designers. I ask the Lord to guide me in making decisions, or just to give me ideas. He answers me every time! WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR OTHER HOBBIES BESIDES ART AND DESIGN? I love to study scripture and listen to sermons. If you had told me I would enjoy this when I was a kid, I would have laughed my head off. I also love to read and now with audible books I can enjoy books while I am working, cleaning, cooking, and more. I always have a book that I am reading. Fiction, non-fiction, and historical fiction is my favorite! WHO IS ONE OF YOUR FAVORITE ARTISTS AND HOW DO THEY INSPIRE YOU? I don’t think I could name one person. There are parts to almost every artist that inspires me. Sometimes it is just to pick up a paintbrush and paint or look at something differently. 2080 Elijah Ludd Rd, Florence 843.773.2798 Find us on Facebook! September 2021

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LIFESTYLE

National Guacomole Day

Nataional Guacomole day is September 16th

easy Guacomole ingredients:

You may associate guacamole with chips as an appetizer at your favorite Mexican restaurant but for some it can become a full-fledged meal. History books tell us that avocados date back to 500 B.C. where the Aztecs first made guacamole. Over time the name for avocado has changed, originally being called the alligator pear because of its rough textured peel that resembled the skin of an alligator. One of the most popular varieties of avocado are Hass, which gets its name from Rudolph Hass who was a mailman in California. Rudolph planted and patented the Hass Avocado in 1935. The first tree that Hass planted stood and produced the beloved Avocados for 70 years. In celebration of National Guacamole Day, here is a recipe that could become a personal favorite. 20

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- 3 medium avocados, Hass - ½ teaspoon kosher salt - 3 tablespoons lime juice - ½ cup diced tomato - ¼ cup diced red onion - 1 tablespoon minced jalapeno, stem and seeds removed - 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro - 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

method: 1. Cut the avocados in half from top to bottom and remove the seeds. 2. Scoop out 2 avocados into a bowl. Add salt and use a fork to mash. 3. Cut the remaining avocado into ½-inch cubes, add the pieces to the bowl. 4. Add the lime juice, tomato, red onion, jalapeno, cilantro, and garlic to the avocado mixture. Stir. 5. Add salt and lime juice to taste.


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HOME HOME

APPLE TART This apple tart is the perfect Fall Recipe to impress your friends with your culinary-art skills without the stress of needing advanced skills. If you can cut an apple and roll-out cookie dough, you can master this dessert on the first try. Whether you are making it for an autumn evening dinner party or save for your Thanksgiving celebration, this tart is such a refreshing change from the traditional apple pie. I love apple pie, but I love how this recipe has minimum ingredients and allows the apples to be the center of attention not just visually but also for your taste buds.

As a heads up, the recipe is, as I have mentioned, very easy but a bit time-consuming. If you have a party to go to in an hour, this isn't the recipe for you today. The crust needs to chill 45 minutes and again for an hour in the pan. To make it easier, I suggest prepping the crust a day or two in advance. Then let the dough warm on the counter until rollable and follow the rest of the recipe from there.

Happy 1st Day of Autumn - September 22nd!

INGREDIENTS

APPLE TART Crust: 1 1/4 c flour (make sure to have extra for dusting) A pinch of sugar (Around 1 tbsp but to taste) 8 tbsp butter 3 tsp ice water 1/4 tsp table salt (ONLY if you use unsalted butter) Filling: 5-7 Apples* 1/4 c sugar 3-4 tbsp butter *I used Gala apples. I would not recommend Granny Smith and usual baking apples because they are too tart for this recipe. I would stick to smaller sweet apples.

METHOD 1. Mix the flour and sugar if using unsalted butter, then add the salt. Cube the butter into smaller pieces and use a mixer to blend the ingredients. Once combined, add the ice water. Mix until you have a "cookie dough" consistency. This mixture will be crumbly. Now use your hands to press the dough 22

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story and photos by Rebecca Giese

together into one large disk ( like a hockey puck), transfer it onto plastic wrap, and wrap it tightly. Chill the dough for 45 minutes. 2. Once the dough has chilled for 45 minutes, prepare a clean surface to roll out the crust. To help the dough from sticking to your counter or table, dust the surface with flour. Now take a rolling pin and roll out the dough into a large round piece at about 1/8 inch thickness. Place the dough on your well-greased tart pan and press to the shape of the pan. Then chill the crust-filled pan for one hour. 3. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare the apples for the tart, de-core, and cut the apples into halves. Then cut the halves into thin pieces. Layer the apples, standing upright, starting from the outside of the crust, working your way to the center. Use any extra pieces to fill in any gaps. Sprinkle the sugar evenly over the apples. Cut the butter into small pieces and lay them over the apples. Then bake for 60 minutes, or until apples are soft and the crust is golden.


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HOME

HAPPY LABOR DAY

Why do we celebrate

LABOR DAY? story and recipe by Doug Smith

The holiday is rooted in the late 1800s when labor activists pushed for a federal holiday to recognize the many contributions American workers have made to our country’s strength and success. Labor Day didn’t start as a national holiday but as a local holiday. Then the state of New York became the first to introduce a bill making it a state-wide holiday. Oregon quickly followed and was first to pass a law recognizing Labor Day as a state-wide holiday in 1887. By 1894, 23 more states had adopted simulator legislation, and on June 28, 1894, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday. “American labor has raised the nation’s standard of living and contributed to the greatest production the world has ever known and the labor movement has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pays tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation's strength, freedom, and leadership – the American worker.” President Grover Cleveland Congress chose Monday for Labor Day because this would ensure a 3 day weekend. This extra day gave the workers more time with their families. The long weekend was so coveted that congress passed The Uniform Monday Holiday Act in 1968. This changed several holidays to ensure they would always be observed on Mondays so that federal employees could have more three-day weekends. The Act, signed into law on June 28, 1968, moved Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, and Columbus Day to fixed Mondays each year. With Labor Day upon us, let’s plan our picnics, grill-outs, or that last trip to the beach. The long weekend not only celebrates the American worker but also is a time of change. Summer has come to a close, school has started and our thoughts turn to fall. 24

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Get more from Doug Smith by following him on Facebook and Instagram at "Doug the Food Guy". Find Doug the FoodGuy on Spotify and Apple podcasts @The Pizzeria & Enzo Show

cucumber salad Ingredients: • • • • • • •

4 medium cucumbers sliced 2 tbsp Balsamic Vinegar 4 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil 3 spring onions 1/2 lemon 1/2 a fresh red chili (optional) 5 or 6 fresh mint leaves

Method:

1. Halve and quarter cucumber, cut into chunks, slice spring onions including the top, slice mint leaves. 2. Place the cucumber, onion, and mint in a mixing bowl, add balsamic vinegar, drizzle 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, juice of half lemon, toss well. 3. Garnish with finely sliced chili pepper.


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LIFESTYLE

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SEPTEMBER 2021 CALENDAR of EVENTS sunday

monday

tuesday

wednesday

1

2

No Rhyme (Nor Reason) Day

5

6

7

thursday

8

Blueberry Popsicle Day

9 The Good Neighbor Gala, Florence Country Club

Southern 500 Nascar Race, Darlington Raceway

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Beer Lover’s Day

Happy Labor Day!

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14

Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology Nurses Day

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MARCH event, Ebeneezer Baptist Church

16 Chamber Business After Hours, PD State Farmers Market Florence Area Big Band , Grand Post Office, Darlington

Grandparent’s Day

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Bald is Beautiful Day

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Pepperoni Pizza Day

Wife Appreciation Day

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27

SC Bridal Showcase, Florence Center

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Chocolate Milk Day

Live Creative Day

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Double Cheeseburger Day

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Voter Registration Day

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Autumn Begins

IT Professionals Day

Farm to Table Event, The Stables at the Inn, Lake City

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Grassroots Tour Luncheon, SiMT, Florence

Edwin McCain Concert, The Blind Pig, Hartsville

30

Love People Day


Send in your events to heather@vipmagsc.com! friday

3

saturday

4

College Colors Day

10 Arts & Craft Show (10-11), PD State Farmers Market Florence Area Big Band, Downtown Florence Tap Into Downtown, Downtown Florence

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Beekeeper Certification, Moore Farms, Lake City

11 One 2 One Ladies' Breakfast, TKA Gym, Florence Run for Brighter Days, Lynches River Co Park

18 Plant & Succulent Swamp, PD State Farmers Market Lynches River Adventure Race

Carolina Food Truck Rodeo (17 & 18), Florence Center

24 Fall Festival (24-26), Carolina Trading Post, Florence Florence After 5, Downtown Florence

SC Tobacco Festival, Village Green, Lake City

25 RALLY For Recovery, Timrod Park, Florence Power Comicon, Florence Center Swamp Fox Highland Games, The Columns Plantation

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LIFESTYLE

Teacher Tips for a "normalisH" school year story by Allie Segars

Teacher burnout is a real thing. Whether you are a first-year teacher or a veteran teacher–you may feel like it should be the 100th day of school already. With so much uncertainty, we all worry about the idea of having to go virtual again. Our teaching world and teaching styles took a turn in 2020 and forced us to transition into a digital style. The majority of teachers were not okay, because let’s face it, change is hard. We started a new school year being mask-free and face to face, and a lot of us believed that we were going to see a “normalish” school year. Unfortunately, we are back in our masks waiting for the announcement that we are going back to virtual learning. I am praying this is not the case, however, if it is, we can do ourselves a favor and be ready. Last month I welcomed my seventh classroom full of cuties in the door. Over the last seven years, I have managed to learn some tips and tricks that have helped me stay organized and sane through all of the uncertainty.

Create a classroom Google Site This requires a little preparation, but it is so worth it. Being a Google app, this is so easy to navigate. I have already introduced my first graders to our classroom site and added it to their bookmarks bar. If we were to ever go virtual, this site keeps everything organized and it's easy to find the information that they are looking for. Parents also love it, because they can find the weekly newsletters, our class photo album, our schedule, and Youtube videos for our lessons and learning. 30

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Digital Assignment Slides I love Google Classroom, but I also love making my assignment slides using links to help my firsties get exactly where they need to go. My goal is to make things SUPER easy so that parents can do what they need to do and won’t be held up with all of this schoolwork. Not to mention make my life a little easier when we are in the classroom. The kids love them, and I have fun making them. You can find cute digital classroom templates on Teachers Pay Teachers - Shaw in the Classroom or you can design your own.

How to remove ads on Youtube When I learned this trick, I was mind blown. I always get nervous when assigning a youtube video, because you never know what kind of ad is going to pop up. I have had some experiences with ads playing, and I suffer from PTSD from them. There is nothing like running to your computer to pause or turn the volume down. LOL! However, to avoid all of that, find your Youtube URL and add a - in between you and tube. That’s it. https:// youtu.be/CgAXlIqgxTU (original link) https://you-tu.be/ CgAXlIqgxTU (revised link) Bottom line, if you are a teacher, you are appreciated and needed. We need to remember that we can do this. Your babes need you.

Thank you for all that you do! Us teachers gotta stick together!


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LIFESTYLE

Create. Perform. Publish.

Have you heard about The Florence Center for Contemporary Music yet? The Florence Center for Contemporary Music, Inc. (FCCM) exists to foster the creation, performance, and publication of contemporary American music through private instruction, group ensemble experiences, audio and video production, and a start-up workspace for entrepreneurs entering the music and media production fields. FCCM offers instruction to individuals of all ages in woodwind, brass, percussion and strings (orchestral group), and guitar, bass, piano, keyboard, drum set and vocal (combo group). Students who desire to learn the performance demands of an organized band (rock band, jazz band, etc.) will have the opportunity to rehearse with such a group, manage, book and promote the group and to perform in public. FCCM provides an in-house performance venue. This fully equipped sound stage is complete with lighting, sound reinforcement, instruments, and recording capabilities for all students to utilize. FCCM’s Concert Series and semi-annual recitals featuring FCCM students, faculty, and guest artist will be held in this venue and open to public attendance. FCCM hosts seminars and workshops with working professionals involved in the various aspects of performance, song writing, concert promotion/management, and recording/ sound reinforcement. The Florence Center for Contemporary Music, Inc. is committed to sustaining the arts in the Pee Dee region, to provide high quality instruction in all phases of our mission, and to enhance the lives of all people through music. FCCM is a 501c3 non-profit organization. They are sustained primarily by grants, financial and material donations, and through fund raising concerts and events. All donations are tax-exempt and are greatly appreciated. If you would like to help please contact us at fccmstudios@gmail.com. 32

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The Florence Center for Contemporary Music, Inc presents

Florence Area Big Band in Concert September 10, 2021 • 6:30-8:00 pm Renaissance Courtyard Dargan St, Downtown Florence •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• September 16, 2021 • 7:00-8:30 pm The Grand Old Post Office, 201 Pearl St, Downtown For more information: www.fccmstudios.org This project is made possible through funding from the Florence Regional Arts Alliance's Quarterly Grants Program, which is funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission which receives support from the National Endownment for the Arts, and due to


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AROUND TOWN: ROTARY CLUB OF FLORENCE’S FORGET ME NOT 5K

photos by Phillip Guyton, True Light Photography

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On August 21st, The Rotary Club of Florence’s Forget Me Not 5K to beat Alzheimer’s kicked off at the James Allen Plaza in downtown Florence, SC. Proceeds benefited the local Alzheimer’s Association and the Rotary grant program.


AROUND TOWN: GRATEFUL DOG BIKE RALLY

Grateful Dog Bike Rally On August 21st, bikers met up at Black Jack Harley-Davidson in Florence and ended an exciting ride at Shiners Bar in Coward. All ages participated and the event included live music, vendors, a kids fun zone, food trucks and much more! All proceeds benefit the Florence, Darlington, and Marlboro County Humane Societies. photos by Phillip Guyton, True Light Photography

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HEALTH + WELLNESS

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because you are worthy enough to live story by Cynthia Ford

What pain-filled your mind? What crushed your dreams? What consumed your thoughts and sealed your freedom in a cage? The door of freedom is open, yet the cage still attaches to your extremities. The silent scream, clouded by thoughts of hopelessness, cutting your sweet life so soon. How precious is this thing called time? Time cannot be bought and whatever we choose to do within our given timeframe has no bearing on time’s continual pace. As time ticks, we proceed with our lives and establish connections or relationships that prove to be beneficial. We were taught to love. Through the bonds of love, we are interwoven through various levels and aspects of our lives. Love yields a feeling of hope, happiness, and security. This bond is a part of why it is challenging when a loved one dies. Death is inevitable however the blow of its effect still hits hard to family members left behind. One form of death that often leaves family members with many questions is suicide. The act of suicide initiates with a single thought that leads to agreement with the thought and acting on the thought. Our bodies naturally fight to live. Even at the point of suicide, we question whether to end it all or choose an alternate route. Families playback in their minds, wondering if there was something they’ve missed or if there was anything they could have done to keep their loved one alive. Many reflect on their last time spent with the loved one or other special memories that stand out more than others. Suicide is a topic that is rarely talked about but happens often in our families and communities. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide was the 10th leading cause of death and led to over 47,000 deaths in 2019. Suicide is also noted as being the second leading cause of death for youth ages 10 to 24 years old. As a result of the increasing concern, several measures are put into place to increase awareness and prevention. National Suicide Prevention Month is recognized in September. Many mental health providers and organizations unite in an attempt to promote awareness and extend services to individuals in need. The National suicide prevention hotline noted several risk factors that are associated with suicide. A few of the risk factors are a history of mental illness, substance use disorders,

hopelessness, impulsive or aggressive tendencies, history of trauma, financial loss, sense of isolation, cultural beliefs, and exposure to others who have died by suicide. As we focus on prevention, it is important to be aware of some of the warning signs associated with suicide. These include talking about wanting to die or kill themselves, searching for ways to kill themselves, talking about having no reason to live, talking about feeling trapped or unbearable pain, talking about being a burden to others, increasing the use of alcohol or drugs, changes in sleep pattern, withdrawing or isolation behaviors, or extreme mood swings. The mind is the battleground. Tackling suicidal indentations and attempts requires tactics that are powerful enough to sustain a mind that has become fragile. Joining efforts to tackle suicide is not just the job for family members directly affected or mental health providers. It is a job that everyone can take a part in. We must push past the act of highlighting potential warning signs. We must increase awareness of outlets of relief, letting everyone know that there is another way out. At the surface is the presenting problem that appears to scream loudly that there is not another option besides ending it all right away. Collectively our efforts of prevention should scream, "You are not alone in this fight to live." Let’s increase the conversation of showing everyone their worth. Let’s normalize seeking help before the problem becomes unbearable. Let us come together like never before to not only spread awareness, but to be the bridge for healing, and the light of hope. The suicide prevention hotline should be known as well as the universal number for emergencies. The suicide prevention hotline (1-800273-8255) will soon transition to a shortened number of 988 in an attempt to have quicker access to help and to provide a number that everyone can easily remember. To family members who lost a loved one to suicide, grieve at your own pace. You too are not alone in this fight. Let the good memories from your loved one live on. Live with no regrets as we are unable to change what has happened. Consider doing something special that will spring forth continual life and make their name live on forever. One idea would be to plant trees or make a garden in their memory. For those who suffer from suicidal thoughts, keep fighting to live. I speak peace, healing, and restoration to you who suffer in silence. You are not alone in this fight. May you find light in the midst of your dark moment. Give yourself grace and a chance to live. You are worthy enough to live.

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HEALTH + WELLNESS

FILTERING OUT THE

RISK OF STROKE story by Brian Blaker, MD, FACC, McLeod Interventional Cardiologist

The aortic valve is one of the four heart valves that control the flow of blood through the heart. Aortic stenosis is a disease characterized by severe narrowing of the valve that directs blood flow out of the heart. It most commonly affects those patients over the age of 65. Over time, the three flaps on the aortic valve that open and close to control the blood flow can become stiff from a buildup of scar tissue and calcium. This reduces the motion of the valve and its ability to open sufficiently to allow for good blood flow out of the heart. When this happens, the heart needs to work harder to move blood throughout the body. Common symptoms of aortic stenosis include chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, passing out, fatigue, or decrease in exercise tolerance. The disease is usually identified by a non-invasive study called an echocardiogram, or ultrasound of the heart. For those patients who are found to have severe aortic stenosis and experience symptoms such as those described above, the only effective treatment is to replace the aortic valve. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR), a minimally invasive procedure being performed at McLeod Regional Medical Center, allows physicians to replace a patient’s diseased or damaged heart valve without removing the old valve. For some patients, particularly older patients and those with medical conditions that make them a poor candidate for open heart surgery, this procedure is an alternative option to traditional surgical aortic valve replacement. TAVR is performed in a similar manner as a heart catheterization. The physician inserts a catheter, a long flexible thin tube with the artificial valve, through a small incision in the groin, then guides it to the heart using X-ray imaging. The valve is precisely positioned across the diseased valve. The new valve is then deployed and starts functioning immediately. 38

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A demonstration of how Cerebral Protection System filters are positioned in the heart’s main arteries to capture the debris dislodged during a TAVR procedure.

While TAVR can save lives and significantly improve quality of life, like all medical procedures, it involves a small amount of risk. One of the risks of many valve procedures is a stroke. A stroke results when there is interruption in the blood supply to an area of the brain. TAVR is comparable with surgical alternatives in terms of effectiveness and safety, however, there is still a risk that pieces of the damaged heart valve can break loose during the procedure, travel through the arteries toward the brain, and potentially cause a stroke. To reduce the risk of stroke, a Cerebral Protection System can be utilized in many patients to capture debris dislodged during the TAVR procedure before it reaches the brain and potentially causes brain injury and stroke. The Cerebral Protection System uses embolic filters, which allows the blood to still circulate through to the brain, while trapping debris or blood clots. Before the TAVR procedure begins, the device is delivered though


Dr. Brian Blaker with the Cerebral Protection System that provides McLeod TAVR patients the best opportunity for a stroke-free outcome.

a small catheter advanced from an artery in the right wrist. The filters are positioned in the main arteries that carry 90 percent of the blood to the brain. Once the TAVR procedure is completed, the filters with the captured debris are removed. Patients with symptoms and/ or echocardiogram findings of significant valve disease can be referred to the McLeod Structural Heart Clinic where a team of interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons meet with the patient and family to evaluate their symptoms and discuss management options. The McLeod Structural Heart Team Coordinator Ryan Hill, NP, then helps arrange the patient’s required testing, which typically includes a cardiac catheterization, lung screening, CT scan, carotid ultrasound and lab work. Once the results are available, the Structural Heart Team reviews the findings to determine the best treatment plan for the patient. While the risk of stroke can never be eliminated completely, the use of the Cerebral Protection System at McLeod Health reduces the risk of stroke, gives our TAVR patients the best opportunity for a stroke-free outcome and provides peace-of–mind for our patients and their families. Currently, McLeod Regional Medical Center is the only hospital in the Pee Dee Region performing TAVR procedures and offering Cerebral Protection for patients who are candidates for treatment. Dr. Brian Blaker is an Interventional and Structural Cardiologist with McLeod Cardiology Associates. Dr. Blaker serves as the Medical Director of the McLeod Structural Heart Program. Physician and self-referrals are welcome by calling 843-667-1891.

Brian Blaker, MD, FACC

McLoed Interventional Cardiologist

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HEALTH + WELLNESS HEALTH + WELLNESS

Assessing Your Relationship Health story by Farrah Hughes, PhD, ABPP, HopeHealth

We all know that the quality of our intimate relationships can powerfully impact our physical and emotional health, as well as the quality of other areas of our lives. Therefore, it is essential that we stay attuned to the well-being of our romantic relationship and seek help when it is suffering. John Gottman is a clinical psychologist who also happens to be a mathematician, and he is a worldrenowned expert on relationships. He and his wife Julie, a marital therapist, have studied thousands of couples in their “Love Lab” at the University of Washington. The result? A sound theory of relationships that has influenced effective treatments for couples. Dr. Gottman has published almost 200 scientific journal articles and 40 books. Plus, he can watch a few minutes of spouses talking with one another and predict with more than 90 percent accuracy which couples will divorce. (You can find out more online at the Gottman Institute’s website, www.gottman.com.) So, when someone asks me for advice regarding their relationship health, I always refer to the Gottmans’ wisdom. To illustrate some well-founded principles regarding relationship health, here are some of John and Julie Gottmans’ findings. These were developed from their research involving married couples, but they apply to all of our romantic relationships – married or not. Think of these as “formulas” for relationship success: 40

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THE 5-TO-1 RATIO In satisfying relationships, positive communications outnumber negative communications by a ratio of 5-to-1. (In unhealthy relationships, the ratio is 0.8-to-1.) • The positive things that we say to our partners and the nice things that we do for them are all deposits into the “bank of goodwill.” Negative comments and behaviors make withdrawals on that account. • Remember to focus on the small, day-to-day moments to really be there when your partner needs you. It’s those moments that build the relationship and keep your bank balance from falling in the red. THE 4 HORSEMEN There are four primary indicators of relationship demise: criticism, contempt, defensiveness, and stonewalling (or withdrawal). These are nicknamed “the four horsemen of the marital apocalypse.” It is okay to disagree. In fact, it’s perfectly healthy! The Gottmans’ research has shown us that it’s how we argue that matters. It’s important to recognize these unhealthy patterns and correct them as soon as possible.


• Criticism: Voicing complaints about specific concerns or issues is healthy but attacking your partner’s character is not. • A complaint might be, “I was worried when you didn’t show up on time. Please text me when you’re running late so that I don’t worry.” • In contrast, a criticism is, “That was so selfish. You never think about how your behavior affects other people, and you don’t have the courtesy to show up on time.”

• Contempt: Contempt goes a step further and assumes moral superiority over the other person. It might include disrespect, mocking, sarcasm, ridiculing, or name-calling. It often is the result of longstanding negative beliefs about the other person and is the single biggest predictor of break-ups and divorces. • An example of contempt might be, “I can’t believe you thought it was okay to butt into my conversation with my daughter. You’re such an idiot! You think you can barge into any situation, even when your tiny brain can’t possibly understand what is going on.”

• Defensiveness: When we feel criticized, we often resort to defensiveness. It involves playing the victim or deflecting responsibility onto someone else. Defensiveness is often intended to squash conflict, but it has the opposite effect and can cause conflict to escalate. • When one partner asks the other partner a question, such as “Did you talk to your son about inviting me to the family cookout?” An example of defensiveness might be, “No, I didn’t have time today because things were so busy. You’re both adults. I really think you need to just talk to him about coming. Why can’t you just do that?”

Attending to your romantic relationship is one of the best things you can do for your emotional and physical health. If you want to seek help on your own, take a look at books written by Dr. Gottman, the Gottman Institute online, or his videos on YouTube. If you could use help to either strengthen your relationship or to leave it in a healthy way, don’t hesitate to reach out to a trusted friend, a pastor, or a behavioral health professional. Counselors, clinical social workers, psychologists, and marriage and family therapists are available to help with difficult conversations in a healthy way and to improve your relationships.

360 NORTH IRBY ST. FLORENCE 843.667.9414 | HOPE-HEALTH.ORG

• Stonewalling (withdrawal): When a partner feels overwhelmed by negativity and conflict, they may pull away, tune out, walk out, or otherwise disconnect. Basically, stonewalling is when a person leaves the interaction, either mentally or physically. • As an alternative, you and your partner can be proactive and decide to take a 30-minute “time out” to calm down, then return to the discussion when you’ve collected your thoughts.

Farrah Hughes, PhD

Farrah Hughes, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and serves as the director of Behavioral Health Services at HopeHealth. She is happily married to her best friend of over 22 years and together they have two children. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, and the Society for Couple and Family Psychology.

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HOME + WELLNESS HEALTH

Devices That Make A Difference PACEMAKERS + DEFIBRILLATORS story by Dr. Sam Rahman, MUSC Health Florence Medical Center

Pacemakers and defibrillators are devices commonly implanted in the heart to treat specific malfunction of the heart’s natural electrical system, allowing patients to lead a better, safer lifestyle and, in many cases, prolong lives. Pacemakers and defibrillators consist of a pulse generator and attached leads. The pulse generator is a small metal case containing sophisticated programmable circuitry and the lithium-ion battery. To install the pulse generator, a small incision is made on the front of the chest wall, just underneath the collarbone, not inside the chest cavity. The incision creates a pocket to install the pulse generator with one, two, or three leads attached to it. The leads are inserted into the big vein underneath the collarbone, following the vein to the heart cavity. Your cardiologist will decide the number of leads you need. Most patients have two leads; one goes to the top chamber of the heart (the atrium), and one goes to the lower chamber (the ventricle). Typically, this is an outpatient procedure with the patient going home the same day. The lithium battery can last up to 12 years, depending on how often it is used. When the battery needs replacement, it is then taken out through a small incision, and a new battery is attached to the old leads.

Dr. Sam Rahman is an interventional cardiologist who specializes in catheter-based procedures for the treatment of coronary artery disease. These procedures include stents, PCI, complex coronary interventions, peripheral arterial disease, and device therapy (Pacemaker and ICD implantations). For more information, please call his office, MUSC Health – Cardiology, at 843-674-4787 or visit MUSChealth.org. 42 VIPMagSC.com September 2021

DR, SAM RAHMAN A pacemaker monitors conditions causing a slow heart rate. The implanted pacemaker watches the heart rhythm all the time and intervenes only if the heart rate slows down. If a slow heart rate is detected, the pacemaker sends a very small electrical impulse stimulating the heart to trigger a heartbeat. This electrical impulse drives the heart to keep going at the desired rate. If the heart beats fast, the pacemaker will not do anything, but it will continue monitoring the heart rate all the time. A defibrillator functions exactly like a pacemaker, but it is also programmed to recognize a life-threatening fast heart rhythm. The defibrillator delivers a high-voltage electrical shock


that terminates a serious and life-threatening heart rhythm. Because a defibrillator provides a high-voltage shock, its battery and pulse generator are larger. Which device a patient needs is decided by your cardiologist. In general, if the heart muscle is weak, the patient needs a defibrillator. If the heart muscle is not weak, a pacemaker is used.

WHICH DEVICE A PATIENT NEEDS IS DECIDED BY YOUR CARDIOLOGIST. IN GENERAL, IF THE HEART MUSCLE IS WEAK, THE PATIENT NEEDS A DEFIBRILLATOR. IF THE HEART MUSCLE IS NOT WEAK, A PACEMAKER IS USED.

Recent technological advancements have made it possible to create tiny pacemakers implanted inside the heart cavity. This type of pacemaker has no leads, and the device itself functions as a battery and a lead. This type of leadless pacemaker is used for particular conditions and is not suitable for every patient. The battery of the leadless pacemaker can last up to 10 years. All cardiac devices require close follow-up, which is usually performed in the office and remotely from home. A home monitoring unit sits in the patient's bedroom and communicates wirelessly with the implanted device. This report, generated by communication between the device and the unit at home, could then be sent to the cardiologist's office through the internet. Thanks to the evolution of technology in pacemakers and defibrillators, many patients can live a long and fruitful life that would have otherwise been cut short without it.

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HEALTH + WELLNESS

EAT. SLEEP. MOVE. story by Brock McCallister, Owner Flo-Town Fitness, Certified Firefighter, Crossfit-L2

The three most vital things every person needs are to eat, sleep, and move. Without these three things, we will never be able to have long-lasting success when it comes to our health. The prescription is very simple, eat unprocessed (fresh) food, sleep 7+ hours per day, and move your body in a way that helps you perform better in your life. The importance of what we eat and drink cannot be overstated. It would be more beneficial for someone to spend 1 to 2 hours each week prepping their food than 4 to 5 hours in the gym. Without the right fuel, our bodies will not perform well, they will not recover, and eventually, they will break down. It is easy to get caught up in diets and calorie counting, but the first box you must check is QUALITY. We need protein and fats from eating meat, eggs, fish, and legumes (beans). This helps us maintain a healthy amount of lean muscle and is what will tide you over until the next meal. We need carbohydrates from potatoes, rice, veggies, fruit, and oats. These are the fuels that we can run off of throughout the day. They Are easy for our body to digest and will give us quick energy that if used will not be stored by our bodies. Also, we get vital vitamins and minerals from all of these sources. If I were to have someone pick one thing to get right, it would be what they eat. This will have the most drastic and longest-lasting results.

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Flo-Town Fitness 612 S Irby St, Florence www.flo-town-fitness.triib.com

Now to tackle sleep, most people do not get enough of it. We need 7+ hours of sleep and depending on what you do for work, lifestyle, and age, you may need more! When we do not get enough sleep it has very adverse effects on the body. It causes memory issues, trouble concentrating, mood swings, poor motor skills (clumsy), increases risk of diabetes, heart disease, weight gain, and low sex drive. As you can see sleep affects almost everything that we do and depending on your age you may need even more sleep. Someone seventeen or less needs 10+ hours, eighteen and over needs 6 to 10 hours. Plain and simple, we need sleep to recover and be ready to be at our best, day in and day out. Lastly, we have MOVE. Everyone's life requires different things, if you work at a daycare, you need to be able to focus on multiple things at one time and pick up kids without injuring yourself. If you are a firefighter, you need to be able to go from 0 to 100 very quickly, carry/drag heavy loads, and be able to recover, so you can do it all again. If you are 70+, you need to be able to get on and off “the pot”, change your clothes, carry in the groceries, and do all of this safely. Your exercise should reflect these demands, which for most people it is similar. You need to train to lift things properly and gradually get stronger, you need to maintain or improve your flexibility, and improve your coordination/balance. All of these carry over to LIFE, not what you see in the mirror. Perfect these things and you will set yourself up for success. Eat fresh food, sleep 7+ hours per night, and move to improve your ability to to perform work.


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NEWSWORTHY

Something to Celebrate... Lloyd named DCSD District Teacher of the Year, Williamson named DCSD Support Staff Person of the Year Sarah Tew Named DCSD's Director of Exceptional Education Darlington County School District (DCSD) announced this week that Sarah Tew will be the district’s director of exceptional education. Michelle Lloyd (left) and Patrick Williamson (right) will serve as the DCSD's District Teacher of the Year and Support Staff Person of the Year, respectively, for 2021-22. Dr Tim Newman, DCSD superintendent, (center) made the announcements during the district's Back-to-School Convocation. Michelle Lloyd, a third-grade teacher at Lamar-Spaulding Elementary School, is the Darlington County School District’s 2021-22 District Teacher of the Year. Patrick Williamson, a teacher assistant at Pate Elementary School, is DCSD’s inaugural 2021-22 Support Staff Person of the Year. The exciting announcements came during the district’s 2021 Back-to-School Convocation held recently inside the Hartsville High School Arena. Dr. Tim Newman, district superintendent, spoke highly of both winners: “Mrs. Lloyd represents the qualities that parents want to see in their child’s teacher,” he said. “The way she described handling last year’s disruptions showed her grace and care for her profession and students. She is well deserving of this honor. “Mr. Williamson is a product of the Darlington County School District as a student and now as mentor for the students that he serves. His role may be titled teacher assistant but that is simply a fraction of all he does for the students of Pate Elementary. We are proud to name him DCSD’s very first Support Staff Person of the Year.”

Tew steps into her new role after serving in the same office as secondary coordinator for exceptional education since 2014. In all, she has worked in the DCSD since 2007 when she began as an intellectual disability moderate teacher at Washington Street Elementary School for grades first through fifth. From 2008-2014, she served as an intellectual disability mild teacher in English/Language Arts and Mathematics at Hartsville High School. Prior to coming to the DCSD, Tew worked as a preschool special education teacher for King William County Public Schools in Virginia. As director of exceptional education, Tew’s responsibilities will primarily include the coordination and supervision of all programs for students with disabilities in the district. She will provide leadership for continuously inventorying the needs of exceptional education students, and she will also oversee the recruitment, selection and placement of exceptional education personnel.

Dr. Ayesha Hunter named DCSD Director of Personnel Darlington County School District (DCSD) announced this week that Dr. Ayesha Hunter will be the district’s new director of personnel. The Darlington County Board of Education approved the hiring at the recommendation of the administration during its July meeting. Hunter comes to DCSD from the Sumter School District, where she most recently served as principal of Bates Middle School. She held the position since 2011. Prior to that she served as a principal at Crosswell Elementary School, an assistant principal at Bates Middle and Millwood Elementary and Wilder Elementary Schools. She taught third, fourth and fifth grades at Crosswell Elementary from 1996-1999. She began working in the Sumter School District as an adult education teacher in 1996. Since 2005, Hunter has also worked as an adjunct professor at the University of South Carolina, Southern Wesleyan University and Grand Canyon University. She holds a Master of Education in Education Administration from Winthrop University as well as a Doctor of Education in Education Administration from South Carolina State University. She is certified as a superintendent, an elementary and a secondary education principal and through the School Leadership Executive Institute. As director of personnel, Hunter’s responsibilities will primarily include planning and directing the district’s program for recruitment and selection of the best qualified teachers and personnel. She will also work closely with efforts to certify district information regarding educational experience, certifications and classifications. She will also coordinate employee scholarship programs and teacher/support staff incentives as well as maintain the job description manual and benchmarking of positions.

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If you are celebrating a positive achievement or have been awarded for a newsworthy accomplishment, email Heather Page at heather@vipmagsc.com.

Historic Marion Revitalization Association Announces New Director Historic Marion Revitalization Association (HMRA) is honored to announce Marie Jacobs as the executive director of the organization. Jacobs will handle day to day operations, manage grants, plan community events, and work to restore the economic vitality of downtown Marion. Marie joins the HMRA board of directors from the Marion Emporium, where she served as a store associat e handling online orders, bookkeeping, customer satisfaction, and more. Prior to this, Marie served for 6 months as an intern through the SC Works Program at HMRA, under guidance of previous director, Stephanie Rizzo. Jacobs’s responsibilities will include community development - encompassing event planning, Facade Grant management, Sign & Paint Grant management, and business support. She will also work to increase awareness of Marion and what it has to offer to community members and businesses alike. Current HMRA board chair and lifelong resident of Marion, Jonathan Atkinson said “We quickly knew that Marie was the right fit for the future of our organization. We are excited for the enthusiasm that Marie has and look forward to the continued success of our programs, many of which she previously had a hand in implementing, and the new ideas that she brings.”

Darla Moore Scholarship established at FMU Francis Marion University is excited to announce the creation of the Darla Moore Scholarship, made possible by the generosity of the Darla Moore Foundation. The Darla Moore Scholarship will be funded by a $5 million gift -- $1 million a year for the next five years -- from the Darla Moore Foundation. Scholarships will cover tuition, room and board or school fees depending on the individual recipient's needs each semester. The first group of Darla Moore Scholars will enroll at FMU starting in fall 2022.

SC Chamber of Commerce Announces Honorees for 2021 Business Leader of the Year, Public Servant of the Year and the Sgt. William Jasper Freedom Award The South Carolina Chamber of Commerce has announced the honorees for the 2021 Business Leader of the Year, Public Servant of the Year and the Sgt. William Jasper Freedom Award. Howard Coker, president and CEO of Sonoco, has been named the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce Business Leader of the Year. The South Carolina Chamber’s Business Leader of the Year is chosen based on leadership in South Carolina and the embodiment of personal success. Other criteria include a business record based on ethical conduct and corporate responsibility, public service, contributions to the preservation of South Carolina’s government and commitment to creating a positive business climate to improve the state’s economy. Congressman James Clyburn, representing South Carolina’s 6th Congressional District, and majority whip, was named Public Servant of the Year. The Sgt. William Jasper Freedom Award will go to Brigadier General Milford H. Beagle Jr., U.S. Army.

“FMU is delighted to receive this substantial gift from the Darla Moore Foundation. These scholarships will support those who would not attend college otherwise, and they will fund tuition, fees, and housing – thereby giving these young men and women the opportunity to participate in the complete university experience. I’m deeply appreciative to Darla for this generous gift and for helping us to educate some of our neediest students,” said Dr. Fred Carter, President of Francis Marion. Francis Marion University will begin accepting Darla Moore Scholarship nominations from high school counselors in January 2022. The scholarship will be available to incoming freshmen students who will be starting classes at Francis Marion in the fall of 2022. Only school counselors can recommend students for the scholarship, who will in turn contact the Office of Enrollment Management for final consideration. To be eligible to become a Darla Moore Scholar, students must be South Carolina residents, enrolling in full-time undergraduate studies, and demonstrate a financial need based on FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), with family income generally not exceeding $75,000. The scholarship is primarily, but not exclusively, geared toward students who will be the first in their family to attend college. Recipients of the Darla Moore Scholarship must maintain a minimum 2.7 GPA and are not required to live on campus. September 2021

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VIP'S BOOK CLUB series by Bethany Rau

The

Southern Book Club’s Guide to

Slaying Vampires With October quickly approaching, bringing with it Halloween, I wanted to dive into a book with some spooky undertones. As I was browsing Barnes and Nobles for a new read, I stumbled upon “The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires.” The cover art alone piqued my interest immediately. After reading the summary, I couldn’t wait to take it home and read it. With just over 400 pages, this Grady Hendrix novel was an instant page-turner! This book takes place in a family-oriented neighborhood in Charleston, South Carolina, which for me made it even more interesting. With mentions of Clemson and Carolina, it created a sense of familiarity. The story develops in the 1990s spotlighting a group of southern women who start their own book club where they primarily read true crime novels. The main character, Patricia Campbell, finds herself bored with her everyday life and feeling neglected by her husband and kids. She has found herself taking care of her elderly mother-in-law who is slowly losing what is left of her sanity. Strange things begin to happen in her small neighborhood when a new neighbor moves in down the street with a shaky past and no family. At first, Patricia and her friends are wary of the stranger but eventually, they come to like him with the pressure of their husbands behind them. He brings with him ample amounts of money, helping him invest in the local real estate development that all of the women’s husbands have also put in what little bit of money they had. When children around town start going missing and dying, Patricia finds evidence pointing to James Harris, the new neighbor. But with her word against everyone else’s, she is left with nothing substantial to pin the crimes against him. She must decide if pursuing it is worth potentially losing her friends and family and risking everyone she loves thinking she has lost her mind. This is one of those books that I wish I could read again for the first time over and over. I could not wait to turn the page and find out what was going to happen next. The author does a phenomenal job of keeping the reader interested and on the edge of your seat.

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5 September 2021

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DRINK OF THE MONTH

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September 2021



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November 2019



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November 2019