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February 8, 2018

Teen dies from flu-related complications

D e L u z , R a i n b ow, C a m p P e ndl e t o n , Pa l a ,

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Volume 22, Issue 6

World of Watercolor found at art center

Investigation of glass doorbusting bandits continues Tom Ferrall tferrall@reedermedia.com

The investigation of burglars who use a sledgehammer to break glass doors to enter businesses for quick hit-and-run jobs has spread beyond Fallbrook, according to San Diego County Sheriff’s Department detective Steve Ashkar. “There are several detectives from several different agencies actually working this because this MO has gone around in the whole North County,” said Ashkar. “It’s much more than just Fallbrook.” Ashkar, who works out of the Sheriff’s Fallbrook substation, said an arrest was made in Escondido the weekend of Feb. 3-4, “that may or may not be related to what’s going on here. The investigation is ongoing.” Three Fallbrook restaurants – Yama Sushi, Thai Thai and Little Caesars Pizza – have been hit twice by the thieves. The businesses first had their front glass doors broken during the early morning hours of Dec. 26, 2017, a day in which the burglars also targeted Rosa’s Mexican Food and Domino’s Pizza. The thieves came away with no money from the five break-ins as they encountered empty tills and impenetrable safes inside the businesses.

Hunter Conner seen in Courtesy photo a candid shot taken April 2016. Karen Ossenfort Special to the Village News Fallbrook High School graduate of 2017, Hunter Michael Conner, died Jan. 17, 2018, from complications of the flu.

Hunter’s Memorial Service will be at 10 a.m., Feb. 10 at Rancho Community Church, 31300 Rancho Community Way, Temecula, 92592. Rose Hunter said the service is open to the community. “Hunter was only 18 when he died, but he led a meaningful and purpose-driven life, full of joy, a thirst for learning, and a heart for those who were hurting,” his parents, Troy and Rose Conner,

see TEEN, page A-11

thisweek Announcements �������������������������A-2 Business ���������������������������������������D-5 Business Directory ���������������������C-8 Calendar........................................A-2 Classifieds ������������������������������������B-7 Dining & Food ���������������������������C-11 Education....................................C-12 Entertainment ������������������������������B-4 Health & Fitness ��������������������������B-2 Home & Garden �������������������������C-1 Legals.............................................B-6 Obituaries �������������������������������������A-8 Opinion �����������������������������������������A-5 Real Estate �����������������������������������C-2 Sheriff’s Log ���������������������������������A-8 Sports.............................................D-1 Wine................................................D-6

“Kathleen in November" by Paul Sullivan is one of 120 entries on display at the World of Watercolor Shane Gibson photo & Beyond exhibition at Fallbrook Art Center, through April 15. See more details and photos on page C-1.

Basurto, Castellanos, Gross and Lackey honored as Students of the Month

Tom Ferrall tferrall@reedermedia.com USPS Residential Customer

SANDAG approves regional tribal transportation strategy Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

engineer and has narrowed her college choices to Purdue, University of Houston and Baylor. She said FHS will always have a special place in her heart. “My great-grandparents met at Fallbrook High School, so it’s just a really, really special place,” said Lackey. Gross was nominated by math teacher Debbie Berg, who was unable to attend the breakfast. English teacher Connie Fellios, who coaches Gross on the Academic Team, pinch hit for Berg. “Michael is one of the strongest players on the (Academic) team,” said Fellios. “What makes him stand out more than anything is his respect toward everyone.” Fellios then read comments that Berg had penned about Gross. The comments included: “Michael is one of the five students who skipped over AP

The San Diego Association of Governments approved a regional tribal transportation strategy. The 18-0 SANDAG vote Jan. 26, with no City of Lemon Grove representative present, accepts the Intraregional Tribal Transportation Strategy for submittal to the California Department of Transportation, which may provide funding assistance. SANDAG and the Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association collaborated on a draft tribal transportation strategy which was discussed at the Oct. 27 meeting of SANDAG’s Borders Committee. The draft allowed for comments, and a refined version was approved at the Dec. 19 SCTCA board meeting. T h e I n t r a r e g i o n a l Tr i b a l Transportation Strategy is the first region-wide comprehensive inventory of tribal transportation needs. In the past two Regional Transportation Plan cycles, tribal projects have been included in the addendum portion of the RTP but utilized individual tribal plans. The RTP includes a plan based on reasonably expected revenue but also includes a revenueunconstrained plan. The next Regional Transportation Plan is slated for approval in 2018, and the tribal projects can be added to the unconstrained-revenue scenario. The tribal transportation strategy includes roads providing access to reservations as well as within the reservations themselves. Many of the improvements that are needed are not on a reservation and would require County of San Diego or California Department of Transportation approval (with possible tribal funding). The draft tribal transportation

see STUDENTS, page A-11

see SANDAG, page A-10

The Students of the Month for February are, from left, Suzetty Castellanos, Michael Gross and Ashlie Lackey. Not pictured, Kenia Basurto.

Village News

see BANDITS, page A-10

Kenia Basurto of Oasis High School and Suzetty Castellanos, Michael Gross and Ashlie Lackey of Fallbrook Union High School were honored as the Students of the Month for February at a special recognition breakfast held Feb. 1 at North Coast Church. Greg Coppock emceed the event, which began with an invocation by Daniel Andrus of St. Peter’s Catholic Community. After the Pledge of Allegiance, Marines from Camp Pendleton presented the students with the Lamp Of Knowledge medal. Lackey, nominated by teacher Adriana Lopez, was the first student to be presented to the audience of family members, friends, school administrators and community leaders. “It’s a great honor to have her in my classes,” said Lopez of Lackey. “Ashlie is a successful student with a GPA of 4.6. She excels in

many AP courses and has received multiple honors and awards. She is a competitive athlete in field hockey and lacrosse with an MVP title.” Lopez said that Lackey participates in FFA, is on the FHS Academic Team, tutors youth in mathematics and has helped coach boys and girls field hockey. “She’s accomplished many great things,” said Lopez of Lackey. “She gives 120 percent in everything that she does, and it’s going to be a great honor to see where she goes.” Lackey said it was “an honor” to be nominated by Lopez, a person she sees as a role model. “She’s just been a great example to me of what being a go-getter is,” said Lackey of Lopez. “She’s been in the military and worked so hard for everything she’s got. As I prepare for my future, it’s nice knowing that if I really want something, I can go get that.” Lackey, a fourth generation FHS student, wants to be a biomedical

Courtesy photo


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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

A NNOUNCEMENTS Exploration on Pala’s Chief Mountain is ongoing

Jeff Swanger holds a Prince of Pala, aquamarine from the 49’er Pocket, Oceanview Mine.

Writers Read presents Liska Jacobs, author of ‘Catalina’

Courtesy photos Jeff Swanger examines a tourmaline pocket at one of his mines in Pala.

Liska Jacobs FALLBROOK – Writers Read at Fallbrook Library, a free monthly author series, will feature Southern California debut author Liska Jacobs and her novel, “Catalina.” The reading is Tuesday, Feb. 13, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the library’s community room. The author’s presentation is preceded by open mic for prose and poetry. “Catalina” (MCD/FSG Originals, November 2017) is a magnetic, provocative novel chronicling a young woman’s downward spiral. At least, that’s her plan. She has just been fired from MoMA on the heels of an

Jordan Bryant photo

affair with her married boss, and she retreats to Los Angeles to blow her severance package on whatever it takes to numb the pain. Described by the Los Angeles Times as “Part California story, part feminist social commentary,” the novel “tracks, with a sense of inevitability, the fallout of a woman with the audacity to make her own mistakes.” Jacobs, a Los Angeles native, holds an MFA from the University of California, Riverside. Her essays and short fiction have appeared in The Rumpus, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Literary Hub,

The Millions, and The Hairpin, among other publications. “Catalina” will be available for sale and signing by the author. Fallbrook Library is located at 124 S. Mission Road, between Alvarado and Fig Streets. The subsequent Writers Read, to be held Tuesday, March 13, will feature the creative writing students of Palomar College. Visit www.ExcuseMeImWriting.com for details. For more information, contact Kit-Bacon Gressitt at kbgressitt@ gmail.com or 760-522-1064.

FUS reaches out to Lilac fire survivors BONSALL - Fired Up Sisters Southern California, (FUS), a w omen’s s upport group of survivors of the San Diego fires, would like to invite Lilac fire survivors to a special meeting on Feb. 21 at 1:30 p.m. at the La

Sala Room, Suite 706 in the River Village Plaza in Bonsall The purpose of the meeting is to share information and experiences as well as lending emotional support. They will have a small gift for each family attending. If

anyone is a survivor or knows of someone who is and can share this with them, they would appreciate it. Survivors should RSVP to firedupsisters@gmail.com by Feb. 16 for planning purposes.

Bark in the Park fundraiser supports dog park These assorted gems come from the Oceanview Mine fee-dig. FALLBROOK - Fallbrook Gem and Mineral Society (FGMS) will present well known area gem miner Jeff Swanger as the guest speaker at its meeting on Thursday, Feb. 15. CEO of Oceanview Mining, LLC and a professional miner in North San Diego County for 35 years, Swanger will speak on the “Ongoing Exploration on Chief Mountain in the Famous Pala Mining District”. He owns all the significant mines on Chief Mountain (the Oceanview, Pala Chief and Elizabeth R mines) and will share how gem mining is once again alive in the area, for the first time in nearly a century. Local mining enthusiasts and history buffs alike will appreciate Swanger’s enthusiasm for keeping the mining efforts of the area active and prosperous, with a keen awareness of the importance the industry has held since discoveries of significant, rare gems such as tourmaline, aquamarine, morganite and kunzite first occurred in the early 1900s. Growing up in nearby Escondido with an interest in pegmatites and mining, Swanger began his mining career in 1983 working at Pala’s Stewart mine where he garnered

valuable expertise from a group of “old timers” in mining the area’s pegmatites. In 2000, he acquired the Oceanview mine on Chief Mountain and began his own operation, turning it into a modern mining effort that also includes a public fee-dig access to mine tailings. An estimated 20,000 people from all over the world have come to Swanger’s mines to dig for gems, keeping whatever treasures they find. He believes that the experience inspires the next generation of gem and mineral collectors. Today Swanger’s operation has become the largest underground gem mine in the United States and he continues to live his dream of discovering the next great gem pocket in the Pala Mining District. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. Admission is free and plenty of free parking is available across the street from the FGMS building located at 123 W. Alvarado Street. Light refreshments will be served. An opportunity raffle will be held and mineral specimens will be available for purchase at a 20 percent discount. For inquiries call (760)728-1130 or see www. fgms.org.

FALLBROOK - “Barkly” the Live Oak County dog park mascot is gathering all canine critters for the Bark in the Park event, to be held on March 17 at Live Oak County Park at Reche and Gird roads. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and there will be a Blessing of the Animals at 9, followed by a community dog walk through the historical and beautiful Live Oak County Park. Organizers will have a frisbee demonstration, a raptor presentation, and the silent auction/raffle which will offer many opportunities to bid on treasures. The main arena will be encircled by booths to shop and eat at, and contests in the main arena will include best costume, fastest tail wag, prettiest, most handsome, owner look alike, etc, with Best of Show winning a trophy. “Barkly” will be wishing all of his friends “Happy St. Pawdy’s Day” and hopes they will join him for a day of fun from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This annual event is the fundraiser for the off leash dog area’s operation and maintenance costs, so everyone is invited to come and support their local dog park. For more information and registration forms, go to liveoakdogpark.com or call Anne Richter at (760) 731-1041.

Barkly, the dog park mascot, poses for a photo with some of his friends at Fallbrook Dog Park. Courtesy photo

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Feb. 25 – 2 p.m. – Fallbrook Historical Society hosts a family matinee showing of “The Great Locomotive Chase”, starring Fess Parker, in The Barn, 1730 Hill Ave. (at Rocky Crest Rd.). John Lupton stars as Cpl. William Pittenger. Popcorn and punch will be served and tours of the Pittenger House will be available until 4 p.m. Feb. 25 – 3 p.m. – Fallbrook Music Society hosts Left Coast Quintet at Fallbrook Library is at 124 S. Mission Road. Not

completely classical – but not completely jazz – this is another “crossover” concert that features some of George Gershwin’s (and others) greatest hits. Admission is free. March 17 – 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. – The fourth annual Bark in the Park will be held at Live Oak County Park. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. with a 9 a.m. blessing of the animals, followed by a community dog walk, contests, demonstrations, vendors and food booths, a silent auction and raffle

prizes. For more information and entry forms, visit www. liveoakdogpark.com. April 7 – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Fallbrook Garden Club will sponsor “The Magic of Color” a horticulture specialty flower show and plant sale at the Zion Lutheran Church, 1405 E. Fallbrook Street. The show is open to the public and there is no admission charge. Visit www.fallbrookgardenclub.org for information regarding the show and instructions for participation.

Village News deadline Editorial submissions are due no later than noon on Friday for the following week's issue. To be sure there is room, submit ting by Thursday af ternoon is recommended. Obituaries are due by Monday, 4 p.m. for that week's issue. All submissions should be sent to villageeditor@reedermedia.com - photos should be sent as jpeg files. For more information, call (760) 723-7319, ex t. 109.


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News

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Temecula Horseless Carriage Club tours Fallbrook Historical Society venues FALLBROOK – The Fallbrook Heritage Center received some 50 guests and 30 pre-1916 vintage cars for a private tour of the Heritage Center facilities by the Temecula Horseless Carriage Club Sunday, Jan. 14. Following tours of the museum, the Pittenger House and the Donald J. Rivers Interpretive Center, the club headed off to take in the Reche Schoolhouse for a great day for both car and history

buffs, as “history meets history.” Private tours of all the Historical Society facilities are available upon request. The Reche Schoolhouse was abuzz with history buffs that Sunday as the parking lot filled with pre-1916 vintage horseless carriages, and the Temecula Horseless Carriage Club enjoyed a private tour of the historical schoolhouse.

Thirty antique horseless carriages gather at Fallbrook Historical Society facilities for a tour down “memory lane.”

Reche Schoolhouse hosts members of the Temecula Horseless Carriage Club and their cars, Jan. 14.

Fifty horseless carriage enthusiasts enjoy a day of history at the Reche Schoolhouse. Fallbrook Historical Society Heritage Center hosts the Temecula Horseless Carriage Club, Jan.14.

Courtesy photos

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February 8, 2018

O UT & A BOUT

Bold and Beguiling Prague

Nathalie Taylor Special to the Village News

As I sat on the terrace of Prague’s Golden Well Hotel, high above the city, and adjacent to the Prague Castle Gardens, the air was alive with the scent of flowers. Birds, sheltered by thick leafy trees, filled the air with their varied songs. This was my first visit to Prague, and my 94-year-old mother accompanied me. As soon as I set foot on the cobblestoned streets, I felt both thrilled and at ease. It was like experiencing a dream – a masterpiece of a dream. Each encounter was electric – Prague Castle, Strahov Monastery, cathedrals, cafés… Photographs cannot capture the essence of Prague. No photograph can preserve the charming ambiance of the city, or the genuine warmth of its people. No photograph can preserve the scents of fresh bread, or fragrant flowers, or birdsongs. A static photograph reveals nothing of the scents or ambiance. But I was experiencing it all – a static photograph of Prague come to life. Our pristine room at the Golden Well Hotel was furnished with antiques and works of art. Its sweeping view of the red-tiled roofs and stucco edifices extended as far as the eye could see. At night, when the lights popped on throughout the city, it was stunning. The complimentary breakfasts were exquisite. A table laden with an array of fresh baked

breads, cheeses, pastries and other breakfast foods, greeted us each morning. We were also given a menu with tantalizing choices. My favorite item was the expertly prepared Scottish Smoked Salmon and Quail Eggs with crème fraiche. My mother savored the Crepes with blueberries and clouds of whipped cream. In the evenings we were surprised by treats left on our nightstands – always some marvelously decadent dessert – served under glass. After a long day it was a joy to step over the threshold. As guests at the Golden Well Hotel, we enjoyed several meals at Terasa u Zlate Studne, the hotel’s terrace restaurant. Chef Pavel Sapík and his staff are stars, and their talents are reflected in the sterling quality of the culinary works of art, especially the desserts. One of the most engaging desserts is the dreamy Chocolate Ganache. Once you take your first bite you won’t come up for air until it’s completely consumed. After we had been sufficiently dazzled by our dinners, we relaxed and enjoyed the view, high above the beguiling city of Prague. My mother has mobility issues, so the hotel concierge booked a car and driver for the duration of our trip. It made the entire experience a seamless wonder. No fighting for a bus seat – no hot, crowded streetcars. Miroslav, our driver, always arrived early and waited for us at the end of the cobblestone walkway with his

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The Fallbrook Art Association 2018 Spring Open Judged Fine Art Show

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March 2 –30, 2018

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 10 – 4 Reception: March 3, 5-7PM ; Public Welcome Special Theme Award: “Spring is Bustin’ Out All Over”

**Artists: Find show entry info at www.fallbrookartassn.org

black air-conditioned Mercedes. He deftly negotiated the narrow cobblestone streets and found ways around traffic snags. He always ferried us to intriguing destinations. Miroslav would stand by the car – in his crisp white shirt and black slacks – waiting while we explored a castle, cathedral, or just a local shop. To be treated in such a grand fashion was a delight to both my mother and myself. The Vltava River flows through Prague, and the pedestrian Charles Bridge (1357), spans the river. Gothic gate towers – massive and masculine – stand at either end of the bridge. Miroslav dropped us off at the Old Town tower, we walked across the bridge, then met him at the Lesser Quarter (Malá Strana) tower. The Charles Bridge is not just functional, no, it hosts a festive street party teeming with vendors, musicians, tourists and residents – all who seem to enjoy themselves equally. We slowly walked the bridge, taking in the rush of color and music. Vendors, who were backed up against the stone balustrade, peddled original paintings, hand-made jewelry, and other artisan works. We succumbed to the wiles of an artisan or two, and, with our purchases in tow, paused to watch the river traffic – tourist boats, pleasure crafts and a barge or two. Prague is known for its Baroque architecture, and the Church of Our Lady Victorious (1613) is representative of this style. The arched ceiling soars high above the spiral gold columns and gilt icons of the altar. Hushed murmurs of visitors echo from the ceilings and stone walls. Subdued light made for a holy atmosphere where many came to pray, or pay tribute to the effigy of the Infant Jesus of Prague. St. Nicholas Cathedral in Malá Strana is another splendid example of Baroque architecture. More ornate than the Church of Our Lady Victorious, its sanctuary is massive, and the ceilings are works of art adorned with frescos of angels and saints. In every corner, niche, and curve, something ornate and lovely catches the eye. Miroslav waited patiently while we strolled around the 12th century Old Town Square, which is encompassed by massive buildings. It was overwhelmingly extensive, but we took deep breaths and slowed our pace, to absorb the magnificence. The Astronomical Clock is a wonder. Built in 1410, it is housed in the Old Town Hall. Each hour, various figures peek from two windows, then delicate bells chime…ding, ding, ding… and then the show is over. Týn Church, with its two towers and many spires, dominates the square, rising above the other buildings. Pastel-hued buildings with scalloped and steppedgable roofs add gentle color to the scene. The Café Louvre is an historic café that oozes creativity. Among notable guests were Franz Kafka and Albert Einstein. It was as if the ghosts of their creative and witty encounters permeated the café’s aura. My long-time friend Rick, and his wife Alena, (residents of Prague), spirited us off to this marvelous place. High above the bustle of Prague, this café boasts its own bustle. Aproned wait staff scurry about, and the cacophony of sounds and scents smack of success. The café was a bit warm, but magnetic and chic. I ordered traditional Czech

Týn Church dominates Old Town Square.

A picturesque canal runs through Prague.

Baroque architecture is seen at St. Nicholas Cathedral in Malá Strana. Beef Goulash with Carlsbad Dumplings. Outstanding! Oh and – by the way – they boast a fabulous chocolate layer cake. From our hotel room window I watched the sunlight illuminate the copper spires, then bathe the red-tile roofs with a muted afterglow. There was an uncommon juxtaposition of sounds – the echo of scrambling

traffic and the myriad of bird songs. From my viewpoint, high above the city, a thousand years of history reached to every direction – each building with a story to tell – each building with inexpressible secrets. I was fortunate to decode a fraction of the secrets during my time in Prague – this “city of a thousand spires” – this city of wonder.


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News

O PINION

Valley Fever is in our soil and the very air we breathe. Since 2011, confirmed cases of Valley Fever have been reported in 50 of California’s 58 counties, reaching a record of 5,372 confirmed cases in 2016. And the problem is growing, with 7,471 provisional cases reported in 2017. This region is also impacted by Valley Fever, with 63 cases reported in Riverside County and 123 in San Diego County during 2016. Valley Fever, which is caused by breathing in fungus

Village News spores that live in the soil, is spread when soil is disturbed by wind or by human activities such as digging or plowing. Unfortunately, once the spores become airborne, they can be carried hundreds of miles by the wind. Symptoms often include fever, cough, rash, headache and muscle or joint pain. The infection can lead to chronic pneumonia and can spread from the lungs to the rest of the body, sometimes causing meningitis (spine or brain infection) and even death. Because the symptoms resemble many other common diseases, Valley Fever cases are underreported. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called Valley Fever a “silent epidemic,” and estimates that nationwide 150,000 cases go undiagnosed every year. To help tackle this serious health problem, this year I will be coauthoring a package of bills aimed at addressing Valley Fever in our state and region. Among the new initiatives, legislation will encourage greater utilization of tests to identify new cases, foster collaboration and communication between state and local health officials dealing with the disease,

require new health standards to prevent and control the disease in public works projects, and encourage more training for

physicians and surgeons. By taking these small steps, we can move toward reining in this preventable and treatable disease.

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Free blood pressure screening offered for Valentine’s Day Valentine’s Day is the perfect time to show your heart a little love. The annual Love Your Heart Day event takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 14 at more than 150 sites in San Diego County and allows adults to get a free blood pressure screening. The event, now in its seventh year, is part of the County of San Diego’s Live Well San Diego vision. Locally, San Diego County Library - Fallbrook Branch will hold blood pressure screenings at 124 S. Mission Rd. from 3 to 5 p.m. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and the second leading cause of death in San Diego County. Obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and a family history of heart disease can put an individual at greater risk of heart disease. Getting a blood pressure check is a simple step to take for heart health. Last year’s Love Your Heart event helped over 53,000 people get to know their blood pressure numbers and take charge of their own heart health. More than 5,300 of those screened last year had an elevated

blood pressure level and 77 were identified with urgent or emergent hypertension.

The opinions expressed in Fallbrook/Bonsall Village News do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Fallbrook/Bonsall Village News staff.

Help eradicate hunger in our community.

Volunteer at the Fallbrook Food Pantry by going to our website and clicking on our “Volunteer Hub”. Everyone benefits when we all work together. 1042 South Mission Road

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EDITORIAL Lucette Moramarco, Assistant Editor Tom Ferrall, Staff Writer Tim O’Leary, Staff Writer Shane Gibson, Staff Photojournalist Joe Naiman, Correspondent (Ind.) Christine Rinaldi, Photojournalist (Ind.)

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A 23-year-old man was hospitalized after crashing into a transit bus near Pala Casino as he tried to evade sheriff’s deputies on Jan. 31, San Diego County sheriff’s officials said. Cesar Lopez, 23, was booked into jail on Feb. 2 following the crash, which happened in in the 10300 block of Highway 76 in the Pala area, according to a San Diego County sheriff ’s news release. He remained there as of press time, with no bail set. Sheriff’s officials say that about 4:15 p.m. they saw a 1999 Dodge Durango in the parking lot of Pala Casino which matched the description of suspect vehicle in a “Be On the Lookout” alert. They say the driver of the vehicle also matched the description of a wanted felony subject. Authorities followed the Durango onto Highway 76 and tried to do a traffic stop, but the man increased his speed west on Highway 76 and a pursuit began. “The deputies lost sight of

Village News has been granted by the courts of San Diego County the right of adjudication, legal No. GIN013243. We can accept legal notices for publication.

DIGITAL SERVICES Lee Yates

Man crashes trying to evade authorities near Pala

the vehicle as it sped west on Highway 76. Moments later the deputies discovered the suspect had collided with a North County Transit bus traveling the opposite direction,” the release states. Sheriff’s officials say the SUV caught fire momentarily but was put out with the help of responding firefighters. Lopez, they say, was found to be in possession of loaded pistol magazines believed to belong to the firearm, suspected methamphetamine, and drug paraphernalia on his person. They also found stolen property inside the vehicle, including checks, IDS and a passport. Lopez was taken to the hospital for unspecified injuries and the driver and passenger of the transit bus were taken for minor ones. The crash prompted the closure of both sides of Highway 76 for hours and snarled traffic in the area. The westbound lanes of the 76 were blocked at Pala Del Norte Road and the eastbound lanes were block at Rice Canyon Road. Both sides reopened around 10:30 p.m.

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

Area artist uses sculpture skills to honor fallen heroes Alex Groves agroves@reedermedia.com

The Temecula Duck Pond, known for having a wide variety of sculptures and artworks, will soon be welcoming another installation later this year: A memorial for Temecula residents who were killed while serving their country. The Temecula Heroes Memorial, designed by La Cresta-based artist Austin Casson, will include a 17-foot-tall steel tower, life-size bald eagle forged in steel and a battlefield cross. On the ground in front of the tower will be five 12-inch bronze seals honoring each of the individual branches of the military. “I was approached by the city and I was interested in it as soon as they told me what they had in mind,” Casson said outside of his La Cresta home last week. “It’s a wonderful project and I’m very proud to be involved. I’m proud to have them ask me.” Erica Russo, a senior management analyst for the city, wrote in an email that the project was initiated following the death of 27-year-old Temecula resident and Marine Staff Sgt. Louis Cardin, who was killed in action while supporting Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S. military’s campaign against ISIS. Following the incident, Russo wrote, the Military Ad Hoc Subcommittee consisting of councilman Jeff Comerchero and then councilman Michael McCracken asked city staff to coordinate an effort with community partners to discuss creating a memorial to honor Cardin. Those community partners included Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4089, The Temecula Valley Woman’s Club, Commissioner Bob Hagel and Riverside County Supervisor Chuck Washington. The group decided on the Duck Pond to complement the existing

Letters Home Memorial, and Casson was invited to submit a concept for the memorial’s design. Casson has been an artist for nearly three decades and began his career making small-scale replicas of world-famous golf holes that could be used as bookends and desk decorations. Those items sold in roughly 3,000 gift shops around the world. “I tried to find someone to make them and I couldn’t find anybody to make them, so I started doing it myself and I found out that I was a sculptor,” Casson said. “It’s just that simple.” From the miniature golf holes, Casson moved into making large scale stone and bronze sculptures and those are the mediums he still works in today. At his home in the hills near Murrieta Friday, Casson was working on a metal sculpture of a winged lady. He particularly enjoys sculpting birds, not unlike the life-size one that will top the memorial. That bird is currently sitting at city hall as the other pieces of the memorial are finished in studios in Temecula and Fallbrook that are helping Casson. Te m e c u l a ’s F a b w e s t Manufacturing, which does metal fabrication projects, is in the process of constructing the 17-foot tower on which the eagle will rest. The battlefield cross is being finished up by Brandon Roy of the California Sculpture Academy in Fallbrook. Casson described Roy as a “world class sculptor.” Casson said that members of the California Sculpture Academy, some of whom are themselves veterans, helped in the creation of the very detailed cross The boots located beneath the rifle are the same kind of boots that Cardin wore and a cast replica of Cardin’s dog tags will also be visible on the cross, Casson said. Cardin, a 2006 graduate of Chaparral High School, joined the

Austin Casson works on pieces at his home studio. Casson was invited to submit a concept Meghan Taylor photo design for the new memorial honoring veterans at the city of Temecula’s Duck Pond. His design was selected for the memorial. Marines in June 2006. He is not the only Temecula resident to have died while serving in the military. Marine Corporal Christopher G. Singer, 23, another Chaparral High grad and a member of the 3rd Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force died in Afghanistan in 2012. Casson said he hopes people stop and take in the memorial as they pass by it at the pond. “It’s a piece that I hope the design will make people think,” he said. “That’s all we can do.” The city is moving forward on the project and is currently preparing to go out for bid on the site work, but Russo said an exact date for when it will be completed has not yet been decided.

A small scale replica shows what a memorial honoring veterans Courtesy Photo will look like when it’s placed at the Temecula Duck Pond later this year..

Rotarians serve at food pantry

Dale Mitchell photo Rotary Club of Fallbrook members spend the morning serving the community at the Fallbrook Food Pantry Jan. 27. Approximately 2,000 pounds of donated food items were sorted, boxed, and prepared for distribution to those with hunger needs. Community service is a priority for the Rotary Club of Fallbrook and is part of Rotary International’s motto of “Service Above Self”. For more information, see www.fallbrookrotary.org.

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The caboose will be coming to Fallbrook once funding is available. FALLBROOK – The much anticipated Fallbrook Railroad Heritage Park project is on schedule. The new historical centerpiece for the downtown area will be a major icon in Fallbrook and will occupy the northwest corner of Main and Elder streets. It will take $16,000 to finish

Phase I, which will allow for grading, laying foundation tracks and transporting the Santa Fe caboose to downtown. The caboose currently is situated in Barstow waiting to be moved to the Fallbrook community. Donations are being accepted to help bring back to Fallbrook

Courtesy photo this part of the city’s rich railroad history. The community can send donations to the Fallbrook Village Association, P.O. Box 2438, Fallbrook, CA 92088. Donations of $500 or more will receive a recognition plaque at the site location.


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

O BITUARIES

S HERRIF'S LOG

card games with Bob and friends, plus quilters’ and newcomers’ groups, as well. As a volunteer and board member at Live Oak Park in Fallbrook, as she had earlier at Dodge Nature Center in Minnesota, Verne shared her love of nature with school groups and community members. A Celebration of Life will be held at the Colony Clubhouse in Murrieta on Friday, March 23 at 10:30 a.m. Attendees are invited to bring a single stem colorful bloom to the gathering. Gifts of Remembrance can be given to:

Laverne Ann (Lance) Christianson, born June 3, 1934, died January 5, 2018. An activist throughout her lifetime, Verne enhanced her communities through countless initiatives of civic engagement, the creative arts and her church. She, with Bob, raised three children, Steve, Jill and Linda, and enjoyed

the accomplishments of her four grandchildren, Stacy, Hanna, Shelly and Stefani. Verne was married to Bob Christianson in her home hometown of LaJunta, Colorado in 1955, after which she and Bob moved to Des Moines, Iowa. Subsequent work promotions for Bob, Verne and the growing family included moves to Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Connecticut and Minnesota. She always contributed to their church life; she was often in the choir and devoted her energy to committees of the church. She was 48 when she and Bob retired early to California. Verne’s leadership and green thumb were evident with her presidency of the San Clemente and Fallbrook Garden clubs. She was an active member and an office holder in the P.E.O. sorority in Fallbrook, then helped establish a new chapter in Murrieta. She loved playing golf,

Dorin (Dode) Kent Martin was born on June 22, 1925 in La Habra, California to Dean and Pansy Martin. He passed away on February 1, 2018 at the age of 92 in Fallbrook, California. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Billie Jean (Muggins), and siblings, Myrtis Story, Theressa Fleming, Donovan Martin, and Anella Campbell. Dode is survived by his daughter,

Diane Foust; granddaughters, Tammy Simpson (Paul), Tracy Rogers (Scott), Tora Schilling (Mark); seven great-grandchildren, and six great-great-grandchildren, as well as many nieces and nephews. Dode lived in Fallbrook for 90 years. He graduated from Fallbrook High School in 1943. As a World War II veteran, Dode served in the Battle of the Bulge in 1944. After completing his service in 1946, Dode and lifelong friend, Dwight Harding, traveled to Oregon to work briefly in the logging industry. Dode returned to Fallbrook and worked for the civil service on Camp Pendleton Military Base as a plasterer. In 1948 Dode’s parents relocated to Oregon, while Dode remained in Fallbrook and resided with his oldest sister, Myrtis Story, her husband, Clarence, and their children, Jack, Cliff, Margaret, and Phyllis. On nights and weekends, Dode spent his time working on cars and

developed a lifelong passion for drag racing, which he then turned into a successful, worldwide business known as Dragmaster Company. In 1998, Dode was inducted into the International Drag Racing Hall of Fame. Dode enjoyed being an active member of the Fallbrook community and dedicated many hours to the Fallbrook Historical Society. In addition to the many hours spent working on cars and giving back to the community, Dode and his wife Muggins also co-founded the Grand Tradition in Fallbrook. Dode was a mentor to many and will be remembered for his easy-going nature, generosity, and sincere desire to help people. A private family interment will be held at the Fallbrook Masonic Cemetery. A Celebration of Life to honor Dode will be held at his workshop located at 810 Palomino Road in Fallbrook on February 17 at 2 p.m.

Martha Jane Kennedy passed peacefully at home surrounded by family on January 23, 2018. She was born September 1, 1944 in Kansas City, Kansas, and was a resident of Fallbrook for 34 years. She is survived by husband Dale of 48 years; daughter Kimberly and husband Jerry Lewis; son Shawn and daughter-in-law April; four grandchildren, Hannah, Brock, Skyler, Jade, and McDaniel brothers Jack, Roy and Joe. She enjoyed houseboat trips, boating and fishing and snow skiing. Her greatest love was

spending time with her family. She was wise, loving and everything good and gracious; a true lady who will be greatly missed. She managed the Fallbrook Gift shop, worked for Ahrend Imaging, was a real estate agent, but most of all a loving wife and mom. She was a member of the National Charity League with daughter Kim, and an auxiliary member of the Distinguished Flying Cross Society. No services are scheduled at this time.

January 19 100 block E. Mission Rd. Commercial burglary 300 block E. Alvarado Lost article January 23 S. Mission Rd. @ Pepper Tree Ln. Driving while license suspended or revoked January 27 1100 block E. Mission Rd. Commercial burglary January 28 1400 block Devin Dr. (1) Arrest: Receive/etc. known stolen property 1400 block Devin Dr. (2) Arrest: Possess controlled substance paraphernalia; possess controlled substance; receive/etc. known stolen property 4000 block Crest Heights Arrest: Felony, assault with deadly weapon: not firearm 1600 block Calavo Rd. Arrest: Felony, likely to cause harm/death of elder/dependent adult 700 block Ranger Rd. Grand theft (from motor vehicle) 1400 block S. Mission Rd. (1) Arrest: Felony, other agency’s warrant 1400 block S. Mission Rd. (2) Arrest: Battery 1100 block E. Fallbrook St. Missing adult 200 block N. Main Ave. Found property January 29 600 block Alturas Rd. Get credit/etc. other’s ID 1100 block S. Mission Rd. Arrest: Felony bench warrant Old Stage Rd. @ Pippin Dr. Arrest: Felony probation violation: rearrest/revoke 1000 block S. Main Ave. Commercial burglary 800 block S. Stage Coach Ln. Arrest: Petty theft 700 block E. Mission Rd. Commercial burglary 2400 block S. Stage Coach Ln. Commercial burglary 1000 block S. Main Ave. Commercial burglary 500 block Alturas Rd. Threaten crime with intent to terrorize 1000 block S. Main Ave. Commercial burglary January 30 W. Beech St. @ S. Main Ave. Obstruct/resist peace officer/EMT 900 block Alturas Rd. Petty theft (from vehicle) 200 block Andalusian Way Commercial burglary 300 block E. Alvarado St. Lost article 1300 block S. Mission Rd. Arrest: Felony, possess controlled substance paraphernalia; possess controlled substance; probation violation: rearrest/revoke 100 block N. Main Ave. Get credit/etc. other’s ID January 31 1900 block E. Mission Rd. Arrest: Misdemeanor bench warrant 400 block Potter St. Stolen vehicle 500 block W. Clemmens Ln. Miscellaneous incidents 2400 block S. Stage Coach Ln. Battery on school employee 1600 block Rainbow Valley Blvd. Arrest: Felony, possess controlled substance for sale 2400 block S. Stage Coach Ln. 5150/Mental disorder 5000 block Second St. Get credit/etc. other’s ID 1100 block S. Mission Rd. Found property February 1 1700 block Reche Rd. Simple battery 100 block S. Mission Rd. Arrest: Felony, personate to make other liable; possess controlled substance paraphernalia; possess controlled substance E. Fig St. @ S. Main Ave. Arrest: Felony probation violation: rearrest/revoke 1100 block S. Mission Rd. Other agency located adult/ juvenile 300 block Woodcrest Dr. Miscellaneous incidents February 2 200 block S. Pico Ave. Arrest: Felony probation violation: rearrest/revoke 300 block W. Hawthorne St. (1) Other agency located adult/ juvenile 300 block W. Hawthorne St. (2) Battery 300 block E. Alvarado St. Found narcotic 1600 block S. Mission Rd. Death February 3 30600 block Via Maria Elena (1) Arrest: Possess controlled substance 30600 block Via Maria Elena (2) Arrest: Possess controlled substance paraphernalia; possess narcotic controlled substance; misdemeanor other agency’s warrant 30600 block Via Maria Elena (3) Robbery 700 block Darla Ln. Arrest: Use/under influence of controlled substance 5500 block Mission Rd. Shoplifting 1200 block S. Mission Rd. Driving while license suspended or revoked 3500 block Rosa Way Grand theft (from building) February 4 2000 block Winterwarm Dr. Death (Coroner’s case) 400 block Iowa St. (1) Arrest: Battery 400 block Iowa St. (2) Drunk in public

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February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

Workman publishes a best seller

The Fallbrook Village News

Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

FALLBROOK – Fallbrook resident Rosemary Workman has announced the publication of her No. 1 Amazon Best Seller titled Blindsided to Blessed: The Roadmap to Success When Life Hits the Fan. It is the true story of how the author found her way back after going through a tragedy that almost destroyed her and her family. Her entire life savings and inheritance were misappropriated by her trusted financial advisor of 13 years in a Ponzi scheme

involving 100 other victims. Workman’s book deals with life’s adversities and takes readers on a journey from the moment of the initial crisis all the way through her recovery and acceptance. Using the image of a road trip, Workman seeks to provide readers with practical steps to finding real solutions to real problems. Workman moved to Fallbrook six years ago with her husband, David, and two golden retrievers. She retired from a career in healthcare in 2013.

Courtesy phots

Wo r k m a n ’s c o m p a n y, Blindsided to Blessed, was founded to create a supportive platform for others who have gone through difficult life events, using humor and compassion to give a lifeline to others when dealing with life’s adversities. The book is available on Amazon. Her website, www. blindsidedtoblessed.com, offers online courses, articles and other tools for dealing with adversity.

Sides given Big Heart Award

Courtesy photo Geri Sides is the Big Heart Award winner for the Bonsall Woman’s Club.

BONSALL - Geri Sides was presented with the club’s annual Big Heart Award at the Feb. 1 meeting of the Bonsall Woman’s Club. The club initiated the Big Heart Award in 2004 and it is appropriately presented to coincide with Valentine’s Day. The Big Heart Award recognizes a member who clearly demonstrates the timehonored tradition of being ready to help others when an act of kindness is needed most, to bring a smile when time and circumstance may not be at their best, to have a big heart that overflows with special compassion for others, and being that person with a giving nature that has no end. Sides clearly possesses these wonderful qualities and has so demonstrated them for over 30 years. Her official position in the club is appropriately designated the ‘Sunshine’ chairperson. As such, she reaches out to members who may

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Dunham wins PCHA Child/ Adult Hunter Championship

Maddy Dunham and Freestyle clear an obstacle during an equestrian event.

Fallbrook resident Rosemary Workman is the author of “Blindsided to Blessed: The Roadmap to Success When Life Hits the Fan.”

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The Pacific Coast Horse Shows Association banquet Jan. 6 at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego included the recognition of PCHA Child/Adult Hunter Championship winner Maddy Dunham. The lifelong Bonsall resident won the Oct. 13-14 competition which was part of the Oct. 11-15 Del Mar International Welcome Week horse show. Separate scores were given for each day and the two daily scores were combined to determine the class winner. Dunham, who turned 17 on Nov. 20, rode Freestyle, a 7-year-old warmblood gelding. Freestyle is owned by Alex and Michelle Parker, whose Cross Creek Ranch is in San Marcos. The Del Mar International Welcome Week competition was Dunham’s second

Courtesy photo

on Freestyle. The October event was also Dunham’s first competition in the PCHA Child/Adult Hunter Championship class which is for both children and adult amateurs. Dunham participates in the online program of Classical Academy and is in 11th grade. She has been involved in show riding since she was 8.

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need a special boost in spirits. She also sends get well and sympathy cards to members who might be experiencing some hard times. One member remarked “When I was in the hospital, that note of cheer from Geri meant more to me than any medicine the doctors prescribed.” For more information on BWC, go to www.bonsallwomansclub.org.

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Woman dies in head-on crash on South Mission Road FALLBROOK – A 20-year-old woman, identified by the Medical Examiner’s Office as Guadalupe Esmeralda Perulero, died and three other people were seriously injured in a head-on crash in Fallbrook early Feb. 4. According to the California Highway Patrol, Perulero was in a rear passenger seat of a small 1996 Saturn sedan when the northbound Saturn drifted into oncoming southbound traffic on South Mission Road and collided with a 2007 Ford U-Haul truck near Quail Knoll Road at approximately 1 a.m. The Saturn’s driver, a 19-yearold Fallbrook man, and his three passengers were all trapped inside the car, and none were believed to have been wearing seat belts, California Highway Patrol Officer Mark Latulippe said. When emergency crews arrived they found Perulero dead in the

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back seat from “obvious fatal trauma,’’ officials said. As of midday Feb. 6, the Medical Examiner’s Office did not have a city or state of residence for Perulero listed on its website. The 19-year-old driver suffered major trauma and a fractured left hand, and was flown to Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Latulippe said. He was expected to survive. The other two passengers, a 17-year-old Escondido girl and a 20-year-old Fallbrook man, were taken to Palomar Medical Center in Escondido with moderate injuries. The driver of the Ford U-Haul, a 27-year-old man from Fallbrook, received minor injuries and was not taken to a hospital, Latulippe said. Officers believe drugs or alcohol may have contributed to the collision.

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strategy development included one-on-one meetings with 16 of the county’s 17 tribes (the county has 18 reservations, but the Capitan Grande reservation is no longer inhabited and is administered by the Viejas and Barona nations whose ancestors lived on the Capitan Grande reservation before the construction of the El Capitan Dam required the residents’ removal). Goals were identified and a survey addressed their relative importance. Safety was the most important goal followed by roadway condition, economic vitality, regional connectivity, tribal mobility, and bicycle and pedestrian access. A total of 136 projects were identified along the Interstate 8, State Route 76, State Route 79, and State Route 94 corridors. The 55 projects along the State Route 76 corridor consist of 36 capital projects with a combined cost of $907.7 million, 12 active

BANDITS

from page A-1

The burglars, apparently not deterred despite getting skunked the first time, came back and did a repeat performance on Yama Sushi, Thai Thai and Little Caesars

February 8, 2018

transportation projects with a total capital cost of $210.3 million, and seven transit projects with a capital cost of $800,000 and operational costs of $3.9 million. The entirety of the tribal transportation strategy has a capital cost of $3.45 billion and operation and maintenance costs of $7.3 million. The strategy has two parts: a process section and a strategy section. The process section provides an overview of the planning effort, existing conditions along tribal corridors, and the method used to develop the inventory of projects. The strategy section includes a list of strategies with shortterm, long-term, and ongoing actions as well as methods to support implementation. The strategies involve support of partnerships and collaboration, coordination of collaborative planning, sharing data in support of tribal transportation with other agencies, and creating funding opportunities. State Route 76 serves the Pala,

Pauma, Rincon, San Pasqual and La Jolla reservations. The transportation needs survey noted the need for safety improvements between Rice Canyon Road in Fallbrook and Pala Casino. The California Department of Transportation is planning an improvement project for the 19 miles between Valley Center Road and State Route 79 which involves road straightening, shoulder widening, and lighting improvements. The tribal mobility needs assessment survey also indicated needs for bicycle lanes and improved shoulders along State Route 76 including sections near Pala Mission Road, Pala Temecula Road, Valley Center Road, Paradise Mountain Road and Woods Valley Road. New turn lanes were deemed to be needed at several locations,including Magee Road/Pala Raceway Road and Pala Road. Roundabouts or other traffic calming measures are desired at the intersections with Palomar Mountain Road and with Sengme Oaks Road. Additional

ridesharing or shuttle services for casino employees, increased transit service, additional bus stops and new transit service are also desired specifically between Valley Center Road and State Route 79. The capital projects accessing or within the Pala portion of the State Route 76 corridor include constructing a bridge across the San Luis Rey River, adding turn lanes at Magee Road/Pala Raceway Road, paving various dirt residential roads, paving the Lilac Road extension from State Route 76 to the reservation boundary, and paving various roads. The safety-related projects for the Pala segment are straightening curves along State Route 76 between Rice Canyon Road and the Pala Indian Reservation, intersection improvements at Highway 76 and Pala Mission Road and at Pala Mission Road and Pala Temecula Road, and safety improvements along Pala Temecula Road. The Pauma portion improvements include general roadway improvements from

Adams Drive to Reservation Road and from Reservation Road to Pala Road, adding a turn lane at State Route 76 and Pala Road, street lights at Reservation Road from Pala Road to Reservation Road, and a traffic signal at Pala Road and Cole Grade Road. The active transportation projects for the Pala segment of the Highway 76 corridor would add bicycle lanes along three miles of Pala Mission Road/Temecula Road from Arouba Road to State Route 76 and along three miles of State Route 76 from the west reservation boundary to the east reservation boundary and add a sidewalk along three miles of Pala Mission Road/Temecula Road from the reservation boundary to State Route 76. The desired transit projects include ridesharing or shuttles for Pala Casino employees and increased transit service along North County Transit District Route 388 which runs between the Escondido Transit Center and Pala Casino.

in the early morning hours of Jan. 29. Again they came away with no money, however, they did get away with a whopping two cases of Gatorade from Little Caesars. The crooks also hit Fallbrook Cafe the morning of Jan. 29 and finally did get some money. “They smashed a side patio door on the west side of the building,

came in and ran around inside for awhile and stole some cash out of the office,” said Ashkar. “Of all the burglaries that we’ve had here, that’s the only real cash loss.” Surveillance camera footage from the burglaries show two male suspects who are almost completely covered up. It is believed a third accomplice waits

for his partners in a getaway vehicle. Ashkar said it is yet to be determined if the same suspects are responsible for both the Dec. 26 and Jan. 29 break-ins. “They covered their faces and they hid their vehicles so it’s hard to say if these are the exact same people as the ones who came in (Dec. 26),” said Ashkar. “They’re doing the same thing, but without seeing their faces you really can’t tell if these are the identical human

beings.” Ashkar said it could be a group working as a team. “They’re covered up, but based on their body size and body types, they may be switching people out,” said Ashkar. “On a 25-man roster in baseball the same nine guys are aren’t always playing. That’s kind of how I’m looking at it.” Anyone with information regarding the burglaries is asked to call the Fallbrook substation at (760) 451-3100.

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calculus AB and entered directly into AP calculus BC. This has not affected his progress this year, in fact, he is near the top of the class. Michael is truly excited to solve difficult math problems. There are times in my lecture that he is many steps ahead of me and is able to predict accurately how the mathematics is related to past topics. “He is well respected by both his peers and his teachers. He is honest, trustworthy and has a good moral compass. Michael has also played varsity baseball all four years and manages to balance both academics and sports quite nicely. He has a 4.2 GPA for grades 10 to 12 and is a strong overall student. I know he will be successful at the next level of education.” Gross said he wants to study aerospace engineering and is considering many prestigious schools, including Purdue, Stanford and MIT. He thanked both Berg and Fellios as well as those in attendance. “I’d like to thank all the community members that came out to support us,” said Gross. “It means a lot that people outside the high school care about people in the high school so much.” Fellios remained at the podium to introduce her nominee, Castellanos, a young lady who has managed to excel in school while simultaneously caring for her ailing mother and younger siblings. Fellios explained that she first met Castellanos four years ago when the student enrolled in AVID (advancement via individual determination) at FHS. “Today, I am more amazed than ever at her strength of character and resiliency,” said Fellios of Castellanos. “An advanced placement student, Suzetty is an inquisitive and reflective individual who participates effectively in class discussions and debates, especially on topics when she can defend the rights of all human beings.” Fellios relayed that Castellanos has won many awards at speech competitions and is an active leader on campus, where she serves as copresident of California Scholarship Federation and secretary of the AVID student council. Castellanos also is a member of Club Futuro and dances with Club Folklorico. “Remarkably, in spite of serious challenges that no one should be forced to experienced at any age, Suzetty wears a vibrant smile and reflects a positive spirit throughout the school day every day,” said Fellios, adding that Castellanos stays on top of her studies and makes up work when she must miss school in order to help her mother. “Suzetty is determined to never

give up on her dream to attend university and excel, so that after graduation, she will be a productive citizen and still support her family,” said Fellios. “She understands the sacrifices that her parents have made for their children.” Castellanos thanked Fellios, her mentors at AAUW (American Association of University Women), her family, the community and Andrus from St. Peter’s. She also expressed great gratitude for the AVID program. “I just really love AVID because it shaped me and made me a better person,” said Castellanos. “(AVID) instills values in you that are very important in life,” Castellanos said she would like to attend UC Berkeley and then step out in the business world. “I hope to be accepted to UC Berkeley and I hope to pursue marketing,” said Castellanos. “That’s my No. 1 thing – or just go into the business world because I do feel that women are misrepresented in the business world. I’d like to change that along with the other wonderful women who are out in the business world. I’d like to be one of them and make a name for myself.” Due to the flu bug, Basurto and her family were unable to make the Student of the Month celebration, however, the standout Oasis student was still recognized. Oasis principal Dr. Narcisco Iglesias read comments about Basurto that were written by teacher Kevin Kent, who was also unable to attend the breakfast. Comments by Kent that were relayed by Iglesias included: “Kenia Basurto is such an excellent choice for Student of the Month from Oasis High School. Academically, she does excellent work. She has earned no less than a 3.25 GPA or higher every semester since coming to Oasis High School at the start of her sophomore year and as a senior she has earned a 4.0 GPA from her first semester this year. She is meticulous, organized and thorough with her assignments. When she is assigned something to do, you can trust that it will be completed on time, and with care and concern. “She is a very diligent student that is concerned about the learning process as well as the content. Kenia is a very bright, cheerful and thoughtful young lady. She always has a smile on her face and displays a very kind demeanor. She is such a positive person, always speaking well of others and putting other’s needs and interests ahead of hers. She represents all that is best about Oasis High School.” The awards breakfast is presented by Fallbrook Student of the Month, a nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring outstanding students in the Fallbrook Union High School District.

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from page A-1 said. Hunter is survived by his parents and his brother John. The family lives in Rainbow. “His dream was to combine his love for travel and people and go all over the world to help those in need through organizations such as Doctors Without Borders and Samaritan Aviation,” the Conners said. One student, Rachel Fraser, remembers Hunter for his big smile. “He was a really outdoorsy kid, and really sweet,” Fraser said. FHS’ Ag department’s Doug Sehnert knew Hunter the four years Hunter was at Fallbrook High. “Hunter was a good solid kid. He was one of our FFA Chapter’s State Proficiency Winners.” Sehnert explained that Hunter farmed on the family farm and helped people out who were less fortunate. “Hunter was also a member of the vegetable farming team of judges,” Sehnert added. “Our lives are forever changed with his loss but we are eternally grateful for the privilege of sharing his life and the immense joy he brought to us,” the Conners said. “He will be remembered for his beautiful smile, kind, and generous heart, his desires to travel the world, his quick wit, his love of others and love of life.”

Courtesy photos

Hunter Conner graduates from Fallbrook High School, June 2017. Craig Sturak, a spokesman for San Diego County Health and Human Services, said that though the death of such a young, healthy, man is rare, there have been several cases this year with the “severe flu season.” He mentioned that the percentage of flu cases in hospital emergency rooms dominates over any other problem. For some, the flu turns into a nasty pneumonia, which turns septic in the victim. The body starts to shut down then as the blood stream is taken over by the bacterial microorganisms. Sturak said it’s important to not

ignore flu symptoms when you are experiencing them. Go to the doctor. Stay hydrated. And if you are healthy and haven’t caught the flu, continue to wash hands, don’t touch your face – eyes, nose, mouth and ears – when you are out shopping or touching things in public. The virus can survive several days on surfaces such as door handles, toilet handles, light switches, etc. County Health also advocates getting the flu vaccine if you haven’t gotten one yet.

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February 8, 2018

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Village News Fallbrook & Bonsall

a l s o se rv i n g t h e c o m m u n i t i e s o f

February 8, 2018

D e L u z , R a i n b ow, C a m p P e ndl e t o n , Pa l a ,

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Volume 22, Issue 6

Potter students deminstrate their spelling skills

The top three students in the 2018 Potter Jr. High School Spelling Bee are, from left, second place, Simon Snead; first place, Viviana Lasley and third place, Holly Pirk.

Shane Gibson photos

Potter Jr. High spelling bee participant Perla Garcia listens carefully as her word is given by judges, Jan. 30.

Potter Jr. High student Aniyah Henderson waits her turn in the final rounds of the spelling bee competition, Jan. 30. She finished in fourth place in the spelling bee.

McKenna Goodman waits her turn to spell a word during the Potter Jr. High Spelling Bee, Jan. 30.

Potter Jr. High students participate in the school’s annual spelling bee, Jan. 30. After spelling words like coquelicot, vicissitudes and ichthysaurus, the first place winner goes on to compete in the San Diego County Spelling Bee.

A Potter Jr. High School Spelling Bee judge holds up a green card signifying the correct spelling of a word during the competition.

Armando Corona waits among a group of empty chairs as the group of competing students thins out during the Potter Jr. High Spelling Bee, Jan. 30. Corona went on to finish in fifth place among his peers.

Melia Goodman stretches during a break in the spelling bee contest at Potter Jr. High Jan. 30.


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February 8, 2018

H EALTH

WOW program provides opioid education Lucette Moramarco lmoramarco@reedermedia.com

The Feb. 1 Women of Wellness program (WOW) featured CVS pharmacist Don Weeks talking about “Opioids: What they are and how they work.” Fallbrook Regional Health District (FRHD) hosted the program at Fallbrook Library. First, Weeks said that it is “really illegal opioids that are the major problem” in the current opioid epidemic; while the number of prescriptions being written for opioids has leveled off, the use of illegal opioids has gone up. According to Weeks, these drugs have molecules that attach to opioid receptors in the brain, nervous system and GI tract. Overall, there are 17 different types of receptors that opioids bind to, “suppressing the perception of pain, reducing the amount of pain felt and calming one’s emotional response to pain,” he said. There are lots of different kinds of opioids that are derived from the opium poppy flower. Morphine, he explained, is the standard against which other opioids are compared to in the United States. He said codeine is one-third as potent as morphine whereas hypocodone, often mixed with acetaminophen, is 1 ½ times the strength of morphine. Oxycodone (Oxycontin) is also 1 ½ times the strength of morphine. In the late 80s to early 90s, the medical community was concerned about untreated and under-treated pain in America. Weeks said that pain became the fifth vital sign after temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure. Unlike the other four signs which are objectively measurable, scoring pain is very subjective in how people feel and handle it. Weeks said fentanyl, which was developed in the 90s and taken in lozenges or in sublingual form (under the tongue), is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. Fentanyl is measured in micrograms and is prescribed from 280 mg to 2400 mg a day. In late 1995, Oxycontin was approved by the FDA. Oxycontin was then marketed in 1996 and made $45 million in sales. In 2000, after a market blitz, he said the drug made $1.1 billion for its company which touted it as nonaddictive and safe. Oxycontin is designed to take two to three hours

to take effect, so another dose is not needed for 12 hours. The drug builds up in one’s system and takes three to four days to reach full strength. After that, it only last six hours so doctors began prescribing it for every eight hours and it became over-prescribed. Starting in 1998, fentanyl was prescribed as a low dose patch which takes 24 hours to take effect and three to four days to reach the level it works best at for eight to 12 hours. Because it is slowly absorbed through the skin, into the bloodstream, the patch has a large concentration of the drug in it so that when the patch is changed every three days there is still a reservoir of opioids in the patch when it is discarded. This is a big issue, Weeks pointed out, because “people swipe patches out of the trash.” When people use discarded patches, the rate of absorption is not known or controlled. To dispose of the patches and other medications, besides taking them to the sheriff’s station, Weeks advised mixing them loose (not in packaging or bottles) in bags with coffee grounds, vegetable waste or cat litter before putting them into the trash. In the 2000s, government statistics showed an increase in overdose deaths. As a result, a lot of legislation has changed how drugs are handled. Vicodin and Percocet had been classified as Schedule 3 narcotics. In late 2015, new legislation changed them and hydrocodone to Schedule 2 narcotics for which prescriptions cannot be called in to a pharmacy. These prescriptions can only be sent electronically if the system is a secure one. Otherwise the doctors have to hand write the prescriptions to be carried into the pharmacy, all in an attempt to solve the problem of illegal opioid use. While the number of opioid prescriptions has gone down, Weeks said, the number of deaths from opioid use has gone up. In 2014 there were 47,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. and in 2015 there were 50,000. In 2016 there were 63,000 accidental overdoses and in 2017 there were 66,000, most caused by illegal or illicit drugs on the street. Many doctors are no longer writing prescriptions for opioids so people are finding their own. “That is the crux of the problem,” Weeks said, “drugs come into the country

Pharmacist Don Weeks answers questions about opioids at the WOW event at Fallbrook Library Feb. 1. full strength, then are cut and cut and cut again, so you don’t know what you are getting.” While opioids are used as pain relievers, they have “a side effect of causing major respiratory depression; they block signals to the brain that keep you breathing,” he said. If the signal is blocked, people stop breathing so 90 percent of opioid deaths are the result of respiratory depression. A lot of these people are also on muscle relaxants, which also cause respiratory depression as do valium and Xanax, which are prescribed for anxiety. Add on use of illicit opioids and the person taking them goes to sleep and does not wake up.

The Best Care, Available 24/7

According to Weeks, another problem is high school parties where teenagers bring drugs taken from their parents’ and/or grandparents’ medicine cabinets and throw them all into a container. Each teen reaches in, takes a handful of pills and then swallows them, sometimes all at once, which can kill them. They do it for the euphoria effect as the drugs produce endorphins. Weeks said a lot more changes are coming up including enforcement with illegal drugs and how prescriptions are handled. Some insurance companies will now only allow a seven-day prescription. Questions from the audience brought up related topics. Opioids also cause constipation as there are opioid receptors in the bowels and the drugs limit peristaltic movement. Many people who need opioids are inactive or flat on their backs, “a recipe for constipation,” Weeks said. He also said that there are some opioids, like Imodium, that can reverse that side effect by attaching themselves to antagonist receptors. Someone brought up a reminder that federal law prohibits a drug’s use by anyone besides the person it was prescribed for. The subject of hospice and unused drugs also

Lucette Moramarco photo came up with one person saying hospice staff should take left over medications while someone else said he was told they belonged to the person’s estate. Another person pointed out that there are opioid recovery programs to help people overcome addiction. When it was said that drugs should be taken as instructed, Weeks said that it is mandatory by state law that a pharmacist must offer a consultation to any customer with a new prescription. The customer can decline it but the pharmacist is suppose to explain the drug and how to take it. A pharmacist can also answer questions about side effects and drug interactions. WOW is presented by FRHD on the first Thursday of each month to educate local residents on a variety of health issues. Women, as well as men, are invited to the event to socialize, have refreshments before the program and win door prizes afterward. Local businesses and organizations donate food, water and prizes each month. Attendees are asked to contribute items for the Fallbrook Food Pantry. For more information, contact Pam Knox at pknox@ fallbrookhealth.org or (760) 7319187.

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We will help anyone regardless of race, religion, creed or nationality. • Since our origination year, 2000, we have helped thousands of needy persons and families. • Major supporters of Fallbrook Food Pantry. • Soup kitchen serves 45 meals daily. • Major donations to REINS Therapeutic Horseman Program, Fallbrook Adult Day Care Center, Fallbrook Senior Center and more.

WE ACCEPT VEHICLE DONATIONS If you would like to be a part of this worthwhile organization, please contact St. Vincent De Paul at 760-728-7012. We accept donations at the Thrift Shop, located at 520 S. Main Ave., from 10am to 2pm Monday through Friday. Furniture pick-up is available. Please call 760-728-7012.


February 8, 2018

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LOS ANGELES – The newly released American Lung Association State of Tobacco Control 2018 report shows California leads the nation, earning strong grades for its tobacco control policies. The 16th annual report grades states and the federal government on policies to prevent and reduce tobacco use. California’s grades improved to the best in the nation thanks to strong policies across the state and the enactment of the new tobacco tax increase approved by voters. “This year, California began reaping the financial and health benefits of an increased tobacco tax,” Mark Johnson, board chair for the American Lung Association in California, said. “I’ve seen personally how effective it can be as one of my close relatives, a longtime smoker, finally quit the day the tobacco tax went into effect. Our family was so grateful for his lifestyle change and we’ve already seen a big improvement in his health.” The hundreds of millions in increased tobacco taxes from Proposition 56 now flowing to critical state health and prevention programs led to a big grade increase for California. The state received an “A” grade for funding for state tobacco prevention programs, up from an “F” in 2016. California’s grade for smoking cessation services also improved from an “F” to a “C.” California also earned an “A” for its “Smoke-free Air Policies,” a “B” for the “Level of Tobacco Taxes” and a “B” for the “Minimum Age of Sale for Tobacco Products to 21.” In conjunction with the national report, the American Lung Association in California released its companion State of Tobacco Control 2018 – California Local Grades report, which issues grades for all 482 cities and 58 counties in California on local tobacco control policies. Highlights from this year’s report include: a record number of 10 communities improved their overall grade to an “A” from last year; California now has 31 communities with an overall “A” grade and 17 fewer communities received an overall “F” grade compared to last year. This past year, some cities changed their policies thanks to the hard work of youth in the community. Cities like Laguna Beach in Orange County and Bell Gardens and Bell in Los Angeles

County passed smoke-free policies that will improve public health. “It was such a cool experience for us. We were able to talk to the Bell City Council and tell them how smoking at public parks set a bad example for kids in our community and they responded,” Beatrice Castillo, a senior at Bell High School, said. “We actually made a difference. It’s a beautiful feeling to know that as a youth, you’ve been able to convince elected officials to listen to you. It was very inspiring.” But despite all these community successes, half of California’s population still live in communities scoring a “D” or “F.” It includes nearly half of the 10 most populous cities in the state, including Anaheim, Los Angeles and Long Beach which remain in the middle of the pack with “C” grades. “Smoking rates continue to decline in California, yet tobacco use remains the state’s leading cause of preventable death and disease, killing nearly 40,000 Californians each year,” Vanessa Marvin, vice president of public policy and advocacy for the American Lung Association in California, said. “Tobacco use is a serious addiction, and the fact that 11 percent of California adults still smoke highlights how much work remains to be done in our communities to prevent and reduce tobacco use.” State and local elected officials continue to pursue policies that reduce youth access to tobacco products and e-cigarettes, reduce exposure to secondhand smoke in multi-unit housing and public facilities and protect those relentlessly targeted by Big Tobacco’s deceptive marketing campaigns including low-income and rural communities and the LGBTQ community. The American Lung Association in California is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease through research, education and advocacy. The Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer, to improve the air people breathe, to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association in California or to support the work it does, call (800) 685-4872 or visit www.lung. org/California.

Another way to prevent bedsores David Lewis Special to the Village News

The Fallbrook Village News recently published an article concerning bedsores and the financial risk to health care facilities because of them. Bed sores, or decubitus ulcers, are serious medical conditions that can lead to the death of the patient, which is what happened to actor Christopher Reeve (Superman) in 2004. In many cases, incontinence of the patient promotes a bed sore. The medical device featured in the article takes the approach of introducing air, or oxygen, right to the affected area, to assist healing. A device such as this, one that can prevent or help heal the sore, is obviously very beneficial for the patient. However, the article makes no mention of the predominate “device” for bed sore prevention or treatment: the therapeutic alternating-pressure air mattress. Alternating-pressure air mattresses have been available for many years, and from multiple manufacturers. The basic concept is simple: make a mattress from many individual inflatable air sacks, which are the width of the bed, from patient’s head to feet. Then connect these air sacks to two air supply hoses, one hose supplying the air sacks numbered 1,3,5... while the other hose supplies those numbered 2,4,6... An air pump with controllable valves then directs air to only the odd-numbered air sacks for a period of time, then inflates the even-numbered air sacks while allowing air to escape from the

odd-numbered group. This backand-forth inflating and deflating is continued automatically, often under the control of a microprocessor. The beneficial effect is that the patient is never supported at any part of their body continuously, even if the patient is not in a condition to move on their own. As the air pressure is released on one group of air sacks, the force against the patient’s skin is completely relieved, allowing unrestricted blood flow, and in some cases, ventilation for drying. A further benefit is the avoidance of capillary occlusion, which happens when the pressure against the patient chokes off blood flow, occurring especially where bones are close to the skin. This will lead to cells in that area dying, so air pressure sensors are often used to ensure the patient is supported safely, by limiting the pressure. Many variations and enhancements are available beyond the basic air mattress described here, including the industry-common low air-loss arrangement, or our patented method of introducing air to the top sheet which the patient lays on. These techniques have the aim of drying the patient’s skin. KAP Medical in Corona, the company which I represent, supplies medical device distributors with air mattress systems manufactured right here in California, many being supplied to major hospitals and other treatment facilities world-wide. David Lewis, a Fallbrook resident, is co-owner of KAP Medical.

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Valentine’s Day – a good excuse to improve a relationship

American Counseling Association You may be someone who loves Valentine’s Day, is totally indifferent to it or hates what an over-commercialized holiday it is, but regardless, it’s still a good opportunity to think about the romantic relationships in which we’re involved. This doesn’t mean you have to run out and buy big boxes of chocolates or giant bunches of flowers, but it can be a good chance to examine your relationship and evaluate ways that you could make it better. Romantic relationships are delicate things that need constant care and attention to survive, mainly because we, like our relationships, tend to change over time. An initial phase for most serious romantic relationships is simply being head over heels in love. Your partner is a wonderful person and you want to do as much as you can to make him or her happy. But as time goes on, that desire and those feelings tend to lessen. It’s not that you aren’t still in love and interested in making that special person happy, but as months or years go by it’s not unusual that we become more used to the relationship. We may forget that we need to pay attention to keeping the romance alive. It’s often noted that most failed relationships don’t explode but simply fade over time as the romance disappears and one or both partners begin to feel neglected or unimportant. A first step in reviving the romance is simply to show your partner that you’re still paying attention. Remember important days, like that birthday and anniversary, maybe even the anniversary of your first date or a special vacation you took

together. Just a simple card or small gift on such occasions, or going to a favorite restaurant, can mean a lot, even if you need your cell phone calendar to remind you. It’s also important to make time for your partner. Perhaps you want to schedule a weekly “date night.” Maybe it means setting aside 30 minutes each day to share thoughts, discuss feelings and make future plans. Making time to communicate is always a strong way to improve a relationship. Valentine’s Day may get all the

publicity for being that special day for love, but building and maintaining a strong, active relationship is more than a oneday-a-year project. Put some effort into keeping your romance alive and you’ll find it will pay real rewards. Counseling Corner” is provided by the American Counseling Association. Comments and questions to ACAcorner@ counseling.org or visit the ACA website at www.counseling.org.

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

E NTERTAINMENT Invitations are out for ‘The Wedding to Die for’ Elizabeth Youngman-Westphal eyoungman@reedermedia.com

and Bruce’s ex, Karoline Karter (Cari Garrison), of the Georgia Karter’s and not those “goobergrowers, Rosalyn and Jimmy”. Other cast members include the father of the bride, Jackie Fitzhugh (Dean Robinson), a business owner of multiple gag shops; the groom’s mother, Sylvia Montgomery (Diana Fink), along with longtime family maid Fanny Fishburne (Kathy Simmons) and a special appearance by the undisclosed Detective Starkey. The only gift you need to bring to the wedding is a ticket for only $15 which includes the reception with cake and appetizers. Seating is limited so do not wait. Call Mary Fry at (760) 468-6302 or stop by Major Market customer service booth to save your seats before they are all gone.

You and a guest are cordially invited to attend “The Wedding to Die for” at Christ the King Lutheran Church in Fallbrook. Appetizers and wedding cake will be served at the reception. Curtain Call Company is presenting a sentimental return to the whodunit murder mystery, “The Wedding to Die for,” at three public performances: Friday the 16th at 7:30 p.m., Saturday Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. with the final performance Sunday, Feb. 18 at 2 p.m. All three productions will be at Christ the King, 1620 S. Stage Coach Lane. The plot unravels at the wedding of Tina Fitzhugh (Cianna Garrison) to Bruce Montgomery (Cassidy Mitchell) when both of their former fiancé’s interrupt the ceremony. Mayhem ensues as Judge Emmitt (Luis Nunez) tries to keep the wedding ceremony on track in spite of the many disruptions headed up by Tina’s former beau, Denny O’Connell (Eric Warner)

the · village · beat

Courtesy photo

Appearing in “The Wedding to Die for” are, from left, front row, Dean Robinson, Kathy Simmons; second row, Eric Warner, Cianna Garrison, Cassidy Mitchell, Diana Fink, Cari Garrison; back row, Luis Nunez.

Singer and songwriter Loggins to perform at Pala July 6

Don’t miss a beat on what is happening in Fallbrook, Bonsall, Pala, De Luz and Rainbow. Whether it is breaking news, local youth sports, or information on events and activities, you will find it quickly and easily at

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PALA – Singer and songwriting legend Kenny Loggins will perform in concert Friday, July 6, at 8 p.m. at the Starlight Theater at Pala Casino Spa & Resort. Loggins’ early songwriting compositions were recorded with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1970, which led to seven albums, performing as the group Loggins and Messina from 1972 to 1977. Loggins, as a solo artist, experienced a string of soundtrack successes, including an Academy Award nomination for “Footloose” in 1984. His early soundtrack contributions date back to the film “A Star Is Born” in 1976, and for much of the 1980s and 1990s, he was known as “The Soundtrack King.” “Finally

Home” was released in 2013, shortly after Loggins formed the group Blue Sky Riders with Gary Burr and Georgia Middleman. Tickets are on sale with no service charge at the Pala Box Office in the casino, or call (877) 946-7252 or visit www.palacasino.com. Tickets also are available at Star Tickets, 1-800-585-3737, or www.startickets.com.

Kenny Loggins Courtesy photo

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your source for everything menifee - local information, news & business

As a City of Transition & Transformation

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I’ll have see these tubes pg 136 first time in will find a small inside of. from a them in other for the to down t emerges to the excited I had not seen their peculiar tors tube championship County Join Siggins gopher they can crawl lead to a narrowy , with history. The North the program’s because the Elijah me of consisting oftheir opening will structures passagewa visiting reminded for one victory Warriors concluded Powers Authority arrived, shape, The s. many years.experience y, and this old The Public Utility 2-1 a hide-out group an formations a with first individual Fallbrook or season crust. cavern. sturdy My of the 2013-14creatures from were School inpassagewa its tube-like and the Rainbow to a large a Temecula After our the hard lavathat the tunnels Section worm Patrick Henry High March District (FPUD) District will be that crater and when my childrenleader Siroky, 8opens page A-3 thoseover rough hiked over III final trip was When Kori told by doctorsiroky, were so Municipal Water April 5. CIF Division happened the 4-H hiking High we be careful scary of the themovie. see HIKING, The was Some areas and I had to knees. highlight College. resident, in 4-H; Recht, a Hamilton dissolved effective vote March 5, heart The Lilly Detillion-S at Mesa Glove Cave. intoemotion mouth of other hikersand scrape our with a rarehypertubes going “It’s down theexperiencing her daughter greatinside teacher. A 4-1 Rainbow in opposition, was Jane surface Fallbrook diagnosed Biology a brave Hiking not to fall said as find Sanford this,” was located like pulmonary Dennis is 7, School with the to be would something called it was like Often we’d lose a member the cave termination of Luis Velasquez, I decided I learned Recht I condition 2007, she said approved the through junior forward crater. then we’d in the Warriors agreement with tension out of a movie. leader when to see the with and crawled bravely joint powers whose goal provided to give them B-5 of victory. to get there other they the scene be traveling FPUD. “We votedto end the joint with the margin to come this far see page 3 hours seven traveled group of the 30-day notice “It’s always hard a good team,” Rainbow board a determined powers,” said McManigle. and lose, but they’re Cody Clark coach president George Patrick Henry delivered the notice McManigle www.myvalleynews.com 6. said of the Warriors. and hoped for July 10 – 16, 2015 Volume 15, Issue 28 FPUD on March of termination to “We just prepared knew it was we t the the best because said WATER, page A-12 see fight,” tough throughou a District going to be Jorge Rojas. High schools School Fallbrook coach announce Unified Patriots both Hemet are proud to salutatoriThe Warriors and final league Ken Seals photo their ans and (HUSD) website. placed third in posted a won the of 2014. to first-ever their valedictori ian the USGS teamedited fromsoccer standings. Fallbrook of 8-10-4, the Class isboys varsity been a This School record ans for calculates valedictor High using regular-season 8. have compromising HUSD Marchmay Avocado West The 2013/2014 Fallbrook program on Parts n honors grade without for the including a 3-4-3 student’s and salutatoria fit paper B-3 CIF championship where the SAT scores are formula content. and see SOCCER, page color a bit of point average true that . harmful be awardIt may be not make it it multipliedtop honors may are lower makes may These in water but it certainly whose GPA drink, Tim O’Leary ed to students drink. does matg toamputee or second. forto double it.Debbie Ramsey than first custom home unappealin Staff Writer in our water Brengle So color comes to drinking toManaging Editor Troops to build factor it Savannah School is honof Homes for Our as important hope ter when High that we Temecula a team the honor may be a also an officials is Hamilton Savannah Brengle a to water as for Sgt. Julian Torres Color has earned Class of 2014 of volunteers carries in regard and other have such stepsinwill amputee, but that doesn’t High’s McGowan finalize ored to ian. Savannah combined consider double purposes Maggie solve what they say “a great in “giving Supervisors uses,isand n of Hamilton for other photos Valedictor and scored a useproblem” slow him down Salutatoria Hamilton that has surfaced nts. at their uses, industrial combat veterans arrangement for 4.23 GPAthe SAT. Dinamed of 2014 home environme back” to other newest amenity. UC San has been the same plight. Class Ridge 2010 on A-3 some aquatic to attend Brengle High’s experiencing g. page Torres the Horse Creek see see page A-5 She plans Engineerin Savannah ian of Hamilton That’s what makes study of a Homes for Valedictor ego and perfect recipient off Gird Road Joe Naiman page A-2 Our Troops project Village News Correspondent see HUSD, in Fallbrook. location; a Facilities “This is our dream but not too The Community the Horse for little slice of country now percent District (CFD) ���A-6 from city; it’s 100 “When Creek Ridge development Creek ������������������� far Torres. exists. 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Additional speakers many Gaita, ceremony for Sgt. from t Winner of Carlo Sgt. make the stuleft, JJ and daughter groundbreaking are, one helped Miller, Contestan school included USMC highwife Ashley with son for Our Troops people Participating in the Lions Club, see page A-13 the project Benford, and his Torreschose Larock how to representand USMC Sgt. Major provided by Homes Julian MD4, this year’s Roy; Dad Curtis (Ret.) Members of the Temecula Valley Major Bill Young Marines march down Front Street in Old Town carrying a massive American flag during Temecula’s 4th Mayor; Sgt.within Fallbrook home a goal, Hennings Bill Horn; was unsure Julie Supervisor Honorary but County Emma Supervisor Fallbrook Industries; Shane Gibson photo of July parade. See more Independence Day photos on page A-6. unit, Diego to achieve Daryl Hosler, round. Quiroz, San dent World Martin stronger Honorary Herrera, Armstrongwhen the next the speech contest many hands DeMenge, field rep for in and Joe do Lee,that. Chair 1937, them in Kyle, Horn, and Fallbrook and It takes won Analicia, Contest Quiroz. of California were Bruce changed Cunningham, Governor into to Benford. Hennings high school level Mayor Martin Judges Student Speech for Our the State is divided District the con(Ret.) LarockThings against all over the local Torres said Homeshis wife’s Tucker recognized Simmons the districts Lions Deputy suggested a great at now be competing his and each of will to be Troops made chapters. the contest came Frank Coiston page A-5 every proved Thomas come true. of severalidea to hold something that test, which has been held By Jodi short Debbie Ramsey see SPEECH, your dream July The the start for 15, 2010, one and Editor On to have every local year markst of the high out of a search could participaten success deployed to Managing of the by A new Call today month after being lost his left year since. the Anza Chapter s seen Contest,” all the 15 districtslarger organizatio installmen of Ivy High -7319 Torres with The Speech another Jasmine Herrera Cunningham, Afghanistan, This year leg busines ner! 760-723 together. districts to interact California om a “Student knee and his right an school unique to the Multiple in become the School and AmandaHailey Tucker homeow g@thevillagenews.cleg below the in wanted after stepping on more and Kyle, and an event above the knee chapters device (IED) James School were one another Or advertisin Joe Naiman Lions Club improvised explosive in Marjah. of Fallbrook High of the Month Linda McDonald-Cash 4 (MD4). 15 districts a canal Village News Correspondent as Students District composed of while crossing out of the honored Union High Special to the Valley News MD4 is limit on Gum Medically evacuated be for the Fallbrook a (FUHSD) at The 35 mph speed Stage Coach said, “I had to country, Torres all along School District breakfast Hello Friends and Neighbors! Tree Lane betweenLane has been major hospitals celebratory to taken me special Thought I’d discuss a little different could keep Lane and Hamilton enforcement. the way so they got stateside.” page B-13 topic this week and one which evI recertified for radar County see STUDENTS, stabilized until States, Torres ery gardener needs to know about A 5-0 San Diego vote Once in the UnitedWalter Reed and that’s what equipment or tools at Board of Supervisors the radar was treated Md., where are needed in the garden. February 26 approved Hospital in Bethesda,rehabilitation for the 0.76-mile initial recertification sure see page B-1 he received his need to make therapies before segment. “We has all surgeries and ������������������������A-2 Diego. to that law enforcement Announcements A-10 coming to San tools available San Diego the necessary “In my opinion, is Business ����������������������������������� B-11 to keep our roads Medical Center them in order �������������������������������� Bill Horn. Balboa Naval that’s where Classifieds����������������������������������� A-14 safe,” said SupervisorTree Lane’s the top of the sphere; said. Coupons Gum �����A-8 “Recertifying Shane Gibson photo I went for rehab,” he he and his Dining �������������������������������������� limit for radar B-12 that H. Frazier 35 mph speed allow officers of Torres explained old, had been Education ���������������������������������� in front of William the re-authorizationfrom B-14 enforcement will radar guns to Traffic accumulates Tree Lane where wife, each 26 yearsto buy in recent Entertainment �������������������������� use motorists School on Gum A-12 to continue to to help monitor of vehicles and Elementary looking for a home have to contain Health & Fitness ��������������������� will be put in place measure the speed but it would radar enforcement & Garden ������������������������B-4 were years, speed. take action as necessary.” �� A-15 Roberts, 11, Jamie Frederick and Kendall Roberts, 9, hold up the speed survey drove many special features.that fit this Home speed limit to using excessive �������������������������������������� Cayla or drivers in In order for a seven -9 “To find a house my type of Legals by radar, a speed Department of Public Works signs in an attempt to save the Canyon Lake Fire Department on at 41 mph or above, were with be enforceable Obituaries ������������������������������������A perform speed Daniel Lanemph, and the other 203 ��A-5 that the speed size of family Courtesy photo impossible,” Opinion �������������������������������������� Friday, July 3. survey must showadjacent 5 mph DPW contractorsseven years on at 40 40 mph. nearly was 4 injury we Multimedia Journalist an below surveys every limit is within between Stage explained Torres. “The houses which have been Real Estate ����������������������������������BKim Harris 85th percentile �����B-2 Gum Tree Lane limits and there are many who feel Lane have had to have increment to the limit can be road segments Hamilton andenter Laneones radar enforcement.As a family’s loved into zone looked at would changed.” Or, if Sports �������������������������������������� Managing Editor abandoned by their elected leaders. if certified for findings were made Coach speed. The speed a school been gutted and includes their it’s important to Justin Triplett was additional 5 mph Some residents took matters alsoyears, No special Courtesy photo limit,golden Elementary was found, it reduced by an Frazier with circumstances the 35 mph speed allow them to continue living in their limit in a suitable one reach for the A group of Canyon Lake resi- into their own hands, protesting of led to a associated speed findings of specialtypical motorist to maintain out mph issues 25 homes and receiveThe assistance to do so a dents aren’t happy that city officials that decision on Friday, July 3, just are financially although rounding not apparent to speed of School. zone when children A-4 was discussed. Home, Inc. can help Tim O’Leary 85th percentile safely. school pageproposal declined a one year extension with one day before the city’s annual the at being Right are made. along statisticalwith the speed limitfamilies see SOLDIER, Triplett described her son as “a Riverside County for fire services. Fourth of July celebration. StandStaff Writer with this matter. A-8 40 mph Periodic recertification, see RADAR, page caring son and a kind and generspeed survey, rounded down from just under 0The city’s refusal to accept the ing in front of the fire station in see page B-3 the 247 with a supporting A $25,000 reward – the second ous Christian young man with a county’s $1.75 million offer has the sweltering heat, residents held continued radar Thirty-seven of is required for The county’s 40 mph. big heart.” She said her son had of its kind to be approved by Temleft the nearly 11,000 residents of signs urging passersby to recall city enforcement. ecula over the past two years – has rededicated his life to the Lord and Canyon Lake out of luck should see SERVICES, page A-8 been offered for key information was reaching out to others. She an emergency occur within city in case of a 24-year-old man who said they had both been members was killed in the doorway of his for years at the Bridge Church in Temecula. apartment. Triplett’s letter also appealed The first reward – which is still active – was authorized after Old to the council’s public safety conTown merchants and friends and cerns. “To date, the murderer(s) is still fans of a slain musician pressed the city for such an action. The recent wandering the streets of Temecula,” council decision was spurred by a she wrote. “We are not safe!” Triplett said she is working mother’s anguish. “The pain of this loss is almost closely with police investigators Ashley Ludwig unbearable for me!” Joyce Triplett, in the case. Staff Writer Justin Triplett was fatally shot at the victim’s mother, wrote in a June 11 letter to the City Council. “Justin 10:15 a.m. on Sept. 22. The killing Temecula’s premier trampoline was the most precious gift that God occurred after he opened the door park, Get Air, has gone vertical with has given me.” to his unit in the Portofino Apartthe new Ninja Course. With new The letter prompted Councilman ments, which is in the 29000 block obstacles that fall between a parkour Mike Naggar to ask for the June 23 of Rancho California Road. course and popular television show, discussion that ended with a unaniTwo nearby residents reported “American Ninja Warrior,” kids are mous vote to include the Triplett that they had heard people arguing A lone sign depicting some residents’ feelings towards city council on lining up to give the Ninja Course a homicide in an existing city reward or fighting about the time of the the closure of the Canyon Lake Fire Station hangs on the station’s try at Get Air. program. Joyce Triplett also spoke see REWARD, page A-3 door. briefly to the council as the reward see page B-4 Kim Harris photo

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February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

Author Laura McNeal speaks at the Fallbrook Book Club

stricken Kansas. She arrives as farms on the Great Plains have begun to fail, and schools are going bankrupt, unable to pay or house new teachers. With no money and too much pride to turn back, she lives uneasily with the family of Ansel Price – the charming, optimistic man who placed the ad – and his family responds to her with kindness, curiosity, suspicion and love. “The Practice House” is an actual building in Fallbrook that was constructed in the 30s to help teach girls what parents feared was a dying art even then: homemaking. The structure is still standing, located in the old school house site across from the Boys & Girls Club of North County. McNeal spoke about the research and work that went into writing the book, which took more than six years, but also the effort and financing required for publishing and marketing a book. Courtesy photo: Prize-winning author Laura McNeal of Coronado, right, poses with her historical novel, “The Practice Room,” and her sister-in-law, Susan McNeal of Fallbrook, Thursday, Jan. 25, during the Fallbrook Book Club meeting.

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B-5

San Diego County Library reveals most checked out items FALLBROOK – The San Diego County Library presents the lists of the top 10 checked out items in each category for the month of December.

FALLBROOK – The Fallbrook Book Club met with prize-winning author Laura McNeal of Coronado Jan. 25 to discuss her newest historical novel titled, “The Practice Room.” Her sister-inlaw Susan McNeal of Fallbrook introduced her to the dozen members attending. The book is set in the 1930s first in Kansas during the deadly dust storms on the prairie and later in the lush farmlands and fruit farms of Fallbrook. McNeal said the book’s title also refers to every house the female characters live in as they try to obtain and keep their own homes and families – as they try to find and make their place in the world. A 19-year-old Aldine McKenna is stuck at home with her sister and aunt in a Scottish village in 1929 when two Mormon missionaries ring the doorbell. Aldine’s sister converts and moves to America to marry and Aldine follows, hoping to find the life she’s meant to lead and the person she’s meant to love. In New York, Aldine answers an advertisement soliciting for a teacher for a one-room schoolhouse in a place she can’t possibly imagine – drought-

The Fallbrook Village News

Adult Fiction 1) The Whistler by John Grisham 2) The Fix by David Baldacci 3) Into the Water by Paula Hawkins 4) Come Sundown by Nora Roberts 5) Y is for Yesterday by Sue Grafton 6) No Middle Name by Lee Child 7) The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware 8) 16th Seduction by James Patterson 9) Camino Island by John Grisham 10) The Late Show by Michael Connelly Adult Non-Fiction 1) Hillbilly Elegy: a memoir of a family and culture in crises by J.D. Vance 2) Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah 3) The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up: the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing by Marie Kondo 4) Waiting for Snow in Havana by Carlos Eire 5) When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi 6) One Pan Wonders by America’s Test Kitchen 7) Afoot & Afield San Diego County by Jerry Schad 8) The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman 9) Grain Brain by David Perlmutter 10) Every Grain of Rice by Fuchsia Dunlop Movies 1) Beauty and the Beast 2) A Dog’s Purpose 3) Logan 4) The LEGO Batman Movie

Reader's Theatre Series at the Mission Theatre

"The Curse of an Aching Heart or Trapped in the Spider's Web" by Herbert Swayne

5) Hidden Figures 6) Spider-Man: Homecoming 7) The Great Wall 8) Arrival 9) John Wick, Chapter 2 10) The Mummy

6) Dog Man Unleashed by Dav Pilkey 7) Wonder by R. J. Palacio 8) Fly Guy by Todd Arnold 9) Pete the Cat by James Dean 10) Ocean of Color by Bill Scollon

Kids 1) *Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney 2) Elephant and Piggie Books by Mo Willems 3) Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling 4) Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce 5) Moana Finds the Way by Susan Amerikaner

*The series were grouped together to allow for something other than Diary of a Wimpy Kid to be on the list. Books and videos may be requested at www.sdcl.org or at your local San Diego Library branch location.

Featuring Kate Prestia-Schaub

BOLD & BRASSY...SWEET & SASSY Feb. 10, 2018 (SAT) 2 PM

Fanfare for The Common Man • Sextet for Piano & Woodwind Quintet • Two Bagatelles • Divertimento No. 2 in D major, K.131 • Carmen Fantasy for Flute & Orchestra Serenade to Music by Ralph Vaughan Williams

BEATLES TRIBUTE SHOW WITH FULL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA!

BOLD

Mar. 17, 2018 (SAT) 2:00 PM

Enjoy nearly thirty Beatles tunes sung, played, and performed exactly as they were written. Hear Penny Lane with a live trumpet section; experience the beauty of Yesterday with an acoustic guitar and string quartet; and enjoy their rock classics.

TICKETS: 951-587-1536

TemeculaValleySymphony.org VENUE: Golden Bears Theater, TVHS • 31555 Rancho Vista Rd., Temecula

the · village · beat

Don’t miss a beat on what is happening in Fallbrook, Bonsall, Pala, De Luz and Rainbow. Whether it is breaking news, local youth sports, or information on events and activities, you will find it quickly and easily at

thevillagenews.com Check it out. Often.

723-7319

760

VALLEY FORT VILLAGE A place you are never a Stranger, just a friend we haven't met. 3757 SOUTH MISSION ROAD • FALLBROOK, CA

Come and take a stroll around our beautiful and peaceful grounds. Enjoy mature trees, rustic old mining town and original buildings. You are sure to find some treasures in our shops, which are filled with Antique and Vintage pieces. Beautiful Collectibles, Gifts, Honey, Fudge and so much more.

Events! EASTER-SPRING FAIR Date: March 25th 2018 • Time: 10am - 4pm

Valentine's Weekend

TEMECULA MODEL A CLUB Date: February 10th • Time: 10am - 11am (time is approximately)

February 10th 7:30pm

VALLEY FORT RESTAURANT

Club members will share about 10 Model A Ford Trucks, built between 1928 - 1931!

Tickets $5

Hisses, Boos & Cheers! Hilarious Melodrama! For more information call 760-731-2278 or go to www.missiontheatre.com

TICKETS ON SALE in CAST office 200 N Main Ave OR at the door one hour before showtime

Reader's Theatre is minimal theater in support of literature and reading. No full sets or costumes. Scripts used openly in performance.

CAST ACADEMY FALLBROOK

CAST Office located at 200 N. Main Street, Fallbrook, CA 92028 (760) 731-2278 | Open: Mon-Thurs 2:00-6:00pm

Tues-Thurs 3pm-9pm | Fri 12pm-10pm | Saturday 1pm-10pm Sunday 10:30am-8:30pm | Closed Monday

VALLEY FORT SHOPS Ol' Thyme Country Store Melange Mercantile Wed-Sun: 10am to 4pm

Sat-Sun: 10am to 3pm

Wed-Sun: 10am to 4pm

Wed-Sun: 10am-5pm

The Red Geranium Lovables

P. Dove Crystals

Fri-Sun: 10am to 3pm

VALLEY FORT

OPEN AIR MARKET Our Market is filled with a wide variety of Handmade treasures done by local artists, Farm Fresh Produce, Sweets and Treats, Fresh Flowers and a whole lot more. Make sure to stop by, we truly appreciate you shopping local and small.

Are you crafty and would love to show off your talents??? Come and set up a booth at our Market. We would love to add you to our Valley Fort Family. Swing on by Monday thru Sunday for an application.

For information please contact our manager: Bianca 619-309-5891, Valleyfortvillage@gmail.com


B-6

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

L EGALS Fictitious Business Name

Fictitious Business Name

Public Notice

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9000962 Name of Business HOLLYWOOD FILM SUPPLIES 300 Carlsbad Village Dr., Carlsbad, CA 92008 Mailing address: 3533 Paseo De Elenita #192, Oceanside, CA 92056 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Arthur Leo Lansdale IV, 3533 Paseo De Elenita #192, Oceanside, CA 92056 This business is conducted by an Individual THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/11/2018 LEGAL: 4610 PUBLISHED: January 18, 25, February 1, 8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001778 Name of Business a. SAN LUIS REY RIDING CENTER b. OKL EVENTING 1059 Little Gopher Canyon Rd., Vista, CA 92084 This business is registered by the following: OKL Eventing, LLC, 1059 Little Gopher Canyon Rd., Vista, CA 92084 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company This LLC is located in the state of California Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/22/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/22/2018 LEGAL: 4620 PUBLISHED: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NORTH COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT, 330 South Main Avenue, Fallbrook, California, County of San Diego, will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at a time certain of 5:15 p.m. at the Fallbrook Public Utility District, 990 East Mission Road, Fallbrook, California, to discuss and approve the Fire Prevention Fee Schedule. The Fire Prevention Ordinance imposes fees for services provided by the Fire Prevention Bureau for plan review, inspection, land divisions and annual permits for certain occupancies and processes.  Members of the public will have an opportunity to make public comment pertaining to the adoption of this schedule.  A copy of this fee schedule may be obtained from the Fire Prevention Bureau of the North County Fire Protection District Headquarters Fire Station at 330 S. Main Avenue in Fallbrook, California, between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, or may be obtained by fax or email by contacting Fire Marshal Patricia Koch by phone at (760) 723-2010 or email at pkoch@ncfire.org.  

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001037 Name of Business CLM VINEYARD MANAGEMENT AND CONSULTING 2899 Alta Vista Dr., Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Christopher Lee Miller, 2899 Alta Vista Dr., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the above name as of 01/01/2018 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/12/2018 LEGAL: 4611 PUBLISHED: January 18, 25, February 1, 8, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001277 Name of Business CONSCIOUS CAPITAL GROUP 428 Sleeping Indian Rd., Oceanside, CA 92057 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Equity Unlimited USA, Inc., 600 17th St., Denver, CO 80202 This business is conducted by a Corporation This corporation is located in the state of Colorado Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 08/21/2017. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/16/2018 LEGAL: 4621 PUBLISHED: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001270 Name of Business a. BEEN TRAVELED b. AUCTIONS BY CHRISSY 4580 Orange Hill, Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Christina Elizabeth Grimsley, 4580 Orange Hill, Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/16/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/16/2018 LEGAL: 4613 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001338 Name of Business MARISCOS EL PACIFICO 111 North Vine St., Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Sanchez Cuisine, Inc., 111 North Vine St., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by a Corporation This corporation is located in the state of California Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 01/01/2018 THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/17/2018 LEGAL: 4622 PUBLISHED: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001367 Name of Business PRO HOT TUB REPAIR 473 Hosmer St., El Cajon, CA 92020 Mailing address: PO Box 12455, El Cajon, CA 92022-2518 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: William Scott Hisaw, 473 Hosmer St., El Cajon, CA 92020 This business is conducted by an Individual THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/17/2018 LEGAL: 4614 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001171 Name of Business AGUILAR JANITORIAL AND CLEANING SERVICES 2687 Market St., San Diego, CA 92102 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Andres Gonzalez, 2687 Market St., San Diego, CA 92102 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/8/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/16/2018 LEGAL: 4615 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001628 Name of Business RS MICRO GREENS 1202 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: a. Sue Beth Rogers, 1202 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 b. Richard Doyle Rogers, 1202 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/17/17. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/10/2018 LEGAL: 4617 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9002392 Name of Business THE AFFILIATES GROUP 2048 Pomegranate Ln. Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Kelly William Bowlin, 2048 Pomegranate Ln. Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 01/26/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/26/2018 LEGAL: 4623 PUBLISHED: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001149 Name of Business FUR & FEATHERS MOBILE VETERINARY SERVICE 31680 Wrightwood Rd., Bonsall, CA 92003 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: a. Geoffrey R. Smith, 31680 Wrightwood Rd., Bonsall, CA 92003 b. Diana R. Smith, 31680 Wrightwood Rd., Bonsall, CA 92003 This business is conducted by a Married Couple Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 12/31/2011. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/12/2018 LEGAL: 4618 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001835 Name of Business THE MANOR HOUSE 2082 Vista Valle Verde Dr., Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Dynamic FPC Design, Inc., 2082 Vista Valle Verde Dr., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by a Corporation This corporation is located in the state of California THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/22/2018 LEGAL: 4619 PUBLISHED: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9003048 Name of Business ROYAL BISON STUDIOS 1456 Clarence Dr., Vista, CA 92084 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Brett Michael Simper, 1456 Clarence Dr., Vista, CA 92084 This business is conducted by an Individual THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 02/01/2018 LEGAL: 4627 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001630 Name of Business a. BAYSIDE BUDDY b. PALS THAT WANDER 1202 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028-3419 Mailing address: 747 South Mission Rd. Unit 364, Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Aysha Ariel Ashley Jenkins, 1202 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/17/17. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/18/2018 LEGAL: 4616 PUBLISHED: January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9002891 Name of Business NOMADIC ADDICT TRAVEL 548 Tumble Creek Terrace, Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Maxwell Kenneth Dukelow, 548 Tumble Creek Terrace, Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/31/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/31/2018 LEGAL: 4624 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9002915 Name of Business LOVELY EARTH 119 South Mission Rd., #189, Fallbrook, CA 92028-3225 This business is registered by the following: Elizabeth, Jane, Gonzalez, 119 South Mission Rd., #189, Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/31/2018 LEGAL: 4625 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9001006 Name of Business MOVING MYSTERY PRODUCTIONS 610 S. Cleveland St., Oceanside, CA 92054 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: E. Lee Troutman II This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 1/11/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/11/2018 LEGAL: 4626 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File Number: 2018-9002165 Name of Business PREMIER CLEANING SERVICES 1256 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 Mailing address: P.O. Box 1376, Fallbrook, CA 92028 County: San Diego This business is registered by the following: Patricia Ordonez, 1256 Old Stage Rd., Fallbrook, CA 92028 This business is conducted by an Individual Registrant first commenced to transact business under the names above as of 01/24/18. THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED WITH THE RECORDER/COUNTY CLERK OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY ON 01/24/2018 LEGAL: 4628 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018

Any taxpayer may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding this item. Patricia Koch, Fire Marshal North County Fire Protection District (760) 723-2010 BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NORTH COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT. Loren Stephen-Porter Board Secretary Dated: January 23, 2018

Change of Name ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case Number: 37-2018-00004160-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS Petitioner: KYLEIGH ROSE HARN and ALEC CHRISTOPHER HARN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: AUBREE ELIZABETH POTTER Proposed Name: AUBREE ELIZABETH HARN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 13, 2018 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept: 26 The address of the court is 325 S. Melrose Dr., Vista, CA 92081 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Village News Date: Jan. 25, 2018 Signed: Robert P. Dahlquist, Judge of the Superior Court. LEGAL: 4629 PUBLISHED: February 8, 15, 22, March 1, 2018

Notice of Availability NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY BONSALL HIGH SCHOOL PROJECT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Bonsall Unified School District (BUSD or District), as the Lead Agency for the proposed project, prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIR) for the project in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (California public Resources Code, Division 13, Section 2100 et seq. (CEQA Statutes) and California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Divisions 6, Chapter 3, Section 15000 et seq. (CEQA Guidelines). PROJECT LOCATION: The 49.8-acre project site is located within the unincorporated community of Bonsall in the north-central portion of San Diego County. The project site is located within Assessor Parcel Number (APN) 124340-3400 approximately 0.30-mile north of the intersection of State Route 76 (SR 76) and Gird Road. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed project is the construction of a new high school for grades 9-12 with a maximum enrollment of 1,500 students, 60 staff (teachers, aides, administrators, and other school personnel). The project would provide approximately 150,500 square feet of building floor area and approximately 21.4 acres of recreational fields, parking, and landscape/hardscape on the 48.9-acre site. POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: The District addressed the potentially significant effects of the project related to aesthetics, agriculture, air quality, biological resources, cultural resources, geology and soils, greenhouse gas emissions, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology and water quality, land use and planning, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, transportation and traffic, tribal cultural resources, and utilities/service systems in the Draft EIR. The Draft EIR analysis determined that the propose project would not result in significant environmental impacts. PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD: The Draft EIR will be available for review during the 45-day public review period from February 5, 2018 and ends March 22, 2018. A copy of the Draft EIR is available for review at: • San Diego County Library, Fallbrook Branch – 124 South. Mission Road, Fallbrook, CA 92028 • Bonsall Unified School District Web Site: www. bonsallusd.com Please send your comments to the Bonsall Unified School District, Facilities, Maintenance and Transportation, Attn: David Medcalf, 31505 Old River Road, Bonsall, California 92003. You may also email your response to david.medcalf@ bonsallusd.com. Please provide the name of a contact person at your agency. Please include “Bonsall High School project” in the subject line. Published: February 1, 8, 15, 2018

T.S. No.: 9987-6486 TSG Order No.: 8714743 A.P.N.: 162-571-05-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/11/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Affinia Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 08/19/2003 as Document No.: 2003-1009934, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, executed by: JESUS OCHOA AND MARIA AURORA OCHOA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date & Time: 02/16/2018 at 09:00 AM Sale Location: East County Regional Center, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2217 BLISS CIRCLE, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $270,912.03 (Estimated) as of 01/19/2018. Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, 1-800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site, www.auction.com, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9987-6486. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Affinia Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 833-290-7452 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: www.auction.com or Call: 1-800-280-2832. Affinia Default Services, LLC, Omar Solorzano, Foreclosure Associate This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. However, if you have received a discharge of the debt referenced herein in a bankruptcy proceeding, this is not an attempt to impose personal liability upon you for payment of that debt. In the event you have received a bankruptcy discharge, any action to enforce the debt will be taken against the property only. NPP0324108 To: VILLAGE NEWS INC 01/25/2018, 02/01/2018, 02/08/2018

TSG No.: 8714441 TS No.: CA1700281495 FHA/VA/PMI No.: 1404539 APN: 183-122-24-00 Property Address: 218 HANNALEI DRIVE VISTA, CA 92083 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/22/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 02/28/2018 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 10/27/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-1014624, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, State of California. Executed by: HELEN GRAVLIN, A WIDOW, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by the statue, 250 E. Main St., El Cajon, CA 92020 All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 183-122-24-00 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 218 HANNALEI DRIVE, VISTA, CA 92083 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $558,272.72. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1700281495 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Date: First American Title Insurance Company 4795 Regent Blvd, Mail Code 1011-F Irving, TX 75063 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE FOR TRUSTEES SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772NPP0323926 To: VILLAGE NEWS INC 01/25/2018, 02/01/2018, 02/08/2018

Trustee Sale No. 17-005425 730-1708949-70 APN 122-491-49-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 06/06/13. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/02/18 at 9:00 am, Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Erica J Camacho and Rick R Camacho, wife and husband, as Trustor(s), in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for USAA Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, Recorded on 06/21/13 in Instrument No. 2013-0391310 of official records in the Office of the county recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), East County Regional Center, 250 E. Main Street, Entrance of the East County Regional Center, El Cajon, CA 92020, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 5202 COBALT WAY, OCEANSIDE, CA 92057. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $326,131.40 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: January 25, 2018 AZTEC FORECLOSURE CORPORATION Elaine Malone Assistant Secretary / Assistant Vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corporation, 3636 N. Central Ave., Suite #400, Phoenix, AZ 85012 Phone: (877) 257-0717 or (602) 638-5700; fax: (602) 638-5748 www.aztectrustee.com NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call or visit the Internet Web site, using the file number assigned to this case 17-005425. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. www.Auction.com or call (800) 280-2832 or Aztec Foreclosure Corporation (877) 257-0717 www.aztectrustee.com NPP0325138 To: VILLAGE NEWS INC 02/01/2018, 02/08/2018, 02/15/2018


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News

|

B-7

C LASSIFIEDS NOTICE

Employment

Garage Sales

Real Estate - For Sale

Real Estate - For Sale

HG Computer Repair Customers: Heidi Groth, owner of this computer repair business was evicted from the location of this business on Dec. 7, 2017. Call her former landlord (760)-723-4706 to claim any personal property that still may be at this location. Any personal property of yours that is unclaimed by Feb. 8, 2018 will be sold, donated or discarded

SAP SD SENIOR BUSINESS ANALYST (MULTIPLE OPENINGS): FFF Enterprises, Inc. in Temecula, CA to be responsible for obtaining & defining requirements, prfrmnc analysis, dsgng, configuring, testing, mnting & supporting sftwr & application in the areas of SAP Sales & Distribution (“SD”) B2B integration & CRM. Must hold Bach’s degree in Comp Sci, Physics, Math or related academic discipline & 5 yrs of progress. responsible work exp in the position offered or reltd. Must know (through academic training or work exp) SAP Sales & Distribution processes, CRM processes, B2B integration, master data & transaction data; dvlpng programs in SAP ABAP/4 & B2B interfaces using SAP ALE & EDI, XML & IDoc formats; configuring SAP Sales & Distribution, performing integration testing w/ trading partner & end-end business process testing within SAP, coordinating cutover for SAP project. If interested, please send resume & cover letter via email to resumes@ fffenterprises.com, FFF Enterprises, Inc., (800) 843-7477

Garage sale: Furniture, sofa love seat, Television, Freezer, Lamp, Books, cookware, exercise equipment. 8:00 am to 12:00 pm Saturday February 10. 1247 Firecrest Way Fallbrook; Ed Bratrud, ebratrud@roadrunner.com, 760-450-5451

28 acres for sale DeLuz, Fallbrook: 28 acres DeLuz, Fallbrook $389.000 Great Secluded Location in the hills with seasonal stream.Property has electricty and working well.Very scenic area, beautiful trees,pond area on site.40883 Tenaja Truck Trail,Fallbrook 92028 310-6123547 760-7282012, Robert, 310-6123547

Single Story POOL HOME with Spa, Great Location, Many upgrades. Upgraded Kitchen with Lots of storage space, Corian Counter Tops Tile Floors and Newer Laminate. Bonus Room next to Enclosed Patio. Master Bedroom with walk in closet and French Doors that exit to rear patio. Circular Driveway, Newer Vinyl Dual Pane Windows, Plantation Shutters Throughout, Bathrooms have been upgraded, Ceiling Fans Throughout, Upgraded Garage Door, Fireplace is for both wood burning and gas. Two Large Sheds for Storage in the back yard, Mature Landscape, Shade Trees, Palm Trees and Fruit Trees. Back Yard has access through side gate for an RV, Trailer, or Toys. Spanish Tile Roof. Solar System to heat up the pool water. Don’t Let this one Pass you by! $310,000. Call Brubaker-Culton for more information. (951) 658-7211

Entertainment/Leisure

Real Estate - For Rent

Ballroom Dance and Show: Dance to live ( Mark Steven Schmidt) and Pre-recorded music plus a Dance S h o w, D a n c e h o s t s , R a ff l e , D o o r Prizes,Cash Bar General Admission $12,USA Dance Membership $10 7-9 PM, Dr Linda Succi, drlindasucci@aol. com, 401 323 4072

For Rent/Fallbrook: 2 to 2.5 Acres to grow flowers, vegetables and small plants in De Luz Heights, across from Ross Lake. Large capacity water pipeline available. Call (760) 917-4789 for more info; Esther Krooth, 760-9174789

Business Services Pet Sitting In My Home: Cage free, social environment, day care + long term. Large rooms for exercise and play. References. Call for details. 760-723-6675, Paulette Thurlow, 760723-6675

Computers Computer Consulting: We help clients of any size, specialising in everything from everyday computer problems to developing new company systems and procedures; VIncent Trevino, vincent@ trevinoadvisors.com, 949-235-5418

Employment EXPERIENCED COOKS & SERVERS: EXPERIENCED COOKS & SERVERS and Host/Hostess. 2 years minimum experience in family style restaurant. Apply in person. 739 E. Mission Rd; Fallbrook. Se buscan cocineros con experiencia de 2 anos en restaurante de estilo familiar. Solicite en persona; 739 E. Mission Rd., (760) 728-1898 TRABAJO gane esta $30,000 en limpieza de la casas: $11-18hr con licencia y corro Vanity Maids 951-7193302, Vanity Maids, 951-719-3302

Free Items (Free Ads) Free Lift Recliner: Free lift recliner. Call for info; Elly de Ru, 760-728-5063

Garage sale: Furniture, stereo equipment, soloflex workout station, Books, carpet, Saturday February 10, 8:00 am to 12:00 pm; Ed Bratrud, ebratrud@roadrunner.com, 760-4505451

Home & Garden Do you need weeds cut and removed?: Beautify your property by getting rid of your weeds. Call Bill for quick service. $15 an hour, Bill Alexander, billalex2012@gmail.com, 442-3338300 Firewood For Sale: Split/seasoned in approx. 18”-19” lengths. 1/2 Cord. Eucalyptus $100, Pine $60, Mixed, $80; Frank, 760-728-1478

28 ft trailer for rent: 28ft trailer in DeLuz hills.quite, peaceful, great for a guy.$750, Robert, 7607282012 or3235645103

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-15-693124-AB Order No.: 730-1508443-70 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/11/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): Mary Louise Easton, a widow Recorded: 3/15/2004 as Instrument No. 2004-0210956 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California; Date of Sale: 3/5/2018 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by the statue, located at 250 E. Main St., El Cajon, CA 92020 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $405,211.82 The purported property address is: 1868 KEY LARGO ROAD, VISTA, CA 92081 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 217-591-03-12 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916-939-0772 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com, using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-15-693124-AB. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 916-939-0772 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-15-693124-AB IDSPub #0136318 2/8/2018 2/15/2018 2/22/2018

T.S. No. 17-0333-11 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 注:本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY PLEASE NOTE THAT PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(d)(1) THE ABOVE STATEMENT IS REQUIRED TO APPEAR ON THIS DOCUMENT BUT PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION IS NOT REQUIRED TO BE RECORDED OR PUBLISHED AND THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION NEED ONLY BE MAILED TO THE MORTGAGOR OR TRUSTOR. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/1/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: TIM B. LOCKHART AND CHERYL A. LOCKHART, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation Recorded 10/8/2003 as Instrument No. 2003-1236382 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Street Address or other common designation of real property: 563 AVENIDA AGUILA SAN MARCOS, CA 92069 A.P.N.: 218-372-32-00 Date of Sale: 2/26/2018 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by the statue, 250 E. Main St., El Cajon, CA 92020 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $210,140.97, estimated The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916-939-0772 or visit this Internet Web site www.nationwideposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 17-0333-11. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 1/17/2018 The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation 2955 Main Street, 2nd Floor Irvine, California 92614 Foreclosure Department (949) 720-9200 Sale Information Only: 916-939-0772 www.nationwideposting.com Sindy Clements, Foreclosure Officer PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THE WOLF FIRM MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR, ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION YOU PROVIDE WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NPP0324503 To: VILLAGE NEWS INC 02/01/2018, 02/08/2018, 02/15/2018 T.S. No.: 9948-2467 TSG Order No.: 730-1612878-70 A.P.N.: 123-492-23-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03/14/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Affinia Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 03/22/2007 as Document No.: 2007-0193312, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, executed by: RONALD COOPER AND JANETTE COOPER, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date & Time: 02/23/2018 at 10:30 AM Sale Location: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center by statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4455 FALLSBRAE ROAD, FALLBROOK AREA, CA 92028 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an “AS IS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $2,275,941.81 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (800) 758-8052 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site, www.homesearch.com, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9948-2467. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Affinia Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 833290-7452 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: www.homesearch.com or Call: (800) 758-8052. Affinia Default Services, LLC, Omar Solorzano, Foreclosure Associate This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. However, if you have received a discharge of the debt referenced herein in a bankruptcy proceeding, this is not an attempt to impose personal liability upon you for payment of that debt. In the event you have received a bankruptcy discharge, any action to enforce the debt will be taken against the property only. NPP0323584 To: VILLAGE NEWS INC 01/25/2018, 02/01/2018, 02/08/2018

One of a kind East Hemet property in Park Hill. Top of the hill property on over 1/2 acre. Private, yet close to everything. Newer double pane windows with views from living room, kitchen, and master bedroom. Large entry that opens to family room. Updated kitchen is open to dining room. Large master bedroom. Generous second and third bedrooms. Inside laundry. Beautiful rear courtyard with dramatic paves makes a beautiful entertaining area. Very private. Large organic garden to grow a variety vegetables. This property has the potential to have RV access. Priced to sell! Schedule your private showing before it’s gone! $325,000. Call Brubaker-Culton for more information. (951) 658-7211 Gorgeous custom home in an upscale area of east Hemet situated perfectly in a quiet cul-de-sac with room for family and friends inside and out. Lovely curb appeal and the huge private backyard comes complete with pool and covered patio where you can take in the excellent mountain views while relaxing or having fun. You will even find room for all your toys in the huge 3 car garage, and room to park your RV, trailer or toys complete with dump station. Inside this open concept home you will find many upgrades and custom touches, from the custom chandelier, arched walkways, interior doors and stone fireplace feature wall to the gorgeous custom texture and wall paint, travertine and porcelain tile and custom carpet. Entertain in the well-designed downstairs living areas, and create a special place for everyone upstairs in the 4 bedroom and 2 full bathrooms, one of which is a spacious master suite. Price includes: Refrigerator, washer and dryer. $410,000. Call Brubaker-Culton for more information. (951) 658-7211

Completely upgraded McMorran home. 4 bedroom, 2 bath on a quiet street. New countertops, appliances, huge covered patio, small backyard, large side yard for your small RV. Priced reduced to $299,000!! Call for your tour and make it yours! Call BrubakerCulton for more information. (951) 658-7211 This lovely home offers 3 bedrooms 2 bath. Spacious detached garage, hurry and schedule an exclusive showing for this nice family home. Roof is only 5 years old. Nice tile flooring in the living room and eating area; lots of fruit trees. Great location, walking distance to the schools and all retail stores are close by. Lots of parking area, Low maintenance yard, each room has a ceiling fan. This home is perfect for a big family. Seller is willing to pay off the solar panels at a full price offer. This home includes stunning new laminate flooring in each room. Open the front door and see the spacious living room. This property is located in a quiet neighborhood. Seller is buying another property and needs to sell quick. Bring me your offer today and let’s open escrow. Price reduction for a quick sale. $429,900. Call Brubaker-Culton for more information. (951) 658-7211

Services Offered NOTICE OF LIEN SALE Notice is given that pursuant to sections 21700-21713 of the Business and Professions Code, Section 2328 of the Commercial Code, Section 535 of the Penal Code that Citrus Plaza Self Storage at 202 West College Street, Fallbrook, CA 92028 will sell by competitive bidding, on or after February 23, 2018 at 10:00 am, property belonging to those listed below. Auction to be held at the above address. Property to be sold as follows: Household, office & business goods, furniture, appliances, personal items, clothing, electronics, tools, duffle bags/suit cases, electronics, sporting and exercise equipment, miscellaneous boxes, containers & bags with unknown contents belonging to the following: Gyr, Vicki Buchanan, Dianne Grant, Robina Manuel, Antonio Searle, Tammy Wells, Marie Consuelo Published: February 1 and 8, 2018

Fallbrook mechanical and contracting: Don’t listen to all the stupid gimmicks, Call Paul at Fallbrook Mechanical and Contacting for all your heating and a/c Needs. Located right here in Fallbrook 760 822-1581 quality work at a fair price. 28yrs experience. Lic#777459 B and C-20, Paul, fallbrookmechanical@ yahoo.com, 760 822-1581 Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lessons, Jack’s Music, 125 S. Main Ave. Suite B. Free introductory lesson. 760 672 5814. Serving Fallbrook since 2004; Jack Kovic, jkovic@yahoo.com, 7606725814

Stucco John Biondi Stucco + Drywall 35+ years experience (951) 244-2089 (909) 645-4456 JohnnyCBiondi@gmail.com

FALLBROOK COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP PRELIMINARY AGENDAS FOR SUB-COMMITTEE MEETINGS FALLBROOK COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP will meet at Live Oak School, 1978 Reche Road, Fallbrook, CA 7 PM, Monday, February 19, 2018 Jim Russell, Chair 760-728-8081 ________________________________________________________________________ Land Use Committee will not meet Tuesday, February 13, 2018 Jack Wood, Chair 760-731-3193 Circulation Committee will not meet Tuesday, February 13, 2018 Roy Moosa, Chair 760-723-1181

Design Review Committee will meet at the Fallbrook Sheriff’s Station, 388 East Alvarado Street, 9:30 AM, Wednesday, February 14, 2018 1. Open Forum. Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the Design Review Committee on any subject matter within the committee’s jurisdiction but not on today’s agenda. Three minute limitation. Non-voting item, no discussion. 2. Approval of the minutes for the last meeting. 3. AD-17-031 Courtyard. Request for an Administrative Permit for a new wall with the height limit raised from 42 Inches to 66 Inches and allow a bridge entryway at 4063 Millagra Drive (APN108-490-04). Owner and contact persons Robert & Tien D’Ausilio, 562-572-7485, bfd8@mac.com. County planner Sean Oberbauer, 858-495-5747, sean. oberbauer@sdcounty.ca.com. Continued at the 15 January FCPG meeting. Design Review Committee. Community input. Voting item. (12/21) 4. Request for waiver of B Designator Design Review requirement for a site plan for grading for ADA parking, signage, fencing and other exterior site modifications. Location: Crestwood Behavioral Health (APN 05-811-01-000) 624 E. Elder, Fallbrook Contact: Anthony Nguyen Ph: 916-471-2244, antnguyen@cbhi.net.  County Planner Aleena Benedito, aleen.benediti@sdcounty.ca.gov. Design Review Committee.  Community input.  Voting item. (1/19) 5. Refresher and discussion on the Fallbrook Design Guidelines and the Design Checklist. Design Review Committee. Community input. Non-voting item. Eileen Delaney, Chair 760-518-8888

Parks and Recreation Committee will not meet Wednesday, February 14, 2018 Donna Gebhart, Chair, 760-731-9441

Public Facilities Committee will not meet Wednesday, February 14, 2018 Roy Moosa, Chair 760-723-1181

Published: February 8, 2018

the · village · beat

Don’t miss a beat on what is happening in Fallbrook, Bonsall, Pala, De Luz and Rainbow. Whether it is breaking news, local youth sports, or information on events and activities, you will find it quickly and easily at

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February 8, 2018

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I just wanted to let you know that the bio ad has brought me ten new clients and more phone calls for consultations. Between the Newspaper and the Sourcebook it’s been a bonanza Diane Hartcorn Hair Stylist of new faces. I

n the 1960’s Diane Hartcorn was a 15-year-old in Fallbrook, but she was already attending a hair design university in La Mesa, and has been cutting and coloring tresses ever since. Diane studied at the Vidal Sassoon Academy in New York in 1974, and her educational travels in hair design also combed through Mexico and the Bahamas. Locally, she owned a hair studio in Fallbrook for more than 30 years, and Diane Hartcorn today she serves clients at Salon de l’art Nouveau, next to the post office in Bonsall. “I’ve been doing this a long time,” she said. “It serves me well and I enjoy every bit of it.” She has one client who has been coming to her for 50 years, she said. Diane also worked behind the scenes for Redken and Matrix, prepping live models for “before and after” appearances at hairshows. Her passion for creating fabulous cuts and helping people look their best comes with her intensive studies on the latest trends. “There’s a lot to learn – it’s ever changing,” she said. Diane recently completed a Schwarzkopf educational color seminar where she learned the latest in two-step blonding. She offers free hair consultations, and says she is honest and wants to make people happy. “I want them to get a color that’s complimentary to their skin and lifestyle,” she said. She makes sure the color they want is adaptable to their hairstyle and their hobbies. Ultimately, she said she wants the hair design to make a statement, which requires a good color and a good cut.

Salon de l’art Nouveau 5525 Mission Road | Bonsall, CA 92003

(located next to ethe Post Office) is su st iv al 414-1008 20 15 Av oc ad o Fe(760)

Village News Fallbrook & Bonsall

ies the commuNit a l s o se rV i N g

of

De luz ,

r a i N b ow,

ala, c a m p p e N Dl e t o N , p

aND

Thank you, thank you... Love it!!!! – Diane Hartcorn, Hairstylist Village News & Sourcebook Advertiser

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pau m a

Volume 19, Issue 16

www.VillageNews.com

avocado Fallbrook celebrates the

April 16, 2015

A-12

Art happenings in Fallbrook

1588 S. Mission Road, Suite 200, Fallbrook, CA 92028 | villagenews.com | my-sourcebook.com

B-1 Making race cars out of avocados

Exploring farm stands

is part of the fun for children

attending the annual Avocado

Ralph effort by local Realtor Avocado Foster, the California of Commission, and University started California, Irvine. Foster years the educational effort five front in ago with a booth directly Sunshine of his Main Ave. office, tip of Realty, on the very north how the festival. He explained for made preparations are being Fallbrook’s big day. of “Prior to the festival, a group be going about a dozen of us will grounds up to the U.C. Irvine test of hundreds where they have explained varieties of avocados,” plastic Foster. “We will have with bags with us and go around all where docents who will explain are some the avocados are from – Chile, from Israel, South Africa, with back and more. We will come about 100 varieties.”

Debbie Ramsey Managing Editor

B-14

Delicious avocado recipes

the When Fallbrook shares with love for its trademark fruit 19 at the masses on Sunday, April Festival, the 29th annual Avocado center, education will be at the literally. g organizin This year, the of body, the Fallbrook Chamber learning Commerce, is putting a festival at center in the heart of the Street. Main Avenue and Alvarado “We are calling it ‘Avocado CEO Lila Central,’” said chamber is our MacDonald. “The festival s way of celebrating Fallbrook’ chamber agricultural heritage. The visitors holds the event to introduce they that hope we to Fallbrook and will return.” the Placing representatives from n California Avocado Commissio extensive and local experts with an education al display featuring avocados dozens of varieties of the street together in the center of chamber of festival is the idea Linda communications director

the · village · beat C-8

Attendance is expected to reach

Festival. 100,000 at the 2015 Avocado

The festival is our way of celebrating Fallbrook’s agricultural heritage

Don’t miss a beat on what is happening in Fallbrook, Bonsall, Pala, De Luz and Rainbow. Whether it is breaking news, local youth sports, or information on events and activities, you will find it quickly and easily at

ly are real crowd-pleasers. Free samples of Holy Guaca-Mo

Village News

Car Show on May 24

Costello. a “We are trying to create about central education al area have avocados and that should ago,” been done umpteen years heard said Costello, who has that comment s from visitors l there was not much educationa previous avocado information at said the festivals. MacDona ld and chamber’s information center at souvenir items will be located well. as the center l The premier avocado educationa ve center is actually a collaborati

Shane Gibson photo

Festival.

Chamber CEO Lila MacDonald

he will In addition, Foster said grown gather another 25 varieties varieties in Fallbrook.”Many of the are old, I know of here in Fallbrook

heirloom varieties.” tely With a total of approxima for 120 varieties of avocados learn festival-go ers to see and also will about, Foster’s crew assorted offer hundreds of bags of for sale (4 lbs. for $5, he avocados Foster Ken Seals photo said). All of the avocados grown. is offering are organically will be “From one bag, people between able to taste the difference addition varieties,” he said. In ns to photographs and explanatiohe said regarding avocados, Foster of his will bring along a good part antique packing label collection, famous some local honey, and his guacamole recipe. he Foster, 75, knows of what whole speaks. “I’ve lived here my my life; my Dad grew avocados; I Grandfath er grew avocados; picked, packed, and distributed 25 acres avocados and still have myself.” from 9 The festival will run . a.m. to 5 p.m., as is customary event Changes to this year’s over include the chamber taking Artisan the organization of the and Street Alvarado on Walk music establishing another live venue. The Artisan Walk on Alvarado showing will feature local artisans of and selling their variety creations to festival-goers. Ken Seals photo

see TRADEMARK, page A-7

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Village News Fallbrook & Bonsall

a l s o se rv i n g t h e c o m m u n i t i e s o f

D e L u z , R a i n b ow, C a m p P e ndl e t o n , Pa l a ,

a nd

Pau m a

www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

Section C

Volume 22, Issue 6

World of Watercolor and Beyond Now open at Fallbrook Art Center “Alafia Trail Boss” by watercolor artist Kathleen Durbin is on display during the 9th Annual Signature American Watermedia Exhibition “World of Watercolor & Beyond” reception at the Fallbrook Art Center, Feb. 3. FALLBROOK - World of Watercolor & Beyond, the ninth annual Signature American Wa t e r m e d i a I n t e r n a t i o n a l Exhibition & Sale, opened with a reception at the Fallbrook Art Center on Feb. 3. This year’s show features 120 original works selected from 398 submissions. The artists represent 29 of the 50 states as well as Malaysia and Singapore. Featured works are all originals in a wide range of subject matter, techniques and styles (experimental to traditional) selected by show juror Ratindra Das, AWS (DF), NWS. This show is the only one of its kind in the U.S., as only

Shane Gibson photos

artists who have attained ‘Signature Level Membership’ status in one or more U.S. Societies are eligible to submit works – so they are all ‘the best of the best’ in watercolor or watermedia works created by national and international contemporary working artists. The show is open daily through April 15, Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays noon to 3 p.m. Admission is $6, free for members. The Fallbrook Art Center is at 103 S. Main Ave., at Alvarado. For other information on the show, to support center programs, or to volunteer, call (760) 728-1414 or visit www.fallbrookartcenter.org.

Over $15,000 in cash and merchandise awards were bestowed by the show juror: Best of Show Award - $2,500 - Ron Thurston, Pennsylvania, ‘Time Travel’ First Place Show Award - $2,000 - John Salminen, Minnesota, ‘River Café, Brooklyn’ Second Place Show Award - $1,500 - Carla O’Connor, Washington, ‘Fancy That’ Third Place Show Award - $1,000 - Dean Mitchell, Florida, ‘I Am Joseph Northern’ Mijello Mission Gold Merchandise Award - $500 - Charles Rouse, California, ‘Little Italy Pizza Parade’ Mijello Mission Gold Merchandise Award - $500 - Valerie Cohen, Nevada, ‘Windy Day on Carson Peak’ John Singer Sargent Award - $500 - Robin Erickson, California, ‘Pony’s Window’ Marine Corps Legacy Award - $500 - Carol Thomason, California, ‘Lines of Communication: 244 PETCO.COM’ Monet Award - $500 - Judy Janc, California, ‘Flamingo Interlude’ City Slickers Urban Scene Award - $500 - Grace Haverty, Arizona, ‘Jazz Player’ Rembrandt Award - $500 - Ingrid Albrecht, Illinois, ‘And off to the Park We Go’ The World Around Me Award - $500 - Angela Chang, California, ‘Filling Station Café XII’ Take Me - New Places Award - $500 - Kathleen Conover, Michigan, ‘Divided: Industrial Revolution’ The Erickson Family Award - $500 - Tan Suz Chiang, Malaysia, ‘Story of the Season #1’ Stand Up for Still Life Award - $250 - Soon Warren, Texas, ‘Reflection Festivity’ Art in Life, Art in Food Award - $250 - Chris Krupinski, West Virginia, ‘Pomegranates & Grapes on a Quilt’ Celebrating the Good Life Award - $250 - Bonnie Woods, California, ‘We’ll Always Have Paris’ Crazy for Abstraction Award - $250 - Elaine Daily-Birnbaum, Wisconsin, ‘Detour’ Dazzling Vistas Award - $250 - Jerry Smith, Indiana, ‘Blue Haven’ Don’t Spatter Me Award - $250 - Robert Mejer, Illinois, ‘Somewhere in Between’ Cezanne Award - $250 - Carolyn Lord, California, ‘Autumnal Equinox Heliotropes’ Mirror, Mirror on the Wall Award - $250 - Margaret Godfrey, Oregon, ‘Will She Be Allowed?’ The Jeanne Shanahan Memorial Award - $250 - Sue Johnston, California, ‘Rio di San Provolo’ The Sky’s the Limit Award - $250 - Rita Crooks, Wisconsin, ‘Calf on the Roof’ CaliforniaWatercolor.Com - $195 - Jansen Chow, Malaysia, ‘Good Morning Machu Picchu' Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff Award - $125 - Carol Mansfield, California, ‘Orbital Traffic Control’

Guests attending the World of Watercolor & Beyond reception at the Fallbrook Art Center view a wide range of watercolor pictures, Feb. 3.

“Girlfriends” by watercolor artist Judy Saltzman can be seen at the World of Watercolor & Beyond exhibition at Fallbrook Art Center.

Guests attending the World of Watercolor & Beyond reception at the Fallbrook Art Center view a wide range of watercolor works of art from various artists.


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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

R EAL ESTATE & H OME AND G ARDEN

Real estate round-up:

It’s not about 'being #1' – in real estate or otherwise Kim Murphy Murphy & Murphy Southern California Realty

Here are a few meaningful things to consider in choosing a realtor, whether you’re moving in or out of the Fallbrook/Bonsall area.

We’ve all been deluged with those oversized glossy postcard mailers with matching oversized claims like “Joe Smith: #1 Realtor in California!” or “Susie Jones Realty Sold $99 Million in Real Estate in 2018!” Or what about those ridiculous weight loss ads – “Best-selling Belly Buster in the World!” We know this is “fake news,” and so into the round file it all goes, right? Truly smart, successful people don’t fall for these gimmicks, nor do they believe everything they see or read. They make life-changing decisions by pouring through research and facts, references and relationships. This is why we, at Murphy & Murphy Southern California Realty, personally choose not to clog up your mailbox.

Look for a realtor who lives in the town you live in or are looking to move to. Why does that matter? Because if they do, they know the town inside and out, from the bigger urban areas right down to the smallest little side streets. They know the ins-and-outs of what streets command what prices and what types of homes (size, layout and architectural style) command what prices. They will also know what zoning laws will and won’t affect what you can ask for your property. They know who the trusted local contractors are, what the best restaurants are, the real story behind local schools, etc. If they’ve lived and worked in the area long enough, they may

even know the owners of the home(s) you’re interested in. How many times have you driven by a home and said,” Wow, I want that house!” I know I myself have said that many times, but if there isn’t a for sale sign out front, you just keep driving right? A good local agent might a) know who lives there and b) what the family’s circumstances are and/or c) may even be able to persuade someone they know to sell their dream home to you, even if it’s not technically on the market.

Even better: look for a realtor who owns a home in your town. Additionally, if they themselves own a home in the area, they are taking into consideration the fact that selling and/or buying your property will directly affect the health of the community, and will have an effect on their own property values as well. That means they want you to get the most money possible for your property for the overall benefit of the local economy. What do people who have done business with them say about them? We recently had the unexpected pleasure of receiving a thank you card from a client for selling her home – complete with a gift card for dinner for us, on her for a job well done and appreciated. Words speak volumes...buying and selling a home is a very intimate thing and should be treated as such, like a relationship. We recently developed such a great personal relationship with a client that she ended up working for us.

Kim Murphy says realtors should know the ins and outs of their community. Real estate is not about buying and selling residences, it’s about becoming part of an expanded family network. A great agent will buy and sell a family and their friend’s homes for generations to come, so look for repeat customers. How involved are they in real estate networking groups? Are they involved in the California Association of Realtors? The North San Diego County Association of Realtors? Any other major industry affiliations? Being on the frontlines of these leading industry organizations

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lends insider knowledge that gives realtors the tools to guide you to make the best choices on the selling and the buying front. For example, if you read last week’s first real estate round-up, you’d have seen that Murphy & Murphy Southern California Realty is on the forefront of creating and channeling the “2018 Portability Initiative,” a measure that, if approved, will allow senior homeowners to carry their low tax bases with them as they buy and sell wherever they want, no matter the home prices. This means seniors are no longer “trapped” and can free up homes for young families. Have they received awards from professional peers? For example: Murphy & Murphy Southern California Realty has received the independently rated “5 Star Award for Customer Satisfaction” for 11 years straight. Chris Murphy was awarded “Realtor of the Year” for the Fallbrook/ Bonsall area in 2009 by the North San Diego County Association of Realtors (NSDCAR) and Sam Murphy was named Weichert Realtors’ “Rookie of the Year” just recently in 2015. These types of accolades mean a lot more than a bunch of sales numbers that make you scratch your head and think, “Is $99 million a lot?” or manufactured claims of being “number one.” Quality not quantity, something to consider. How do they support their community? Do they give back to their local community through hosting, supporting or sponsoring events like golf tournaments, art exhibits and/or Chamber of Commerce events? Do they directly donate to local charities? In 2017, Murphy and Murphy was blessed to be able to donate over $35,000 to local nonprofits and ultimately benefit the greater good of Fallbrook. Everything mentioned above comes down to one basic point: It’s not about being #1…it’s about making you and your community #1. Kim Murphy can be reached at kim@murphy-realty.com or (760) 415-9292 and would love to hear from you. Her broker license is #01229921 and she is on the board of directors for the California Association of Realtors.


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News

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Your Leader in Real Estate Services Serving Fallbrook/Bonsall/Oceanside ~ Local & Trusted

#1 AGENT FOR A REASON!* THANK YOU Fallbrook and Bonsall for trusting PATRICK MARELLY to sell your home – YOU have made us #1 The Marelly Group has... • SOLD more homes than any other agent or team! • SOLD the highest dollar volume! • SOLD our listings at 99.3% of the listed asking price!

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Masterpiece Collection 3825 Flowerwood Lane, Fallbrook $1,599,000

1808 Santa Margarita, Fallbrook $1,595,000

3961 Citrus Drive, Fallbrook $1,489,000

279 Bottlebrush, Fallbrook $1,300,000

30452 Luis Rey Heights, Bonsall $1,150,000

3938 Flowerwood, Fallbrook $1,125,000

2560 Wilt Road, Fallbrook $1,100,000

3045 Via del Cielo, Fallbrook $1,099,000

30330 Via Maria Elena, Bonsall $999,900

5790 Camino Del Cielo, Bonsall $999,900

2230 Calle Dos Lomas, Fallbrook $999,900

2793 Dos Lomas, Fallbrook $999,900

1045 Big Oak Ranch, Fallbrook $849,900

3538 Gird Road, Fallbrook $799,900

1581 Loch Ness, Fallbrook $775,000

3665 Palomar, Fallbrook $765,000

2024 James Gaynor, Fallbook $749,900

2078 James Gaynor, Fallbrook $735,000

1412 El Nido, Fallbrook $650,000

1849 Chapulin Lane, Fallbrook $575,000

218 Calle de Paloma, Fallbrook $459,000

445 Debby, Fallbrook $449,000

448 Shady Glen, Fallbrook $399,900

5422 Villas Drive, Bonsall $370,000

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1259 De Luz Road, Fallbrook $700,000

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

GOING ABOVE & BEYOND Buying or selling, you'll have a trusted pro guiding you every step of the way. We’re home to hardworking agents.

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Fallbrook

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1109 N. Stagecoach Lane

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925,000

1st time on market since 1988, privately nestled on 9.76 view acs. 4200 sf home offers 4BD, 4.5BA & office (could be 5thBD). Granite counters in kit & DR. Huge open LR w/views of the Santa Margarita River valley. This gentleman farm has an 800' well. Huge grg w/RV door. 22 panel solar sys.

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3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,350 sq.ft. Great location, yet close to town! Charming bungalow, open floor plan with fireplace. Not on MLS yet - but can get you in. Call us today to view!

Team Gallegos Rudy, Chris & Sandy 760-985-9600

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Building site - Panoramic view location close to the end of Stagecoach Lane. 3.5 acres with access to Santa Margarita horse trails, water meter included. Great opportunity to build your ranch, or dream home with plenty of land left over for horses.

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Framed by lovely oak tree in front yard...a perfect family home! 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, new granite island kitchen, new paint & flooring. House has solar & 3 car garage with potential small guest apartment with separate entrance. Completely fenced with electric gate entrance on .60 acre usable lot.

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Team Bartlett Brett & Al

760-828-2498


February 8, 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

Investing in real estate - part 1

Pam Moss Special to the Village News Having made the big decision to invest in real estate, where at least you may have something to show for the money invested, there are still many steps to take and mistakes to avoid. So let’s look at a few. The analysis paralysis.

Believing the more information you get the better decision you will make. The focus is on the criteria used to determine if they will make an offer. Often using a set formula for performance and return on investment. Some like cash on cash some like an internal rate of return. There are many financial methods to determine the viability of how the investment meets your goals. Consistency is the key; use the same method in property comparisons. Smart investors don’t get caught up in the minutia. Your due diligence can make or break you. Doing only a cursory look – This mistake usually takes two forms: The first being not reviewing the historical operating statements and current rent rolls carefully. One of the tricks of the trade to use is look at the utilities

– often they will tell a story about tenant turnover and vacancies. The second biggy is only doing a cursory physical inspection of the property. If you are buying apartments, you need to have your building inspection inspect every unit, the roofs, the laundry areas, the attics, the crawl spaces, garages and parking areas too. You need to review the title and plotted easements carefully to make sure there are no neighbor problems. If you are buying property with a group of investors or syndication make sure that those in the investment group have the same goals and exit strategy as you. Secondly make sure that each of the investors is financially in the same position so that you don’t end up carrying someone. If you don’t like what you hear from the managing partner of the group or

even one of the investors – pass on the property. Another important factor but not the least is a lack of cash reserves. One of the biggest mistakes investors make is not having the cash reserves to facilitate unexpected expenses. Or being over optimistic about the funds needed for cost of tenant improvements or leasing commissions or vacancies.

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Last but not least is the investor in a 1031 exchange which allows the investor to defer capital gains and reinvest the equity into a like kind-exchange. Sometimes investors are so eager to avoid the taxes on the gain they overpay for the exchange or up-leg property. Please feel free to email Pam Moss if you have any questions, pmoss.broker@gmail.com.

Elite Real Estate Brokers • www.SanDiego-CountryRealEstate.com

Do you have land? Do you want to sell?

Fallbrook Beautification Alliance names new board and projects FALLBROOK - The Fallbrook Beautification Alliance has announced its new board and executive directors, along with project priorities for 2018. FBA will be starting the year with the major task of re-landscaping much of the South Mission Medians adding flowering plants and permanent ground covers. Fallbrook’s historic downtown sidewalks are now lined with colorful flower pots, which the FBA will continue to maintain, along with the East Mission Military Memorial and Pico Promenade. The group will once again host two community wide cleanup events, in the spring and fall, engaging families, businesses and individuals to remove trash from Fallbrook streets. The household battery disposal program will be expanded to include a third drop off location, in addition to current sites at Albertson’s and Major Market.

The Fallbrook Village News

Please contact us – we need land – the more the better! The location is not as important. We will carefully evaluate your land and zoning. We have buyers of all types for all locations! Call or text today!

Office 760-706-1111 Cell 714-296-9300

Elite Real Estate Brokers

PAM MOSS, BROKER

PMOSS.BROKER@GMAIL.COM CalBRE #00451292

Property Management Rentals & Real Estate Professional & Personal Service at Reasonable Rates Homes & Apartment Communities

Courtesy photo The new FBA board includes, from left, Julie Gipner, Noelle Denke, Jean Dooley, Shirley Fender, Karen Feyler, Mary Jo Bacik, Cate Robinson, Harry Clyde, Jerri Patchett, and Marta Donovan. Board members not pictured are Heather Howard and Lacy Schwartz. The dedicated graffiti removal team will continue to work closely with the Sheriff’s Department having spent close to 14 hours per month removing unsightly tags and scrawl last year. Volunteers will continue to regularly clean and polish over 30 pieces of

Thompson and Associates Millie & Kelley Thompson/Realtor Call for a rental survey at no obligation.

public art. Anyone interested in helping with any of these initiatives, or in making a donation to help offset the costs of the work, can visit fallbrookbeautification.org and make a difference.

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1120 S. Main St., Fallbrook

Property

SPOTLIGHTS! The Best of the Best On Pala Mesa Golf Course

Coming soon! Upgraded, well located at end of cul-de-sac. Open space and trees on one side & lovely view over the golf course on the oversized private patio. Granite & ss in kitchen. Solar shades & skylight. 1100sf with 1BR/1BA plus office niche. $435,000

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PAM MOSS, BROKER

To view call Pam Moss 714-296-9300 CalBRE #00451292

Too Late! In Escrow in Peppertree Park

Meander to the front door and hear the soothing fountain as you enter the foyer that opens up to a great room with extra tall ceilings. Lg kitchen with island seating, modern cream cabinets and granite counters. Backyard has built-in bbq & tons of seating. $699,000

To view call Virginia Gissing 949-292-2850 CalBRE #01857605

San Luis Rey Heights View Lot

Zoning: R-1, AnimalL, A70/A701 land 4.2 acres with west facing panoramic sunset views - No HOA! Unique parcel w/partial fencing, year round stream, mature oak trees. 2 private entrances. Approved septic for 3BD. Perfect property for horses, grove. $449,500

To view call Caryn Gildea 760-644-3322 CalBRE #01364100

Forever Views Gated Estate Home

Fantastic custom home, built 2009. 2473 sf, 3BD, 3 full BA w/1 opt BS, 2 car grg & room for RV parking or a building site for a casita. 180° forever views to the east. Hardwood floors thruout w/luxurious designer carpet in the BDs. Designer kitchen. $740,000-$780,000

Charming Plus Space

Recently remodeled has hardwood floors, granite counters, stainless appliances. Total of 6 BD 5 BA 4671 SQ FT includes the detached 2 story guest house with kitchenette, bath, living room. Beautiful property with 1.8 AC of usable space. A great value! $849,900

To view call Patrick Marelly 760-473-0000

To view call Chris Murphy 760-310-9292

CalBRE #01054284

CalBRE #01246689

Fallbrook View Home on 1.3 Acres

3BD, 2BA, 1684 sf w/whole house solar system, new roof, new energy effecient HVAC & windows. 2 car garage with 1/2 bath, RV parking and circular driveway. Watering reduced for lawn & landscape. Approved short sale at $507,000, pays off solar lien too.

Come Build Your Dream Home

On this beautiful lot in prestigious gated Lake Vista Estates in Bonsall. Views, boulder out croppings, water meter included plus compacted pad ready to build. All utilities in the street including sewer & COX CABLE ready for hook-up. $350,000

To view call CR Properties 760-645-0792 CalBRE #01391379

Tucked Away with Never Ending Views

At the end of a cul-de-sac in an exclusive neighborhood is this absolutely fabulous custom designed/built home! Enjoy complete privacy while basking in your pool and spa. Sit on the mtn view balcony from the upstairs master suite. Beautifully upgraded. $969,747

To view call Ken Follis 760-803-6235 CalBRE #00799622

Jeanne Stuart 760-310-4663 RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

CalBRE #01130759

Imagine Owning the Home of Your Dreams

Whether you are a horse enthusiast, passionate about gardening or simply want to escape the stresses of life, this home offers it all. $1,199,000

Call Cynthia Hauff 760-468-2909 CalBRE #01274144


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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

Local arborist stresses do not top trees

This London plane tree not only has no protection, it has no leaves to produce food for it. Roger Boddaert Special to the Village News The topping and butchering of trees in any community is like a plague from time to time. This destructive pruning practice of

cutting back large branches to stubs leaves wounds that invite bugs, decay and disease that can enter a tree. When the general public sees more and more of this indiscriminate cutting of trees it becomes acceptable and it

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Some of these eucalyptus trees are totally bare so will be prone to sun damage.

definitely is not. Topping can destroy a trees natural shape, its beauty and grace. It saddens me for I know that people pay top dollars to have this done to their trees, but don’t realize the long range ramifications that can follow after a tree has been mutilated. Topping of trees is sometimes called heading, stubbing and hat-racking. Trees have a life span like you and I and should be cared for properly. After a tree is topped, you have a point of entree for decay into healthy tree tissue. When a tree is over pruned, you must understand that it will be more open to sun than it was before. The canopy or what I call the umbrella of a tree, that shades the interior branches/ limbs and bark is very important. When the foliage of a topped tree is removed, this can allow too much sun inside and the bark can sun burn or sun scald and when this occurs it can lead to secondary problems. A tree also knows of its needs to manufacture the proper amount of food through its foliage when it is healthy. You must understand that the green leaves of a tree are the trees food manufacturing factory and without the leaves the tree can become weak and susceptible to a plethora of invasive of bugs and other conditions. I always say that trees are like people and no two of them are exactly alike and knowing this we must respond independently in reviewing tree by tree. The following are some items that can happen when a tree is topped. Starvation: with the lack of leaves the tree can decline quickly. Shock: trees can go into shock

and lose their food-making process of photosynthesis. Also trees can become susceptible to bugs and diseases. Weak: rapid new water sprouts can erupt around the stub cuts and produce wind throw branches that can fail. Topped trees are just unsightly. Tree death: some trees can die from this severe butchering, like beeches. Cost: for people who don’t realize that in the long run they will be spending more money on tree care and having the trees pruned again and again after topping. Shade: for when you lose the benefits of shade that trees produce, you lose a very valuable and important element that all trees can give us….shade. Age: the trees around our homes are aging and won’t be around forever and should be cared for appropriately. That a healthy tree lives longer is a fact. There are pruning techniques such as drop-crotching or canopy thinning that can achieve good results as well. You can prune back to sturdy lateral branches to reduce the trees overall height with this type of directional pruning. But if it’s the wrong tree in the wrong place, maybe it’s time to re-consider its removal. I always say, “plant the right tree in the right place.” Do your homework when selecting trees and plants around your landscape. Topping also destroys the overall balance between the roots and the crown of the tree. A good professional arborist employs both science and art in the approach for the proper caring of trees. Trees and your landscape offer

many benefits to your home, so treat them with respect and give them proper stewardship in their life span. The Sunset Western Garden Book is a good resource of information on plants to refer to. Sunset has been around for a long time and gives you good solid information. You can also contact the National Arbor Day Foundation for additional information, www. arborday.org. Roger Boddaert, a certified I.S.A. arborist, can be reached at (760) 728-4297.

Roger Boddaert photos After being topped, this jacaranda tree still has leaves but has exposed branch ends.

Sergio Garcia, Teresa Adams and Rodney Hughes

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February 8, 2018

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More 5-Star Ratings than Any Other Local Agent H H H H H

#1 Team for Windermere Homes and Estates #1 Five-Star Reviews on Zillow #1 Ranked in Client Satisfaction We Will Sell Your Home for More Money & in Less Time A Portion of Every Sale Goes to Local Charities

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February 8, 2018

The right time to prune roses Frank Brines Master Consulting Rosarian

Nature lies fallow in winter in preparation for the new year. All life needs rest in order to grow with greater strength. Winter is the time of withdrawal that precedes renewal. But now it’s time to take a few simple steps to get your roses off to a great year! There is no magical specific date to prune. According to all accounts and professional rosarians, the proper time is “late winter.” This has many meanings—bottom line, you want to prune late enough that there’s little risk of frost damage to

the tender growth that will emerge from pruning. In the Temecula Valley, last average frost date is March 31, so that means you’re probably safe pruning in mid- to late-February. Of course, it’s always a gamble. The best advice is to watch the weather. Generally speaking a little later is best when we’ve had winter rain since the rains are cold and the ground is wetter and colder than usual. Different parts of the yard may have other conditions. A south facing wall backing the plants will be warmer than a shadier area. The composition of the soil will have differing effects. Whether there is

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still a generous later of mulch can effect soil conditions. After this pruning, you can usually expect a flush of blooms 8 to 12 weeks later, depending on the temperatures during that period – the warmer it is, the shorter the time to blooms. But all things being equal, if you prune in the latter half of February you will likely have blooms for 2017 rose shows scheduled in mid- to lateApril. If you would like blooms for a specific date, count backwards approximately 10 weeks from that date. Pruning should be complete on this date. The main reason for the major late-winter pruning is to reset the plants’ biological clock. A wake up call to begin a new life cycle–like restarting a factory. The following procedures mostly apply to hybrid teas and floribundas, but are reasonably serviceable for minis. They are not really applicable to climbers, ground cover roses, trailers, or shrub roses – all those types have their own pruning methods. In general, it is recommended that you have good pruning tools and gloves with arm protectors, sharp clean bypass hand pruners, and long handle loppers is recommended. One needs to have a range of pruner sizes handy. Each size has a limit to the diameter thickness for which it is most

efficiently used; using too small a pruner on too large a cane can damage both. At minimum, have a pair of loppers and a standardsized pair of hand pruners that fit your hand size. If you have some older plants

Courtesy photo with large canes that may need to be removed, a saw is a handy tool to have. All pruners should be kept clean, sharp, and in good repair. Rubbing alcohol is ideal for cleaning pruners, before and during the job.

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Notice To Readers: California law requires that contractors taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also requires that contractors include their license number on all advertising. You can check the status of your licensed contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking jobs that total less than $500 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

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February 8, 2018 It also helps prevent transmitting diseases from plant to plant, and you can use it as first aid for punctures and scratches to your skin. A good pair of leather gloves are necessary with long sleeves or separate pair of sleeves to protect our arms. Before starting the job, lubricate the moving parts with a little light oil (such as 3-in-1 oil), and make sure they operate without resistance. Sharpen each blade with a small diamond file (available at garden centers), trying as much as possible to match the original bevel of the blade. Every 100 cuts or so, swipe the file over the blade a few times to keep it sharp. If you notice that the pruners are crushing the stems and/or leaving a tail, it’s past time to sharpen! To minimize damage to the cane keep this rule in mind; the sharp blade should always face the part that will be left. This will minimize the crushing of the cane or stem as it will be the part that is discarded. This rule works for preparing stems for arranging or putting into a vase. Now, decide what style of pruning you feel comfortable with (Figure 1). I find this works well with the way buds are distributed along the cane. Buds are found in the “axil” where a leaf meets the cane; leaves spiral around the cane at about 1.5” intervals. This places outward-facing buds about 4” apart. If you prune lightly to moderately, and if frost damages the tender young growth, then you can still re-prune to the next bud down. In Southern California our rose bushes can grow quite large, so start with some gross pruning to bring the project down to size. I use loppers to cut every bush down to about 3 feet high. This lets you examine the structure of the bush, and to use your hand pruners to more easily remove canes that are twiggy, dead, crossing other canes, or passing through the center of the plant. Also remove old leaves as you go along so you can easily see the structure of the plant. After removing all that stuff from the interior of the bush you can do the final pruning. Attempt to leave a domed top to the degree possible so the plant will bush out in a pleasing, balanced manner. There are two kinds of cuts you will make. Some cuts remove the entire branch; these cuts are made flush with the surface of the parent cane. Other cuts simply shorten a cane. It is important to position your pruners so you minimize damage to the plant. Take a look at your pruners and notice that they have a sharp cutting blade (which slices through the cane), and a dull curved noncutting blade (which holds the cane in place during the cut). These are called bypass pruners, the only type recommended. Position your pruners so the non-cutting blade is in contact with the portion of the cane that will be removed, and the cutting blade is on the side of the cut that will remain on the plant. (See Figure 2.) This will make more sense when you are actually holding the pruners and getting ready to cut! Also, always prune above an outward facing bud with an angled cut. (See Figure 3). A word of caution when pruning: Look for the small nests of hummingbirds, as this is the nesting period for two varieties in our area. Also, if you discover praying mantis egg cases on any branches you remove, find a place to put them where they will be undisturbed and hatch out so you can benefit from the offspring! Be sure to dispose of all cut off material into your green waste bin and put it on the street. Clean the ground thoroughly of all rose debris. Apply a dormant spray to the plants and the soil surface to ward off diseases. Then add 2”-4” of composted mulch to cover the entire garden area. The first fertilizing will be when new growth is about 2 inches long. I recommend lower values of the three elements ( Nitrogen [3], Phosphate [4],K Potassium [3]) with slightly higher value for Phosphate. In two weeks begin with heavier feeding every 2 weeks for great blooms or at least monthly. Now would be the best time to asses the irrigation system for any needed repairs while there is no new growth and mulch has not been spread. Be sure to visit Rose Haven, located at 30592 Jedediah Smith Road (the cross street is Cabrillo Avenue) in Temecula. as well as the web site, www. TemeculaValleyRoseSociety.org.

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New Tax Laws FOR 2018 New tax laws are being implemented this year that may impact homeowners’ taxes.* While these new tax laws will affect income taxes filed in 2019, it’s important to be aware of what changes could potentially affect you and your wallet. BELOW ARE A FEW HIGHLIGHTS OF HOW THE NEW LAWS MAY AFFECT HOMEOWNERS:

BELOW ARE A FEW HIGHLIGHTS OF HOW THE NEW LAWS MAY AFFECT HOMEOWNERS: • The mortgage interest deduction:

• For mortgages taken out after December 15, 2017, only interest on up to $750,000 in acquisition debt is deductible ($375,000 if married filing separately)- includes primary and second homes • Interest on up to $1,000,000 in acquisition debt incurred on or before December 15, 2017 is still deductible ($500,000 if married filing separately) • The $1,000,000 limit ($500,000 if married filing separately) will still apply to anyone who refinances existing qualified residence debt that was incurred before December 15, 2017 to the extent theinterest new loandeduction: does not exceed the old loan The mortgage • Acquisition debt is ANY debt incurred in acquiring, constructing or substantially improving a • For mortgages taken afterbyDecember qualified residence and isout secured the residence15, 2017, only interest on up to $750,000

acquisition debt deductible ($375,000 if married filing separately) - includes • Thein interest deduction on is home equity debt is eliminated •primary This is any debtsecond that is secured and homesby a qualified residence other than acquisition debt • Interest on HELOCs used to purchase a qualified residence is deductible to the extent that the • Interest on up to $1,000,000 in acquisition debt incurred on or before December loan is used to purchase the property (making it acquisition debt)

15,

2017 is still deductible ($500,000 if married filing separately) • The $1,000,000 limit ($500,000 if married filing separately) will still apply to anyone The standard tax deduction will nearly double for single filers from $6,350 to $12,000, for joint filers who refinances existing qualified residence debt that was incurred before December from $12,700 to $24,000, and for heads of household from $9,350 to $18,000 15, 2017 to the extent the new loan does not exceed the old loan The new law eliminates the deduction for personal exemptions and the personal exemption phase-out • Acquisition debt is ANY debt incurred in acquiring, constructing or substantially State and local income tax, property tax, and sales tax (in the aggregate) will now be limited to a improving a qualified residence and is secured by the residence maximum deduction of $10,000

• No changes will be made to the current law that excludes capital gains on the sale of a home. • • •

• The current mortgage revenue bonds and mortgage credit certificates (MCCs) are preserved under the • The interest deduction on home equity debt is eliminated new tax laws

• This is any debt that is secured by a qualified residence other than acquisition debt • Interest on HELOCs used to purchase a qualified residence is deductible to the extent that the loan is used to purchase the property (making it acquisition debt)

Source: IRS https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/resources-for-tax-law-changes

• No changes will be made to the current law that excludes capital gains on the sale of a home. • The standard tax deduction will nearly double for single filers from $6,350 to $12,000, for joint filers from $12,700 to $24,000, and for heads of household from $9,350 to $18,000 • The new law eliminates the deduction for personal exemptions and the personal exemption phase-out • State and local income tax, property tax, and sales tax (in the aggregate) will now be limited to a maximum deduction of $10,000 • The current mortgage revenue bonds and mortgage credit certificates (MCCs) are preserved under the new tax laws

*This advertisement does not constitute tax advice. Please consult a tax advisor regarding your specific situation. Copyright©2018 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS#2289. 4750 S. Biltmore Lane, Madison, WI 53718, 1-877-699-0353. All rights reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates and programs are subject to change without notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Equal Housing Lender.

FW 2475641

Source: IRS https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/resources-for-tax-law-changes

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*This advertisement does not constitute tax advice. Please consult a tax advisor regarding your specific situation. Copyright©2018 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS#2289. 4750 S. Biltmore Lane, Madison, WI 53718, 1-877-699-0353. All rights reserved. This is not an offer to enter into an agreement. Not all customers will qualify. Information, rates and programs are subject to change without notice. All products are subject to credit and property approval. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Equal Housing Lender. FW 2475641

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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

B ONSALL R ECONSTRUCTION

When a home improvement project stalls, get it back on track FA L L B R O O K – U p o n embarking on a home improvement project, homeowners who have never before lived through such undertakings are often told to expect their projects to take more time than initial estimates suggested. Unforeseen complications can compromise project timelines, and some homeowners may find their projects stuck in neutral. Stalled projects can make life at home difficult, and homeowners may feel helpless with regard to getting a project back on course. But there are ways for homeowners to get stalled projects back on course. Start off on solid financial footing. It’s important that homeowners who want to upgrade their homes enter the home improvement process with a realistic grasp of their finances. Many home improvement projects stall when homeowners run out of money. Homeowners can avoid such unfortunate situations by only beginning a project they know they can afford. Whether funding a project with a loan

or savings or a combination of both, homeowners should make an honest assessment of what they can afford to commit to a given project. If the amount of money available does not add up to the estimated cost of the project, delay the project now or you might be facing a stalled project down the road. Honestly assess whether or not the job can be finished. Do-it-yourselfers may have the abilities to complete a project, but they should not let their pride get in the way of their ultimate goal, which is the completion of the project. In addition to money, time or lack thereof, is often the culprit behind stalled projects. Homeowners with full-time jobs, families or both may not be able to find the time to complete a job in a timely fashion. If the project has been stuck in neutral and no sudden windfall of free time is on the horizon, start contacting contractors to finish the job instead. Ask for help. There’s no shame in asking for help to complete a project. Some homeowners may underestimate the scope of a project until it’s too late. Asking

family, friends or neighbors for help might be the only way to get a stalled project back on track. Certain home improvement projects may not require advanced skills, and even friends or family with little or no home improvement experience can pitch in to complete such projects. When more advanced projects stall, homeowners may want to hire contractors to complete the work. If budgets have not left much room for hiring a contractor, homeowners can perform some of the labor on their own. Be mindful of permits. Some home improvement projects require permits, and these permits often have expiration dates. Homeowners must keep permits in mind when projects start to stall, recognizing that they may need to reapply for permits if projects go unfinished for especially long periods of time. Stalled home improvement projects can be a nightmare. But homeowners can address such delays in various ways to get projects back on track.

Unforeseen complications can compromise project timelines, and some homeowners may find their projects stuck in neutral. Courtesy photo

Pacific MFG Homes Disaster Relief PROGRAM We at Pacific Mfg. Homes express our deepest sympathy and compassion to you as you continue to endure the difficult conditions brought about by the wildfires in our San Diego area. We realize that you continue to be impacted by the fires in some capacity and would once again like to extend our thoughts and prayers to you and your family as you recover from this tragedy. To this end, we would like to offer our Disaster Relief Program to you and your family.

Pacific MFG Homes

Disaster Relief Program CERTIFICATE Available immediately, Pacific Manufactured Homes will provide $2,500.00 to participating NEW HOME purchasers to use as they wish. Additionally, Pacific is teamed up with Major Nation Lenders to provide special financing and down payment assistance to victims of the fires. Pacific will continue to work closely with F.E.M.A., The Red Cross, The Salvation Army, the local Chambers of Commerce, Insurance Companies, and everyone else necessary to insure a complete and successful restoration.

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February 8, 2018

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The Fallbrook Village News

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D INING End a Valentine’s Day dinner with homemade dessert FALLBROOK – Valentine’s Day is synonymous with many things, including chocolate. Many sweethearts exchange chocolate on Valentine’s Day, making chocolate confections as essential to a successful holiday as flowers and romance. Men and women who want to make this Valentine’s Day extra

special can forgo store-bought chocolates in favor of homemade confections. The following recipe for “Swiss Mountain Ice Cream” from Maxine Clark’s “Chocolate: Deliciously Indulgent Recipes for Chocolate Lovers” (Ryland, Peters & Small) is a great way to end a romantic holiday dinner.

Swiss Mountain Ice Cream Makes about 2 quarts White chocolate sauce (see below) 2 cups whole milk 1 cup sweetened condensed milk 3/4 cup granulated sugar 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa 14 ounces premium milk chocolate (over 32% cocoa solids), chopped 1 teaspoon pure vanilla essence 1 1/2 cups whipping or heavy cream, chilled 6 1/2 ounces white nougat, roughly chopped 1 ice cream maker (optional) 1 freezer-proof tray or container 1 mountain-shaped mold (optional) Put the milk, condensed milk, sugar, and cocoa in a pan, bring to a boil, then simmer gently for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in the chocolate and let melt, stirring occasionally. Let cool completely, then add the vanilla essence and refrigerate for about 1 hour. Stir the cream into the mixture, then churn-freeze in an ice cream maker in two batches. This will take 20 to 30 minutes. It will increase in volume as it thickens and freezes. Stop churning when thick and smooth, add the nougat, and churn to mix, then transfer to a chilled freezer-proof tray, cover, and freeze. If you don’t have an ice cream maker, put the mixture in a freezer-proof tray or container and freeze until it is frozen around the edges. Mash well with a fork and return to the freezer. Continue mashing with a fork and freezing the mixture until thick and smooth, about 2 hours. Stir in the nougat. At this stage, you can pack it into a mold and return to the freezer. If the ice cream is in a mold, remove from the freezer and dip briefly in hot water to melt the outside. Invert onto a chilled plate, lifting off the mold. If the ice cream is in a container, transfer to the refrigerator to soften for 20 minutes before serving in scoops. Drizzle with White Chocolate Sauce and serve.

White Chocolate Sauce Makes about 2 1/2 cups

1 cup light or heavy cream 6 tablespoons milk 8 ounces white chocolate (over 25% cocoa butter), chopped Put the cream and milk in a small pan and bring to just below boiling point. Remove from the heat and let cool for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the white chocolate and stir until completely melted. Serve warm. NOTE: If reheating, do so over gentle heat. Do not allow to boil or the sauce can thicken and seize.

Swiss Mountain Ice Cream

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February 8, 2018

E DUCATION New school under way for military-dependent students at Camp Pendleton MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON - The foundation has been poured for a new school that has been years in the making for the Fallbrook Union Elementary School District. Work on the brand-new San Onofre School got underway even before the official groundbreaking ceremony in December, but an increase in activity over the past weeks has really shown a modern campus taking shape. The new construction is going on adjacent to the existing school, which was built in 1974 to serve the Marine Corps base’s families. A second phase was added three years later. San O’s students, known as the Panthers, will continue to attend class in the current facilities while the new school is being built. When it’s done, the old buildings will be replaced with a playground. A $72 million federal grant awarded to the district to expand its two schools located aboard the military base - the other school is Mary Fay Pendleton School - will enhance student learning by providing space for new technology, art and music, as well as improved drop-off areas

and sports fields. The Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment monies fund the majority of the project, while 20 percent matching state funds make up the rest. The modern, two-story campus will boast a 21st century learning environment that features improved science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs and computer labs with wireless internet. The school will also expand grades, moving from K-6 to K-8. The student-led groundbreaking ceremony held Dec. 14 began with a welcome message from fifth-graders Seth Kessler and Angelyka Dilling. Honored guests included the governing board and Col. Joseph Williams, the Marine Corps Installations West chief of staff. Remarks delivered by Valentina Ugalde, who is in the third grade, and Kendall Breslin, a fifth-grader, put student leadership skills on center stage. “Thinking of one word to sum up the San O community, I thought of kindness,” Kendall said. “Everyone here is loved, everyone is important and we

Students, staff and military leaders break ground for the new San Onofre School on Camp Pendleton. practice kindness.” Valentina pointed to the closeknit community’s support of each other as one of the school’s unique qualities. “We are not afraid to face

challenges,” she said. “Because you know you’re not alone.” Construction of the new school is expected to be complete within two years. Once open, it will be able

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to serve up to 900 students in kindergarten through eighth grade. About 480 students in transitional kindergarten (TK) through sixth grade are currently enrolled.

Santa Margarita Reciprocity P.E.O. remembers its founders FALLBROOK – The Santa Margarita Reciprocity P.E.O. hosted a special event Jan. 20, at the Golf Club of Southern California to honor the seven founders. P.E.O. is a philanthropic educational organization, whose mission is women helping

women. Over 60 ladies attended the brunch, representing the five P.E.O. chapters in Fallbrook and many from the Temecula chapters. Dr. Lydia Story Knopf spoke of her journey to attain her Ph.D. in organizational leadership with a concentration in entrepreneurial leadership and how it was

Rancho Margarita Reciprocity P.E.O. members welcome their guest speaker, Lydia Story Knopf Courtesy photo at a special event, Jan. 20, from left, MaryLin Pitalo, Knopf, Genie Summers and Barbara Hartloff.  

Rancho Margarita Reciprocity P.E.O. members are seen with guest speaker, Lydia Story Knopf at the Golf Club of Southern California, Jan. 20: from left, Sheila Risser, Connie Tognoli, Knopf, Shirley Story and Gleam Levering.

accomplished with the help of the P.E.O. Educational Loan Fund she received. Knopf spoke of her gratitude to the P.E.O. sisterhood for their support, love and guidance through her journey. Knopf grew up in Fallbrook, attended La Paloma Elementary School, Potter Junior High School and Fallbrook High School and graduated in 1983. She is the mother of four boys, who all attended college, and she said she appreciates the support she had from her husband and sons. She

said she comes from a long line of entrepreneurs. Her parents, Jack and Shirley Story, began the Fallbrook Tennis Club, helped organize the Fallbrook Historical Society and were partners in opening the beautiful Grand Tradition. She said that the P.E.O. founders were certainly entrepreneurs in their day. Vision, innovation and risk-taking are the marks of entrepreneurship, and they certainly displayed these qualities. P.E.O. began in 1869, when a

woman’s place in society was very different than it is today. Men’s clubs were successful, but the time was ripe for women to emerge as leaders as well. Many, many years later, the P.E.O. sisterhood continues to improve the lives of women through education and philanthropy on an international level with over a quarter of a million P.E.O. chapters and over 102,000 women benefiting from the organization’s educational grants, loans, awards, projects and the stewardship of Cottey College.

Applications for California Senate Fellows due Feb. 12 SACRAMENTO – Applications for the 2018-2019 California Senate Fellows program are being accepted until 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12. The program provides college graduates an opportunity to become full-time Senate staff members at the state Capitol in Sacramento for 11 months, beginning October 2018. Fellows are assigned to the personal or committee staff of a Senator and also participate in academic seminars with Senators, senior staff, journalists, lobbyists and state government officials. The fellowship program is jointly operated by the California Senate and the Center for California Studies at Sacramento State University. Fellows are paid a stipend of $2,627 per month plus health, vision and dental benefits. They earn 6 units of graduate credit from Sacramento State University for the academic portion of the program. “Being a Fellow provides an excellent opportunity to gain firsthand knowledge of the legislative process,” Senator Joel Anderson said. “Whether your career goals are the public or private sector, the Senate Fellows program provides valuable training.” Former Senate Fellows include current members of Congress and the California Legislature, judges and numerous other elected

The 2017-2018 California Senate Fellows are seen in the Senate Chambers. officials and community leaders. Responsibilities include researching public policy issues, helping develop legislative proposals, analyzing and staffing legislation, assisting with constituent inquiries and casework, participating in meetings as the Senator’s representative, writing press releases and speeches and performing other delegated tasks. Anyone who will be at least 20

years of age and a graduate of a four-year college or university by Sept. 1 is eligible to apply. There is no preferred major. Individuals with advanced degrees and those in mid-career are encouraged to apply. For more information or to apply, visit the Senate Fellows website at www.csus.edu/calst/ senate.

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Davenport named to honor roll NORMAN, Okla. – Bonsall resident Riley Elizabeth Davenport was named to the honor roll at the University of Oklahoma Norman campus for the fall 2017 semester. Students must earn a minimum 3.5 GPA on a 4.0 scale to be included on the honor roll. Honor roll students must be enrolled full time in at least 12 credit hours.


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February 8, 2018

D e L u z , R a i n b ow, C a m p P e ndl e t o n , Pa l a ,

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Volume 22, Issue 6

Lady Warriors throttle Cougars 42-19

Senior basketball players, from left, Riley Sullivan, Iman Sadat and Alyssa Ware are honored prior to Fallbrook High’s game against Escondido Feb. 2.

Fallbrook High’s Jessica Wilbert takes a shot against Escondido.

Lady Warrior Nya Jackson works to get a shot off against Escondido.

Lady Warrior Riley Sullivan goes up for a layup against Escondido. Fallbrook won the varsity girls basketball game 42-19.

Fallbrook High’s Iman Sadat gets the rebound against Escondido.

Lady Warrior Antonia Rosario gets a layup against Escondido.

Lady Warrior Taylor Evans takes a jump shot against Escondido Feb. 2.

Shane Gibson photos


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February 8, 2018

S PORTS

Lady Warriors tame Cougars in pool

Lady Warrior Chloe Corrales looks for an opening before firing a shot on goal against Escondido.

Fallbrook High’s Ella Hearn fights off an Escondido player and takes a shot on goal during the Lady Warriors’ varsity water polo match against the Cougars Jan. 24. Fallbrook posted a 15-5 victory.

Lady Warrior Natalie Travers attempts to block her opponent’s pass.

Shane Gibson photos

Fallbrook High senior water polo players, from left, Ella Hearn, Natalie Travers and Chloe Corrales are honored prior to the Lady Warriors’ match against Escondido Jan. 24. Fallbrook defeated Escondido 15-5.

Warrior Wrestlers have success at Mission Hills Tournament Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

Five Fallbrook High School wrestlers who spent Jan. 6 at the Mission Hills Tournament reached the round in which the winner would receive a medal. “I couldn’t have asked for the tournament to go any better than it did,” said Fallbrook coach Christian Vera. “As a whole we did outstanding. Across the board everyone wrestled very well.” The Mission Hills Tournament allows a school to enter multiple grapplers in the same weight class although only one of those is designated to be scored. Fallbrook took a total of 14 wrestlers, but the Warriors were represented in only seven weight divisions. “We just got a bunch of guys that we thought deserved to go to the tournament,” Vera said. Fallbrook still finished tenth as a team. “To be able to do that with so few scoring wrestlers was very impressive,” Vera said. Six wrestlers in each weight bracket received medals, so a victory in the championship semifinals or consolation quarterfinals was necessary to advance to matches which determined positions. Although only one Fallbrook competitor obtained a medal, four others reached the consolation quarterfinals whose winner would next wrestle in a medal round. “We had quite a few guys make it very deep into the tournament,” Vera said. Lance McNatt had Fallbrook’s highest finish. He lost in the 152-pound semifinals before winning the consolation matches for third place. McNatt began competition with a 16-1 technical fall decision against Phanxico Hoang of Scripps Ranch and then pinned Donovan Piro of Mission Hills in the third round. The semifinal match between McNatt and Christian Cruz of Valley Center ended as a 10-7 decision victory for Cruz, but in the consolation bracket McNatt salvaged third place with a 6-0

decision against Jesus Padilla of Central Union and a 9-2 decision against John Clayton of ArmyNavy. Kaleb Beckmann reached the consolation quarterfinals in the 220-pound class. Beckmann began the tournament with a first-round pin of Army-Navy’s Larry Wu and a second-round pin of Del Norte’s Tristan Henderson. In his semifinal Beckmann was pinned by Poway’s Javier Espinoza, who eventually won the championship, and in Beckmann’s only consolation bracket match Josh Mitchell of Helix prevailed by a 3-0 decision. Fallbrook’s other 220-pound wrestler, John Eastom, was a match away from the consolation quarterfinals. Eastom pinned Cody Brockington of Del Norte but then lost a 16-5 decision to Andrew Villagomez of Montgomery before losing to Mitchell in a consolation match. Dylan Livingston was in the 145-pound consolation quarterfinals. He began the tournament by pinning Shankar Torres of Canyon Crest in the third round, but Livingston was then pinned by eventual fourth-place finisher Miles Bryant of Serra. Livingston’s first consolation bracket match was a 10-2 decision victory over Joel Davis of Mount Miguel, and Livingston then pinned Spenser Pira of Guajome Park in the second period. Adam Zavala of Central Union won an 8-2 decision against Livingston in the consolation quarterfinals. Matthew Kendall won two matches and lost two in the 145-pound bracket. He pinned Davis in the third period but was then pinned by Matthew McCauley of Valley Center. That sent Kendall to the consolation bracket where he defeated Torres when the Canyon Crest wrestler was disqualified in the third period. Kendall was then pinned by Jonathan Diaz of Valley Center. Enrique Volquardsen advanced to the consolation quarterfinals in

the 160-pound division. He pinned Steele Canyon’s Robert Weber in the first round but was pinned by eventual champion Craig Smith of Mount Miguel in the second round of the next match. Volquardsen pinned Tanner Johnson of Valley Center in the third round of Volquardsen’s initial consolation match, but in the consolation quarterfinals Truman Irion of Escondido pinned Volquardsen in the second round. Gavin Beckmann reached the consolation quarterfinals of the 285-pound class. His first match was a loss by the second-round pin of Serra’s Ansel Figueroa, but in the consolation bracket Beckmann pinned Oscar Morales of El Camino in the third period. Beckmann was then on the falling end of a third-round pin by Escondido’s Nic Nava. Marco Alejandre won two matches and lost two in the 132-pound division. He opened the tournament with a 16-7 major decision victory against Matthew Hollaway of Del Norte but was then pinned by eventual champion Zeke Stoddard of Poway. In Alejandre’s first consolation bracket match he pinned Steele Canyon’s Brandon Pagen in the second round. Alejandre was then pinned by Efrain Guzman of Mission Hills. Uriel Juarez was Fallbrook’s 126-pound representative. After winning an 8-0 major decision against Miguel Ayala of Mount Miguel he faced the division’s No. 1 seed, Escondido’s Julian Rodriguez, in the quarterfinals and lost by a 10-1 major decision. “Holding off the number one seed from pinning you is very impressive,” Vera said. In his consolation match Juarez lost a 10-9 decision to Christian Korbacher of El Camino. “All the guys did awesome,” said Vera. “I couldn’t ask for more. We had so many young guys step up and be able to perform at a high level. The future bodes well for these guys.”


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National Junior Basketball league play continues FALLBROOK – National Junior Basketball held its sixth week of games Jan. 21 at Fallbrook High School. Several NJB teams played – Rookies (K to 2nd grade boys and girls), both Division 3 (3rd and 4th graders) boys teams, Division 2 (5th and 6th graders) boys and girls and Division 1 (7th and 9th graders) boys and girls. NJB is an excellent option for growing a healthy level of competitive spirit, an appreciation

for the game of basketball, and the tools to take kids’ skills to the next level. The league plays games each Sunday at Fallbrook High School until the final weekend of Feb. 11, after which the All-Star games start up. For a detailed list of game times, visit the league website at: www.fallbrook-njb.com.prod. sportngin.com. Interested parties can also view league information or game photos on the NJB Facebook page.

In a Division 2 boys game, Oliver Kurnik goes to the hoop with the ball while Steven Harkins (No. 1), Austin Lauffer (No. 5) and R.J. Burley (No. 15) react to the play.

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In a Division 1 girls game, Robin Hinchliff dribbles the ball while teammate Payton Calloway (No. 13) looks to provide help.

Fallbrook players Roco Buley (No. 30), Emory Vorndam (No. 10), Ian Wilson (No. 2) and Javier DiazDean (No. 11) get ready to go after a rebound in a Division 3 boys game.

Fallbrook’s Jasmine Uresti takes a shot while teammates Amelia Vorndam (No. 12, face hidden) and Lucy Powell (second from right) come in for the rebound in a Division 2 girls game.

Naiya Kurnik shoots a free throw during a Division 1 girls game.

Vikings go 1-2 in flag football tournament Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

Vallecitos Elementary School participated in a flag football tournament at Hamilton High School in Anza Jan. 18, and the Vikings won one of their three games. “We turned out to be more competitive than I thought,” said Vallecitos coach Ray Hanbeck. “Usually football is not one of our stronger sports.” Six points were awarded for a touchdown, and although there was no kicking for extra points, a team could choose between a one-point conversion attempt from the 3-yard line or a two-point conversion attempt from the 12yard line. A team could only pass for a one-point conversion but could either run or pass for a twopoint conversion. An interception was worth two points as well as possession of the ball. T h e Vi k i n g s b e g a n t h e tournament with a 16-0 loss to Hamilton Elementary School. “We weren’t able to create any points, but we were able to hold them to two touchdowns,” Hanbeck said.

Hamilton’s boys won the tournament championship while outscoring their opponents by a cumulative 52-4 margin. Cottonwood Elementary School (Aguanga), which took third place in the tournament, defeated Vallecitos in a 16-8 contest. “It was a close game,” said Hanbeck. Va l l e c i t o s s c o r e d o n a touchdown pass from Christian Posey to Manny Arciga. A consolation game pitted Vallecitos against Pauma and the Vikings ended the game on the desired end of the 32-0 final score. “We pretty much dominated,” Hanbeck said. Posey threw a touchdown pass to Arciga, and on a reverse, Arciga threw to Posey for a touchdown. Ivan Franco threw two touchdown passes to Arciga. Seven small elementary schools in southern Riverside County and northern San Diego County participate in tournaments throughout the year with each school hosting a different sport. The participating schools will next compete Feb. 15 in a basketball tournament at Borrego Springs Elementary School.


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February 8, 2018

Ramona edges Fallbrook on the mat

Fallbrook wrestlers honored during Senior Night Feb. 1, from left, are John Eastom, Dylan Livingston, Kaleb Beckmann, Lance McNatt, Eli Moreno and Enrique Volquardsen.

Warrior Gavin Beckmann takes his Ramona opponent down to the mat in the 285-pound weight class. Fallbrook lost the Feb. 1 wrestling dual 42-30.

Shane Gibson photos

Warrior Enrique Volquardsen battles his Ramona opponent in the 160-pound weight class.

Fallbrook High’s Warrior Lance McNatt pins his Ramona opponent in the 152-pound weight class.

Warrior Curtis Permito Jr. works at pinning his Ramona opponent in the 132-pound weight class. Fallbrook lost the Feb. 1 wrestling dual 42-30.

Fallbrook High’s Matthew Kendall, right, battles his Ramona opponent in the 138-pound division Feb. 1.

FAST reaches championship game of tourney Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

The Fallbrook Associated Swim Team water polo club reached the championship game of the 11th annual Pacific Winter Classic tournament. The FAST 14-and-under coed team won three matches and lost only the final in the tournament held Jan. 13-14. “We played really well,” said FAST coach Doug Pearce. “It was really cool to watch.” FAST had 15 players. Only two of those were 14-year-olds and a majority of the team could have played in 12-and-under competition. “I was really impressed,” Pearce said. “They surprised me. I was

expecting them to do well, but a lot of the kids are newer.” FAST had played in league competition over the past three years but the Pacific Winter Classic was the squad’s first tournament in three years. “I didn’t know what to expect,” Pearce said. Pearce graduated from Fallbrook High School in 1995 and played for the 1993 Warriors team which won the CIF Division I championship under coach Joe Goss. He then played for the University of the Pacific under coach John Tanner, whose other activities at the time including coaching the United States national team. “I have been fortunate enough to be coached by some of the best coaches,” said Pearce.

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Pearce was out of water polo for approximately 15 years before returning to help the growth of the FAST program. “I’m very excited,” said Pearce. “They are going to have great talent entering into Fallbrook High next year. They have a lot of speed, skills, and experience.” Pearce is Doug Pearce V. Doug Pearce IV played for Newport Harbor High School under coach Ted Newland. The FAST team includes Doug Pearce VI. “Polo is a family tradition,” said Doug Pearce V. Del Norte High School was the site of FAST’s Jan. 13 matches and is also the home pool of the Pacific Water Polo club, which was FAST’s initial opponent in the tournament. “They’re a well-coached team,” said Pearce of Pacific. FAST was able to take a 14-7 victory over Pacific. “Our players played pretty well,” Pearce said. Kai Maestas led the team with eight goals. Doug Pearce VI scored four goals. Brock Bushnell had the other two goals. Kayden Trafford led the team with three steals and also had one assist. FAST goalkeeper Anthony Hearn made eight saves and added a steal. A 16-2 victory over the Escondido-based Riptide team gave FAST two wins for the first day of tournament play. “We did well,” Doug Pearce V said. Maestas had eight goals and Doug Pearce VI placed six shots

into the net while leading the team with five steals. Hearn made five saves. The margin of victory also allowed pool time for all of the FAST players. “We got to sub a lot, which was good,” Doug Pearce V said. That win placed FAST into the Jan. 14 semifinal at La Jolla High School’s Coggan Pool. Valhalla High School’s nickname is the Norsemen, and the Sons of Odin water polo club practices and plays home matches at Valhalla. FAST had a multi-goal lead against Sons of Odin. “They came back,” Pearce said. “They made a run for it.” The final Sons of Odin goal made the score 8-7 in FAST’s favor with 15 seconds remaining. FAST was able to avoid a turnover and run out the clock. That victory indicated that FAST was able to pull out close games when the necessity arose. “It was awesome,” Pearce said. Doug Pearce VI had five of the goals with Maestas scoring the other three and leading the team with five steals. Trafford, Pearce, and Jonathan Nelson added three steals apiece. The Jan. 14 final at Coggan Pool pitted FAST against the Poway Valley “A” team. FAST overcame a 4-0 deficit after the first quarter to create a 9-9 score by the end of the third period, but Poway Valley ended the game with a 1310 triumph.

“They were physically faster and stronger than us,” Doug Pearce V said of Poway Valley. Both the Poway Valley “A” team and Sons of Odin include high school players, and the size differential was evident when the players gave “high five” congratulations to each other after the games. “It was really cool to watch the kids keep up,” Pearce said. “They played really well.” Doug Pearce VI had six goals in the final. Trafford and Maestas each scored twice. Hearn made seven saves. “We were able to control the two-meter on offense with Doug Pearce and Kaimana Maestas, with them taking turns rotating into the two,” said Doug Pearce V. “The other teams had no answer to this threat. They finally were able to shut down the two-meter in the last quarter of the championship game by triple teaming Doug. “Kayden Trafford controlled the two-meter on D (defense), not allowing any of the teams to get two-meter set and did a great job on creating ball movement on offense,” continued Pearce V. “Anthony Hearn did a great job in the goal and shows continual improvement each game that he plays. The supporting cast of players did exceptionally well, especially the younger ones who had to step it way up to play against older, more physically matured, and experienced players.”


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B USINESS County offers free tax preparation for low-income families José A. Álvarez County of San Diego Communications Office

It’s that time of the year again to get your income taxes filed, and you might be able to get them done for free. The County is once again teaming up with its local partners to help low-income families or individuals prepare their taxes at no cost. The free tax preparation will take place until April 16 at dozens of locations throughout the county. The only requirement for the free service is that filers meet income requirements. “We want people to claim their Earned Income Tax Credit and to keep more of their hard-earned money, money that could be spent here and support our local economy,” said County Supervisor Greg Cox. The free tax preparation services are part of the annual Earned Income Tax Credit campaign, which began in 2003 and is conducted by local non-profit

organizations located throughout the region and supported by the County Health and Human Services Agency’s Community Action Partnership, the IRS, AARP, United Way of San Diego County and 2-1-1 San Diego. The campaign helps residents claim their EITC, the federal government’s largest assistance program to support low- to moderate-income families. The IRS estimates that between 20 and 25 percent of eligible people do not claim their EITC each year. As part of the campaign, you can have your taxes prepared for you, prepare them yourself with assistance from a volunteer or do them on your own by visiting myfreetaxes.org. To receive free services, call 2-1-1 to make an appointment at a site near you. The free tax preparation campaign aims to get people out of poverty and help them thrive, one of the goals of the County’s Live Well San Diego vision. Individuals and families who worked in 2017 and earned less than $53,505 could qualify for as

much as $6,318 in federal EITC tax credit. The California credit could be as little as $223 or as much as $2,775. Residents must file a tax return to be eligible for both credits. Last year, EITC campaign volunteers in San Diego filed more than 31,000 federal and state tax returns, bringing about $35.6 million in total refunds to local working families and individuals. About $15 million of the refund amount was EITC dollars.

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Sole-source contract approved for SDCRFA equipment Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

The San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved sole-source contracts for the acquisition of San Diego County Regional Fire Authority equipment. The supervisors’ 5-0 vote Jan. 23, authorized the director of the county’s Department of Purchasing and Contracting to enter into negotiations with authorized dealers of Scott Safety self-contained breathing apparatus equipment, ZOLL Medical Corporation cardiac monitor and defibrillator equipment and accessories, and Bendix King very high frequency radios and accessories. The action also establishes $1,383,305 of appropriations based on Community Development Block Grant revenue received for the SDCRFA equipment. “It is critical that our firefighters have the tools they need to respond to wildfires and other emergencies,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. In April the Board of Supervisors approved the county’s 2017-18 annual funding plan for Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnerships, Emergency Shelter Grant, and Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS programs. The plan included both recommended projects for the expected CDBG funding and alternative projects which would be acceptable if funding became

available. S i x S D C R FA p r o p o s a l s were placed on the alternative list: a $480,645 proposal for 800-megahertz radios at 10 SDCRFA stations including the DeLuz and Palomar Mountain stations, a $192,500 request for self-contained breathing apparatus for five stations, a $181,830 desired allocation for VHF radios at seven SDCRFA stations including DeLuz and Palomar Mountain, separate $165,000 proposals for emergency backup generators at the Jacumba and Shelter Valley stations, and a $120,000 request for cardiac monitors and defibrillators for the Palomar Mountain, Shelter Valley, and Jacumba stations. Because the projects on the alternative list are already reviewed, if additional CDBG funding becomes available the projects can be implemented by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development deadline. The SDCRFA requests could be completed faster than public works projects, so those were chosen for funding when the additional federal revenue became available. “They would be the fastest to spend and ready to proceed,” said David Estrella, the director of integrative services for the county’s Health and Human Services Agency. The San Diego County Regional Fire Authority already owns more than 50 Scott Safety self-contained breathing apparatus units which are housed on county-owned apparatus at various stations.

Every firefighter has an annual “fit” test to ensure an adequate seal of his or her SCBA mask and that test is brand-specific. The familiarity and consistency of equipment and safety gear was also used to justify the solesource contract, and the ability to mix equipment from different fire engines is another benefit of utilizing a single brand. The ZOLL cardiac monitor has a robust set of communication devices which provide maximum compatibility with electronic patient care reporting systems including the county’s ImageTrend system. The ZOLL monitor is also compatible with the defibrillation pads used by SDCRFA and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection personnel. The SDCRFA already owns 19 ZOLL monitors. The ZOLL monitor is also lighter and more durable than other cardiac monitors, and built-in diagnostic algorithms provide capabilities which are the most reliable for determining myocardial infarction. SDCRFA and CalFire personnel at county fire stations already use Bendix King radios. The standardization of functions and radio configurations enhances firefighter safety and eliminates the need for emergency responders to learn how to operate unfamiliar radios during dangerous situations. The sole-source procurement process will include market research on fair and reasonable pricing, and the contracts will be subject to successful negotiations.

Anderson’s voting record praised for support of California small businesses SACRAMENTO – State Senator Joel Anderson received a 100 percent rating from National Federation of Independence Business California for his votes on legislation impacting small businesses in the state. Throughout the legislative year, this non-partisan organization whose membership consists of 325,000 small and independent business owners from all 50 states and Washington, D.C., determines the organization’s top priorities and creates a record for how each

state legislator votes. John Kabateck is the NFIB California state director and stated, “Senator Anderson has been a champion for small business owners in California for years, and our latest voting record is a further reflection of that. While many in the legislature claim to support our small business job creators, Senator Anderson’s unwavering 100 percent NFIB voting record proves he stands up when it matters most with his critical vote in the legislature.”

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Bebee seated as FPUD’s CWA representative

Joe Naiman Village News Correspondent

Jack Bebee has replaced Brian Brady as the Fallbrook Public Utility District’s representative on the San Diego County Water Authority board. Bebee was seated at the Jan. 25 SDCWA meeting. “I think it’s important that we have a voice in what’s happening regionally, and I’m happy to fill that role for the district,” he said. Brady, who retired Jan. 12, had been FPUD’s representative on the CWA board since October 2011. Bebee was raised in the Chicago suburb of Lake Bluff. He received his bachelor of science degree in physics from Washington and Lee University in 1998 and his master of science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois in 2000. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., hired Bebee after he received his graduate degree and based him in the firm’s Carlsbad office. Bebee’s activity with Malcolm Pirnie included working on FPUD’s ultraviolet disinfection facility at Red Mountain. FPUD chief engineer Joe Jackson retired in October 2009

and FPUD engineering manager Mike Page retired in February 2010. Bebee was hired by FPUD in 2009 to fill the consolidated position and originally held the title of engineering and planning manager. FPUD added the operations of the district’s wastewater treatment plant to Bebee’s responsibilities in 2013 and changed his title to assistant general manager. In Brady’s final months with FPUD he focused on external matters and Bebee was given the title of acting general manager. San Diego County’s Local Agency Formation Commission has a Special Districts Advisory Committee which makes recommendations for the LAFCO board to consider. Members of the 16-member (in the absence of vacancies) advisory committee can be either board members or staff of an independent (voter-elected) special district. Bebee was elected to the Special Districts Advisory Committee in 2016. The CWA representative does not need to be a board member or even on the staff of the member agency. After FPUD board member Paul Algert passed away, board member Leo McGuire replaced Algert as

FPUD’s representative on the CWA board. McGuire served from September 1982 to March 1983 and recommended that it would be in the best interest of FPUD if FPUD general manager Gordon Tinker served as the district’s CWA representative. Tinker retired from FPUD in June 1999 but remained on the CWA board until August 2001, when FPUD general manager Keith Lewinger became the CWA representative. Brady replaced Lewinger on the CWA board after Lewinger retired. The agency’s governing body must appoint the CWA member. FPUD’s board voted 5-0 Dec. 11 to designate Bebee as Brady’s replacement on the CWA board. CWA board seats have specific six-year terms, although board members can be reappointed or leave prior to the end of a term. Bebee’s term runs through July 14, 2022. His position on the SDCWA board also includes assignment to two committees. Bebee will be on the Engineering and Operations Committee and the Water Planning Committee. Brady had served on those two committees prior to his retirement.

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Wine Country

Valley News • www.myvalleynews.comFebruary • February8, 9, 2018 2018

The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

Uncork a lovely weekend at South Coast Winery Resort and Spa for Valentine’s Day South Coast Winery Resort and Spa and Carter Estates Winery owner Jim Carter’s vision to have a place where guests can come and receive gracious hospitality is coming true in Temecula’s Wine Country on Rancho California Road.

Whether guests prefer reds, whites, dry whites, sweet whites, dry roses and sweet reds, dessert or sparkling wines, South Coast Winery Spa and Resort at 34843 Rancho California Road in Temecula’s Wine Country has them all.

From shoes to toiletries, hundreds of beautiful gifts are offered at the South Coast Winery Resort and Spa gift shop.

Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Even though it is still winter in the Valley, the warm sun, flowers and singing birds will soon be ushering in Valentine’s Day for young and old lovers seeking romance and fun. South Coast Winery Resort and Spa is ready, as Cupid entices, with fine wines, food, luxury lodging or even a relaxing massage. The skilled and welcoming staff of South Coast Winery Resort and Spa at 34843 Rancho California Road in Temecula Valley Wine Country is preparing a

Wines, gifts, cards and chocolates await lovers coming to the South Coast Winery Resort and Spa on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14.

special Valentine’s Day menu with their Valentine’s dinner, a “romance at vineyards” package and for the romantically inclined, a cupcake and wine tour. Don’t forget the winery’s “Decadent Romance Spa Package” with a 50-minute massage for two in a private couple’s room, followed by a glass of award-winning South Coast sparkling wine and yummy chocolate truffles. One of Temecula’s oldest and finest wineries, South Coast Winery Resort and Spa isn’t just focusing on Valentine’s Day, Wednesday Feb. 14, but will offer the “Love at first Sip” Valentine’s

Wine Country Events Calendar Friday, Feb. 9 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery

Noon-2 p.m.

Gourmet Cheese Artisanal Tour & Wine Tasting, Avensole Winery

1-2:30 p.m.

Behind the Scenes Wine Tour, South Coast Winery

3-5:30 p.m.

Happy Hour, Vineyard Rose, South Coast Winery

5-7 p.m.

Live music, Sebastian Sidi, at Meritage Restaurant at Callaway Winery

5-8 p.m.

Live Music, Aris and Shea, Cougar Vineyard and Winery

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Endeavor, Lorimar Winery

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Ruben V, Miramonte Winery

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Michael Edon, Avensole Winery restaurant

6-10 p.m.

Salsa Night, Kimba Light, Bel Vino Winery

7-11 p.m.

Live Music, The Ponte Cellar Lounge

11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery

Noon to 4 p.m.

Live Music, Fear of Phobias, Bel Vino Winery

Noon to 4 p.m.

Live Music, Brennen & Amanda, Masia de La Vinya Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Michael LeClerc, Avensole Winery Patio

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Dulaney & Co., Robert Renzoni Vineyards

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Astra Kelly, Fazeli Cellars

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Tralian Rox, Danza del Sol Winery

3:30-5:30 p.m.

Happy Hour, Vineyard Rose, South Coast Winery

5:30-8:30 p.m.

Live Music, Ponte Winery Restaurant

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Natalie Kirkwood, Avensole Winery Restaurant

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Old School, Lorimar Winery

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Bluefish, Miramonte Winery

7-11 p.m.

Live Music, The Ponte Cellar Lounge

Saturday, Feb. 10

Sunday, Feb. 11 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Brunch at Bouquet Restaurant, Ponte Vineyard Inn

10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Bubble Brunch Buffet, Wilson Creek Winery

11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Brunch Specials at Meritage, Callaway Winery

11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery

11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Dog Day Sundays, Carol’s Restaurant at Baily’s Winery

Noon to 4 p.m.

Live Music, Cassie B Project, Bel Vino Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Izon Eden, Avensole Winery Patio

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Jimmy Patton, Europa Village

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Midnight Satellites Acoustic, Lorimar Winery

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, John & Austin, Fazeli Cellars

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Ben Bostick, Danza Del Sol Winery

UPCOMING: Feb. 14, L’Amore at Europa Valentine’s Dinner Feb. 14, Bel Vino Winery Sweetheart Dinner Feb. 14, Valentine’s Day Four-Course Dinner, Wilson Creek Winery Feb. 14, Valentine’s Day Dinner at Annata Bistro/Bar, Mount Palomar Winery March 4, Bridal Show 2018, South Coast Winery March 17, St. Patrick’s Day 5k and 15k, Cougar Winery April 19, Grape Day Winemaker Conference

ADVERTISE YOUR EVENTS WITH THE VALLEY NEWS and get exposure to over 140,000 readers! (only $25 per event, calendar items due Friday noon of the week prior to print) Call 951-763-5510 or visit www.myvalleynews.com!

Day specials all month long. If its wine shopping for Valentine’s Day or for any other special occasion, wine connoisseurs can’t go wrong by picking up a bottle or case of the winery’s awardwinning reds, whites, desserts or sparkling wines. The wines, produced by South Coast Winery at their Wild Horse Mountain Vineyards, have earned awards and ribbons nationally and internationally. Those awards are proudly displayed on the gift shops large wood-framed wall. The friendly tasting room staff pours guests’ favorites and will help visitors discover just the wine for them at the roomy tasting bar. The well-stocked gift shop offer clothes, fine glassware, shoes, exclusive toiletries and hundreds of other ideal gifts for every occasion. Gifts to impress lovers or close friends are available in the brilliant rings, bracelets and other jewelry in the specialized jewelry shop at the resort. Businesses, nonprofits, speakers, wedding parties, family reunions or other special occasions can reserve the huge banquet room with fine dining and host of other amenities. The romantic wedding venue on the grounds offers vast green lawns, flowered hallways and arches, surrounded by acres of vineyards. Still, the Tuscan-inspired Hotel Tower with its 50 luxury rooms from $189 a night and 82 villas from $249 a night for couples can be especially decorated to order for a couple’s big event. Introducing the winery to prospective brides, grooms and their families, the annual Bridal Show will be held Sunday, March 4, noon to 4 p.m. for only $10 a person, but space is limited, Marketing Assistant Lauren Rodriguez said. Also, South Coast Winery Resort will present a Wine, Dine and Paint event Saturday, Feb 10, with artist and muralist Jill Roberts. Guests may come and learn to paint with Robert’s instruction while enjoying wine and food, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Reservations are

Christina Ferrara, a friendly cashier from South Coast Winery Resort and Spa, helps customers choose one of the many fine wines and gifts offered at the popular Temecula Wine Country winery at 34843 Rancho California Road.

Guests at the South Coast Winery Resort and Spa enjoy a taste of the Temecula wineries finest wines in the large tasting room.

Fine jewelry for every occasion is offered at this exclusive jewelry shop at the South Coast Winery Resort and Spa in Temecula.

South Coast Winery Resort and Spa, one of the first wineries in Temecula’s beautiful wine country, has won awards through the years for their fine wines, locally, nationally and internationally as shown on Tony Ault photos the wall of their tasting room.

$75; call (951) 491-8506. Every Friday and Saturday in February and on Valentine’s Day, the resort will offer Wine and Cupcake walking tours and pairing for $60 per person. The Vineyard Rose Restaurant offers food prepared by master chef Lauren Lowe and is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Breakfast is served 8-11 a.m.;

Wine TasTing

2 1 for

Monday thru Friday

Wine Tasting Daily 11:00am-5:00pm 31225 Rancho California Road Temecula, CA 92591

951.676.1711 ~ www.MauriceCarrieWinery.com

lunch is served 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and dinner is offered 5-10 p.m. daily. South Coast Winery Resort and Spa is located on 63-acres and was established by owner Jim Carter who saw Temecula as one of the nation’s finest wine growing areas and a California visitor destination. Carter more recently built the Carter Estate Winery, which is growing in popularity, and another in Texas. The finest grapes are also grown and blended at the Wild Horse Peak Winery for the South Coast and the Carter Estate Wineries with the finished wine barreled at its Murrieta warehouse. “It is Jim Carter’s vision to have a place where guests can come and receive gracious hospitality at all times,” Rodriguez said. “Everybody here, employers and staff have made a place like that. This is definitely an all-inclusive resort. Please come and visit us.” Reservations are required for Valentine Day’s stays and are suggested for tours and other special events. For a complete list of services and events at South Coast Winery Resort and Spa, visit www.southcoastwinery.com, and for prices and event availability, call (951) 587-9463 or (866) 994-6379.


February • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News February9,8,2018 2018

www.VillageNews.com |

The Fallbrook Village News VILLAGE NEWS

|

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FEBRUARY 8, 2018

Romance is in the air in Temecula Valley Wine Country Visit Temecula Valley SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

February is for lovers, and Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country, conveniently located just 60 minutes from San Diego and 90 minutes from Los Angeles, is for lovers on a romantic getaway. With stunning scenery overlooking the rolling hills of Temecula Valley Wine Country, superb dining experiences and first-class accommodations, Temecula Valley offers couples an idyllic setting to relax, unwind and rekindle passion throughout the month of February. Romantic dining and sweetheart adventures await in Temecula Valley. Couples can exhale away the stresses of everyday life while visiting one of Temecula Valley’s spas, including GrapeSeed Spa at South Coast Winery and the newly opened Spa Pechanga, both featuring couples massages in tranquil environments. Couples can take their love to the literal heights while riding in a hot air balloon overlooking the rolling hills of the valley below or while atop a horse and carriage ride through the beautifully serene wine country; these two activities are very popular places for marriage proposals as well. Throughout their stay, couples can enjoy exceptional dining opportunities in wine country, at Pechanga Resort or in charming Old Town Temecula including fine-dining establishments, casual eateries serving up local cuisine, as well as wine tasting and craft beer sampling at dozens of vineyards and breweries. Advance reservations are highly recommended for dining, spa treatments and romantic activities. Visit Temecula Valley recommends many local hotels and resorts for romantic getaways in Temecula Valley. Temecula Valley features a wide

Many wineries offer special Valentine’s Day dinners that guests can make reservations for. Among those is Falkner Winery’s Pinnacle Restaurant. Shane Gibson photo

Both Temecula Valley Wine Country and nearby Old Town Temecula offer couples fine dining opportunities. Sangio’s Deli, located at Cougar Vineyard & Winery, offers quality meats, hand-tossed pizzas Courtesy photo and decadent desserts.

Fire Kitchen, in-room sparkling wine and late checkout. Additional accommodation options are available for couples at SpringHill Marriott and in Temecula Valley Wine Country at South Coast Winery & Resort, Carter Estates, Inn at Europa and the Inn at Churon. With natural gifts of climate and geography Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country

is recognized for scenic vineyards, award-winning wines and more than 40 wineries. The popular, boutique destination includes the Temecula Valley American Viticulture Area as well as Historic Old Town Temecula, Pechanga Resort & Casino and Temecula Wine Country Golf Trail. For details and itinerary options for couples on romantic holiday, visit www.VisitTemeculaValley.com.

Salsa in the Vines Every Friday from 6 to 10 $10 Cover Live Bands • Bistro • Wine & Beer

A hot air balloon ride is a great way to see the rolling hills of Temecula Kim Harris photo Valley, as is a horse-drawn carriage ride.

array of hotel accommodation options for couples yearning for the ultimate romantic getaway. The newly opened, AAA Four Diamond, 568-room and suite hotel wing at Pechanga Resort & Casino boasts first-class amenities, including 24hour room service, luxurious 300 thread-count sheets with pillow-top mattresses, fully stocked mini bar, access to the resort’s fine-dining restaurants, nightclubs, casino, pool

complexes and entertainment. The newly renovated Embassy Suites boasts complimentary cooked-to-order breakfasts, evening snacks and adult beverages included with each stay. Temecula Creek Inn’s 130 rooms and suites offer cozy amenities for couples seeking a quiet retreat; their Date Night Package includes complimentary room upgrade, dining credit for a romantic meal at Cork

Bistro Hours Fri 1-9pm • Sat & Sun 11am-4pm

2 FOR 1 WINE TASTING

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Welcome to a New Experience Resort. Winery. Restaurant. Passion.

855.763.5640 | CarterEstateWinery.com


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The Fallbrook Village News | www.VillageNews.com

February 8, 2018

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

NEW LISTINGS

HOME BUYS

This is Fallbrook. Quiet street not far from downtown. Ranch style home on .49 acs. 3/2 baths. Wonderful picture windows overlooking view. Cozy living room fireplace. Detached artist studio. Covered “cattery”. New roof, 2 car grg. 170062150 $535,000

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180 DEGREE UNOBSTRUCTED VIEWS! An absolute 10! Enter through the gated entry to find this single level custom home located on 1+ acre. The generous sized rooms include a great room with forever views to Mt. San Jacinto, custom entertainment center and upgraded fireplace. You’ll enjoy preparing your meals in the gourmet kitchen. 180003187 $825,000

LAND/BUILDING SITES

Rainbow Crest Ranch. This spacious home features 5 BDs w/ private patios to enjoy the view. Kitchen has a recent remodel.Bring all the animals, horses are welcome, there are livestock pens, chicken coop, aviary, barn and huge cattery. $740,000

This is it! Gorgeous Palma Model features several upgrades and is move-in ready. The kitchen has been recently updated with new self-closing cabinets, countertops & recessed lighting. 55+ Ocean Hills Country Club. 170060453 $517,500

OPEN SAT 2/10 10AM-3PM

Sunrise & sunset views from this well appointed classic modern single story home in desirable Gird Valley area of Fallbrook. Exceptional updates throughout. Gourmet kitchen w/Wolf & Sub Zero appliances, integrated reverse osmosis water system, extra-large Blanco sinks, builtin refrigerator, wine refrigerator & so much more! 180004896 $799,000 - $829,000

5 ACRES. Panoramic views and access to the Santa Margarita River Trail. Would make a wonderful building site. 1 1/2 inch water meter. Possible Seller Financing. 170059116 $199,000

5644 Circle View Dr., Bonsall

Great neighborhood close to town and commuting. Nice home on over half and acre with easterly views near the end of the cul-de-sac. Spacious yard with an assortment of fruit trees, roses, mature landscape and room to entertain. 180001279 $489,000

Excellent building site on 2.18 acres that includes an avocado grove and family fruit. Surrounded by growing grounds and estate homes, the views from this property represent the best of Bonsall 180004573 $549,000

Mediterranean Delight. VIEWS will entice YOU from every room! The open floor plan is set up for Entertaining with a Wet/Wine/Beer/Soda Bar. Very low-maintenance on this hillside custom home. No backyard. Just VIEWS. 170060755 $539,000

Three lots are looking for a new Owner! Seller has done much of the work to get these ready for building-Now it’s YOUR opportunity to finish the job! Build & sell other lots or develop all lots w/Homes & sell them or You can do whatever? All 3 lots approx 1/2 acre EACH. Par 2 has 1”inch WATER METER. Parcels 2 & 3=Power & water on Constant Crk. Par1=Power, water,sewer & gaslines on Pizzo Ln. ALL lots access on Constant Crk. ParcelMap 20480=Par 1#74,Par 2#75, Par 3#76. ALL 3 SELL together. 170039067 $300,000

Quiet sanctuary with panoramic views of valleys, hillsides and beyond to Santa Margarita river below. Open floor plan in main home w/doors inviting you outdoors from almost every room making for easy entertaining. Thinking of a vineyard? Land has already been cleared and ready to go. Sparkling pool w/waterfall, spa, solar and much more. 170054307 $899,000

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YOUR OWN FARM TO TABLE Turn Key Stallion Estates custom single story with amazing views. Fully fenced with electric gate + solar. Pristine landscaping incls 70 roses, family fruit trees, abundant artificial turf (low maint). Appx 2700 sf, 4BD, 3.5BA, flowing open floor plan w/plenty of passive light + 2 skylights. Newer laminate wood flooring, tile & carpet in bdrms. 10’ ceilings + vaulted ceilings in main living areas. French drs to entertainers delight backyard. $879,000

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Welcome to Shogo Mountain. From the beautifully landscaped entrance to the fantastic views this 8 acre professionally managed grove has appx. 500 Hass avocado trees with great production records. 170043737 Offered at $429,000

Investment, Future Farmer! Approximately 1000 avocado trees and family fruit on 10+ acres with fabulous views. Very private location on top of the hill. Can be 2 family home. 4BD, 3BA with 2 large decks. Avocados are in a co-op. Bonsall School District. Off Gopher Canyon/395.

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Fallbrook Village News  

February 8, 2018

Fallbrook Village News  

February 8, 2018

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