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magazine Publisher Tammy Clark tmclark225@gmail.com Editor Heather Page heather@vipmagsc.com Office Manager Tiffany Skipper jtskipp35@gmail.com Advertising Executives Jordan Pupa jordan@vipmagsc.com Julie C. Tyler juliectyler@yahoo.com Creative Design Tuesday Taylor Ashley Rogers

Contributing Photographers Jonathan Boatwright Wendy Cagle Erin Daniels Phillip Guyton Bradley Lail NDC Photography Jill Snyder Contributing Writers Kayla Jebaily-Adams Kat Barnettte Kent Daniels Ashley Elvington Rebecca Giese Zach Hughes Jack Muench Jordan Pupa Allie Roark Doug Smith Camielle Styles Donna Tracy

Serving Florence, Hartsville, Darlington, Marion, Mullins, Lake City and the surrounding areas 2011-B Second Loop Rd, Florence, SC 29501 FIND US ON FACEBOOK

For advertising rates, call 843-687-4236.

COVER CONCEPT

Thanks to Wendy Cagle Photography for sharing this back-to-school photo for our August cover. It gives the perfect intro to this issue, where we celebrate local educators. If you’d like your photography featured on Vip’s cover, send your entries to heather@vipmagsc.com!

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CONTENTS

ISSUE 45

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AUGUST 2019 BUSINESS 12 Wilcox, Buyck & Williams, P.A.: George Rogers 14 Hartsville Chamber: Crema Coffee Bar 16 Florence Chamber: King Cadillac Buick GMC 18 Bucket List: Paddling The Little Pee Dee River 20 Doug Smith: Tomato Pie 22 Kent Williams: Lake City's First Industries

SPECIAL FEATURE 24 Mac McDougal - Principal, J. Paul Truluck Creative Arts and Science Magnet School 26 Stacy Wilbanks - Principal, Creek Bridge STEM Academy 28 Micaela Cox - 4K/5K Montessori Teacher, McLaurin Elementary 32 Marlin Ketter - Director of Bands, Hartsville High School 32 August 2019 Calendar of Events 34-38 Meet the Teachers 40 Claire Copeland - Retired PE Teacher, All Saints'

HEALTH + BEAUTY

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42 HopeHealth: National Health Care Week 44 Around Town: Visit Lake City's Cocktails + Cuisine 45 Have A Nut Free School Year 46 Essential Oils For The School Year 48 Newsworthy: Something To Celebrate 49 TV Suggestion: Grand Hotel

LIFESTYLE 54 Allie Roark: Here's To A Happy New School Year 56 Boys & Girls Club of the Pee Dee: Patricia Singleton Parr

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58 Rebecca Giese: Build Your Team 60 Drink of the Month: The Teacher's Aid


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BUSINESS

George Rogers

Gamecock 1980 Heisman Trophy Winner story by Mark W. Buyck, III It’s the "Dog Days” of August and you can be sure that the upcoming college football season is on the minds of many South Carolinians. Former Gamecock Head Coach Steve Spurrier refers to this time of the year as the “talking season.” This is also a time when everybody’s favorite team is undefeated and their fans are predicting great success for the upcoming season. While Clemson has won 2 of the last 3 National Championships, the University of South Carolina fans still recall fondly what was probably the single best individual season for any South Carolina college football player. In honor of George Rogers’s 1980 Heisman Trophy win and his Hall of Fame career, the University of South Carolina has erected a statute of Rogers in the plaza outside of Williams Brice Stadium. The statute contains the inimitable George Rogers’s grin and he is usually found nearby prior to most Gamecock home games signing autographs and posing with his trophy. Below is the wording of a plaque on the statute honoring Rogers:

George Rogers, University of South Carolina 1980 Heisman Trophy Winner George Rogers enrolled at the University of South Carolina in 1977 and became one of the greatest football players in school history. In 1980, Rogers was the first Gamecock to receive the Heisman Trophy and holds the distinction of twice finishing in the top 10 in Heisman Trophy voting. During his career at Carolina, Rogers rushed for 5,204 yards, gaining more than 100 yards in each of his final 22 college games. His 31 career rushing touchdowns and 202 career points broke SC records and rank among the most in school history. Rogers was a first-team All-America in his junior season and a consensus firstteam All-America in his senior season. His jersey number, 38, was retired during halftime ceremonies at Carolina’s final 1980 home game. The New Orleans Saints selected Rogers as the first overall pick in the 1981 NFL draft. He was the NFL Offensive Rookie of the year in 1981 and was a Pro Bowl selection in 1981 and 1982. He won the Super Bowl as a member of the 1987 Washington Redskins. He is a member of the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame, the University of South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame, and the College Football Hall of Fame. Rogers’s impact in the Columbia area continues through the George Rogers Foundation, helping students achieve the success that he attained during his years at Carolina.

248 West Evans Street | Florence, SC | 843.662.3258 2050 Corporate Centre’ Drive, Suite 230 Myrtle Beach, SC | 843.650.6777

Business Law, Litigation, Real Estate, and Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys 12 W. VIPMagSC.com Mark Buyck, III 12 VIPMagSC.com

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BUSINESS: GREATER HARTSVILLE CHAMBER MEMBER OF THE MONTH

CREMA COFFEE BAR Serving coffee for people that love to drink it Crema Coffee Bar is a coffee shop that specializes in handcrafted coffee, smoothies, frappes, and so much more in the heart of downtown Hartsville. Opened in 2015, owner Tiffany Crist is so grateful to the community that has opened their arms to her and her family. Tiffany is Counter Culture Coffee certified, having completed all of the drink courses and aced the written, oral, and practical exams. All of the Crema baristas have undergone Counter Culture training. Tiffany and the Crema staff have created a unique menu that boasts old favorites, as well as several original and seasonally rotating drinks.

which is also for sale. The work of Rachel Riner, a wonderfully talented local artist and baker, will be featured from August through October.

Over the past four years, the desire to develop a strong downtown community has grown at Crema, and with it, the realization that people need a place to have events and fun things to do here in their own hometown. Tiffany loves having events for people in the community, and likes to think of Crema as a hub where you could have a work meeting, do homework, chat with friends, or meet some new people.

You can find all of their events listed on their Facebook page, call in to the shop, or follow them on Instagram.

On Friday and Saturday nights, Crema rotates a series of monthly—including movie nights, Magic the Gathering, poetry slams, Mario Kart tournaments, Murder Mystery nights, and so much more. Every quarter, Crema showcases the work of a different local artist,

CREMA 136 W. Carolina Ave Hartsville (843) 309-9606 14

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Looking for something fun to do over the weekend?

Join the Cremmunity!


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BUSINESS photography by Fred Salley

King Cadillac Buick GMC 39 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Last month King Cadillac Buick GMC celebrated 39 years in business. While the foundation of the business has always been to offer the highest quality vehicles at the best prices, owner Reamer B. King also understood the importance of being an integral part of the community. This included joining the Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce where the business has been a member since infancy. Back in 1984, when the company was just starting out, there were 26 employees. These days the dealership is a vital part of the community by employing 104 people. Employee’s positions range from the sales department, service department, parts department, and administration. One important observation to note is the lack of turnover within the company. “We invest in our employees, making sure they have the best and most current training to accommodate our customer's needs,” says Woody Truluck, King’s Vice President and General Manager. With the demand for service technicians continuing to rise, being a dedicated employer is key. Woody goes on to say that the majority of their employees have been with the company for more than 16

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10 years, many of those being there for more than 25 years. “This also has a positive effect on our customers. When they come in for oil changes and checkups, it’s comforting to them to see the same faces. Our customers have grown to trust the men and women in our service department.” Reamer B. King and Woody Truluck believe that they are the best dealership around and they know that’s due to their award winning team. Every person on the team contributes to their success. This month the Florence Chamber chose King as their business of the month because of them being a superior role model in the business community. For more information on King, visit them online at www.kingflorencegm.com and www.kingcadillacsc.com. 100 W Evans St, Florence 843.665.0515 flochamber.com


HEALTH + BEAUTY

Have A

Nut-Free School Year!

Over the last several years, peanut allergies have become a hot topic. Many of our local schools and early childhood development facilities are “nut-free.” This means the once lunchbox staple of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches can no longer be found amongst cafeteria tables, nor any other area of school. This is because peanuts can cause a life-threatening reaction in some people. The most severe allergic reaction to peanuts is anaphylaxis, when the whole-body responds to the allergen. There are several misconceptions about peanut allergies. The biggest being that a peanut is typically clumped with tree nuts. A peanut is not a tree nut, it is a legume (belonging to the same family as soybeans, peas and lentils). Therefore tree nuts are safe for school. Here are some kid-approved peanut butter alternatives to make your kid and his school happy!

KID-APPROVED PEANUT BUTTER ALTERNATIVES

1 Wowbutter 2 Barney Butter Almond Butter Honey + Flax 3 Kween Granola Butter 4 Artisana Organics Pecan Butter 5 Justin’s Chocolate Hazelnut Butter

This August, as we get comfortable in our new school groove, let’s be aware of what we send our kids to school with and make sure it’s contents are peanut free! August 2019

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BUCKET LIST

Paddling The

LITTLE PEE DEE RIVER story by Zach Hughes

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is no surprise that South Carolina is home to many thriving rivers. Each of them different than the next. Many of you drive over some of the more well-known rivers as you travel throughout the state. I remember growing up driving over the Pee Dee rivers headed towards the beach and I always imagined what it would be like to cruise down the river on a boat or a kayak. Here recently, I decided to push my experiences further and find a new place to try to paddle. My friends at Naturally Outdoors insisted that I needed to try paddling the Little Pee Dee River. They mentioned that they consider it one of the more beautiful rivers in our state and that it may not get enough credit. I will admit, when I had the chance to finally paddle it, I was not disappointed. One Sunday, not long after giving it some consideration, I was invited to join a Boy Scout troop paddle down the Little Pee Dee. Having started our drive down there as a group, the road leading there was just as relaxing. Taking Old River Road, we would make our way towards Brittons Neck. That was where we launched into the river. As soon as we made our way towards the landing, I could tell this would be a paddle nothing like any of my other paddling trips. At this point, in front of the landing, there was a small island with lush green cypress trees which cast a shadow over the water in between us and the main channel of the river. We launched into the water and began paddling around what I have come to know as Ducks Island. I was immediately mesmerized by how beautiful the water was. A dark cool and somewhat clear river, the water on the surface was clear as can be, but remained a smooth black color as a whole. I was also very enchanted by the lush green trees that covered the river 18

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bank. From the first turn to the last, each bend of the river presented a new set of thick cypress and oak trees to fill your soul with greenery. When the river is lower, there is no shortage of exposed white sandy beaches as well to stop and enjoy a snack. Many of them have very distinct overhanging trees that stretch over the water, reaching for sunlight. Often times too, the water below the beach can be very shallow, turning the water to a dark sweet tea color. In these shallow areas, it is very distinct how the current of the river turns the sedimentary sand into waves of what looks like an underwater desert of dunes. The peaks of these dunes can sometimes be shallow enough to stop your boat. Despite the number of beaches and shallow areas, the majority of the river remains a deep black channel of moving water. All the while some sections feel as if the water is just standing still to reveal a glass smooth reflection of the surrounding trees. I remember specifically on one of my more recent trips, that when we arrived at one of the forks in the river, the


Zach Hughes resides in Florence with his wife Alexis and their newborn son Christopher. Zach is a local entrepreneur, and has spent most of his time working around the automotive industry. In his spare time, Zach enjoys discovering South Carolina and dabbling in journalism.

trees opened up to an area that reminded me more of a lake. The wind swept through the wide-open section, rippling the water. All the while, there was a group of boaters, hanging out on a sandbar. Very reminiscent of my years growing up at the lake. For someone who grew up going to the lake, I feel right at home on the river. I feel much more secluded, and it is very much less busy. One of the things I can say about kayaking, especially this river, is that there never seems to be enough turns and stretches of river to satisfy my thirst for the water. Who knew that a river could calm your soul so well, and make you feel at home. Each time I have returned to the Little Pee Dee, each turn surprises me with new changes.

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HOME

Summer's Best: Tomato Pie story by Doug Smith

As I sit outside and gaze at the beautiful stars, I can relax and reflect on the tasks of the day. I’m sitting outside listening to noisy crickets and frogs with no cell phone in hand. It’s beautiful. Today, multiple tasks were completed around the house. It was truly an average Saturday. I visited my local farmer’s market, as I do most Saturday’s, and picked out some bright red tomatoes. Some of them were large enough to cover an entire slice of bread. It always amazes me how memories become so vivid when we connect them to food. I could almost hear my dad’s voice saying, “For me, there’s nothing better than a tomato sandwich on such a hot day.”

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Growing up in Darlington, my dad would always grow his tomatoes for us to enjoy all summer long. With all the different ways to enjoy this delicious fruit, I would say that there is something so special about a tomato sandwich. It shines in its simplicity. In reference to my dad, I would now say, “There is nothing better than a tomato sandwich on such a hot day.” I enjoy keeping things simple. I was once told by a dear friend and mentor, Chef John Kacala, to “keep it simple, let honest ingredients shine. Remember, it’s not what you put into the recipe, it’s what you get from it that counts.” One day not that long ago I finally understood what Chef was trying to teach me. It’s not the meal or the dish that’s important, it’s the time spent sitting around the table sharing stories of the day and dreams of tomorrow with friends and family. This is what you get from a great meal. If your table is like mine, we’re always trying to overcome the issue of the cellphone. This can be a difficult topic to address and keep everyone happily engaged. What has worked for us over the years is to get the whole family involved in preparing dinner (it’s hard to text or participate in social media with dough on your hands). I think of his advice quite often as we prepare food for friends and family. Keep it simple and let the food shine. Those words bring me to the tomato pie. It is so simple and so delicious. The way we prepared it allows the sweet tomato to shine and the memories of days past to be relived.


Get more from Doug Smith by following him on Facebook and Instagram at "Doug the Food Guy".

INGREDIENTS

Doug Smith's Tomato Pie

3 large fresh tomatoes, sliced thin 10 fresh basil leaves, chopped 1 thyme sprig, stem removed 1/2 cup green onion or sweet onion, chopped 9-inch pie shell (prebaked) 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup mayonnaise salt and ground black pepper

METHOD • Preheat oven to 350º F. • Slice tomatoes thin and place on a baking sheet, sprinkle with extra virgin olive oil and sea salt. Roast at 350º for 10 to 15 minutes or until the edges start to show color.* • Drain. • Layer the tomato slices, herbs, and onion in pre-baked pie shell. Season with salt and pepper. • Combine the grated cheeses and mayonnaise. • Spread mixture on top of the tomatoes. • Bake for 30 minutes or until lightly browned. Allow to rest for at least 15 minutes before cutting and serving. *Alternate Prep: Slice tomatoes thin place the tomatoes in a colander (single layer.) Sprinkle with salt and allow them to rest for 10 minutes.

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HOME

Did You Know...

Lake City's First Industries: Turpentine & Strawberries story by Kent Daniels The first major industry of the area was turpentine. Turpentine men from North Carolina and Virginia came down to bleed the "piney wood" and also to cut the pines for cross ties for the railroads. Soon these trees were exhausted and the people of the area had to find another major industry to replace the old one.

then went to Wilmington, North Carolina, where he saw many strawberry truck farms and was surprised to learn how far north and how far into the interior of North Carolina strawberry farming was successfully conducted. He came back home determined to make a start.

Henry Horace Singletary was born on November 15, 1848, on a farm near Lake City. He was the son of Ebenezer Dunham Singletary and Rectina (sic) Jane Gordon Singletary. His father died a year after he was born, so he was reared and educated in the home of his uncle, Alford Gordon. When he was a lad of 16, he joined the Confederate Army but served only a short time. After the war, he returned to Williamsburg County (That part of Williamsburg County is now in Florence County.) and worked as a farmhand for two years. Then Henry Horace Singletary went into farming for himself. On November 30th, 1870, he married Miss Olivia Ervin Singletary, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Singletary. They lived with Olivia's parents for the first two years of their married life. Then in 1872, the younger Singletarys moved to Lake City, where they lived for forty years. Horace continued farming until his death on July 12, 1912.

Henry Singletary carefully prepared two acres and set out his strawberry plants. A dry spell struck and in order to save his plants, he hauled water to them in a two-horse wagon. Some died, but he got a fair stand. His neighbors laughed at him. Some of them went so far as to whisper around that they were afraid Henry was "losing his mind." Time rolled on and he hired several children in the community to put straw under the plants and to pick the strawberries as they ripened. Soon he was ready to make his first shipment. Unfortunately, Henry's strawberries reached New York on a Saturday night and had to stay in the hot railroad car all day Sunday. When unloaded on Monday morning, they were rather spoiled, so that when sold, they brought only ten cents per quart. That was very discouraging, but he didn't give up. He sent his next shipment to Richmond, Virginia, not arriving on a weekend, so that they were unloaded and sold in a timely fashion. This time his berries brought twentyseven cents per quart. His perseverance paid off. The old adage, "He who laughs last, laughs best" was fulfilled.

Henry Singletary unconsciously began to take the agricultural lead circa 1890 when he observed that the soil around Lake City was well adapted for strawberries. He wondered why they had never been grown here for the market. He made two or three trips to Charleston during the strawberry season that year, in order to find out what he could about their culture. Some of the farmers down there answered his questions, while others treated him as a sort of gentleman tramp. He

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Henry's neighbors no longer thought that he was a fit subject for the lunatic asylum, but began taking an active interest in the results of his experiment. In time, they began to think of strawberries as so much gold. Thus was laid the foundation of Lake City's second industry, strawberries. Kent Daniels, Lake City native, retired teacher, and now Director of the Lynches Lake Historical Society

Continue to follow Kent in future issues of Vip as he sheds some light on the history of Lake City.


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SPECIAL FEATURE

Mac McDougal story by Ashley Elvington / photos by NDC Photography

With great power comes great responsibility, and Francis ‘Mac’ McDougal certainly has his share. However, not all heroes wear capes – they teach! Before soaring to success in the field of education, Mac grew up in Lake City and graduated from Lake City High School in 2000. Once he received his diploma, he attended Winthrop University where he studied classical opera. During his college years, Mac was awarded the privilege to travel and sing with the Glenn Draper Singers and the Lake Junaluska Singers throughout England. He later obtained his bachelor’s degree in Choral Music Education K-12 in 2005 and his master’s degree in Choral Conducting in 2006. The learning didn’t stop there, however, as Mac also attended USC and received his master’s degree in Educational Administration in 2014. Today, Mac is attending The Citadel and will obtain an Education Specialist degree in December. After that, Mac will continue his studies at Clemson University where he will enter the EdD doctoral program.

Principal at R.B. Stall High School in North Charleston, followed by a brief position as a Teacher Recruitment Specialist for the Human Resources department of the Charleston County School District, before making a career move back to his hometown of Lake City. Most recently Mac has accepted the Principal position at J. Paul Truluck Creative Arts and Science Magnet School where he looks forward to visiting old friends and making new ones.

While Mac certainly enjoys learning, he also enjoys helping his students learn. His teaching career began in 2008 at West Ashley High School in Charleston, South Carolina. During his time there, Mac was the Director of Choral Activities, a position he held until 2018. From August to December of 2018, Mac was the Assistant

The decision to return to Lake City was a no-brainer for Mac, as he’s all too familiar with the community, the residents, and the students. “I’m finding that some of my students’ parents were classmates. That always makes it interesting for the students when they find out I already know their parents personally!”

Looking back on what influenced his decision to enter the field of education, the inspiration started in the classroom. “Honestly, all of my teachers in Lake City inspired my career. I had multiple music teachers who encouraged my music career: Mary Cagle, Patricia Blackmon, Betty Jean Godwin, Faith Godwin, and Betty Carter. During my time of teaching chorus and piano at West Ashley in Charleston, I had a wonderful principal, Mary Runyon, who I considered a wonderful leader. She encouraged me to work on my admin degree.”

According to Mac, J. Paul Truluck is a remarkable school. “I can’t say enough good things about the faculty, staff, and students. Not only do we offer a variety of creative arts and science courses, but our school is also a Capturing Kids’ Hearts program school. We use this program to build relationships with our students.” Mac easily accomplishes this task. “I love connecting with them in the hallways. Walking by during class changes and hearing, ‘Hey, Mr. McDougal’ is such a rewarding feeling!” Mac has plans for J. Paul to make the school even better than it currently is. “As we move to a high school focus, we are looking to create that feel across the campus. We are looking to add canteen/vending machines in one of the hallways. We are restructuring some responsibilities and creating a list so that not only faculty and staff know our responsibilities, but we also know our responsibilities. Clear communication was one of the things requested by the faculty and staff, and that’s what I want to work toward. We will also be implementing Department Heads. These PLCs 24

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(Professional Learning Communities) will meet and look at data to determine where our needs are for our students.” Some days have been tougher than others, such as when Mac arrived at the school for his job at the end of April. “Following in the footsteps of Jeanette Altman - who is a remarkable educator and is loved by the faculty - was challenging. There were so many things that were due at the end of the year, and I wasn’t sure if I would be able to get them done. I thank my amazing admin team and district leadership for stepping in and assisting during the transition. Now that I’ve had the summer to plan, I’ve been able to reflect on the needs of the school and students. I was able to have a reflective conversation with each of my teachers at their end of-the-year checkout. I used that feedback to drive decisions for the coming year with my leadership team.” And if you’re a teacher who is entering the classroom for the first time this year, Mac shares this advice with you, “Don’t be afraid to ask for help from your fellow teachers, your school leaders, and your administration. Remember to make time for yourself and for your family. They are your greatest treasure!” It’s not serious all the time, however, as Mac recalls a funny incident from the classroom. “When I was a high school chorus teacher, I had assignments on my SmartBoard. One student raised his hand, ‘Mr. McDougal, can I move closer? I can’t see. I have Cadillacs in my eyes.’ I replied, ‘Huh? Whachu talkin’ about?’ He said, ‘Yeah, I have Cadillacs in my eyes. I need to move closer.’ I responded, ‘Yeah, my friend, come on up to the front. By the way, I think you mean cataracts.’” Great power and great responsibility can sometimes bring uncertainty… But not for this great educational leader. If there’s one thing he’s certain of, it’s that he’s right where he needs to be. “I found my niche in life. I found my passion. I am truly thankful to my family, my friends, and my community. It takes a whole community to raise a child.”

“Don’t be afraid to ask for help from your fellow teachers, your school leaders, and your administration. Remember to make time for yourself and for your family. They are your greatest treasure! Principal, J. Paul Truluck Creative Arts and Science Magnet School August 2019

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SPECIAL FEATURE

"Teaching is not for the faint of heart. It’s very hard work… but it is some of the most rewarding work you will ever do.” Principal, Creek Bridge STEM Academy

Stacy Wilbanks story by Jordan Pupa / photos by Jonathan Boatwright

We hear it all during the early years of life, "What do you want to be when you grow up?" For many of us, the answer is either completely unknown or a conglomerate of several tasks making up the perfect career path. For Stacy Wilbanks, her heart was set on being a nurse. But even the weeks before leaving for Clemson University and into her first semester there, her parents could sense the opposition and would say, “Nursing might just not be for you.” Turns out, they were right! After Stacy’s first semester, she decided to change her major to elementary education. It didn't take long before she realized she was exactly where she needed to be.

fifth grades, and she taught at night at an alternative school. It was in 2007 that Stacy began working with Marion County School District teaching first grade. Stacy shares, “Ms. Angie Grice, the then principal at Easterling Primary, took a chance on me. There was only one teaching vacancy in the entire school and it was in first grade, a grade I hadn't taught yet. Ms. Grice offered me the job and I taught there for the next five years and then became the Curriculum Specialist at Easterling Primary School. I later went to the district office to be a district curriculum specialist before I decided to go back to my LOVE- teachers, students, and learning!”

Stacy now holds a master’s degree in Educational Leadership and has held numerous teaching positions in an elementary setting including first, second, fourth and

In the spring of 2017, Stacy was offered a position to open a new school - the Academy of Early Learning, Marion County School District’s consolidated preschool

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program. This school included all of the 3-year-old with disabilities classes, 4K classes, and Montessori classes to one building in Mullins. For the past two years, Stacy has been the principal there - growing their student population and growing the district’s Montessori program, something she is particularly proud of. Stacy was instrumental in bringing the Montessori program to Marion. Montessori is a way for students to become intrinsically motivated learners, where they can learn at their own rate with materials that develop conceptual understanding instead of just skill and drill. The environment is quiet and peaceful. People pay a lot of money in other places for private Montessori school, but in Marion County School District they offer it for free! “When Marion County School District decided to open their first Montessori classroom, I did not know much about it,” says Stacy. “I was new to the district office and someone else had started down that road. After some time researching, learning and spending time in classrooms with the students and teacher, I realized what great potential it had in our school system. I lobbied to everyone I knew - teachers, parents, community members, and the superintendent. We started with just one classroom at the then Mullins Early Childhood Center and now have three 4k/5k Montessori classrooms at the Academy of Early Learning and will have two Early Elementary Classrooms (first and second grade) at North Mullins Primary for the younger Montessori students to feed into. I believe there are plans for continued expansion which I couldn’t be more excited about.”

become the ones reading and writing the stories and leading the line in the hallway. Children giving me hugs and high fives, stopping by the office to see me, sharing their work, or reading to me is also pretty amazing too! Teaching is not for the faint of heart. It’s very hard work…but it is some of the most rewarding work you will ever do.” Stacy has been instrumental in many exciting changes and new opportunities that are in the works. Creek Bridge Middle/High School will now be Creek Bridge STEM Academy which will serve students from kindergarten through 8th grade in the area that used to be Marion 7 (Rains, Centenary, Gresham, Britton’s Neck, etc.). This fall, Stacy will begin her next chapter as principal at Creek Bridge. “We have big plans! STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. We are going to thread this theme throughout our academic content and infuse problem-based learning in all classrooms for our students. We have installed a state-of-the-art STEM lab and I couldn’t be more excited to watch us grow and succeed. The teachers and our STEM Facilitator will be going through some big training this month. We want to instill a lifelong love of learning in our students, have them proud of their academic achievements, and be prepared socially and academically for their next steps!”

The program has made a great impact on students in the Marion County School District. Students have the opportunity to stay with the same teacher for two years, developing relationships and learning at their own rate. The older students in the classroom become leaders and teachers to the younger students which cultivates a strong sense of leadership from a very young age. Students have a choice in learning materials and lessons, encouraging them to be selfmotivated, responsible, and problem solvers. “Our Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test scores are proving that students are growing leaps and bounds,” explains Stacy. “We have six-year-olds that can count by nine’s and five-year-olds that can add three-digit plus three-digit numbers. It’s amazing!” For Stacy, the most challenging part of her job is wanting to inspire every teacher and student and not being able to reach them all! The most rewarding part of her job is watching children grow and change. “Children that come to school not even knowing how to walk in a line or sit on a rug and listen to a story August 2019

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Micaela Cox Malala Yousafzai once said, “One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” While she may not admit it, Micaela Cox is easily changing the world through her efforts in teaching children of the Pee Dee. After all, it takes someone truly special to choose the field of education as their career. Micaela shares, “I have always considered myself a teacher. When I was growing up, friends would come over and we would play school together. It was something that I always had my heart set on.” Once she graduated high school, Micaela knew what she wanted to be when it was time to enter the real world. “My choice [to teach] was influenced by multiple teachers that demonstrated the qualities of a good teacher. I remember the impact that they had on me, and it encouraged me to pour this same feeling into others. I have always loved children and working with them, whether it was babysitting or volunteering at children's church.” She received her undergrad in Early Childhood Education from Francis Marion University, a school known for creating impactful teachers. “My professors from Francis Marion are still a part of my life today. They continue to check in and meet my students each year. They are great cheerleaders, as well as friends.” Her studies continued to Coastal Carolina, where she received her master’s in Instructional Technology. “Throughout college, I was exposed to multiple age groups in preschool by working at Ebenezer Weekday Ministries. This job not only supported a college student, but it also taught me a few survival tools for the future.” Currently, Micaela teaches at McLaurin Elementary School as a

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Montessori teacher for four and five-year-olds. Before becoming Montessori certified, however, she taught in a traditional kindergarten classroom. It was here where Micaela created the foundation for her career in education. Having experience in both a traditional and Montessori classroom, Micaela has seen the difference between the two settings. She explains, “A Montessori classroom is focused on self-discovery and independent learning. The transition was, of course, difficult for a teacher that is used to control. This classroom environment allows students to work at their own pace and grow from there. Each student is met where they are to make learning possible.” While the environment was certainly different from what she was used to, the goal was the same – to help each child succeed and understand that they matter in this world. She admits, “I feel as if the classroom is my mission field. Being at a public school, I pray that my students can see God through the love that I pour into them. Not every student of mine comes from a great home with lots of love. Therefore, grace is something that I try to extend to each of them.” Teaching certainly isn’t for the faint of heart. Every day brings challenges of its own. “It comes with the job. One of the biggest challenges is knowing what some of my students go through when they leave school. Teachers carry that burden for them. Our hands are tied on what we are allowed to do. I worry about them and just want to bring them all home.”

Truly caring about her students, Micaela pays attention to the things they care about and take interest in. Most recently, it has been a passion that she too shares – photography. “I would love to have a photography club. When kids see photos of themselves around the classroom, it helps them feel at home. I would love to get a Polaroid camera and take photos of the kids throughout the year. I picture twinkly lights on a wire where the students can go and clip the pictures that they take onto the line. This allows other students and classroom visitors to see our creativity and see the fun that we are having.” For Micaela, no dream is too big when it comes to making her students happy. While she is creating her own legacy in the world of education, Micaela is quick to show her appreciation to those who have paved the way for her and those who have helped her on tougher days. “Education is a hard field to walk into. Thankfully, I have a tribe of women that I am blessed to have support me and encourage me when the days are long. Mrs. Huffman was one of the women who took me under her wing and made sure that I was confident in my choices. She was a mentor, a shoulder to cry on, and a role model who poured into me, even when I didn't ask for it.” If you’re considering a career in teaching, Micaela shares this piece of advice with you: “Find that person. Your first year of teaching is more than likely going to be tough and you are going to want to quit multiple times. However, ignore the negative talk and listen to the positive voices that you hear instead.” Luckily for her students, they have a positive voice in their lives – something children in this world need today more than ever. Someone who is more than just a teacher, who is also a mentor and dependable source of support and encouragement. And she goes by the name Mrs. Cox.

“I feel as if the classroom is my mission field. Being at a public school, I pray that my students can see God through the love that I pour into them..." McLaurin Elementary, 4yo and 5yo Montessori

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Marlin Ketter States, districts, and communities are starting to really see the importance of music and music advocacy. Music is a crucial component of a well-rounded education for students. According to Marlin Ketter, Director of Bands for Hartsville Middle School and Assistant Director of Bands at Hartsville High School, learning to play an instrument and being a part of a successful school band instills discipline, cooperation, self-esteem, creativity, critical thinking, leadership, and personal responsibility in students. Mr. Ketter inspires students to do things they never thought they could do. He fully invests in their future, leading them to become better individuals with creative minds and the desire to make a difference in the world. Marlin is graduate of Coker College and also holds a master’s degree in music education from North Greenville University. The fine art of music runs through his family. Marlin’s father was a trumpet player, his mother was a participant in the color guard, and his sister played flute and piccolo. “My family was very encouraging when I made the decision to pursue a teaching degree and I never looked back,” says Marlin. “My family believes that with God on your side, there is no obstacle that cannot be achieved. This type of support has guided me through some of the most difficult challenges, as well as some the most rewarding successes.” 30

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"When a student performs in an honor band clinic or gets recognize in front of their peers, there is a sense of moral success in me that keeps striving to be a better and more focused educator,” states Marlin. Director of Bands, Hartsville Middle School Assisant Director of Bands, Hartsville High School

The constant support from the education department at Coker College was also influential in Marlin pursuing education. Marlin shares, “Coker is one of the best colleges for education in the southeast. Their constant stride to make sure that every student is prepared and career ready is nothing short of outstanding. They are encouraging in the fact that they do not provide all of the answers but provide the necessary resources and processes in finding the correct answers.” While at Coker, Marlin became a proud member of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) and the National Association of Teaching and Singers (NATS) among many other organizations. Additionally, he was inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa, and served as an adjudicator for district, all county, and region events. He also had the opportunity to complete an honors project called, “Reaching Children through Music: A Middle School Choral Clinic,” designed to reach middle school children through music one step at a time. During his tenure at North Greenville University, Marlin wrote a thesis focusing on the recruitment and retention in urban middle schools. Upon completing his education, Marlin has had the opportunity to teach at numerous schools within the area. Currently, Marlin holds the role as Director of Bands for Hartsville Middle School in addition to the Assistant Director of Bands at Hartsville High School. When it comes to his yearly schedule, there is no rest for the weary! Just to give a brief overview, band camp begins late summer. The fall is full of football games and marching band competitions, and the winter is comprised of concert and jazz band, winter ensemble, and community parades. The start of a new year is full of region band and all-state auditions. All-state clinics and concert festivals are held in the spring, then ArtSummer is in the early summer.

Many people do not recognize the behind-thescenes work it takes to run a band program, especially a successful one. “When a student performs in an honor band clinic or gets recognize in front of their peers, there is a sense of moral success in me that keeps striving to be a better and more focused educator,” states Marlin. “I do not claim accomplishments, rather long-term success that people can distinguish that when they hear Hartsville Middle School name associated with Mr. Ketter, they know both identities are successful in their own rights.” This summer Marlin was the director the ArtSummer program for Darlington County School District, a three-week course where students are exposed to and participate in activities in multiple arts disciplines. This year, they had the opportunity to serve nearly 100 students in the areas of Dance, Instrumental Music, Media Arts, Theater, Visual Arts 2D & 3D, and Vocal Music. Great teachers like Marlin who give it their all yearround are remembered not for the knowledge they impart, but for the way they encourage and lift their students’ achievement, not just in a subject, but also in the important skills of living a fulfilling life. “When each child walks into my classroom, I want everyone to feel we can achieve anything possible. Whether it is learning the correct posture, learning a new note, or learning how to tie shoes, the learning possibilities are endless on both sides of the spectrum. I want them to know that…if better is possible, than good is not enough! We must strive to be excellent at everything we do. With education, the power of one will not get the job done: but by providing, protecting, and pursing, my students will reach new heights in becoming life-long learners and career ready.” August 2019

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WHAT'S HAPPENING IN

AUGUST

sunday

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1 Florence RedWolves Game Sparrow Stadium Dylan Sneed Hoof & Hound, Hartsville

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Fluid Acrylic Art Series Artbug Studio, Hartsville

Beginners Yoga Class Seminar Brewing, Florence

Think & Ramen Trivia Local Motive (every Mon.)

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Willie Nelson & Family and Alison Krauss Florence Center

Southeast Wedding and Event Expo The R.O.B., Lake City

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National Soft Ice Cream Day

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National Banana Split Day 32

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Small Business Professionals Roundtable Hartsville Chamber

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National Fajita Day

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The Continuum Grand Opening Lake City

National Dog Day

National Bacon Lover's Day

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Steve Earle & The Dukes Francis Marion Performing Arts Center

Hartsville Chamber Connections at Breakfast Wine Down Wednesday Lake City Visitors Center

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National Creamsicle Day

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Marion Chamber Golf Tournament Dusty Hills Country Club

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Karaoke Local Motive, Florence

Free Medical Clinic of Darlington

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Ladies Day Blue Line Shooting Center, Florence

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California Wine Sale Florence Country Club

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Car Hauler Parade & Fest Florence Center Darlington Town Square


Put this on your calendar! friday

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saturday

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Forget Me Not 5K Color Run SMIT, Florence Grateful Dog Benefit Rally Black Jack Harley, Florence Fiesta Friday Lake City

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Screen on the Green Burry Park, Hartsville

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Films at the Farm Moore Farms, Lake City

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Hip Hop Legends Tour Florence Center

17 Doll & Toy Show SiMT Building

HYP Doggie Dash 5k YMCA of Hartsville National Roller Coaster Day

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Garden Lecture Series Moore Farms, Lake City

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Comedy Night Florence Little Theatre National Night Out Burry Park

National Sponge Cake Day

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Night of Hope Hartsville Country Club

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Florence After 5 Downtown Florence Bringing Downtown Alive! Concert Liberty Lane, Darlington

NASCAR's XFINITY Series Darlington Raceway

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SPECIAL FEATURE

TAKE TIME TO

Meet The

TEACHERS

Teachers in our community do not receive enough praise. They spend countless hours, inside and outside of the classroom, teaching our children not only educational practices but the fundamentals of life as well. Since we are all gearing up for another school year, we thought we'd help shine some light on a few of these wonderful educational influencers. From teachers to principals to superintendents, their guidance is influential in the lives of our children. Follow the next few pages to learn some interesting facts about who's hanging out with our children on a daily basis!

WESTON NUNN

AP European History Teacher, Trinity-Byrnes Collegiate School What are some traditions you have for the first day of school? On the first day of school I like to really dress up. During the year I wear a shirt and tie every day, but I really like to set a special tone on day one. So I make sure that I have a fresh hair cut, that my shoes are polished, and that I accessorize a blazer or suit jacket with a pocket square or lapel rose to really make an impact. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? My students are surprised that I know more about pop culture than they think I do, and that I'm not just a nerd who listens to Handel, Mozart, or Stravinsky. For example, recently while conducting a summer college essay writing workshop, I gave my students a choice of background music: classical, jazz, or German death metal. They chose the latter, and when I immediately told them the artist we'd be listening to and then pulled the music up on YouTube, they were stunned (and maybe a little afraid).

SUSANNE ELVINGTON

Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Marion County School District Who inspired you to be a teacher? As a little girl, I always dreamed of being a teacher, just like my mom and my first grade teacher, Mrs. Ellen Davis. They both fostered within me the desire to learn and explore new things. Both of these ladies have helped me become the teacher that I am today.

What is the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job, is watching my first graders grow into strategic, enthusiastic, and engaged readers and writers. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? 36 years ago I was a first grader just like them, and attended the same school that they attend now, Easterling Primary School. 34

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BRITTANY CURTIS

Grades 1-5, Special Education, Thornwell School for the Arts, Hartsville

What are some traditions you have for the first day of school? I always like to start the year with a project that signifies we're all a team. Sometimes we make a puzzle or do a group goal setting activity. It's fun getting to know them and help them get to know each other. How do you spend your summer breaks? I spend summer break traveling with my family. I love having my daughter home and actually getting things done around the house that I never get time for otherwise! And of course, I plan for the new school year! What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I was in the Young Singers of Darlington and we were invited to sing at Disney World. When we were there I came down with the chicken pox and had be flown back home by myself.

SONYA GRAVES

Principal, Lucy T. Davis Elementary School, Florence

What inspired you to become a teacher, prior to being a principal? I had a wonderful fifth grade teacher who pushed me beyond my limits! I also participated in the Teacher Cadet program when I was in high school. This experience confirmed my passion for witnessing academic, social and emotional growth for all students! What advice do you have for new teachers? Building relationships is key! Students will work harder for you if they trust you and feel loved. Also, always remember "why" you chose this profession! What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I enjoy writing poetry in my free time! I actually had a poem published years ago!

DANIELLE REAMES

3k-5k, Speech Language Therapy, Southside Early Childhood Center, Hartsville

What advice do you have for new teachers? First year is tough--But so are you! Take chances and give it your all! Lastly, relax and make it fun. What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? I love a good 5 a.m. workout to jump start my day and I enjoy playing golf. What are you most looking forward to this school year? Seeing the growth in my little learners. Helping a child to communicate whether it be verbally, through signs, pictures, or using a communication device is the greatest feeling in the world! Can’t wait to see all of my sweet friends and start working on mastering their speech and language goals! TURN THE PAGE FOR MORE TEACHER MEETINGS.


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SPECIAL FEATURE

MANDY HICKS

Early Childhood Development, Delmae Heights Elementary What inspired you to become a teacher? My fifth grade teacher, Mrs. Simmons, made a positive impact on my life. She not only was a great teacher academically, she personally invested in me and other students. I knew I wanted to have the same effect on others.  What is the most challenging part of your job? The most challenging part of my job is not being able to change circumstances for students. It is very difficult watching children not get the support they need.   What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you? My students would be surprised to know that I enjoy deer hunting. My dad took me out for my first dog drive a couple years ago with Sportsman Hunting Club and I loved it.

KANDACE BETHEA

Superintendent, Marion County School District As Superintendent, what is your main focus at the job? As superintendent, my main focus is to ensure that every child is exposed to high quality teaching and learning experiences as we strive to prepare them to become college, career and citizenship ready. What is the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job is when we, as educators,  see the impact of our meaningful work being evidenced through students' academic and personal successes! What advice do you have for new teachers? My advice for new teachers can be communicated using 3-Ps: Have PASSION for your work; Be PURPOSEFUL in building positive relationships with students; and PLAN for success!

NICOLE SNIPES

3rd Grade Teacher, Carver Elementary Magnet School, Florence What inspired you to become a teacher? I had two teachers who inspired me to become a teacher! My third grade teacher, Mrs. Bateman and my middle school band director, Mr. Jones. What are some traditions you have for the first day of school? I always spend the first day getting to know my students and working on building my classroom community! A good strong classroom community is the key for a successful year! How do you spend your summer breaks? I spend my summer breaks with my son, Joseph and daughter, Ella! We enjoy camping in our camper!

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RYAN MILLING

Assistant Principal, Lake City High School What is the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job is watching students gain skills that will allow them to be successful in college or the world of work. At the high school level that is when a student earns a career certification and/or applies that to a job that they will have once leaving high school. At the high school level it's also when high schoolers graduate and move on to the next chapter of their lives and/or put in the hard work to pass a grade or overcome some of life's challenges.  I would say that the last sentence applies to my work with elementary students also.  What advice do you have for new teachers? Always remember why you decided to get into the profession. A lot of times our efforts will have lasting impacts and those impacts may not be seen until years down the road.  New teachers should find mentors immediately, a good group of individuals to plan with and to bounce ideas off of and to never stop believing in themselves and to not be afraid to grow.    What is one thing your students would be surprised to know about you?  What they are most surprised about is that I am a fraternal twin.  On another note I often share my failures with my students. I want them to learn resilience and see it in real people. They still get excited when they see me in the grocery store.   What inspired you to become a teacher?  I started out wanting to go into business or engineering but something was always calling me to purpose. I sought out mentors and people that I trusted for feedback. Most of those people that I relied on were educators themselves. So I began my journey on inquiry into field like social work and criminal justice but decided that education was the best fit. 

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SPECIAL FEATURE

After 41 years, Claire has hung up her gym shorts and whistle at All Saints’ Episcopal Day School in Florence to experience retirement. Her love and admiration for the students, administration, and school made her reluctant to leave, even after so many years. We set down with Claire to chat about her career at All Saints’ and her plans for retirement.

Q&A with Retired PE Teacher at All Saints’,

Claire Copeland After 41 successful years, let’s go back to the beginning. What inspired you to become an educator? “I was blessed with wonderful teachers; particularly my high school physical education teacher and an English teacher. They were what a teacher is supposed to be - dedicated to creating a learning environment that made students feel safe and loved at the same time.”

What has been the most rewarding part of your career with All Saints’? “Being the coach for grades K3 through sixth I’ve been able to watch the children grow and improve in all phases of athletics. Seeing how the children go from being a shy, unsure three-year-old to a confident sixth-grader has been a treat!”

What were some of the most challenging parts of your All Saints’ career? “There were no challenges too large that I didn’t enjoy taking part in! If I have to 40

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pick something it would be teaching K3 students. Like all three-year-olds, keeping them engaged for 30 minutes can be challenging! However, they always loved everything I introduced and I always felt like they loved me unconditionally!”

All Saints’ appreciation to you for the time you dedicated to the school was shown when they named the gym in your honor. Tell us how it felt to receive such an honor? “I was humbled and surprised to have the gym named Copeland Court. It was certainly one of the greatest moments of my career.”

Tell us about retirement, what plans do you have? “Retirement still doesn’t seem real! I’m sure it will hit me when August rolls around and I don’t have anywhere to be at any specific time. As of right now, retirement means sleeping in and spending more time with family and friends. I’m looking forward to it!”

photography by Fred Salley


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HEALTH + BEAUTY

August 4-10, 2019

National Health Center Week story by Donna Tracy, Communication Coordinator, HopeHealth Every August, HopeHealth joins a nationwide campaign to bring awareness to the nearly 1,400 health centers that are serving the health needs of underserved communities across the US. This year, HopeHealth, along with the National Association of Community Health Centers and the Health Center Advocacy Network, celebrates the ways that health centers are Rooted in Communities. As part of the celebrations, HopeHealth invites you to take part in Advocacy Wednesday by visiting one of our Florence, Clarendon, or Williamsburg County locations on Aug. 7. Come discover how HopeHealth is rooted in your community and sign up to be an advocate for centers across the nation. Advocacy Wednesday is a signature advocacy event that exists to encourage staff, patients, and the community to show support for HopeHealth and other health centers by signing up to be a health center advocate.

For more on the benefits of community health centers, visit the National Association of Community Health Centers at nachc.org or the SC Primary Health Care Association at scphca.org. 42

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How “rooted in community” are community health centers? The answer is, deeply. In 2017 alone, community health centers brought essential, quality health care to more than 28 million people in areas where it may otherwise not exist and bring innovative solutions to the most pressing community health care issues. At HopeHealth, the Population Health department continuously studies the behavioral and environmental elements that impact our communities and helps determine the specific needs in our areas. For example, HopeHealth has: • Expanded the Diabetes and Nutrition Institute telehealth services so patients in Greeleyville, Kingstree, and Manning can attend Florence diabetes prevention and management programs from their local HopeHealth office. The Pee Dee area has some of the highest incidence rates for diabetes in the nation and two-thirds of

all adults in South Carolina are considered overweight or obese, according to the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control. • Adding integrated pain management, rheumatology, chiropractic, and behavioral health services to help better serve our communities and address the ongoing opioid crisis. • Integrating behavioral health services with primary health care to address the behavioral health needs in our areas and reduce the stigma of seeking care. • Opened facilities in communities like Greeleyville, S.C., where HopeHealth provided care for nearly 4,000 people in the surrounding area last year. In the three counties HopeHealth serves as a community health center, more than 42,000 of your coworkers, family members, friends, and acquaintances have chosen to make HopeHealth their medical home. “The advantages of a primary care home are much like playing football in your home stadium. You get to know your provider and your care team, and, more importantly, your providers get to know you and your health history,” said Dr. Edward Behling, HopeHealth chief medical officer. “Continuous care at a primary care home builds a long-term relationship between you and your provider that can help reveal ongoing health issues that might otherwise go unrecognized at a single doctor’s office visit. Such relationships lead to better communications and disease management, less risk of complications, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer visits to an emergency department.” The roots of a community health center also blossom beyond the care individuals receive for their health. According to NACHC, CHCs created more than $54.6 billion in total


economic activity in 2017 alone. In South Carolina, 23 health centers generated $5.13 for every dollar invested in health care programs and had a $855 million economic impact that included more than 3,400 full time jobs at the centers and an additional 3,700 indirect jobs in their communities. In the Pee Dee, HopeHealth had a $95.3 million total economic impact in 2017 that included nearly $44 million in community spending. The health center employees are also rooted in your community. They are the people who you sit next to at your daughter’s basketball game, see grabbing lunch at the local barbecue joint, getting their hair cut at the main street barber shop, or buying gas at the corner station. They are your community. While National Health Center Week provides a time to focus on those ways we are rooted in our community, advocating for health centers is a year-round effort. Those unable to visit HopeHealth during Advocacy Wednesday can still show their support by signing up as an advocate at hcadvocacy.org. Periodically, advocates are asked to help reach out to legislative representatives regarding bills and initiatives that impact our centers and, in turn, our communities. Ways you can support your community health center include: • Making a community health center your health care home • If you are a health center patient, using your center’s 340b pharmacies partners when filling prescriptions. HopeHealth’s pharmacy partners can be found on our website at hope-health.org/ pharmacy, or listed in any patient room • Donating to your area community health center • Advocating for community health centers Currently, advocates are asked to helped communicate the importance of keeping health centers funded beyond the Sept. 30, 2019, funding cliff. HopeHealth’s business model includes a small portion of federal dollars that help support programs and services for patients who face barriers in accessing quality and consistent health care. While health centers have enjoyed bi-partisan support for their more than 50 years, funding is set to expire Sept. 30. Join us on Advocacy Wednesday or visit hcadvocacy.org to sign up as an advocate to support community health centers.

360 NORTH IRBY ST. FLORENCE 843.667.9414 | HOPE-HEALTH.ORG August 2019

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AROUND TOWN: COCKTAILS + CUISINE

Cocktails + Cuisine

On Friday, June 28th, Visit Lake City SC presented its inaugural Cocktails & Cuisine. The event was held at The Stables at The Inn at the Crossroads in Lake City. The evening began with a cocktail hour featuring specialty drinks crafted by one of Charleston’s newest hot spots, Bourbon N’ Bubbles. The three course plus dessert menu consisted of West Indies Crab Salad, Duck Confit, Braised Pork Cheeks and Chocolate Panna Cotta. The Inn at the Crossroads Executive Chef, Sherif Elkyhati, along with Lowcountry culinary legend Michelle Weaver of Charleston Grill concocted the multi-course meal that wowed party goers. Stay up to date at www.visitlakecitysc.com for more upcoming events! photography provided by Bradley Lail - Crowdedbox Digital

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HEALTH + BEAUTY

Have A

Nut-Free School Year!

Over the last several years, peanut allergies have become a hot topic. Many of our local schools and early childhood development facilities are “nut-free.” This means the once lunchbox staple of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches can no longer be found amongst cafeteria tables, nor any other area of school. This is because peanuts can cause a life-threatening reaction in some people. The most severe allergic reaction to peanuts is anaphylaxis, when the whole-body responds to the allergen. There are several misconceptions about peanut allergies. The biggest being that a peanut is typically clumped with tree nuts. A peanut is not a tree nut, it is a legume (belonging to the same family as soybeans, peas and lentils). Therefore tree nuts are safe for school. Here are some kid-approved peanut butter alternatives to make your kid and his school happy!

KID-APPROVED PEANUT BUTTER ALTERNATIVES

1 Wowbutter 2 Barney Butter Almond Butter Honey + Flax 3 Kween Granola Butter 4 Artisana Organics Pecan Butter 5 Justin’s Chocolate Hazelnut Butter

This August, as we get comfortable in our new school groove, let’s be aware of what we send our kids to school with and make sure it’s contents are peanut free! August 2019

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HEALTH + BEAUTY

ESSENTIAL OILS for the School Year story by Kat Barnette, Young Living Consultant

There are a couple of easy ways to incorporate using oils at school. Some schools do allow teachers to diffuse oils in their classrooms. Others have put them on cloths and placed them on the children's desks. Make sure to check with your school to see what their rules are. For individual children, you can use leather jewelry and apply the oils straight to the leather. Anytime the child wants to smell it, they can! It’s like wearing a perfume, but way safer and can help them focus, destress, relax..the options are endless! Another great option is to use a diffuser locket necklace and place a piece of leather inside. Add a few drops to the piece of leather and wear all day. 

LAVENDER This is great support for sleep the night before school! If there are butterflies for your kiddos, or if they are restless, especially before bed, diffusing and applying to the feet is a great option to help them get the sleep they need! Benefits of lavender oil: • Roll onto feet after school for calming • Roll onto the chest and diffuse when pollen count is high and you’re battling allergens • Use generously on the skin after touching something hot or after a day in the sunshine • Use generously on bug bites or itchy skin • Roll onto the back and drop into bath water when experiencing constipation

Want to know more about oils for back-to-school? Visit www.myyl.com/katbarnette

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LEMON This is a “cleansing” or “clearing” oil which can be helpful for the respiratory but also for the emotions. Roll this one onto the feet and diffuse for nervousness. Benefits of lemon oil: • Use to remove gum or sticky residue - my fav is to remove paint after those crafty days • Add to a blend with Lavender when pollen count is high and battling allergens • Add onto the chest and diffuse during the winter months to support the respiratory system

THIEVES This is the oil for a big ‘ol immunity support! You can use this proactively before you start the school day every day. It makes the BIGGEST difference.

PANAWAY This is a great oil for all the boo-boos and growing pains. Those little legs have lots of growing to do! When they are experiencing growing pains, this is one to grab!! Who has little ones who wake up at night from growing pains?


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NEWSWORTHY

Something to Celebrate... DR. LESLEY KIRBY, AUD GETS NOMINATED TO PRESTIGIOUS BOARD

Dr. Lesley Kirby, AuD has been invited to participate on the prestigious National Advisory Council (NAC) for the world-renown hearing aid manufacturer, Beltone. She is one of 8 members nationwide chosen to help lead, direct and give advice to the National and International corporate leadership at Beltone, based just outside of Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Kirby is the private-practice owner of the premiere hearing healthcare facility in the Pee Dee Region, Lifetime Hearing Services, with 4 locations including Florence, Hartsville, Cheraw, and Camden. Lifetime Hearing is the only dispenser of Beltone hearing instruments within a 10 county region; the only regional Cochlear Implant and BAHA (for single sided hearing losses) location, and the only location in the region to provide FDA approved Levo Tinnitus Treatment Therapy. Just last year her practice was awarded the “Best Office in the Southeast” award by Beltone. Next year, Lifetime Hearing Services will be celebrating their 20th anniversary assisting those in the Pee Dee with hearing and communication difficulties.

THE HANNAH SKIPPER FOUNDATION HELPS GET A SHELTER FOR THE PRAYER GARDEN A ribbon cutting ceremony was held on June 25 to reveal the Shelter at the Prayer Garden of the Courtney McGinnis Community Shelter. The Hannah Skipper Foundation would like to thank the community for their support in helping make it happen! This new pavilion along with it’s attractive new landscape and benches will allow for outdoor events and a nice space for residents to sit quietly and reflect, out of the weather. The foundation would especially like to thank Tim and Lisa Stephens of East Coast TVM for their gracious contribution to this project, Taylor Garden & Gift Shop for the landscape design, and Central United Methodist for the landscape labor & beautiful benches as well as House of Hope for allowing this opportunity.

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ECHOLS BECOMES RILEY DIVERSITY FELLOW

Les Echols of the Greater Florence Chamber of Commerce joined thirtynine leaders from the Midlands and surrounding area in completing the Riley Institute at Furman’s Diversity Leaders Initiative (DLI) in June 2019. Over the past five months, participants examined sensitive issues related to diversity and inclusion, explored “blind spots” and discussed how to suspend assumptions. Each class is expertly facilitated by Juan Johnson, an independent consultant and former Coca-Cola vice president. As part of the program, participants worked in small, cross-sector groups to respond to real issues and opportunities in their communities through service projects. Les’ group, College Bound Kids, created a project that focuses on increasing education for parents and students about 529 college savings plans and developing resources to assist them which will give more students the opportunity to attend college. DLI class members are identified through a rigorous process including a nomination, application, and interview. Individuals are selected to join the class based on their capacity to impact their organizations and communities. In addition to the Midlands, DLI classes are selected annually in the Upstate and Lowcountry. Each class is crafted to reflect the diverse demographics in South Carolina. DLI graduates become Riley Fellows, members of a powerful, cross-sector, statewide leadership network that includes CEOs of corporations, mayors, city and county council members, legislators, school superintendents, pastors and rabbis, non-profit heads, chamber of commerce directors and community leaders. The full roster of Riley Fellows is available online at riley.furman.edu.

If you are celebrating a positive achievement or have been awarded for a newsworthy accomplishment, email Heather Page at heather@vipmagsc.com.


LIFESTYLE

Streaming platforms offer thousands of movies and show options and sometimes it can be tough to know what to choose. Looking for recommendations? You no longer have to #askfacebook because we’re here to help!

GRAND HOTEL

Available on ABC & Hulu Mexican-American actress-producer-director and all-around Renaissance woman Eva Longoria created an English-language adaptation of Spain’s popular drama series, Gran Hotel. Considered the Downton Abbey of Spain, audiences waited with bated breath for news of the US remake titled Grand Hotel. Grand Hotel is full of intersecting storylines, lots of twists and turns, and no one being who they seem to be! Provocative drama takes place at the last family-owned hotel in multicultural Miami Beach. In the first few minutes, a terrible storm hits Miami, sending the staff and guests at the fabulous Riviera Hotel scurrying for cover; it's also the perfect cover for a crime when a young staffer goes missing under sketchy circumstances. Wealthy and beautiful guests bask in luxury, but scandals, escalating debt and explosive secrets hide beneath the pictureperfect exterior.

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HERE’S TO A

Happy New School Year story by Allie Roark

If you are a teacher like me, you have probably been spending your last several weeks of summer planning for a new school year by spending hours on Pinterest, working in your classroom, and working on new lesson plans. I don’t know about you, but this summer flew by. I am not ready to set my 4:30 a.m. alarm clock again. This feeling can be quite similar to the "Sunday scary's" except a little more intense. In the past, I spent the majority of my time worrying about my classroom being ready when I wasn’t even concerned about being mentally ready. What good will a pretty classroom do if there is an unorganized or insane teacher in charge of it? I have decided to begin a fresh, new school year with a few new strategies to help make the Sundays less scary, the school days more purposeful, and my mind less crowded. These tips can easily be modified to help any working gal in their profession. So if you’re not a teacher, you’re still welcome to take and implement what sounds good to you.

Have a positive mindset. Being a teacher is hard. We are expected to meet a lot of demands every minute, hour, day, and week. Most of the time it seems expected, and we don’t feel appreciated. It can leave you feeling drained and empty. Friend, it’s impossible to pour from a cup that’s empty. Fill your cup up. Be intentional with your “me time." Whether it’s taking bubble baths, reading for pleasure, listening to worship music, journaling, or exercising - find the time to do it. I choose to set an alarm at 4:30 a.m. to read my bible and go to the gym. It’s time that we stop feeling guilty for living our lives outside of work. Set a time to stop answering emails. In fact, don’t even check them. They will be there in the morning. You’ve had a long day, and you deserve some downtime with yourself and your family. It’s time to turn the teacher off and be you again. Another way to keep a positive mindset is to start each day with a grateful heart. Write out ten things that you are grateful for each morning. You are cheating if you are constantly using “your house, car, job, husband, and kids” as your answers. What little things made you happy the day before? This tip seems easy, but it does force us to think about what’s going right in our lives instead of what’s going wrong. I have also found it helpful to find a positive teacher bestie. It’s inevitable to not complain, but find someone that can remind you of the happy during the disappointments. Not only can we learn from each other, but we can cheer each other on in the hallways. We never get tired of compliments or appreciation. It isn't a contest after all.

Create a routine. Raise your hand if you hate mornings (raises hand). The first 30 minutes of every day are crucial. Do you have a routine for when the students enter the room? Are they constantly coming up to your desk to ask you something? Are you having to ask them for their homework every morning? Did that one student forget to make his lunch choice again? These things seem minimal, but when they all happen at once, you find yourself playing catch up for the next 54

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hour. Plan out your procedures for how you want things done and use the first two weeks to make sure your students follow through with it. Students should walk in the room knowing exactly what they need to be doing. While they are doing their assigned work, go ahead and answer those emails, send in the lunch count and attendance, take a sip of your coffee, and take a deep breath.

Be organized. Some would probably say that I take this to the extreme, but to each its own, right? I wouldn’t say that I am OCD in all areas of life, but my workspace is something that I like to feel in control of. Misplacing something or having to stop a lesson to look for something seriously can start a morning off on a stressful foot. Why? Well, kids. As soon as you lose their attention, it’s a tough job getting them back on track. I invested in the cheap bins from Target or Walmart that usually come in a pack of five for $5 and seriously organize it all. I stick on cute labels to help me locate the bin in a quick manner, and it has been a game-changer. Are you a teacher with stacks of papers on your desk?

Be a happy planner. If you read the article last month, you will see this same tip. That’s how much I believe in it. You’ve got to plan. Based on my enneagram number, I am the achiever. Planning is my thing. I don’t know why, but I get so excited to check off the tasks on the to-do list or mark something as “done” in my planner. It’s rare for teachers to leave by three in the afternoon, or leave without any papers to grade or lessons to plan. This is something that I am going to take very seriously this year. Each Sunday, I plan to spend maybe 30 to 45 minutes planning out each upcoming week. During the week, I seem to forget to be intentional and send home notes, make positive phone calls home, check my email, or schedule a meeting with a parent. I am probably one of the worst to check my email and respond right away. Even worse than I am at texting, and that’s pretty bad. If your schedule rarely stays the same week to week, you can adjust and plan accordingly. Every evening shouldn’t be spent marking papers, looking for lessons on Teachers Pay Teachers, or answering emails. Assign days for those tasks and stick to it. This action plan will work if you write it out. August doesn’t have to be scary. We love our jobs. Just remember a few months in how important YOU are. We do our best when our cup is full, so let’s be sure to keep it full for the next school year. August 2019

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PATRICIA SINGLETON PARR story by Kayla Jebaily-Adams / photos by Erin Daniel

“Service is the rent we pay for the privilege of living on this earth” – Shirley Chisholm, U.S. Congresswoman and Delta Sigma Theta Inc. Sorority Sister

Patricia "Pat" Singleton Parr considers service to be a way of life. A board member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee since 2016 and a longtime donor, she has engulfed herself in helping children. Not only is she Secretary of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area’s board, she is also Chair of the Boys & Girls Club’s Champions for Youth Event, the lead for the Boys & Girls Club board annual meeting, the coordinator for the Florence Boys & Girls Club Teen Honor Roll Dinner, and facilitates the Florence Boys & Girls Club’s cooking class. She enjoys organizing events and taking part in hands on activities with the members. The cooking class she holds for members takes place every week during the school year. Members learn how to cook and bake a variety of dishes, including, mini-pizzas, mini-corndogs, apple pie, breakfast food, smoothies, cupcakes, and holiday-themed foods to name a few. Ms. Parr also teaches them about choosing healthy food options and the benefits to having a well-rounded diet. Club members enjoy being around Ms. Parr’s warm, compassionate demeanor, and her cooking class is always well attended. Ms. Parr chose to work with the Boys & Girls Club after she retired as an assistant solicitor for the Twelfth Judicial Circuit Office of Solicitor. She looked for places 56

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where there was the greatest need in the community, and she could be involved in hands-on work. She had always been interested in working with the Boys & Girls Club, as she was a big supporter of the work and mission of the organization. When she saw an opportunity to help children who need direction, she took it, accepting the role of a board member. Since then, along with conducting the cooking class, she has been instrumental in the organization of multiple events, and even brought back the Teen Honor Roll Dinner at the Florence BGC, where teen honor roll students are recognized for their academic achievements at a dinner with board members. The organization considers themselves lucky to have such a strong advocate for children on their side. Her compassion, intelligence, and tenacity are strong qualities that shine through in her work with the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Pee Dee Area. Ms. Parr believes it is important for African American children to see positive African American adults as role models. She is a strong role model for members at the Club, particularly young girls who attend her cooking classes. Pat Parr, has been a fierce advocate for children and her community for many years. Since moving to Florence from Columbia in 1984 following her graduation from law school at the University of South Carolina, she has volunteered with multiple organizations providing services to children, including Jack and Jill of America Incorporated, Pee Dee Coalition against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault, Junior League of Florence, and Florence School District One. Her sorority, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., has taken on service projects to help the community, particularly children, as well. She was also an active “room mom” for her children’s classes at All Saints Episcopal Day School and Florence District 1 Schools as well as serving as APT officers and School Improvement Councils. She hopes to continue serving her community in different capacities. As Ms. Parr told her children as they were growing up, “To whom much is given, much is expected.” She believes God put her on Earth for a reason. Even through great trials in life, such as major illnesses, her dedication to service and her life’s purpose has not waivered. She will continue to make a difference in her community for the better. The Pee Dee Area is lucky to have a service-minded individual like Ms. Parr working to make life better for those who live here.

843-662-1142 • bgcpda.org August 2019

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LIFESTYLE

Build

YOUR TEAM

story by Rebecca Giese / photo by Jill Snyder, Mixed Metaphor Photography

The other day I was asked, "How do I do it all?" I guess referring to having a retail space, blogging, and design work. Well, the answer is I don't "do it all." And if I tried, I would have probably failed. My secret, which isn't much of a secret, is that I have an excellent team behind me, with my MVP player being my mom, Laura Giese. After years of struggling on my own. Whether studying for an exam or taking on a project a little too big, I learned the value of finding and working with a team. As important as it is to know your strength, it is even more important to know your weaknesses.

Rebecca & mom, Laura

The early successes of Southern'spirations (our retail shop & lifestyle brand) are all thanks to my mom. Not only does she help by upcycling furniture and creating our textile goods, but she is my sounding board, cheerleader and there through all the late nights and early mornings.

Everyone needs a Laura Giese on their team, the person that gets things done and asks the questions that make you think and makes you push the creative limits. Having someone that is so passionate and such a hard worker on the team makes me want to push harder, hit new goals, and grow as a business owner and a person. You can't find that type of drive or success without a team behind you. How do you find your team or let go enough to add a team member to your business, dreams, and passions? First, look internally, without being too hard on yourself, figure out your weaknesses and make it a goal to find someone that can fill those gaps. It might be a physical skill, knowledge or a personality trait. The most successful people are not necessarily the most talented or smartest, but what they are good at is creating an All-Star team. I just got lucky that I didn't have to look far and found my teammate close to home. 58

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Back to School Season! Tips for Studying For the New School Year • Learn your learning style. Auditory or Visual? Take an online quiz to learn which learning style you gravitate towards • Find a custom study technique to go with your learning style. • Pick the right location to study, maybe a coffee shop, library, or kitchen table. Find the best for you. • Find the best time of day you are alert to study. Are you a morning person or night owl? • Plan for studying in your day to day schedule, make studying a habit instead of cramming for an exam. • Youtube can be your best friend, find diagrams and graphics to explain everything from metabolism to fractions. • Ask for help. Everyone needs help at some point; ask a peer, professor, or parent. • Be confident. Once you have put in the time and effort, remember to trust your gut and that you got this! Currently residing in Hartsville, Rebecca Giese enjoys exploring the Pee Dee area, shopping local artisans, trying new restaurants, and finding inspiration from the history and culture surrounding her. When not out on an adventure, she’s telling stories on her blog, Southern’spirations.


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HOME

The Teacher’s Aid

recipe by Camille Styles

• • • • •

1 bottle of Brut Rose' bubbly Natural cane sugar cubes (1 per drink) 1 bottle of cranapple juice 1 can of ginger ale 1 red apple

Mix 1/3 Brute Rose', 1/3 ginger ale, and 1/3 cranapple juice in a champagne flute. Drop one sugar cube into the bottom of the glass and garnish with a slice of red apple. (Soak the apple slices in lemon or lime juice to keep them from browning.)

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