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Blueberry season is in full swing, B-10

Anza Events Calendar, A-2

Beware of feline illnesses before adopting a cat, B-10

ANZA VALLEY

OUTLOOK

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WITH CONTENT FROM

May 16–22, 2014

www.anzavalleyoutlook.com

Section Volume 14, Issue 20

FM Radio Station Is Coming To Anza FCC Grants LPFM Radio Station Permit To Anza Non-Profit By Sandi Hughes On April 29, 2014, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) granted the rural community of Anza, California a historic opportunity to have its own community radio station. The local nonprofit Anza Civic Improvement League (ACIL) was issued a permit to build a lowpower FM (LPFM) radio station following a once in a generation FCC application process. Tony Soares shows many how to make pinch bowls like young Gabriel and his dad.

Jodi Thomas photo

A Celebration of Local Tribal Culture at Hamilton High “Navuk Pen Enan Ivax” – Come and Learn Today By Jodi Thomas Hamilton High School held a very special gathering where culture and talent were shared and appreciated. The event was the Indian Cultural Learning Day, which was held by the Indian Education Program and coordinated by Leonella Leash, Vivian Hamilton, Ruben Salgado, Mercy Estrada and Antonio He-

redia Jr. The purpose of the day was to educate others on the history of local Indian tribes such as the Cahuilla, Ramona and Santa Rosa Reservations as well as other Intertribal guests. Many demonstrations sharing the food and art of the local tribes took place throughout the celebration. The event also included story-telling, pottery making, bas-

ket weaving, beading, and dream catcher making. There was music in the form of drumming, singing and dancing. Bird Singers sang different bird songs to round out the day’s experience. Tony Soares – one of the guests of the event – came from his home in Joshua Tree, Calif., where he works as a potter and flint knapper. Flint knapping is the art of shaping

obsidian and other stone into useful cutting tools like arrowheads. Soares taught the art of pottery on the day of the event, specifically with regard to making pinch pots. From the number of small pots drying it appeared Soares taught many people throughout the course of the day. Normally, the potter builds larger

see TRIBAL, page A-6

Just the facts – an overview of the Every 15 Minute Program CHP Officer Darren Meyer E15M Project Coordinator Introduction The Every 15 Minutes (E15M) program is a two day event aimed at making high school juniors and seniors think about drinking, driving and personal safety. It seeks to help students consider whether they’re making mature decisions and what outcomes their decisions will have on family, friends and loved ones. History and updated facts This first of its kind prevention and education program was developed by the Chico Police Department in 1995 through a Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Grant Assistance to Law Enforcement (G.A.L.E.) grant. In 1996, the Chico Police Department was fittingly awarded The Excellence in Community Policing Award by the National League of Cities for its efforts.

see E15M, page A-5

see RADIO, page A-3

A Thimble Full of News By Anne Crutchfield The May meeting of the Thimble Club was held Thursday, May 1. The invocation was given by Annie Ashby and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Tonie Ford. The menu consisted of a Mexican tortilla casserole and tossed green salad. Dessert was lemon cake with lime frosting served with rainbow sherbet. Cooks were: Teri Crutchfield, Sandi Roe, Betty Love, and Sue Croft. Our guest speaker was Captain Ray Wood, who is in charge of the Hemet Station. He discussed response time - an area he has been trying to improve

see THIMBLE, page A-4

Health Acne affects both adolescents and adults

CHP Officer and E15M Project Coordinator Darren Meyer, CHP Officer Chris Blondon, Riverside County Sheriff’s Coroner Assistant Donna Burns, Riverside Sheriff’s Deputy Coroner Nancy Rissi, Deputy Jason Reed, Deputy Waler Kurtz and Deputy Ronnie Mitchem all played integral parts in the success of the Every 15 Minute Program. Jodi Thomas photo

Trail Angels, thru-hikers find adventure on Pacific Crest Trail Allison Renck Special to the Valley News

Mary Litch, a PCTA volunteer, has adopted part of the Pacific Crest Trail near her home in Anza. She hikes/rides this section of the trail weekly, overseeing the condition of the trail. Allison Renck photo

Close your eyes, take a deep breath, and visualize what it might feel like to hike 145 miles through arid lands. The 145 miles isare only the beginning of your journey. You still have more than 2,400 miles left to complete your thru-hike on the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). Back to visualizing: it has been hot the last few days and at one point you run into a swarm of bees, which luckily only left a few stingers in your body. As you approach Coyote Canyon Rd., you drink a small sip of water. You think about how you’re almost out and you know there might not be any water until Paradise Corner Café.

Then, up ahead, you see a plastic tub with six water bottles in it. The PCT Trail Angels are looking after you again. Trail Angels provide some of the comforts of home and life’s necessities along the trail. Paradise Corner Café is at the junction of Hwy 371 and Hwy 74. Hikers on the PCT look forward to stopping there, due to its close proximity to the trail and its reputation among hikers as having the best burgers on the trail. Every year right around April and May the town of Anza increases its population due to the thru-hikers and equestrians traveling the PCT. The number of permits varynumber of permits varies each year, but this year the number of hikers is

see PCT, page A-7

Graduation is right around the corner and teenagers will be faced with the added stress of achieving physical perfection. However for many, feeling beautiful or handsome in their caps and gowns will face one major obstacle – acne. Skin blemishes affect the majority of adolescents, and can be a major source of embarrassment. But it isn’t just teens who are troubled by this matter, one in five American adults suffer from acne as well.

see page B-8

thisweek

Business Directory ������������������������A-5 Business ��������������������������������������B-2 Anza Calendar ����������������������������A-2 Classifieds �������������������������������� B-11 Dining Guide �������������������������������B-6 Education �������������������������������������B-9 Entertainment �������������������������� A-10 Health ������������������������������������������B-8 Home & Garden ��������������������� B-10 Local ..............................................A-3 Pets ............................................. B-10 Real Estate ����������������������������������A-8 Sports �������������������������������������������B-1


The Anza Valley Outlook • www.anzavalleyoutlook.com • May 16, 2014

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS T h e A n z a Va l l e y O u t l o o k would like to know if you have an upcoming event, pictures, a letter to the editor or a newsworthy idea for a story. Please e-mail the Anza Valley Outlook at jthomas@anzavalleyoutlook.com.

the 12th, due to the parade being on the first Saturday. At the Lion’s Gymkhana field on Kirby in Anza-sign ups at 3pm starts at 4pm. Nov 1st last one- is buckle day starts at 9am. Call or text Lion Roland Vellanoweth 951-662-9166.

Turkey Shoot Sunday May 18th at 9 a.m. – Shoot takes place at the Lions’ Gymkhana Field. Call Bob Love for details at 951544-5907.

Turkey Shoots are held the third Sunday of each month May thru November at 9am at the Lions Gymkhana Field. Call Lion Bob Love for details 951 544-5907

Anza’s 7th Annual Earth Day – This event will be taking place Saturday, May 24 in Minor Park in the heart of Anza. Organizers are looking for earth-friendly vendors. Proceeds from vendor fees will go toward maintenance and upkeep of the Little Red Schoolhouse and Minor Park.

Anza Valley Property Owners Rights Team: AVPORT- board would like to invite you to participate in this process of “Citizens assisting Citizens”. At this time we are in need of assistance from attorneys, licensed contractors, engineers, and general volunteers for stuffing and addressing envelopes. All assistance is greatly appreciated and all of us are important to make this work. You can contact us at (951)389-4884 or email us at Anza,Avport@gmail.com. AVPORT Board -Michael MachadoPresident, Robyn Garrison-Vice President, Chrystal Walls-Treasurer, Pamela Machado - Secretary, Steve Packard - Oversight, Alan Thomas- Lead Inspector, Jeff Walls- Legal Analyst and Research. Visit the website at https:// sites.google.com/site/anzaavport/ home/contact-the-avport. Read AVPORT’s letter to the editor of introduction at www.anzavalleyoutlook.com/story/66701/

Wild Flower Composition Competition May 24 - Competition will be at the Little Red School House. If you are interested, please contact the committee by calling 951-389-0080 or email AnzaEarthDay@gmail.com. AVC’s 4th Famous Annual Ride on the Rez- May 24 - The Ride leaves from the Costo’s Ranch on the Historic Cahuilla Indian Reservation off Terwilliger Road. Ride starts 10 a.m. with lunch on the trail and is approximately four hours along. There will be a barbeque dinner back at the ranch around 4 p.m. The cost of a ride and dinner is $35, but dinner only is $10. There will be pie auction raffles as well as cowboy music by Michael Thomas and Craig Downey. RSVP by May 19 by calling Tom and Diann Parr at 951-294-0293 or Renette Davies at 951-763-5655. VFW Ceremony - May 31 at 11 a.m. – This will be a joint installation ceremony of all officers for the Post and its Auxiliaries. The ceremony will be followed by a potluck luncheon- please bring a dish. High Country Fine Art Show May 31 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. The art show will be taking place at the Anza Community Hall at 56630 Hwy 371, in Anza, Calif. An artists’ reception with refreshments will be held from 12 p.m. until 2 p.m. There will be works of art for sale and raffle opportunities. All funds raised go to the Hall. Lions Gymkhana – Gymkhana will be on Saturday June 7 and will start at 4 p.m. with signups as early as 3 p.m. at the Lions’ Equestrians Field off Kirby. From Hwy 371 turn South onto Kirby Rd. For questions call Lion Roland Vellanoweth at 951-662-9166. Anza Days – Friday, July 4 – Lions Bar-b-q dinner and dance-- Dinner takes place from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Adult entry is $7, but kids are free. The Dance itself will go from 7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Live entertainment will be presented by The Barn Yard Boyz. Saturday July 5 - All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast – This event will be hosted by the Thimble Club from 7 to 10 a.m. for $5.00. Parade starts at 11 a.m. with live entertainment and vendor booths in the park all day. Vendor applications are available at ACIL Facebook page or www.anzacivic. org. Applications are also available at the Anza Hardware store, or the Anza Lions Facebook page https:// www.facebook.com/AnzaCivic Miss Anza- Entries for Miss Anza, and junior Miss Anza are available from Carol Franco at (619)-750-3006 The winner will be announced at the Bar-b-q. May--Check out below for all the monthly regular happenings Community happenings and organizations-

Low cost water testing at swapmeet first Saturday of month- If you are concerned about your well water quality there are low cost tests available. Just visit Merle Johnson’s booth at the swapmeet on the first Saturday of the month. If you have questions you can reach Johnson at 951-970-3938. Park And Little Red School House Improvement Meetings – Meetings take place monthly at 5:30 p.m. in the Little Red School House on the last Thursday of each month. The prime objective is to engage the community at large to help develop, plan and execute park or building clean-ups and repairs, in addition to fundraisers for the ACIL and other community charity events. The park is located on Highway 371 at Contreras Road, in the heart of Anza. 4-H Meetings are usually on the 3rd Wednesday of the month (except February) at 6:30 p.m. in the Anza Community Hall. – 4-H is a youth organization for youth 5-19 years old that has many different projects that the youth can become involved in. High Country 4-H is open to children living in the Anza and Aguanga and surrounding areas. For further information please contact Community Leaders Wanda and Evan Tiss at 951-7630312. Senior lunches at the Anza Community Hall are starting up again: Lunches take place every Tuesday of the month and the second and fourth Thursday of the month from 11:30-12:30 at the Anza Community Hall. If you are new and would like to join please call the Pechanga Kitchen at 1-800732-8805 Ext. 4520. Anza’s Mormon Church weekly happenings -Sunday Sacrament - 10 a.m.; Sunday School- 11 a.m.; Priesthood/Relief Society 12 p.m.; Wednesday Scouts 6 p.m.Wednesday; Youth night 7 p.m.; Contact- Ruiz at 951-445-7180 or Nathan at 760-399-0727 for more info. See Free Exercise Class info below. Free Exercise Class open to the public – This class added new days starting February 24. Classes are Mondays and Wednesday mornings at 8 a.m. There’s also an evening class on Thursday and 5:30 p.m. at the Mormon Church south of Hwy 371 on Contreas Rd next to the park. “This is a great class

Lions Gymkhana is on the first Saturday of each month May thru October except July, it subject will beto on Prices change.

we have been holding since the beginning of summer and have had great success. There are no obligations,” said Alicia, one of the class members. Questions call Alicia at 619-829-3402 Anza Valley Artists Meetings are on the third Saturday of the month – Meetings are held in different homes. At each meeting a potluck luncheon is served and then there is a short meeting. Often there is a guest speaker. For more information on joining the club, please contact President Jill Roberts at 858-774-5855 (cell) or 951-763-2570. Friends Uniting Neighbors or the F.U.N. Group - Will be providing free community meals the last Sunday of each month. All are welcome -- donations of time, money, and anything else are always welcome. The FUN group -- as they like to be called -- gather up supplies donated by individuals, local merchants, restaurants, and churches to help the FUN group prepare the best quality and tastiest meal they can for all who attend. To get involved call Donald Seddon at 760-390-5537 or Terry Seddon at 760-695-7452. Read about them in the AVO go to www.anzavalleyoutlook.com/story/72792/ Anza Valley Chamber of Commerce- To become a member or to learn more, go to: www.anzavalleychamber.com or call 951-290AVCC (2822). VGC Women’s – Thursday at 7 p.m. - Call Valley Gospel Chapel for more info at 951-763-4622. Study continues on prayer and all women are welcome. Call 951-7634622 for more information. VARSITY YOUTH CHURCHThursday - Hangout starts at 6 p.m. meeting at 7 p.m. at Valley Gospel Chapel (VGC) for all High School Students. Hangout time includes food, fun, fellowship, games and music. For questions call 951-7634622- VGC is on Chapman Road in the Terwilliger area. Go south on Kirby from Hwy 371 to Terwilliger Rd then right on Bailey and left on to Chapman the church is on the right. Western Eagle Food Box Project - This is a program at VGC. $25 a box, once a month on the first Tuesday of the month. Participants prepay with cash and can pick up the box the next day on the First Wednesday of the month. You can also order and prepay for food boxes at Lorraine’s Pet Supply in Town for cash only up to the Tuesday the church collects funds for the following Wednesday. For more information, call Valley Gospel Chapel (VCG) or call 951763-4622. Open to all. AV Christian Men Service Club Food Distribution – Club holds their food distribution outreach, USDA inclusive, every 3rd Wednesday of each month at the Anza Community Hall from 9:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. Abled Volunteer’s skills needed - bilingual, adding, spelling, reading. Being able to carry weight maybe required. Volunteers receive first pick of food for their help. Contact Jeff Crawley at 951-763-1257. Monthly Christian Men’s Breakfast 4th Saturday of each month. - 9 a.m. breakfast rotates to different locations. Call for time and place. Free Mobile Health Clinic- Every third Wednesday of the month from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. No appointment is needed. Non-insured may only be in the RV in Halls parking lot or inside the Anza Community Hall. M-Cor General meetings are the 4th Tuesday of the month. Meetings take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Little Red Schoolhouse in the heart of Anza -Visit www.m-cor.

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org-for all the M-Cor news and events, as there are many. Contactemail info@m-cor.org. or call Annika Knoppel at 951-551-0940. Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church Wednesday Bible Study - at 10 a.m. Church is located at 56095 Pena Road in Anza. Call 951-763-4226. Cottonwood Country Council Meeting- Second Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Old Cottonwood School House or KellerHarris Community Center Sage Rd in Aguanga, CA 92536 near Cottonwood Elementary in Aguanga on Sage Rd. Come get involved in the community. President is Jeff Marana and the yearly due is $5. Cottonwood Country Council family fun movie and snack night -first Sat of the month- Doors open at 5 p.m. Don’t forget to get your movie pack; hotdog meal, popcorn, for a nominal donation. Movie is free and starts at 6 p.m. in the Old School House near Cottonwood Elementary. The council raises money at this and various events to fund projects for the local kids attending Cottonwood and Scholarships for graduating Seniors from Hamilton that attended Cottonwood. Anza Community Hall Assoc. (ACHA) Membership & Rental Info- Meetings take place the first Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. Board business meeting takes place the third Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. These meetings are general members meetings and the public is always welcome. No member input on board meeting dates. Members of the community are like shareholders, and membership and swapmeets are the main way the hall pays the bills. No government funds are allocated. Be a voting member, make a difference and receive discounts off of Hall Rentals, swapmeet booths and save on propane gas. Join for $20 for a Family and $35 for a Business per year. For your next event check out the new special hourly rates, call ACHA Membership Chairman, ‘Taz’ Hofstot at 714-392-4069, or contact him via e-mail at BPTAZ@ aol.com for more information. Swapmeet at the Anza Community Hall- Early morning to early afternoon. Meets the first and third Saturdays of each month, weather permitting. Vendors wanted for both indoor and outdoor booths. For information call Jose Barragan at 760-349-9067. To Rent the Anza Community Hall Call Paige Armstrong at 951260-6734. Cahuilla Light House Fellowship-Breakfast and Bible StudyPublic welcome. Meetings take place the first Saturday of the month at 10 a.m. and are held at the Tribal hall below the Casino in Anza. Breakfast will be served. For questions, call Nella Heredia at 951-763-0856. Civil Air Patrol- Squadron 59 is looking for new members of all ages. They offer many opportunities. If this interests you please contact the squadron commander Major Dennis Sheehan 951-4034940 who is from the Anza area. To learn more and see the clubs meeting schedule go to http://www. squadron59.org. Thimble Club-Meets the first Thursday of the month. Come and enjoy lunch ($5) and more. They meet at the Anza Community Hall and lunch starts at noon, with the meeting after. The Thimble Club is a local philanthropic women’s group that was started by the local farmer’s and ancher’s wives over 100 years ago. Over the year these ladies changed and influenced the lives of the people and the communities of the Anza Valley. Join in the proud tradition of the ladies of the Thimble Club -living in the community- serving the community. No sewing required. Call VP Shaaron Chamber 619 20-1268 for more info. Anza Valley Lions Club- First Monday of the month open meeting all welcome dinner served at 7 p.m. $10 at the Anza Community Hall. Lions always serve the community and organize some of the most important events in Anza the Gymkhanas and the Anza Days Weekend and events. Men and women membership are invited to become members -come visit. Call Lion Bob Love- Membership 951 544-5907 for details. Check them out on Facebook Anza Valley Chamber of Commerce- Join and support your community business’. AVCC Board meetings take place at 6 p.m. on

the first Thursday of each month except in July. AVCC mixers are on the third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Call 951-290-AVCC (2822) or go to www.anzavalleychamber.com for more information. Latin Class- If you are interested in taking this class call Nancy West for more information. The class is open to all ages. Call 760-213-0908 for more information. Fit after 50 - Free Exercise Class every Tuesday and Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Anza Community Hall. Chair aerobics helps with coordination and balance and increases muscle tone – there is no jumping. Wear gym shoes and bring water. Leader is Joe Volkman (951)763-0827 and assistant is Reba Schulz (951)7632254. Anza Quilter’s Club- Meets at the Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church in Anza on the first and third Tuesday from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Fire Explorer Program-Program meetings take place Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. every second, third and fourth Tuesday of the month. Located at Fire Station 29 in Anza. Call 951-763-5611 for more information. Boy Scouts-Cubs Clubs meet every Tuesday at 6:00 p.m. Boy Scouts every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. at the Mormon Church on Contreras Rd, South of Hwy 371. For more info call Richard Hotchkiss at (951) 551-3154. Boys Scouts-Cubs - Also meet at Lake Riverside. Call Ginny Kinser for details at 909-702-7902. Alcoholics Anonymous – Meetings take place Wednesday evenings at 8 p.m. Location is 56095 Pena Rd. in Anza at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church. For more information call 951-763-4226. ALANON- Tuesday evenings from 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. It is on 56095 Pena Rd. in Anza at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church. For more info call Carol at (951) 763-1022. Grief Share -If anyone would like to attend a new session of grief share, please call the church at 763-4226 to preregister. Meetings are held at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church at 56095 Pena Road in Anza. Grief Share is designed to minister to people grieving the death of a loved one. Through videos and discussion we learn to walk the journey of grief and support each other along the way. It is a place for hurting people to find healing and hope. The Most Excellent Way- a Christian center recover programFor all kinds of addiction. This is a court approved program and childcare is provided. Also, help with transportation available. Program meets Fridays at 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 57085 Horton Hills Rd. Call Jessica at 951-541-5356 for more information. Hamilton Museum- Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at 39991 Contreras Rd, Anza, Calif. 92539. Phone: 951-763-1350 http://www.hamiltonmuseum.org Hamilton Museum- Wednesdays and Saturdays, 10am-2pm, 39991 Contreras Rd, Anza, CA 92539. Phone: 951-7631350 http://www.hamiltonmuseum. org New M-COR Reference Library- Open Fridays from 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. at 56030 Us Highway 371 in Anza. Library is behind the Overland Realty in Anza. Call Annika Knoppel at 951-551-0940 or email info@m-cor.org for more information. The Park & the Little Red School House- In the heart of town are for rent. They are cared for by the Anza Civic Improvement League (ACIL). Membership helps pay for the upkeep of the park. It’s only $10 for an individual, $18 for a family, or $35 for a business membership. You can conveniently pay online via Paypal, or download the form and mail in your check. Mail membership to PO Box 391000, Anza, CA 92539. Call 951-330-4411 LM Email-info@anzacivic.org . To pay online/learn more- www. anzacivic.org. Anza Civic Improvement League (ACIL) was incorporated in 1964. The current ACIL board is Bob Giffin,President; Vini Contreas,Vice President; Carol Ann Smith,Treasurer; Annika Knoppel,Secretary; Merrie Kraatz,Director; and Joy Edwards, Director.


May 16, 2014 • www.anzavalleyoutlook.com • The Anza Valley Outlook

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Anza Local

M-Cor’s Garden Group meets the Alpaca’s of Anza By Jodi Thomas

than most other manures do. The manure also tends to have higher nutrition content than other livestock, including cow and horse manures. Mountain Communities of Resilience or M-Cor, as a group is always looking to experience ways others have found to carve a niche in Anza and the Roy’s and their alpacas have done just that. The Roy’s winter garden, fertilized by Alpaca Gold, provided a large salad for the potluck. Thirty-five people attending enjoyed the potluck and the tour, learning about how the Roy’s run their Alpaca Ranch and make a profit. Not only do they sell fleece and other products made from alpaca fibers, they also sell girl alpacas for breeding and boys for pets. The alpacas are sold in groups of two because they are herd animals and need each other. Two alpacas can generate enough alpaca manure to support a large garden and the fiber harvest can be made into several types of accessories every year. Alpacas live into their late teens and even the older and coarser fibers can be woven into very soft rugs or felted to make shoe insoles. Julie also makes a reusable produce out of Alpaca fiber equivalent to the dryer sheet, the Alpaca Dryer Ball. “Just leave 2 balls in the dryer and they will fluff your clothes in less time than conventional chemical dryer sheets (they take out the static cling too),” Julie Roy said. “You can use a lower temperature on your dryer as well. Because they are reusable, you just have to purchase them once and use for months.” The Roys will be selling the Alpaca Dryer Ball at the Anza’s Earth fair on May 24. “The Food and Garden Group really appreciated being invited and included in an Alpacas of Anza Valley event,” said Marea StinnettLevine, founder of M-COR. “We look forward to every opportunity to build upon community and individual efforts towards developing local food and small farms in our beautiful valley.” The Roys are always ready

Anyone who meets the Roy’s alpacas finds them unique and interesting. But as the M-Cor’s Garden Group learned at a recent event held at the Roy’s Alpacas of Anza Ranch, the animals are not just valuable for their fleece but also for their manure. The Roy family has dubbed their own special blend of alpaca manure, “Alpaca Gold.” According to the Roys: Alpaca compost offers many benefits over artificial, man-made, commercial type fertilizers and has many positive effects when added to soil. The compost naturally contains nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and micro-nutrients. Organic matter in manure and compost support biological activity which makes soil healthier. Soil structure is physically improved, and it also retains moisture. This positively impacts the nutrient cycle in a soil ecosystem.  Scientists have found that compost not only provides nutrients, but also leads to an increase in organic matter, humic acids, beneficial bacteria and fungi, which are vital to all plants’ health and growth. Manure makes a great amendment to potting soils and can inhibit plant diseases as well. With a light, earthy smell, alpaca fertilizer is one of the best organic fertilizers for vegetable and flower gardens, lawns and houseplants. Chemical and organic fertilizers indicate their nutrient content with three bold numbers on the package. These numbers represent three different compounds: Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potash (Potassium), which is described with the letters N-P-K. The three numbers listed on fertilizer labels correspond to the percentage of these materials found in the fertilizer. Nitrogen helps plant foliage to grow strong. Phosphorous helps roots and flowers to grow and develop. Potassium (Potash) is important for overall plant health.   Why is alpaca fertilizer better than other liveLivestock Manure Comparison stock fertilizers? Animal Nitrogen % Phosphorus % Potassium %  All camelids, including alpacas, Llama/Alpaca 1.7 0.69 .66 have  an efficient Chicken 1.0 0.8 0.4 digestive process Cow 0.6 0.15 0.45 due to their 3 true Goat 2.0 0.5 0.6 stomachs. This means the maHorse 0.7 0.25 0.55 nure contains Pig 0.5 0.35 0.4 significantly less Sheep 0.95 0.35 1.0 organic matter

RADIO from page A-1 The permit grants the ACIL 18 months to set up the equipment and studio necessary to be “on the air,” broadcasting to area residents within an approximated 10 mile radius of the tower location north of the Anza Village. The studio will be located in the Anza Village and will be open to the public. The nonprofit station will be a community based, noncommercial entity and its programming will focus on education, entertainment and issues important to the local community. It will also be prepared for emergency broadcasting if the need arises. However, the exact nature of the radio programs will depend on the creative genius of those in the community who volunteer to produce them. The steering committee invites any individual or community organization interested in local radio broadcasting to get in on the ground level of this historic and exciting new community resource. This is the first time in 13 years and likely the last time ever that the FCC will issue new LPFM permits. Plans to apply to the FCC for this permit began in July of 2013. Members of the Mountain Communities of Resilience (M-COR), the ACIL and other local residents met for four months to prepare the submission for the short nationwide FCC application window last winter. The ACIL agreed to be the qualified non-profit organization to own the license but a new nonprofit, Anza Community Broadcasting, will be formed to handle fundraising and station management. Licensing information is publicly available online at http://bit. ly/1itugxv. For more information and to get involved, please contact Bud Elmore by phone at 951-581-4409 or by email at 2budzracing@gmail.com.

Thirty-five people enjoyed the potluck and tour of the Alpaca Ranch at the recent M-Cor event titled, “From Jo O’Brien photo Alpacas - to the Garden- to the Table.”

to mentor. If you are interested in learning more about alpacas you can contact them by calling

858-361-6321. You can also receive their newsletter by going to www.AlpacaNewsletters.com.

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Need Help with your utility bills? A community clinic will be held at the Anza Community Hall May 21st from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

Riverside County’s Community Action Program may be able to help you through the Home Energy Assistance Program (H.E.A.P.).

Bring COPIES of the following documents: - COPY of current propane AND electric bills - COPY of Social Security Card (showing last 4 weeks of usage) - COPIES of Income for everyone in - COPY of any Disconnection notices or the household (For the last 4 weeks) Urgent notices. Paycheck stubs SSI and/or SSA Award Letter - COPY of Current, valid picture ID Unemployment check stubs - COPY of Proof of U.S. Citizenship Current TANF Notice of Action (One of the following) Child support receipts U.S. Birth certificate Disability insurance payments Current U.S. passport showing Jobs paid in cash place of birth. Current bank statement showing Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship direct deposit ONLY for SSI, SSA, Military DD214 - Must show place of birth TANF, or Pension. Valid Permanent Resident Alien Card Baptismal Certificate - Must show place of birth Follow the income guidelines to make sure your household size qualifies. Your monthly or annual income cannot exceed the amount listed for your household size.

Income Guidelines for your household size: Household Size 1 2 3 4 5 6

Monthly Income $2,019.64 $2,641.06 $3,262.49 $3,883.92 $4,505.34 $5,126.77

For more information visit: www.capriverside.org OR

Yearly Income $24,236.00 $31,693.00 $39,150.00 $46,607.00 $54,064.00 $61,521.00

www.anzaelectric.org

Attention Contractors Invitation For Bids ICDBG 2013

The Cahuilla Band of Indians Housing Commit tee is searching for bids to construct Four (4) homes on the reservation. Construction includes: Manufactured Homes, Grading, and Utility Trenching. The Cahuilla Reservation is located in the towns of Anza and Aguanga, which is approximately 30 miles SE of Temecula, CA.

May 12, 2014 to May 19, 2014 Contractors will pick up bid package at the Cahuilla Tribal Administration Of fice. Bid package contains General Section and Specifications

May 19, 2014 - Site Visit 10:00 A.M.

No other site visit will be permit ted. Writ ten questions submit ted only, via fa x or email. No Verbal or phone inquiries will be considered. The Cahuilla Tribal Administration of fice is located at: 52701 CA Highway 371, Anza, Ca 92539. For questions and information contact: Housing Project Manager by email: tribaladmin@cahuilla.net or by Fa x: 951-763-2808 To view entire

CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATION INSTRUCTION SHEET go to ht tp://inlandempire.craigslist.org/trd/4437064934.html

To learn more about M-Cor and their upcoming events go to www.m-cor.org. www.anzavalleyoutlook.com

ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK Serving Anza, Aguanga, Garner Valley, Sage, and surrounding Southwest Riverside County communities. JULIE REEDER, Publisher STEPHANIE C. OCANO, Editor LISA HASLER, Accounting

Editorial

PAUL BANDONG, Sports Editor J.P. RAINERI, Multimedia Editor JODI THOMAS, Anza Area Manager ALEX GROVES, Staff Writer TIM O’LEARY, Staff Writer JOE NAIMAN, Writer (Ind.) BEVI EDLUND, Writer (Ind.) CHARLES MCKEE, Sports Writer

Advertising Sales

MICHELE HOWARD JOSEPHINE MACKENZIE TIM DEEGAN LAURIANNA BRIANA ANNA MULLEN VANIA FUNE PAT WEIL

Production

KARINA RAMOS, Art Director FOREST RHODES, Production Assistant SAMANTHA GORMAN, Graphic Artist MYLENA MATHENY, Graphic Artist JOHN YADA, Production Assistant

Web Site

JOHN YADA ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 391353, Anza, CA 92539 PHONE: (760) 723-7319 PHONE: (951) 763-5510 FAX: (760) 723-9606 THE ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK (ISSN 0883-6124) is a legally adjudicated paper, AKA AMERICAN OUTLOOK, is published weekly by the The Village News, Inc., 1588 S. Mission Rd. #200, Fallbrook, CA 92028. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Anza Valley Outlook, P.O. Box 391353, Anza, CA 92539 THE ANZA VALLEY OUTLOOK IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CORRECTNESS OF OPINIONS OR INFORMATION OR ERRORS PRINTED IN THIS PAPER, OR FOR ANY JOB, SERVICE OR SALES ITEM. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CHECK OUT ALL ADS. The Anza Valley Outlook is a newspaper of general circulation printed and published weekly in the City of Anza, County of Riverside, and which newspaper has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of the County of Riverside, State of California, March 14, 1986; Case Number 176045

Copyright The Valley News, 2014 A Village News Inc. publication Julie Reeder, President The opinions expressed in The Valley News do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Valley News staff.

Advertising Policy: Acceptance of an advertisement by The Valley News does not necessarily constitute an endorsement of its sponsors or the products offered. We will not knowingly publish advertisements that are fraudulent, libelous, misleading or contrary to the policies of The Valley News. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement we find unsuitable. Please direct all advertising inquiries and correspondence to the address below. Letters to the Editor: Please submit all correspondence to our corporate office by e-mail to editor@myvalleynews.com or by fax to (760) 723-9606. All correspondence must be dated, signed and include the writer’s full address and phone number in order to be considered for publication. All letters are submitted to editing to fit the the publication’s format. Back Issues Available: A limited number of previous issues of the Valley News and Anza Valley Outlook (prior to current week) are available for $1.50 each, plus $1.00 postage and handling ($2.50 total cost). Call (760) 7237319 to order.

Anza Valley Outlook & The Valley News Published weekly Mail to Corporate Office 1588 S. Mission Rd. #200 Fallbrook, CA 92028 (951) 763-5510 FAX (760) 723-9606 Corporate Office: (760) 723-7319 OUR E-MAIL ADDRESSES: info@myvalleynews.com editor@myvalleynews.com sales@myvalleynews.com circulation@myvalleynews.com


The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

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The Thimble Club every year generously awards the monies raised back to the community. These pictured represent the many organization who received those funds.

THIMBLE from page A-1 since taking over the station – with members of the club. He also explained how response time is prioritized. For example, if someone calls in the theft of an automobile and a deputy is on the way to take down

the details of that theft when a call of an assault comes in, the deputy will be rerouted to take the assault case. Captain Wood started his career as a deputy assigned to the Hemet Station, and has now come full circle by returning as Hemet’s top cop.

May is the month each year when the Thimble Club returns 100% of the profit they made on fund raisers back to the community. This year recipients were: • Boy Scouts, accepted by Mason & Michael Gilmore • Hi Country 4-H, accepted by

Lyddiah Gorino • Summer Reading Program, accepted by Doreen Nagel • High Country Recreation, Absent • Christian Men’s Assoc., accepted by Jeff Crawley • Anza Scholarship Fund Carl Simmons • ACIL, accepted by Carol Ann Smity • Lions, accepted by Marge Kohler • From The Heart Ministry, accepted by Tammy Marana • Citizen’s Patrol, accepted by C.J. Drake

• Anza Community Hall, accepted by Don Watson • Josh Crawley Scholarship, accepted by Leticia Crawley Be sure to mark your calendars to attend the Thimble Club Rib Dinner on Thursday, June 12 From 4:00 To 7:00 p.m. Be on the lookout for flyers around town. The Raffles Won Were: Wrapped Gift, Marilyn Peck; Unwrapped Gift, Betty Love; and The 50/50 in the amount of $67 by Brian English of the Christian Men’s association who very generously donated it back to the Thimble Club.

Thimble Club Chefs every month prepare a delicious meal; the May Chefs were Betty Love, Teri Crutchfield, Sue Kraft and Sandi Roe. Shaaron Chambers photos

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Guest speaker Capt. Ray Wood shared about the Riverside Sheriff Department with the ladies.

Lions Club Holds Opening Turkey Shoot By Betty Love The Lions Club opening Turkey Shoot was on Easter Sunday this year.  We had 16 shooters and a really good time.  The Grand Champ of the event

was Dennis Hartmann and the Ladies Champ was Dahlia Serrato. The Youth Champ was Robert Love. The turkey shoots are held the third Sunday of each month from May through November.  Come

out and join the fun on May 18 at 9 a.m. at the Lions’ Gymkhana Field.  We dont really shoot turkeys! Check out the AVO’s “Upcoming Events,” section for more information.

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Local merchants, like the folks at Anza Village Market, are teaming up with your local cooperative to offer you discounts. Just take your Co-op Connections Card wherever you go. And say hello to savings.

For a complete list of participating businesses visit www.anzaelectric.org and click the community tab or go to www.connections.coop for both local and national businesses.


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

E15M from page A-1 The program’s name was derived from the fact that in the early ‘90s, someone in the United States died in an alcohol-related traffic collision every fifteen minutes. However, with the implementation of new laws as well as grass roots programs like Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD), Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) and Friday Night Live (FNL), the death rate has lowered to once every thirty minutes. Still, many might argue that number is still too high. Goals and Objectives The program brings together a broad coalition of interested local agencies with the goal of reducing alcohol-related incidents among youth. The partnering of the California Highway Patrol, local law enforcement, local hospitals, emergency medical responders, schools, businesses and service clubs validates the importance of working together to ensure a healthy community. The program requires about eight to ten months of careful planning. Prior to the actual event, approximately 25 students – representing a cross section of the school – are selected. Waivers are reviewed and signed by students and their parents. Program Components Day One One student is removed from class every fifteen minutes and becomes one of the “living dead.” A uniformed officer and a counselor enter the classroom and read each student’s obituary to those remaining in the class. The obituary is posted in the classroom for the remainder of the school year. Simultaneously, the parents of each living dead student are given their child’s death notification by a uniformed officer or chaplain. Although the death notifications are simulated and everyone knows this, the notifications typically result in overwhelming displays of emotion and concern. Throughout the day, members of the living dead place their tombstones in a temporary cemetery on the school campus so friends and classmates can mourn their loss. A simulated drunk driving collision involving pre-selected high school students is staged on school grounds for the benefit of the entire student body. It begins with a pre-recorded 911 call that triggers an emergency response by law enforcement, firefighters, paramedics and the coroner. Each agency uses the drill as a training exercise to simulate real life responses. In the Hamilton scenario: Paramedics treat one student for critical injuries and fly him out to Mercy air. He was the passenger in the drunk driving car. Second and third students are declared dead and each is removed by the coroner. The fourth student, designated as the drunk driver, is stuck in the wrecked car in this case and must be removed by “The Jaws of Life.” After the removal he is given a field sobriety test and is arrested for driving under the influence. After the collision, the drama continues for the students involved in the crash. Officers book the drunk driver into jail. After booking is completed, the drunk driver must call a parent or guardian to explain what he or she has done. Emergency medical responders transport the critically injured patient to a local trauma center where doctors simulate attempts to save his or her life.

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Unable to do so, the doctor on duty has the grave task of notifying the student’s parents of their child’s untimely death. Organ procurement team members discuss the option of organ donation with the parents of the deceased child. Meanwhile, the student who died on-scene is taken to the morgue, weighed and measured, and placed in a body bag until a family member can identify the body. At the end of the day, law enforcement chaperones take the living dead to an overnight retreat. Once the students become members of the living dead, there is no contact with family or friends. At the retreat, the students participate in team building activities and learn first-hand from people who have been involved in or affected by an incident involving alcohol. The evening ends as the students write letters to their loved ones, expressing the thoughts they would convey if they had not been killed on that particular day. Day Two The living dead students return to school to attend a student body assembly. The living dead students are seated in the front of the auditorium opposite their parents. Members of the community who were involved in planning the event sit in a semi-circle behind the living dead. During the assembly, everyone in the auditorium watches a video of the previous day’s events. After the video, several of the living dead students read excerpts from the letters they wrote the night before. They share with their friends and classmates what if felt like to die without having the chance to say good-bye. Other members from the community, like trauma doctors, law enforcement officers and emergency responders, explain how they are personally affected on a daily basis when someone makes a poor choice involving alcohol. The assembly concludes with a call to action challenging everyone in the auditorium to make responsible choices when alcohol is involved. After 24 hours on an “emotional roller coaster,” parents and living dead students are reunited. Parents and teens are typically overwhelmed with emotion and gain a new sense of love and commitment to one another to make the right choices. After the assembly, everyone gathers at a reception hosted by and for the participants. The program helps the students see members of their community in a different light. They are no longer just cops, doctors, paramedics, or firefighters, but also friends, mentors, and human beings who care about the kids in their community. The two-day E15M program is very dramatic and emotional-and purposely so. Teenagers are constantly reminded about the choices they have to make involving alcohol and how many others are affected by their decisions. They know the intellectual statistics. However, many teens share the belief it will never happen to them.

el p s o yG Valle pel Cha Pastors Blake and Stephanie Booth and the Church Family at Valley Gospel want to meet you. Come visit us at

E15M Project Coordinator CHP Officer Darren Meyer tests Trey Thornberry for intoxication to establish a charge for drunk driving after the mock collision.

Day Two; the assembly concludes with a call to action challenging everyone in the auditorium to make Jodi Thomas photos responsible choices when alcohol is involved.

Results and Impact This powerful program is designed to create an awareness among students that they are not invincible. This program helps open the emotional doors, and it addresses a problem most teens do not know exist. They experience first-hand how their actions affect the lives of so many other people. Funding With funding available from the California Office of Traffic Safety, the California Highway Patrol provides mini-grants to agencies and organizations implementing the program. Experienced California Highway Patrol personnel are available to provide technical assistance in plan-

New Pastors- New Outlook Building a “Church Culture” that develops a Spirit of Giving, Strong Faith, Strong Families Breakfast - Meet and Greet 9:30am Sunday Service 10 am Child care is prov ided

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The Oak Grove Community Hall is having a

RUMMAGE SALE!

ning and implementing the E15M program. The California Highway Patrol E15M project coordinators help schools avoid the most common mistakes and help overcome some of the most difficult obstacles.

If you have any question about the E15M program you can contact CHP Officer Darren Meyer Public Information Officer at the San Gorgonio Pass CHP office located at 195 Highland Springs Avenue, Beaumont, Calif. by calling 951-769-2000 ext-238.

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Anza Valley Outlook Service Directory HARDWARE ANZA VALLEY HARDWARE & FEED RON COOK

(951) 763-4668 Fax (951) 763-0208

56350 Hwy 371 P.O. Box 391399 Anza, CA 92539

Saturday May 24th and Sunday May 25th

Food, beverages, furniture, art and lots of “stuff”

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Proceeds go to repair the Bell Tower and front Signage. Hours 8:00 to 3:00.

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Outdoor vendor space available, $10.00 covers both days. Located 20 miles east of Temecula in rout to Warner Springs on Hwy 79 South/Temecula Parkway.

The Oak Grove Community Hall is available to rent for all events large or small. It offers a beautiful Pine and Oak interior. Sound system, stage, full kitchen, Additional Services are also available upon request. The Oak Grove Camp Gound is located adjacent to the Hall for overnight stays. For information call Kelly Collard-Redewill 951-719-5017

Wicker Water Well Pump Service Frank M. Wicker, Owner Most 5-25 gpm Well Pumps In-Stock, In Anza (951) 763-2747 Fax (951) 763-5408 Lic#816551

Notice To Readers: California law requires that contractors taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also requires that contractors include their license number on all advertising. You can check the status of your licensed contractor at www.cslb. ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking jobs that total less than $500 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.


The Anza Valley Outlook • www.anzavalleyoutlook.com • May 16, 2014

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Anza Local TRIBAL from page A-1 pots than the ones he showed event attendees how to build. He builds his pots by the coil and paddle method, which he learned from his grandmother. His pots are renowned for their different styles, each of which is fashioned after the pottery traditions of different tribes. Soares learned the different styles by actually visiting the various tribes and learning their pottery-design methods. The largest collections of Soares’ work can be seen in the Springs Reserve Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada. Native Americans traditionally stored food stuffs in these pots like seeds and nuts. The pots would keep them safe from rodents. Rose Ann Hamilton, who led the basket weaving class, showed a local resident how to make decorative fans using Juncus grass. In the native language, the grass is called “Shayille.” This grass, which grows locally, is dark green and can be found growing in the wet meadows along Hwy 371 as it crosses through the Cahuilla Reservation. Hamilton also discussed some information about the local Cahuilla tribe. She said the tribe has two main clans, the Wild Cat Clan and the Coyote Clan. Mothers traditionally keep track of and teach their children the family’s ancestral genealogy and history. This is important as members of the Wild Cat Clan cannot marry into their own clan but must marry someone from the Coyote Clan, according to Hamilton. Similarly, members of the Coyote Clan cannot marry other Coyote Clan members but must marry someone from the Wild Cat Clan, she said. After some of the presentations concluded, lunch was served. It appeared no one wanted to miss out on the freshly made Indian Tacos that were free for all who attended. The cooks, Angela Heredia, Veronica Salgado, Luther Salgado Sr., Leticia Salgado and John Bustos all appeared very busy, but also seemed to be enjoying themselves. The cooks visited with those who waited as they cooked. Next to the lunch room there was

a native food display that included Candle Stick Yucca blossoms and stalks as well as acorns that were being ground the old fashion way. The fresh blooms of the yucca were a staple for the area tribes as well as the stalks which could be eaten boiled or raw. Raw Yucca stalk tastes like jicama, according to those who have tasted it. Once the mealtime was finished, event officials commenced the celebration of joy through the sharing of tradition; they celebrated using drums, song, and dance. One of the guests, Benjamin Hale, stood in full regalia with his small daughter Alethia as she learned the traditional dances. Hale said he remembered learning dance from his father, who he traveled and performed publicly with at Disneyland, Knotts Berry Farm and Wild Bills in Anaheim. His dances were rhythmic and in time to the beat and little Alethia had her own dance steps to follow. Watching them together was a heart-warming experience. Benjamin said his father created two sets of wings for dancing out of Golden Eagle feathers. He pulled a pair out a pair of the wings and it was clear they were precious to him. He said the eagles are protected and only Native Americans are allowed to possess their feathers. Golden Eagles can have a wing span of approximately 8 feet. Benjamin Hale’s wing set has been carefully crafted to replicate the grandeur of the great wings of a Golden Eagle. In the dance he placed the great feathers of the eagle across his shoulders and his feet moved to the beat of a drum while he soared and moved the wings as an eagle would. After Hale began to dance, four drummers joined into the performance; they were Glen Begay, Randy Kinlicheenie, Brian Robin and Aaron Tsosie. The men are from different tribes; they came to drum for the gathering and for the special dancers. The first dancer was the lead drummer’s daughter, Jingle Dancer Auriah Begay. Jingle Dancers have bells sewn onto their costumes that sway and jingle as they dance. Auriah was then joined by other jingle dancers as well as the “fancy

dancers,” all of whom were from a dance troop that was learning traditional dance. This group is an inter-tribal group that meets and practices at the Pechanga. Their colorful costumes made them look like butterflies in the spring air as they soar around and look for flowers. The sum of the jingle dancers and fancy dancers who danced that day were, Lauryn Cuevas, Holly Mangilian, Dominque Lombardi, Samantha Wisespirit, Rebecca Nogales, Nicole Freeman, Lanae

Reyes, Racine Wisespirit, Leena Reyes, Ushla Fernanadez, Sandrah Fellows and Annalisa Berrios. For the next part of the celebration, everyone was invited to form a circle and join in a group dance. The drums and dances were a very moving and enjoyable experience for many of the individuals in attendance. At the end of the day as in the beginning, the Bird Singers, Antonio Heredia Jr., Reuben Salgado, Isaeah Heredia, Thomas Tortez, Frankie Cline, Michael Jones,

Aiden Heredia, Dyami Williams, Allin Martinez, and Anthony Kyreacos came to sing. Across from the men, the women – dressed in meek apparel -- stood. The men began to sing the Cahuilla traditional Bird Songs, which were passed down through the generations. Their only instruments were their voices and rattles. And, as they sang, the women began to dance and that was the end of a day of celebration and learning.

Reuben Salgado & Mercy Estrada pose with the Historical Tribal Food display at the Indian Cultural Day at Hamilton High School.

A lunch of Indian Tacos were prepare for all for free by this crew of happy people; lt-rt; Angela Heredia, Veronica and Luther Salgado Sr., Leticia Salgado, and John Bustos.

Basket Weaving was taught by Rose Ann Hamilton, her new friend Tonie by her side shows off the fan she made out of Juncus grass.

Benjamin Hale's performance soars in the Eagle Dance.

The “Group Dance” was extended to all who came that day.

Drummers Glen Begay, Randy Kinlicheenie, Brian Robin, and Aaron Tsosie, drumming for the first of the women dancers , Auriah Begay.

The dance troop consists of women and girls from many tribes, their colorful costumes are unique to each individual who's components can be changed to fit the type of dance.

Jodi Thomas photos


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

PCT from page A-1 rumored to be over 1,200 people. The PCT traverses the eastern end of town. Hikers and equestrians travel ; it from the border of Mexico and California to the border of Washington and Canada. The trail is over 2,600 miles long and travels through some very rugged country. A thru-hiker is a hiking term used to describe long distance hikers that attempt to traverse or hike through the whole length of a long distance trail like the PCT. On Saturday, May 3, ,Anza’s local PCT volunteer and Trail Angel Mary Litch was helping make these thru-hikers’ lives a little easier. Mary owns property that is adjacent to the PCT and on this piece of dirt Mary has created a place where hikers and equestrians can rest and refuel before they continue their journey. Mary provides water, sodas, chocolate pop tarts and a table to sit at. For your tired horse, she provides water and grass hay. On May 3, Mary provided something special; she fired up the grill and cooked hamburgers for all the hungry and weary travelers. She also invited some out-oftown guests to come and enjoy her PCT Ranch in Anza. When asked what Mary does as a PCT volunteer she replied, “I’ve been a volunteer with the PCTA [Pacific Crest Trail Association] working on repairing trail tread (path) and trimming back vegetation along the PCT for three years. I’ve unofficially adopted the section of the trail nearest my house between the two Table Mountain Truck Trail crossings. I ride [my horse] or hike this section at least once a week, noting any issues. If

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they are easy to fix, I do it myself. Otherwise, I report the problem to Don Line, the trail chief for this section of the PCT.” Mary wears a T-shirt that says “All dirt roads lead to Anza, CA” as she tells me a little bit about herself. “I used to live in New England and vacationed every summer along the Appalachian Trail, so I have some experience with thruhikers,” she said. “The ones on the PCT are very similar: they are so interesting.” “These are not people who are just wandering through life on autopilot,” she saidcontinued. “It seems like there are more thru-hikers on the PCT this year. But this perception may just be the result of my being more actively engaged with them.” I had the opportunity of meeting a couple of thru-hikers by the names of Julia Frantz, 28, and Philip Pfanner, 34, from Eugene, Oregon. This couple had begun their journey on April 24. Both, in their own words, are “taking time away from work to find adventure and get off the grid.” Phillip is employed as a nurse and Julia is employed at a nonprofit where she raises funds for the arts. They reported that they are trail runners and that is how they conditioned for this thru-hike. When asked what the hardest part of the hike has been, Julia replied, “Not being able to shower enough.” Phillip added, “My feet seem to hurt all the time.” The couple is going by “Liverstrong” when they sign into log books along the trail. You can look up other thru-hikers’ trail journals at wwwpcta.org/journalist. During Mary’s event I met thru-

Thru-hikers Philip Pfanner, 34, and Julia Frantz, 28, from Eugene, Oregon, enjoy Trail Angel Mary Litch’s rest stop along the Pacific Crest Trail. Allison Renck photos

hikers from, Boston, Massachusetts, Ohio, Idaho, Colorado, and quite a few from Oregon. Most were in there 20’s and 30’s, but I did meet a man who was a school bus driver that had helped build the trail in the 1970s, s. Besides Mary’s event in Anza, the local Santa Margarita Group of the Sierra Club hosted a one-way hike from Barrel Spring to Warner Springs on the PCT (8.5 miles) with lunch at Eagle Rock. The Warner Springs Community Resource Center and the Santa Margarita Group of the Sierra Club

hosted a welcome celebration for PCT thru-hikers. Pam Nelson from the Sierra Club reported, “The thru-hikers were thrilled to have a celebration for them that included free taco plates and a cake dedicated to the PCT and the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. I made a large set of posters showing the wilderness areas they would be encountering on their journey to Canada. A group of three was doing a ‘selfie’ photo/ video while soaking their feet in foot baths and saying jokingly that no one should come to the Warner Springs Community Resource Center because of the torture of having

foot baths, showers, washed clothes and free taco plates. It’s fun to hear all the discussions about routes, experiences, equipment and so on in all the accents from around the world.” To be inspired is to feel alive and it appears that from the Trail Angels to the thru-hikers, the Pacific Crest Trail inspires many to go a little further and find a new adventure. For more information on the Pacific Crest Trail, go to www.pcta.org. To comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

A-8

Real Estate

Buyers, get prepared or get left behind your offers and don’t rely on your need to negotiate the best deal.

John Occhi, Mike Mason Special to the Valley News The buying season is finally here – odds are that if you are going to buy a Temecula/Murrieta home this year, you’ll buy it between now and August. Sure, you’ve been getting your financial affairs in order and you’ve been up at night searching the internet and browsing again first thing each morning at all of the available homes for sale…but are you really ready to jump in and do what it takes? Think of finding and purchasing a new home as a marathon. It’s not going to happen overnight and it’s not going to be easy. Just like a marathon, most of the preparation is achieving a mental attitude that you must have for the long run. Don’t give up, don’t look for shortcuts, be persistent and be consistent. Looking for a deal or a home? Many buyers will wear themselves out searching for “the right home” to fall in love with, only to lose their dream by insisting on submitting a low ball offer. What’s sad is that many buyers will repeat the process several times before they realize this may not be the best tactic if they want to move before school starts in the fall. Smarter buyers with a local agent who is in tune with the market will know and understand the current market trends and know what homes are selling for in each specific neighborhood you are shopping in. Current market conditions do not support the notion that low-ball offers will gain any respect from this year’s sellers who are still hoping for a repeat of last year’s buying frenzy that saw multiple offers and a nearly 25 percent increase in value across the board. Do yourself a favor and prepare reasonable fair market offers. Use current and reliable data to structure

If it’s meant to be, it’s meant to be There will be homes that you really want. You’ve analyzed all of the data with your REALTOR®, you structure the cleanest best offer, and then you submit it. At this point, if you are going to maintain a healthy mental attitude, you have to let go of the outcome. If the home you are fighting for is supposed to be yours and have the right positive mental attitude then success will be that much sweeter and the loss much easier to deal with if you find yourself back on the street looking for that perfect home again! Are your priorities in alignment with buying a home? It’s a tough question. Trust your instinct of course! Then, when your agent notifies you that a home that meets every want and need on your list, is within budget, is in the desired neighborhood, do you drop what you were doing to go look at it? Or do you ask to schedule a showing for Saturday afternoon after Junior’s little league game? Do you keep getting overbid because you are asking for a 60 day escrow? Maybe you want the seller to contribute 3 percent towards your closing costs plus pay for a home warranty…hmm, not in this market. The truth is there are many variables to every offer and typically lots of competition when priced right. You need to be working with an agent whom you trust so that you can trust your agents’ advice and harness his/her expertise. Consider each setback and learn from the experience – don’t become a victim of repetition. TV buyers are in fantasy land If you ever watch any of the multiple television shows on the process of buying real estate you may be gaining some insight but trust me – this is not “The Real World.” First off, it is near impossible to look at three houses and one of them becomes perfect. It’s going to take much more than this.

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Second, the couple who doesn’t know what they want really need to decide and not rely on their REALTOR® to figure it out for them. How many couples have you seen on TV where one wants to live in an urban environment and the other out in the country – all for $900 a month? Well, you need to work this out with your partner (or yourself) long before you ever cross your first threshold. Determine what you want, what you need, where you want to be and a realistic budget. Open escrow – finish line in sight Sure, you found the perfect home and have an accepted offer for a price within your budget, but it’s not yours yet. You still have a lot of work to get done if you are going to close on time…or at all (always remember, not every escrow closes). Escrow can be anti-climactic, after all of the energy that went into finding your new abode but you can’t slow down now – stay focused and do what needs to be done. This includes showing up for all of the necessary inspections, work closely with your lender, providing all of the necessary documentation (yes, there will be hoops to jump through), and remain flexible because there will be unforeseen things that will happen that will require your prompt attention. No one wants to see all of yours and your agents’ hard work and the thought of losing your dream home slip between the cracks. Stay focused on the end game. Be ready to jump through hoops as they mysteriously appear and give your home finding/buying experi-

ence the highest priority. Provided you can stay the course, odds are definitely in your favor of being settled into your new home long before the kids return to school this fall. Call us today and get the information you need to make the right decision. The information is free, call now at (951) 296-8887.

Questions regarding available inventory and/or other real estate matters contact Mike@GoTakeAction.com. Mike Mason, Broker/ Owner of MASON Real Estate Cal. BRE: 01483044, Board of Director of your Southwest Riverside County Association of Realtors® (SRCAR), Traveling State Director, California Association of Realtors® (C.A.R.).

Movie theater entertainment complex with bowling alley, sports bar set to open in Menifee during summer 2015 MENIFEE – Regent Properties recently announced that Krikorian Premiere Theatres will open a luxury movie theater entertainment complex at the Menifee Town Center. Regent’s Menifee Town Center, which is currently under construction, is an ambitious 172-acre mixed-use development that will include a variety of housing options as well as retail, dining and entertainment spaces and potential municipal and state government offices. Once complete, the vibrant mixed-use development is destined to become a modern civic center and the central gathering place of Menifee. Regent Properties’ officials are thrilled to bring Krikorian Premiere Theatres on board, calling them an ideal tenant with a new idea for a lively entertainment complex that will add to an already-inviting atmosphere. “We welcome Krikorian to the Menifee Town Center and look forward to all the excitement they will bring to our project and this community,” said Daniel T. Gryczman, executive vice president of Regent Properties. “Their one-of-a-kind concept is certain to be become one of the most bustling spots in town.” In announcing the agreement to purchase land in Menifee Town Center, George Krikorian, president

and CEO of Krikorian Premiere Theatres, said the company is eager to move into the Menifee marketplace and enthused about the opportunities that will bring. “We have been watching with interest the growth of Menifee and have long wanted to be a part of the community,” Krikorian said. “It was just a question of finding the right site, and with the Menifee Town Center, we firmly believe we have found the heart of Menifee.” The Krikorian complex, which is projected to open in the summer of 2015, will include 12 stadium seating luxury auditoriums, all outfitted with leather, fully reclining seats, intheater food and beverage service, and state-of-the-art sound systems. In addition to the movie screens, the Krikorian complex will feature a 16-lane bowling alley, a restaurant/ sports bar with a 70-foot screen and luxury sofa seating, and a family entertainment center complete with private rooms for birthdays and other special events. “We are creating a completely different entertainment experience than what’s out there in this area today,” Krikorian added. Menifee Mayor Scott Mann, who announced the coming of the Krikorian complex during a recent city council meeting, had a hard time containing his delight about the coming attractions at the Menifee Town Center.

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“I can’t wait for this complex to open and look forward to taking my family for dinner and a movie,” Mann said. “The investment these people are making in our community speaks volumes about their confidence in Menifee and the tremendous growth and maturation we have experienced since becoming a city just a few short years ago.”

Survey of homeless veterans shows slightly fewer living on the streets than a year ago RIVERSIDE – A survey of homeless veterans in Riverside County in January found a four percent reduction among those living on the streets or in encampments, compared to a survey of the county’s entire homeless population one year ago. The overall number of homeless veterans, however, rose from 285 in January 2013 to 290 in January 2014. The one percent increase is due largely to the number of veterans living in emergency or transitional shelters. The Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to conduct a biennial count of homeless people living on streets, in abandoned buildings, at freeway overpasses and underpasses, in vehicles, encampments and other areas. The survey of homeless veterans was done as part of the VALOR Task Force (Veterans Assistance Leadership of Riverside County), created by the county’s Board of Supervisors in May 2013 to honor, support and assist veterans with quality-oflife issues such as homelessness, healthcare, education and job training.  A housing sub-committee of the VALOR Task Force was created with the short-term goal of finding permanent housing for 285 homeless veterans, the number identified in the 2013 point-in-time count. To date, the housing sub-committee has permanently housed more than 400 homeless veterans.  The full report is available at www.dpss.co.riverside.ca.us.


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

A-9

Local

Subaru shares the love with Assistance League

I take good care of my family...with Palomar Health.

Jaime Rivas, M.D., Emergency Physician Palomar Medical Center

John Hine, left, and Bill Brumbaugh presented checks to Sue Sampson and Dorcas Shaktman for their charitable work in the community. Courtesy photo

TEMECULA – For every new Subaru sold, Subaru of America donates $250 to one of five charities, with the choice being made by the buyer. This year’s program ran from November 21, 2013 to January 2, 2014. In addition, Subaru opened up the opportunity for individual Subaru stores to select a unique local sixth charity that works within their local community. “When Subaru announced that we could choose a local charity to be added to the Share the Love event, we did not have to even think hard about it. Assistance League of Temecula Valley was our first and only choice,” said Bill Brumbaugh, vice president/GM of John Hine Temecula Subaru. “They have spent the last 25 years helping those less fortunate achieve a better, more meaningful life. We are proud to have such a wonderful, caring and hard-working organization right here in Temecula.” During the event, for every new Subaru sold or leased, Subaru made a donation to the customer’s choice of participating charities. The Subaru Share the Love event

was founded five years ago but for the first time a local charity could be added to the list. John Hine, owner of John Hine Temecula Subaru Mazda, and Bill Brumbaugh recently presented Assistance League incoming president Sue Sampson and current president Dorcas Shaktman with two checks totaling $3,000. One check was the proceeds from the Share the Love event and the other was a donation from John Hine. “We are very excited and so appreciative of the support,” said Shaktman. “This is a perfect example of how businesses and volunteers can work together to provide for those in need.” Assistance League is a 501(c)(3) volunteer organization serving the families of Southwest Riverside County for 25 years. Revenue from the Assistance League Thrift Shop, 28720 Via Montezuma, Temecula, is the main source of funding for their philanthropic programs. For more information about the programs and membership information, visit www.temeculavalley.assistanceleague.org or call (951) 694-8018.

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

A-10

Entertainment

The Movie Review: “21 Jump Street” Robert T. Nickerson Special to the Valley News With 22 Jump Street set to be released on June 13, let’s take a trip to the past and see how 21 Jump Street fared and set us up for this upcoming sequel. For some kids, high school can be a challenge. There are bad teachers, bullies, peer pressure, and is regarded by most as a daily prison. But for other teenagers, this is the only time of life that’s important. They have friends, popularity, and a last chance of innocence before responsibly consumes them. Could two people from each side become friends? It’s possible, as seen in the latest of television adaptations, 21 Jump Street. Though I haven’t seen the original series, it apparently revolved around the same concept as this movie. Only, it was taken seriously. The movie, however, is a comedy. I have a feeling that some fans were outraged when they discovered this. As someone who has never seen the show, I have no

opinion. But this movie works mighty well as a comedy. 21 Jump Street is a story that’s not just about going back to high school, it’s about second chances. Schmidt and Jenko (played by Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum, respectively) have known each other since high school. Jenko was a jock and Schmidt was a nerd. They had different cliques but both shared the same failure in prom. They missed out on the biggest social event of their adolescent years. Seven years later, they meet up in the police academy where they help each other out. Sooner than you can say revival, they are transferred to their new unit. Because of their youthful appearance, they are sent back to high school as undercover students. I think this is every young adult’s dream, even if they hated high school. This is their chance to reclaim the time of being a stupid kid. And these actors define the perfect stupid kid as acted by a young adult. The story turns the tables on the characters when they forget each

other’s false identities. So the jock becomes a nerd and the nerd becomes a jock. Now, they are going to get a taste of each other’s world. They are going to understand that high school is not as easy as they remembered. Seven years can change a lot. High school movies always cast actors that are too old, and here, both leads are way too old. But it works. While the audience sees them as adults, the world of 21 Jump Street buys it. We get drug addicts, studentteacher relationships, technology usage, and, of course, a production of Peter-Pan with Jonah Hill as Peter. That scene brings laughter from disaster. If you’re looking for a new great comedy, this is it. 21 Jump Street is up there with Starsky and Hutch. It’s another

great example of a dramatic television series becoming a great comedy. I’ll give this 5 prom limos out of 5. You don’t need to have seen the show, but a surprise appearance will make you want to. 21

Jump Street should be visited by anyone wishing to return to high school. Robert T. Nickerson is a film critic. His work can be seen at mastermindfilmproductions.com.

How to reduce summer party waste

Temecula Heart and Stroke Walk raises more than $100,000 TEMECULA – More than 2,000 people turned out for the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Temecula Valley Heart and Stroke Walk aimed at raising awareness and funds to fight the nation’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers – heart disease and stroke. The event held at Lake Skinner in Winchester on May 3 raised more than $100,000. “The success of this event would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of our Executive Leadership Team and AHA staff,” said Rick Hartsock, chairman of the 2014 Temecula Heart & Stroke Walk and chief operating officer of Mission Ambulance. “On top of raising more than $100,000, we were able to get the American Heart Association’s message of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke to over 2,000 people in the Temecula Valley. I am proud to have worked with such a dynamic team, and I look forward to next year.” Many of the walkers represented families, individuals and teams formed by local companies who have spent the last few months raising money to support the AHA’s mission of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Abbott Vascular was the top fundraising team with more than $32,000.  The Temecula Heart and Stroke Walk is an annual event that brings the community together to help achieve the AHA’s 2020 impact goal of improving the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20 percent. Participants included many heart disease and stroke survivors as well as families who lost loved ones to the nation’s leading causes of death. Among the participants were 3-year-old Dalton Rode of Hemet and his family who have been joining the walk since it started in Temecula four years ago. Dalton was in his mother’s womb when he was diagnosed with a congenital heart defect where the two main arteries going out of his heart were switched in position. He had openheart surgery only seven days after

he was born. Two years later, a new diagnosis led to a second open-heart surgery for Dalton, and while in recovery he suffered a stroke. Today, Dalton is an energetic 3-year-old who loves trains and enjoys spending time with his two siblings. “We are extremely blessed by the medical advances made so that we may today celebrate the life of our Dalton,” said his mother Melissa Rode. Heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 and No. 4 killers in America. The American Heart Association’s mission is to build healthier lives, free of these and other cardiovascular diseases. The AHA’s lifesaving activities include improving patient care, advocating for better health and educating the public, including populations at risk, through community education programs. The AHA also funds groundbreaking medical research to help better understand, treat and prevent heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Despite the AHA’s track record in funding research, each year hundreds of deserving projects go unfunded because there was not enough money to support them. The Heart & Stroke Walk provides an opportunity for the community to help build awareness of heart disease and stroke and raise funds to support cardiovascular research. Every dollar raised at the Heart & Stroke Walk means another dollar toward research, another discovery down the line, another life saved. AHAfunded research has contributed to many important discoveries, including CPR, life-extending drugs, pacemakers, bypass surgery, the heart-lung machine and surgical techniques to repair heart defects. The Temecula Valley Heart Walk is sponsored nationally by Subway and locally by Abbott Vascular. Additional sponsors include Walgreens, TE Connectivity, Mission Ambulance, Temecula Valley Hospital and Fitness 19. For information about next year’s Heart & Stroke Walk, visit  www.TemeculaHeartWalk.org or call (310) 424-4174.

INLAND EMPIRE – Backyard barbecues and pool parties are staples of summer. Such festive events with family and friends create memories that last a lifetime. But as enjoyable as such get-togethers can be, many are not terribly ecofriendly, an unfortunate reality that can take a heavy toll on the planet. Reducing summer party waste is not very difficult. Eco-conscious hosts can take several steps to reduce the carbon footprint of summer party season. Serve guests using reusable kitchenware Though a backyard barbecue may seem like the perfect time to pull out the paper plates and plastic cups, such items are wasteful. Hosts might have to do a little extra work, but serving guests using reusable kitchenware can make any pool party more eco-friendly. Such items can be reused again and again

all season long. And hosts don’t need to use the fine china, opting for plastic plates and cups instead. Such items are dishwasher-friendly, meaning the only extra work hosts have to do is load and unload the dishwasher. Don’t go overboard with main items Many hosts know that they are bound to have some leftover hamburgers and hot dogs after everyone goes home for the night. Those leftovers often end up going to waste. Instead of making too many items that can’t be enjoyed as leftovers, hosts can make more salad and pasta that might taste better the day after. In addition, such items can be sent home with guests, whereas guests are unlikely to take home burgers and franks. Hosts who find themselves with a substantial amount of leftovers should call a nearby food bank or homeless shelter to see if they ac-

cept leftovers as donations. Organize the menu with friends Some people feel that party etiquette dictates that guests bring something to the party. While this is a great way to relieve hosts of some of the financial burden of hosting a party, it can also produce waste if guests bring the same items. In the days before the party, hosts should contact their friends and family to make sure everyone is bringing something different if the event is a potluck. This reduces the likelihood that food will end up going to waste. Recycle bottles and cans Whether it’s beer, soda, or water, beverages served at barbecues and pool parties tend to come in bottles or cans. To ensure a party is more eco-friendly, hosts should designate a garbage can for just bottles and cans, directing guests to discard these items in an eco-friendly way.

Local area youths win top honors at the World Irish dancing championships MURRIETA – It wasn’t just the luck of the Irish that led four young Temecula-area residents to capture titles at the 2014 World Irish dancing championships held last month in London, England. In addition to attending classes three days a week at the Claddagh School of Irish Dance in Murrieta, the dancers also traveled to Ventura, California at least one weekend a month where they were joined by members of the Claddagh School’s other locations around Southern California for grueling practices that lasted six hours a day. “Performing the five minute choreography is similar to sprinting for five minutes,” 19-year-old Bonnie Bellah said. “We would perform the whole choreography full out and if anything wasn’t perfect we would run through it again. The rule was to keep doing it until you never got it wrong.” The hard work ultimately paid off for Bellah and her classmates: 10-year-old Fiona Harley, 12-year-

old Peyton Stearns, and 17-year-old Alison Casey. The school brought home two first place trophies in the traditional group dancing category known as ceili dancing, which requires teams of eight dancers to perform two historical dances. The teams must learn the dances in their entirety but don’t know which sections they will be required to perform until the competition starts. Stearns was a member of school’s winning entry in the 11 to 13 age group, beating out over 60 teams from around the world. Casey was part of the team which won in the 16 to 19 age range. Both Stearns and Harley were members of a 16-person team that took home second place in the under 13 age group for a non-traditional performance titled “Galway Girls,” while Bellah joined Casey for a similar team, in the highly competitive 16 and over age group, which also secured a second place for a performance inspired

by William Butler Yeats’ poem “The Wild Swans of Coole.” Harley, who is currently ranked as one of the top 10 Irish dancers in the Western United States for her age, also competed in the under 11 solo dancing competition. “It was amazing to be competing against the best dancers and schools in the world,” Stearns said. “Some of these schools and dancers are the ones we read about all the time, so just being able to dance against them is awesome.” The Claddagh School of Irish Dance was started by Irish-born Maire O’Connell in 1985 in Ventura, California. The Murrieta location has been serving the area for over 10 years and is led by Kelly Sullivan, who studied under O’Connell before becoming certified to teach Irish dance in 2001. Classes are available for beginners ages four through adult. For more information visit www.claddaghmurrieta.com.

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May 16, 2014 • www.anzavalleyoutlook.com • The Anza Valley Outlook

A-11

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04172 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Rivera The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MOMMY FIT 40419 Amesbury Ln., Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Britney Marie Gonsalves, 40419 Amesbury Ln., Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 1/2/14 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/24/2014 LEGAL: 2085 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03907 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: EMPIRE AQUATICS 46463 Vianne Ct., Temecula, CA 92592 County: Riverside Launa Vasquez (Michelle), 46463 Vianne Ct., Temecula, CA 92592 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 5/14/2009 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/16/2014 LEGAL: 2062 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04409 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By G. Gould The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: HANGER 13 AUTO SALES 31683 Corte Rosario, Temecula, CA 92592 County: Riverside Chain Logistics Inc., 31683 Corte Rosario, Temecula, CA 92592 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/1/2014 LEGAL: 2095 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-00989 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By J. Mendoza The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. JANN BROWNE 2. LILLIE BELLE MUSIC 10727 San Miguel Rd., Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240 County: Riverside Jana Lynn Barnes, 10727 San Miguel Rd., Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 1989 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/14/2014 LEGAL: 2070 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03895 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ENGINEERING FOR KIDS 30381 Red River Cir., Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Mailing Address: 30520 Rancho California Rd., Ste 107-124, Temecula, CA 92591 Gardiner Education Inc., 30381 Red River Cir., Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/16/2014 LEGAL: 2079 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03878 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Rivera The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DANIELLA GARDEN 42200 Moraga Rd. Suite 20#H, Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Daniella Food LLC., 42200 Moraga Rd. Suite 20#H, Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/15/2014 LEGAL: 2063 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04441 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By G. Gould The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ISU INSURANCE SERVICES-CORMARC AGENCY 25220 Hancock Ave., #200, Murrieta, CA 92562 County: Riverside CorMarc Insurance Services Inc., 25220 Hancock Ave., #200, Murrieta, CA 92562 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on July 1, 2011 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/1/2014 LEGAL: 2096 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04220 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By M. Gonzales The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: NO SOL SPRAY TANNING 28751 Rancho California Rd., #A, Temecula, CA 92590 County: Riverside Mailing Address: 44602 Johnston Dr., Temecula, CA 92592 Carmen M. Nugent (Michelle), 44602 Johnston Dr., Temecula, CA 92592 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 2/8/14 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/25/2014 LEGAL: 2086 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04300 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By L. Montes The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: B & T DOOR SERVICES 30465 Novato Way, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside Jason Michael Cahalan, 30465 Novato Way, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/29/2014 LEGAL: 2087 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-01108 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By J. Mendoza The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. VILLA BLANCA PROPERTIES 2. LISA NOBLES 3. VILLA BLANCA INVESTMENTS 4. VBI PROPERTIES 5. VILLA BLANCA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 6. VILLA BLANCA REALTY 82812 Generations Dr., Indio, CA 92203 County: Riverside Serena Lisa Nobles, 82812 Generations Dr., Indio, CA 92203 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/29/2014 LEGAL: 2088 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04460 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By M. Gonzales The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: STARLINE NAILS 40428 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd., #102, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside Skyline Nails, Inc., 40428 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd., #102, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/2/2014 LEGAL: 2089 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03744 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By M. Gonzales The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. TEMEULA TOURS 2. TEMECULA BALLOON TOURS 3. TEMECULA BIKE TOURS 4. TEMECULA BICYCLE TOURS 5. TEMECULA HOME TOURS 6. TEMECULA HELICOPTER TOURS 32037 Vineyard Ave., Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Temecula Tour Company, LLC, 32037 Vineyard Ave., Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/11/2014 LEGAL: 2090 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04061 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By N. Melendez The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: VIVA LIMOUSINE 32037 Vineyard Ave., Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Temecula Tour Company, LLC, 32037 Vineyard Ave., Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above on May 2012 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/22/2014 LEGAL: 2091 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-01102 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By A. Chavez The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BUG GUYS PEST CONTROL 80173 Golden Horseshoe Dr., Indio, CA 92201 County: Riverside 1. Tracy Harley Judnich, 80173 Golden Horseshoe Dr., Indio, CA 92201 2. Jeremiah Leon Carter, 67760 Rio Arapaho Rd., Cathedral City, CA 92234 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/29/2014 LEGAL: 2092 PUBLISHED: May 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-01194 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By S. Perez The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: EL SUPER TORO LOCO #4 91200 2nd St., Mecca, CA 92254 County: Riverside Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1376, Mecca, CA 92254 Abesud (--) Halum, 49849 Harrison St., Coachella, CA 92236 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/7/2014 LEGAL: 2101 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03758 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. MACK’S HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 2. ALL AIR HVAC 39257 Via Curvado, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside William J. Mack (James), 39257 Via Curvado, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/14/2014 LEGAL: 2064 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03161 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By B. Harris The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: MY LISTING SOURCE 873 Beaumont Avenue, Beaumont, CA 92223 County: Riverside ETC Realty, 873 Beaumont Avenue, Beaumont, CA 92223 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 3/12/2014 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 3/28/2014 LEGAL: 2065 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03717 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By A. Ribac The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ALYSSA SULLI 37736 Summer Wind Ct., Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside Alyssa Leilani Sulli, 37736 Summer Wind Ct., Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above on April 1, 2014 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/11/2014 LEGAL: 2066 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03247 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: JADCO 44839 Trotsdale Drive, Temecula, CA 92592 County: Riverside Jay Estabillo Domantay, 44839 Trotsdale Dr., Temecula, CA 92592 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 3/31/2014 LEGAL: 2067 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03578 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By G. Gould The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TEMECULA CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE 27450 Ynez Rd., Ste 100, Temecula, CA 92591 County: Riverside Mailing Address: 34112 Hartwell Ct., Temecula, CA 92592 Temecula Center of Integrative Medicine LLC, 27450 Ynez Rd., Ste 100, Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/8/2014 LEGAL: 2068 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03201 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CUSTOM OFF-ROAD DESIGNS 38415 Innovation Ct., #H, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside Mailing Address: P.O. Box 891826, Temecula, CA 92589 Shari Lynn Small, 38752 Sage Rd., Hemet, CA 92544 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 12/23/2008 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 3/31/2014 LEGAL: 2069 PUBLISHED: April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04644 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Rivera The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: LUCK & LOVE MACARONS PATISSERIE & CONFISERIE 29425 Lynn Court, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside a. Lady Diannaly Sison b. Michael Joseph Sanders Both residing at: 29425 Lynn Court, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 1/15/2014 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/7/2014 LEGAL: 2102 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04212 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By G. Gould The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1. DIAMONDRO MEDIA 2. DIAMONDRO MEDIA GROUP 35942 Murano St., Murrieta, CA 92562 County: Riverside Dean (--) George, 35942 Murano St., Murrieta, CA 92562 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/25/2014 LEGAL: 2099 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-01187 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By S. Perez The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: SELAH INTEGRATIVE HEALTH AND WELLNESS 37841 Cathedral Canyon Drive, Cathedral City, CA 92234 County: Riverside Ashley Ann Chehey, 37841 Cathedral Canyon Drive, Cathedral City, CA 92234 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 5/7/2014 LEGAL: 2100 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03697 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: DRAPES AND DESIGN 329252 Winchester Rd., #107-352, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside a. Debra Ann Patterson b. Patrick William Sawchuk Both residing at 31404 Orchard Ln, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by a Married Couple Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above on 4/1/2014 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/10/2014 LEGAL: 2080 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03696 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Flores The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PATTERSON & SAWCHUK RACING 329252 Winchester Rd, #107-352, Murrieta, CA 92563 County: Riverside a. Debra Ann Patterson b. Patrick William Sawchuk Both residing at 31404 Orchard Ln, Murrieta, CA 92563 This business is conducted by a Married Couple Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above on 4/1/2014 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/10/2014 LEGAL: 2081 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03763 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Santana The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ANTHOLOGY INSPIRED PRESS 4607 Ridge Point Way, Riverside, CA 92509 County: Riverside Zoe Life Publications, Inc., 4607 Ridge Point Way, Riverside, CA 92509 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/14/2014 LEGAL: 2084 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

SUMMONS Attorney or party without attorney KEVIN L. OBERMOELLER 2182 BEGONIA CT. HEMET, CA 92545 Attorney for: SELF-REPRESENTED SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE 880 N. STATE ST. HEMET, CA 92543 CASE NUMBER: HED1301089 Petitioner: KEVIN L. OBERMOELLER Respondent: TESS M. BLACKFORD ORDER FOR PUBLICATION 1. Publication Granted: The court finds that the respondent cannot be served in any other manner specified in the California Code of Civil Procedure. The court orders that the documents listed in item 6 be served by publication as least once per week for four successive weeks in the following newspaper: Anza Valley Outlook, Valley News 6. Documents to be served by publication or posting: a. Summons (Family Law) (form FL-110) 7. If, during the 28 days of publication or posting, you locate the respondent’s address, you must have someone 18 years of age or older mail the documents listed in item 6 to the respondent along with this order. The server must complete and file with the court a Proof of Service by Mail (form FL-335). Date: 4/17/14 Signed by: Judge Stephen J. Callon PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the abovementioned Petitioner has filed a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage/Legal Separation/Nullity. You may file a written response within thirty (30) days after the date of mailing of Summons to you at your last known address of: 17373 Ryan Ave., Lake Elsinore, CA 92530. If you fail to file a written response within thirty (30) days, your default may be entered and the Court may enter a Judgment. The Judgment may include any one or all of the following orders: restraining orders, child support, custody/ visitation, spousal support and/or division of assets and debts. In addition, attorney’s fees and costs and such other relief may be granted by the Court. If you wish to seek advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, maybe filed on time.

LEGAL: 2082 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03631 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By T. Vargas The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: IRONTREE CONSULTING & MITIGATION 55900 Bach Road, Anza, CA 92539 County: Riverside Mailing Address: P.O. Box 390111, Anza, CA 92539 Irontree Management Company, 55900 Bach Road, Anza, CA 92539 This business is conducted by a Corporation This Corporation is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/9/2014 LEGAL: 2071 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03994 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By N. Medina The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: INLAND OASIS POOL SERVICE 24168 Juanita Dr., Quail Valley, CA 92587 County: Riverside Mailing Address: 28700 Sunridge Ct., Menifee, CA 92584 Deanna Rachelle Workman, 24168 Juanita Dr., Quail Valley, CA 92587 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/18/2014 LEGAL: 2072 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-00873 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By T. Brimmer The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: CAR SITTERS OF THE DESERT 48871 Via Ventura, Indio, CA 92201 County: Riverside Lorenzo C. Carrillo (Carrillo), 48871 Via Ventura, Indio, CA 92201 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/3/2014 LEGAL: 2073 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04026 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Rivera The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ZOOLIAD 28481 Rancho California Rd., #109, Temecula, CA 92590 County: Riverside Rosa Nofal (Isela), 28499 Plymouth Way, Temecula, CA 92591 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/21/2014 LEGAL: 2074 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: I-2014-00221 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By S. Romero The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TRANQUIL REIKI 392 E. Stevens Rd., #D11, Palm Springs, CA 92262 County: Riverside a. Jerri Stiles Quinn, 392 E. Stevens Rd., #D11, Palm Springs, CA 92262 b. Jamie Janine Smith, 392 E. Stevens Rd. #D16, Palm Springs, CA 92262 This business is conducted by Co-Partners Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 1/24/2014 LEGAL: 1956 PUBLISHED: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014 Error: The file date was not the same as shown on the fictitious statement. REPUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04092 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By D. Rivera The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AMERICAN EAGLE DRAIN SERVICE 33481 Furrow Ct., Wildomar, CA 92595 County: Riverside David Anthony Rivas Sr., 33481 Furrow Ct., Wildomar, CA 92595 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/22/2014 LEGAL: 2075 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-04099 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By N. Melendez The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PET SITTING PLUS OF TEMECULA VALLEY 45738 Creekside Way, Temecula, CA 92592 County: Riverside Ellen D. Lemieux (Denise), 45738 Creekside Way, Temecula, CA 92592 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/22/2014 LEGAL: 2076 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03915 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By A. Acevedo The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: TRU-HEALTH ALLIANCE, PMA 39738 Calle Azucar, Murrieta, CA 92562 County: Riverside Finding The Cause, LLC, 39738 Calle Azucar, Murrieta, CA 92562 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/16/2014 LEGAL: 2077 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: R-2014-03934 Filed Riverside County Clerk’s Office Larry W. Ward By M. Gonzales The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: OASIS LAWN SERVICE 23872 Matador Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 County: Riverside Kevin Louis Schneider, 23872 Matador Way, Murrieta, CA 92562 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious name(s) listed above. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE COUNTY CLERK OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY ON 4/17/2014 LEGAL: 2078 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014

CHANGE OF NAME ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case Number: RIC 1404090 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS Petitioner: STEFANIE HALL DENNY filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: STEFANIE HALL DENNY Proposed Name: STEPHANIE HALL DENNY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 28, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: 2 The address of the court is 4050 Main Street, Riverside, CA 92502 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Anza Valley Outlook Date: April 23, 2014 Signed: Sharon J. Waters, Judge of the Superior Court. LEGAL: 2083 PUBLISHED: May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case Number: RIC 1404427 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS Petitioner: BERTHA GUTIERREZ MARTINEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: BERTHA V. GUTIERREZ MARTINEZ Proposed Name: BELLA GUTIERREZ MARTINEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 30, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: 2 The address of the court is 30755-D Auld Rd., Murrieta, CA 92563 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Anza Valley Outlook Date: May 1, 2014 Signed: Sharon J. Waters, Judge of the Superior Court. LEGAL: 2097 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case Number: RIC 1404576 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS Petitioner: JENNIFER BLYTHE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: ADELINE DIOR LEE Proposed Name: ADELINE DIOR BLYTHE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 16, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: 2 The address of the court is 4050 Main Street, Riverside, CA 92501 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Anza Valley Outlook Date: May 6, 2014 Signed: Sharon J. Waters, Judge of the Superior Court. LEGAL: 2098 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case Number: RIC 1404707 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS Petitioner: SHANE GARRETT HORNING filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: SHANE GARRETT HORNING Proposed Name: SHANE GARRETT CURTIS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 23, 2014 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: 2 The address of the court is 4050 Main Street, Riverside, CA 92501 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Anza Valley Outlook Date: May 8, 2014 Signed: Sharon J. Waters, Judge of the Superior Court. LEGAL: 2103 PUBLISHED: May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 2014


The Anza Valley Outlook • www.anzavalleyoutlook.com • May 16, 2014

A-12

is sponsoring the

4 th A nnuAl

ARTS SHOWCASE Saturday, May 17, 2014 11:00am - 4:00pm Menifee Countryside Marketplace Food Court Between Beer Hunter and Chipotle

ENJOY A DAY FILLED WITH MUSIC, ART AND CULTURE Showcase will include music, dance, artists, and performers from Menifee and surrounding areas

Hosted by:

Menifee Countryside Marketplace Sponsored by:

Arts Council Menifee

Bringing the arts to Menifee and local artists to the public

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VALLEY

NEWS

May 16–22, 2014

Pets of the Week, B-10

B

Section

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 14, Issue 20

2013-14 Outstanding Athletes of the Year honored Four scholarships awarded, eleven Valley schools receive Sportsmanship Awards SOUTHWESTERN LEAGUE

Courtesy photos Sunbelt League Athletes of the Year: Back (L to R): Tommy Wilson (Elsinore), Alejandro Castellanos (Heritage), Ricky Ruiz (Lakeside), Ramon Benz (Paloma Valley), Osvaldo Mejia (Perris), Chris Rested (Temescal Canyon). Front: (L to R) Hailey Price (Elsinore), Nichole Chilson (Heritgae), Kianna Williams (Lakeside), Kailee Smith (Paloma Valley), Summer Traylor (Perris). Not pictured: Ashley Michalski (Temescal Canyon).

CHAPARRAL Cheyenne Coger John Baron

Tennis Football, Soccer

GREAT OAK Cadie Bates Cole Dreschler

Volleyball Soccer

MURRIETA MESA Emily Buechler Davian Neitz

Cross-country, Soccer, Track Football, Basketball, Track

MURRIETA VALLEY Paige Virgil Kevin Padlo

Water Polo Football, Basketball

TEMECULA VALLEY Sarah Spencer Parker Yocum

Volleyball Football, Wrestling

VISTA MURRIETA Kasey Calderon Aaron Ruth

Volleyball Football, Basketball, Baseball

SUNBELT LEAGUE

Southwestern League Athletes of the Year: Back (L to R): John Baron (Chaparral), Not pictured: Cole Dreschler (Great Oak), Davian Netz (Murrieta Mesa), Kevin Padlo (Murrieta Valley), Parker Yocum (Temecula Valley), Aaron Ruth (Vista Murrieta). Front (L to R): Cheyenne Cogar (Chaparral), Cadie Bates (Great Oak), Emily Buechler (Murrieta Mesa), Paige Virgil (Murrieta Valley), Sarah Spencer (Temecula Valley), Kasey Calderon (Vista Murrieta).

Paul Bandong Staff Writer The Citrus Belt Area Athletic Directors Association (CBAADA) honored 168 male and female athletes from its 84 member schools and fourteen member leagues this past Monday, May 12th, at an awards breakfast held at Cal Baptist University in Riverside. Each school selected their Athlete of the Year on the basis of athletic achievement, academic excellence, school and community

service, and character. Each Athlete of the Year received a certificate and a patch. CIF Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod gave a short welcome address acknowledging this time to celebrate “’the cream of the crop’ for their hard work, dedication, and example to others.” A new School Sportsmanship Award was announced and eleven Valley schools were among the twenty-three schools inaugural recipients: Chaparral, Great Oak, Heritage, Lakeside,

Murrieta Mesa, Murrieta Valley, Paloma Valley, Perris, Temecula Valley, Temescal Canyon, and Vista Murrieta. In addition to the twenty-four athletes named from the Southwestern and Sunbelt Leagues, four Valley athletes were among the ten recipients of a $500 scholarship awarded by the CBAADA; and for the first time ever, two were from the same school. One hundred and two student-athletes applied for the scholarships. Jasmine Garcia, a soccer player

ELSINORE Hailey Price Tommy Wilson

Tennis, Water Polo, Track Football, Basketball, Baseball

HERITAGE Nichole Chilson Alejandro Castellanos

Tennis, Softball Cross-country, Track

LAKESIDE Kiana Williams Ricky Ruiz

Basketball Soccer, Football

PALOMA VALLEY Kailee Smith Ramon Benz

Softball Football, Soccer, Track

PERRIS Summer Traylor Osvaldo Majia

Cross-country, Soccer, Track Cross-country, Track

TEMESCAL CANYON Ashley Michalski Chris Rested

Volleyball, Basketball, Softball Wrestling

from Lakeside High, will be majoring in microbiology at San Diego State University. Davis Peralta, from Elsinore High, played three sports: football, basketball, and track. He will be attending the University of Redlands to study physics and mechanical engineering. Sarah Spencer from Temecula Valley High, played volleyball and soccer. She will be studying

biology at Colorado Mesa. Parker Yocum, also from Temecula Valley High, will be wrestling and studying law at BYU. At the conclusion of the awards ceremony, student-athletes were urged to seek out the special people who helped shape their character and helped them achieve their success. “You didn’t get here all by yourself.”

Chaparral, Great Oak, and Temecula Valley Powderpuff football teams prepare for upcoming Sugar Bowl Paul Bandong Staff Writer Powderpuff football season is here and high school senior girls from all three Temecula public schools prepare for the annual Sugar Bowl by playing the junior teams at their respective schools. Chaparral and Temecula Valley played on Friday, May 9. This was the first time in four years that Chaparral juniors and seniors have played each other. The Chaparral seniors won 12-6 in double overtime. The Temecula Valley seniors held on to win 14-8. The Great Oak juniors vs. seniors game is Thursday, May 15. This year’s Sugar Bowl games will be held at Great Oak High School stadium on Friday, May 16: Great Oak vs. Chaparral @ 4:30 p.m. Temecula Valley vs. Chaparral @ 5:45 p.m. Great Oak vs. Temecula Valley @ 7 p.m. Ticket prices are $3 for students and $5 for general admission. Come on out to support the girls and see who gets the Mayor’s Cup for the very first Powderpuff Football Temecula City Championship. Chaparral seniors win in double overtime Prior to the game, Alex Argent, head coach for the juniors team said, “We have a lot of physical

girls that play different sports; the seniors are kind of girly, too pretty to play physical enough…” The seniors proved to be up to the challenge as the game was a tough defensive battle for three quarters. In the first half, senior Lorena Ruiz gained 35 yards on a reverse; Stephanie Martinez zig-zagged her way down to the 20 before a fumble ended their drive. Junior Rebecca Branch caught the first pass of the game for six yards. Teammate Mariah Young ran a QB sweep left for 30yards. Despite these few moments of offense, the half ended in a scoreless tie. Junior Micaela Presgrove intercepted a Christine Williams’ pass and returned it 42 yards before being stopped at the one-yard line. Stephanie Martinez scored on a quarterback sweep play to give the juniors a 6-0 lead with 1:11 left in the third quarter. Branch’s interception in the fourth quarter ended a six-play 43-yard drive by the seniors that ate up more than six minutes of the clock. The juniors were unable to move the ball and gave the ball up on downs to the seniors at their own 20. The seniors took advantage of good field position with a sweep by #88 and a TD run by #7 (rosters/names not available). The score was tied 6-6 with 1:23 left in the game. The juniors moved 45 yards on a catch and run by Mariah Young, but an interception by Martinez with 54 seconds left ended regulation and

sent the game into overtime. Each team was allowed two plays from the five-yard line. The juniors had the ball first. Neither team was able to score and the game went into a second overtime. The seniors scored on a pass play to Ruiz; the juniors fumbled on their second possession giving the victory to the seniors, 12-6. Temecula Valley seniors hang on for 14-8 win Juniors coach Griffin Doran said, “We look good, feel good, play good…and that transfers from coaches to players. This game should be fun and physical – there’s a little bad blood – but we’re expecting to win. We’re crafty.” Seniors coach Garrison Flores was expecting “a good, but close game. We have some fast girls and we’re expecting to win.” The seniors forced the juniors to punt on their first possession and proceeded to march down the field making three first downs until Tiffany Jackson intercepted a Sam Capuzzi pass at the 18-yard line. Two plays later, senior Marissa Laster intercepted a pass and returned it to the 21 to end the first quarter. Ten seconds into the second quarter, senior QB Capuzzi connected with Lorena Regalado on a post pass for a 21-yard TD and a 6-0 lead. Capuzzi outran the defense to the left pylon for the

see POWDERPUFF, page B-4

Suzanne O’Hara photos Senior quarterback Sam Capuzzi sprints past the Temecula Valley juniors defense in last week’s Seniors vs. Juniors Powderpuff game. The seniors won 14-8.

Peyton D’Andrea (16), quarterback for Temecula Valley’s junior Powderpuff team, passes the ball to a wide open receiver in last week’s 14-8 loss to the seniors.


The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

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Business

Keep a lid on vacation costs price matches the initial quote. I’ve seen fares jump $50 or more in just minutes or had the seat I was booking suddenly become unavailable. A few additional tips: * Follow and “like” airlines and ticketing sites on Facebook and Twitter. They’ll often share sales, discounts and promotional codes with their followers. * If the airfare goes down after you’ve purchased your ticket, ask the airline or ticketing site to refund the difference – it couldn’t hurt to ask. * Print and carry a copy of your airline’s Contract of Carriage, which outlines your rights and the airline’s obligations should your flight be cancelled or delayed for reasons besides weather or other “acts of God.” * Consider vacation rentals listed on sites like Airbnb.com, VRBO. com and HomeAway.com. You

Jason Alderman Special to the Valley News Summer vacation is right around the corner. I’m not a big believer in pre-planning every single detail – sometimes the best vacation moments are spontaneous. But unless your rich uncle is paying for the trip, you’ll need to do a certain amount of preparation or your budget will fly out the window. You do have a vacation budget, right? If not, here are a few suggestions for creating one and some cost-saving ideas to help keep expenses down. First, be realistic about what you can afford. If your vacation will take more than a month or two to pay off, you may want to scale back on this year’s trip and start setting aside money now for next year. When building a trip budget, try to anticipate all potential expenses.

Consider things like: * Airfare-related expenses. Include taxes and fees for items like changing flights, extra leg room, priority boarding, Wi-Fi access, meals, and checked, oversized or overweight baggage. * Kayak.com, Airfarewatchdog. com and Travelnerd.com provide handy charts that compare various fees for popular airlines; however, always double-check the airline’s own posted rules before booking your flight. * Transportation to and from the airport – at home and all travel locations. * Car rentals. Factor in taxes, gas, fill-up penalties and insurance (check your auto insurance and credit card policies to ensure you don’t pay for duplicate coverage). * Hotel/lodging. Don’t forget taxes and other local fees, charges for

phone/Internet, room service, early check-in or departure, gratuities, etc. * Hotel room rates often are based on double occupancy. Although kids usually can stay for free, many hotels charge extra for additional adults. * Entertainment. Include meals and snacks, event admission and ticket-ordering charges, transit passes or taxis, sporting equipment rental, babysitters, and special clothing or accessory requirements (sunscreen, hiking boots, etc.) * Throw in an extra 10 or 15 percent for unanticipated expenses – lost luggage, flat tire, etc. Search for deals on flights, hotels and rental cars at comparison sites like Orbitz.com, Kayak. com, Priceline.com, Hotwire. com, Hotels.com and Travelzoo. com. But beware, before clicking “confirm,” make sure the final

Menifee Small Business Development Center to host state payroll tax workshop May 20 MENIFEE – Menifee’s Small Business Development Center is hosting a free workshop for small business owners and entrepreneurs about California employment tax compliance. The State Payroll Tax Workshop, scheduled for Tues., May 20, from 9 to 11:30 a.m., offers an overview of California payroll reporting requirements for small businesses. A representative from the State of California Employment Development Department will provide a hands-on approach to calculating and completing state payroll tax. The free workshop will be held at the Menifee Chamber of Commerce upstairs conference room located at 29737 New Hub Drive,

Suite 102. Seating is limited and pre-registration is recommended. Participants may pre-register online at www.iesmallbusiness.com or by calling (951) 781-2345. This workshop is hosted by the Menifee Small Business Development Center, a free resource offering business support services, workshops and classes to Menifee small business owners. The Menifee SBDC also offers one-on-one counseling sessions on the first and third Tuesday of the month to assist with specific small business related inquiries. It is located inside the Menifee Valley Chamber of Commerce. The Small Business Development Center is part of the City of Menifee’s Business Development

Program that provides additional resources for the community’s small businesses to help them grow and succeed. It’s paid for by the City of Menifee, hosted by the Menifee Valley Chamber of Commerce, and run by the Inland Empire Small Business Development Center (IESBDC) which is based at Cal State San Bernardino’s Inland Empire Center for Entrepreneurship. For more than 20 years, the IESBDC has provided business assistance to small businesses and entrepreneurs. For additional information, contact City of Menifee Management Analyst Brian Oulman at boulman@cityofmenifee.us or (951) 672-6777.

can often find cheaper accommodations with more space and amenities than hotels offer. * Before booking a hotel room online, call the individual property to see if they can beat the company’s posted rate. Also ask for member discounts for organizations you belong to like AAA or AARP. Practical Money Skills for Life, a free personal financial management program run by Visa Inc., has a handy web-based travel calculator that can help you estimate travel costs and rejigger them to meet your budget needs (www.practicalmoneyskills.com/calculators). Bottom line: A little preplanning now can ensure you don’t blow your whole budget on unexpected vacation expenses. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s financial education programs.

City of Temecula welcomes EMD Millipore business expansion TEMECULA – The City of Temecula is pleased to welcome the business expansion of one of its prized life science companies, EMD Millipore. EMD Millipore has finalized plans to lease close to 38,000 square feet of additional building space in Temecula’s Business Park. In total, the organization will have nearly 150,000 square feet, spread across three buildings, dedicated to the development, manufacturing and distribution of biologics and chemicals. “Temecula is a strategic site for EMD Millipore and continues to be a center of excellence for biologic reagent manufacturing,” said Chris Ross, head of operations for EMD Millipore. “Bringing together the production power and intellectual capabilities of our San Diego facility as we consolidate operations into our Temecula campus will help to foster innovation and growth in our Bioscience business, and create new career development opportunities for employees. This investment reaffirms the company’s long term commitment to maintaining and enhancing our presence in Southern California.” This expansion, led locally by Fabien Marino, the operations site head for Temecula and San

Diego, will bring over 100 jobs to the city, bringing the total number of employees at EMD Millipore’s Temecula site to more than 350. C i t y o f Te m e c u l a M a y o r Maryann Edwards said, “EMD Millipore’s decision to grow in Temecula is a huge asset to our community. The expanded footprint and creation of jobs offers tremendous economic value and will serve to further strengthen and synergize our existing bioscience industry cluster.” Headquartered in Billerica, Massachusetts, EMD Millipore – a division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany – has nearly 10,000 employees in 66 countries. With a portfolio of 60,000 products, the company offers a broad spectrum of proven tools and technologies, together with performance solutions innovations, dedicated to helping customers succeed in the research, development and production of biotechnology and pharmaceutical drug therapies.Comprised of three business areas – bioscience, lab solutions, and process solutions – EMD Millipore is a top tier supplier to the life science industry, and serves as a strategic partner for scientists, engineers, and researchers.

Switch jobs with grace and decorum INLAND EMPIRE – Women leave jobs for various reasons. Some women cite disparities in pay, an inability to advance through the company or incompatibility with a particular place of business as their reasons for seeking new employment, while others leave jobs to take time off for family obligations, only to reenter the workforce at a later time. The Bureau of Labor Statistics say the average person changes jobs 10 to 15 times (with an average of 11 job changes) over the course of a career. Reports about employees in Fortune 500 companies have found while women make up nearly 50 percent of these companies, they represent just 7.5 percent of top earners. Dissatisfaction with their income encourages some women to look for greener pastures. Transitioning between jobs is common, but professionals can take certain steps to ensure their transition works out for them and does not burn any bridges along they way. * Have a definitive reason for leaving. It’s foolish to change jobs on a whim. Be clear about why you are leaving and whether problems can be remedied by speaking up or if leaving for another company really is the best solution. Having firm reasons for your resignation will enable you to leave with more confidence and conviction. * Provide enough notice to the company. If you have been working in a particularly poor environment, it may be tempting to run out the door even before your written resignation has finished printing. This may not bode well for future recommendations and leave your name tarnished within the industry. Instead, give ample notice and find a mutually acceptable window of time in which your position will

be filled. While two weeks is standard, some positions may require more or less time. It’s best not to drag your exit out too long though. * Meet with your boss first. Don’t let a boss find out about your intentions to leave the company through the workplace gossip mill. It is always more professional to keep plans to yourself and show your boss the respect of hearing about your decision to leave first. Do so in person and not over the phone or via email. * Continue to do your job to the best of your abilities. Giving notice is not a ticket to goofing off or participating in an office vacation. Slacking off damages good will and is a surefire way to burn some bridges. Put in your best effort until the day you leave the company behind. * Avoid making negative comments. When discussing your reasons for leaving, be diplomatic but honest. Similarly, do not talk poorly about your former job to your new employer. You may inadvertently portray yourself as a disgruntled employee. Furthermore, word travels fast within many industries, and a loose tongue may compromise future networking opportunities. * Maintain decorum even if it was not your idea to leave. Being fired or downsized can hurt, particularly when you thought you were doing a good job. Remain cool and always be professional. How you conduct yourself when facing adversity could speak well to your future employers. William Shakespeare may have said that a person is remembered for his entrances and exits, and this is particularly true in the workforce. When it is time to leave an employment position for a new one, do so with grace and humility.


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

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Sports

Chaparral’s Jedaki Hill sets new triple jump record for Pumas JP Raineri Multimedia Editor True track and field fans, and of course family members, of those that participate know the dedication that an athlete must bring to each competition and event during the season. For the family of Jedaki Hill, a senior triple jumper from Chaparral High School’s track and field team, they couldn’t be prouder of his most recent accomplishments. At their meet against Murrieta Valley earlier this month, Jedaki broke Chaparral’s long standing triple jump record, which was 45’1″, bringing it to 45’10″. “The work ethic that Jedaki has is textbook of what happens when you put your mind to competing to be the best at what you do,” said head track and field coach Martin Dinsenbacher, who went on to say, “He literally added over three feet to the end of his jumps, from the beginning of the season to now, and that is a true testament to what hard work will do for you. He earned that record, most certainly.” Hill moved to the Temecula area in 2005 where he has been raised by mother Elisha, alongside sister Jenesis, who is also on the Pumas track and field team. “Jedaki has always been a very kind, energetic, and humble person,” said Elisha. “At the time in life where most kids are trying to find themselves, Jedaki has

Senior Jedaki Hill broke Chaparral’s long standing triple jump record with a jump of 45’10″.  The previous record was 45’1″.

confidently identified himself as a person who stands up for what is right, is loyal, and believes in doing what is right even if it is the hard thing to do.” Jedaki began running track in Oceanside for the North County Stallions track team where he was a sprinter. When moving up to Temecula he stopped and began pursuing basketball at the encouragement of others because of his height. While basketball may have seemed like the natural gravitation for someone of his stature, it never quite seemed to fit his independent free spirit and he began running again for Chaparral’s track team. He eventually took an interest in jumps and since then has found a sport he felt he could truly immerse himself in. Standing at about 6’4” Jedaki is not only a member of the Pumas

track and field team, but is also an outstanding student. His current GPA is 4.0. He enjoys history the most and excels at math. “My family has supported me through thick and thin when it comes to sports and academics. I set many goals that they held me to and now that I have recently reached and accomplished one of my goals this year, which was to get the Chaparral High School triple jump record, I’m excited to see what I can do as the remainder of the year comes into play,” said Jedaki. While Jedaki is now a recordsetting triple jumper for Chaparral High School, occasionally you can find him high jumping or long jumping as well. Jedaki’s goals after high school are to go abroad for a short spell, starting with family he has in the Netherlands and eventu-

Courtesy photos

Jedaki Hill, a senior on the Pumas track and field team, is not only a record setting triple jumper but is also a 4.0 student at Chaparral.

ally traveling throughout Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

To comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

HS softball: Undefeated Nighthawks named 2014 Southwestern League Champions

CIF Southern Section Championships schedules

Bishop’s three home runs powers Murrieta Valley past Chaparral 24-2

Swimming and Diving Diving prelims took place this week at the Riverside Aquatics Complex on the campus of Riverside City College. Finals will be held in conjunction with swimming finals for each division. Division 4 Prelims were Wednesday, 9 am; Division 3 is at 4 pm. Division1 Prelims are Thursday at 9:00 am; Division 2 begins 9:00 am on Friday. Championships start with Division 3 on Thursday at 5 pm. Division 4 starts at 5 pm on Friday. Saturday championships begin with Division 2 at 10:00 am and Division 1 at 5:00 pm. Swimming and diving team points will be combined to determine divisional team champions. Track and Field Track and Field Prelims feature

Clary photo The Murrieta Valley Nighthawks have gone undefeated in league this year and with two games left in the regular season have clinched the title of Southwestern League Champions.

with Nicole Johnson aboard. She had two hits against Sanchez. The Nighthawks will finish out the regular season against Temecula  Valley  this week and the Pumas will face a very tough Vista Murrieta team who are 4-4 and need to sweep Chaparral to stay in the hunt for a CIF SS Playoff spot.

Another All Star joins the Fletcher Jones Team.

Southwestern League Standings Team League Overall Murrieta Valley 8-0 19-7 Chaparral 5-3 19-10 Great Oak 3-3 11-11 Vista Murrieta 4-4 16-8 Temecula Valley 2-4 7-13 Murrieta Mesa 0-8 8-18-1

Storm battle for first as ‘geeks’ take over the stadium Tyler Zickel Assistant Director of Storm Media Relations

Vincent Troncoso -Master Certified Sales Consultant Vincent Troncoso has recently joined the Mercedes-Benz of Temecula team. Vincent has been a successful Inland Empire Mercedes-Benz sales associate for 7 years, relocating from Riverside. He has received multiple Top Performer Awards and is master certified by Mercedes-Benz. He's a devoted steward of the three-pointed star and last year shared his passion for the Mercedes-Benz brand with more than 400 new owners.

MERCEDES-BENZ OF TEMECULA A

Courtesy photo

The Storm will continue to battle for the top spot in the South Division of the California League after dropping five of their last six games.

GEEKend, a weekend long celebration of geek culture. Friday will be Superhero Night, where you can dress up as your favorite superhero, win movie passes and enjoy postgame fireworks. Saturday will be Star Wars Night. Admission is free to all those who dress as their favorite Star Wars Character and there will be a meet and greet with Star Wars characters. Sunday will be the first ever Ren“Eye”sance Day, where the concourse will transform into a renaissance fair and there will be

a first-ever post-game renaissance battle on the field, the first in the history of Minor League Baseball. In addition to the festivities, the Storm is working with Get Well Gamers to host a used video game drive. Get Well Gamers help acquire video games and systems for kids who are in the hospital. Donate and used game or game system and receive free Storm tickets. For all information regarding games, game times and upcoming promotions visit stormbaseball. com or call (951) 245-HITS.

F L E T C H E R

J O N E S

C O M P A N Y

40910 Temecula Center Drive • www.mbtemecula.com

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The Lake Elsinore Storm ended April with a seven-game winning streak headed into May battling for the top spot in the South Division of the California League. Starting pitcher Joe Ross, whose brother Tyson Ross plays for the San Diego Padres, recently received Pitcher of the Week honors in the Cal League after recording his second win of the season, going six innings while recording nine strikeouts in the 1-0 victory over the Visalia Rawhide (Diamondbacks affiliate) at The Diamond. Ross is currently one of the top prospects for the Padres and is fifth overall in the League with a combined 35 strikeouts in 38 innings pitched posting a 2.58 ERA. As of Tuesday, May 13 the Storm are 20-17 and just one game back of the league leading Lancaster JetHawks (Astros affiliate) and will take to the road for a three-game series against the Inland Empire 66’ers this week with their next home series starting Friday, May 16 – Thursday, May 22. On May 16, the Storm kickoff

Boys Volleyball The 2014 CIF Southern SectionFord Boys Volleyball Championships will be held Saturday, May 24 at Cerritos College. Playoffs are already underway in five divisional single-elimination tournaments conducted at host sites.

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Charles McKee Sports Writer The Murrieta Nighthawks jumped all over Chaparral Thursday afternoon, May 8 and clinched the Southwestern League Title with a convincing 24-2 victory. The game was halted after five innings of play. Murrieta’s Olivia Sanchez gave up two runs on four hits and struck out eight Pumas on her way to her seventh victory of the season. Chaparral’s Karissa Frazier, one of the top pitchers in the league, lasted only two and a two third innings. She gave up nine runs on eight hits and wound up with the loss. Murrieta Valley’s explosive offense was led by sophomore twin sisters Autumn and Amber Bishop. Amber hit three home runs while going a perfect 5-for-5 at the plate and knocked in six runs for the Nighthawks. Her sister Autumn went 5-for-6 with a home run and also had six RBIs. Kiylee Chenault was 4-for-5 with a double and drove in four runs for Murrieta Valley. Stephanie Moreno had three hits, scored twice and had an RBI against the Pumas. The only Puma offense came off the bat of junior Cheyenne Balzer who homered in the first inning

four meets that each qualify nine finalists in all events (16 boys and 16 girls) for the 2014 CIF-Southern Section Ford Divisional Championship Meet, presented by Farmers, to be held Saturday, May 24 at Falcon Stadium at Cerritos College. All meets begin on Saturday, May 17. Field events begin at 11 am; running events at noon. Division 1 is at Trabuco Hills High School; Division 2 is at Moorpark HS; Division 3 is at Estancia HS; Division 4 is at Carpinteria HS.

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

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Sports

Last week’s recap, plus key final week baseball matchups in Southwestern League Rams, Pumas and Nighthawks seek to be spoilers against Bears, Broncos and Wolfpack

Mike Clary photos The Broncos are tied for second with Temecula Valley and are just one game behind league leading Great Oak with two games left to play.

Mitch Hayes scores the game’s only run on a passed ball in the second inning. Great Oak now stands alone at the top of the standings in the Southwestern League.

Charles Mckee, JP Raineri Sports Writers The Southwestern League enters its final week of the 2014 baseball season and the race for the championship boils down to a few key matchups this week. Three teams are separated by a single victory and they all must continue to win to come out on top. Here is a look at what happened last week with the local teams: Great Oak - 10 : Temecula Valley - 2 Great Oak 1 : Temecula Valley - 0 Great Oak took sole possession of first place and now sports a 9-4 record. They have won their last three games in a row, including last week’s two game sweep of Temecula Valley. The Golden Bears fell into a tie for second place with Vista Murrieta as a result of the losses. The Golden Bears and Broncos are both 8-5. Great Oak will face the struggling last place Murrieta Mesa Rams who will try to spoil the Wolfpack’s hopes of holding on to first place. The Golden Bears will have their hands full this week as they travel to Murrieta Valley to face the Nighthawks. MVHS is in fourth place with a 7-6 record after dropping three out of the last four games. Temecula Valley’s big bats have only scored four runs in the last three games and will be needed against the Nighthawks. They have lost three in a row. Vista Murrieta - 10 : Murrieta Mesa - 1 Vista Murrieta – 5 : Murrieta Mesa - 1 Vista Murrieta (18-6, 8-5) powered past Murrieta Mesa to stay in the hunt for the league championship. The Broncos are tied for second with Temecula Valley and

are just one game behind league leading Great oak with two games left to play. The Broncos have won their last four games and have come thundering back into the Southwestern League race. Vista Murrieta started the season 0-3 losing consecutive league games to Temecula Valley, Great Oak and Murrieta Valley. They have been 8-1 since, losing only to the Golden Bears. Murrieta Mesa is looking to rebound from five straight losses and become the spoiler against the Wolfpack this week in the race for first place in the Southwestern league. The Ram offense needs to come back to life and their pitching has to toughen up to beat number one Great Oak. The Broncos last two games of the regular season will be against Chaparral who are in fifth place in the Southwestern league and are coming off a huge 6-4 upset over Murrieta Valley that essentially knocked the Nighthawks out of the race for first place. The Pumas lost 14-5 in their only game against Vista Murrieta this season. M u r r i e t a Va l l e y - 2 : Chaparral - 0 Chaparral - 6 : Murrieta Valley – 4 Even though Murrieta Valley took the series two games to one, the Pumas put a huge wrinkle in the Nighthawks plans at winning a league championship last Thursday with a come from behind victory in the last inning. Murrieta Valley built a 4-0 lead with two runs in the second and two more in the third, but Chaparral’s pitching and defense stiffened in the fourth and shut out the Nighthawks for the rest of the game. The Pumas kept chipping away at Murrieta’s lead, scoring two in the fifth and another run in the sixth off of a solo home run by junior Bhret Bewley to trail 3-4.

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Chaparral rallied for three runs in their last at bat when junior Gavin Johns launched an RBI ground Rule double to score the go ahead run and stun the Nighthawks in front of the home town crowd. The Pumas used four pitchers in the game against Murrieta Valley

and it was junior Marc Saucedo who ended up with the win. Cody Cruz got stuck with the loss for Murrieta Valley. Bewley sparked the Puma offense with a 2-for-4 performance at the plate alongside Senior Buddy Sokach, who also had two hits in four at bats and scored and drove in a run against the Nighthawks. Murrieta Valley seniors, Shad Soto went 3-for-3, scored and drove in a run and James Schmidt doubled in another run for Murrieta Valley. Junior Aaron Shackelford knocked in two runs for the Nighthawks. The Nighthawks final two

games of the regular season will be against Temecula Valley who is tied for second place with the Broncos in the Southwestern League with an 8-5 record. They trail Great Oak by a game. Southwestern League Standings Team

League Overall

Great Oak Temecula Valley Vista Murrieta Murrieta Valley Chaparral Murrieta Mesa

9-4 19-6 8-5 17-7 8-5 18-6 7-6 15-10 4-9 11-13 3-10 8-16

Six Valley boys’ tennis teams in CIF-SS playoffs Paul Bandong Staff Writer Pairings for the 2014 CIF Southern Section-Ford Boys Team Tennis Championships, presented by Farmers were released this week. Competition among the 201 entries got underway Tuesday with wild card contests. Six Valley teams will be competing in playoffs. Round One was Wednesday, May 14; Round Two is Friday, May 16. Quarter Finals are Monday, May 19; Semi Finals are Wednesday, May 21. All matches are scheduled for a 3 pm start. Finals will be held Friday May 23 at the Claremont Club; 11 am start time. DIVISION 3 (32-Team Bracket with 38 entries). Top seeds are: Placentia/Valencia (19-1), Empire League Champion San Luis Obispo (21-2), PAC-7 League Champion Cypress (17-3), Empire League Runner-up

Aliso Niguel (11-1), Sea View League Champion #6 Great Oak (19-1) was undefeated in Southwestern League (10-0). They are ranked behind Oaks Christian. Round One: Temecula Valley, Southwestern #3 travels to Rancho Cucamonga, Baseline #1. Winner faces winner of (Arroyo Grande, PAC 7 #2 vs Torrance, Pioneer #2) Vista Murrieta, Southwestern #2 hosts Oakwood, Liberty #2. Winner most likely faces #4 Aliso Niguel, Sea View #1 Great Oak, Southwestern #1 hosts winner of Wild Card “E” (Lakewood, Moore #3 vs Los Osos, Baseline At-Lg). Winner most likely faces Buckley, Liberty #1. DIVISION 4 (32-Team Bracket, 47 entries). Top seeds are:

league Champion Cate (11-5), Condor league Champion Redlands (13-4), Citrus Belt League Champion Santiago/Corona (15-2), Big VIII League Champion Heritage (14-5) was undefeated in Sunbelt League (10-0). Wild Card Round, Tuesday May 13. “G” Elsinore, Sunbelt #2 hosts Rancho Verde, Inland Valley #4. Winner faces Santiago, Big VIII #1. “H” Temescal Canyon, Sunbelt #3 travels to Burroughs, Desert Sky #2. Winner faces Redlands, Citrus Belt #1. Round One: Wednesday, May 14 Heritage, Sunbelt #1 hosts winner of Wild Card “N” (Downey, San Gabriel Valley #2 vs Vista Del Lago, Inland Valley At-Lg)

JW North (17-1), Inland Valley

POWDERPUFF, from page B-1 successful PAT and an 8-0 lead. The juniors turned the ball over on downs. The seniors started another drive but junior Sydney Magnin, a center defender for the TV girls varsity soccer team, intercepted a Capuzzi pass on a 4-and-9 play. Two plays later, senior Marissa Muñoz intercepted a pass by junior QB Peyton D’Andrea. With 3:50 left in the half, Capuzzi used her speed to score on a 44 yard QB keeper to give the seniors a 14-0 lead. The PAT attempt was fumbled. Five of the half’s 14 penalties occurred in the final three minutes of the half. Katelyn Ellis’ 23 – yard zig-zag run brought the ball down to the 18-yard line with 14 seconds left. The seniors used all three timeouts, but were unable to capitalize before the end of the half. There were four changes of possession in the third quarter as both defenses stiffened. Juliana Light came in at QB for the juniors and heaved a 30-yard pass on the money to Alexis Smith who raced another 33 yards for a 63-yard TD play to cut the seniors’ lead to 14-6 with 2:36 left in the quarter. Light scored up the middle for a successful PAT, 14-8. In the final quarter, the juniors turned the ball over on downs to the seniors at the 9:52 mark. The seniors earned four first downs driving down to the 16-yard line, eating up almost seven minutes of clock before the juniors stopped them with 3:03 left. The senior defense held as Kaitlyn Williams batted down the last pass attempt to end the game. “The girls are great!” exclaimed Coach Flores. “They have worked

JP Raineri photos Kristen Williams, senior quarterback for Chaparral, hands off to Stephanie Perez who tried to sneak past the juniors defense. The seniors won 12-6 in overtime.

The juniors defense was tough as senior quarterback Kristen Williams (45) gets a pass off before having her flags pulled in last weeks 12-6 overtime win at Chaparral High School.

hard and deserve the victory. Last year we used playbooks to show the plays; this year they all memorized the plays. Shout-outs to Nicole Robertson for that diving catch – it should have been ruled a catch – to

Sam Capuzzi for managing the offense and for the entire defense for allowing only one touchdown all night. We played well, but we will need to play better in the Sugar Bowl.”


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

B-5

Sports

Wildcats undefeated in Sunbelt League Paloma Valley on quest for CIF Title

Courtesy photo Paloma Valley boys varsity volleyball team went undefeated in the Sunbelt League and are ranked #8 in Division 3 of the CIF Southern Section.

Paul Bandong Staff Writer In the final polls, Paloma Valley boys varsity volleyball team (176, 12-0), the undefeated Sunbelt League champion, is ranked #8 in Division 3 of the CIF Southern

live · work · play Don’t miss a beat on what is happening throughout the Temecula Valley, including Murrieta, Temecula, Wildomar, Menifee, Sun City, Anza, Aguanga, and Lake Elsinore. Whether it is breaking news, local youth spor ts, or information on events and activities, you will find it quickly and easily at

myvalleynews.com Check it out. Often.

VALLEY

NEWS

723-7319

760

Section. Coach Katie Bradley returned this year to coach the Wildcats who were 18-9 and second in league at

8-2 last year. The 2012 team was 24-5 and 10-0 in league, losing in the second round of playoffs. The team is led by senior Justin Ramos (230 kills) and junior David Hamilton (240 kills). Middle blocker, junior Armando Fuentes leads the team in blocks with 51. Ramos, Hamilton and Darren Fabricante account for 443 of the team’s 886 digs (53%). Fabricante leads the team with 636 of the team’s 809 assists. The team has recorded 148 aces and 128 blocks with 12 kills and 12.1 digs per set. The Wildcats’ quest for a CIF Southern Section title begins with Division 3 play as they host Paramount, San Gabriel Valley 3# (1112) on Tuesday, May 13. They will advance to the second round of play on Thursday, May 13 to face the winner of #9 Culver City (10-4), Ocean League #1 vs Oxnard (11-15), Pacific View League #3.

The quarterfinals matchup on Saturday, May 17th, will most likely be against #1-seed South Pasadena (13-2) Rio Hondo League #1. Hemet West Valley (13-3), Sun-

belt #2 opens at Gahr (22-5), San Gabriel Valley #2. Hemet (15-8), Sunbelt #3 travels to Warren (11-3), San Gabriel Valley #1. Finals will be held Saturday, May 24 at Cerritos College.

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

B-6

Dining &

Entertainment i n t h E Va l l E y

Dead Man’s Party performs tribute to Oingo Boingo this Saturday

Courtesy photos

Dead Man’s Party.

ead Man’s Party will be performing this Saturday, May 17, at Mount Palomar Winery in beautiful Temecula wine country. Doors open at 6 pm. Tickets are available for $20 each or $25 each on the day of the show. Tickets can be purchased online at heyday.com/Heyday/DMP. html. There are various specials available as well for reserved tables or larger groups. Mount Palomar Winery is located at 33820 Rancho California Road in Temecula. For over a decade tribute band Dead Man’s Party has been bringing Oingo Boingo tunes live the way you remember then from the original Oingo Boingo shows. This eight-piece band has been fashioned after the original Oingo Boingo line-up. They feature a three-piece horn section, guitar, bass, keys, drums and a frontman so convincing that audience members sometimes believe they are actually watching Danny Elfman himself. Not only has Dead Man’s Party been “Elfo-Approved” by Oingo Boingo founder and Dead Man’s Party supporter Richard Elfman, but the band has even been joined

D

on stage by former Oingo Boingo band members such as John Avila, Steve Bartek and Johnny “Vatos” Hernandez. Dead Man’s Party notes that Danny Elfman has said that he would not reunite the band Oingo Boingo, which is why they exist. Dead Man’s Party is dedicated to recreating the Oingo Boingo experience. They work hard to deliver music true-as-possible to its original sound. Dead Man’s Party always delivers a high-energy, “in your face” performance. They promise not to disappoint. Expect to hear

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Grilled vegetables are a sizzling complement to summer dishes

Courtesy photo

Grilled zucchini rolls.

One of the highlights of the summer season is the incredible bounty of fresh produce, and grilling these vegetables gives them a smoky, delicious dimension. Chef BBQ Naz, a grilling expert, shares some simple tips for flavor perfection. When preparing vegetables, slice them to expose as much of the vegetable to the grill surface as you can. Coat vegetables with olive oil before placing them on the grill. This will help prevent them from sticking to the grill. Use the right tool for the job. Accessories like grill toppers and skewers are perfect for keeping smaller foods like cherry tomatoes and onions from rolling around or falling through the grate. Don’t leave vegetables unattended. Vegetables are delicate and can easily overcook if not monitored. Grill extras. Leftover grilled vegetables are great in soups, salads, sandwiches and on pizzas and pasta. When grilling vegetables, consider this popular recipe. Grilled Zucchini Rolls Ingredients • 3 medium zucchinis, sliced 1/4-inch thick, lengthwise • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 4 ounces chevre (soft goat

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cheese), at room temperature • Pinch of freshly ground black pepper • Pinch of kosher salt • 2 tablespoons sun-dried tomatoes, oil-packed and minced • 1 teaspoon oil from the sundried tomatoes • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, minced • 2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese, freshly grated Directions Preheat the grill on medium. Brush both sides of sliced zucchini with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Place on the grill and cook for 4 minutes per side. When cooked, set on a wire rack to cool. In a small bowl, combine the chevre, salt, pepper, sun-dried tomatoes, oil and thyme. Using a small spatula, spread the cheese mixture thinly over one side of the zucchini. Lightly roll the zucchini, and place seam side down on a small, parchment-lined baking sheet. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Place baking sheet on top rack of the grill for 15 minutes. Remove to a platter and serve. Additional recipes and a complete vegetable grilling guide can be found at www.broilkingbbq.com.

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May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

B-7

Dining &

Valley Fort Steakhouse – a beef lover’s paradise!

At Valley Fort Steakhouse, the 7 oz. “Petite Cowgirl” is a tender, delicious cut perature of prime rib served with a hot baked potato and steamed vegetables.

nd black

ied tomaminced he sun-

Nathalie Taylor Special to the Valley News

experience. Dinners are served with steamed broccoli and sweet carrots, as well as with a fluffy baked potato. Prime rib is also available as a Senior Special served with a potato, vegetables, dessert, and homemade bread. Valley Fort cooks create a variety of soup-of-the-day choices. One choice – Tomato Bisque – is a smooth, velvety soup with a heavy tomato flavor and delicious hints of onion, carrots and basil. When you swing open the doors of Valley Fort, an Old West atmosphere will greet you, and might even make you forget the year is really 2014. Vintage red glass Tiffany lamps dangle from

re you “hankerin’” for a good steak? Or a “rip-roarin’” cut of me, prime rib? Valley Fort Steakhouse in Fallbrook is a beef lover’s san paradise! Savory selections of d Certified Angus Beef are just waiting for you - succulent filet medium.mignon, tender flat iron steak, rib d zucchinieye, porterhouse, top sirloin and with salt.prime rib. ook for 4 The prime rib, cooked mediumrare, is tender, flavorful, and wire rackjuicy, but add a bit of horseradish sauce and it heightens the flavor mbine theeven further. The meat is tender, un-driedwith no pesky sinew to mar the . Using a he cheese e side of l the zucide down ined bakParmesan eet on top inutes. d serve. d a comide can be bq.com. The restaurant grounds are fun to explore and add to

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the Old West theme.

The “Tomato Bisque” soup is a savory puree of tomatoes, onions, carrots, and basil.

Nathalie Taylor photos

Courtesy photo

Valley Fort Steakhouse has an authentic Old West atmosphere.

Valley Fort Steakhouse, opened the ceiling. Shelves above the American-style food. tables are cheery with antiques; The Red Dog Saloon, adjacent to by Hank and Patty Hornsveld and the walls are peppered with the dining area, has a variety of wine, in 2012, is located at 3757 S. autographed black and white craft beers and ale available. Eight Mission Rd. in Fallbrook. photos of Western movie actors. television screens are perennially For further information, In the garden area, a stream including weekly meanders through a green specials, please visit “Savory selections of Certified lawn; and Old-West-style www.thevalleyfort.com Angus Beef are just waiting for you buildings give the place a or contact them at (760) Knott’s Ghost Town feel. 728-3200. - succulent filet mignon, tender flat When my cousins from O p e n We d n e s d a y iron steak, rib eye, porterhouse, top Sweden visit I am going to through Saturday, 3:30 sirloin and prime rib.” make sure that Valley Fort p.m. to closing, and is one of our restaurant Sunday 9 a.m. to closing. destinations. It’s a novel taste tuned to the NFL Channel and Valley Fort can accommodate of the Old West; and the hearty ESPN. Live music fills the air on large parties and also offers an fare is just good “down-home” Friday and Saturday nights. outdoor wedding venue.

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

B-8

Health

Acne affects both adolescents and adults Debi Foli Special to the Valley News

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Graduation is right around the corner and teenagers will be faced with the added stress of achieving physical perfection. However for many, feeling beautiful or handsome in their caps and gowns will face one major obstacle – acne. Skin blemishes affect the majority of adolescents, and can be a major source of embarrassment. But it isn’t just teens who are troubled by this matter, one in five American adults suffer from acne as well. People spend a lot of time and money to try and solve their acne problem – over the counter creams, lotions, washes, trips to the dermatologist and prescriptions. However, during this process, the cause of the inflammatory bacterial condition of the skin (known as acne vulgaris) is often overlooked. “Guidelines of Care for Acne Vulgaris Management,” put forth by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, outlines systematic protocols and a provisional roadmap for treatment, steering doctors towards many harmful prescription medications. It’s a rare instance for a dermatologist to stray from these guidelines, referring to the diet to address the cause. One of the common acne medications, known as Accutane, has dangerous side effects which a doctor should warn about. Acne is primarily a disease of the western world and can respond well to natural treatment. Unhealthy cultural dietary habits mixed with exposure to toxic environmental elements contribute to not only diseases and obesity, but bacterial skin conditions as well. The average American’s diet contains high amounts of sugar and refined carbohydrates. These products can lead to insulin spikes which activate growth hormones. Growth hormones (most commonly testosterone) can trigger sebum (skin oil) production that the glands cannot secrete fast enough. This leads to blockages in the hair follicle and thus acne. Dietary recommendations for acne *Avoid sugar and refined foods: In a study published in the American

Journal of Clinical Nutrition, young men with acne problems placed on lowglycemic diets for 12 weeks, showed significant improvements in acne and insulin sensitivity. *Avoid dairy products: William Danby, MD, a skin expert who promotes the possible dairy-acne connection, explains that the two may be related. “Milk contains components related to the hormone testosterone that may stimulate oil glands in the skin, setting the stage for acne.” For those worried about losing a source of vitamin D and calcium, don’t worry. One can easily get more usable calcium from eating leafy greens like spinach, kale or broccoli, and almonds! *Drink plenty of water: Drink one quart of clean filtered water per 50 lbs of body weight, not to exceed three quarts. Reverse osmosis filtered water is best. To remember to drink enough water throughout the day, always try and carry a water bottle. *Know your vitamin D level: Without adequate vitamin D, a body cannot control infection, in the skin or elsewhere. On sunny days, one should get outside to expose their arms and legs to some sunshine. Supplementation with 5,000 IU of vitamin D per day can easily increase Vitamin D levels. Of course, it’s always best to test one’s vitamin D levels to know exactly how much they need to supplement. *Take a probiotic: Levels of naturally occurring, healthy bacteria can be reduced in the body by stress, poor diets, and some medications. Recent research discovered that probiotics may reduce the number of acne lesions. A 2001 study found that administering 250 mg daily of L. acidophilus and B. bifidum

improved acne and also reduced the side effects of antibiotics. The theory behind this treatment is that probiotics reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, two important causes of acne. *Take a good Omega 3/6/9 Fish Oil (EPA/DHA/GLA): High levels of testosterone can also cause acne. GLA (borage oil) provides highintensity support for hormonal balance and healthy skin. Skin is the largest organ in the human body and is often the first visual indicator of an essential fatty acid deficiency. EPA and DHA – the omega-3 essential fatty acids in fish oil – and GLA – the essential fatty acid found in borage oil and evening primrose oil—are crucial nutrients for skin health and function. These essential fatty acids (EFAs) reside in the membranes that surround skin cells, where they regulate a large number of cellular processes that directly impact skin health. There may be many other imbalances within one’s body’s chemistry or an underlying problem with their liver contributing to acne symptoms. According to article author Debi Foli, it all starts with the Symptom Survey at straightnutrition.com/tools/ symptom-survey or call (888) 8207374. The information provided in this article is for educational purposes only and contains the opinion of the writer. One’s individual health status and any required healthcare treatments can only be properly addressed by a professional healthcare provider of one’s choice.

Stroke prevention is possible through preparation, proper health care Sam DiGiovanna Fire Chief Special to the Valley News Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. It is the third leading cause of death. Each year, approximately 795,000 people suffer a stroke. However, studies show that up to 80 percent of strokes can be prevented by working with a healthcare professional to reduce personal risk. May is National Stroke Pre-

vention month and the following stroke prevention guidelines will help you learn how you may be able to lower your risk for a first stroke. Talk to your doctor about high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major stroke risk factor if left untreated. Smoking doubles the risk of stroke. It damages blood vessel walls, speeds up artery clogging, raises blood pressure and makes the heart work harder. Alcohol use has been linked to stroke in many studies. Drink only

in moderation. Cholesterol is a fatty substance in blood that is made by the body. Many people with diabetes have health problems that are also stroke risk factors. A doctor and dietician can help manage diabetes. Excess weight strains the circulatory system. Exercise five times a week. Maintain a diet low in calories, salt, saturated and trans fats and cholesterol. For additional stroke information talk to your physician and visit www.cdc.gov.

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May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

B-9

Education

Warm Springs Middle School bands achieve decade of excellence

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MURRIETA – The symphonic and intermediate bands at Warm Springs Middle School in Murrieta recently earned unanimous superiors at a competitive music festival presented by the Southern California School Band & Orchestra Association (SCSBOA). It is the 10th straight year the symphonic band earned superiors, which is the highest possible score, and nine of those years the high marks were unanimous among the three judges, including this spring. During that same 10-year stretch, the intermediate band has earned nine superiors (six of those unanimous) and one excellent, which is the second-highest score. “This is a great achievement for

the students,” said Trent Newton, director of bands at Warm Springs Middle School. During the festival, one of the selections the symphonic band performed was “Clockworks,” a colorful, rhythmic composition about clocks written specifically for the 79-member ensemble by Randy Dulaney, the band and chorus director at Vail Ranch Middle School in Temecula. Dulaney was one of Newton’s students in the early 1990s when he taught at Valley View High School in Moreno Valley. Today, Dulaney’s oldest daughter plays trumpet in the symphonic band at Warm Springs. “This was a special moment for me – the world premiere of Randy’s

Courtesy photos

work and having his daughter perform his composition,” Newton said. In all, there were 44 elementary, middle and high school bands that performed during the SCSBOA festival, which took place on March 13 at Vista Murrieta High School and March 20 Temecula Valley High School. The next performance for the Warm Springs bands will be the spring concert in the school’s multipurpose room on May 22 at 7 and 8:15 p.m. For more information about the music program at Warm Springs Middle School, and to register to participate during the upcoming school year, visit wsmsband.com.

CSU San Marcos and Mt. San Jacinto College collaborate to provide 4-year degrees to students TEMECULA – Representatives from California State University, San Marcos, the City of Temecula and Mt. San Jacinto College including CSUSM Dean Mike Schroder, Temecula City Manager Aaron Adams and MSJC Vice President Pat Schwerdtfeger celebrated a ground breaking event for their joint educational facility in downtown Temecula on Wednesday, April 30. The partnership at this site provides students with a seamless transition from the associate’s degree to the bachelor’s degree with all coursework conducted on site, locked pricing, guaranteed timeto-completion and a collaborative cohort-based model. Students interested in business administration and eligible for college-level English and math will be the first to take advantage of the new program

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Always 1-to-1! Reading Skills Math Skills Algebra I & II Geometry Individualized Programs! Month-to-Month Tuition! 951.302.3047 32483 Temecula Pkwy, Ste E115 No Contracts to Sign! (behind El Pollo Loco in the Wolf Retail Store Park) Guaranteed Results! www.tutoringcenter.com

Reach For The HIGHEST Star!

SM

Nichols Speech, Inc. Support from your first consultation to the completion of speech and language goals. Fast facts about Nichols Speech: •Family-friendly office where parents are part of their child’s progress •Many health insurance plans •Affordable private rates •Play-based therapy for children •Serving ages two through adult •Progress supported by home programs Call us: (951)541-0615 Visit www.nicholsspeech.com

Azusa Pacific University

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

From left, CSUSM Dean Mike Schroder, Temecula City Courtesy photo Manager Aaron Adams and MSJC Vice President Pat Schwerdtfeger.

beginning Fall 2014. For more information visit

www.msjc.edu/CSUSMbusiness or call (951) 487-3409.

Earn your degree from a university known for excellence in education. Azusa Pacific has a reputation for consistently producing innovative and comprehensively prepared educators. Our graduates serve as teachers, counselors, coaches, and administrators throughout Southern California, and are known in their schools and districts as leaders in the field. Choose from more than 35 ways to earn your credential or degree at APU’s Murrieta Regional Center, including a bachelor’s degree completion program in liberal studies, and join a 115-year legacy of excellence in education.

Summer classes June 163 at Azusa Pacific’s Fall classes start start September Murrieta Regional Center. Apply today! (951) (877) 304-3400 210-8841 | apu.edu/explore/education 40508 Murrieta Hot Springs Rd., Murrieta, CA 92563

14998

AZUSA | HIGH DESERT | INLAND EMPIRE | LOS ANGELES | MURRIETA ORANGE COUNTY | SAN DIEGO | ONLINE


The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

B-10

Home & Garden

Elevating gardening success by making tasks easier Melinda Myers Special to the Valley News Enthusiasts shouldn’t let a sore back, bad knees or lousy soil stop them from gardening. It’s not that difficult to elevate a garden for easier access and better gardening results. The simple act of creating a raised bed improves drainage in heavy clay soil. Add in some organic matter to further increase drainage and improve the water holding ability for sandy soils. If the soil is beyond repair or one doesn’t want to wait, a raised garden allows one to bring in quality soil and create a garden right on top of the existing soil or even paved areas. The quality soil and easy access will allow for dense plantings without pathways. This means greater yields, up to four times more, in raised beds than in-ground gardens. Raised beds also help conserve water. A gardener can concentrate their growing efforts in smaller

areas and that means less water wasted. Increase the benefit by using soaker hoses or drip irrigation in order to concentrate water application to the soil nearest the plants, right where it is needed. Make the raised bed a comfortable height for the person that will be tending it. Elevating the garden minimizes bending and kneeling. Design raised beds in corners or edges suited for sitting or areas narrow enough to set a garden bench alongside for easy access. Design raised gardens so they are narrow enough for gardeners to easily reach all plants growing within the garden. Or include steppers or pathways if creating larger raised garden areas. Add a mowing strip around the edge of the raised bed. A narrow strip of mulch or pavers set level with the soil surface keep the area tidy and eliminate the need for hand trimming. Select a material for the project that is suited to the existing landscape design. Wood, brick

and stones have long been used to create raised beds. Consider man-made materials that are longlasting and easy to assemble. One example would be Lixington Planter Stone. These stone sections can be set right on the ground, fit together easily, and can be arranged and stacked to make planters the size, shape and height desired. Start a raised bed garden by measuring and marking the desired size and shape. Remove the existing grass and level the area. For taller raised gardens edge the bed, cut the grass short and cover with newspaper or cardboard prior to filling with soil. Be sure to follow directions for the system being installed. Once the raised bed is complete, fill it with quality soil. Calculate the volume of soil needed by multiplying the length times the width times the height of the raised bed, making sure all measurements are in feet. Convert the cubic feet measurement to cubic yards by dividing it by 27 (the number of cubic feet in a cubic yard).  

Incorporating raised flower beds using stone planters can beautify the landscape without taking a lot of time or effort. Infinity Lawn and Garden photo

For a 4 x 8 feet raised bed that is 2 feet deep, multiply 4 x 8 x 2. This equals 64 cubic feet. Divide by 27 and it will need just a bit more than one cubic yard of soil. Don’t let the math overwhelm the situation, most topsoil companies and garden center staff can help with calculations. Just be sure to have

the raised bed dimensions handy when ordering the soil. The best part is that this one time investment of time and effort will pay off with years of gardening success. To comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

Blueberry season is in full swing Michelle Mears-Gerst Special to the Valley News Blueberry season has arrived and the fields at Temecula Berry Company are open to the public. Besides a new harvest, there are many fresh changes at the farm this season including a new addition to the Graesser family. Michael Graesser, also known as Farmer Mike, married a local realtor this winter named Cindy. Cindy has brought a bounce back to Graesser’s step and his two young children, Gage and Daisy. The children lost their mother, Shelly, in April 2012. Shelly was a long time educator in Temecula Valley School District who was loved by many in the community. Graesser, a devout Christian, now helps others through their grief, setting an example that life goes on and today is a new season of hope. Cindy comes from a Christian background and her dad, Henry, is a pastor of a church in Escondido. The new couple has much in common but farm life is new to her. “If you get a chance and you want a laugh, ask Cindy about picking up the little pigs. She’ll be happy to share,” said Graesser. Graesser and his budding family have added new events this season for kids of all ages. Daisy, 6, has worked hard to create a very important show about feeding the farm chickens. Daisy will interact with children who attend and educate them about her clucking feathered friends. Gage, 5, will be clamoring for an audience like his big sister at his Pig Show. Penny and Lucky will be on display weekly where Gage will hold a short show talking about his “oinking” friends.

The harvest this year for the super fruit is early and may not last till July so don’t delay your travel plans to come visit the farm. “We had a mild winter which helped the blueberry crops,” said Graesser. There is always something going on at Temecula Berry Farm. New this year is Muffin Monday. The first 50 customers on Monday mornings get a free, homemade blueberry muffin. There will also be for sale blueberry loafs and blueberry jams as well as pre-picked blueberries in 18 oz. containers. Graesser said they will also offer gift sets and gift certificates. Nana’s Story Time continues to be a hit. Story time is once a week, with times located on their website and Facebook page. Field trips are very popular but Graesser asks inquiries be sent via email due to the large demand. The blueberry picking however is just as fun with a few friends or family members. Inez Gonzalez, 4, from Mira Loma, enjoyed the one-on-one interaction picking berries from the bushes with her aunt and uncle and 18-month-old cousin Marina Young. The Young’s live in Corona and despite the early season heat had a lot of fun visiting the farm for the first time. Four-year-old Kamrynne Johnson from Temecula came dressed as a fairy for her berry-picking day. “The farm is awesome. This is our first time here and it is a lot of fun,” said Virginia Johnson. “Just remember to bring cash or a check, they don’t accept credit or debit cards.” Starting Friday, May 9, the annual movie night at the farm will kick

Metal Roofing • Shade Covers • Steel Buildings •

760-690-2891 Lic #961382

I Need a Loving Home ANIMAL

RESCUE KOMPANY

Please come visit us & meet the wonderful animals that are up for adoption at one of the following locations: “I am a sweet girl and I need to be in a loving forever home.”

Meet SUNNY: Golden Retriever : : Female (spayed) Golden/Chestnut

11 Years (best estimate)

• We want to help! To relinquish a litter of puppies/kittens, please email Ellen at: animalrescuekompany@gmail.com • We spay mama dogs for free too!

33175 Temecula Pkwy, A527 • Temecula

www.AnimalRescueKompany.org

Temecula: PetSmart located at 32413 Temecula Pkwy. Sats & Suns 11:00 to 4 :00 Murrieta: PetSmart located at 25290 Madison Avenue. Sats & Suns 11:00 to 4:00

Temecula Berry Company offers families the experience of picking berries and learning about farm animals and farm life. Michelle Mears-Gerst photos

off with the popular movie Frozen. Movie night is free and open to the public. Families are encouraged to

bring blankets and dinner. The Temecula Berry Company is located at 39700 Cantrell Rd. in

Inez Gonzalez, 4, from Mira Loma, picks berries at Temecula Berry Company.

Temecula. For more information, visit www.temeculaberryco.com or call (951) 225-5552.

Pets Beware of feline illnesses before adopting a cat Laura Rathbun Special to the Valley News It is kitten birthing season and you may be considering adopting one. If so, that’s good, but be careful that your new kitten doesn’t have an upper respiratory infection (URI). URIs are common in cats from shelters and catteries. It also can easily spread to cats you already have and make them extremely ill. I learned about URIs recently when I volunteered for a local cat rescue group and one of my own cats became ill. In early January, I started working with the group, which had an adoption partnership with a Murrieta pet store. During the three months that I volunteered at the pet store, I noticed that many of the group’s cats had eye and nasal discharge and sneezed. I asked the group’s leader why the cats were having such symptoms. She told me that rescue cats get “small, little kitty colds” and assured me that the cats would be fine. I didn’t realize it at the time that these cats actually had symptoms of URIs and it was more serious than she claimed. I became a foster caregiver for one of the group’s female kittens in March. Each day I had to wipe discharge from her eyes and nose,

but thought the discharge would eventually stop. The kitten appeared healthy and had come to me directly from the group leader’s home after being there for several months. On April 14, I went to the pet store and brought home one of the group’s male kittens to foster and possibly adopt. He also had eye and nasal discharge and frequently sneezed. I assumed he had a cold that he’d soon get over. About a week later, I noticed that one of my own cats was ill. I have two indoor cats, Chloe and Phoebe, who are about 9-yearsold. I immediately took Chloe to our veterinarian who diagnosed her with an URI. The doctor said that Chloe more than likely caught it from the foster cats and said that my other cat Phoebe probably has a stronger immune system so she didn’t become ill, too. The doctor also clarified that there’s no such thing as “small, little kitty colds” and sneezing is a sure sign of an URI. I was shocked by what I learned from the doctor. I returned the foster cats to the pet store, disinfected my home, and notified the group’s leader by email that the foster cats had made Chloe ill. I informed her that all of the cats at the pet store needed medical treatment for URIs.

I also reported the situation to the pet store’s management and Animal Friends of the Valleys. The group’s leader emailed me back and claimed that my cat Chloe had infected the group’s cats. She didn’t want to take responsibility for letting the illness fester and spread in the cats. Of course, I’m no longer associated with the group. The pet store also ended its partnership with the group on April 24. Thankfully, Chloe responded well to treatment and is feeling better, but it will take weeks for her to fully recover. I spent almost $1,000 on her medical bills. So beware of URIs if you intend to adopt a kitten, especially if you already have a cat. To comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

Pets of the Week Hi, my name is Creampuff. I am a 7-monthold, female Siamese mix. I am a sweet little kitten. I am cute and playful. I will need to be spayed before going to my new home. Intake number:  222631

Hi, my name is Toodles. I am a 3-year-old, female Terrier mix. I am a real cutie pie. I am playful and friendly. I am already spayed and ready for my new home. My adoption will include both my spay fee and adoption fee. Intake number: 222147   Courtesy photos

For more information, visit www.animalfriendsofthevalleys.com or call (951) 674-0618. The shelter is located at 33751 Mission Trail in Wildomar. Cat adoptions are only $5 through the month of May (plus the cost of spay/neuter, if applicable).


May 16, 2014 • www.myvalleynews.com • The Valley News

B-11

Temecula Valley

MARKETPLACE Call (760) 723-7319 or go online at www.myvalleynews.com to place an ad today! ANNOUNCEMENTS

CABLE/SATELLITE TV

HEALTH/MEDICAL

DID YOU KNOW 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

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DID YOU KNOW Newspaper-generated content is so valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) DID YOU KNOW that not only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) AUTOS WANTED DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 800-7315042. (Cal-SCAN) BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company! Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. (CalSCAN)

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Business Directory

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Teachers with Degrees

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ESTATE SALES

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

ELISSA’S ESTATE SALES

LANDMARK PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Let us do ALL the work for you!! Serving the Inland Valley Area. Over 15 years experience. References upon request Elissasestatesales@gmail.com www.californiaestatesale.com

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951-263-3841

Termite/Dry Rot Repair Remodels & Restorations Room by Room Renovations Escrow Repairs Lic#B928620 Insured & Bonded Call Jose 760-519-4432

landmarkjeff@yahoo.com

PAVING

REAL ESTATE

FIND OUT WHAT THE HOME DOWN THE STREET SOLD FOR ONLINE www.myhomesalesreport.com Or Free Recorded Message

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May 17, 8AM 240 O’HEARN DRIVE, FALLBROOK 3-Way Tower Speakers, Cameras, Photography, Frames Sewing Machines, 48” Oak Dining Set, Lots More.

Employment Offered CLERICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT PT 15 hours weekly MWF for State funded Child Development Center. Computer Skills-Microsoft Office, Excel. Bilingual Translation skills/Spanish. High School Diploma, clerical experience, fingerprints, TB test. Entry 9.18 hr. Fax resume 760-7285337

FALLBROOK VFW looking for P/T Bartender, days. Some exp req. Apply at 1175 Old Stage Rd. bring resume. No phone calls. after 3:00pm FALLBROOK WINDOW WASHING Co. part to full time window cleaner needed. Clean driving record a must. Email reply to fallbrookwindowwashing@yahoo.com

GRAND TRADITION ESTATE and Gardens is currently hiring for a Line Cook position. To apply please submit application/resume to 220 Grand Tradition Way, Fallbrook.

PET Keep your pet Happy, Healthy, and Protected. Call 800-675-7476 Now and get a free Pet Insurance Quote for your Dog or Cat. Choose Up to 90% Reimbursement. Get Special Multiple Pet Discounts. (Cal-SCAN) REAL ESTATE 316+/- Acre White River Ranch Auction, Calico Rock, AR. Minimum Bid $800,000. Sealed Bids Due by May 27. Atlas RE Firm, #2276. 5%BP. 501-840-7029. AtlasRealEstateFirm.com (Cal-SCAN) SERVICES/HANDYMAN One call, does it all! Fast and Reliable Handyman Services. Call ServiceLive and get referred to a pro today: Call 800-9588267  (Cal-SCAN)

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

3 convenient locations: Menifee ~ Hemet ~ Temecula

& Sun. 8am May 17th & 18th furniture, books, collectibles, antique clock, clothes, bakers rack, framed artwork, dishes, knickknacks, & much more! 31203 Old River Rd. Bonsall, 92003

Services Available AUTISM PROGRAM ETAS is pleased to announce the opening of its latest Child Development Program for special children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. ETAS is an IRC and insurance provider for ABA treatment. Visit us on the web at www.etasprogram.com. (909) 795-4255

Miscellaneous Wanted

Health & Fitness

I BUY OLD MILITARY uniforms, medals, knives, helmets, etc. Even stinky stuff you think is trash. Bob MilitaryPickers.com (760) 450-8498

Making A...difference and a lot of money too. Call Lorraine (760) 421-1103

WELLSPRING HERBS & VITAMINS offers a wide selection of herbs, vitamins, essential oils, homeopathics, teas, flower essences and other lotions and potions. Iridology and Live-Cell appointments are available. Come in for your FREE Bio-Scan! Bio-Scan will scan your body and tell you where your deficiencies are. We are located at 1223 S. Mission Rd. (Behind Pizza-Hut) 760 728-1244 www.nutrastar.ne (760) 7281244

Rental Management

We Make It Easy for You!

Apts/Duplexes/Studios 1BEDRM Spacious, clean. Walk-in closet, balcony, storage, Lovely Courtyard. No smokers. Pet on approval. $800. (760) 7287630 AVAIL. NOW 1BR apt. on Main St. $800/ mo. Call Jacqueline (760) 310-5288

Commercial/Industrial SHOP SPACE W/OFFICES. 1,000 sq. ft. to 1,800 sq. ft. in Fallbrook. (760) 7282807 or (760) 212-0584. www.fallbrookindustrialspace.com.

Houses/Condos/ Cottages for Rent We Rent/Lease Apartments, Condos, Homes & Estate Homes from $850-$3,500. THOMPSON AND ASSOCIATES 1120 S. Main St. Fallbrook, CA 92028 (760) 723-1708 Please visit our website: www.thompsonproperties4you.com

FALLBROOK 4BR, 2BA $1850. approx

FB DUPLEX 2BR 2BA, yard & garage, fenced. $900/mo. No pets. Close to school and town. Avail. 6/1. 760-390-2913

Bedroom/bath/kitchen-Living room; 575 sq. feet Granny Flat, close into downtown, $900 per month. Includes water, trash, electricity, cable with internet. No pets or smoking. Avail 6/1. Contact (760) 728-5060

Property Management with Personal Attention

See a complete list of available rentals at: murrietatemeculapropertymanagers.com

Murrieta

5br/3ba, 2 car garage. 1br/ba dwnstrs. Pool/spa w/service. Pet on approvl. Grdnr. 2550sf. $2150

Menifee

2br/2ba on golf course. 55+ area. 2 car garage. New paint, carpet, tile. Small pet. 974sf. $1300

Hemet

5br/4ba, 3 car garage. No pets. Community pools/parks/lakes. 3340sf. $1600

Wildomar

3br/2ba attached garage. 1400sf. adobe house, new interior paint, new kitchen flooring. avail. now $1195

Call 951-696-5920

39429 Los Alamos Road, #E, Murrieta

Mon-Fri 9-5 & Sat 10-3 • Lic #01130743

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWNHOUSE Fallbrook, 1200 sq ft., secluded in grove, walk to downtown. $1,475 a month. Available May 9th, 2014. Taking applications (760) 451-1726

Office Space/Retail PROFESSIONAL SUITE- 1593 S. Mis-

sion Rd 756 sq. ft, 2 offices, reception area, conference/kitchen area, BA w/ storage (760) 728-0185

RETAIL STORE AVAILABLE immediately. 2450 s.f., corner location (Hawthorne & Main in Fallbrook). Includes loading dock, 90¢/s.f. per month with lease (760) 7281281

Antiques & Collectibles KARGES China Cabinet (Black) gold trim, beveled windows. Approx. 40 yrs old. $4,700 (951)506-483

In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Valley News will not publish any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Valley News encourages equal opportunity in the workplace.

760-723-7319

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat.

ANY TYPE PATIO FURNITURE wanted. Table, chairs, etc. in Fallbrook only. In good condition. (760) 723-6675

NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS for a 1

MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-800-9453392. (Cal-SCAN)

MOVING SALE household items, clothes/shoes 7 am-noon May 17th. 165 Lillian Way Apt. B Fallbrook

PROJECT MAHMA: Mom At Home

PERSONALS/ADULT

Business directories have worked for those who are on a tight budget. Call today.

editor@myvalleynews.com

sleeping area in house, heat/air. Huge fenced area, reasonable rates/references. For reservations, call (760) 723-6675.

1600 sq ft. A/C, fireplace, dishwasher, 1 story, large fenced yard. Central Fallbrook, gardener inc. (818) 207-7993

(951) 400-3126

something you would like to see more of or not at all? Or is there something you would like to read about that we haven’t covered yet? Send your input to

Garage/Yard/Moving Sale GARAGE SALE - GREAT STUFF!!!

SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (CalSCAN)

mj.pavetheplanet@gmail.com

Valley News respects your opinion and would like your voice to be heard. Is there a specific section you prefer among the rest? Is there

Animal/Boarding & Sitting PET SITTING IN MY HOME. Great

Will Price Match Any Doctor in

Temecula Valley!

All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling unites published in The Valley News are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin or any intention to make such preference limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. State laws forbid discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby served noticed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

$59 $79

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The Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • May 16, 2014

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INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

The Cadillac Certified Pre-owned Bumper-to-Bumper Limited Warranty provides extensive coverage for defects in materials or workmanship of covered components for the full term of the warranty. The coverage includes parts and labor but excludes maintenance and wear and tear items. There is no deductible for covered repairs. Cadillac will provide for repairs to the vehicle during the warranty period in accordance with the following terms, conditions, and limitations. a

and r

1.9

% APR for 36 Months on Select Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles in Stock! *$28.62 per month per $1,000 financed and $0 down in lieu of rebates and bonus cash. ON APPROVED ABOVE AVERAGE CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. Only on the Cruze, Malibu, Regal, LaCrosse, Terrain, Traverse, Enclave, Acadia, Silverado & Sierra. Offer exp 5/22/14.

2014 CHEVROLET

SPARK EV 2LT HATCHBACK $ 23,288 Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats, OnStar, SiriusXM Satellite #C14429A/412862

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

BEAUTIFUL

2013 CHEVROLET

TAHOE LT SPORT $ 37,993

Premium Wheels, Leather, Third Row Seat, Parking Sensors, #T14507A/132219

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

LOW MILES

2011 CHEVROLET

VOLT SEDAN $ 24,991

Alloy Wheels, Navigation System, Bluetooth Wireless, #P10010/102061

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB SL Bed Liner, OnStar, Sirius/XM Satellite #T14733A/171506

SUBURBAN 1500 LT SPORT $ 44,993

Oversized Premium Wheels 20”+, Leather, Moon Roof, Backup Camera, #P9981/121148

31,991

$

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

LOW MILES

2014 CHEVROLET

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

2013 GMC

LOW MILES

2013 CHEVROLET

CORVETTE GRAND SPORT COUPE Premium Wheels $ 19”+, Leather, Navigation, SiriusXM Satellite, #C14694A/104225

53,993

INCLUDED WITH PURCHASE

MUST SEE

LOW MILES

Introducing Owner Care Exclusive 2-Year,30,000 mile standard maintenance includes oil changes, tire rotations, and multipoint inspections. 12-Month/ 12,000 mile bumper-to-bumper warranty. Remainder of 5 Year/100,000 mile power train limited warranty. 24/7 road side assistance with courtesy transportation. Terms and conditions available, see dealer for details.

MANAGER’S SPECIALS!!! 2003 FORD

2006 CHEVROLET

COLORADO EXT CAB LT

F150 SUPER CAB XL

Towing Pkg, Cruise Control, CD (Single Disc), A/C, #T14464A/B70421

9,991

$

Alloy Wheels, Towing Pkg, Bed Liner, MP3 (Single Disc), #T14930A/285869

TEST DRIVE TODAY!

2012 HONDA

LOW MILES

CHALLENGER SXT COUPE

MP3 (Single Disc), Cruise Control, Power Windows/Locks, #T14323A/538245

14,594

13,991 2013 DODGE

CIVIC LX SEDAN

$

$

Premium Wheels 19”+, MP3 (Single Disc), Cruise Control, #P10013/641358

SUPER LOW MILES

$

26,991

951-699-2699 • www.ParadiseAutos.com

LOW MILES

27360 Ynez Road, Temecula • In the Temecula Auto Mall All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer document processing charge, any electronic filing charge, and any emission testing charge. Expires 5/22/14.

Terry Gilmore, Dealer FOR The People

Anza Valley Outlook  

Anza Valley Outlook May 16, 2014

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