Issuu on Google+

HS Football: Nighthawks, Eagles soar into CIF Southern Section Championships, B-1

VALLEY

NEWS

A

Get the beSt in LOCAL news delivered to your mailbox every week!

Section

Call 951-763-5510 to subscribe OR Subscribe online at:

www.reedermedia.com/corp/subscribe/

Your Best Source for Local News & Advertising

Serving Temecula , Murrieta , L ake E lsinore , M enifee , Wildomar , H emet, San Jacinto and the surrounding communities December 2 – 8, 2016

www.myvalleynews.com

Local

Assemblywoman Melendez gives legislative update

Volume 16, Issue 49

Miss Marvelous Pageant gives local girls chance to shine

Paul Bandong PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez (R-67th District) was the keynote speaker at the Lake Elsinore Valley Economic Workforce Development Committee luncheon held Nov. 17 at the Diamond Club at Lake Elsinore Stadium. see page A-3

Local

Local Memorial Fund set for slain officer Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The family of slain Palm Springs Police Officer and Hemet native Lesley Zerebny sought to thank the people of the Hemet and San Jacinto Valley, The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department and the local police departments for the outpouring of help and sympathy they have given them since her death Oct. 8. see page A-7

Entertainment

Santa sightings increase throughout the valley Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The holidays are in full swing, and what better way to celebrate with the family than spending some quality time with Santa? This year there are multiple opportunities throughout the area to join the jolly old elf for some fun and games and a little bit of breakfast, or dinner.

VALLEY NEWS

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID HEMET, CA PERMIT #234

see page C-5

Julianna Phippen of Chaparral High School, receives the crown for Miss Enthusiastic during the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant at TVHS, Nov. 16. See more photos on page A-4. Shane Gibson photo

Menifee mayor resigns following failed re-election bid and censure Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Menifee’s embattled former Mayor Scott Mann announced his resignation from his post in an email sent to city hall employees the city announced last week. In the email, received late Friday, Nov. 18, Mann informed the city clerk that he was resigning as mayor as of Thursday, Nov. 17, for “personal reasons and to streamline the transition process to new leadership.” After receiving the notification while he was out of the office, the city manager informed the remaining council of the resignation by phone. Mayor Pro Tem Greg August will serve as the mayor until the incoming mayor-elect, Neil Winter, is sworn in with the new council Wednesday, Dec. 7. Mann, who recently lost his bid for re-election, was censured by the city council during a Nov. 2 meeting. The move came about following

see MANN, page A-5

Former Menifee Mayor Scott Mann talks with attending members of the community after a special city council meeting at Menifee City Hall to address Mann’s misuse of political campaign money for personal expenses, Oct. 19. Shane Gibson photo

Holiday fun abounds in Southwest Riverside County Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

From the time we are small children, Christmastime has always been a time of wonder and excitement. Virtually every city throughout Southwest Riverside County is celebrating the holiday season this year, and with a variety of events scheduled throughout the valley, even the stingiest Scrooge is sure to find something about which to smile. The following is a list of celebrations and events throughout the local area designed to bring the “ho, ho, ho” back into the holiday season. Murrieta Complete with a parade, home decorating competition and even a Festival of Lights, Murrieta shines Santa and Mrs. Santa Claus ride in a horse-drawn carriage during the 2015 Murrieta during the Hometown Holiday Parade held Nov. 28. Shane Gibson photo

see HOLIDAY, page A-7


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

A-2

LIMITED TIME

MOON VALLEY NURSERIES

With Coupon

VALID AT ALL MOON VALLEY NURSERIES & TREE LOTS SHOWN Not valid with other offers or discounts. Only 1 coupon per tree valid.

Reg. Individual Price per tree applies. In stock only. Not valid with package pricing. Excludes wholesale. Lowest price tree “free” See store for complete details.

AM AZ IN GLY FR ES H TR EE S! Ex pr es s sh ip pe d fr om ou r gr ow er s w it hi n 48 hr s of cu tt in g!

Olive trees just arrived from our farms

1000’s of Palms

• N O B L E F IR • D O U G L A S F IR O R E ! • G R A N D F IR & M

or Nig y a D p o h S

•Shade Trees •All Palm Varieties •Evergreen Trees •Citrus & Fruit Trees

•Large Hedge Material •Flowering Trees •WATERWISE Trees & Palms •Dwarf Palms & MORE!

LARGE PRIVACY HEDGES

Cal. Pepper

GIANT TREES!

ht

wn Tre o r G m r a F All

es!

See location for details and pricing

MURRIETA / TEMECULA

36705 Briggs Rd. - Murrieta, CA 92563

On Winchester (79) Just past French Valley Airport

6 - 8 Years Old!

3 - 5 Years Old!

3 HUGE!

3 SUPER

MORENO VALLEY

Trees or Palms Trees or Palms

Benton Rd

Auld Rd.

1399

499

Packages $

MURRIETA

SAN DIEGO / ESCONDIDO

CARLSBAD / OCEANSIDE

26334 Mesa Rock Rd. Escondido, CA 92026

1044 Carlsbad Village Dr. - Carlsbad 92008

I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd. Rd

Chino, Chino Hills, Rancho Cucomonga, Claremont, La Verne, Vellano & all nearby areas

GIANT TREE LOT!

Riverside, San Bernardino, Moreno Valley, Woodcrest, Loma Linda & all nearby areas

Call Debbie Ramirez at 909-325-4009 Call Anthony Gardner at 951-387-3072 Murrieta, Temecula, Canyon Lake, Winchester, Menifee, Lake Elsinore, Perris & all nearby areas

Call Dave Schneider at 951-331-7279

San Diego County, Rancho Santa Fe, La Jolla, Del Mar, Escondido, Poway & all nearby areas

Call Kraig Harrison at 760-291-8361

Vista

Dr.

AT OUR NURSERY

San Marcos

i dV

sba

rl Ca

e llag

TEMECULA Me Mt Springs Rd

(Just North of the French Valley Airport)

De

Call one of our design professionals today...

w

I-5 & Carlsbad Village Dr. - Northwest Corner

ado

Professionally Planted and Guaranteed!

n.

Professionally Planted and Guaranteed!

Now From WITH AD - Mix or Match

er

Packages $

Now From WITH AD - Mix or Match

HEMET

AT OUR NURSERY

ESCONDIDO

Reg. single price per tree applies. Not valid with other offers or discounts or on previous sales. Some restrictions may apply. Excludes packages or previous sales. Crane, if required is additional. Excludes blue select trees & carry out super buys

MURRIETA / TEMECULA

Mon - Sat: 7:30 - 5•Sundays: 9 - 5

951-616-1706

HEMET

MORENO VALLEY

Benton Rd

36705 Briggs Rd. - Murrieta, CA 92563

Auld Rd.

On Winchester (79) Just past French Valley Airport

MURRIETA / TEMECULA

CHINO / CHINO HILLS

ORANGE COUNTY

36705 Briggs Rd. - Murrieta, CA 92563

5211 Edison Ave, Chino, CA 91710

6500 Alton Parkway, Irvine, CA 92618

NORTH HOLLYWOOD

RIVERSIDE / SAN BERNARDINO

SAN DIEGO COUNTY

9501 Lincoln Ave. - Riverside, CA 92504

26334 Mesa Rock Rd. Escondio, CA 92026

951-616-1706 909-287-3378 714-908-4922 On Winchester (79) Just past French Valley Airport

FILLMORE / VENTURA CO.

SW Corner of Central & Edison

Exit Sand Canyon Ave.

805-521-4360 818-284-6894 951-817-7419 760-316-4000

3906 E. Telegraph Rd. - Fillmore, CA 93015 11745 Sherman Way, North Hollywood, 91605 HWY 126 & Torrey Rd. (across from AM-PM)

Jusw W. of Lankershim

SW Corner Van Buren & Lincoln Ave.

MURRIETA

I-15 Exit Deer Springs Rd.

CSLB 941369 C-27

Landscapers, Designers, Architects, Project Managers & Developers SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WHOLESALE MANAGER

CALL MIKE SALOMON 951-234-0109 (Just North of the French Valley Airport)

TEMECULA


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

A-3

Local

Assemblywoman Melendez gives legislative update at EWDC luncheon Paul Bandong PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez (R-67th District) was the keynote speaker at the Lake Elsinore Valley Economic Workforce Development Committee luncheon held Nov. 17, at the Diamond Club at Lake Elsinore Stadium. Melendez gave a brief legislative update and entertained questions and held a conversation with the group. “We lost three seats in the Assembly,” started Melendez, “giving the Democrats a supermajority in the Assembly but not in the Senate.” A supermajority is one party holding two-thirds of the legislative seats in their respective statehouse, effectively giving that party control which would allow them to raise taxes and place measures on the statewide ballot without the other party’s support. Melendez stated, “This past year I fought hard to protect our Second Amendment rights, ensure privacy for our children, reduce regulations on business, bring transparency to an overbearing government, and block over $135 billion in proposed tax increases.” “The Democrat majority in the Senate Committee on Appropriations killed a number of bills,” said Melendez. The Legislative Whistleblower Act (AB 1788) would have protected employees and staff of California Legislature who reported ethics violations. The Vehicle Registration Fee Transparency (AB 1752) would have separated vehicle registration fees into separate lines on the renewal notice. The Drought Friendly Landscaping Tax Credit (AB 2040) would have provided a state income tax credit for those who installed drought-friendly landscaping. The bills to defund High Speed Rail (AB 2049), expand Freeway Patrol Services (AB 2014), give local governments greater control over the operation of sober living homes (AB 2255), restore millions of dollars to cities like Menifee

Avoid Paying Too Much When Buying a Home Buying a home is a major investment no matter which way you look at it. But for many homebuyers, it’s an even more expensive process than it needs to be because many fall prey to at least a few of many common and costly mistakes which trap them into paying too much for the home they want, losing their dream home to another buyer, or worse, buying the wrong home for their needs. A systemized approach to the homebuying process can help you steer clear of these common traps, allowing you to not only cut costs, but also buy the home that’s best for you. An industry report has just been released entitled “9 Buyer Traps and How to Avoid Them”. This important report discusses the nine most common and costly of these home buyer traps, how to identify them, and what you can do to avoid them.

Melissa Melendez (R-67th District) shared a recap of election results and her postelection views at the Economic Workforce Development Committee Luncheon held Nov. 17, 2017. Paul Bandong photo

and Wildomar that lost Vehicle License Funding to the state (AB 2277) and Megan’s Law Exemption (AB 2569) were also killed by the Democrat majority in the Senate Committee on Appropriations. Melendez reported that the Governor signed into law AB 1906 which allows state hospitals to detain sexually violent predators if they are found to be a continuing threat to public safety and AB 2097 which prevents school districts from collecting sensitive student information except where required by federal law. “Do you know that our state fabric is now officially denim?” asked Melendez explaining that the governor approved AB 501. The Governor also approved AB 2466 that would allow convicted felons to vote while in jail. The Governor also signed SB 10 allowing immigrants entering the country without legal permission to purchase health insurance on California’s state health exchange, SB 1139 that would allow the same group of immigrants to attend medical school. He also signed into law SB 1322 that would eliminate all penalties against prostitutes that are minors, essentially legalizing child prostitution. The Governor also signed into law AB 2298 that requires law enforcement to notify gang members

they are in or going to be placed in the gang database. The California State Sheriff’s Association opposition letter stated, “This measure undermines public safety by informing gang members that they are subject to investigations.” Melendez summarized results of the Propositions. She noted that Proposition 67 prohibiting plastic single-use bags passed, but Proposition 65 that would have allowed the money collected for grocery and retail carry-out bags to go to the environmental fund failed. “The point of Prop 67 was to protect and preserve our environment.,” said Melendez, “Why shouldn’t the money for the bags used go to environment instead of the General Fund?” Melendez responded to a question on president-elect Trump’s task of selecting cabinet members and staff by stating, “they need to choose whether they want to be politicians or lobbyists.” Melendez closed the Q & A portion by stating that the answer to attracting high-paying high-tech jobs in the area is a local workforce with the level of education that matches employer needs. However, she also noted that building and development on land in the area is subject to the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan that could affect the attraction/growth of high-tech firms to the area.

Order this report NOW to learn how to avoid costly buyer mistakes before you purchase your next home. Call 1-800-781-0928 ID# 1018 TODAY!!! Jim Holbrook / BRE#01709606

NOW IN 2 WAL-MART LOCATIONS Dr. Haleh Guilak Family Optometrist

   

Over 16 Years Experience Specializing In:

Family Eye Care Contact Lenses Pre and Post-Op for Laser Eye Surgery Ocular Disease Screening

Most insurances accepted WALK-INS WELCOME

Wal-Mart Temecula 32225 Temecula Pkwy. (951) 302-8062

Wal-Mart Murrieta 41200 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd. (951) 696-8258

RTA board honors bus driver who helped 2 lost girls reunite with family RIVERSIDE – A Riverside Transit Agency coach operator was praised for his quick thinking that helped two lost children return to their family. It was an event that illustrates the fact that bus drivers do much more than move people from place to place. Sergio Valenzuela was parked at the Riverside Downtown Terminal last week, waiting for people to board his Route 13 bus, when he noticed two young girls alone, pacing back and forth through the crowded transit hub. As his customers filed into the bus, Sergio continued to keep his eyes on the two children, hoping a parent or guardian would eventually show up. A few minutes later, with no parent in sight, Sergio had seen enough. “I got out of my bus and walked over to these two little girls and asked them if they were OK,” he said. “They said they were waiting for their grandmother and they were pretty shaken up because they were alone.” After hearing the story, Sergio called police to the scene, who were eventually able to reunite the 5 and 7- year-old girls with their family. Nov. 16 the Riverside Transit Agency board of directors honored Valenzuela with a “hero” award for his actions. RTA Chairman of the Board Frank Johnston said the event

burger, hot dog or corn dog

RTA bus driver Sergio Valenzuela stands smiling in front of his bus. Valenzuela helped two lost girls reunite with their family. Courtesy photo

illustrated how RTA coach operators do some of their best work when they are not behind the wheel. “This incident tested Sergio’s training, attention to detail and customer service, resulting in a great outcome,” Johnston said. “He represents RTA’s finest.” RTA buses have always been safe places for children. In fact, every RTA’s fixed-route vehicle displays a yellow “Safe Place” sign that enables children to ask drivers for help and, if appropriate, get a lift to an area shelter or youth service provider. As a parent of two young children himself, Valenzuela says he knows all

too well how scary it can be to have a child go missing. “I knew something was wrong,” he said. “Once the police showed up and did their part I felt a whole lot better. I wasn’t about to let them wander around alone.” The Riverside Transit Agency provides public transportation for Western Riverside County, operating 37 fixed routes, eight express routes and Dial-A-Ride service. RTA’s service area spans 2,500 square miles, among the largest in the nation. For bus route and schedule information contact RTA at (951) 565-5002 or go to www.RiversideTransit.com.

Call Maria Mora at (909) 466-5339

all beers and wines

fries & tots

It may be painful to think about your funeral, but it doesn’t have to be painful to pay for it.

F

uneral arrangements are a difficult topic to discuss, especially when the funeral will be your own. But having these conversation will make it easier for your survivors. We offer the most options and best value in the preplanning market, plus easy funding plans to meet your individual needs. Call for information today and receive our free Personal Arrangement Guide.

www.berry-bellandhall.com

CALL NOW TO

SAVE UP TO $500

ON PRE-PLANNED SERVICES.

BERRY BELL & HALL FALLBROOK MORTUARY, INC. FD-828

760-728-1689

333 N. VINE STREET, FALLBROOK

Family Owned & Operated Steve McGargill, FDR #1446 Scott McGargill, FDR #628

10 Questions to Ask Before You Hire a Real Estate Agent - Not all real estate agents are the same. If you decide to seek the help of an agent when selling or buying your home, you need some good information before you make any moves. Choosing a real estate agent is one of those critical issues that can cost or save you thousands of dollars. In this FREE special report, we give you the specific questions you should be asking to ensure that you get the best representation for your needs. Before you hire any real estate

agent, call and get a copy of a FREE Report entitled “10 questions to Ask Before You Hire an Agent”. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-866-256-0756 and enter 2006. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out the questions the others would prefer you never ask!

This report is courtesy of CalBRE: 01483044. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2016


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

A-4

Local MISS MARVELOUS from page A-1

Elianna Ramirez of Temecula Valley High School, makes her entrance to the formal wear segment of the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant.

Savannah Wallace of Great Oak High School, makes her entrance to the formal wear segment of the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant for special needs girls.

Your Fun & Friendly FEED & Pet Store With Great Prices

Stephanie Smith of Chaparral High School, makes her entrance to the formal wear segment of the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant for special needs girls at TVHS.

with s w a P e h t k c e D ngs! holiday savi

PET SPECIALS

FEED SPECIALS

ASPEN PET PILLOW DOG BED 27” X 36” (5 Assorted Colors & Patterns)

KAHOOTS ALFALFA PELLETS 50lb

Special

NOW $8.75

$17.99 NATURAL BALANCE DOG FOOD ROLLS 1lb

BUY TWO GET ONE

FREE NATURAL BALANCE CAT DELECTABLE DELIGHTS 2.5oz

BUY TWO GET ONE

FREE

Victoria Molina of Great Oak High School, makes her entrance to the formal wear segment of the Miss Marvelous Pageant.

Savannah Wallace of Great Oak High School, performs a dance routine during the talent segment of the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant for special needs girls at TVHS. Wallace was crowned Miss Powerful during the conclusion of pageant.

JOLLY BALLS 10in (Plain and Scented)

NOW $14.39 MANNAPRO NUGGETS (1lb and 4lb bags)

KAHOOTS BRAND CAT FURNITURE

40% OFF

20% OFF

AWF BEDDING PELLETS 40lb

NOW $4.99

LITTLE FARMER DRIED POULTRY TREATS 1lb (Surf & Turf and Add-A-Bug)

Shilda Avila of Great Oak High School, dances with her peers during the 6th annual Miss Marvelous Pageant at TVHS, Nov. 16. Avila was crowned Miss Inspiring during the conclusion of pageant.

NOW $9.99 Temecula Pet Store

Murrieta Feed & Pet Store

31845 Temecula Parkway #A, Temecula, CA 92592 951. 303. 3381

41711 Ivy Street, Murrieta, CA 92562 951. 461. 6993

KahootsPet.com Product selection may vary by location. Specials valid December 1-31, 2016 or while supplies last.

An Evening of Jewish Musical Heritage and Learning In Celebration of Hanukkah Featuring the World Renowned Klezmer and Traditional Jewish Music of Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi

December 29, 2016

Volunteers needed for point in time FRENCH VALLEY – “We’re looking for volunteers to help us with Point-In-Time, an annual counting of homeless within the community” said 3rd District Supervisor Chuck Washington. Point-In-Time  will be held Jan. 27, 2017, throughout Riverside County. “This count is used by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) not only as a measure of the homeless popula-

tion, but also as a basis to determine many of the resources and funding  the county receives from HUD and other federal funding sources to address homelessness in Riverside County” Washington explained. Volunteers must register in advance and complete a mandatory 90-minute training session. Sessions will be held in December and January before the count. Register online at www.surveymonkey. com/r/DTVBGR2.

10% OFF

PAINT - REMODEL - REPAIR We’re Known for

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Good Service! Interior & Exterior Painting Flooring - All Types Remodel This Old House Co.

951-297-1509

6:00pm – 9:30pm

Offer expires 12/1/16

Call today to put your dream into action!

At the Temecula Community Conference Center, Temecula City Hall 41000 Main Street, Temecula

us this n i o J or o month f ur

• Educational sessions for children & adults FREE • Israeli dance lessons family event! • Traditional foods No admission fee. Free parking in the old town parking structure. Open to the public. Suggested $10 donation per person.

Schedule of Events:

Presented by:

6:00pm: Doors open Education session Traditional food 7:00pm: Yale Strom & Hot Pstromi 8:30pm: Israeli dance lesson

Wake Up Wildomar Breakfast! December 7TH

7:30am at the Corporate Room FREE

34846 Monte Vista Dr., Wildomar, CA 92595

this month to all Members

Must RSVP with the chamber before December 1ST

Welcome New Businesses and New Residents!

www.WildomarChamber.org

on

r yd

Co

St

rail ion T

(951) 679-0419 • tbstemecula.org

Call us or come by! Monday-Friday 9am-3pm Wildomar Chamber of Commerce 33751 Mission Trail, Wildomar 92595 951-254-0437 admin@wildomarchamber.org

Miss

A Conservative Congregation with a Modern Twist

Bundy Canyon Rd


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

A-5

Bill would prohibit sex offenders from entering school grounds SACRAMENTO – In order to further protect children from dangerous sex offenders Sen. Connie M. Leyva (D-Chino) today announced when the California State Senate convenes in early December she will introduce legislation to prohibit any registered sex offender from being present on a school campus in California for any reason. Current law allows a school administrator to grant a registered sex offender access to a school campus as long as the parents and staff receive a two week notice. Registered sex offenders are now allowed to volunteer at schools as long as they are not acting in a supervisory role or in constant interaction with children as part of their volunteering. The legislation that Sen. Leyva intends

MANN from page A-1 a specially called meeting Oct. 19, after the news broke that Mann had a proposed settlement in place with the enforcement division of the California Fair Political Practices Commission in the amount of $60,000. The settlement is for campaign violations that included misuse of nearly $45,000 in campaign funds. The FPPC announced the settlement in a press release Oct. 14. During the Nov. 2 city council meeting, August said the scandal was the first of its kind for the city and explained the release of information regarding the settlement from the enforcement division by the FPPC was done to inform voters before they headed to the polls. “We’ve been a city for eight years and I have been a council member for nearly four years now and to my knowledge, this is a first for the city,” August said. “It’s new territory for all of us. What makes this decision difficult for all of us is the FPPC announced a proposed settlement and fine before the commission’s vote to finalize the settlement on or around Dec. 15. The reason for the announcement by the FPPC was to inform the public before the Nov. 8 election, not for the purpose of the council to take disciplinary actions against one of our colleagues.” August said the FPPC is not answering questions asked by city council and that Mann has claimed attorney-client privilege, leaving the council “to fill in the blanks.”

to introduce at the start of the 20172018 regular session will eliminate the ability of school administrators to grant permission for sex offenders to enter school campuses. “Existing law in California allows registered sex offenders to be present on school campuses and volunteer in a variety of capacities,” Sen. Leyva said. “The safety of students should always remain a top priority, so I look forward to introducing legislation in the near future that will tighten the loopholes that sex offenders could use to gain access to school campuses in California. Though there are some restrictions on the types of volunteering in which registered sex offenders may participate, there is also enough ambiguity that could “These two decisions make it a little difficult for councilmembers to find out and feel comfortable where they are,” he said, adding that he did believe council had enough information to make a decision regarding the censure, despite the FPPC “putting the cart before the horse.” According to Mann, the FPPC violations, which also included “record keeping violations,” occurred “for the most part, before I became mayor.” To-date Mann, who also serves as the president of Riverside County Division, League of California Cities, chairs the Riverside County City Selection Committee and serves as a Commissioner for the Riverside County Transportation Commission, has reimbursed $17,152 of the $44,894 in misused funds to his committees. Mann apologized in an official statement and said that he took the money due to financial hardship. “The choices I made included borrowing campaign funds for personal use, a decision I deeply regret,” he wrote. “With the support of family and guidance from my pastor, I was able overcome my financial problems and make restitution to my campaign account. At no time did this strictly personal situation affect the City of Menifee or interfere with my performance as mayor.” August will serve as the mayor until the incoming mayor-elect, Winter, is sworn in with the new council Wednesday, Dec. 7.

result in a registered sex offender being unsupervised while interacting with kids at school. Also, parents who do not want to have registered sex offenders present at their child’s school do not have the legal ability to prevent this potentially dangerous situation.”

In recent months, concerned parents across California, though most notably in Fontana within Sen. Leyva’s district, have expressed tremendous concern about allowing registered sex offenders to be present or volunteer on school campuses.  In response, the Fontana

Unified School District approved a policy in September 2016 that seeks to address these school safety concerns. Sen. Leyva will introduce this proposed legislation in order to ensure statewide uniformity to help keep children safe at California schools. 

ValleyWide Hearing Aid Center Inc. SCAN MEMBERS USE YOUR

PLEASE CALL NOW FOR YOUR

TO GET A HEARING AID AT LITTLE OR NO COST TO YOU!

HEARING TEST TO DETERMINE IF YOU CAN BE HELPED BY A HEARING AID

2016 BENEFIT

FREE

Proud Provider of Phonak Hearing Technology

NOW AVAILABLE

Charged up+ ready to go

rechargeable hearing aid with built-in lithium-ion battery

Phonak Audéo™B-R is the first ever hearing aid to feature a built-in lithium-ion rechargeable battery that provides 24 hours* of hearing with one simple charge. The quickest charging longest lasting rechargeable hearing aid ever produced. Easy handling, no more hassles of disposable batteries. Groundbreaking built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery. *Expected results when fully charged. Includes up to 80 minutes wireless streaming time. Please refer to www.phonakpro-us.com/evidence.

Rechargeable Hearing Aids - No more changing your batteries every week

www.valleywidehearingaidcenter.com • MOST Insurances Accepted We accept Humana, Health Net, Scan Inter • FREE House Calls Valley, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Aetna, Care 1st, • FREE Hearing Aid Cleaning Central Health Plan, I.H.E.P., • Service & Repair on All Makes and Models Molina and Most Other Insurances • Full Range of Hearing Aids and Accessories

Yvonne Sandoval

Licensed Hearing Aid Dispenser BC-HIS, HA7526 Board Certified in Hearing Instrument Sciences

Ask about streaming and connectivity to all electronic devices. Completely wireless in high sound quality simultaneously in both hearing aids.

Patience and Compassion for all your Life Long Hearing Health Care Needs

VALLEYWIDE IS HERE FOR YOU!

951-925-8100

HEMET

2143 W. FLOrIdA AVE

Mon-Thur 9am-4pm, Fri 9am-2:30pm Saturday by Appointment

RIVERSIDE

2995 VAN BUrEN BLVd, A2 Monday 9:30am-2pm Thurs-Fri 9:30am-2pm

k n a h T ! u o Y On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we thank all SJUSD school staff, parent and community volunteers, business and civic leaders and VOTERS for supporting our bond election efforts and our kids’ futures! In a substantial victory for our local schools’ present and future students, voters overwhelmingly said “yes” to a $44.5 million school bond to implement new infrastructure to our schools and modernize our classrooms in support of students’ college and career success.

Hemet/San Jacinto Council

San Jacinto

Education Foundation


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

A-6

Local

Lynn Marion Moore died peacefully in his home on November 15, 2016, in Murrieta, Calif. at the age of 78. Lynn is survived by his wife, Jan Moore of Murrieta; children, John Cleaon Moore of Camarillo, Calif., and Stephanie Keri-Lynn Hamilton of Murrieta; his brother, Michael Moore, of Bishop, Calif., and stepdaughter, Lisa McDonald, of Costa

Mesa, Calif.. He is preceded in death by his mother, Violet Geneva Moore, of Huntington Beach, Calif.; and father, Emmett E. Moore, of Sterling, Va. Lynn was born on February 21, 1938 in Dearborn, Mich. to Violet Geneva Moore (Armstrong, Ontario CN) and Emmett E. Moore (Wayne, Ky.). Following high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps., performing his training at Camp Pendleton, Calif. Lynn’s service as a Marine took him to several countries in Asia, where he participated in land and sea exercises during the period between the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. During his military time, he married his first wife, Donna Anderson, and fathered three children, of which two survivors are John Cleaon Moore and Stephanie Keri-Lynn Hamilton (Kerry). Lynn’s third child, Timothy Gerard Moore, born on the same day of his birthday, February 21, 1963, passed away during the first year of life, November 25, 1963,

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL for SECURITY PATROL SERVICES SUBMITTAL DEADLINE: December 8, 2016 CITY OF SAN JACINTO The City of San Jacinto requires security patrol service for 31 sites within the City. Patrol officers will provide dusk till dawn security inspections of parks and other facilities. City has had successful guard/patrol services contracts with local providers; however these contracts now expire and do not have any renewal options. Therefore, the City is returning for a competitive solicitation to establish new contracts.

For information and copies of the RFP please contact; City of San Jacinto, Attention Rick Hoffman 595 S. San Jacinto Ave, San Jacinto, CA 92583 http://www.ci.san-jacinto.ca.us/city-govt/bids.html HoffmanConsult@Verizon.net 951-505-4595

Costs Are Lower Than You Think When the unexpected happens... Make Sure Your Family is Protected with Living Benefits Through your Life Insurance

FIND OUT HOW

your Life Insurance Can PAY YOU

CASH

If You Can No Longer Work Due to Critical, Chronic Or Terminal Illnesses or Injury. Every 30 to 40 Seconds in the U.S. someone has a Heart Attack, Stroke, or is diagnosed with Cancer.

Call today!

Your Local Agent - 13 Year Murrieta Resident

Doug Castino Financial Adviser Lic. #0G19272

Call 858-886-6716 www.DougCastino.com

PARTNERS SOUTH INSURANCE SOLUTIONS

three days after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. While our nation grieved, Lynn and his family’s sadness was compounded with the loss of his son. Through it all, John and Kerry remember Lynn as a supportive father who encouraged everyone to become the best person possible. His wife of over 20 years, Jan Moore, brought greatly needed joy and love to Lynn’s life. It was during these years while supported

by Jan, that Lynn faced retirement and worked his hardest at being a good husband, father, and friend to others. Lynn was discharged honorably from military duty and joined an electrical contracting business in Downey, Calif. While there, he performed for years, teaching himself the necessary skills to be awarded a contracting license, and subsequently started his own business, Annapolis Electric, located in

Huntington Beach, Calif. Lynn ran his business for decades covering areas throughout Southern California. His determination and strong work ethic allowed him to serve customers well into his seventies. The family would like to thank the caregivers and support staff of Hospice and Palliative care. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Hospice Care (www.hospicecare. com/donate/).

Helping Hands take on a whole new meaning for local mother WILDOMAR – Amy Martinez, a young 28-year-old mother of 2-year-old Harper and 4-year-old Liam, rushed herself to the emergency room in Wildomar back in February of 2015. She had been hoping to pass a kidney stone that she was told she could pass, but it had not been measured or examined at her Urgent Care. By the time she got to the emergency room, it was too late. Sepsis had set in and by August of 2015, Amy became a quadruple amputee.  Martinez was selected by local wish fulfilling organization Charity for Charity and honored in February of 2016, where they granted her wish of prosthetic swimming legs. At that time, she was not concerned about receiving hands, it was expected that insurance would cover them, which is why prosthetic swimming legs were her wish. Charity for Charity fulfilled this wish along with a couple other surprises at their Stars of the Valley event. By the end of summer, Martinez was still not approved for her hands and had to learn to do everything with only her amputated arms. She did receive her legs early on but Charity for Charity did not feel that this was acceptable of the insurance and did not feel that a young mother of two should go another day without hands to hold her children and caress their faces. So, Charity for Charity set out to raise funds in an “Amy’s Hands” specific campaign.  The funds started coming, quickly at first. Then, after a couple months, it slowed down and Charity for Charity was $100,000 away from covering the cost of the $129,000 hands. That is, until President and Founder Charity Prestifilippo got a call from a close friend that would change the momentum and catapult the fundraising efforts at an astonishing speed. This generous donor

Amy Martinez, a quadruple amputee holds her children, Harper and Liam, thanks to a generous donation of hands due to the fundraising efforts of local nonprofit Charity for Charity during a special event held Nov. 9. Courtesy photos

brought in $50,000 and challenged Charity to contact his list of specified friends and donors to bring in the difference. One of the names on the list took the cause and ran with it, contacting his list of friends and community members and the thousands were pouring in. A representative from Pechanga Resort & Casino called him on a Sunday and offered to bring in the difference. With all the money that flooded in, this group – along with the efforts of a fundraising group in Martinez’s community of Canyon Lake – raised far beyond the amount to cover her hands, according to a press release issued by the nonprofit. When faced with what to do with

the excess funds, Terry Gilmore of Paradise Chevrolet and Charity of Charity for Charity decided that a new Chevrolet Traverse was the answer. Martinez’s current vehicle was not big enough for her wheelchair that she uses sometimes, her service dog Nitro, her two children and any other family or friend that helps her from day to day.  So, a small, intimate group of large donors gathered at a sponsored dinner by Gourmet Italia on Wednesday, Nov. 9, as an opportunity for Martinez to say “Thank you.” What she didn’t know, was that this generous and compassionate group wasn’t just there to celebrate her hands, they were surprising her with a new car. Martinez couldn’t have been more touched, humbled, overjoyed and loved that night. This community took “helping hands” to a whole new level and made an impact and change in this young ladies life that will forever remain on each and every heart who witnessed the beautiful season miracle. This group of donors, didn’t just give her a car and hands, they gave her hope, inspiration and love.

Amy Martinez smiles in her new car, a Chevrolet Traverse, that was presented to her Nov. 9.


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

A-7

Local

Local Memorial Fund set for slain Palm Springs officer, Hemet native, Lesley Zerebny Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The family of slain Palm Springs Police Officer and Hemet native Lesley Zerebny sought to thank the people of the Hemet and San Jacinto Valley, The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department and the local police departments for the outpouring of help and sympathy they have given them since her death Oct. 8. Since Palm Springs Sheriff’s Deputy and Police Officers Zerebny and Officer Jose ‘Gil’ Vegas shooting death at the hands of alleged killer John Hernandez in Palm Springs, vigils have taken place for the officers. The city of Hemet set aside Sunday, Oct. 16, for a vigil in

HOLIDAY from page A-1 during the annual Holiday Lights celebration. The fun begins Dec. 3 at 5 p.m. with the city’s annual Hometown Holiday Parade. Join in with hundreds of residents who line Washington Avenue in historic downtown Murrieta, sip some hot cocoa and enjoy this truly quaint push-cart parade that ends in Town Square Park. Once the parade ends, make your way to Town Square Park for the Festival of Lights and Tree Lighting for the city of Murrieta at Town Square Park. The evening will be filled with holiday charm. Full-size, decorated themed trees will line the park and be donated to families in need after the event. A performance from your favorite Frozen characters will take place along with a trackless train, carriage rides and more. Because Murrieta residents love to give back, the annual Santa Stops return Dec. 5-14. With various stops throughout the city, Santa will cruise through town on his sleigh collecting canned food and toys for needy children and families in the area. The nightly schedule is available online at www.murrietaca.com. For those of you who can’t wait to outshine your neighbors, then perhaps the city’s home decorating contest is for you. Break out those holiday decorations and get the entire neighborhood involved. Visit www.murrietaca.gov/holidaylights to register your home or the entire block by 5 p.m. Dec. 6. Winners of the annual contest will be announced Dec. 16. There is a catch though; your home has to be within city limits to participate. Temecula Things are about to get chilly in Temecula when Temecula Chilled kicks off Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. with Santa’s Electric Light Parade beginning at the intersection of Del Rio Road and Jefferson Avenue. Bring your holiday cheer and enjoy a holiday tradition presented by the city of Temecula. There will be floats, school marching bands and more. This year’s parade theme is “Family First for the Holidays.” Don’t forget to head back into Old Town Dec. 3 for the annual Holiday Party at the Temecula Valley Museum located at 28314 Mercedes St. The fun runs from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and this year, in honor of the Season’s Greetings exhibit, families can have their picture taken for free by a professional photographer for use in their own holiday cards. There will be fun crafts for the little ones and hot chocolate. For more information, call (951) 694-6450. If you are downtown Saturday, Dec. 3, you should head on over to the Old Town Temecula Community Theater at 7:30 p.m. for the 17th annual holiday favorite “Christmas in the Air,” performed by the Southwest Women’s Chorus. You will hear familiar tunes, fun new ones and classical pieces as well, all designed to put you into the holiday spirit. If you can’t make the Dec. 3 performance, don’t fret; a matinee performance will be held Dec. 4 at 2 p.m. The Old Town Temecula Community Theater is located at 42051 Main St. For tickets and information, call (866) 653-8696. Want to get out and tour the lights? Then the ‘Twas the Lights Before Christmas Bus Tours, presented by Southern California Edison are for you. Running Dec. 8-11 and Dec. 15-18 from 7-8:30 p.m., attendees will tour Temecula’s festive homes from a double decker bus. The evening includes refreshments, prize drawings and more. Bus leaves from the Old Town Temecula parking structure. Space is limited, and pre-registration is

remembrance of Officer Zerebny with thousands attending. “We really want to thank the City of Hemet and the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department for all they have done for the family,” said Daniel Zerebny, grandfather of Zachary Zerebny, husband of Lesley and their daughter Cora. Zachery, a Sheriff’s Deputy himself, is being helped by his family with little Cora, who all reside in Hemet. “We just can’t thank everyone enough,” the senior Zerebny said. He said the family has since set up a memorial fund for Lesley and her family through the Bank of Hemet for those in the Valley who have been asking what they might do to help with Zach and Cora. The

nonprofit Riverside County Sheriff’s Association has been raising money to benefit both fallen officers as well. The friends of Lesley and Vegas has also set up an internet fund for the families through www.gofundme. com/2tejkxwk. Gofundme officials said to send donations to the specified address. Another fraudulent fund on the web has been deleted. The newest memorial has been set up with the Bank of Hemet. Donations to Zach and Cora can be made to the Lesley Zerebny Memorial Fund through any one of the Bank of Hemet branches in Hemet, Anza, Beaumont, Riverside or San Jacinto. The main office is located at 3715 Sunnyside Drive in Riverside (92506).

John Hernandez Felix, 26, was arrested shortly after he allegedly shot and killed Zerebny and 63-year-old Vega and wounded three others, including another deputy Oct. 8. He is charged with two counts of first-degree murder, three counts of attempted murder, unlawful possession of a firearm after being a convicted felon, unlawful possession of armor piercing ammunition and possession of stolen property. Riverside County District Attorney Michael Hestrin said he believes the attack was a trap set for officers responding to a domestic disturbance call. When they arrived, they were met by volley of shots from an allegedly stolen AR -15 assault weapon. Hestrin said the

suspect intended to kill the officers. Felix was taken into custody after being shot by with non-lethal rounds as he tried to leave the home where the attack occurred. He is being held without bail in the Robert Presley Detention Center in Riverside. Officer Zerebny was a 2007 West Valley High School graduate where she met and married her husband Deputy Zachary Zerebny in 2011. He graduated from Hemet High. The couple had baby Cora six months ago and had returned to duty only a few weeks before her death. Officer Vega was buried at the Coachella Valley Public Cemetery in Coachella following a graveside service in mid-October.

required. Don’t forget this is an open-air bus, so dress accordingly. For information or to register, visit http://temeculaca.gov/1133/Twasthe-Lights-Before-Christmas-BusTou. One of Temecula’s most popular holiday attractions, Temecula on Ice, will host a grand opening celebration Dec. 9 from 5-6 p.m. The celebration includes ice skating exhibitions and Bobby races. Preregistration is required and can be done by visiting http://temeculaca. gov/1120/Temecula-On-Ice. The ice-skating rink is open Dec. 8 through Jan. 2. Lastly, on Dec. 23 at 5:30-7:30 p.m. Pennypickle’s Polar Express rolls into town, just in time for Moms and Dads to enjoy some alone time during this busy season. Bring your pajama and robe-clad child and watch as they board Professor Pennypickle’s Polar Express for an evening of fun activities and adventures. Send food and drinks for your children ages 5-10, if you wish. Space is limited, so make your reservations early. For more information and reservations, call (951) 308-6376. For more great holiday events in Temecula, visit www.temeculachilled.com.

free event offers free refreshment, live entertainment, a drawing for an original art piece and much more. Arts Council Menifee is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the arts in the community. For more information, visit www.artscouncilmenifee.org. The fun doesn’t end there either, the city will hold its annual Holiday Extravaganza and Tree Lighting ceremony at Menifee Town Center’s Oak Tree roundabout Dec. 10 from 4-9 p.m. Come out and join Santa and Mrs. Claus for a great evening full of holiday cheer with food, craft vendors, kid’s snow play zone, entertainment, pictures with Santa and more. Bring an unwrapped toy or non-perishable food items to benefit the Menifee Valley Community Cupboard and the Spark of Love Toy Drive. Menifee Town Center is located onequarter mile west of Interstate 215 in the heart of the City of Menifee and is accessible by Scott Road to the south and Newport Road to the north. For more information, call (951) 723-3880.

tivities for the whole family. The party will feature a Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony and a visit from

Santa, too. For more information, call (951) 674-3124, ext. 292.

Hemet Not wanting to be left out of the holiday fun, the city of Hemet has a wide range of activities planned this holiday season so head on over to the Downtown Hemet Historic District and enjoy all of the sights and sounds the city has to offer this holiday season. The city will host its 10th annual Christmas Tree Lighting Dec. 2 at Valley-Wide Regional Park located at 901 W. Esplanade Ave. Kick off the holiday season with this free event including the movie “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” music, complimentary refreshments and a special visit from Santa. Don’t forget to bring your cameras for your picture with Santa. For more information, call (951) 654-1505. For those who love a parade, the city delivers big-time with its annual Christmas Parade and Celebration on West Florida and Palm avenues. This free hometown parade and celebration kicks off at 10 a.m. and features over 100 organizations showing off their holiday spirit. The festival includes music, entertainment, vendors, games awards and much, much more. This year’s theme is The Gift of Volunteering. For more information, call (951) 660-4910. What better way to show your holiday spirit than a run through town. That’s exactly what participants of the 31st annual Tinsel Triathlon can expect Dec. 11 at the largest reverse sprint triathlon in the nation. The run will be held in a “scenic, calm area” of west Hemet. The rest of the triathlon, sponsored by the Soboba Foundation, features a fast and flat biking course, ending with the swim with a heated Olympic size pool. For more information or to register, visit www.tinseltriathlon.com. The Harvard Shoppes and Downtown Deli will present a Harvard Street Christmas Dec. 17 from 4-8 p.m. Come on out and see the decorated store fronts, light displays and a tree lighting ceremony while enjoying street vendors, crafts, entertainment a classic car show and more. Word on the street is that Santa Claus will be making an appearance at this fun family event. For more information or vendor applications, call Steve at (951) 692-0974. Menifee Arts Council Menifee will present their annual holiday art show “Believe” Dec. 4 from 2:30-5 p.m. at the Kay Ceniceros Senior Center located at 42888 Evans Road. This

Lake Elsinore Last, but not least, in the list of holiday fun is the City of Lake Elsinore’s annual Winterfest Celebration. Also scheduled for Dec. 3, this event takes place in the historical downtown area. Families will enjoy a holiday parade, bouncers, children’s crafts, sled runs, cultural and musical entertainment, visits with Santa, crafters, shopping and dining with both restaurants and food vendors. The best parking is along Spring Street or in the lot at Heald Avenue and Main Street across from the Cultural Center. This event reaches four downtown blocks from Heald Avenue to City Park, offering low cost or free ac-

EXPERIENCE ALWAYS MATTERS

Law Offices of Morton J. Grabel In Temecula

Practice Limited to:

4 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 Services $1385 including filling fees and representation at the 341 Hearing. Riverside County Only*.

Member of Local Chambers of Commerce

We are a debt relief agency and file for relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

4 Personal Injury 4 Elder Abuse

Se Habla Español

Nursing Home Neglect • Bed Sores • Falls • Malnutrition • Dehydration

4 Real Estate Matters 4 Civil Litigation

• Contract/Business Law [plaintiff & defense]

4 Mortgage Foreclosure Defense LAW OFFICES OF MORTON J. GRABEL, APLC 29377 Rancho California Rd. Suite 103 Temecula, CA 92591 Office (951) 695-7700

attorneymortongrabel@gmail.com


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

A-8

RCCD decision to add college cops to county radio system raises questions Paul D. Young SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

RIVERSIDE – The Riverside Community College District police force today was granted access to Riverside County›s public safety communication system at minimal

cost under a contract that received extra scrutiny before being approved by the board of supervisors. In a 3-0 vote, with Supervisors John Tavaglione and Chuck Washington absent, the board authorized the Department of Information Technology to program 21 hand-

held radios belonging to the RCCD Police Department, enabling its officers to receive and transmit on the countywide Public Safety Enterprise Communication system, or PSEC. The agreement stipulates that RCCD will cover only the expense of programming the units, about

California DocuFim Festival December 5-13 Screening More than 30 Documentaries Everyone welcome - FREE TO PUBLIC in this inaugral year! Documentary screenings start at 4 pm at Santa Rosa Academy (SRA) and 6 pm at Mt. San Jacinto College (MSJC). Last screenings are 7 pm and 9 pm, respectively. For security reasons, please bring your SRA, MSJC or government issued ID. Please visit californiadocfest.com/program/ for full list of documentaries.

World Premier ICONS Documentaries at Santa Rosa Academy & Temecula

6 PREMIERE EVENTS IN 3 CITIES Thursday, December 8, in Temecula AUTISM: World premier of 3 films screened. An exhibition of art by autistic youth. Plus a VIP reception. Friday, December 9, in SRA Tribute to SHIMON PERES of Israel, VACLAV HAVEL of Czech Rep., and MARCH AIR RESERVE BASE: World premier of 2 films. A VIP reception. Saturday, December 10, in SRA EMPOWERING WOMEN: American premier of films made by women and about women. Plus a VIP reception, hosted by Germany, Greece and the Czech Republic. TERRORISM: American premier of 2 films, documenting tragedies. Plus a discussion with the director. Sunday, December 11, in SRA HOLOCAUST: American premier of a short film. Plus a VIP reception, hosted by Poland. JERUSALEM: American premier of 2 short films. Plus a VIP reception, hosted by the city of Jerusalem. A special award given to Senator Jeff Stone. Monday and Tuesday, December 12 and 13, in Palm Springs THANK YOU FOR SERVING / VETERANS: Screening of 2 films. Plus a VIP reception. A special award given to a veteran. These Premiere Events are by invitation only. If you would like to attend and for discounts inquire 760-980-3057 or email docufilmfestival@gmail.com.

America’s Son: JFK Jr. on Dec 8 in Temecula

Filmed with 35 members of the Kennedy family when they visited Ireland for the 50th anniversary of JFK’s visit to his motherland. Exec. Produced by Barak and Gunasti. Released in Docu Film.

Citizen Shimon on Dec 9 at SRA

Released in Docu Film 2016. Exec. produced by Barak and Gunasti. Citizen Shimon is the history of modern Israel. It is narrated by the late president of Israel Shimon Peres. The documentary opens with Robert DeNiro. Kathleen Turner is also included. Dr. Henry Kissinger adds a historic perspective. Bill Clinton and Queen Elizabeth II are some of the other dignitaries.

Maestro at Home on Dec 10 at SRA

Filmed with Andrea Bocelli and his family. Released in Docu Film 2016. Exec. produced by Barak and Gunasti. It is a love story. Lionel Richie, Quincy Jones are part of it. Also includes segments and anecdotes on Mohammed Ali and Pope’s latest visit to the US with Bocelli.

The Kid from Detroit on Dec 11 at SRA

Released in Docu Film 2016. Exec. produced by Barak and Gunasti. The Kid is Kid Rock. Doc opens with Mitt Romney. Sheryl Crow is also part of it.

proposal to make it “fair.” PSEC went live in January 2014, replacing the county’s analog system, which had been in place for decades but drew complaints from law enforcement officials because of the coverage gaps that plagued it. The system boasts 100 percent connectivity, with no identifiable “blind spots” throughout the 7,300-square mile county, thanks to 75 cell towers that preserve signals, according to county officials. In 2014, the board directed the IT department to step up marketing efforts to recruit more users of the system, which cost about $180 million to complete – nearly $40 million more than originally estimated when the board hired Motorola to build PSEC in early 2007. Users can tap four separate voice and data channels, including a 4.9 GHz broadband stream, for realtime delivery of information. The interoperability component of the system has been among its chief selling points. Law enforcement and fire agencies from multiple jurisdictions can instantly interface. Unlike with analog signals, scanner hobbyists cannot tune in sheriff’s communications, or those of any other networked entity. PSEC utilizes signal encryption that prevents the general public from hearing what›s being transmitted or received, much like a satellite channel that cannot be accessed without a passkey.

$6,700, and not pay monthly access fees for the privilege of using the system, which can run $35 per radio. The decision to spare RCCD from paying access fees prompted Supervisor Kevin Jeffries to question the rationale behind imposing fees on some entities and not on others. “It seems unfair that we›ve allowed some cities to sign up and not pay, at least for the first five years,” the supervisor told Chief Information Officer Steve Reneker. “The media have radios that are not programmed to transmit, and yet they›re paying a monthly fee. RCCD is not going to pay,” he said. “We need to make a decision one way or another that›s fair to everybody. I don›t like the way we are treating some (versus) how we›re treating others.” Reneker characterized RCCD›s situation as “unique,›› pointing out that he community college district police force, which has responsibility for three campuses, only wanted to link to PSEC to monitor and communicate with the Riverside Police Department, whose officers switched to the countywide radio system over the summer. “RCC and the city want to maintain the same level of interoperability,” Reneker said. He acknowledged, however that the college cops will be able to monitor and transmit on all PSEC channels. Jeffries said he remained unconvinced that the fee schedule was just and vowed to return with a

California Docu Film Festival screens more than 30 documentaries The California Docu Film Festival in Menifee kicks off Dec. 5, and runs through Dec. 13. Documentary screenings start at 4 p.m. at Santa Rosa Academy and 6 p.m. at Mt. San Jacinto College. Last screenings are 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., respectively. Screenings are free to public. Special events throughout the festival include several VIP receptions which are by invitation only. For more information about these special events, to attend or for

discounts call (760) 980-3057 or send an email to docufilmfestival@ gmail.com. World premieres of several films, including “Icons in Their Own Words,” “Maestro at Home” and “America’s Con: JFK Jr.” will also be held. The Festival is open to all. For security reasons, please bring a MSJC or government issued ID. Visit http://californiadocfest.com/ program/ for full list of documentaries and more information.

We have the Valley covered. preview: Spring baseball 2016 , D-1 Southwestern League

s The sweet reward of gardening, B-1

VALLEY Local

CSEA files security camera grievance

A

Your Best Source

for Local News

NEWS

& Advertising

Volume 16, Issue

12

e for Local News

NEWS

& Advertising

Surrou nding and THe

San JacinTo

commu niTieS

Volume 16, Issue

39

e for Local News

Your Best Sourc

spring

A

VALLEY

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID CA FALLBROOK, PERMIT #499

Your Best Sourc

and Girls’ HS Lacros se: Boys’ preview, D-1

VMHS senior wins C-7 $40,000 scholarship,

A

Section

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID CA FALLBROOK, PERMIT #499

s.com w ww.myvalleynew

2016

sports High school spring , C-1 playof fs at a glance

iser Bear Creek fundra B-1 a tasty succes s,

VALLEY

VALLEY Section

NEWS

March 18 – 24,

the heat with Temecula turns up l, C-5 Hatch Chile Festiva

, ties and HS Football: Upsets ht Week crushing wins highlig Three action, B-1

A

Section

Section

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID CA FALLBROOK, PERMIT #499

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID CA FALLBROOK, PERMIT #499

NEWS

& Advertising Volume 16, Issue

21

e for Local News

Your Best Sourc

& Advertising Volume 16, Issue

s.com w ww.myvalleynew

16

en ta Grand Prix out of the park l wraps up week e Reality Rally Marine hits it Tour de Murrie town w brings Nativ Local o e rise Loca int Soboba Pow Wo er bond h Cat stuck in for a good caus Local Low mecoming surp San Jac fun ho to th sa ns th wi land wi itio oves rates tree a est appr pet et speeds throug inter Hem r fit community’s American com Serving Temecu

la ,

– 29, September 23

murrieTa , l

ake

e lSinor e , m

enifee ,

Wildoma r , H

emeT,

ews.com www.myvalleyn

May 20 – 26,

2016

to bene MVUSD

new 3-yea employee MOU

Tony Ault Staff Writer

Unified School Murrieta Valley Presiden t Mike District CSEA MVUSD Board Lawson told the seconcerned about members were installed in district curity cameras recordings leading buses that made two district bus of to the discipline drivers.

see page A-3

Local

Local

Local

City urges letter writing campaign

Supervisors fund Camino Del Vino road paving of County Board The Riverside $306,475 of Supervisors approved Del Vino Camino funding to pave Via Fernando in Temecula between Road. and DePortola

around the corner Prix cyclists race Pro Men Grand page D-2! Tour de Murrieta of the event on more photos March 12. See

see page A-5

of Adams Avenue

and B Street

during the Tour

Tiffany’s Gift event shows driving and drinking don’t mix Tony Ault WRITER

Tim O’Leary STAFF WRITER

Breslin and her Young Tiffany from Murrieta friend “Dessie” their Skidoos in on were floating the Colorado River the middle of having fun over just talking and weekend in 2008 the Fourth of July when tragedy struck.

a plans to open Closely-h eld ’s high school in Temecula

lion in Grand Prix. Bridgette Moore de Murrieta Wildomar Mayor photo Wildomar

Gibson Shanethat residents of hopes ing cities will and the surround governor that the write a letter to much needed fundcould put some city’s coffers. ing back to the

Local

Plan to open Catholic high school picks up momentum

Kim Harris EDIA.COM VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERM do if you had What would you milput nearly $2 the chance to ty’s pocket? your communi

Joe Naiman Writer

irony, but the It may seem like tree” was devup a proverbial “cat owner Megan astating for felineshe was missing Mead. “I noticed said. “(Bear) on Sunday,” Mead morning and comes goes out every 5 p.m. every night. home around come inside.” Sunday, she didn’t

see page A-3

see page A-2

l Pow Wow, Sept.

arena during

the

Inter-Triba 20th Annual Soboba

18. See more

Catholic been unveiled page A-4! photos on wine country have to be sub-

photo Gibson are expected Shaneand publicly Riverside County mitted soon to officials for review.

tage combine in Heart and heri annual Women 12th features local en attend 10th ery Resort & lSpa Wines for Caninesorts Animal as reality show era Health Loca Hundreds of wom thcoast Win teen’s quinceañ annual event supp eys Murrieta Gardens Business event at Sou Eight more an arena for aim was “to provide l Friends of the Vall with each other, celebrates women to network and arrested in illega see page A-6

Pets

AFV offers oneof-a-kind camp experience Kim Harris Managing Editor

fast approaching Spring Break is the Temecula Valley for students in looking for a way and for parents children, Animal to entertain their Valleys may have Friends of the its Furry Friends the answer with Kids’ camp. see page B-5

A Gourd Dancer

y

Temecula Valle Fair opens this weekend

– Temecula ValTEMECULA by Temecula ley Fair, presented its gates to opens Valley Toyota, March 18. On fairgoers Friday, of fun at the fair tap for a weekend ations, the are livestock demonstr BalHorse Show, a Peruvian Paso performances and loon Glow, live much, much more.

performs in the

Paul Bandong mentor others .COM find resources, l education and PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA receive additiona Chamber of group has offered Temecula Valley in Business support. This ties, connections and Commerce’s Women con- new opportuni in business.” Today’s seniors event sold out for the fourth resources for women was Karissa MURRIETA – 350 women The first speakerFamily Life & more from every secutive year. Over ed in this of are expecting senior The vendors participat at South Harrison, pastor lives. at Cornerstone 8 by and 51 aspect of their has responded event held Sept. Spa. This Women’s Ministries She encourhousing industry living communi- year’s & Winery Resort Community Church. Coast assisted Your in “Live in Your creating senior residents year’s theme was “Living expert aged women to, four ties, a place where of Your Reality.” Vision” and featured and inspired Vision Instead of today is not thrive. reality educated “Your said see page B-5 speakers who your vision is,” ons. glamorous, but from with their presentati year for the con- Harrison, “Choose to operate your This is the 10th to Temecon instead of your imaginati ference event. According /CEO Alice went on to describe memory.” She of the ula Chamber President was a result of the need to activate both parts Sullivan, this event membership over a survey of their ENCE, page A-7 Originally named see CONFER 10 years ago. Advocates, the Business Women

National Assisted Living Week

Enter tainment

Enter tainment

d

2016

Ashley Ludwig STAFF WRITER

Valley Unified The Murrieta the board acting as School District Financing AuthorMVUSD Public the refunding of d ity has authorize Tax Revenue $75 million in Special of lowerBonds taking advantage ing interest rates.

has signed Hemet City Councilof Understatdum off on a Memoran unit of the ing with the non-safety es International Service Employe provide no general Union that will to its city workers salary increase step raises starting outside of regular June 30, 2019. July 1, 2016, through

April 15 – 21,

support

Tony Ault STAFF WRITER

Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

see page A-3

s.com w ww.myvalleynew

2016

Prepare to ‘Get Shamrocked’ at popular Celtic music festival

Kim Harris EDIA.COM VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERM the last three Every fall for to

see page A-5

see page A-4

to post to social

Clinton Keith g groundbreakin held

rendum coming

baseball during a mock Kim HarrisSgt. took to the mound Master EDITOR MANAGING for him as he Marine Corps United States surprise in store son and daughter Kim Harris arm, his father, no idea of the AJ ceremony for to surprise his council meeting May 12. Menifee had warmed up his aking as a disguise Base MANAGING EDITOR groundbre return to the next ndation of revld pitcher from young ball player and slips into umpire gear off Clinton Keith at March Air ReserveA nt, sweeps ited Brock, a 10-year-o May 13. As the the park back to the U.S. as with their recomme the long-awa have been ar- AJ d Park Friday, ty building at was held Jacob Preal of combat deployme and returned umpire. g options, as well to mystery Eight more people game at Wheatfiel served 3 tours out in a communi for training for six-months extension project enue generatin NEWS INTERN Road himself as the years, who has of search warrants Randy Brock (top, left) hides whether or not March 30. When VALLEY after he revealed rested in string deployed in Japan dad, Randy, a Marine for 21 their opinion on r. Wednesd ay, from their dad Riverside County during the game. Brock was disguised photos originally widening gap be- put it up for vote this Novembe the roadway, (right) get a hug mother Janet (not pictured). Gibson served by the InShane Mikaella as his cleverly completed Special Pressured by a left) nt nt, said generated Robert Johnson mid-1990 s, will Sheriff’s Departme MET in an watches (bottom, plate. AJ and his sister, 9-year-old long deployme City Manager expenditures and Menifee city’s planned in the home home after the Keith from I-215 tween the council the vestigations Bureau’s within the city, of il- the dirt from were thrilled to have thier dad connect Clinton to shared with budget and his prorevenues problem 6, the April 4-1, combat 79. The children effort to post midyear to State Route over the City Council voted grows in Riverside on page A-3. manager $50,000 for city finances g to his legal marijuana see page A-6 See more photos allocate the city expert in order jections Accordin years. an five won with County. next handbag to consult even this resolution for com- forecast, Menifee broke both exprovided a designer in Business see page A-7 to reach a city Farm Insurance efforts that can year with $29.6 million in Julie Ngo of State Reality Rally at the recent Women Paul Bandong photo munity outreach revenues. and of 2016. public safety s and generated by Gillian Larson South Coast Winery Sept. 8, accommodate however, City penditure at in a growing city. the next five years, conference held

Potential tax refe

shown Estate gardensPlateau ents Rosa Entertainment Special need stud ular in Santa tourifee Artists tainment Enter brate at Spectac HS Nature Education Men ive cele tect pro ates GO featured at Balloon & Councilman don Prom, hosted at Open House event Murrieta City Control officers Wine Festival this weekend vests to Animal

rising costs possible tax opstaff proposed four three of which tions to raise funds,special election. require a citywide said they realize Councilmembers ion a Menifee the stiff competit on lengthy face proposal will this November proposition formselection coming with the general a unanimous swing. Through directed to of the arts full staff was Local artists, patronsto view the council vote, and guests gathered the on the walls of newest creations the Center April 3 at Kay Ceniceros Council Menifee bimonthly Arts open house.

Tony Ault WRITER

o New Subscriber

of the Reality

s in Old

Rally challenge

Shane Gibson

photo

Kim Harris MANAGING EDITOR

Local

grow stings

media for one

Workshop TroPennypickle’s the Golden Mic a selfie inside t “Conga” won ce. from throughou for best performan stars and players head-to- phy so good and the kicked off with the Temecula Valley going “The talent was may do Reality Rally n judged event. so great that we for the Sync Showdow head in the audiencees was Rat Sult, response its first ever Lip as a kick-off April 7. The Ceremoni this every year Jonat Pala Mesa Resort l that orga- Master of or and sports mar- Reality Rally,” said Chairman event coordinat and director event was so successfu g making it the keting and management promoter. nie Fox. Fox is founder into town last and Reality Rally raced it a plethora nizers are considerin Entertainment, performances event for the annual with of Jonnie Fox The high energy weekend bringing of TV’s most regular kickoff voting, but ul- vocal entertainment group Jonnie Michelle’s g close some benefitin to r led fundraise chose Matt of stars from some shows including Place Breast Cancer Resource timately the audience Sherman page A-7 popular reality see RALLY, r over Ashley and Afraid,” the Gallaghe “Survivor,” “Naked Race.” Fans Center. participated in place. Dennis Luciani’s Fifteen groups reality for second and “The Amazing of events to n featuring both showdow flocked to a variety favorite players. meet with their

21 takes team Century Reality Rally April 9. Town Temecula

to Menifee

Subscription Form

Over gap will be formed a considerable le $20 million defiwith a foreseeab the city does not if cit accumulating councilmembers act now. While about handing remained skepticalthe consultation, so over $50,000 for them that doing Johnson assured E, page A-3 see MENIFE

to the public her ez briefly explained on playgrounds Lisa Almendar e being sprayed Public Speaker Jacob Preal photo roundup glyphosat concerns about and schools.

o Renewal

Kim Harris – Animal control WILDOMAR Friends of the MANAGING EDITOR officers of Animal a bit safer variety of Featurin g a wide Valleys are feeling daily duties air their all genres, hot th as they pursue concerts from and at the 12 communities thanks balloon glows in a sailor theme Wiens throughout the of Murrieta City balloon rides, Briley and EMS held at nd honored veterans y some of Temecula Fire Marshal Jason Antonucci. photo Kitties” event much of This dachshu to the generosit to get a feel to bring the wine from see page B-2 Paul Bandong finest winfor canines and e.” Park, Friday, see page C-2 Jonathan Ingram. an Coordinator Jennifer ted by the City experienc Square annual “Wines Tony Ault Town Walker Councilm actually Valley Wine Country’s High rieta’s 24. custom fitted Great Oak Temecula Balloon All were congratula surprised to of surviving Raevyn Saturday, Sept. Intern WRITER A total of nine Winery. Attendin gSept. 23, andDuke’s eries, this year’s promises visitors also to the AFV shared her message becoming an Valley News Council who were in Temecul a, being Festival see page C-2 and Wine vests were presented School & only briefat disorders Scott Fergunot her field new tradition was The out eating in the ever before. Paul Bandong Duke about Murrieta Fire Chief Sean Hadden learn that a advocate through officers for use quinceañ era stood Ferguson. more fun than corner, Ask Giselle 12, at the AFV animal welfare ips with shelter Chief Staff Writer a grin instantly with the cameras in every introduced by Chief minted son and Police ing Monday, Sept. Wildomar and see page B-5 relationsh friends in quinceañera and healing her just city’s newest police fire department had 50 coins public in of than many facility introduced the ra Shelter ofof the Valleys dogs. “Animals are more but with on her face. officials, s to the Mursurprise to the Animal Friends – they can glows month, Duke had the op- the court attending a quinceañe give out to city for officers and firefighter came as a total wanted it to be a communi ty at followed to , many and companions annual “Wines Last officials and e her rite “We Council April 5 Spectacular Prom held its 12th safety the City first time. Inevitably 5, at the friendsus how to savor the present mopresent. experienc the outstandrieta to during ficers for March the ACO photo friends pinning ceremony. teach who have given Middleton, under the Shane Gibson developed from she said. portunity Canines & Kitties” dances with his by a formal badge pinned by Had- members to the fire department in surprise” said Mo department Cellars. The event ment and reclaim our joy,” Willa of passage ceremony Channel, conversations Joshua Certza landscaping backMay 14. the Wiens Family Director Introduced and lovers atwith its garden as the YouTube feature culture shock. of were ing support Supervisor for a) Oak High School animal Executive SRPNEF the waterfall officers Great 220 spotlight, question and quinceñer AFV and as of (a greeted the to cars e beach chorus Oak High sold out den and his commandrecruited from past years. coins were given as a It started with “I had to explain it took them a nessTV, chose nts of the organizaled a rousing n, A homemad a collection of restored classic 39125 Avenida Bonita. assistant Great Police departme Quinceañera” at tended in support serving local Bagwell Birthday ” to Jeanette- Awesome The first or of the celebratio friends) and member officers Brock Devey whether local dropped with head coordinat La Cresta home said, as been Merilyn Ault photo her in its “My Dream selects one to (my Departme nt and special recognition to each Raevyn Walker donating used tion that has Spectacular Prom garden tour guests at this with “Happy is retiring from to catch on,” Duke of her Randon Carlsbad Police might consider use by Animal The Web show saw her sixth for 28 years VALLEY NEWS INTERN Marie Bassi, who ra jour- while Devey, Reed Leitch, of the City Council, Mayor Gibbs, for night. d that some Women’s series. commun ities Officers Brock to fruition that protective vests AFV Fund Raisone proactive humane the Temecul a Valley longtime girl to have their quinceañe s they will Ludwig g she discovere Pro Tem Rick Miller and Thomas challenge Ashley even heard of with their comemost enjoy all three of the high education and online, showcasin Jeff Martin, Steve from the River- Lane, MayorJonathon Ingram, Harry environmental WRITER Control Officers. Tiffani Young of friends had not programs . The group has been “I ney broadcast Gracing the world It’s their en STAFF tor, animal services $27,000 (after Club. Thes of AFV. the 15th birthday before. On top of the pressuresera, need students Manager coming together. all about Tony Ault Gresser all formally Department, Councilm face in the future. Garden Tour ing Coordina many facets of quinceañ if he might be grins, the specialHigh, Temecula schools Alan Long, City supporter Hispanic lavish ce by Em- the event raised over said. “It’s at Temecula ’s Naiman the imThe 13th Annual counts side County Sheriff’s Lake Elsinore Ramos and for the modern played organizing a Joe then asked Ingram AdministraAshley Ludwig there A surprise performan the kids STAFF WRITER COM Quality from Great Oak Chaparral High night,” Koeffler entitled “Garden-both in the from determining if her friends expenses) for AFV. EEDERMEDIA. Rick Dudley, Hadden, ns’ minis and tradition and cameras Human it’s just fun to see fun.” rs during Edger Sel Hayes and Garden Party VistaBackyard to able to help in winery,” Staff Writer Duke taught JNAIMAN@R to the Ashley Ludwig Dance Productio wowed the girl. The lights Valley High, and end them and Bella Heather Scrivano. having Nature’s sponsors available n born families opened ing in Mother Pre-even t appetize Director Joy Canfield, Great Gatsby portance of quinceañeras by PF pire teams and Disptacher the by toHungaria thefor the Work- were possible Four La Cresta Dr. Kim Foxd the school year’s WRITER newly pro- tive in their own element,d throughout how created right into Duke’s gear. her visitors visitors and of celebrate Manager the juniors dance ty to The wine Temecula Valley cocktail hour were provided made lease introduced 14. it Cziraki, visit the hundreds acquiring May communi Relations gardens you thought CERT Ferguson In 2014 an Jonathan When the ar Prom the Hispanic in Mur- assist in The fun permeate to the many their estate viewGizella Imreto and theme, as she his love for support brought estate g City Councilm crowd. owners homes Chief David Lantzer worth, Capt. Norton, Colonyothers. , day for pet at Spectacul and cruise down Chang’s. another in 15,000 aniA-4Center years Development Middleton from the historic around facilitatin As a result, given respect for moted Deputy He La Cresta Mojust the evening’s 14 showing their two Wine Country the crowd, even vests from Murrieta ACO Supv. even more special. It was DUKE, page “In 1996, we took seeforce landscapes off and in the views Hal Olcott and custom fitted Dulak. Scan- event centeredyouth with special all of Noah Turner began of Adele’s rate was night special educa- May Santa Rosa Plateau Nature with a deep Country Nelson, extended for five following me Capt. Clinton Norton. A-6 the member pinning and Morgan receiving Jack was new Wine in release them page line Chris not and after rieta is live owner the animals NS, quilted vineyard Road, there is no the Crivello, Wright, for lease’s our enjoyed to for rescue “I in uniform, kneeling for a photo cool Anthony mals and with his rendition Temecula California end of the see GARDE in proceeds down discovered two inclusion have the students d Engineer Jacob photo , she but who attended Education Foundation’s missionthe said. “It was so individuals serving decision ACO Officers pose Winery is known left standing are Joe Alcarez and Chris Cabrera, ning Facebook Courtesy following the Rancho California provincial win- events Chief Sean Hadden a special ceremony performedphoto recognize who would not tion program of page A-3 around,” Duke Pictured from estate. Bella Vista term, but a recent those in y made the “Hello.” n pinscher puppies needs, ty to experience a school become aware ial winery in Murrieta Police see WINES, Tony Ault Shannon Ingram last week. Sheila Risinger, Daniel Roger, original 5-year missing the French police officers stray Doberma page A-5 help students Board of Su- he eventuall as the first commerc bottom of the hill. Best-sell ing writer, for Pound, each of his newest 5. streets of Tijuana, opportuni see DANCE, Will Tucker, Ingram, and Bill Nichols. 5-0 Riverside County23, approved ery estate at the Pound Council April living on the dance. the Temecula region. Aug. Jan Bratten Kopp, author of front of the City need of help. an instructional pervisors vote ION, page A-3 Andrew, see page C-4 Mexico, in dire see page B-4 Traci Koeffler, that lease. DONAT of n see the terminatio see page B-6 Highmusic lovers flock Celtic at Great years,Oak ShamMy Duke, a freshman the annual Get Web show,for nines, Giselle photo ra with the reality Murrieta Dressed to the Festival. Now in Video y and Music her quinceañe Irish Photograph rocked School, celebrated festival expects every step. Torres stars fourth year, the documenting its Quinceañera of what reality the same to Mur-

s and

and Fire new hire Murrieta Policeed promotions not

Wine Country

Wine Country

Business

Maurice Car’rie a consistent winner in y Temecula Valle

County terminates lease for Workforce Dev. Center

Your Best Source for Local News & Advertising see page C-7

Serving Temecula, Murrieta, Menifee, Wildomar, Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake areas and Hemet & San Jacinto

Don’t miss a single week!

Support local, independent news by subscribing today.

Sign up to have the Valley News delivered to your home weekly!

Pets

Ohana Paws Rescue, no pet left behind

Name: __________________________________________________ Bella Vista ry Winery, histo and European wine

Address: ________________________________________________ City:_______________________ State:________ Zip: ____________ Phone: _________________________________________________ Email: __________________________________________________ Subscription Payment Options (Choose One) o $45.95 one year - New Subscriber Special* o $79.95 two years - New Subscriber Special* o $99.95 three years - New Subscriber Special* o Visa

o Mastercard

Special Discounted Pricing!

o Check

Cardnumber: _____________________________________________ Expiration Date:_______________ Billing Zip Code: ______________ Signature: _______________________________________________

Call 951-763-5510 to Subscribe

OR Mail this completed form to: Valley News, 1588 S. Mission Road, Suite 200, Fallbrook, CA 92028

Or Subscribe Online at: www.reedermedia.com/corp/subscribe *Introductory rate for New Subscribers only. After the first year, regular rates will apply at $49.95 per year, $89.95 two years and $119.95 three years. Renewals will not be charged until the last paid subscription period expires. This agreement remains until cancelled by myvalleynews.com.


VALLEY

B

Section

NEWS

December 2 – 8, 2016

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 16, Issue 49

SPORTS

HS Football: Nighthawks, Eagles soar into CIF Southern Section Championships JP Raineri  SPORTS@REEDERMEDIA.COM

As the 2016 high school football season comes to an end, not one, but two local teams find themselves playing in the final game of the season. Temecula’s Rancho Christian Eagles (11-2) continue to ride the success from their regular season along with the Murrieta Valley Nighthawks (11-2) as both teams look to end their storybook seasons victoriously. After claiming their first ever South Valley League Championship this season, the Eagles made it through the semifinals with a 28-21 win over Godinez High School and went on to face South El Monte (112) in the semifinals of the Division 13 bracket Friday, Nov. 25. It would be Rancho Christian’s second half performance that was the key difference as they defeated South El Monte 42-28 to advance to the CIF Southern Section Division 13 Championship game Friday, Dec. 2. The two teams fought to a 14-14 tie as they headed to the lockeroom at halftime. The Eagles jumped ahead 21-14 on the second play of the third quarter as junior QB, Jaden Schieberl, scored on a 69-yard run, which was his third touchdown of the night. Sophomore Malosi Napoleon would on the Eagles next possession, running the ball in from 30 yards out. South El Monte cut the lead to a single TD on a quarterback keeper play, but Rancho Christian drove right back down the field with Schieberl scoring his fourth and final touchdown of the game on a 6-yard run with 9:30 left in the game. Sophomore Jojo Saatzer came up a clutch interception that he ran back 20-yards and Napoleon turned out the lights on South El Monte with an 8-yard run to put the game away 42-21. South El Monte’s QB, Daniel Olmos would get the final score on a late fourth quarter run. He completed 10 of his 14 passes for 111 yards and ran for 69 more. Running back, Sal Tovar ended up running for 145 yards on 22 carries, caught two passes for 22 yards and had a TD. Schieberl rushed for 236 yards on 15 carries for Rancho Christian and Napoleon added another 110 yards with his 14 touches. Junior place kicker Emma Baker was a perfect 6 for 6 in her PAT attempts. Rancho Christian will be home Saturday, Dec. 3, to face Santa Ana. The Undefeated Saints (130), champions of the Golden West League, are back in a CIF Final for the first time since 1986. Coach Charlie TeGantvoort’s team has scored over 400 points while barely allowing 150. QB Damien Macias and RB Jorge Briseno lead the offense while Kevin Cea anchors the strong defense. Santa Ana seeks the schools seventh CIF title. Rancho Christian arrives at its first CIF final game. The Eagles, champions of the South Valley League, have won eight games in a row, scoring over 460 points and barely allowed 250. The Eagles rushing attack has combined for over 45 TDs while Nicholas Alvarez has 13.5 sacks for a team nearing 50 total sacks on the season. Rancho Christian looks to win the programs first CIF title. Before the Eagles take on Santa Ana, all eyes will be on the Murrieta Valley Nighthawks Friday, Dec. 2. The Nighthawks, who have taken the old adage of a clean slate in the playoffs to heart, exploded for nine touchdowns and gained over 700 yards en route to a 63-42 victory over La Habra in their Division 2 semifinal playoff game Friday, Nov. 25. The Nighthawks, with their wellbalanced attack, are averaging 560.3 yards per game with over 7,200 total yards on the season: 3,691 on the ground and 3,593 in the air. They have scored 96 TDs and average an astounding 50.8 points per game. Against La Habra sophomore quarterback Hank Bachmeier, who has not thrown an interception in the past seven games (147 passes),

Coach Jim Kunau leads Rancho Christian to the CIF SS Division 13 finals for the first time in school history.

Jaden Schieberl rushed for 236 yards on 15 carries scoring four TDs to lead Rancho Christian to a 42 -28 victory over South El Monte in David Canales photo the CIF Division 13 semi final.

David Canales photo

Malosi Napolean (26) sends the Eagles to the Division 13 final after scoring his second touchdown of the game, Malosi gained 110 yards on 14 carries. David Canales photo

Murrieta Valley heads to the Div. 2 CIF Championships behind running back, Lika Palmer, who has rushed for 2,259 yards on the season, averaging 173.8 yards per game and 9.1 yards per carry. Matthew Ressler photo

threw five touchdowns and completed a season best 23 of 27 passes for 319 yards. Bachmeier has completed 76.3 percent of his passes on the season for 3,558 yards and 43 TDs. Senior running back Lika Palmer got the job done on the ground gaining 272 yards on 38 carries and scored four rushing touchdowns and had another one via airmail. Palmer has rushed for 2,259 yards on the season, averaging 173.8 yards per game and 9.1 yards per carry. He has 28 rushing TDs, two kickoff return TDs and one receiving TD. The Nighthawks actually trailed twice in the game. The Highlanders scored first and the two teams went back and forth scoring touchdowns through second quarter when the Nighthawks finally pulled away taking a 42-28 score into halftime. Murrieta Valley’s defense made several big plays to ensure their victory,

but did give up six TDs and almost 500 yards against La Habra, though they would outscore the Highlanders 21-14 in the final half to go on to win, 63-42. “We came up with big stops when we needed to, but we need play better defense in big games like this,” said Murrieta Valley Coach Sean Cue. “We have some room for error with an offense like ours, but if we can fix the little mistakes we made as we head into next week, all should be good.” Junior Marquis Spiker (1,494 yards and 23 TDs on the season) had six catches for three touchdowns and 79 yards against La Habra, senior Ryan Mascarenas caught the other TD pass from Bachmeier and good news came earlier this week for senior and team captain, Maurice Bell, who has been cleared to play. Bell had to leave the game after catching three passes due to what

Leading the Nighthawks to the CIF Div. 2 Championships is sophomore quarterback, Hank Bachmeier (19), has completed 76.3 percent of his passes on the season for 3,558 yards and 43 TDs. Matthew Ressler photo

was thought to be a torn meniscus, but reports indicate there is no tear and he will be a game time decision, according to Coach Pete Duffy. In the playoffs, the Nighthawks have scored 190 points in three games, averaging 63.3 pts per game and have totaled 1,846 yards, averaging over 615 yards: 367 rushing and 267 passing per game. Murrieta Valley will be home Friday, Dec. 2, to host San Clemente in the CIF Southern Section Division 2 Championship game and one program will finally ascend to the mountaintop. San Clemente arrives at its third straight CIF title game after falling just short the previous two years. The Tritons come in at 10-3 and the runner ups of the South Coast league after beating the

top seeded Heritage Patriots in the second round. Coach Jaime Ortiz leads a well-balanced squad that has been on a roll during the playoff s. QB Jack Sears has passed for 2033 yards and 31 TDs while rushing for almost 10 TDs while RB Brandon Reavens is responsible for 21 total touchdowns. On defense the Tritons have forced over 20 turnovers and 23 sacks. The Tritons are back in a CIF final and hungry for their first CIF title, but so is Murrieta Valley as the Nighthawks look to complete their storybook season with the programs first CIF title. Game time is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Article contributions made by Valley News General Sales Manager and sports writer, Paul Bandong.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

B-2

Local

Caltrans outlines Riverside, San Bernardino District 8 freeway projects in next 5 years Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

A list and a map showing 20 Southwest Riverside County Caltrans District 8 freeway projects either underway or planned for the next five years now available from the district offices in San Bernardino were handed out at a Riverside County District 3 Municipal Advisory Council meeting in Anza Nov. 9. The information is available on request from residents in Riverside and San Bernardino County. Caltrans District 8 is a part of the state transportation agency’s efforts to be more transparent with their projects. The district offices are located at 464 W. 4th Street in San Bernardino or and can be reached by calling (909) 383-4646. Below is a list of those projects, costs and expected startup and completion dates. The projects will take place on Interstate 10, 15 and 215 and several other state highways. Interstate 15 in Temecula from 0.2 miles south of California Road w w w . m y v a l l e y n e w s . c o m

ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK Serving the communities of Temecula, Murrieta, Wildomar, Menifee, Sun City, Lake Elsinore, Hemet, San Jacinto, and Anza weekly. JULIE REEDER, Publisher LISA HASLER, Accounting

Editorial

KIM HARRIS, Managing Editor J.P. RAINERI, Sports Editor JODI THOMAS, Anza Area Manager SHANE GIBSON, Staff Photographer TIM O’LEARY, Staff Writer PAUL BANDONG, Staff Writer TONY AULT, Staff Writer JOE NAIMAN, Writer JACOB PREAL, Weekend News Desk Editor TARYN MURPHY, Intern

Advertising Sales

MICHELE HOWARD JOSEPHINE MACKENZIE TIM DEEGAN LAURIANNA BRIANA ANNA MULLEN TAMMY BIRMINGHAM SHANDA WILSON ADKINS

Production

KARINA RAMOS YOUNG, Art Director FOREST RHODES, Production Assistant SAMANTHA GORMAN, Graphic Artist MYLENA MATHENY, Graphic Artist

Digital Services LEE YATES TIFFANY YANG ANDREW REEDER

Copyright Valley News, 2016 A Village News Inc. publication Julie Reeder, President The opinions expressed in Valley News do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Valley News staff.

Advertising Policy: Acceptance of an advertisement by Valley News does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of its sponsors or the products offered. We will not knowingly publish advertisements that are fraudulent, libelous, misleading or contrary to the policies of Valley News. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement we find unsuitable. Please direct all advertising inquiries and correspondence to the address below. Letters to the Editor: Please submit all correspondence to our corporate office by e-mail to valleyeditor@reedermedia.com or by fax to (760) 723-9606. All correspondence must be dated, signed and include the writer’s full address and phone number in order to be considered for publication. All letters are submitted to editing to fit the the publication’s format. Back Issues Available: A limited number of previous issues of Valley News and Anza Valley Outlook (prior to current week) are available for $1.50 each, plus $1.00 postage and handling ($2.50 total cost). Call (760) 723-7319 to order.

ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 391353, Anza, CA 92539 PHONE: (760) 723-7319 PHONE: (951) 763-5510 FAX: (760) 723-9606 ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK (ISSN 0883-6124) is a legally adjudicated paper, AKA AMERICAN OUTLOOK, is published weekly by the The Village News, Inc., 1588 S. Mission Rd. #200, Fallbrook, CA 92028. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Anza Valley Outlook, P.O. Box 391353, Anza, CA 92539. A N Z A VA L L E Y O U T L O O K I S N O T RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CORRECTNESS OF OPINIONS OR INFORMATION OR ERRORS PRINTED IN THIS PAPER, OR FOR ANY JOB, SERVICE OR SALES ITEM. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CHECK OUT ALL ADS. Anza Valley Outlook is a newspaper of general circulation printed and published weekly in the City of Anza, County of Riverside, and which newspaper has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of the County of Riverside, State of California, March 14, 1986; Case Number 176045

Anza Valley Outlook and Valley News Published weekly Mail to Corporate Office 1588 S. Mission Rd. #200 Fallbrook, CA 92028 (951) 763-5510 FAX (760) 723-9606 Corporate Office: (760) 723-7319 OUR E-MAIL ADDRESSES: valleyeditor@reedermedia.com info@reedermedia.com sales@reedermedia.com circulation@reedermedia.com

to 0.1 miles south of Winchester Road. It will relocate existing roadside facilities to safe work locations and provide vegetation control treatments. The cost will be $1,085,000, starting in spring 2017 and completed in the fall. Interstate 15 in Temecula from Junction 79 and Winchester Road to the southbound on ramp at Rancho California Road. It will relocate existing road side facilities to safe work locations and provide vegetation control treatments. The cost will be $1,533,000, starting in fall 2018 and completion in fall 2020. Interstate 15 near Temecula from the San Diego County line to the southbound on ramp at Rancho California Road that will relocate existing roadside facilities to safe work locations and provide vegetation control treatments. The cost will be $1,173,000, starting in the spring of 2017 with completion in the winter. Interstate 15 in Temecula, Murrieta and Corona from 0.2 miles north of Winchester Road to 0.2 miles south of Warm Springs Creek; 0.05 miles south of Temescal Wash bridge to 0.02 miles south of Parkridge Avenue. The cost will be $820,000 and will provide sediment stabilization, erosion control (source control), starting in summer 2020 with completion in summer 2021. Interstate 15 in Temecula from

0.42 miles south of Route 15/79 separation to 0.64 miles south of the route 15/215 separation that will do a preventative maintenance overlay treatment. The cost will be $7,875,000, starting in summer 2017 with completion in winter 2018. Interstate 15 from the San Diego County line to the Temecula River replacing the two outside lanes in both directions. The cost will be $31,010,000, starting in the fall 2020 with completion in spring 2022. Interstate 15 in Temecula from Rancho California Road to the north junction of 79/Winchester Road to replace plants and the irrigation system. The cost will be $1,210,000, starting summer 2020 with completion winter 2022. Interstate 15 near Murrieta from 0.5 miles south of Route 1-15/I-215 separation to 0.3 miles north of Clinton Keith Road to relocate signs and electric facilities for safety, modify and upgrade irrigation facilities. The cost will be $3,240,000 starting summer 2019 with completion winter 2020. Interstate 15 Menifee near Murrieta at Scott Road to reconstruct the interchange. The cost will be $63,781,000 starting in spring 2017 with completion in fall 2018. Interstate 215 in Murrieta, 2 miles north of Clinton Keith Road to 1 mile south of Scott Road

(with city lead) to build a double roundabout interchange. The cost will be $32,406,000 beginning summer 2021 with completion in spring 2023. Interstate 215 in Murrieta and Menifee from the Route 15/215 separation to 0.5 miles north of Scott Road to provide sediment stabilization and erosion control. The cost will be $6,003,000 starting in winter 2019 with completion winter 2021. Interstate 215 Murrieta, Menifee and Perris from 0.1 mile south of Keller Road to Cactus Avenue for sediment stabilization and erosion control. The cost will be $1,048,000 starting winter 2019 with completion summer 2023 Interstate 215 in Menifee at McCall Boulevard interchange with interchange modifications. The cost will be $27,510,000 starting summer 2012 with completion summer 2023. Interstate 215 Menifee to construct a four-lane bridge overcrossing. The cost will be $ 4,000,000 starting summer 2017 with completion summer 2018. Interstate 215 Murrieta from 0.2 miles north of Clinton Keith Road to 0.5 miles south of Scott Road to install a concrete barrier at the edge of shoulder. The cost will be $3,000,000, starting winter 2019 with completion winter 2020. Interstate 10 near Banning from

0.3 miles west of East Ramsey Street to San Jack Ditch Bridge to replace barbed wire and wire mesh fence. The cost will be $300,000, starting winter 2020 with completion summer 2021. Interstates 10, 215, Highways 111, in Riverside and San Bernardino counties to do miscellaneous work including deck rehabilitation, super and substructure repair, railing repairs, scour mitigation and joint and sign replacement. The cost will be $1,961,000, starting winter 2018 with completion spring 2019. Interstate 10 from Banning, Palm Springs and Blythe at San Gorgonio Wash, Whitewater overflow and the Blythe Bridge for seismic retrofits. The cost will be $4,451,000, starting winter 2018 with completion winter 2019. Interstate 10 Beaumont rom Pennsylvania Avenue to the 10/111 separation to replace lances 3 and 4 and outside shoulders with JPCP, overlay inside shoulder, concrete slab replacement Lane and upgrade curb ramps lanes 1 and 2. The cost will be $162,231,000, starting fall 2018 and completion winter 2019. Interstate 10, Routes 60 and 86 at various locations to install five changeable message signs (CMS) on Routes 10 and 60 eastbound and 1 on Route 86 northbound. The cost will be $2,964,000 startup spring 2019 and completion in summer 2019.

Faith

Thanksgiving 2016: A holiday filled with food and thanks in Hemet and San Jacinto Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

It was both giving and thanks in the communities of Hemet and San Jacinto as churches, nonprofits and grateful restaurant owners provided and estimated 3,000 meals to the homeless, shut ins, seniors and the lonely on America’s truest Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 24. The largest hungry and grateful residents appeared Thursday morning at the Val Vista Assembly of God Church on East Florida Avenue for a delicious meal of turkey and all trimmings. The free Thanksgiving meal has been a Val Vista church tradition for 30 years with many of same people attending year after year. Participating in the event were more than 35 other organizations, businesses and churches. The Thanksgiving Day visitors were greeted by the church Pastor Randy Jones, the assistant pastors and volunteers who offered a handshake and, if desired, a loving hug. “Let’s all love on the people. Give them a loving touch, but only if they want it,” Pastor Jones explained during the volunteer orientation. “Some don’t like to be touched … Now, let’s man your battle stations.” The nearly 300 volunteers, including the four newest Hemet and San Jacinto beauty queens, spread out in teams to serve the diners in two lines. Turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, casseroles, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and all the holiday food favorites filled the plates of all those attending in the fellowship hall. Not only did the volunteer servers dish out the meals to the people coming to the church but others like Pastor of the Nigerian Balm of Truth Church Matthew Olaniyi and his friend Dave Felix helped take tinfoil covered meals to shut ins in the area. It was one of Pastor Olaniyi’s many helpful acts he has made since earning his Ph.d. in Ministry in the United States. Olaniyi surpised other guests by wearing his traditional brightly-colored tunic and hat for Thanksgiving. The church took out 368 meals to shut ins in the Hemet and San Jacinto Valley. Clergy of other faiths were also in attendance offering words of thanks, joy and hope to all those present. Pleasantly surprised were the

Graham brothers, Billy (not the evangelist) and David, regular Thanksgiving dinner guests, when Miss Hemet Kelsie Bohanon and Miss Hemet Jocelynn Schlieder personally served them pieces of pumpkin pie. “We been coming here five years,” said Billy. “We wouldn’t miss it.” Both brothers, like others enjoying the dinner who had no other family to enjoy Thanksgiving with or were without a home of their own. The Grahams said they are from San Jacinto and are now living out of their truck. They said they were very thankful for the homecooked meal and the company that day. Miss San Jacinto Dominique Hernandez and Miss Teen San Jacinto Kaylee Morales were also seen in the serving lines helping where they could. Newly Elected Hemet City Councilwoman Karlee Meyer and other city officials attended and helped out with food serving during the afternoon. Last Year re-elected Mayor Bonnie Wright volunteered as a server. Another free Thanksgiving dinner that afternoon was offered at the Dwelling Place Church on Girard for mainly for those homeless and needy, but others were also welcome. Not only were free turkey dinners offered the approximately 200 attending but an opportunity to get a haircut, receive a free health checkup and with the help of Project Hope, Street Soldiers were offered a “Hope” bag filled with toiletries, water, food, soap and other necessities not always available to the homeless. Dwelling Place Pastor Bob Beckett – helping with the special Thanksgiving event – said this was the first time the dinner was being held on the church grounds. In past years, members and volunteers, not only from the Dwelling Place but from other Christian churches and faith based groups, like the Risen Kings motorcycle group in the Valley went to Hemet’s Weston Park to serve the meals and offer personal assistance to the homeless and needy. This year those from the park and other areas who wished to come to the dinner were bused to the church. “This is just who we are as a

Dwelling Place Church Pastor Bob Beckett with Project Hope Outreach Ministry CEO Stacie Olson and her son Elijah, 8, greeted the many homeless and needy invited to the church’s Thanksgiving dinner and festival. Nov. 24 at 27100 Girard St. in Hemet.

Miss Teen San Jacinto Kaylee Morales serves a dinner guest during the free Thanksgiving meal that served to more than 2,000 area residents Thanksgiving Day Nov. 24. Courtesy photos

church,” said Beckett, “It is in our DNA just to help others.” Assistant Dwelling Place Pastor Steve Rook summed Thanksgiving up saying, “Thanksgiving is simply for our God, country and family who we should be thankful for. Every day should be a Thanksgiving Day.” Meanwhile, those more fortunate found themselves in long lines and wait times at popular restaurants offering special Thanksgiving meals or visiting with close friends and family.

It seemed to be an especially thankful time for the thousands of Hemet and San Jacinto families knowing the economy seems to be improving, health care expanding and a promise, with the passage of Public Safety Measure U to help assure residents a safer community and seeing more and more public and private agencies seeking solutions for the growing number of homeless trying to find work and housing in the area.

The View Church gives over 100 Thanksgiving meals to community families MENIFEE – On Sunday, Nov. 20, members of The View Church came together in a collective effort to compile over 100 boxes filled with complete Thanksgiving meals for families in the Temecula Valley. Each box, or care package as volunteers called them, was complete with a 10 pound turkey, side dishes and even a pie for dessert. The meals were loaded onto

vehicles and delivered joyfully by church staff and volunteers alike. Remaining meals were distributed to local families during a church gathering at Rancho Ramona Park in Menifee Sunday afternoon. The charitable efforts of The View Church benefited over 100 families in the local community, including meals delivered to families in partnership with Circle of Care, Quail

Valley Elementary School, Project Touch, and other community organizations. The effort is part of The View Church’s mission to be a church that is necessary in the local community. Pastor Chuck Keim of Circle of Care expressed sincere gratitude for the donations. “We don’t buy any food,” Keim said. “We pass along all that we can get. We

serve about 850 families a week, and this will be very helpful during this holiday season. We thank The View Church for the faithful giving.” Supporters can keep up with The View Church and get information regarding their future community initiatives online at www.theview. church.


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-3

Health

Improve indoor air quality in advance of winter 2016 TOP DOCTOR

Dr. Vidhya Koka, MD Medical Director, SJ Medical Group

D

Improving and maintaining indoor air quality in winter can help a home’s inhabitants stay healthy during the colder months. Courtesy photo

Upon the arrival of winter, people in regions where winter is marked by cold weather tend to spend significantly more time indoors. Because windows tend to be closed during winter, indoor air quality can suffer, making conditions inside a home less than desirable. According to the American Lung Association, poor air circulation in a home can promote the spread of bacteria and viruses. Once such bacteria or viruses are inhaled, coughs, colds and flu can spread. In addition, asthma and allergy sufferers may experience worsening symptoms thanks to the presence of endotoxins, which are substances that come from the broken-down cells of dead bacteria. Because many people spend significantly more time indoors during winter than other times of the year, it’s essential that they take measures to improve indoor air quality in the months ahead. Cut back on chemicals. It’s ideal to avoid heavy chemical usage inside a home throughout the year, but it’s especially important to do so during winter. Solvent-based cleaners or cleaning products with strong fragrances can negatively affect indoor air quality and potentially trigger allergic reactions. In lieu of chemically-enhanced cleaning products, use natural products that get the job done without sacrificing indoor air quality. Stop smoking indoors. Tobacco smoke can affect smokers and nonsmokers alike. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children. Those include more frequent and severe asthma attacks and respiratory infections. In addition, reports from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have linked secondhand smoke to an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Adults exposed to secondhand smoke are at greater risk for coronary heart disease, stroke and lung cancer. Tobacco smoke contains thousands of pollutants that can greatly diminish indoor air quality, so make sure smokers limit their smoking to outside the home throughout the year, but especially during winter. Take off your shoes when entering the home. Snowy conditions often require a home’s inhabitants and guests to remove their footwear upon entering a home, but it helps to remove footwear in a mudroom

or just inside the front door when entering a home even when it’s not snowing. Shoes can pick up dirt, dust and a host of other particles during winter, and if tracked inside those unwanted guests can negatively affect indoor air quality. Routinely inspect bathrooms for mold. During winter, mold can grow in rooms that are exposed to moisture but not properly ventilated. In many homes, that’s the bathroom. Even if a bathroom has a ventilation fan, routinely inspect the ceiling and shower for mold growth. Exposure to mold can cause a host of negative side effects, including nasal and sinus congestion and sore throat. Mold also can exacerbate asthma symptoms. Improving and maintaining indoor air quality in winter can help a home’s inhabitants stay healthy during the colder months.

SJ Medical Group, founded by Dr. Vidhya Koka, is committed to offering excellent medical care as well as superior customer service. We serve patients of all ages and backgrounds, from newborns to the elderly, including patients in skilled nursing facilities. Our goal is to meet the healthcare needs of people living in our region, servicing multiple office locations within Southern California.

r. Koka’s patients claim she is their favorite doctor because she is “extremely knowledgeable, caring, listens, great bedside manners and stays on top of their health care needs.” SJ Medical Group, founded by Dr. Koka, is committed to offering excellent medical care serving patients of all ages, including patients in nursing facilities. Dr. Koka graduated from Eastern Virginia Medical School and did her residency at prestigious University of California, Irvine. Dr. Koka was recruited by Mulliken Medical Group during her residency program and later promoted to medical director. She started an urgent care program to serve patients for after hours. Dr. Koka moved to Hemet in January of 2004 with her husband, Lakshman Koka, 3 1/2-year old daughter Anusha and their 21-day old son, Krishna. The Koka family is extremely thankful to their community and show their support

by volunteering and sponsoring most nonprofits that serve our valley. Dr. Koka believes in “Strong and steady quality health care” and has multiple providers (both male and female) and locations to provide specialized care at each location. Exclusive Senior Clinic: (951) 652-3001 is open to serve seniors at 422 N. San Jacinto St., Hemet. Urgent Care: (951) 260-0186 serving all ages for non life threatening medical emergencies at 1579 S. San Jacinto Ave., Suite B, San Jacinto. Urgent care also specializes in schools & business health care by providing drug testing, physicals, workman’s comp services and more! Family practice clinic: (951) 665-1100 at 1695 S. San Jacinto Ave., San Jacinto. Clinic Inside Walmart: (951) 654-8500 at 1861 S San Jacinto Ave., San Jacinto.

Four Locations in Hemet & San Jacinto to Serve You

951-665-1100 Main Number • www.sjmedicalgroup.com

Nationally Recognized for Patient Safety

Tahquitz High School Mental Health Fair planned HEMET – Tahquitz High School students will find their campus visited by a number of private and public health agencies in a special event Friday, Dec. 2 to encourage ways and means to improve their mental and general health through stress reduction and good habits School officials reported they have invited several mental health agency representatives to visit the campus during the two lunch periods, from 11:12 a.m. to 12:48 p.m. “The goal of this fair is to increase student/parent knowledge of the resources available in the community while simultaneously reducing the stigma of mental illness on campus,” a school news release said. Mental health representatives, psychologists, doctors and nurses will be present to answer any questions about mental health problems and provide ideas of how to improve mental health and where they can seek help if needed. There are many avenues available to students suffering from mental health problems that the fair will explain.

Temecula Valley Hospital was awarded an “A” rating for patient safety, ranking it among the safest hospitals in the United States. Learn more at www.temeculavalleyhospital.com

Need a Doctor? Call Direct Doctors Plus® at 855-859-5203. Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Temecula Valley Hospital. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. 163071 11/16


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

B-4

Health

Make sure to store and use holiday leftovers safely TEMECULA – Few meals are created and then eaten in their entirety. That’s especially true of holiday meals or other special events. Leftovers are to be expected, and in many cases, leftovers are eagerly anticipated. Sometimes leftovers can be even more delicious than when the meal was originally served. Storing leftovers may not be so simple, as poorly stored foods may end up causing illness when eaten later. Learn the basics of leftovers and how to prolong the shelf life of foods left behind. Foodborne illness, also known as food poisoning, is caused by harmful bacteria growing in food. Few people can detect changes in the taste or texture of contaminated food, so it can be difficult to know if an item is dangerous to eat, said The Mayo Clinic. Bacteria grow well in what is termed ‘the danger zone.’ This is between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Many instances of foodborne illness can be prevented through proper food handling, which begins when food is purchased and continues during the cooking process, culminating in the safe storage of leftovers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service rec-

Leftovers can be safely stored in the refrigerator for up to four days. Courtesy photo

ommends refrigerating leftovers within two hours of cooking food or holding it hot. All food that has been left out for more than two hours should be discarded if it is perishable. The Mayo Clinic advises that most leftovers can be kept between three to four days in the refrigerator. If they will not be eaten in that time frame, it’s best to freeze the food for a later time. When frozen, some foods can last between three and four months. To cool food rapidly and deter the growth of bacteria, separate food into small, shallow containers. Cut large items of food into smaller portions to cool. Do not allow foods to cool on the counter before storing them in the refrig-

erator. Thawing out leftovers presents another possible safety issue. Use a cold water bath, the refrigerator or the microwave to defrost frozen leftovers. Refrigerated foods can simply be reheated. When reheating leftovers, make sure they reach 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Gravies, soups and sauces should be brought to a rolling boil. The USDA also recommends covering leftovers to reheat them. This retains moisture and ensures that food will heat all the way through. When cooking foods in the microwave, check for cold spots in the food, and reheat accordingly. Safe handling of leftovers can help prevent illness and ensure that leftover food does not go to waste.

Cognitive decline provides another reason to quit smoking

Exceptional care with a gentle touch It’s our pleasure to introduce...

JOHN C. PLATTS, DDS Family and Cosmetic Dentistry

New Patient Special Offer

♦ UCLA Graduate 1993 ♦ Affordable Dental Care

Initial Exam Cleaning and Full Mouth X-Rays

♦ Most Insurance Accepted ♦ Digital X-Ray, Intra-oral Camera ♦ Friendly, Professional Staff

$59

with this ad only now thru

reg $230 December 31, 2016

951-506-5300 temeculavalleydental.com 27450 Ynez Rd ♦ Suite 106 ♦ Temecula In the Target Shopping Center

Are Urinary Problems Interfering with the Quality of Your Life? Do you have frequent urination? Do you often wake at night to urinate? Do you have the sensation of not emptying your bladder? If so, you may be one of the millions of men suffering from a condition called Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) that causes the prostate to enlarge. Urologists at TRI VALLEY UROLOGY are conducting a research study to evaluate an investigational drug to help reduce Overactive Bladder (OAB) symptoms in men with BPH. Qualified participants must currently be taking tamsulosin (medication for BPH).

Basic qualifications are:

• Males, 40 years or older • Currently taking tamsulosin • In general good health

If you qualify, you may receive:

• Study related exams at no cost • Reimbursement of your study-related travel

Tri Valley Urology

25495 Medical Center Drive, Ste 204 • Murrieta, CA 92562 E-mail: colleen@trivalleyurology.com

Call Today (951) 698-1901 ext. 241

BPH Study Participants Wanted

Smoking can damage blood vessels, which may be linked to cognitive decline and dementia. Courtesy photo

TEMECULA – Smokers have scores of reasons to give up the habit. In addition to contributing to cardiovascular disease, lung cancer and other lung ailments, cancers elsewhere in the body, wrinkled skin and diseases of the eyes, nose and mouth, smoking may also contribute to cognitive decline. There’s growing evidence suggesting that using cigarettes can affect the brain in negative ways, including causing cognitive decline as early as age 45. According to the study “Impact of Smoking on Cognitive Decline in Early Old Age,” led by Severine Sabia, as published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry, smoking is a possible risk factor for dementia, although the impact smoking has on the brain may have been underestimated in elderly populations because of the general shorter life span of smokers. Study participants were given a battery of tests in memory, vocabulary and executive function that included reasoning and fluency, and a global cognitive score. Both men and women participated (5,099 men and 2,137 women, with a mean age of 56), and smoking history was recorded over the 10-year assessment period. An analysis revealed that a cognitive decline occurred in all tests except vocabulary among all participants, but mostly in men. However, faster cognitive decline was observed among current smokers compared with those who had never smoked. The size of the effect associated with smoking was similar to that of 10 years of aging. Findings are similar to other research being done on the topic of smoking and its impact on the brain. The Alzheimer’s Society

states that smoking is bad for the heart, lungs, and vascular system including the blood vessels that feed oxygen and nutrients to the brain. Recent research has shown that smoking is a significant risk factor for vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, with smokers twice as likely to develop the disease as nonsmokers. The Mayo Clinic defines vascular dementia as problems with reasoning, planning, judgement, memory and other thought processes caused by brain damage from impaired blood flow to the brain. Factors that increase the risk for vascular dementia are high cholesterol and smoking. Dementia can be brought on by stroke, whether it’s a large stroke or a series of ministrokes. WebMD says vascular dementia can occur over time as “silent” strokes build up – something that seems to occur more readily in smokers and those with cardiovascular disease. Symptoms of cognitive decline that may result from smoking and vascular dementia can include problems with short-term memory, wandering or getting lost, trouble managing money, difficulty planning or following through on activities, loss of bladder or bowel control, delusions or hallucinations, inappropriate emotions and impaired coordination or balance. More research is needed with regard to the association between smoking and cognitive decline related to dementia. If research continues to prove a correlation, greater warning may be issued about smoking and its effect on parts of the body beyond the heart and lungs. Even at this early junction, current research suggests yet another reason to quit lighting up.

#1PHYSICAL THERAPY

in the Inland Empire Fastest Growing Physical Therapy Operation in California!

H H H A LEGACY OF EXCELLENCE H H H TEMECULA Corporate Office: 29645 Rancho California Road, Suite 234 .. 951-506-3001 31515 Rancho Pueblo Road, Suite 101 ...... 951-303-1414 MURRIETA 39755 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd, Ste F 120 . 951-894-1600 25495 Medical Center Drive, Suite 304 ....... 951-696-7474 iCare, 27722 Clinton Keith Rd ..................... 951-878-9820 MENIFEE 29798 Haun Road (Hope Building).............. 951-679-8500

FALLBROOK 577 Elder Street, Suite I ................... 760-723-2687 WILDOMAR 36243 Inland Valley Drive, Ste 110... 951-677-7221 LAKE ELSINORE 425 Diamond Drive, Suite 101.......... 951-674-9515 HEMET 3989 W. Stetson Ave, Suite 105 ....... 951-652-3334 MIRAMAR 8901 Activity Rd, Suite D .................. 619-535-6900 APPLE VALLEY 16008 Kamana Rd, Suite 200 .......... 760-810-7767

www.AllStarPhysicalTherapy.net


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-5

Health

Program offers free specialized phones to Californians with disabilities OAKLAND – The telephone may be an accepted part of life in the 21st century, but not for an estimated 3 million Californians. Most people take using the telephone for granted. But for individuals who have difficulty seeing, hearing, speaking, remembering or moving, what seems to be a simple telephone call can be challenging and can prevent communication with their family, friends and others. The same telecommunications technology that fuels neverending innovation has produced a wealth of specialized phone and devices for people with disabilities. The California Phones provided by the California Telephone Access Program are free to eligible Californians. California residents are eligible for specialized California Phones if they have phone service and are certified by a licensed physician, medical doctor, or audiologist as having difficulty using a standard telephone because of difficulty seeing, hearing, speaking, remembering or moving. There is no cost, obligation, age or income requirement. Once an individual qualifies for a California Phone, they can visit

one of CTAP’s Service Centers throughout California or call (800) 333-7900 to determine the most appropriate device for their requirements. Trained staff will recommend the phone that best fits a client’s needs, discuss the phone features, and provide training on how to use and personalize their California Phone. The Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Program distributes telecommunications equipment and services that improve communication for all Californians. The program of the California Public Utilities Commission provides free specialized telephone equipment and relay services through CTAP and the California Relay Service. CTAP provides California Phones that amplify sound, adjust tone, light up for incoming calls, display phone conversation as text, have large buttons with raised numbers, are portable, or have speed dial phone buttons incorporating photographs. CTAP offers approximately 60 types of specialized California Phones and devices. The California Relay Service provides specially-trained communication assistants to relay

telephone conversations between people who are deaf, hard of hearing or are speech-disabled with those they wish to communicate with by telephone. California Relay Service, captioned telephone and speech-to-speech relay services are all offered in English

and Spanish. The Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Programs is funded by a small surcharge that appears on all Californians’ telephone bills. The money collected pays for both CTAP and the California Relay Service.

This surcharge appears on phone bills as “CA Relay Service and Communications Devices Fund.” To download an application, find the nearest service center, or for more information, visit www.CaliforniaPhones.org or call (800) 333-7900.

Open Enrollment

for Medical Insurance is Here

Who can you trust to help you with your Medical Insurance Needs? TesTimonial “We never realized how much difference it would mean to have the right medical group on your side. My husband is on Medicare and the ‘Medical Group’ he was with was stringing him along for over a year concerning his health issues. Egregious things kept happening and we were more than frustrated. I suggested we talk to Charise about what we were experiencing. I thought perhaps she would know what we should do. When my husband shared what was going on with Charise she took the matter seriously and moved into action; she even made phone calls to his current medical group to see if we could get some satisfaction. After getting nowhere herself she checked out the groups rating. She discovered their customer care rating was so bad they were in danger of losing their insurance companies that subscribe patients to them. She promptly found my husband a new group with excellent ratings. Come this last January 2016 for the first time someone took my husband’s cardiac Arrhythmia and other issues seriously. He was sent to an excellent Cardiologist who promptly sent him to a Superb Electrophysiologist who found what the problem was. Surgery was scheduled and using an ablation technique, the Electrophysiologist was able to fix his arrhythmia. My husband is doing much better and I believe her caring ways helped to save his quality and quantity of life. The right insurance group is important and having a knowledgeable caring person like Charise on your side is invaluable.” - The Thomas’

Learning to care for yourself when caring for another

“I’ll search thousands of nationally recognized companies to find coverage that is right for you!”

Call Charise Karjala at 951-659-2757

Lic. #0I25521

ADVICE IS FREE!

www.healthmarket.com\ckarjala

American Counseling Association SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

Taking care of a loved one is not an uncommon occurrence these days. Lifestyle changes and medical advances have more people living longer, but sometimes without the ability to safely handle the challenges of daily living themselves. It isn’t simply an aging population that is expanding the need for caregivers. Many families have members who may have mental or physical impairments, or serious, debilitating health issues. And while there are a growing number of facilities and organizations that can provide care, they are often out of the financial reach of many families or go against a family’s wishes to personally provide the needed care for a loved one. The result is that many people find themselves in the role of family caregiver, a role that can often be close to a 24-hour, seven-day a week job. Unfortunately, many of those providing family care often fail to realize or choose to ignore the toll that such an obligation, along with other family or work requirements, can have on them. While there are no easy solutions to such situations, there are things that can be done to help family caregivers take better care of themselves. In many cities, it is possible to find businesses, organizations or individuals who can provide what is called “respite” care. This is when someone comes in for a few hours, maybe once or several times a week, in order to give the primary caregiver a muchneeded break. Such services, however, can be hard to find in many places, especially smaller towns and rural areas, and may be prohibitively expensive if they are available. The alternative is for the individual providing the care to learn to care better for himself or herself, to essentially work out a “personal respite” program. This can take a variety of forms, from just scheduling a short break to have a cup of tea or read a book, to turning to friends and other family members for their assistance in providing the help that will give the caretaker a few hours of personal time. While family caregivers tend to be concerned, giving people, it’s vital for them to monitor their own mental and physical wellbeing, too. Failing to recognize when the stress of helping is having a negative impact on their patience or ability to think clearly or respond appropriately can lead to serious and unexpected issues. “Counseling Corner” is provided by the American Counseling Association. Comments and questions to ACAcorner@ counseling.org or visit the ACA website at www.counseling.org.

Community Education Program

Medical Gold Minds MODERN THERAPIES FOR PARANASAL SINUS DISEASE Join Us Thursday, December 8, 6 p.m. Operations Center, 2nd Floor Temecula Valley Hospital 31700 Temecula Parkway, Temecula, CA 92592 Light refreshments will be served

Special Guest Speaker Matthew Leach, MD Ear, Nose, Throat

Join Dr. Leach as he discusses: • Allergic Rhinitis & Sinusitis • Triggers • Medical & Surgical Treatments

Do something for yourself … plan to attend this special community health program.

Reservations are not required Join the conversation and bring your questions. For information, call 951-331-2220

31700 Temecula Parkway | Temecula, CA 92592 temeculavalleyhospital.com Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Temecula Valley Hospital. The hospital shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. 160055


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

B-6

Sports

Great Oak cross country teams stay the course, claim State titles after Section wins

The Great Oak’s boys’ and girls’ cross country teams came in first at the Southern Section Cross Country Finals and the CIF State meet. Photo by Jason Eichelberger, PrepCalTrack

The Wolfpack boys’ scored 62 points at the Cross Country Division 1 CIF State Meet, claiming the state Courtesy photo title for the third consecutive year.

tion finals for the boys’ was Gavin Korby, who stepped up big time after being called upon to run at the last minute and took 26th place and freshman Devin Ito was the third fastest ninth grade girl in the meet, helping the girls’ win by 95 points, while the boys came out on top by 40 points. The Wolfpack teams also swept at the Cross Country Division 1 CIF State Meet, claiming titles for the third consecutive year. This year, for the sixth time in the last seven years, the girls won the title and were led this time around by senior Nicole Rice (17:32.5) who finished in third place. Seniors Evelyn Mandel took eighth place (17:43.1), Kiyena Beatty finished 11th (17:53.315.), Sydney Belus was 15th (17:58.620). Junior Sandra Pflughoft came in 20th place (18:08.9). The Wolfpack Girls scored 47 points to beat Davis by 20 points. Davis finished second to Great Oak in last year’s championship meet by only 2 points and were hoping for a different outcome this year. The Great Oak Boys’ team was well in front of second place finisher, Dana Point, winning by a score of 66 to 102. Senior Solomon Fountain paced Great Oak with a third place finish (15:20.7), juniors Jacob Korgan (15:30.0) and Carlos Carvajal (15:36.5) finished 10th and 15th, senior Justin Eipp (15:48.20) took 26th and junior Gavin Korby was 32nd (15:56.2). Junior Olivia O’Keeffe from Davis was the State Individual Champion with a time of 17:28.9. Sophomore Lauren Peurifoy from Martin Luther King was second. The Vista Murrieta Broncos girls’ team, led by sophomore Peyton Candaele (18:32.6) and seniors Amelia Strahan (18:58.8) and Julie

Paisley Trent SPORTS@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Great Oak’s cross country teams won big at the recent 2016 CIF Southern Section Finals in Riverside as well as the State Championships in Fresno. Both teams came in first at the Southern Section finals as the girls’ team achieved their seventh CIF championship in the past eight years, with five consecutive wins, and the boys’ team won their second title in a row. With the boys’ and girls’ teams now ranked No.1 in the state and receiving national acclaim, their recent accolades had their sights set on the top of the podium for the California State Meet as well as this week’s Nike Cross Nationals. Solomon Fountain proved he can run with the best in the state by taking fifth place at the Southern Section meet and Sydney Belus marked her return to elite status by taking third place. Coach Soles lists senior Solomon Fountain as one of the top runners and a leader this season, having a 4:10 mile time. For the girls’ team, Soles states, “We actually have five girls that have taken turns being the No. 1.” Regarding Evelyn Mandel, Kiyena Beatty, Nicole Rice, Sydney Belus and Sandra Pflughoft; Soles believes these rotating winners “give us flexibility that no matter who’s having an off day the other girls are going to step up.” This mostly senior group of varsity girls is described as very close, saying they’re motivated to run well for their teammates, as they push each other harder, working together. The boys’ team also concurring that they are motivated to run faster for their team. Wrapping up the Southern Sec-

The heMeT Valley’s largesT & Most Complete RV Parts, Sales & Service

CE 1972 SIN

BOB’S RV SALES H E M E T, C A L I F O R N I A

Diaz (18:59.4) finished seventh in the CIF State Championship. The Wolfpack travels to Portland, Oregon, to the Nike Cross Country Nationals Meet in Portland next week. The boys’ team is the defending National Champion. The girls’ team placed third last year. Runners describe this past CIF win as confidence boost or “a steppingstone to the bigger picture, which is state and nationals,” says runner Jacob Korgan. For the coaches, the CIF Southern Section finals are the first time the runners go all-out in the season, allowing them to gauge their level and see what improvements still need to be made. Each season the athletes set their goals for the season, working toward contending for the titles at the State and Nike Cross Nationals this year. Working toward their own goals yield increased motivation and effort, as well as that “the athletes have gotten to a mindset that they can compete at the highest level,” says Coach Soles. As Great Oak’s program is based on competing for the upcoming State and Nike Cross Nationals titles, they visualize their goals of winning those races throughout the season. Training-wise, Great Oak Cross Country runners are encouraged to stay focused on development year-round, rather than solely working toward competition. “I think Soles has created a training program that aims to balance winning championships and making sure we’re still progressing as a team and getting faster,” explains junior Carlos Carvajal. Coming to practice during their holiday break reveals how dedicated these runners are to their goals, and shows

The Wolfpack girls’ scored 47 points at the Cross Country Division 1 CIF State Meet, claiming the State title for the fifth consecutive year. Courtesy photo

For the sixth time in the last seven years, the Great Oak girls’ have won the state title. Photo by Steven Brouwer, PrepCalTrack

Carlos Carvajal (850) and Solomon Fountain (852) lead the Great Oak boys’ during the CIF Southern Section cross country finals in Riverside Photo by Chuck Utash, DyeStatCAL Saturday, Nov. 19.

how they consistently work hard and make sacrifices for their team. With regards to the rigorous training within cross country, Coach Soles believes that harder training makes the races the easiest part for the runners, and allows them to go into meets confident. Soles reflected on how Great Oak’s Cross Country Team didn’t start winning

$300 OFF

Winter Weather has arrived.

Call to schedule a Furnace tune up.

Furnace change out. Valid through December 31, 2016.

I’ll Sweat So You Don’t Have To...

We pride ourselves on high quality workmanship, excellent service & affordable pricing

Family Owned & Operated

Service You Can Trust

Parts • Storage • Service Collision Repair • Hitches ConsignMenTs WanTed

We are California’s #1 RV Park Model Specialist!

Over 30 Years Experience Lic #993821

Family Owned & Operated

heating and air conditioning

Call 951.723.0811 www.JB3HVAC.com

951-927-1377

44219 E. Florida, Hemet www.bobsrvsales.com

SALES • INSTALLATION • SERVICE • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE • WE SERVICE ALL BRANDS!

titles until 2010, and they are now unmatched, continuing to build a legacy and a reputation, showing how hard their team continues to work and their rewards for the effort put in. Coach Soles believes Cross Country is a strong part of Great Oak’s SPIRIT. According to him, cross country runners have some of the highest grade point averages for athletes on campus, and are extremely passionate about what they do, as well as cheering on other sports as part of a community that is happy to see each other succeed. Great Oak is also shown to have a strong impact on the runners, as they try to work as a part of the school, and representing it during their time there and post-graduation. Most of the seniors plan on pursuing running in college, with Evelyn Mandel already signed with Texas Christian University and Sydney Belus committed to University of Arizona. They are looking forward to continue running in college, and it shows how the work they put into running has allowed for educational opportunities. As most the seniors finish this year of lasts, feeling excited and sad, they emphasize putting forth their best effort with the team to continue this ongoing legacy. Meanwhile, the junior boys say they are looking to gain more confidence and upper level experience running senior year. Article contributions made by Valley News Sports Editor, JP Raineri.


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-7

Sports

Mesa Baseball supports Centennial, take in a night of beisbol with Domingo Ayala

Domingo Ayala goes over some of the hilarious Beisbol Academy instruction that has got him famous at Centennial High School for the Huskies fundraiser last month.

the first call Huskies Head Coach, George Wise made. “We have a good relationship with the Rams and wanted to make sure the local champs got to enjoy Domingo while he was in town,” says Wise. With his Mariachi theme music blaring on the loud speakers, wearing his signature white baseball shirt with red sleeves, white baseball pants, two mismatched Nike spikes and a “Pop-able” silver neck chain, Domingo entertained all while he ran through his routine. Though most know that Ayala is about as real as Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny, the performance artist never broke character while going through some of his hilarious Domingo Beisbol Academy instruction that focused on the finer points of home run hitting, base stealing and playing catch for a scout. “It was good for the boys to get off the field, hang with other players from the outside school’s that went

JP Raineri SPORTS@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Murrieta Mesa’s baseball program has not taken their outstanding year for granted. After winning the 2016 CIF Southern Section Division 1 Championship in June, the program has barely taken time off as the new season approaches. Head Coach Bryn Wade and his coaches have run camps, instituted new morning workout programs during the offseason, gone to showcase tournaments, welcomed quite a new amount of players to the program and even had some fun hanging out with Domingo Ayala. That’s right Domingo Ayala – the self-professed and self-promoting Dominican baseball prodigy, beisbol instructor, aspiring big-leaguer and YouTube sensation. Heading into their winter workout period, Corona’s Centennial High School hosted a fundraiser that brought Domingo to the baseball fields and Murrieta Mesa was

Early last month players from the Murrieta Mesa baseball program got invited to hang out with selfprofessed and self-promoting Dominican baseball prodigy, Domingo Ayala. JP Raineri photos

Players of all ages hang with Domingo Ayala at Centennial High School.

and have some fun with Domingo. We couldn’t be more appreciative to the Huskies and Coach Wise,” stated Wade. As the day concluded, Ayala, who has also been to Chaparral High

School and even surprised Great Oak in recent years, told the Murrieta Mesa players to ask their “Meester Coach” about getting a scholarship to play for the Rams this season. Senior center fielder Jordan Spur-

geon laughed and said, “As long as you don’t take my spot, I’m sure we can get you a good scholarship.” More info on Domingo Ayala can be found at www.domingobeisbol. com.

Sports around the valley…

0:00

VALLEY SPORTS SCORES HS Boys’ Basketball Nov. 28

Nov. 28

Tahquitz (0–1) – 53 Centennial (1–0) – 81 Tahquitz scoring: Williams – 11, Nov. 28 Hardiman – 10, Shirley – 8, Revilla – 8, Reed – 5, Sabb – 4, Ciccone – 3, Overton – 2, Strawbridge – 2 Great Oak (0–1) – 63 Rancho Christian (1–0) – 74

Nov. 28

Chaparral (1–0) – 75 Barstow (0–1) – 60

Nov. 28

Nov. 28

Apple Valley (0–1) – 34 Paloma Valley (1–0) – 68 Paloma Valley scoring: Dunlap – Nov. 28 11, Bradshaw – 11, Contreras – 9, Seavers – 7, Moore – 7, Yanga – 7, Chung – 7, Nolan – 6, Bouman – 3, Beloso – 2 Nov. 28 Ayala (0–1) – 58 Perris (1–0) – 70 Perris scoring: Denevivez – 25, Jones – 20, Davis – 13, Navarette – 8, Ruiz – 5 West Valley (1–1) – 73 Shadow Hills (0–2) – 45 West Valley scoring: Mozga – 26, Anderson – 16, Williams – 5, Elian – 1, Navarro – 3, Usher – 2, Shaheen – 2, Guerrero – 11, White – 7

Nov. 28

Public Safety Academy – 76 River Springs – 20 PSA scoring: Holley – 26, Deleon – 21, Aponte – 18, Alvarez – 4, Cathcrt – 3, Gamarro – 2, Torres – 2 River Springs scoring: Stone – 9, Royer – 4, Marquez – 4, Doughs – 3. Highlight: Jose Aponte added 10 steals for a double–double.

Nov. 28

Chaparral scoring: Howard – 4, Villanueva – 7, Thompkins – 3, Hernandez – 2, Rapada – 3 Public Safety Academy – 46 River Springs – 20 PSA scoring: Bellamy – 16, McKinley – 14, G. Gomez – 12, E. Gomez – 2, Navarro – 2 River Springs scoring: Stone – 4, Escobar – 2, Guzman – 2

HS Girls’ Soccer Nov. 28

West Valley (0–1) – 2 Ramona (1–0) – 3 Perris – 8 Nuview Bridge – 0 Goals: Carbajal (P) 3 Saves: Gonzalez (NB) 11, Diaz (P) 6 Linfield Christian (1–0) – 3 Moreno Valley – 0 Goals: Hook (LC) 2, Bella (LC) 1 Saves: Burns (LC) 1 Highlights: Marissa Fields (LC) made two assists while Macie Parcell (LC) made one.

HS Boys’ Soccer Nov. 28

Ramona (1–0) – 2 West Valley (0–1) – 1

Nov. 28

Perris (2–0) – 8 Nuview Bridge (0–1) – 0 Goals: Carbajal (P) 3 Saves: Gonzalez (NB) 11, Diaz (P) 6

HS Girls’ Water Polo Nov. 28

Great Oak (1–0) – 11 Lakeside (0–1) – 4 Multiple goals: Edsall (GO) 6, Young (GO) 2, Reagan (L) 3 Saves: Henning (GO) 7

*Reported scores get top priority for print, report scores to sports@reedermedia.com.

Follow

all the sports action on Twitter @v_n_sports

HS Girls’ Basketball Nov. 28

Murrieta Mesa (1–0) – 54 Ramona (0–1) – 36 Murrieta scoring: Dixon – 4, Cheng – 7, Hutchinson – 4, Stallo – 10, Burlson – 2, Hernandez – 4, A. Williams – 2, Hutter – 8, D. Williams – 12

Nov. 28

Valley View (2–0) – 74 Chaparral (0–1) – 19

Great Oak’s Jason Bush (22) takes a shot against Rancho Christian’s Jordan Montgomery during their first preseason matchup in Battlezone Tournament action Monday, Nov. 28.

Murrieta Valley’s Kyle Schroeder (22) gets a shot through Foothill Christian defenders in their Battlezone Tournament game Monday, Nov. 28.

WANTED Rancho Christian’s Isaiah Mobley (3) drives past Great Oak’s Zeryck Russon (13) in the Eagles 74-63 JP Raineri photos preseason win.

What social media platform should you be marketing on? 72% of adult internet users use Facebook: 70% log on daily; • 43% do so several times per day 28% of adult internet users use Instagram: 59% use it daily; • 35% visit several times per day 25% of adult internet users use LinkedIn: 46%of online • adults who are college graduates are LinkedIn users

WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS All years, makes & models Local dealer licensed & bonded

VALLEY AUTO SALES AGUANGA

951-763-5502 - JOE

(Pew Research Center, 2015)

(Pew Research Center, 2015)

(Pew

Only 25% of the more than 450 illion members visit the professional social network each month

Research Center, 2015).

23% of adult internet users use Twitter: 30% of online • adults under 50 yrs use Twitter; thre are four times as many (VentureBeat 2016).

international users as U.S. users (Pew Research Center, 2015).

Where are your customers? That’s where you should be marketing. Your best source for local news and advertising. Social Media TIP #15

Reeder Media

VALLEY

NEWS

Call today for these services or to learn more

760-723-7319 or 951-762-5510

U.S. of A. Golf School Sam Snead & Barry Krumweide Methods Taught

For Disabled Golfers Foundation

FREE LESSONS, CLUBS, WHEELCHAIR PUTTING, TOURNAMENTS ALL YEAR LONG!! For more information

Call Barry 760-728-3005


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

B-8

GOSCHAUTO.COM

951-292-7779 goschtoyota.com 350 Carriage Cr, Hemet

neW 2017 TOyOTa cOROLLa L cVT leAse for

$169

Per month 36 months PlUs tAX

aLL iN stoCK with modeL #1832

*On approved above average Toyota Tier 1 credit, not all applicants will qualify. $2,649 customer cash or trade equity + $750 Manufacturer’s rebate = $3,399 total due at signing. Includes 12,000 miles/year, 20 cents/mile thereafter. Includes Dealer doc fee of $80. Zero security deposit.

aLL iN stoCK

neW 2016 TOyOTa PRius c leAse for

$179

Per month 36 months PlUs tAX

1 at this Lease #125814

*On approved Toyota Tier 1 credit, not all applicants will qualify. $2,446 cash or trade equity + $750 manufacturer rebate = $3,196 total due at signing. Includes 12,000 miles/ year, 20 cents/mile thereafter. Includes dealer doc fee of $80. Zero security deposit.

All neW 2016

chEVy siLVERadO cREW cabs in sTOck

951-356-2086

net sAVInGs

$11,000

goschchevy.com

400 Carriage Cr, Hemet

aLL iN stoCK

GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP .................$4,500 CHEVY CONSUMER CASH ............................$1,000 CHEVY BONUS CASH ....................................$2,000 SELECT MODEL BONUS CASH .....................$3,500

HEMET

951-813-2140

goschfordhemet.com 150 Carriage Cr, Hemet

neW 2017 FORd EscaPE s net cost MSRP ....................................... $24,570

$17,995 1 at this offer #C11464

GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $2,075 SALE PRICE ............................ $22,495 RETAIL CASH ............................. $1,500 BLACk FRIDAY CASH ................ $1,000 TRADE ASSIST REBATE ............ $1,000 RETAIL OwNER LOYALTY ......... $1,000

neW 2017 FORd FusiOn s net cost

$17,995 1 at this offer #187608

MSRP ....................................... $22,995 GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $3,250 SALE PRICE ............................ $19,745 FORD RETAIL REBATE ................. $750 FORD TRADE ASSIST................ $1,000 (Must trade in 1995 or newer vehicle)

TEMECULA

951-972-8032 goschfordtemecula.com 28695 Ynez Rd, Temecula

neW 2016 FORd FiEsTa s sedAn net cost

Manual, 4-Door Sedan

1 at this offer #204181

MSRP ....................................... $14,965 GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $2,565 SALE PRICE ............................ $12,400 RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH ........ $1,000 RETAIL BONUS CUSTOMER CASH .... $1,500

$9,900

neW 2016 FORd F150 suPERcREW XLT net sAVInGs

2Wd, 3.5 ecoBoost

$12,000 aLL iN stoCK

GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $6,000 SPECIAL FORD CREDIT RETAIL TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE ............ $6,000 (Must trade in any year vehicle and finance through Ford Credit)

Hyundai

951-691-1576

goschhyundai.com 100 Carriage Cr, Hemet

neW 2016 hyundai ELanTRa GT net cost

$15,830 1 at this offer #322862

Manual Transmission MSRP ....................................... $19,830 GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $1,500 SALE PRICE ............................ $18,330 MANUFACTURER REBATE ....... $2,500

neW 2016 hyundai accEnT sE net cost

$12,280 1 at this offer #159731

Manual Transmission MSRP ....................................... $15,780 GOSCH DISCOUNT FROM MSRP............................... $1,500 SALE PRICE ............................ $14,280 MANUFACTURER REBATE ....... $2,000

*All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Vehicle will only be sold at advertised dealer. Offers expire 12/7/16 unless otherwise shown.


VALLEY

C

Section

NEWS

December 2 – 8, 2016

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 16, Issue 49

ENTERTAINMENT

Menifee Christmas House brings joy to visitors during the holiday season

Upon arriving at the Menifee Christmas House, visitors are treated to a display that lights up the night sky.

Inside the Menifee Christmas House, visitors will find numerous holiday displays such as this holiday harbor. Courtesy photos

The Menifee Christmas House owners Chris and Mary Carnes share the spirit with a fantastic light display that the entire community can enjoy.

A veritable winter wonderland awaits visitors to the Menifee Christmas House.

Mary Carnes, along with her husband Chris (not pictured) discovered a passion for sharing their holiday displays with visitors after winning a nationwide contest in 1991.

What holiday display would be complete with a Christmas tree in all its glory?

A miniature drive-in movie theater is just one of many holiday displays at the Menifee Christmas House.

Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

each year to revel in the holiday décor. “We had no idea it would turn into this but we are thrilled it has,” she said. “We now realize that people from all over the country also enjoy our decorations.” Each year the couple makes snow with 50 pounds of baking soda and sees their electric bill increase by about $500, even though 90 percent of their decorations are outfitted with LED lights, Mary said. Although the Menifee Christmas House has become a tradition in this small city, the holiday decorations aren’t the only thing that people come out for. Many nights there is entertainment provided by talented volunteers, and Santa usually comes for a visit, providing guests a night of good, clean family fun. “All of our entertainers are from the Menifee community and talented family and friends,” Mary said. “In past years we’ve had singers, jugglers, magicians, musicians and more. We never know when someone will show up and want to entertain our guests either inside

the house or on the front lawn.” Mary says that sharing her home, food and drink with everyone who shows up for what she called their “gift” to the community is rewarding for both her and her husband. “The gratitude and love that we receive back from our guests fuels our enthusiasm to continue to do this year after year,” she said. Enthusiasm is a necessity for the couple who spends three months before the holiday decorating their home and another three months after to take it all down and put it away in their garage, attic and backyard shed. “We have been married and collecting for over 40 years,” Mary said, adding that experience has changed their lives by opening doors and allowing them to become more active in the Menifee community. In addition to sitting on the board for Menifee Valley Community Cupboard, the two also joined the Menifee Arts Council. “You need to realize there are more good people out there than bad,” Mary said. “The news seems to focus on the bad more than the

What do you get when you cross 50 pounds of baking soda, more than 40 years of marriage and an enormous holiday spirit? If you are Chris and Mary Carnes, the answer to that question is a season of joy, sharing and caring in the form of their ever-popular Menifee Christmas House. Every year since 1994, the couple have opened their home to residents as a way to celebrate the holidays, a tradition that has evolved into a way to support the Menifee Valley Community Cupboard, where they both volunteer, and help with food donations, according to Mary. “For many years, people who came to the house would ask what they could do for us for the food, drink and Christmas spirit we gave them,” she said. “About seven years ago we decided to accept donations for our local Menifee Valley Community Cupboard. That first year we collected about 50 pounds of food. Last year we

collected just over 5,300 pounds.” Sharing the Christmas spirit by opening their home to the public goes back to 1991 for the couple who entered a nationwide decorating contest while living in Eagle Rock. They won the grand prize in that contest, Mary said, solidifying their passion for sharing their holiday spirit with their community. “The Los Angeles Times published a story about us on Christmas Eve,” Mary said. “The Saturday after Christmas, during a party we were having for family and friends, we ended up with a house full of strangers who just dropped by to see our decorations. We met many new friends and thought it was pretty cool that so many people enjoyed what we did.” Mary, who retired from the American Forces Radio and Television Service, said that she and Chris, who teaches eighth grade math and algebra in Hemet at Rancho Viejo Middle School, had no idea that the initial Christmas House in Eagle Rock would evolve into what it has become. More than 15,000 visitors come to their home

good. We tend to focus on the good all around us.” Mary says the couple’s goal is to spread what they believe is the spirit of the holidays to as many people as possible, no matter their religion. “Everyone walking through our door is a VIP and we treat them as such,” she said. “We also want to collect as many nonperishable items for the MVCC for distribution to the many needy families in the Menifee Valley. There is no fee for admission to the Menifee Christmas House, which opens Saturday, Dec. 3, however, those who attend are welcome to bring a non-perishable food item for the Menifee Valley Community Cupboard. The Carnes will keep the popular display open every evening from 6 to 9 p.m. through Dec. 31. “Sometimes we open earlier and we stay open later as long as people keep coming,” Mary said. Menifee Christmas House is located at 30035 Calle Pompeii in Menifee.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

C-2

Dining in the Valley Rosie’s Kitchen

Editor’s note; Valley News is pleased to announce our new dining column, Rosie’s Kitchen, featuring award-winning Chef Rosie O’Connor of Provecho Grill in Menifee. Twice a month Chef Rosie will address cooking questions sent in by Valley News readers. To send a question to Chef Rosie to be answered in a future column, send an email to provechogrill@ gmail.com. Dear Rosie, What kind of cheese, Chile peppers and sauce do you recommend when making Chile rellenos? Martha and Dayle Dear Martha and Dayle, When I was growing up I would visit my Aunt Trini in Tijuana and she would make the best Chile Rellenos. Tia Trini stuffed them with Queso Fresco cheese which is slightly salty, mild and light in flavor. It is healthier than aged cheeses. She also used Poblano Chiles which are bolder in flavor than an Anaheim, Ortega or Bell pepper. On the other hand, my father owns Guadalajara Grill in Temecula and Lake Elsinore, he makes his Chile Rellenos with Anaheim Chiles and stuffs them with Monterey Jack cheese. My dad’s Chile Rellenos are gooey, cheesy and delicious.

Voted BEST

Chef Rosie O’Connor.

At Provecho Grill, we use Queso Fresco, cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese. The truth is I LOVE cheese. I prefer to use Poblano peppers because of their little hint of spice. As for the sauce, it is up to your taste preference. We use Ranchero Sauce like my dad taught me. However, I’m including a roasted tomato salsa recipe which is my personal favorite at home. I have seen other aficionados use green salsa or go naked (no salsa). It is truly up to you. Provecho! Dear Rosie, How do you cook the various fish at Provecho to make it so perfectly seasoned/marinated, crispy on the outside yet moist and fluffy on the inside? My attempts always result in bland, dry or rubbery fillets that I still eat because they are healthy. Please help, Chef Rosie! Valentina

MExIcAn FooD in the Inland Empire!

Chile Relleno.

Courtesy photos

Dear Valentina, I remember being so intimidated by fish when I first started cooking. Because of my stubborn nature I dove right into it. Failure was not an option! I used my cooks as Guinea pigs and fed them rubbery soles for a couple of days. It was the sacrifice that I had to make to finally get it right. You are well on your way. If we are talking about a 6 ounce portion of a white, flaky fish one trick I learned is to make sure that your fish is well dried. Dry it out a with a paper towel thoroughly. I enjoy giving it a little kick with Cajun spice, Bay seasoning or Lawry’s Lemon Pepper. If salt and pepper is all you have then go for it girl! Whatever you choose, make sure you season your fish on both sides though. Trick #2 Your pan with oil, butter or butter substitute should be hot. Otherwise it will stick and not cook properly. Trick #3 Always cook your fish skin side first. Leave it alone while its cooking. The fish will tell you when its

ready to be turned over. If it sticks to your pan it’s not ready. Patience grasshopper. Trick #4 Your fish will give out an opaque color on the side that is cooking, once you turn it, give it a minute or two to cook. Pull it off the pan before it cooks to the middle. Don’t underestimate the power of “carry over cooking.” That’s when your fish continues to cook as you let it rest. That got me every time. I hope these tips help. Thanks for writing in.

Directions: Cut the tomatoes and onions in quarters. Place them along with peeled garlic, 2 serrano pepper on a sheet tray and smother them with canola oil. Broil them for 10 minutes until they have reached a slightly dark roasted color. Blend the cooked ingredients and cilantro in a blender. Add salt and pepper to taste. Add garlic salt, cumin and oregano to the finished product. Salsa Brava! Yields 3 cups.

Chef Rosie’s Roasted Salsa for dipping and Rellenos Ingredients: 1-pound Tomatoes 2-Chile serranoes 4-Garlic cloves, peeled 1-yellow or white Onion 2-oz. of chopped Cilantro A pinch of Oregano A pinch of cumin 1-oz. of Garlic salt A pinch of Pepper Salt to taste 2-oz. Canola oil

After graduating from the Art Institute of San Diego, Chef Rosie O’Connor opened Provecho Grill in Menifee, Ca in 2012 focusing on Mexican dishes with her own Latin twist. She has received many awards including So Cal Chef ’s Pinnacle Award and Best Restaurant four years in a row. Provecho Grill is located at 26862 Cherry Hills Blvd, Menifee (951) 246-3200. Visit them online at www.provechogrill.com.

Lifelong chef takes over at Pechanga Resort & Casino’s Blazing Noodles

Pre-Order Your Tamales Now!

$10 oFF

•Lunch BuFFET •EARLY BIRD •HAppY HouR •SunDAY Some restrictions apply. Expires 12/31/16 BRunch Holiday Gift Certificates Available! •LIvE MuSIc!

on $40 or more

Proud Recipient of the 5 Star Rating by Southern California Restaurant Writers!

Great Mexican Food!

(951) 766-1192 • 3909 W. Florida Ave., Hemet LosVaquerosRestaurant.com

Chef Timmy Che.

VOTED #1

Courtesy photo

TEMECULA – A natural at preparing Asian cuisine, Chef Kok Che (Chef Tim) has taken over as the head chef of Pechanga Resort & Casino’s authentic Chinese restaurant,  Blazing Noodles. Pechanga, California’s largest resort-casino and voted #1 casino in the country by USA Today, is continuously expanding its culinary excellence with acclaimed chefs from across the globe. At Blazing Noodles, he will oversee the entire menu and kitchen staff. Chef Tim has vast experience in upscale dining including head chef roles in Las Vegas and Macau, China. Before Pechanga, he worked at a AAA Four Diamond Las Vegas casino and resort as the executive chef of a fine-dining, contemporary

Chinese restaurant. Chef Tim started cooking professionally when he was just 18 years old at his family’s barbecue seafood restaurant in his hometown of Macau, China. At a young age, he learned his trade from his family by preparing authentic Chinese seafood delicacies with his mother and older brother. His favorite part of being a chef is the creation of the dish and how his talent makes guests happy. Chef Tim is married with one daughter, who is a banquet designer in Las Vegas. Throughout his career, his most memorable experience was serving a customer who spent $500 on wagyu beef at his restaurant to make their own noodle soup.

VOTED #1

Best Wei Chinese Market

10%

Try Our Chicken! Traditionally raised and matured slowly for best meat and flavor. Fed a vegetarian diet, without any hormones or antibiotics. California grown and locally harvested for ultimate freshness.

$10.99 each. Sold fresh, daily.

OFF

on $20 and more purchase of regular priced items.

BEsT sanDwich shOp in the inland Empire & BEsT REsTauRanT in hemet & san Jacinto! SUB SANDWICHES • GOURMET COFFEE • PREMIUM SALADS • CATERING

Daily! Mon Ham • Tues Turkey • Wed Roast Beef • Thurs Salami • Fri Pepperoni • Sat The Downtowner • Sun Ham, Turkey & Roast Beef

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 951-929-1521

113 North Harvard St in Downtown Hemet Locally Owned & Operated by Karen & Steve Covington

FACEBOOK.COM/DOWNTOWNHEMET

This offer does not combine with other promotions. Coupon needs to be presented to receive the discount. Expires 12-31-16

Beef & Lamb Slice $6.50/lb While Supplies Last!

Get Happy with Small Plate Selections & Drink Specials - Available in the Bar Only

27452 Jefferson Ave, Temecula (Behind Chin’s)

951-699-7788

26700 Ynez Ct, Temecula • 951.308.2722 • BLUEWATERGRILL.COM


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

C-3

CALENDAR OF EVENTS CHILDREN AND TEENS: NOW – Everbright Exhibit at Pennypickle’s Children’s Museum, 42081 Main St. Temecula. Professor Phineas T. Pickles invites visitors to try out the unique and innovative Everbright. This is a one of a kind experience for kids of all ages from toddler to adult to explore their creativity by turning 464 LED lights that provide endless possibilities of vivid color, geometry and pattern. Information: (951) 308-6376. Dec. 7 – 4-4:45 p.m. DIY Crafternoon: Santa’s Workshop at the Temecula Public Library. Your children will get festive with crafts, stories, cookies and a surprise visit from Santa. Registration required and begins Nov. 30 at the library, 30600 Pauba Road. This event is for ages 3-12. Dec. 12 – 7-8 p.m. Winter Wonderland: Holiday Ornaments at the Temecula Public Library, 30600 Pauba Road. Join in and make a special ceramic ornament from Painted Earth. Limit 40. This event is for grades 7-12. Advance registration begins at the library reception desk two weeks prior to the program. Information: (951) 693-8900. Dec. 23 – 5:30-7:30 p.m. Pennypickle’s Polar Express – just in time for moms and dads to enjoy some alone time during this busy season. Bring your PJ and robe clad child as they board Professor Pennypickle’s Polar Express for fun activities and adventures. You may send food and drinks for your child if you wish. For children ages 5-10. Space is limited. Reservations and information: (951) 308-6376. ENTERTAINMENT: Dec. 1, 3, 4, 6-11 – 7:30-9:30 p.m. “A Christmas Carol” presented by The

Temecula Valley Players at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater, 42051 Main St. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Dec. 3 – 7:30 p.m. Classical Christmas presented by California Chamber Orchestra in association with Temecula Presents at Murrieta United Methodist Church, 24652 Adams Ave. Murrieta. Dec. 3 – 7 p.m. A Soulful Christmas at the Historic Hemet Theatre, 216 E. Florida Ave. Featuring Jerome Robinson and 2nd Generation Platters and Norman Carter former lead singer of the Delfonics. Tickets and Information: (951) 658-5950. Dec. 3 – 7 p.m. MSJC Singers and Chamber Choir will perform a multitude of most-loved and often performed choral pieces, both with accompaniment and acapella at 1499 State St. Tickets and Information: (951) 487-3790. Dec. 3-4 – 7:30-9:30 p.m. 17th Annual Christmas in the Air holiday favorite performed by the Southwest Women’s Chorus at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater, 42051 Main St. You will hear familiar tunes, fun new ones and classical pieces as well. This annual event will put you in the Holiday spirit. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Dec. 8 – 7:30 p.m. Jazz at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. Featuring Al Williams Quartet. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Dec. 10 – 7 p.m. Speakeasy at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. Speakeasy is live traditional jazz of the 20s and 40s. Performances feature the house band, Second Hand Jazz with vocalist Rosalie Porter in rotation with prominent Southern California Traditional Jazz artists. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Dec. 11 – 3 p.m. Candlelight Classics at the Merc, 42051 Main St.

Temecula. Ring in the holidays with a Temecula Tradition. The Merc will be decked out in festive finery and featuring City of Angels Saxophone Quartet. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Dec. 16-18 and 20-23 – 3 and 7:30 p.m. The Nutcracker Ballet 2016 presented by the Ballet Studio in association with Fine Arts Network Theater Company will be at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater, 42051 Main St. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Performances on Dec.17, 18 and 23 will be at 3 p.m. Dec. 17 – 7 and 9 p.m. Country at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. Live Country music show featuring the house band backing up the Valley’s hottest country artists. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696.

terprise Circle N, Suite 100 Temecula. Information: Erin (951) 719-3685 or Lizabeth (951)348-8976. Support group sponsored by Hill Alcohol and Drug Treatment. www.HillRecovery. com. Dec. 11 – 7 a.m. 31st Annual Tinsel Triathlon at West Valley High School, 3401 Mustang Way, Hemet. The largest reverse sprint in the nation. Also, 5K run, racing wheelchair, hand cycles and team triathlon sprint. Proceeds benefit the United Way. Information and registration at www.tinseltriathlon.com. Now – Dec. 12 – Habitat for Humanity Inland Valley to host the annual Christmas Tree Lane at the Promenade Temecula. Christmas Tree Lane will be located outside of the lower level Macy’s Women’s wing. Shoppers can enter to win one of the trees by dropping off a suggested donation of $1. COMMUNITY EVENTS: Proceeds from the event stay within Dec. 3 – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lake El- the Inland Valley area. Information: sinore/Wildomar Elks Lodge No. 2591 (951) 296-3362. Dec. 13 – 6-8 p.m. Holiday Ginto host their 18th Annual Christmas Tree Lane at the lodge, 33700 Mis- gerbread House Night at Valley Vista sion Trail, Wildomar. Ten decorated Community Center, 43935 E. Acacia trees with presents valued at $1,000 Ave. Hemet. Start your holiday season or more will be raffled off. Tickets: $1 by making gingerbread houses. Hot each. Proceeds will benefit the lodges cocoa and cookies will be served. scholarship program. Trees will be Cost: $2 pre-registration or $3 at the raffled at 4 p.m. and winners must be door. This is great holiday fun for present to win. Free admission event the whole family and there will even be a special visit from Santa. Seatis open to the public.  Dec. 4 – 2:30-5 p.m. Arts Coun- ing is limited. Register early. (951) cil Menifee proudly presents their 927-6673. Dec. 14 – 4-4:45 p.m. Happy 10th Holiday Art Show “Believe” at Kay Ceniceros Center, 42888 Evans Road. Birthday Library Celebration at the Menifee. Free admittance, free re- Temecula Public Library, 30600 Pauba freshments, live entertainment, draw- Road. Join the fun and celebration. ing for an original art piece, and more. Space is limited. Information: (951) Dec. 8 – 6-7 p.m. Parent Support 693-8980. Now – Dec. 16 – 3-7 p.m. Photos Group for parents of young adults battling chemical dependency with with Santa at the Promenade Mall, education, peer support, intervention 40820 Winchester Road. Temecula. tools and peace of mind. Find experi- Reservations www.TemeculaSanta. ence strength and hope at 41877 En- com. Dec. 20 – 4 p.m. Salvation Army Christmas Dinner for the homeless at Hit songs by Myles Mellor 340 S. Palm Ave. Hemet. Volunteers needed to help in the kitchen, gather items for gifts and serve meals. Infor1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 mation: (951) 791-9497. 14 15 12 13 Dec. 24 – 8 a.m. The City of Lake Elsinore presents: Healthy LE- Santa 16 17 18 Fun Run/Walk event at the Lake Elsinore Levee, 500 Diamond Dr. Free 20 19 admission. Information: (951) 6743124 ext. 265. 21 22 23 24 Now – Dec. 21 - The Annual City of Murrieta Holiday Food and Toy Drive 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 is seeking donations of non-perishable 37 38 39 35 36 food and new unwrapped toys and gift cards to assist local families in 40 41 42 need this Holiday Season. The official Santa Drop locations will be accepting 44 45 43 donations at the following locations: Murrieta Community Center, Murrieta 48 49 46 47 Senior Center, Any of the 5 Murrieta 50 51 52 53 54 Fire Departments, Murrieta Police Department and Murrieta City Hall. 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 Information: (951) 304-7275. Nov. 30-Dec. 21 – City of Mur64 65 66 rieta’s Letters from Santa. Parents you will be able to download letters 68 69 67 from Santa by visiting www.murrieta. org/holidaymagic. And your child can 71 72 70 receive a special greeting from Old St. Nick himself by calling Santa’s Hotline (951) 461-6086. 41. Attractive 9. Reed instrument Now – Dec. 14 – 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 10. Smear 42. Row 35. Yours Across Salvation Army Food and Toy Drive, 11. Turner and others 47. Get angry S. Palm Ave. Hemet. Get in the 13. Termination 51. D Day participants 1. Make 37. Wanted-poster 340 a cat sound word Holiday spirit by donating food and 14. Singer with the album “Life for 53. Decorative pitcher new toys to the Salvation Army. 4. Denominational 39. Noted Warhol subject offshoot Rent” 54. “Attack!,” to Rover Volunteers will pack food boxes for 17. White wine aperitif 55. From a distance 8. Money 40. Ellie Goulding distribution hit to the community Dec. 18. Informalinvolved wear 56. Deal with 13 and Dec. 15 parents be able 22. Sister of Clio 57. Trick 12. Feel compassion 43. DiFranco with the 2008 album "Red will Letter to shop in the “Toy Joy Store” filled 23. Measuring instrument 58. For keeps Year" 14.Old with donated toys. Information: (951) Renaissance 25. time GPS engraver 60. Toothed wheel 791-9497. 26. River of Lyon 61. Crest of a hill 44. Take potshots (at) 15. Ready and willing's partner 62. Nose out 27. Kind of duty 45. Painter's pictureWORKSHOPS, prop MEETINGS and 28. show hit 63. Romanov V.I.P. 16.__-man Ed Sheeran ANNOUNCEMENTS: 30. Probable 65. First mate 46. Jiffs 19.Tickle Rotten 32. 66. Put in stitches Now – Dec. 5 – MSJC Veterans’ 48. Certain Celt 33. Like some jeans 20. Garden bed planters Resource Centers and Brandman 34. Carpenter’s need 49. Many lipstick colors University will team up to hold a Shoe 36. has a couple 21.Mama College-based military training Answers on page D-7 38. Look at for takeover 50. Time piece? Drive to provide gently used shoes to

Crossword puzzle by Myles Mellor Across 1. Make a cat sound 4. Denominational offshoot 8. Money involved 12. Feel compassion 14. Renaissance engraver 15. Ready and willing’s partner 16. Ed Sheeran hit 19. Rotten 20. Garden bed planters 21. College-based military training 24. Spider-Man creator Stan 25. Big energy supplier 29. Aura 31. Alcatraz escape vehicle 35. Yours 37. Wanted-poster word 39. Noted Warhol subject 40. Ellie Goulding hit 43. DiFranco with the 2008 album “Red Letter Year” 44. Take potshots (at) 45. Painter’s picture prop 46. Jiffs 48. Certain Celt 49. Many lipstick colors 50. Time piece? 52. Bakery purchases 55. Lots of property 59. Small gate 64. Rihanna, Kanye and Paul McCartney hit 67. Notre Dame niche 68. At no point 69. Infatuated 70. Rush 71. Shot up 72. As-instructions link Down 1. Floor protectors 2. Mountain come-back 3. Buzzing sound 4. Fireball 5. Unit of force 6. CNBC interviewees 7. Sweetheart 8. Mobile sculptor Alexander

24. Spider-Man creator Stan 25. Big energy supplier

Military and Veteran families. Drop off locations: Menifee Valley Campus, 28237 La Piedra Rd buildings 1017 and 3000. San Jacinto campus 1499 N. State St. building 1560. Information: VRC (951) 639-5237 or Mary (951) 639-5234. Dec. 5 and 6 – 7 p.m. MSJC announces auditions for the spring musical “Violet” at the San Jacinto campus Theatre building 1500, 1499 State St. College students and community members wishing to audition should prepare a song that showcases their voice and bring sheet music, CD or iPod. An accompanist will be provided. Be ready to read from a script, improvise a scene and/or be interviewed by the director.  Rehearsals will be held on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 6-9:50 p.m. starting late January. “Violet” opens in March and plays for two weekends. Information: Payden (951) 487-3791. Dec. 6 – 6 p.m. NAFE Temecula will meet at Spositos, 28120 Jefferson Ave. Suite 207, Temecula. Speaker 13-year-old Anika who owns Anika’s Pink Closet. Murrieta NAFE will not meet in December as the meeting date falls on the Holiday. Information: Robbie (951) 255-9200. MSJC announces extended hours for Student Services. Now students can choose from a variety of convenient times to get the services they need to register for Spring 2017 classes. Hours will be extended through Jan. 14, 2017. Information on campus hours: (951) 487-3215 or (951) 639-5215. NOW – MSJC Child Development and Education Centers are now enrolling and offer child care and preschool for children 18 months through five years, are open to students and the community and offer several enrollment options based on family income and need. The centers, located in San Jacinto and Menifee, are open Monday through Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Information: San Jacinto: (951) 487-3605 or Menifee: (951) 639-5605. NOW – Sun City Certified Farmers Market is held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday in the parking lot of the Menifee United Church of Christ, 26701 McCall Blvd. Vendors offer produce, crafts, food and more. Information: Pamela (951) 491-4111. NOW – Memoir Writing Group every second and fourth Monday from 1-3 p.m. at the Mary Phillips Senior Center, 4845 6th Street, Temecula, everyone has a story, join them and write. NOW – Parent Support Group available for parents whose children of any age struggle with addiction. Education, Skills, Support. Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 43397 Business Park Drive. Suite D8, Temecula. Information: (951) 775-4000 or info@ thecenter4lifechange.com. NOW – Clippendales meet the second Monday of each month 6 p.m. The Elks Ladies, an Elks Auxiliary of the Lake Elsinore/Wildomar Elks Lodge 2591 has formed a club call the “Clippendales.” The object of this club is to send manufacturers coupons to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan to be redeemed for products at their commissary and other stores. NOW- Lake Elsinore/Wildomar Elks Lodge 2591 hosts Bingo at the lodge each Thursday to raise funds for its charities. Occasionally the lodge arranges for additional Bingo games to help community groups raise funds as well. Lodge 2591 is located at 33700 Mission Trail, Wildomar. Information: (951) 674-6804. NOW– 3:30-4:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesday afternoons Senior Fitness Program is offered at the Lake Elsinore Senior Center, 420 E. Lakeshore Drive. Participants should bring a set of 2 or 3-pound dumbbell weights and water to drink. Space is limited. Information: Lisa (951) 533-2612.

52. Bakery purchases

The Public’s Country Club 29. Aura

31. Alcatraz escape vehicle

55. Lots of property 59. Small gate

– GREAT RATES! –

• Championship Golf • Dining • Weddings • Banquets • Swim & Tennis

1020 Soboba Road, San Jacinto, CA 92583

(951) 654-4300

www.sobobaspringscc.com


C-4

Wine CountryTemecula

Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

VALLEY NEWS

DECEMBER 2, 2016

Day in the life of a vinter with Cougar Vineyard & Winery Six days after introducing a mixture of yeast and water to the Falanghina grape juice - the fermentation process is well underway inside the large fermentation tank, Sept. 27. 

Rick Buffington places a sample of Falanghina wine in an analyzer that measures various ph levels, acids and a variety of other levels before running the wine through its final filtration, Nov. 11.

Cougar Vineyard & Winery owner Rick Buffington sits at a table with a variety of wine testing instruments before running the Falanghina wine through its final filtration, Nov. 11.

Erick Erno monitors water pasteurization of the automated bottling machine, Nov. 21. Running water above 180 degrees throughout the inside of the stainless-steel machine sterilizes the equipment before the bottling process begins.

Shane Gibson photos

Cougar Vineyard & Winery owner Rick Buffington (left) and assistant winemaker Erick Erno connects a variety of hoses to the cross-flow membrane filtration system, Nov. 11. The filtered Falanghina wine will flow back into the large fermentation and hold until bottling.

Wine Country Events Calendar

Cougar Vineyard & Winery owner Rick Buffington loads the automated bottling machine’s hopper with a supply of Cougar Winery’s signature corks before the bottling process begins, Nov. 21. [Left] Cougar Vineyard & Winery assistant winemaker Erick Erno pulls a rope that lifts the lid of a large fermentation tank holding the finished Falanghina wine, Nov. 21. Releasing pressure from the stainless-steel tank will allow the wine to flow freely to the automated bottling machine. 

Wine TasTing

2 1 for

Monday thru Friday

Wine Tasting Daily 11:00am-5:00pm 31225 Rancho California Road Temecula, CA 92591

Falanghina wine begins flowing into bottles simultaneously as the turret rotates continuously, Nov. 21. The automated bottling machine helps Cougar Vineyard & Winery fill, cork, seal and label on average 20 bottles a minute.

951.676.1711 ~ www.MauriceCarrieWinery.com

New Year’s Eve Dinner Celebrate the new year with a fabulous four-course meal and live music at Meritage. Chef Diamond has meticulously created a special farm-to-table, New Year’s Eve menu for your dining pleasure. Saturday, December 31st, 5pm to 8pm $75 per person, plus tax & gratuity

For reservations call 951.587.8889 To view the menu, visit www.callawaywinery.com

32720 Rancho California Road, Temecula, CA 92591 951.676.4001| www.callawaywinery.com

Cougar Vineyard & Winery owner Rick Buffington places bottles of Falanghina wine into a case at the end of the bottling line, Nov. 21. Cougar Vineyard is one of two known wineries in the U.S. producing the Italian wine. Characterized for its well balanced and crisp acidity, with notes of floral, melon and lemongrass.

6-7 a.m., 10-11 a.m. 5-8 p.m. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m 1-2:30 p.m. 3-5:30 p.m. 5-7 p.m. 5-8 p.m. 5-8 p.m. 5:30-8:30 p.m. 6-8 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 5-8 p.m. 8 a.m. 9:30-11 a.m. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 12 noon to 3 p.m. 12-4 p.m. 12-4 p.m. 12-4 p.m. 1-2:30 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 5-7 p.m. 5:30-8:30 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 8 a.m. 9 a.m. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 12-2 p.m. 12-3 p.m. 12-4 p.m. 12-4 p.m. 1-2:30 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 1-5 p.m. 2-5 p.m. 2-5 p.m. 4-7 p.m. 5-7 p.m. 5-8 pm

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2 Bootcamp, Passion4Ftiness, Cougar Vineyard & Winery Live Music, Izon Eden, Avensole Winery Restaurant Vintage Marketplace, Galway Downs Oak Mountain Winery University, Oak Mountain Winery Bailey Estate Club Tasting Behind the Scenes Wine Tour, South Coast Winery Elegant Food & Wine Pairing, Carter Estate Happy Hour, Vineyard Rose, South Coast Winery Live Music, Nathan Rivera, Meritage at Callaway Winery Live Music, Evan Diamond-Goldberg, Cougar Vineyard and Winery Live Music, ABQ Trio, Leoness Cellars Winery Live Music, Restaurant at Ponte Winery Danza Navidad, JD Priest, Danza Del Sol Winery Karaoke Night, Bel Vino Winery Sip into the Sunset, Briar Rose Winery Live Music, Europa Village Live Music, Midnight Satellites, Lorimar Winery Live Music, Thornton Winery Live Music, Fazeli Cellars Winery Live Music, The Core, Miramonte Winery Live Music, Ponte Cellar Lounge SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery Live Music, Midnight Satellites, Avensole Tasting Room Live Music, Lilah Vener, Avensole Restaurant Stretch: Harmonizing Hatha, Grapeseed Spa, South Coast Winery Soul Saturdays, Keyways Vineyard Winery Oak Mountain Winery University, Oak Mountain Winery Behind the Scenes Wine Tour, South Coast Winery Cooking Class, Cuisine of the Rhone-Alps, Europa Village Cooking Class, Cuisine of the Rhone-Alps, Europa Village Moto Barrel Room Tours, Doffo Winery Bailey Estate Club Tasting Live Music, Annata Bistro at Mount Palomar Winery Tapas & Wine, The VIB, Bel Vino Winery Live Music, Masia de la Vinya Live Music, JD Priest, Wilson Creek Winery Elegant Food & Wine Pairing, Carter Estate 2016 Polenta Party, Doffo Winery Live Music, Harmony Road, Barrel Room, Leoness Live Music, Shayli & Co., Robert Renzoni Vineyards Live Music, Callaway Courtyard Live Music, Danza del Sol Live Music, Fazeli Cellars Winery Live Music, Al & Brad, Meritage at Callaway Winery Live Music, Restaurant at Ponte Winery Live Music, Mrs. Jones’ Revenge, Lorimar Winery Live Music, Cellar Lounge at Ponte Winery Live Music, Indica Roots, Miramonte Winery SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4 Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery Live Music, Cougrzz, Avensole Tasting Room Hot Yoga, Grapeseed Spa, South Coast Winery Yoga, Mimosas, Brunch, Galway Downs Oak Mountain Winery University, Oak Mountain Winery Bubble Brunch, Wilson Creek Winery Behind the Scenes Wine Tour, South Coast Winery Moto Barrel Room Tour, Doffo Winery Sunday Brunch at Meritage, Callaway Winery Bailey Estate Club Tasting Pet Fair, Oak Mountain Winery Live Music, Annata Bistro at Mount Palomar Winery Dog Day Sundays, Carol’s Restaurant at Baily’s Winery Ugly Sweater Party, Danza Del Sol Winery Funday Sunday in the Yard Garden, Falkner Winery Live Music, Jeff Brinkman, Bel Vino Winery Live Music, Jeff Tucker, Wilson Creek Winery Elegant Food & Wine Pairing, Carter Estate Live Music, Europa Village Live Music, Inbar Horowitz, Restaurant at Leoness Cellars Live Music, Al & Brad, Lorimar Vineyards & Winery Live Music, Old School, Robert Renzoni Vineyards Live Music, Fazeli Cellars Live Music, KG3, Pavilion, Oak Mountain Winery “Sounds of Sunday”, Monte de Oro Winery Live Music, James Holland, Cougar Vineyard & Winery Live Music, Vintner’s Garden, South Coast Winery Live Music, Miramonte Winery Live Music, ABQ Trio, Meritage at Callaway Winery Tree Lighting, Lorimar Winery

Wine Country map courtesy of Temecula Valley Winegrowers


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

C-5

Entertainment

Diamond Valley Lake hosts an ‘Old Fashioned Holiday’ TEMECULA – The Western Science Center, along with the Diamond Valley Lake Visitor Center, will once again be hosting Old Fashioned Holiday, the museum’s annual holiday celebration, Tuesday, Dec. 6, at 5 p.m. Old Fashioned Holiday, a free family-friendly event, will feature a wide selection of arts & crafts vendors for guests’ holiday gift shopping, and live entertainment

provided by crowd favorites In Motion Training Center and the Savvy Swing Dancers. Every child will also receive a stocking stuffer full of goodies, while supplies last, and will have the chance to meet Santa Claus in the museum’s theater. Visitors to the museum will enjoy familiar holiday tunes as they explore the ice age history discovered at Diamond Valley Lake. The museum’s fossil prep volunteers

will also be on the exhibit floor to demonstrate how they clean and repair fossils and to answer visitors’ questions. Holiday craft stations will give visitors the chance to make custom ornaments, and the museum’s popular traveling booth will have information on upcoming exhibits and more, as well as fossils from the museum’s collections on display. Over 600 people enjoyed the

event last year, and the Western Science Center has worked to make each year bigger and better than the last. “It’s a great way for us to give back to the community that has supported the museum throughout the year,” Brittney Stoneburg, marketing and events associate, said. “We couldn’t do what we do without community support. We’re proud to host Old Fashioned Holiday again.”

The museum will feature free admission for all visitors during the event; hot cocoa and cookies will be available for a small donation. Destination Coffee Bar & Bistro will also be on hand selling coffee. The Western Science Center is located at 2345 Searl Parkway in Hemet. For more information, visit www.westerncentermuseum.org or call (951) 791-0033.

As the holiday season approaches, Santa sightings increase throughout the valley Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The holidays are in full swing, and what better way to celebrate with the family than spending some quality time with Santa? This year there are multiple opportunities throughout the area to join the jolly old elf for some fun and games and a little bit of breakfast, or dinner. On Dec. 3, come to the Kay Ceniceros Senior Center, located at 29995 Evans Road in Menifee. Enjoy breakfast, crafts, activities and a special visit with Santa. Children will have the opportunity to take pictures with Santa so bring your own camera for this special event. On Dec. 10 there are several opportunities for children to share their wish list with Santa over breakfast. For those near Wildomar, head on out to Fire Station

No. 61, located at 32637 Gruwell Street from 8 -11 a.m. The event will open early for those with special needs beginning at 7:30 a.m. Cost is $5 for each adult and $3 for children 10 and under. Photos with Santa are $5. Santa will also make an appearance Dec. 10, from 8-10 a.m. at the 7th annual breakfast with Santa at Valley Wide Regional Park, located at 901 W. Esplanade Ave. in Hemet. The event will feature children’s activities, games, vendors, music, opportunity drawings, arts and crafts and more. Don’t forget to bring a camera for a picture with Santa. Cost is $3 per person and includes 1 entry, 1 breakfast and 1 entry into the grand prize drawing. For reservations or more information, call (951) 654-1505. And just because he’s magical and can go anywhere he wants with

the help of his reindeer friends, Santa will make a third stop Dec. 10 in Lake Elsinore for a Pancake and Sausage Breakfast with Santa at Fire Station No. 85, located at 29405 Grand Ave. Bring cameras for photos with Santa and the local firefighters. Cost is $8, and reservations can be made online at www. lake-elsinore.org/SpecialEvents or call (951) 674-3124, ext. 292. For those who aren’t early risers, how about dinner with Santa instead? Kriss Kringle likes Lake Elsinore so much that he is hanging out for a spaghetti dinner, so head on over to Lake Elsinore Saturday, Dec. 10, at 5 p.m. for Dinner with Santa at Fire Station No. 10, located at 410 W. Graham Ave. Reservations are required, and cost is $8 per person for spaghetti dinner and time with the big guy. Call (951) 674-3124 ext. 292 for

more information and reservations. Maybe you are looking for some alone time with your spouse or significant other to finish up that holiday shopping. If so, bring the little ones to Parent’s Night Out – Holiday Edition at Kay Ceniceros Senior Center in Menifee Dec. 3. Finish your shopping or just have an evening out while your children get to play, do crafts and even get a visit from Santa. Cost is $15 per child includes dinner, popcorn and a movie. This event is for children ages 5-12. So maybe breakfast and dinner is not your thing. Well, that’s OK, too. Santa’s Workshop is coming to the Temecula Public Library Dec. 7 from 4-4:45 p.m. Children will get festive during this do-ityourself “crafternoon” full of fun and excitement with crafts, stories, cookies and you guessed it, a sur-

prise visit from Santa. Registration is required for this event designed for children ages 3-12. The library is located at 30600 Pauba Road in Temecula. For those who want to cut back on that expensive holiday electric bill while doing something good for the environment, don’t forget to bring your old holiday lights to exchange them for new LED lights and receive a free energy efficiency starter kit. The light exchange is made possible by the Western Riverside Council of Governments and will be held at Wildomar’s Breakfast with Santa event, Dec. 3 from 8-11 a.m., Hemet’s Christmas in the Park Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Murrieta’s Festival of Trees Dec. 3 from 5- 7 p.m., and Canyon Lake’s Tree Lighting Ceremony Sunday, Dec. 4, from 4-7 p.m.

Sing holiday favorites with the Southwest Women’s Chorus on Dec. 10 at Temecula Theater’s Courtyard TEMECULA – Bring the family out or round up the neighbors and join the Southwest Women’s Chorus for a fun-filled afternoon singing holiday favorites. The choir will lead the “Community Sing-A-Long” in the Old Town

Temecula Community Theater Courtyard Saturday, Dec. 10 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The theater courtyard is located behind the Merc at 42051 Main Street in Temecula. Founded in 2000, the Southwest Women’s Chorus provides women

who love to sing with the experience of performing quality choral music while empowering them through artistic growth, camaraderie and community involvement. Their goal is to provide a quality opportunity for choral singers to learn or improve

their craft. The chorus sings a wide variety of music, including classical, spiritual, folk, Broadway and old standards. The group presents two concerts each year at Christmas and in the spring at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater.

More information on the many arts, culture and entertainment happenings in the City of Temecula can be found by visiting www.TemeculaCA.gov or by calling (951) 694-6480.

Christmas Tree Lane now open at Promenade Temecula designed Christmas trees with themes such as the Super Hero Tree, The Giving Tree (packed with gift cards and cash), and the Moana Tree. The beautifully decorated trees will be given away to winning ticket holders Dec. 12 at a drawing ceremony at the mall. Tree winners won’t just receive the ornaments; they will win the entire tree. “We are so proud of this year’s Christmas Tree Lane,” Habitat for Humanity Inland Valley Ex-

Children view Christmas Tree Lane at the Promenade in the Temecula. The event is an annual fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity Inland Valley. Courtesy photo

TEMECULA – Habitat for Humanity Inland Valley will once again spread holiday joy throughout the community with its 10th

annual Christmas Tree Lane at the Promenade in Temecula. The fundraiser opened Nov. 5, and features 20 exquisitely

R E S T O R A T I O N

Piano Tuning, Repair & Restoration Bob Fuhr 951-440-3408

ecutive Director Tammy Marine said. “It’s a culmination of hours of volunteerism, generosity and artistry. We’d like to think the beautiful display also makes a statement about the power of collaboration while celebrating diversity. “Come by and see the trees. They’ll touch your heart and are a great way to support families in Inland Valley while kicking off the holiday season,” Marine said. Opportunity drawing tickets

are on sale for $1 each or 10 for $5 at the event, located near the entrance to Macy’s Women’s Store on the lower level during regular mall hours. Promenade in Temecula is at 40820 Winchester Road in Temecula. For more information or to volunteer at Christmas Tree Lane or Habitat for Humanity Inland Valley, visit www.habitativ.org or call (951) 296-3362.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

C-6

Opinion Editor’s Note: Opinions do not necessarily reflect the views of the Valley News staff. We invite opinions on all sides of an issue. If you have an opinion, please send it as an e-mail to valleyeditor@reedermedia.com, or fax us at (760) 723-9606. Maximum word count 500. All letters must include the author’s name, address and phone number. The Valley News reserves the right to edit letters as necessary to fit the publication’s format.

Together we can make a difference in our communities Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

This morning I awoke to an email in my inbox on a WalletHub study regarding charitable giving. The study, 2016’s Most Charitable States had some interesting facts and figures. According to the article accompanying the study, “American’s are some of the most generous people in the world, ranking second out of 140 countries” last year. The article reports that American donors gave more than $373 billion to charity, with 71 percent coming from individuals. That’s a lot of giving. Another way that Americans give is through volunteer hours. “Between 2014 and 2015, nearly 63 million people volunteered with an organization at least once, serving a median of 52 hours per year,” the article reported. In the study, WalletHub ranked the 50 states using 13 key metrics including “volunteer rate” to “percentage of income donated” to “percentage of sheltered homeless.” Here is a quick snapshot of what they found. Utah was ranked No. 1, followed by Minnesota and North Dakota, all three states had high volunteer rates, high donated income and high numbers of volunteer hours. On the other end of the spectrum at 48, 49 and 50 respectively were Texas, California and Arizona.

Yep, California ranked second to the last in the study. If that shocks you, don’t worry, you aren’t alone. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw that we as a state scored so low. From my time in the Temecula Valley, four years to be exact, I have found numerous instances of charitable giving. I see social media posts on residents of the area giving, giving and giving more. I remember a story of a Temecula police officer buying shoes for a shoeless woman in a random act of kindness. Officer Bruce Pierson didn’t stop there, he met with the woman the next day, giving her a bag of clothes donated by members of the entire police force. Fast forward a couple of months and we have another chance encounter between a Temecula police officer and a man who appeared “down on his luck.” Deputy Shawn Gurganious was caught red-handed in April, performing a random act of kindness at Temecula’s Salvation Army store where he helped a homeless man by purchasing him a bag of clothing. Local police officers aren’t the only ones giving a helping hand. Regular citizens like you and I help in our own way as well. I recently saw a Facebook post, in one of the many groups I troll looking for news, from a woman who had a Christmas tree that she wanted to give to a single mother in need. There was massive response to

the post so she held a drawing and entered all of the names of the people who responded. It seemed there could only be one lucky winner, until at my last check, when another person offered up a Christmas tree they had sitting around as well. It was heart-warming to see. If I had an extra tree, I would have offered it up as well too. What a great way to celebrate the holiday season. Kudos to those ladies for making Christmas just a little better for others. It doesn’t stop there. In this week’s edition of Valley News, we have a story about Amy Martinez, a quadruple amputee who not only received a set of hands from local nonprofit Charity for Charity, but also a brand-new Chevy Traverse, thanks to the generous donations of people from within our community, including Terry Gilmore

of Paradise Chevrolet who came up with the idea. There are hundreds of charitable organizations within our valley that residents can donate to, not just during the holiday season, but throughout the year. And guess what, if money is tight and cash donations aren’t feasible for you, you may give something even more valuable, your time. Many nonprofits are always looking for volunteers. Some great programs in the valley include volunteering as a docent at the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve, you might become a volunteer with the Girl Scouts or support the Salvation Army with a donation of your time. Animal Friends of the Valleys is always searching for a variety of volunteers, too. You don’t have to leave your home to volunteer either. The American

Reflecting on our many blessings Marie Waldron SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

In this season of Thanksgiving, we Americans have a great deal to be thankful for. God’s blessings and gifts are all around us, even when we may not notice them. Our nation is founded on the rule of law, with checks and balances that guarantee our God-given freedoms are protected. Our peace-

ful elections and lawful transfer of power remain the envy of the world. We should also be thankful that we are among the most generous people on earth. Just a quick look around the 75th Assembly District provides multiple examples of our giving, supportive nature. Solutions for Change, which seeks to provide families in need with a permanent solution for homelessness, is one

www.olivetuniversity.edu

Help Wanted Olivet University in Anza

Chef Wanted

Position requires menu planning, cooking for 100 to 200 people two meals per day/five days a week, and manage daily kitchen cleaning duties. Chef will train and supervise other hourly staff for all kitchen duties. Certified Food Handler. Food service industry experience in a cafeteria setting preferred. Salary negotiable.

Cook Wanted

Full-time or part-time cooks for meal services. Position requires working in a team cooking for 100 to 200 people two meals per day/five days a week, daily kitchen cleaning duties. Certified Food Handler. Food service industry experience in a cafeteria setting preferred. Salary negotiable.

Contact: hiring@olivetuniversity.edu

No Event or Party Too Big or Small For Balloon Artist Extraordinaire GeriLyn Mellin the Balloonernooner

Create a Magical Theme Party with Balloon Art • Delight Your Guests with Special Character Balloon’s Made Especially for Them • Balloon Arches for Special Events and Weddings, Birthdays, Parties of All Kinds

Ask about our Hat Box Parties Call to Learn More and Book Your Special Event or Party Today!

LANIK

951.401.8417 LM

ENTERPRISES, INC.

Balloonernooner@gmail.com

Reputable and Dependable

23 years experience

EMAIL:

Family Owned and Operated for more than 35 years Now offering

Flat Rate Septic Tank Pumping Service Free Consultations Septic Installation & Certification to Total Site Prep Permanent Foundations for Manufactured Homes and more

www.facebook.com/balloonernooner

HomeSmart Legends of California Let Your Home Buying or Selling Experience Be An Uplifting One.

With GeriLyn Mellin Reality with a Personal Touch Cell: 951.401.8417 OffiCe: 951.491.7800

To Learn More and View Our Complete Services Go To

email:

Lanikseptic.com

BallooningRealtor@gmail.com

Or Call

800-207-2505 OR 951-676-7114 State A, B, & C-42 Lic. #458947

E-mail: lanikenterprises@hotmail.com Gordon Lanik, President

Red Cross, the Alzheimer’s Association and Ronald McDonald house are just a few of the many agencies that have virtual volunteering opportunities. Volunteermatch.org is just one website you can use to find volunteer opportunities within the local community. This handy website lets you choose by your interests which can help make your volunteer experience more enjoyable. This holiday season, let’s show those folks at WalletHub how wrong they were ranking us bighearted Californians at the bottom of their list. Dig deep and donate. It doesn’t matter if it’s your money, your time or both; if we work together we can make a big impact in our communities and I am all for that! But hey, it’s only my opinion.

CalBRE#01979115

outstanding example. The Elizabeth Hospice, the oldest and largest nonprofit hospice and palliative care provider for children and adults in San Diego County, has served the needs of thousands of San Diego County families for almost 40 years. Groups serving our veterans include the Veterans Association of North County, which provides job placement services, education, training and counseling for all North County veterans, and Homes for Our Troops, which builds mortgage-free, specially designed homes for our nation’s most severely injured veterans. And there are so many other organizations helping people every day here in North County. When we give thanks to our Creator for the many blessings bestowed upon us as free human beings, we should also remember the many outstanding individuals, businesses and charitable institutions that reach out to those in need throughout this region. It’s an honor to serve such outstanding people in the California Legislature.

More police officers are needed in Hemet Letter to the editor, Hello I am a resident of Hemet, California. My concern is the amount of pedestrian verses car incidents, I have been a member of the Hemet Valley Incidents on Facebook and I am constantly seeing posts about pedestrians being critically injured by cars and most of them are fatal. I have seen on a number of occasions while driving, people on cycles, walking and pushing carts, I’ve even seen parents with children walking across main roads with heavy traffic. In my opinion the situation has gotten completely out of control and something has to give. I understand that the police are short staffed but due to Measure U passing, there should be more police in Hemet. I’m tired of seeing memorials every few miles from people being killed by cars. Something needs to be done. Sinovia Martin Hemet, California

REACH 75,000± REAdERs /week (print & online) with a Classified Ad

Call Lili at 951-763-5510

or Place your ad online at www.myvalleynews.com Deadline to call in Mondays Noon Deadline to submit online Mondays 5pm

Starting at $ !

20


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

C-7

Education

‘Meeting the Needs of Every Student Through Inclusion’

California Charter School Association Reports a Qualitative Study on Special Education Stephanie Lai VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

California Charter School Association recently published a qualitative study regarding practices for special education in 10 selected schools. The report reviews the 10 charter schools and their innovative approaches behind their special education programs, implementation and policy arrangements that have improved outcomes for students with disabilities. Chosen by the directors in charge of the study, the schools exemplified similar attributes in which the CCSA found would improve the special education infrastructure. Particularly exemplifying inclusive programs, the 10 schools offer insight to policy arrangements that produce the best results for serving students. According to the study, “Meeting the Needs of Every Student Through Inclusion,” schools have problems when they lack autonomy and individualized student support. Special Education Adviser Kate Dove explained, “The system, not intentionally but historically, has worked out to separate and segregate them into these programs.” The outdated models of special education pro-

grams many traditional schools operate with undermine the individual success of special education students due to the binding nature of the programs. As the students are “labeled,” the programs have systematically focused on compliance rather than on results and the individual need base differences of all students within the school. Within the report, the California Charter School Association’s year and a limited study generalized the qualitative conclusion to center around inclusion. Programs from the 10 charter schools were chosen through achievement statistics, suspension and enrollment levels among other factors. Together the schools generated conclusive data in which led the CCSA to the philosophy of inclusion. The exemplary schools submersed their special education students in content rich courses so that students could learn together regardless of ability level. Multitiered programs allow for assisting the individual weaknesses of all students through campus-wide systems. Menifee’s Santa Rosa Academy, a school chosen for the study, utilizes a multitiered system for supportive human interaction. “The Academy’s program, Safety

Net, is a vast database of student information behavior students that looks at all the students and targets intervention for these students who may be falling behind. They do not need to be special education students,” Dove said. The inclusionary idea goes both ways, as the program records student anecdotes and teacher records for the administration to review. Rather than labelling their students, Santa Rosa Academy catches students struggling early on and enrolls students in individualized classes, such as their speech classes. “Santa Rosa Academy is actually very interesting. They operate on a three-track model,” Dove explained. The school offers traditional classroom setting schooling; a blended education program where students attend school a few days out of the week with the other days with online schooling; and an online-based education. The flexibility in the schooling itself gives large support for the students and increased the range of students enrolled in the school. “There was a student in a traditional setting with behavior issues. He was unable to learn or interact, but once he moved over to Santa Rosa, the administration aimed to

integrate the child from traditional to blended track. The specialized setting garnered his social skills,” Dove described with reference to the flexibility of the track system. The tracks within Santa Rosa are not mutually exclusive depending on the need of the student. Administration and special education teachers aim to build whatever the student needs at that time, with the idea of making them more independent while utilizing the strategies they’ve learned specifically through multisensory learning and STEM subjects. In addition to the inclusion of other students, Steven Baratte of California Charter School Association said, “staff is the most important component for effecting positive change and we hope that these schools and schools across the state will look at some of the best practices identified in the study and see which ones they can incorporate into their campus.” The high performing charter schools thematically correlate their success with the support of the teachers and community alike. While these schools have similar funding levels, the aspect that makes the difference is how they

can directly provide their own services rather than relying on the authorizer for them to provide a full range of services. Funding through the California Education Code, allows charter schools such as Santa Rosa Academy to operate independently under the umbrella of their authorizer. However, Santa Rosa Academy has attained economic autonomy for their program funding through Special Education Local Plan Area by operating as a school of the authorizer, thus giving the school control of their funding. These charter schools have attained fully independent funding from the continuum, allowing them to allocate their budget for individualized learning. The detailed study gives insight on the educational programs high performing charter schools have taken. The association hopes to continue improving educational systems will be achieved through spreading awareness of their qualitative study. Anticipating publication in January, the CCSA is currently working on a tool kit that would provide additional guidance on the charter school community and further their mission.

Eight Honored as Hemet/San Jacinto Students of the Month “My greatest contribution is spreading kindness,” Randi Nuanes from Hamilton High School said. Principal Dr. David Farkas acknowledged her leadership by example as well as her skill and gift as an artist. She admitted her shyness and fear of public speaking, but said “I’m glad you’re all here to witness me conquering this.” Brooklyn Wright from Helen Hunt Jackson High School started her own business, Antoinette Photography, at age 16 and started in independent study in middle school to avoid bullying. She continues to thrive in a cohort-based study program and plans to major in photography in college. Honors English teacher Sarah Opperman at Western Center Academy nominated Fatemah Odtallah. “She dreams of a better

Committee Chairperson Karena Chum (left) poses with the November Students of the Month from Hemet and San Jacinto School Districts. (L to R) Jorge Davalos, Randi Nuanes, Gabriela Mendoza, Christina Muoio, Brooklyn Wright, Fatemah Odtallah, Cassiopeia Tichy, Reuben Rodriguez. Paul Bandong photo

Paul Bandong PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA.COM

It was a morning of inspirational stories as student after student was honored at the November Hemet and San Jacinto unified school districts’ Student of the Month Breakfast held at The Sizzler Restaurant in Hemet. Many stories carried the themes of overcoming adversity, discrimination and shyness. First to be recognized was Gabriela Mendoza from San Jacinto High School who overcame speech and learning disabilities and impressed staff with her determination and vision. She plans on pursuing a business degree at California State University, Fullerton followed by completing an MBA. Jorge Davalos from Mountain View High School represented a great example to his teachers of

“a student who decided to change his life.” He began high school as one showing all the signs of failing and became one who recently completed 80 credits in one year. Now he will graduate early. Davalos wants to be a construction planner. Cassiopeia “Cassie” Tichy from Hemet High School spent a year in home hospital battling Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare type of cancer that grows in the bones. She underwent chemotherapy and radiation treatments, blood and platelet transfusions and is currently the first child participating in a case study at Rady Children’s Hospital with a protocol that has been successful with adults. She plans on pursuing her education and career in art. Christina Muoio from West Valley High School is characterized by her teachers as a “student with a passion for learning.” Despite

battling with self-doubt that consumed her, she refocused on her accomplishments and not comparing herself with others. Muoio recently medaled as Academic Decathlon county champion and plans to double major in English and history. Eric Dahlstrom, principal of Tahquitz High School, introduced Reuben Rodriguez as a student who attends calculus class at 7 a.m., takes other advanced placement classes, participates in dual enrollment, and is captain of the cross-country team. “I came from a middle school with only 40 students to a high school with over 1,000 students,” Rodriguez said. “It was a culture shock.” He credits his leadership position to a desire to help other students with their loneliness and need for inclusion. He hopes to attend University of California, Los Angeles.

CLOSER TO HOME, CLOSER TO CAREER

SPRING 2017 EARN AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE

Continue Your Education Journey at Azusa Pacific

Complete Your Bachelor’s Degree at APU’s Murrieta Regional Campus A college graduate earns an average of nearly $24,000 more per year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Azusa Pacific’s bachelor’s completion programs help students with 30-45 units of transferable credit reach their education goals and advance their careers. CHOOSE FROM:

TRANSFER TO A FOUR-YEAR UNIVERSITY

B.A. in Criminal Justice

RECEIVE JOB TRAINING OR CAREER CERTIFICATE

B.A. in Psychology

B.A. in Liberal Studies

DAY, EVENING & ONLINE CLASSES ONLY $46 A UNIT for California Residents FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE

REGISTER NOW

msjc.edu 951.639.5313

world – of a society that is colorful and strong. She is passionate and an advocate for others who lack the ability or courage to speak,” said Opperman. Odtallah related her story of rejection and discrimination as a Muslim-American and being a victim of ignorance and intolerance by her “friends.” “There is nothing like being on the receiving end of hate to learn the value of love,” Odtallah said. “It opened my eyes to the importance of forgiveness.” Odtallah plans to study psychology so she can help children in poverty deal with anxiety and depression. Crystal Ruiz, city councilwoman for the City of San Jacinto, personalized her keynote address to each of the honorees and finished with “you will all stumble at some time, but you can overcome. You are all an inspiration already!”

It’s time to take the next step. Contact us today! Murrieta Regional Campus 40508 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd. Murrieta, CA 92563 (951) 304-3400 | murrieta@apu.edu apu.edu/murrieta

CLASSES START JAN 17TH

San Jacinto, Menifee, San Gorgonio Pass and Temecula 20264


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

C-8

New Homes in Gated Community Patio Homes Perfect for Seniors, Singles & Active Adults that Don’t Want Yardwork THIS WEEK’S SPECIAL

4BD, 2.5BA, 1870 sf includes: quality washer/dryer and refrigerator package. All homes built for comfort, safety and energy conservation.

Only $255,900

A single story 3BD, 2.5BA with 2 car tandem garage plus front yard landscaping!

homes built for safety and Only $239,900 Allcomfort, energy conservation.

FREE Appliance Package (GE Washer/Dryer and Refrigerator)

When You Close by December 15, 2016! na Es

H

press

way

Esplanade Ave HWY 74 (Florida Ave)

State

Sanderson

Ramo

Bring this coupon to Kirby Village!

HWY 74 (Florida Ave) or Ramona Expressway to Sanderson, to Esplanade East to Kirby, One half block North. Come to Kirby Village today!

Call today for a private showing (951) 658-7211

Hemet / San Jacinto

Murrieta / Temecula

990 W. Florida Ave. Hemet, CA 92543

30111 Technology Dr, Ste 150 Murrieta, CA 92563 (Off Winchester Rd)

DECEMBER 2016 EVENTS

(951) 658-7211 • www.brubakerculton.com

Welcome New Members

■ MOVING MOM ■ 5 STAR NAILS ■ CALIFORNIA COAST CREDIT UNION ■ SEBAZ PRODUCTIONS ■ EVOLUTION SOLUTION MARKETING ■ STEPFAMILY SYSTEMS ■ KRISPY KREME

For more information regarding any of these events, please contact the Chamber office at (951) 672-1991. Visit us at menifeevalleychamber.com.


VALLEY

D

Section

NEWS

December 2 – 8, 2016

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 16, Issue 49

COMMUNITY

Community celebrates Jacob’s House Playground

Temecula Mayor pro-tem Maryann Edwards, in her role as Western Office Director for Senator Jeff Stone, presents a certificate from the Senator’s office to commemorate the ribbon-cutting for the new playground at Jacob’s House to Shawn Nelson.

Paul Bandong PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The parking lot was full and adjoining streets were lined with cars as residents, friends, family and the Temecula and Murrieta Chambers of Commerce came out to celebrate the latest developments at Jacob’s House in Temecula: a children’s playground and new garden landscaping. These new developments are in addition to the chapel, Pathway of Hope, Garden and Mural all built through the generosity of businesses, the community and volunteers. Jacob’s House is a community resource; it is a home dedicated to providing families and loved ones of those hospitalized in traumatic medical need with shelter, physical, emotional and spiritual support. Jacob Nelson, for whom the house is named, died at age 24 from a car accident Oct. 22, 2006. His sister, Jennifer, was in a near-fatal accident 10 years earlier, and the Nelson family was able to stay in a Ronald McDonald hospitality house in Loma Linda. There was no such place near the Escondido hospital where Jacob was taken. Jacob’s parents, Shawn and Stephanie Nelson, wanted to help families going through the same traumatic crisis and shared the dream of a Ronald McDonald house in Temecula. They soon found out, however that one could not be built in Temecula because the new planned Temecula Valley hospital was not a children’s hospital. Plans were revised to provide a refuge that would serve

the needs of all age groups and all the local hospitals, and it was proposed to name it Jacob’s House. Six years later, in December 2012, their nonprofit organization was able to purchase a 4,000 square foot home on 2.3 acres of land a half mile away from the new hospital. The following June a community open house raised $60,000 to furnish the home. “The community outreach and outpouring of support has been immeasurable,” said Nelson, “We couldn’t have done it without this generous community.” Each room is named after a child who has died. “This is a home built by love and hope,” Nelson said. “Hope makes a difference and can change lives. We can’t change the destiny, but we can impact the journey.” Jacob’s House provides a refuge in the storm -- a place to shower, sleep, have a meal, wash clothes, and give families peace that they don’t have to worry about anything else, just focus on their loved one. The goal of the group of volunteers is to be as loving and supportive as they can be and to create an environment of hope, comfort, peace and inspiration. In October 2013, the new Temecula Valley hospital opened, and in December 2013, Jacob’s House served its first family. Since then, 312 guests have had 2,409 night stays. “This playground will be wonderful for the kids of the families that stay with us,” Nelson said. “It is our last major project on the property.”

The Pathway of Hope leads to the chapel at Jacob’s House. The Pathway consists of engraveable pavers to remind guests that they are not alone on their journey. The shed was transformed into a chapel by The Rock Church of Temecula Valley.

Shawn Nelson (with scissors) is surrounded by family, staff, friends and members of Temecula and Murrieta Chambers at the dedication of the playground at Jacob’s House Nov. 15. Paul Bandong photos

He also credited Executive Director Linda Mehia, the board of directors and many volunteers. Jacob’s House welcomes corporate sponsors, community partners, faith partners, key partners, service providers and volunteers. They also have a wish list of items on their website. For more information, visit www. jacobshousetemecula.org. A permanent plaque recognizes the contributions of the businesses, groups and families that made the playground possible at Jacob’s House.

REAL ESTATE

Market at a glance (As of November 13, 2016) No of Homes Sold Inventory of Properties Listed

TEMECULA

MURRIETA

WILDOMAR

LAKE ELSINORE

CANYON LAKE

MENIFEE

SUN CITY

HEMET

SAN JACINTO

26

28

9

16

1

11

6

36

10

(482) 451

(459) 428

(111) 104

(243) 228

(109) 110

(166) 159

(154) 148

(415) 414

Average Selling Price

$427,823

$393,488

$377,845

$310,494

$368,000

$367,316

$257,800

$217,719

(149)

$257,800

155

Average List Price

$713,562

$646,562

$412,351

$350,091

$533,808

$391,995

$303,196

$259,200

$258,936

Median List Price

$509,000

$448,250

$408,250

$349,900

$439,250

$375,000

$287,000

$235,000

$260,000

Asking Price per Square Foot

$201

$173

$159

$164

$202

$156

$160

$147

$136

Average Days on Market

116

105

86

74

129

64

81

119

124

Most Expensive Listing

$7,400,000

$3,499,000

$999,900

$1,198,000

$1,999,900

$749,000

$975,000

$1,649,000

$1,500,000

Least Expensive Listing

$249,100

$149,900

$215,000

$39,900

$155,000

$149,000

$159,000

$48,900

$49,900

Average Age of Listing

18

16

21

21

29

14

26

36

23

% of Properties w/ Price decrease

44%

42%

42%

38%

47%

43%

30%

39%

23%

% of Properties Relisted (reset DOM)

15%

12%

12%

7%

12%

10%

14%

6%

7%

% of Flip properties (price increase)

7%

6%

6%

8%

2%

6%

11%

5%

8%

Median House Size (sq ft)

2939

2952

2465

2110

2250

2497

1672

1588

1870

8,001-10,000

8,001-10,000

8,001-10,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

Median Number of Bedrooms

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

3.0

4.0

3.0

3.0

4.0

Median Number of Bathrooms

3.0

3.0

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.0

2.0

2.0

Seller (37.9)

Seller (40.3)

Seller (48.8)

Seller (49.9)

Seller (42.1)

Seller (47.5)

Seller (50.9)

Seller (48.3)

Seller (43.9)

Median Lot Size (sq ft)

Market Action Index*

*This Index measures the current rate of sale versus the amount of inventory. Index above 30 implies a seller’s advantage. Below 30, conditions give the advantage to the buyer. Market data provided by Escrow Leaders (Altos Research) and is current as of 11/28/16. Sales Data provided by SRCAR (MLS) and current as of 11/27/16. Boxes with multiple entries have previous week’s numbers (in parentheses) and this week’s number for comparision purposes. Strong Trends (multiple weeks) in each area are indicated by color: green indicates upward trend; pink indicates downward trend. Valley News makes no representation as to the accuracy or completeness of this data.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

D-2

Business Recent Home Sales

List of transactions from selected cities in Southwest Riverside County • 146 closed transactions from 11/21/16 through 11/27/16.

www.srcar.org • (951) 894-2571 Murrieta 26529 Jefferson Ave.

Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 “Sterling Business of the Year” Murrieta Chamber of Commerce’s 2014 "Medium Size Business of the Year" City

Address

Aguanga

49450 Kiowa Drive

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

City

Address

259,000

1738

2BR

2BA

25

Menifee

Hemet 2355 E. Florida

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

31740 Yale Lane

$342,000

2062

4BR

2BA

47

Menifee 27070 Sun City Blvd.

City

Address

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

Temecula

30738 Eastgate Parkway

$405,000

3149

4BR

3BA

83

Anza

59475 Granite Gulley Road

$85,000

720

2BR

1BA

126

Menifee

28688 Bridge Water Lane

$335,000

1777

4BR

3BA

6

Temecula

32922 Monte Drive

$455,000

2916

5BR

3BA

91

Canyon Lake

22239 Loch Lomond Drive

$368,000

2947

3BR

2BA

71

Menifee

29136 Stone Ridge Street

$360,000

2438

4BR

3BA

53

Temecula

43415 Calle Morita

$379,900

1416

3BR

2BA

61

Hemet

38425 Boot Lane

$330,000

1640

4BR

2BA

495

Menifee

26096 Germantown Drive

$235,000

1328

2BR

2BA

41

Temecula

32046 Calle Caballos

$467,500

2417

3BR

2BA

89

Hemet

353 Soboba Street

$256,500

1698

3BR

2BA

166

Menifee

27204 Michener Drive

$320,000

1728

4BR

2BA

3

Temecula

34551 Serdonis Street

$780,000

2929

4BR

3BA

13

Hemet

2986 Hampton Avenue

$210,000

1281

3BR

2BA

46

Menifee

30768 Sorrel Lane

$475,000

2676

3BR

5BA

9

Temecula

33929 Galleron Street

$494,500

3302

5BR

4BA

77 76

Hemet

2730 Banyan Tree Lane

$237,000

1817

3BR

2BA

154

Menifee

30272 Via Palermo

$333,000

1643

3BR

3BA

28

Temecula

31938 Corte Cardoza

$410,000

1888

3BR

2BA

Hemet

41705 Thornton Avenue

$295,000

2279

3BR

2BA

190

Menifee

28171 Summitrose Drive

$395,000

2442

3BR

2BA

6

Temecula

43113 Volterra Street

$343,450

1556

4BR

3BA

5

Hemet

25155 Avocet Circle

$225,000

1704

4BR

3BA

164

Murrieta

17755 Avenida Bosque

$925,000

1500

3BR

2BA

589

Temecula

41910 Camino Casana

$400,000

1752

3BR

2BA

69 19

Hemet

41860 Soledad Lane

$400,000

2003

3BR

3BA

141

Murrieta

37838 Spur Drive

$325,500

2467

4BR

3BA

114

Temecula

32970 Rhine Avenue

$536,000

2939

4BR

3BA

Hemet

333 SAN JACINTO Street

$230,000

2540

4BR

3BA

37

Murrieta

31655 Waterfall Way

$425,000

3628

5BR

5BA

193

Temecula

39892 Chalon Court

$480,000

3197

5BR

3BA

17

Hemet

24871 Cologne Drive

$233,000

1568

3BR

2BA

147

Murrieta

29204 Gandolf Court

$417,000

2648

4BR

3BA

176

Temecula

43893 Sassari Street

$393,000

1750

4BR

3BA

60

Hemet

380 Santa Lucia Drive

$68,000

1800

2BR

2BA

112

Murrieta

41410 Juniper Street

$213,000

1159

2BR

2BA

111

Temecula

41616 Slice Way

$439,000

2874

4BR

3BA

42

Hemet

3045 Daniel Drive

$250,000

2082

4BR

3BA

83

Murrieta

40106 Jonah Way

$370,000

2929

5BR

3BA

143

Temecula

41808 Vardon Drive

$380,000

1760

3BR

2BA

50

Hemet

1382 Via Rivas

$327,000

1635

2BR

2BA

60

Murrieta

36385 Cougar Place

$379,900

2570

4BR

3BA

91

Temecula

33210 Camino Rubano

$396,000

1553

3BR

2BA

2

Hemet

25524 Sharp Drive

$129,000

1628

3BR

3BA

105

Murrieta

29209 Branwin Street

$417,000

2420

3BR

3BA

93

Temecula

31925 Wildwood Court

$465,000

2898

3BR

3BA

12

Hemet

3051 Red Cedar Trail

$230,000

2390

4BR

3BA

57

Murrieta

38725 Bears Paw Drive

$339,000

1912

2BR

2BA

71

Temecula

45695 Hawk Court

$362,250

2628

4BR

3BA

0

Hemet

3275 Shipley Place

$270,000

2163

4BR

2BA

55

Murrieta

34848 Star Jasmine Place

$418,900

2806

4BR

4BA

56

Temecula

32030 Calle Espinosa

$364,999

1508

3BR

3BA

1

Hemet

428 Tewell Drive

$300,000

2024

2BR

2BA

21

Murrieta

23925 Constantine Drive

$400,000

2300

4BR

3BA

92

Temecula

45477 Masters Drive

$357,900

1318

4BR

2BA

29

Hemet

350 Taylor Street

$185,000

1144

2BR

1BA

19

Murrieta

41524 Blue Canyon Avenue

$242,000

1340

3BR

2BA

40

Temecula

28037 Calle Estrella

$300,000

1128

2BR

2BA

24

Hemet

42592 Willow Canyon Road

$379,900

1972

3BR

2BA

75

Murrieta

24568 Jacarte Drive

$354,900

1850

4BR

3BA

32

Wildomar

33510 Canyon Ranch Road

$314,000

1875

4BR

3BA

83

Hemet

4424 Cove Street

$279,000

1951

4BR

3BA

76

Murrieta

28304 Kara Street

$347,500

2078

4BR

3BA

47

Wildomar

35614 Wanki Avenue

$300,000

2219

4BR

3BA

148

Hemet

2746 Manzanita Way

$146,900

1536

2BR

2BA

16

Murrieta

23890 Via Pamilla

$298,000

1489

2BR

2BA

61

Wildomar

24119 Brillante Drive

$374,000

2598

4BR

3BA

87

Hemet

44561 Grovewood Circle

$167,000

1560

2BR

2BA

1

Murrieta

27919 Tamrack Way

$389,900

2318

4BR

3BA

13

Wildomar

33571 Sunbonnet Court

$391,602

2351

4BR

3BA

119

Hemet

8270 Faldo Avenue

$276,500

2024

2BR

2BA

35

Murrieta

26342 Norma Jean Place

$482,000

3808

5BR

4BA

11

Wildomar

23140 Cannery Road

$368,000

3094

4BR

3BA

78

Hemet

26116 Corte Tecolote

$315,000

2683

4BR

3BA

17

Murrieta

39699 Columbia Union Drive

$285,000

1532

2BR

2BA

11

Wildomar

33450 Maple Tree Lane

$420,000

2196

4BR

3BA

78

Hemet

2641 La Brea Avenue

$175,000

1206

2BR

2BA

25

Murrieta

22921 Saint Georges Court

$635,350

3056

3BR

4BA

11

Wildomar

35297 Amatista Avenue

$360,000

3040

3BR

3BA

53

Hemet

658 El Dorado Lane

$105,000

1248

2BR

2BA

51

Murrieta

39497 Crystal Lake Court

$380,000

1853

4BR

3BA

4

Wildomar

33757 Windmill Road

$208,000

1056

2BR

2BA

29

Hemet

42168 Mayberry Avenue

$240,000

1705

3BR

2BA

50

Murrieta

27876 Post Oak Place

$400,000

3073

4BR

3BA

22

Wildomar

35712 Finch Court

$349,999

1824

3BR

2BA

12

Hemet

5387 Paseo Famosa

$299,900

1734

3BR

2BA

49

Murrieta

30476 Powderhorn Lane

$405,000

2528

4BR

3BA

14

Wildomar

22813 Navut Avenue

$315,000

1619

4BR

2BA

4

42

Hemet

24515 California Avenue

$95,000

1248

2BR

2BA

51

Murrieta

39892 De Vendome Court

$350,000

1740

4BR

2BA

Hemet

2776 Colby Street

$139,900

1333

3BR

2BA

5

Murrieta

39950 Spinning Wheel Drive

$410,000

2623

4BR

3BA

2

Hemet

41306 Shadow Mountain Way

$229,500

1510

3BR

2BA

6

Murrieta

26463 Arboretum Way

$246,000

1246

2BR

3BA

16

Hemet

733 La Morena Drive

$142,000

1166

2BR

2BA

26

Murrieta

39863 Saint Honore Drive

$395,200

1911

3BR

3BA

3

Hemet

1185 Thompson Street

$134,000

792

3BR

2BA

3

Murrieta

29244 Woodfall Drive

$357,000

2962

4BR

3BA

21

Hemet

611 Palm Avenue

$86,295

1254

2BR

2BA

9

Murrieta

39697 School House Way

$409,500

2700

5BR

4BA

22

Hemet

25456 Jerry Lane

$128,000

1740

2BR

2BA

34

San Jacinto

521 Glory Street

$210,000

1268

3BR

2BA

154

Hemet

41833 Vanchelle Court

$225,000

1454

3BR

2BA

29

San Jacinto

1430 WINDRIDER Street

$244,000

1539

4BR

2BA

90 94

Hemet

2042 Avenida Olivos

$98,500

820

2BR

1BA

4

San Jacinto

2545 Red Pine Street

$305,000

3125

5BR

4BA

Lake Elsinore

34098 Dianthus Lane

$340,000

2363

3BR

3BA

110

San Jacinto

1912 Warwick Street

$250,000

2050

5BR

2BA

61

Lake Elsinore

19645 Berrywood Drive

$310,000

1973

3BR

2BA

40

San Jacinto

1053 Waterleaf Way

$290,000

3107

6BR

3BA

104

Lake Elsinore

31 Plaza Avila

$399,999

2580

4BR

3BA

127

San Jacinto

1181 Lilac Road

$249,000

2324

4BR

2BA

19

Lake Elsinore

15146 Versailles Street

$319,000

1732

3BR

2BA

17

San Jacinto

631 Shaver Street

$222,000

1652

4BR

2BA

44 24

Lake Elsinore

53239 Compassion Way

$350,000

3081

5BR

3BA

46

San Jacinto

1831 Cape Horse Drive

$249,000

2030

4BR

2BA

Lake Elsinore

15115 Grand Avenue

$185,000

1300

2BR

2BA

96

San Jacinto

1246 Pardee Street

$257,000

2226

4BR

3BA

66

Lake Elsinore

15128 Knollwood Street

$307,000

1391

3BR

2BA

29

San Jacinto

1420 Lynden Trails Drive

$302,000

3082

6BR

3BA

49

Lake Elsinore

109 Sumner Avenue

$250,000

1446

4BR

3BA

78

Sun City

29368 Reading Road

$245,000

988

2BR

2BA

16

Lake Elsinore

17357 Peeler Avenue

$287,000

1749

4BR

2BA

27

Sun City

28824 Snead Drive

$195,000

1143

2BR

2BA

49

Lake Elsinore

31956 Botany Court

$315,000

1770

3BR

3BA

28

Sun City

28293 Calle Lustrosos

$225,000

1101

2BR

2BA

12

Lake Elsinore

30505 Canyon Hills Road

$235,000

1274

2BR

3BA

44

Sun City

28106 Murrieta Road Road

$169,000

1000

2BR

1BA

11

Lake Elsinore

17641 Nelson Avenue

$250,000

1397

3BR

2BA

6

Sun City

26090 Shadywood Street

$210,000

1199

2BR

2BA

43

Lake Elsinore

3948 Ash Street

$364,900

2581

3BR

3BA

33

Sun City

28849 Glen Oaks Drive

$161,000

1098

2BR

2BA

3

Lake Elsinore

33138 Windward Way

$370,000

2505

4BR

3BA

45

Temecula

46850 Pala Road

$415,000

1757

2BR

2BA

144

Lake Elsinore

35158 Fennel Lane

$380,000

2257

4BR

3BA

8

Temecula

31557 Royal Oaks Drive

$475,000

2923

4BR

4BA

127

Lake Elsinore

33549 Cedar Creek Lane

$305,000

2116

4BR

3BA

3

Temecula

46471 Sharon Street

$385,000

2365

3BR

2BA

10

Menifee

28680 Argo Drive

$424,900

2858

4BR

3BA

58

Temecula

28785 Bristol Road

$399,900

2144

4BR

3BA

60

Menifee

29950 Freshwater Street

$402,580

2719

5BR

3BA

32

Temecula

42165 Calabria Drive

$310,000

2060

3BR

3BA

120

Menifee

29215 High Ridge Circle

$418,000

2121

3BR

2BA

65

Temecula

42750 Calle Capistrano

$529,000

1300

2BR

2BA

117

Metal Roofing • Shade Covers • Steel Buildings •

760-690-2891 Lic #961382

Don’t Replace. . .REPAIR

We stock or can special order any replacement part for every major brand of appliance. Special orders 24 hr availability.

“Do It Yourself ” One Stop for Home Appliance Repair Needs!

Preferred Appliance Parts Heating & A/C • Washers / Dryers Refrigerators / Freezers • Microwave Ovens And many more

26175 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 203, Murrieta • 951-304-1166 LIC #3

71783

SINCE 1975

40 Years Experience

Matthew 10:27

Don’t Goof - Let Us Do Your Roof ■ All Types of Repairs ■ Quality Roofing Services ■ Residential & Commercial www.housetoproofing.net RICH CARROLL, Owner (951) 679-8369

Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District’s tips for saving water during the holidays LAKE ELSINORE – Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District has a few tips for preparing your home for holiday meals and parties without running up your water bill. Even small changes can add up to big savings over the course of the holiday season. Consider thawing your turkey and other holiday dishes in the fridge, rather than under running water.

The holidays are full of frequent parties and messes, but try to only wash and dry full loads of laundry. Expecting out of town guests? Install a low-flow shower head in your bathrooms before they arrive. Find free devices and rebates at www.evmwd.com/rebates. Cut back on the amount of glasses that will need to be washed at holiday meals. Des-

We Buy Houses for

CASH $$$$!!!

• Fair Prices • No Commissions • No Need to Clean or Repair Your Property • You Choose Your Closing Deadline

Receive an Offer Within 24 Hours of Viewing! We are happy to work with you in solving your real estate problems! Call today with any questions!

Blue Bear RE LLC 858-888-6475

ignate one glass for each of your guests to use during the holiday celebration. Instead of sending pipe-clogging fats and grease down the drain, pour pan drippings into an empty jar or can. Allow the grease to cool, solidify and throw the container in the trash. Set the holiday table with a pitcher of cold water instead of filling each glass. This way guests fill their glass only when they need more. Use any leftover water for your dog bowl or plants. “The holidays are a great time to evaluate where you can save water,” Water Efficiency and Educational Specialist Matthew Conway said, “Many of these small changes can also be used throughout the year as you continue conserving.” For more simple tips to try throughout the year, as well as rebates, savings and tools, visit  www.evmwd.com/conservation. EVMWD provides service to more than 133,000 water, wastewater and agricultural customers in a 96-square mile area in Western Riverside County. The district is a sub-agency of the Western Municipal Water District and a member agency of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

D-3

OVER 1000 HOMES SOLD!

760.206.3994

KimandKenRealEstateGroup.com ~ A Portion of Every Sale Goes to Support Various Local and National Charities ~

WE’RE WINDERMERE’S

# 1 TEAM

BECAUSE WE PUT OUR CLIENT’S NEEDS FIRST!

Why list with Kim & Ken? ♦ Maximum Exposure (Homes Appear on Tens of Thousands of Websites) ♦ Strong Link to Ready, Willing and Able Buyers (Over 5,000 Buyers in our Data Base) ♦ Market Our Homes with Cutting Edge Technology ♦ Sell 46% of Our Own Properties (Immediate Response to All Inquiries) ♦ Consistently Get Our Clients Asking Price or Above Asking Price ♦ Sell Quickly with the Least Amount of Inconvenience to You ♦ Strong Negotiation Skills (More Money in Your Pocket!)

PLUS WE WILL DONATE FOR YOU!

Kim and Ken Real Estate Group believes strongly in giving back to our community.

This holiday season we will donate

$300 TO YOUR FAVORITE CHARITY for each referral that lists or purchases with us!!!

T& FL A

A US

BL

E LA

KE

A NE

RB

Y TED GA

+

55

Murrieta $328,747

Canyon Lake $338,747

Fallbrook $498,747

Check out this area! Definitely in the path of future development! Neighborhood commercial zoning and just a short distance off the freeway. Currently a manufactured home and detached 3 car garage are the improvements. Totally flat and usable property. Bring your business ideas and receive rental income while you are processing your plans.

Canyon Lake upgraded one level home boasts solid wood crown molding, window casements, wood floors with solid wood upgraded base, quality window upgrades, wood sliders & dramatic fireplace in living room. Kitchen has granite counters, breakfast bar & newer stainless appliances. Large covered patio & fenced yard. Seller wants this one sold now!!

Gated 55 and better Fallbrook Community for your convenience and security. One level view home boasts large rooms, volume ceilings, wood floors and much more. Fabulous outdoor area for your projects and enjoyment. This private location with views to Palomar mountain. Activities daily in this sought after community. Ready for you now!

R

M OO

FO

V RR CU

L-D

E

C -SA M

N OU

I TA

IE NV

WS

Fallbrook $428,747

Fallbrook $636,747

Fallbrook $644,000

Welcome to your inviting Fallbrook Home close to downtown. Drought tolerant landscape in front and back frame your freshly painted home. Lovingly cared for and meticulously maintained. Bathrooms have been re-done incl new master vanity and tile surround. All windows except 2 have been replaced. Tankless water heater. Newer heat and A/c system.

Gated Peppertree Park home in Fallbrook! Spacious, retreat back yard. Relax in the dining pavilion or by the pool w/ electric cover. Separate fenced doggy area complete w/ trees & a doggie cottage! Convenient floor plan includes a downstairs master retreat, office, kitchen w/ pull out shelves adjoining the family room and fireplace for those cozy family gatherings.

Absolutely beautiful single story home located on a fully fenced rolling 3.75 esf acres with 24 x 48 barn/garage/shop, one full RV station (dump/ elec/water) and one partial RV station (elec/water only), outdoor bathroom, spa, sweeping mountain views from front and back, 5000 esf of parking space, horses permitted on property…and so much more!

H H H H H More 5-Star Client Reviews Than Any Other Local Agent Ken Follis 760.803-6235

Kim Carlson 760.434.6873

Cal BRE #00799622

Cal BRE #00968586

KenFollis.com kenfollisrealtor@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE

KimCarlsonHomes.com kim@kimcarlsonhomes.com

EXCELLENCE


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

D-4

Real Estate / Home & Garden

Submitted an offer on your dream home, now what? Mike Mason SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

Time for nervous anticipation. You’ve found the home you want, and you are excited. Yet you want to be calm and objective as possible. Be prepared for counter offers. Don’t let the pressure get to you. Remain patient, let your Realtor act as your liaison with the seller and their real estate agent. Keep in mind, you may need to be flexible on price, closing date, appliances and repairs. Beware of putting contingencies in your purchase agreement. They weaken your offer. However, if you currently own a home your offer may need to be contingent on it selling first. Or if you’re uncertain about the structural integrity of the home, you may want a have a home inspection contingency. Keep in mind any contingency could take you out of the running if a non-contingent offer is also presented. Once your offer is accepted, be prepared to open escrow and seal the deal with some earnest money. Earnest money is usually a percentage of the homes’ purchase price that indicates you’re serious about the purchase and indicates your good faith. It’s generally applied to the purchase price when you complete the purchase, but may be forfeited to the seller, if you fail to complete the purchase. Many first-time buyers may be taken by surprise when it comes to earnest money, especially if they have to make a fast offer. Check with your agent for the appropriate amount to have, at the ready in your checking account. Now that you have a fully executed purchase contract, know that there will be more than 50 tasks and deadline deliveries that will need to be completed within a “normal” residential real estate transaction. It will be your real estate agent’s responsibility to make sure the

processing of all documents are complete and all deadlines are met. The process of taking a signed purchase contract through to closing involves a great many details, deliveries and document submissions. Coordination of this process is of critical important and involves several other professionals besides your real estate agent as stated herewith, to make sure that all phases of the escrow closing process moves along smoothly. Title: A title company is needed to make sure that all documents and deliveries are processed in a timely manner. Your real estate agent will examine all of their title and recorded documents to uncover all material defects and items of importance. This is normally more concern to the buyer, but sellers must be prepared to respond to their objections, so it’s important to know what’s in all recorded documents. Example:  while there are normally a few items in a title binder that can be corrected as they’re recorded and pass with the property, sometimes there are requirements or exceptions that weren’t expected but must be addressed.  With the more careful lending environment, perhaps you have a previous divorce and the lender wants better protection against claims and will require additional documentation from a former spouse. Inspections, survey and appraisal: A real estate agent’ job is also to coordinate access for inspectors and the appraiser, and to accept deliveries of reports as well as any objections or correction requirements from the buyers.  Every instance of delivery of an inspection and/or buyer objections requires a response in most cases, and there are deadlines. It is very important to stay on top of these deadlines, make sure reports are delivered on time or extensions are put into place, and that all respond within required time lines. Failure to do so could obligate you to repairs or other corrections or kill the deal.

Get clean, healthy, and great tasting water at home! WaTer CondiTioning and SofTening SySTemS The Purearth2o Chloramine whole house conditioning systems are designed specifically to reduce chloramines, chlorine odors and tastes throughout your entire home, giving you great tasting, healthy water.

SCaLeXPeL WaTer CondiTioner The Scalexpel water conditioner is an eco-friendly water treatment system that protects your plumbing system and appliances against scale deposits.

aLkaLine WaTer fiLTerS This inline filter will increase your water’s pH, increasing the alkalinity of your water. Alkaline water is absorbed by the body faster than tap or bottled water, and helps provide the body with needed hydration.

reverSe oSmoSiS SySTemS The Purearth2o Reverse Osmosis System is designed to provide households with an abundant supply of pure bottled-quality water.

www.purearth2o.com sales@purearth2o.com Tel: Toll-free 888-614-4483

If you have questions or would like to schedule a free consultation, give us a call today, toll-free at

888-614-4483

garding available inventory and/ or other real estate matters please contact, Mike@GoTakeAction.com. Mike Mason, Realtor® & Broker/ Owner of MASON Real Estate. LIC:

01483044, Temecula Valley resident for 30+ years, Board of Director (since 2011) Southwest Riverside County Association of Realtors® (SRCAR).

How will the housing market be affected by President Trump? Gene Wunderlich SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

With the recent presidential election focusing more on personal issues than substantive policy, one element that was only rarely addressed by either candidate was their policy approach to the housing industry. Considering that president-elect Donald Trump is a real estate man, the lack of proposals to address the nation’s housing concerns was somewhat discomfiting. Yet since virtually nobody actually expected him to be elected, many people gave both candidates a pass on many policy specifics. Recently, the National Association of Realtors Chief Economist Dr. Lawrence Yun shared his opinion on how Trump’s presidency could impact real estate. With the presidency and Congress under Republican control, there will be active discussions on tax reform. The past promise that “everything will be on the table” means that in addition to simplifying the tax code, there could be some attempt to trim or eliminate mortgage interest deduction, reduce property tax deduction and cut exemptions for capital gains. Research has shown that these tax benefits are critical for homeownership and economic growth, including job growth. Real estate agents will be monitoring these developments very closely. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac may not survive, and with their

demise, the fixed-rate, 30-year mortgage could disappear. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac currently underwrite, or provide secondary market liquidity, for as much as 90 percent of mortgage loans in this country today. The hope is that private lenders will re-enter the market and take up the slack, but without government guarantees it would be a considerably different market. While it is widely acknowledged that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac made some horrific decisions a decade ago requiring substantial bailouts with taxpayer money, not only have they repaid the bail-outs but have been one of the few arms of the government to actually generate significant profits for the past three years. Onerous Dodd-Frank knee-jerk regulations will be modified or eliminated leading to less regulatory burden, especially for smaller banks. This simplification could lead to both greater mortgage availability and more loans to builders who could then address the current housing shortage. This growth would need to be done carefully to avoid opening the Pandora’s Box of underregulation which lead to the financial meltdown in 2008, but we could see a move away from the stringent lending standards now in place to a more normal credit market. The unregulated regulatory agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, may face scrutiny leading to less regulatory land-use pressure.

FREE PER UNIT WITH REPAIR.

$47.50 WITHOUT REPAIR. MUST PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF ESTIMATE.

Politically charged elements like the “Waters of the U.S.” ruling and the “Clean Air Act” may actually need to prove their worth, reducing the price for land acquisition and cost of entitlements for development. Given the environmental leadership role of California, these less costly and burdensome regulations might not have much impact on our market. If Trump follows through on his pledge to address the nation’s sagging infrastructure, there is hope that housing may be included as an element of infrastructure badly in need of assistance; the shortage of homes is becoming a nationwide problem, not just in California. Yun also addressed several economic considerations not strictly housing related, like short-term stimulus to the economy, faster gross domestic product growth, modestly higher interest rates, more jobs, a rising trade deficit, more stock market gyrations and a greater focus on trade skills at community colleges to address the lack of skilled workers in the marketplace. Obviously, it is much too early to get a precise bead on how Trump will govern, but as with any new administration there will be both positive and negative outcomes to most policy decision. Let’s keep our fingers crossed that most of those changes are positive for homeowners, for future homebuyers and for our country.

Air Conditioning & Heating TuneUp & Diagnostic COUPON NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS

LI

C

91

8 12

3231 Business Park Dr. Suite C-228, Vista, CA, 92081

Repair negotiations:  If the buyer submits requirements for corrective actions to items on reports, it is critical to all parties to determine the cost of those requirements and the appropriate response necessary to keep the deal going in a way beneficial to both the buyer and seller. Should one agree to make certain repairs, there will be deadlines associated with completion, and possibly requirements for the buyer’s inspector to return and re-inspect for completion and repair quality. A good agent will keep all of this on track for you, and can recommend contractors who do quality work at fair prices. Lender document coordination: One of the leading causes of delayed closings can be a problem with funding due to lender last minute requirements or other document demands. Monitoring all document flows to make sure this doesn’t happen is also just as critical.  It’s not the seller, that is getting a mortgage, but a seller will be very concerned with the buyer’s ability to do so and their lender’s process and ability to meet deadlines and fund at closing. Mortgage problems kill a lot of deals. A good real estate agent is going to be involved in the buyer’s process and will make sure all goes as planned to a successful close. It is the goal of every good Realtor to exceed the expectations of all involved. Call us today at (951) 296-8887 and get the information you need enabling you to make an informed, educated decision. Questions re-

Award-Winning Service for Over 30 Years! MONTHLY SPECIAL

SYSTEM TUNE-UP Only $47.50 SAVE ENERGY DOLLARS EVERY MONTH FALLBROOK 760.728-8989 DE LUZ 951.677.2777 RAINBOW 760.729.5050

CAMP PENDLETON 760.757.1111 BONSALL 760.639.6060 PALA 760.749.7747

$500 Off! Any Complete System Changeout (Condenser, Furnace

or Coil) TEMECULA 951.699.4488 MURRIETA 951.677.5445 CANYON LAKE 951.244.7300

COUPON NOT VALID WITH OTHER OFFERS

LAKE ELSINORE 951.674.8800 MENIFEE/WILDOMAR 951.674.8800 SUN CITY 951.244.7300

866.MYFAMILY • 866.693.2645 www.866MyFamily.com


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

D-5

Business

Hundreds celebrate Michelle’s Place 15th Anniversary at Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce mixer TEMECULA – Michelle’s Place Breast Cancer Resource Center was lit up in pink for the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce mixer Thursday, Nov. 16, celebrating their 15 years of service to the community. Several hundred business professionals came out to support Michelle’s Place and network among colleagues. The mixer had a large selection of food and drinks provided by Europa Village Winery, Devilicious, The Bank Mexican Restaurant & Bar, South Coast Winery, Waba Grill, Luna Grill, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Urbane Café and Firehouse Subs. During the mixer, Europa Village presented a check to Michelle’s Place for $3,000 from their October fundraiser for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. “We were pleasantly surprised by our friends at Europa for their donation,” Kim Goodnough, executive director of Michelle’s Place, said. “They did an amazing job promoting breast cancer awareness during October, and we appreciate them immensely for their support.” The spirit of generosity was felt throughout the night, as nine individuals committed to the monthly “Wings of Hope” giving program at Michelle’s Place. These gifts support the many programs and services Michelle’s Place has available at no cost

Europa Village presents a check to Michelle’s Place at the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce mixer on Nov. 16. Gregg English of Europa Village, Bill and Marilyn Watson, Kim Goodnough, John Goldsmith of Europa Village attended the presentation.

to women and their families dealing with breast cancer. Michelle’s Place would like to thank event sponsors, Mythos Technology and Coldwell Banker Commercial SC, along with Morningstar Productions and The Christmas Kings for their amazing lighting features, Extreme Signs and Graphics, the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce, Valley Young Professionals, all food and drink vendors, and all who attended the mixer for their support. During its 15-year tenure, Mi-

chelle’s Place has provided more than 110,000 services to over 10,500 women and families throughout Fallbrook and Riverside and San Bernardino counties. On average, Michelle’s Place sees over 70 newly diagnosed clients a month, many of whom are under 40 years old. Michelle’s Place Pink Ribbon Assistance Program provides financial assistance to women currently in breast cancer treatment, as well as assistance for back-to-school, Thanksgiving meals, and Christmas gifts for the holidays. Temecula Val-

The Michelle’s Place Cancer Resource Center lights up in pink for their 15th anniversary celebrated at the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce mixer on Nov. 16. Courtesy photos

ley New Generations Rotary Club has launched its annual Michelle’s Place Stocking Project, providing stockings full of Christmas gifts to Michelle’s Place Breast Cancer Resource Center for children of women undergoing breast cancer treatment in the community. This year the need has grown and thanks to a local sewing club, the stockings have been upgraded to Santa sacks to be filled with toys and gifts for the families in the program. In 2015, the program helped provide Christmas gifts for 180 children

whose mothers are fighting breast cancer. New Generations Rotary is asking for donations of $50 for one child, $200 for a family of 5, or $300 to give something to everyone in the family before Dec. 9. Donations will be used to purchase gifts for each specific child in the program. To donate to the project directly, visit http://tvnewgenrotary.com or contact newgensrotary@gmail.com. For more information on Michelle’s Place, visit www.michellesplace.org or call (951) 699-5455. 

Law Corner: The what, where and when motorists should record statements after a car accident Morton J. Grabel SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

On occasion, individuals visit my office quite sometime after a car accident has occurred to discuss their case. During our conversation they inform me they have already provided a recorded statement to the other party’s insurance company. When I ask why a recorded statement was provided, the reply goes something like “well, the accident wasn’t my fault, so I thought, what difference could it make?” In helping people understand when and what to say in this circumstance, I’ll begin with a question. What should I say in a recorded statement after a car accident? First, consider whether motorists should be making a statement at all, and whether they are legally obligated to make a recorded statement. When discussing the motorist’s

own insurance carrier, there is a legal obligation to cooperate as the adjuster investigates the accident and processes the claim. That obligation extends to giving a recorded statement and providing other requested information during the adjuster interview with the motorist’s own insurance company. It is best however to have a discussion first with an attorney to carefully go over the facts. However, if the other side is asking for a recorded statement, it is not necessary to give one. Why not? Even if the motorist is not at fault? There are many reasons why giving a recorded statement to the other side, including the insurance company for the other driver or their attorney, is not wise. In a nutshell, making a recorded statement cannot help the motorist’s case at all; it can only help the other party. The other side will compare every recorded statement with any other

statements about the accident, such as in the police report, in the emergency room report, in the hospital record and in any statements made in the future such as in a deposition. They will try to make the most of even the smallest inconsistencies, trying to make the motorist look like they are hiding something, like they really do not remember or are a flat-out liar. Second, an experienced adjuster for the other side knows how to frame questions in ways that will lead to potentially incriminating statements. For example, the adjuster might ask how long the stoplight was yellow when the motorist entered the intersection, and whether they saw it turn to red. When the motorist says they did not see the signal turn to red, the adjuster will try to frame that response as an indication they were simply not paying attention.   Please note by reading the in-

formation above and herein, no attorney-client relationship has been created. Moreover, the information provided herein is not to be relied upon as legal advice for specific legal needs. For information about specific legal needs, contact The Law Offices Morton J. Grabel in Temecula at (951) 695-7700. Grabel is, originally

Fallbrook’s Friendly Lawyer with Friendly Fees

Wills • Trusts Estate Planning Senior & Military Discounts

760-728-1960 405 S. Main, Fallbrook In Practice 25 Years | FallbrookJim@sbcglobal.net

CalBRE #01518797

Temecula Business Women’s Connection Raises over $6,000 for homeless TEMECULA – The Temecula Women’s Business Connection is proud to announce its recent “TWBC Holiday Open House with Heart” raised $6,009 for local nonprofit, Project Touch, who serves homelessness. The business association worked to make a difference in the community as over 30 members of TWBC hosted the recent “heart fundraiser,” donating all proceeds to a local charity.

More than 60 businesses generously donated merchandise and gift certificates to be raffled off for the fundraiser. The event saw generous support from the community as over 200 people participated, buying raffle tickets and merchandise. TWBC would like to sincerely thank its members, the Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce and the community for their donations to raffle prizes and ticket sale purchases

which helped raise these funds. The Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce partnered with the TWBC on the nationally acclaimed “Giving Tuesday” Nov. 29 to present Project Touch founder, Anne Unmacht, with the donation check. For additional information regarding TWBC, contact Robin Varnet at (951) 795-8080 or email renewedhealthassocs@gmail.com.

from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, attended an American Bar Association law school, has an master’s of business administration, a real estate broker’s license, a California nursing home administrator’s license and is a member in good standing of various local chambers of commerce.

Working With You, Working For You! Over 20 years experience! Testimonial: Tony and his team helped repair my credit in just a couple of

months. I was not getting approved for any credit before I went to see him. Now I am getting offers in the mail every week and I’ve since opened 3 credit cards. Thank you for your speedy and effective work Sobak Financial team! - Laura V., Murrieta

Credit Repair: A 60-100 point FICO increase between 30-45 days Debt Settlement: Settlements between 10-40% Purchases & Refinances: Competitive Rates & Quick Close

Satisfied with our services? Rate and review us on Yelp!

FREE Consultation Always! (951) 816-3335

www.sobakfinancial.com | 24910 Washington Ave. Ste 305, Murrieta, CA 92562


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

D-6

Pets Animal Friends of the Valleys

Pets of the Week Retrievers & Friends

Ramona Humane Society

Special: All cats/kittens, pit bulls and Chihuahua adoptions are just $5 (spay/neuter fees, if applicable, are additional). Dog & cat adoption fees include a microchip, basic shelter vaccines (excluding rabies), and a free vet check.

My name is Miska. I am a beautiful 3-year-old ShepherdLabrador mix and a very faithful girl. I was the protector of my Hi, my name is Charley. I’m a Hi, my name is CJ. I am a 1-year- property where the coyotes would come in due to no fencing. 9-month-old spayed, female tan old neutered black and white I am good with chickens and and white beagle mix. I am a very domestic long hair cat. I am a my small friend CP, a Lhasa sweet girl. I have lots of energy very sweet boy. I am litter-box Apso who came in with me to since I am still a puppy. I like to trained and get along with cats, the shelter. We don’t need to play outside and fetch the ball. dogs and kids. I can’t wait to be adopted together, but I am I would make an amazing pet. I find my “fur” ever home. I am all looking for a loving home. am all ready to go! ready to go! Intake Number: 322628 Intake Number: 320648 For more information on Miska, please visit the Retrievers Website: www.animalfriendsofthevalleys.com and Friends website at www. Address: 33751 Mission Trail, Wildomar, CA 92595 retrieversandfriends.com or call Phone: (951) 674-0618 • Hours of operation: Monday, Tuesday, (951) 696 2428. Thursday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

My name is Jagger. I am a Pitbull mix and am about 2-yearsold and have a really sweet disposition. I am spayed, good with other dogs, up-to-date on my shots and am looking for a loving home. Intake Number: 107582 / R208251

My name is Segar. I am a gray and white domestic short hair cat and am about 2-years-old. I am litter-box trained, good with other kitties, up-to-date on shots, dewormed and spayed. I am looking for loving home. Intake Number: 102836 / R206350

For more information on Jagger, Segar and other great pets for adoption, contact the Ramona Humane Society at (951) 654-8802 or visit www.ramonahumanesociety.org. Courtesy photos

Make homes safe for pets Pets require certain comforts to live long and healthy lives. In addition to adequate nutrition, exercise, medical care, and mental stimulation, pets need a safe place to live. The average home is filled with

pets from home-related injuries. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, a few simple adjustments around the house can prevent many pet emergencies. Invest in cabinet locks. Cats and dogs can be curious animals, gaining access to areas of a home pet owners never would have imagined possible. If you can’t store everything beyond pets’ reach, then use cabinet and drawer latches to prevent access to areas that are off limits. Lock doors to basements, garages and storage sheds as well. Cover all garbage cans. Animals have extraordinary senses of smell, and they may be attracted to trash cans around the house. Pets rooting around in the garbage can be messy, but this can also make pets vulnerable to illness. Invest in garbage cans with locks or tight lids to prevent food poisoning or choking. Use medications wisely. Be mind-

ful of medications, making sure none of your pills fall on the floor where they can be gobbled up by pets. Protect belongings. Cats can scale many objects in the house, gaining access to areas of the house that dogs cannot reach. Cats also can be attracted to small shiny objects, such as jewelry or glass items, that are choking hazards. Store potential choking hazards out of sight of curious cats. Clean the furnace. Allergens and poor indoor air quality is not just a concern for humans. Pets also can be affected by allergies and health issues that result from exposure to mold or dirt in a home. Have your HVAC system routinely serviced and routinely change indoor air filters to maintain healthy air quality. When possible, open windows to let fresh air inside. Secure windows and doors. Cats and dogs may be distracted by something outdoors and feel compelled to chase after it. Dogs and cats can

suffer serious injuries if they fall from windows. Make sure window screens are secure and install guards if your pet likes to hang out by the windows. Exercise caution when entering and leaving your home so pets don’t scurry outside. Keep cords and electronic outlets secure. Teething puppies or curious cats may bite or pull on power cords. Use cord keepers to cover up electric lines and outlet locks to keep plugs where they should be. Provide a comfortable indoor climate. Many pets spend the majority of their days indoors where climate and temperature can be controlled. However, if yours is an outside pet or requires a brief stint in the garage or an uninsulated area, make sure the temperature in such areas is comfortable and safe. Take precautions around the house to keep pets safe, comfortable and secure.

ELECTRICIAN

HOME IMPROVEMENT

OFFICE SPACE

REAL ESTATE

ML ELECTRIC

REASONABLE PRICES

CL#620784 - Bonded Full Service Home & Commercial Honest & Reliable - Free Quotes Call Mario (951) 491-1439 or (951) 252-4322 Web: MLELECTRIC.NET

Termite/Dry Rot Repair Remodels & Restorations Room by Room Renovations Escrow Repairs Lic#B928620 Insured & Bonded Call Jose 760-519-4432

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, LLC Why RENT when you can OWN? Specializing in Medical office space Right space/Right lender/Custom Builds available

FIND OUT WHAT THE HOME DOWN THE STREET SOLD FOR ONLINE www.myhomesalesreport.com

LANDSCAPING

PIANO LESSONS

various items that can be harmful to pets. Just as parents’ baby-proof their homes when welcoming new children into their families, pet owners can take inventory of potential hazards to pets and take steps to safeguard their

FULL TERMITE SERVICES Dry-rot & Termite Damage • Seamless Repairs • Fast Escrow Reports

Targeted-Area Treatments, Fumigations & Orange Oil

PEST CONTROL SERVICES CALL FOR FREE INSPECTION!

Ants • Spiders • Bees • Fleas • Bed Bugs • Wasps • Gophers • Squirrels • Rats • Mice • Birds

760-728-3000 www.knockoutpestandtermite.com

BOOKKEEPING

Bookkeeping & Payroll Services

ERIKKA WATTS Building a Solid Foundation to Facilitate Growth

(951) 365-0002 www.Merit-Resources.com info@Merit-Resources.com BUILD DESIGN/CONST.

BLAZE ANTHONY DESIGN New Homes / Additions / Remodel FREE CONSULATION Lic. 177427

(951) 526-7349

• LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED

Business Directory

ESTATE SALES

ELISSA’S ESTATE SALES Let us do ALL the work for you!! Serving the Inland Valley Area. Over 15 years experience. References upon request Elissasestatesales@gmail.com www.californiaestatesale.com

(951) 285-6461

CONSTRUCTION

HANDYMAN

RF KINZEL CONSTRUCTION

INLAND EMPIRE HANDYMAN & MAINTENANCE

Wood Patio Covers, Fencing, Decks & Repais

(760) 689-5562 Bonded & Insured Lic#324346-B

CRYSTAL COURT CONSTRUCTION Upgrade your home and add value at the same time. In business since 1987 I can help with doors, windows, flooring, room additions, remodeling of your kitchen or bathroom. I can also provide the latest in lighting inside and out!!

(951) 894-6840 - Office (951) 852-1196 Mobile CSLB# 519341 Current Licenses B-1, C-27, C-10

"Give us a call we do it all" Handyman Repairs,Upgrades,and Remodels Home and Office Cleaning Maintenance Residential and Commercial Lic#022985 English- Harvey 951-581-5851 Spanish- Ula 951-525-7812 Quality,Service, Craftsmanship We accept Credit,Debit Cards

AFFORDABLE GENERAL HANDYMAN SERVICES experienced, fast & reliable service Call Brian

OLIVOS LANDSCAPING Synthetic Grass ~ Water Wise Maintenance ~ Clean-ups ~ Mowing Palm & Tree Trimming ~ Planting Irrigation & Repairs FREE ESTIMATES - Insured

760-859-4839 MASONRY

WYNDHAM MASONRY Pavers, stone, brick, block, retaining walls, repairs, all masonry FREE ESTIMATES LIC#916586

(951) 677-2728 PAINTING

GREG’S QUALITY PAINTING • Interior and Exterior • Repaint Specialist • Quality work, Quality materials • Serving the Temecula Valley, Murrieta and Fallbrook since 1982 • Competitive prices • License #499346

951-692-0247

(951) 923-6015

List your business for less than $20 week. Call today! 760-723-7319

WOOD’S PAINTING CONTRACTORS Interior ~ Exterior Professional Workmen! Reasonable Rates, Free Estimates Lic#700305 Fallbrook / North County 760-728-1796 / 760-723-1736 Temecula 951-246-0350 / 951-676-6530 www.woodspainting.com

John Grant (951)775-0615 officeprojectmanagement.com

INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP Children and Adults John and Audrey Teachers with Degrees

(951) 672-9051 PIANO TUNING

FUHR PIANO Repair, Restoration and Tuning Call Bob Fuhr

Or Free Recorded Message

(800) 611-0726 #1041 24 hours a day

HOME PARTNERS REALITY Seniors! Purchase a New Home No Monthly Mortgage Payments No Qualifying - No Credit Check FHA Insured - H ​ UD Approved Relocate to a Senior Community www.ihavenomortgage.com

(951) 445-4833 (951) 816-8206

(951) 440-3408

KIM & KEN REAL ESTATE GROUP

PAVING

(760) 206-3993

MIKE JONES PAVING • Resurfacing • Slurry Seal • Chip Seal • Crack Filling • Patching • Brick Pavers • Concrete • Striping Free Estimates!

(951) 400-3126

KimAndKenRealEstate@gmail.com

KIM CARLSON Kim@KimCarlsonHomes.com

(760) 434-6873 KimCarlsonHomes.com CalBRE# 00968586

KEN FOLLIS KenFollisRealtor@gmail.com

mj.pavetheplanet@gmail.com

(760) 803-6235

PLUMBER

KenFollis.com CalBRE#00799622

RETIRED PLUMBER Looking for SMALL JOBS Drain stoppages also VERY Reasonable rates

Ron (951) 692-2802 since 1976 Lic # 335784 PONDS - FOUNTAINS

WINDERMERE REAL ESTATE Homes & Estates 746 S. Main Ave., Suite A Fallbrook 760-230-8401 www.windermere.com

THE POND GUY

SCREEN PRINTING

Koi Ponds, Fountains & Lakes Installation ~ Repairs ~ Monthly Serving Reasonable Rates www.rvlponds.com

ART OF REBELLION

760-717-0338

Custom Printing On T-Shirts, Hoodies & Hats Great Prices & Free Delivery! www.artofrebellion.com


December 2, 2016 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

D-7

CLASSIFIEDS Local Classifieds Animals (Boarding & Sitting)

Employment & Jobs

Lost & Found

Real Estate

RV for Sale

PET SITTING IN MY HOME Cage free, social environment, day care + long term. Large rooms for exercise and play. References. Call for details. 760-723-6675

MISSING DOG MARLEY 3 yr old MALE Lab Beige, Microchipped Missing Nov 13th from Vista, CA and reportedly seen in BONSALL a few days ago. $1,000.00 Reward for his safe return. Please call 281 709 5227.

BRUBAKER CULTON REAL ESTATE (40859 Acacia Av, Hemet 92544) (Tyler) Calling all Investors! 4BR, 1.5BA, 1750sqft. + ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS (OVER 3000 sqft. UNDER ROOF ON A 14,810sqft. LOT. GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY! FIXER. ALL NEW ELECTRICAL WITH BRAND NEW PANEL. READY FOR INVESTOR TO FIX AND FLIP! CASH OR REHAB FINANCING ONLY. $149,800. (951) 492-4756

BOB'S RV SALE 2005 34? Sierra Sport Toy Hauler Travel Trailer. AC, Generator, Fuel Station Sleeps 10, 8200lbs Dry Weight. $15995.00. Bob?s RV Sales. 44219 HWY 74\n\nHemet, Ca. 951-927-1377 ex.1

CABINET REFINISHING Cabinet Color Makeover and Restoration from $999 a kitchen.\n20+ years experience, Yelp reviews. Free consultation. License #100417\nRefinishArts.com (951)239-6702 Jason.

CAHUILLA CASINO Cahuilla Casino seeks hard-working, friendly & professional individuals to provide exceptional guest service. Go to www.cahuillacasino.com & click on ?Careers? to view current job openings. Candidates are encouraged to complete an application & email to HR@Cahuillacasino.comMeet with our HR team during upcoming Open Interviews, Wednesday, December 7th from 9:30am to 12:30pm & Thursday, December 15th - 9:30am to 12:30pm. Available jobs include:Cage Cashiers, Gas Station / Convenience Store Manager, Line Cooks, Public Safety Officers / EMTs, Prep Cooks / Dishwashers, Servers / Bartenders. Cahuilla Casino offers competitive wages, enhanced benefits (medical, dental, vision, 401k savings), generous PTO, employee incentives & discounts.

Commercial for Rent

For Sale

FALLBROOK. 2000SQ FT SHOP with offices. Access for big trucks. 447 Ammunition Rd. $1,600 a month. 951302-0502.

MEDICAL ITEMS FOR SALE Tons of medical equipment for sale. Crutches, walker/scooter, assistance for restroom, and so much more at the Fallbrook Senior Center Thrift Store located at 399 Heald Lane Fallbrook, CA 92028. 760-723-4602.

Barber Shop for Sale BARBER SHOP FOR SALE IN HEMET Three chairs with styling booth. Selling due to retirement. Here at this location for years. Sale reasonably priced $5000. Call 951-766-6304.

Cabinet Refinishing

Commercial/Industrial For Rent SHOP SPACE 800 sq. ft. to 1,800 sq. ft. in Fallbrook. 760-728-2807 or 760212-0584.

FOR SALE 29 acres for sale in De Luz, Fallbrook Remote, peaceful, quite. Seasonal stream. Income avocado and flowers on property. Water and power, telephone. Beautiful little valley. $399,000. Weekends 760-728-2012. Cell 310-612-3547. Private seller.

Employment & Jobs EXPERIENCED COOKS & SERVERS and Host/Hostess. 2 years minimum experience in family style restaurant. Apply in person. 739 E. Mission Rd. Se buscan cocineros con experiencia de 2 anos en restaurante de estilo familiar. Solicite en persona. 739 E. Mission Rd.

Garage Sale/Moving Sale/ Estate Sale. MOVING SALE Sat Dec 3rd. 8am3pm. Great stuff. Housewares, tools, furniture, decorative items, collectibles.223 Sky Country Ct. Inside four car garage.

EXPERIENCED KITCHEN HELP Line Cook/Prep needed for fast paced Mexican restaurant in Fallbrook. Bilingual a plus. Call Jon 760-728-4556

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED IN O C E A N S I D E I buy old military uniforms, medals, knives, helmets, etc. Even stinky stuff you think is trash. Bob MilitaryPickers.com (760) 450-8498

Real Estate GORGEOUS VIEW LOT Want privacy, and a Tuscany view ? Your dream home, casita and sparkling pool can be built right here in Fallbrook tucked in off the street for solitude and privacy. 4 bedroom septic layout. Did we mention the view!?! $171,000. Rudy & Sandy Gallegos. Remax United (760) 985-9600 BRUBAKER-CULTON REAL ESTATE (43910 Tiber. Hemet, CA) (George & Tony). Charming and well maintained 2-story Valle Vista home. You will be impressed with this home and all that it has to offer: from the fabulous floor plan, to the oversized lot and sturdy balcony. This home also features granite kitchen counter tops, a handyhome 10 x 20 shed with overhead storage and an above ground enclosed spa that seats 7 adults. There is so much to love about this home and this community. Come and take a look for yourself! $271,900. (951) 492-4756 B R U B A K E R - C U LT O N R E A L E S TAT E ( 8 5 8 C a m e o . H e m e t , CA) (Tyler) Fresh and clean! Newly rehabbed! 2bd, 2ba home. Brand new fixtures, new hardware and new garage door. Brand new appliances and new granite counter tops. Large backyard, low maintenance front yard. Brand new permitted roof. Great location and close to shopping. This is a must see!! $194,800. (951) 492-4756

Looking to Rent LOOKING TO RENT Teacher/script writer returning from Texas, needs quiet, private house, 2 bdrm/2ba, (2story), cul-de-sac, cat/dog/yard, trees. 858/829-3900.

SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE Independent Delivery Contract. Fallbrook area. 7 days/wk. Early Morning Hours. $900.00- $2000.00 per month. Allen159@aol.com

BRUBAKER-CULTON REAL ESTATE (2838 Alne. Hemet, CA) (PM) FAMILY SPECIAL! Bring your RV and toys and all your kids to this 4 bedroom 2 bath home on a large corner lot! Separate gate and fence for your RV or boat storage in gated storage, right on the property. Inside, enjoy a fireplace that faces two different rooms that have vaulted ceilings and lots of sunlight. Beautiful grass front yard and two car garage make coming home feel welcoming. Large master and bath with lots of storage. West Hemet neighborhood makes any commute convenient, and affordable. New wood flooring and tile. This home is large and comfortable. $1525 per month rent. (951) 492-4756 BRUBAKER-CULTON REAL ESTATE (880 Majela. Hemet, CA)(G&J) Absolutely DARLING 2 Bedroom/1 Bath. On a cul de sac in Senior community SunPark II. Turnkey in every way! NEW Carpet, NEW Tile, NEW paint, New GFCIs, Everything looks NEW! Bright and cheery home with a great floor plan. Kitchen opens up to an additional patio room, perfect for morning coffee or another living space. Full size laundry room, Master and secondary rooms are both a great size, and bathroom like new! This home has Character and Charm. $129,900. (951) 492-4756

BOB'S RV SALES 2007 25? Nomad Travel Trailer. Lite 4625 lbs. Dry Weight. Ducted A/C. Awning. Stab. Jacks Power Jack. $11995.00. Bob?s RV Sales. 44219 E. Florida Ave. Hemet, Ca. 951-927-1377 ex.1

Services STANLEY HANDYMAN SERVICES Licensed and Insured. Family owned and operated. Over 20 years experience. Driveway and parking lot repairs. Cleaning, patching, crack filling, seal coating, asphalt repairs and maintenance, line striping, etc. Commercial residential. (951) 7221364 CK ENGINEERING CK Engineering Custom home grading service. 951764-2605

House for Rent FALLBROOK-4BR, 2BA W/Family Rm., Large fenced lot, Newly Rehab'd. $2,000/mth-1 yr lease. Must Qualify (760) 728-2935

RV for Sale BOB'S RV SALES 2011 31? Chaparral Travel Trailer w/Large Slide. A/C, Power Awning, Outside Kitchen. 6800lbs. Dry Weight $16,995.00. Bob?s RV Sales. 44219 HWY 74 Hemet, Ca. 951-9271377 ex.1

County Classifieds

DONATE YOUR CAR - 888-433-6199 FAST FREE TOWING -24hr Response - Maximum Tax Deduction - UNITED BREAST CANCER FDN: Providing Breast Cancer Information & Support Programs (Cal-SCAN)

Pregnant? A Married couple without children seeks to adopt. Will be hands-on parents. Visit our website: http://chadandjulioadopt.weebly.com. Financial Security. Expenses Paid. Chad & Julio (ask for Adam). 1-800790-5260. (Cal-SCAN)

AUTOS WANTED DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800-731-5042

ANNOUNCEMENTS

AUTOS WANTED

DID YOU KNOW 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com

Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1- 800-743-1482

AUTOS WANTED/LUXURY WANTED! Old Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948-1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid 707 965-9546 (Cal-SCAN)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CABLE/SATELLITE TV DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All-Included Package. $60/ mo. for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1- 800-385-9017

EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release – the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http:// prmediarelease.com/california

CABLE/SATELLITE TV DISH TV 190 channels plus High Speed Internet Only $54.94/mo! Ask about a 3 year price guarantee & get Netflix included for 1 year! Call Today 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN)

Crossword puzzle answers from page C-3 1

2

3

4

M E W

12

A

16

T

19

S

C

H

H

I

O R

13

14

E

N

D

17

K

D

I

I

R O

A

35

T

40

L

43

A

46

S

26

R

27

28

I

N

O

V

E M E

N

I

E

C

A

64

F

67

A

70

R

56

C

57

R

O U P E

S E

E 41

47

E R E D

T

G

51

R

F

I 68

N

71

23

A

E L

30

L

V

L

I

K

E

I

P

E

A

E

L

52

R

Y

58

E

V E

G R

65

E V

66

S

E

E W

T

L

O U

D

E

D

E

S

E

R

38

FINANCIAL SERVICES Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW. You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-6735926 (Cal-SCAN)

HEALTH/FITNESS ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-7039774. (Cal-SCAN)

HEALTH/FITNESS PLEASE RUN UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE - Start losing weight with Nutrisystem’s All-New Turbo 10 Plus! Free Shakes are available to help crush your hunger!* Call us now at 1-800-4046035 *Restrictions apply (Cal-SCAN)

HEALTH/MEDICAL VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! Cut your drug costs! SAVE $$! 50 Pills for $99.00. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed and Discreet. CALL 1-800624-9105 (Cal-SCAN)

32

A

33

F

34

HOME SECURITY Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-9184119 (Cal-SCAN)

INSURANCE SAVE HUNDREDS ON INSURANCE COSTS! AUTO AND HOMEOWNERS. CALL for a no obligation quote. (800) 982-4350 Lic # 0K48138 (Cal-SCAN)

INSURANCE/HEALTH Lowest Prices on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888989-4807. (CalSCAN)

LEGAL SERVICES DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One-Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www. capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN)

$59 $79

T

39

E Y

R

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-966-1904 to start your application today! (Cal-SCAN)

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace -little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-796-5091

E 31

M A O

42

O U

D O

A

S

E

L

E

D

S

R

54

S 60

C

61

W

I

E

C O N

R

T

E

49

E

11

L

E

59

S

B

45

53

10

A

18

O

I

9

C O

15

R

24

C

8

T

L

A

A G

E

7

A

N 48

S

C

S

22

37

H

E

55

36

S

R

6

20

H

44

E

N G O U

29

C O

50

U

5

D

21 25

S

FINANCIAL SERVICES

S t o p O V E R PAY I N G f o r y o u r prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-800-2730209 Promo Code CDC201625.

CalBRE# 01493156, 01494648 & 01898539

DID YOU KNOW 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

MEDICAL BILLING & CODING! Train ONLINE for a career as a Medical Office Specialist! Get job ready from home! HS Diploma/GED & PC/ Internet needed. 1-888-407-7169 TrainOnlineNow.com. (Cal-SCAN)

HEALTH/MEDICAL

$171,000

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1-877-879-4709 (CalSCAN)

CAREER TRAINING/ EDUCATION

Team Gallegos 760-985-9600

AUTOS WANTED

Rudy, Chris & Sandy Gallegos

ADOPTIONS

1 Acre Beautiful Building Site With Views – Fallbrook

YA R D S A L E Sat. Dec 3rd 1344 Morro Rd Fallbrook. 8-noon. Bicycle, hardware, furniture, household goods. Down sizing. Lots of Stuff.

SENIORS HELPING SENIORS Would you love to help someone else? Flexible hours. . .you set your schedule! Prior experience working with senior citizens helpful. We're looking for loving, caring people! Call 760-884-4111 today!

Miscellaneous Wanted

69

G

K

62

E

63

T

D

S

A G

A

72

P

E

R

All Renewals

2 convenient locations: Winchester (Hemet) ~ Temecula

New Patients


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • December 2, 2016

D-8

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

NEW LISTINGS

HOME BUYS

PREVIEW HOMES

Drop off a new unwrapped toy at our office

Explore the possibilities...home sits on just over a gentle acre, fully fenced and gated. Plenty of room to plant or play. This 3 bedroom home has formal living room with vaulted ceiling and skylights, fireplace and wood floors. 160060026 $580,000

WWW.COLDWELLBANKERPREVIEWS.COM FOR VIRTUAL TOURS AND MORE!

Turn Key Home with a Detached guest suite in the sought after community of Pepper Tree park. this luxurious home is on a quiet cul-de-sac and is loaded with up grades including an owner owned solar electric system. 160058744 $699,500

Welcome to Vista Montanoso ! Masterful construction by Primo Builders in 2004. Situated on a quiet 2.17 acre knoll in the Hidden Meadows golf comm. Unparalleled views of Mt Palomar. No expense spared. 3890 SF of living space, over 9000 SF including covered outdoor living areas. 160032228 $1,599,000

OPEN SAT 12/03 11AM-3:30PM 32105 Old Country Ct, Winchester

LAND/BUILDING SITES

Morning Star Ranch Community located in Winchester. Gorgeous 2946 Sq.Ft 2 story home featuring 4 BD, 3.5 BA, master suite located downstairs. Backyard oasis with pool and spa.Temecula school district. Enjoy! SW16734054 $489,000

Tucked back off a country road. Large welcoming porch overlooks views to the mountains and over a half acre of lush gardens and trees. Fresh paint throughout, remodeled kitchen and baths. 3 BD, 2 BA w/formal living room. 160059995 $515,000

Sheer Elegance ~ 4 BD, 3.5 BA all w/granite counter tops, private office, formal dining room, double master suites, one w/cozy fireplace, gourmet kitchen w/large center island, granite counters and large walk-in pantry. Stunning high end lighting fixtures, central vacuum, zoned heating & air. 160060813 $789,000 Private 2.54 acre parcel. Electric gate, partial fencing, corners are marked, power to property. Property will require a well for water. Contact me for more information! 160060333 $75,000 High on the hills of Bonsall with panoramic views of Palomar Mountain and the village below lies this pristine 26 acre building site. Ideal for a vineyard estate. Put your label on this one! 160045002 $799,000

San Marcos - Newly Renovated! Conveniently located near shopping and public transportation and not too far from CSUM. Dual pane windows with shutters on most. New carpet & paint thruout. Porcelain tile. 160059546 $399,000 - $415,000

Enjoy the beautiful hilltop views on 13+ acres. Family compound, that offers both the main home, plus two bedroom guest house. Need appointment to preview. 160036148 $795,000

5 ACRES - . Panoramic views and access to the Santa Margarita River Trail. Would make a wonderful building site. 1 1/2 inch water meter. Possible Seller Financing. 160061285 $199,000

Field of Dreams! Outstanding all useable 25 acre ranch with 5306 SF, 3 BR home, private irrigated baseball field, 13 stall horse barn, 6 pastures w/well irrigation, huge car collector’s barn, pool, original farm barn & much more. 160004017 SW16014872 $3,250,000

OUR COLDWELL BANKER VILLAGE PROPERITES AGENTS: Don Bennetts Kimberly Biller Judy Bresnahan

Pat Bresnahan Abby Elston Susie Emory

Johnny Faubel Jane Felton Jerry Gordon

Lorene Johnson Paul Kavanaugh Ruth Kavanaugh

Bret Hasvold Chris Hasvold Cynthia Hauff

Linda Gordon Tess Hansford Eddie Harrison

Susie’s Home Collection... Professionalism with a Personal Touch.

760-525-9744 s u s i e @ cbvillage. c o m

Jessi Scrape Donna Shanahan Janice Shannon

Vicki Robertson Jordan Rochlis Nancy Schrimpf

Cathy Kudroshoff Cheryl Pizzo JoAnn Rapaszky

Geri Sides Tom Van Wie Marianne Yeager

Looking out for your Best Interest! a fantastic team and we were fortunate “Jerry & Linda make to have them represent us. ” Jerry & Linda are the best agents we ever had and we have sold “ 7 homes. Caring, ethical, effective and knowledgeable. They made the process easy for us. ” – Jack & Fran

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE# 01079037

– Brad & Stella

Jerry & Linda Gordon

Jerry: 760-519-5279 Linda: 760-519-7199

CalBRE #01140954 CalBRE #01035328 VILLAGE PROPERTIES twogordons@gmail.com | www.twogordons.net

THE FEEL OF COUNTRY LIVING WITHOUT THE DRIVE. Your own haven with this 2314 sf ranch style home nestled on an acres of trees, flowers and shrubs $556,000 just minutes from town.

G

Coming Soon!

IN

W

NE

T LIS

SPECTACULAR VIEW WITH LAND FOR VINEYARD. Charming 3BD, 2BA has that and so much more. Separate site w/water, elec & inviting camper for overnight guests or caretaker. Possible barn? Front & back decks. $429,000

donna@cbvillage.com CalBRE #01193680 VILLAGE PROPERTIES

Personal Dedicated Service

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

W NE

T LIS

Marketing Fallbrook for 35 years

Calbre# 01450115

LARGE FAMILY WANTED: You will have a feeling of comfort in this friendly five bedroom home. Enjoy two cozy fireplaces on cool evenings. Room for pool, gardening, and RV parking on one gentle acre. Easy to show. $549,500

G

Wonderful Community

HILLTOP LOCATION IN EXCLUSIVE WILT ROAD AREA

Just minutes to the I-15 commute corridor. Stunning Hacienda inspired estate is beautifully designed and fully appointed offering casual comfort with a seamless blend of indoor & outdoor living. 3 en’suites plus an optional 4th currently used as an office with private outside entrance. Courtyard casita brings bedroom total to 5. U-shaped hacienda w/courtyard pool & dining. Come for a visit, stay for a lifetime. Offered at $1,590,888

760-522-7112

LORENE JOHNSON

Cheryl 760-468-2218 Don 760-822-3284

Beautiful 1935 SF 4 BD 2.5 BA home in sought after Paloma Del Sol Community of South Temecula. Gourmet kitchen, granite counters & viking range. Community parks, trails and sports courts. Award winning Temecula Valley School District.

Donna Shanahan

E

Specializing in Fallbrook For 30 yearS

IN

Offered at $405,000

IN

Cheryl Pizzo & Don Bennetts CalBRe# 00815495

Paloma Del Sol!

OW

R SC

W

NE

Playgrounds, walking trails + easy access for your work commute and the perfect entertaining backyard makes this home the sweetest place to live. Large semi open floor plan. Master BD w/large walk-in closet, 2 BD w/Jack-and-Jill BA and the 4th BD downstairs w/ full bath across hallway. $469,000

W

NE

760.419.9802

sellwithjess@gmail.com

W NE Upgraded Turnkey 2 BD + 1 optional (Current office w/built-ins) 2 Bath Located on 15th Fairway of Top rated Pala Mesa Golf Course Resort with mountain/valley & winery views! Open floor plan, private backyard, covered patio + “Bull” Outdoor kitchen/BBQ island w/refrigerator + sink & side burner. Designer paint throughout, recessed lighting & Ceiling fans. Newer Samsung stainless steel appliance, custom stone fireplace with mantle. Travertine tile in entry, hallway, kitchen and bathrooms. 2 car attached garage with built in workbench and cabinets. $377,000

Call Tom Van Wie 760.703.6400

tvw@sbcglobal.net CalBRE #01412145

G

IN

T LIS

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE #01929597

Tri-Level Private Home

G

Single Story Custom on 1.07 View Acres. Appx 3758 sq ft, 4 Bd, 3 Ba, Recently painted inside and out, near new Custom pool, Plenty of room for entertaining + 3 car garage. Beautiful Views. Call me for more details! Offered at $899,000

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE# 00612840

Jessi scrape

ING

T

LIS

760.522.2588

LoreneRealtor@aol.com

IN IST

L

Bring the family to this TriLevel 4 BD home. Family room w/wet bar. Wood floor leads to kitchen and a wonderful deck. Located on a private street near schools, bank and shopping. Very private backyard. Many ceiling fans.

GERI SIDES, GRI, BROKER ASSOCIATE

1ST IN CUSTOMER SERVICE AWARDS

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

Offered at $459,000 2015 Outstanding Performance Recipient

Call Today 760.207.8497

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE#00414751

760-728-8000 • www.CBVillageProperties.com VILLAGE PROPERTIES BRE #01934791

River Village: 5256 So. Mission Road, Suite 310, Bonsall Fallbrook: 1615 So. Mission Road, Suite C

An Equal Opportunity Company

Equal Housing Opportunity


Temecula Valley News