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Serving Temecula , Murrieta , L ake E lsinore , M enifee , Wildomar , H emet, San Jacinto and the surrounding communities January 13 – 19, 2017

Local

Attorneys in Palm Springs cop killer case weigh in

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 17, Issue 2

Hemet PD badge ceremony direct result of Measure U victory

INDIO – A prosecutor Tuesday, Jan. 9, took issue with an accused cop killer’s attorney for telling the media that the case would not get to trial for at least three years, which she said would cause undue pain for the families of the two slain officers, one of whom was a Hemet native. see page A-3

Local

LE Sheriff Station gets new commanding officer Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department announced the promotion of Capt. Daniel Anne to lead the crime fighting agency’s Lake Elsinore Sheriff Station. The announcement was made late last week after Anne’s promotion from Lieutenant to Captain. see page A-4

Entertainment

ACS’s annual Bark for Life to be held in Murrieta

Hemet Police Sergeant Gabriel Gomez, has his father Gabriel pin his badge to his uniform during a special promotion ceremony held at the Hemet City Council Chambers, Jan. 4. Shane Gibson photo

Paul Bandong PBANDONG@REEDERMEDIA.COM

This is a historic day,” said Hemet Chief of Police Dave Brown. “We are witnessing the first police officer hired and funded

under Measure U and the promotion of three officers in support of a new Special Operations Bureau made possible by funding under Measure U.” The Special Operations Bureau is tasked with aggressively tack-

ling quality of life issues that have plagued the Hemet community in recent years - drugs, violent crime, gangs, prostitution and homelessness. Measure U passed by voters in November 2016 provides rev-

Trevor Montgomery VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

In honor of animals who have been caregivers to cancer survivors and other canines who had cancer themselves, Kristine Crothers has planned yet another annual Bark for Life in Murrieta. see page A-10

Health

Protect yourself and loved ones from strokes Dr. Terry A. Rondberg SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

see page B-5

Business

MWD approves design for Disaster Recovery upgrades Joe Naiman JANIMAN@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California recently approved the preliminary design phase for upgrades to the Lake Mathews Disaster Recovery Facility. see page B-6

see POLICE, page A-7

Undeterred by act of violence, young man with autism returns to work

Stephanie Lai VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke. Forty more seconds, another stroke. There are more than 795,000 strokes each year, of these, more than 140,000 people die, making strokes the third leading cause of death in the country.

enues to the city of Hemet via a one cent sales tax for the next 10 years. The tax goes into effect April 1, and the City Council has committed budgeted expenditures

Douglas Hier holds a sign advertisement for a local taco shop on the corner of Madison Avenue and Kalmia Street in Murrieta, after becoming a victim during a Dec. 31, incident where he was senselessly shot at with a BB gun by a passenger in a car, while working his routine day shift at the busy intersection. Hier has since returned to his sign twirling job, where people are now showing him support after hearing of the New Shane Gibson photo Year’s Eve incident.

As a young adult diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and central auditory processing disorder, Douglas Hier works hard to help provide for his family. He works as a sign twirler for family-owned and operated La Pasadita Taco Shop at 24635 Madison Avenue in Murrieta. Hier works three days a week, dancing and twirling signs at the intersection of Kalmia Street and Madison Avenue. He said knowing he is being productive and helping his family pay their bills brings him a great deal of personal satisfaction. But Saturday, Dec. 31, Hier’s job took a scary and potentially traumatizing turn. The incident began when two unidentified males drove slowly past the corner where Hier works. Without reason or provocation, the two began shouting at Hier before the passenger pointed a realisticlooking BB-gun at him and opened

see HIER, page A-3

Hemet FD begins rebuilding process following passage of Measure U Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

It’s been less than a month since the Riverside County Registrar of Voters certified the Nov. 8 elections but the city of Hemet is wasting no time in rebuilding its public safety department with the addition of three new members to the city’s fire department Jan. 2. “This is one of many steps your Hemet Fire Department is taking toward rebuilding,” Fire Chief Scott Brown said. “We are very excited with the energy we have moving forward right now.” The three firefighter paramed-

ics, Josh Klimek, Zach Petite and Andrew Tusa will be in training for the next six weeks before being assigned to a HFD station.  Brown said the hiring is part of the department’s revitalization thanks to the passage of Measure U. “It’s all part of the spending plans from Measure U,” Brown said, adding that the department recently promoted eight people from within the department. “That represents the first big push to opening Station 5.” Brown said with the purchase of

see MEASURE U, page A-4

Hemet Fire Chief Scott brown (back) poses for a photo with newly sworn firefighter paramedics Josh Klimek, Zach Petite and Andrew Tusa. Courtesy photo


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

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January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

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Local

Attorneys in Palm Springs cop killer case weigh in on trial timeline INDIO – A prosecutor Tuesday, Jan. 9, took issue with an accused cop killer’s attorney for telling the media that the case would not get to trial for at least three years, which she said would cause undue pain for the families of the two slain officers. John Hernandez Felix, 26, faces first-degree murder and other allegations that could land him on death row if convicted of the Oct. 8 killings of veteran training Officer Jose Gilbert Vega, 63, and rookie Officer Lesley Zerebny, 27, a native of Hemet. Felix also allegedly wounded a third officer and fired on two others. The two murder counts include special circumstance allegations of murder of a law enforcement officer, lying in wait and taking multiple lives in the same crime and making Felix eligible for the death penalty. Assistant District Attorney Michelle Paradise said there was no reason why the case couldn›t take one year or less to get to trial and reproached defense attorney John Dolan from making comments that she said “could completely distress our victims’ families.” She referred to a Nov. 10 story in the Desert Sun, in which Dolan told the newspaper that the case would be lengthy, taking up to three years before getting before a jury, though

he did not provide any specific reason for his timeline. “If Mr. Dolan cannot complete this case within three years because of his busy calendar schedule and multitude of high-profile cases, then I ask that he be reassigned,” Paradise told Riverside County Superior Court Judge Anthony R. Villalobos. Paradise requested that Dolan no longer make any statements to the press regarding the case, which could lead a judge to issue a gag order that would forbid either attorney from making statements to the media. Dolan responded that he thought it was “disingenuous” of the District Attorney’s Office to make such a request while also issuing news releases on the case, but said he has “no intention of making any further statements.” Paradise said the county has a “legal duty” to make certain statements to the public, but that she personally would not be speaking with the media regarding the case either. Paradise also said she believed that a change of venue was likely, which is a common defense request to ensure a fair trial, as jurors are likely to be polled from the community at or near the scene of the crime. However, no motion for a change

in venue, which would bring the case to either Riverside, Murrieta or Banning for trial, has yet to be filed. While Vega lived in the Coachella Valley, Zerebny was a native of the western county city of Hemet, possibly reducing the number of viable venues even further. Vega and Zerebny were the first-time Palm Springs police officers killed in the line of duty since Jan. 1, 1962, when Officer Lyle Wayne Larrabee died during a vehicle pursuit. Officer Gale Gene Eldridge was fatally shot Jan. 18, 1961, while investigating an armed robbery. Felix was convicted of assault with a deadly weapon and sentenced to two years in prison for a 2009 crime that originally drew an attempted murder charge but was pleaded down. He was also convicted of street gang activity. After his release from state prison, he was accused of resisting arrest by Palm Springs police on the same street where he allegedly shot the three officers, who had responded to a domestic violence call. Court records also show that he was on probation at the time of the shooting for a misdemeanor driving under the influence conviction. Felix will return to the Larson Justice Center Jan. 27 for another felony settlement conference.

San Jacinto City Council considers water rate increase proposal Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

A $215,000 grant from the Santa Ana Watershed District is spurring the San Jacinto City Council to study a change in water rates for the 4,000 customers using city water. The proposed rate change could increase rates across the board by $10 per month. It has been seven years since the city changed its customers’ water rates that now are averaging approximately $67.91 per month. City water rates are currently based on a flat rate and water used by each household or business with a billing unit set at 748 gallons. Under the proposed water rate change, there would be three cost tiers depending upon how much water each household used. The monthly meter fee of $15.36, a $2 monthly energy charge and $1.07 per billing unit from the water rights settlement with the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians would remain the same. The new rate could bring an increase for families of two or less, yet a decrease in cost for

HIER from page A-1 fire, he said. “At first, I really thought I was being shot at,” Hier explained through his mother, Therese Hier. Although he quickly and instinctively brought his sign up to protect his face, Hier said he was hit by several of the BBs, bruising and frightening him. Despite the physical pain, Hier said it was the emotional pain that hurt the most. Hier was able to describe the vehicle, a dark red PT Cruiser, and the passenger, blond hair and bad acne, later for police. He recalls little about the driver, only that he was wearing a black baseball cap. He was unsure of their ages. Although La Pasadita has surveillance cameras inside and around the restaurant, there are no cameras facing the intersection where the incident happened. There was at least one witness who saw the attack however. Hier said after the two suspects drove away, a woman in a black SUV immediately pulled over and asked him if he was OK. She comforted Hier before wishing him her best and driving away. Both Therese Hier and Murrieta police officials would like to speak with that witness to learn any additional information about the suspects or their vehicle that she might have seen. Douglas started working for La Pasadita about two years ago as part of the Murrieta Unified School District’s Adult Transition Program. La Pasadita is owned by Osvalda and Analy Quintero. Analy Quintero praised Hier’s work ethic and strong effort. “Douglas always shows up on time and works very hard for us,” Qunitero said. “To be honest, when I first heard about what had happened to Douglas, I was truly shocked. It

larger families. The current base rate charges $1.53 per billing unit up to 15 units and then jump up to $2.12 per unit after that. Most larger families who need more water for personal (indoor) use find themselves paying the higher rate. The proposed new water billing rates would be divided into three tiers. Tier one would be set at $1.57 per billing unit for indoor use with a baseline of 55 gallons per person per day and $2.60 per billing unit for outside uses in Tier 2 and $3.20 per billing unit in Tier 3 that is considered excessive water use. The proposed water rate change as explained by city water Consultant Lynn Merrill, basically falls in line with Eastern Municipal Water District and the Lake Hemet Water District which use tiered water rates. However, costs for the larger districts have jumped because the drought has forced them to use more expensive outside water sources to meet demand. Merrill said the San Jacinto Water District water rates are far less because it uses its own water sources and the rest from the Soboba Indian reservation lands and

will remain that way. “We are not trying to penalize our customers,” said Merrill. He said the base rate is only going up by 4 cents and the larger water users will feel the rate change more. He said the proposed rates would be much fairer to the city customers allowing a family of six use more water before facing more penalties in the higher tiers. “I am confident we are getting a good value for water to our customers,” Merrill said. In changing the city water rates Merrill said “we want to encourage more water conservation,” noting that the higher Tier 3 rates will help in that effort. He did say the proposed rates as shown were only an example of how they might be structured and said additional study will determine what the exact rates might be if the city approves of the concept. The council gave the consultants the go ahead to make a further presentation in the next 45 days as required by the grant and to bring it back to the council in February. If approved when it returns to Council the new rates would go into effect in September.

made me really mad. Nothing like this has ever happened before. Our community is very nice and supportive.” Quintero said that Douglas is a quiet and shy person; he doesn’t speak out much and never complains. “He didn’t even tell us that day what had happened, because  he thought he might lose his job if he said something,” Quintero said. “He really loves his job and didn’t want to jeopardize his employment with us.” Quintero said they are glad Douglas goes out there and is willing to work and be productive. “We love having him working for us,” Quintero said. “Those two don’t know the pain they caused Douglas. He just wants to feel safe and wants to know he can do his job without being attacked or bullied.” Therese said her son was occasionally bullied when he was in  school, but he has never been bullied at work before this incident. “Parents need to teach their kids better, to be more tolerant and understanding of others. It all starts at home. Be kind to others,” Therese said. “Life is too short to waste your energy being a jerk to someone you don’t even know. Just be nice to others It’s not that hard.” Therese said she does not harbor any ill-will toward the two who attacked her son. “I hope the best for them and hope they get their lives together, grow up and find something more positive to focus their energy on,” she said. “If nothing else, I hope this is a learning experience for the two who did this. People with disabilities deserve to be treated like everyone else, not treated differently.” Therese said she spoke with Murrieta police officials again, who called to check on her son and to let the family know they were follow-

ing up on potential leads. “Douglas is a very happy kid with a heart of gold. In spite of everything, he’s a survivor. He has a phenomenal work ethic,” Therese Hier explained. “He was a bit worried and nervous about returning to work, but he didn’t want to let that stop him. He didn’t want to let his employers down, and he really wanted to go back.” In spite of his ordeal, Douglas, 23, didn’t want to miss his next shift but bravely returned to La Pasadita. She offered to sit in her van in a nearby parking lot to offer her son support but Douglas declined. Therese said she parked surreptitiously in a nearby parking lot to watch her son’s shift anyway. What she witnessed throughout the day warmed her heart, she said. Several people who had read or heard about what happened to Douglas Hier stopped to talk with him, offering him words of encouragement, she said. “One woman pulled up with a group of kids,” Therese said. “They all got out of their car and gave Douglas a big group hug. They prayed with him and wished him a happy birthday when they found out it was his birthday.” Another woman stopped and offered to sit with Douglas and watch him to make sure he would be safe. A third woman even offered to bring Douglas a cupcake to celebrate his birthday. Douglas said, “It hurt my feelings, a lot. These boys made me feel sad. It makes me feel like my job is no longer safe. But I’m not going to let what those boys did dictate the rest of my life. I’m going to move forward.” Anyone with information about the incident or who witnessed the assault should contact Murrieta police officials at (951) 304-2677. Callers can remain anonymous.

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

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Local

Lake Elsinore Police Department gets new commanding officer Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department announced the promotion of Capt. Daniel Anne to lead the crime fighting agency’s Lake Elsinore Sheriff Station. The former lieutenant was promoted to the rank of captain and received his new assignment Thursday, Jan.5, according to a press release issued by the department. Anne, a 20-year veteran of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department, fills the vacancy created by the recent retirement of the station’s former commander, Capt. Leonard Hollingsworth last month. “We are fortunate to have been able to work with the sheriff’s department to continue the fine tradition of great police chiefs by welcoming Capt. Dan Anne to our team,” Lake Elsinore Mayor Robert Magee said. The Lake Elsinore Sheriff’s Station provides police service to the unincorporated county communities of Alberhill, El Cariso, Glen Eden, Glen Ivy Hot Springs, Good Hope, La Cresta, Lakeland Vil-

lage, Meadowbrook, Ortega Hills, Temescal Valley and Warm Springs in western Riverside County, and provides police services under contract to the cities of Lake Elsinore and Wildomar. Anne will serve as the chief of police for both cities.  Anne joined the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department in 1996 and attended the 132nd Basic Peace Officer’s Academy. He began his law enforcement career assigned to the Robert Presley Detention Center working in corrections. In 1998, he was transferred to the Moreno Valley Police Department and worked varied assignments on patrol, as a school resource officer and on the city’s Problem Oriented Policing Team, the release reported.  “In 2004, he was promoted to investigator (detective) and assigned to the Lake Elsinore Sheriff’s Station, working a wide variety of crimes before being transferred to the sheriff’s administrative investigations unit (internal affairs). There he investigated civil and administrative complaints as well as officer involved shootings.  In December 2005, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and transferred to the

Hemet Sheriff’s Station. As a sergeant, he was assigned patrol operations at Hemet, San Jacinto and Moreno Valley police departments, and later supervised a background and recruitment team at the sheriff’s Personnel and Recruiting Bureau,” the release read.  Anne was promoted to the rank of lieutenant in 2010 and had field and administrative assignments at the Lake Elsinore Sheriff’s Station. While at the Lake Elsinore station, he oversaw patrol operations, special teams, detective bureau, and served as the liaison to the city of Lake Elsinore. In 2013, Anne was transferred to the Ben Clark Training Center where he oversaw the Advanced Officer Training Unit. In September 2014, he was specially selected by the department to command the Riverside County Cal-ID Bureau in partnership with San Bernardino County Cal-ID

within the California Identification System, serving all law enforcement agencies in Riverside and San Bernardino counties with collaborative biometric services and identification technology. “Capt. Anne will serve Wildomar well; he is a good fit,” Wildomar mayor Bridgette Moore said. “We are impressed with his resume, and with his past experience at the Lake Elsinore station, so he’ll be able to jump right in.” Anne holds a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University Fullerton. He holds his Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory and Management Peace Officer Standards and Training certificates.  He is a 2015 graduate of the FBI National Academy. Anne and his wife Loralee reside in the city of Riverside.

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department has announced the appointment of Capt. Daniel Anne, pictured here with Sheriff Stan Sniff, to commander of Lake Elsinore’s Sheriff Station. Courtesy photo

Temecula Valley Elks #2801 recognize Hoop Shoot free throw competition winners

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The Temecula Valley Elks Lodge No. 2801 presents the winners of their Hoop Shoot free throw competition with a recognition dinner and printed T-shirt. The winners will compete in the division level competition at Mt. San Jacinto College this month. In the front row, left to right, are winners Peyton Cronin, Alison Chapin, Joseph Azzarell, Taj Jackson and Tyler Hernandez. In the back row, left to right are Ken Hauer, Temecula Valley Elks Exalted Ruler; Elroy T. Elk, Drug Awareness Mascot; and “Spike” Lunn, Lodge Hoop Shoot Chairman. Courtesy photo

TEMECULA – Temecula Valley Elks Lodge No. 2801 held their annual Hoop Shoot free throw competition in December and recently invited the five Hoop Shoot first place winners, Peyton Cronin, Alison Chapin, Joseph Azzarell, Taj

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two new engines which just finished outfitting and staffing increases that he is “aggressively pursuing” he hopes to see Station 5 open no later than March. “We have very talented people internally, we don’t pay for that, we do it ourselves,” he said addressing the retrofitting of the two new engines. “I should have those ready in the next week and a half.” Brown remains steadfast in his commitment to make sure there are paramedics in every station. “It will help us achieve the next milestone which will be putting the part-time peak demand EMS unit in service,” he said. “It’s a demand driven resource that we will be placing into service as the data dictates.”

Jackson and Tyler Hernandez to the lodge for a recognition dinner. Following the dinner, Lodge Hoop Shoot Chairman “Spike” Lunn presented them with a shirt from the Elks with the “Temecula Valley Elks #2801” printed on the shirt,

along with “2016 – 2017 Hoop Shoot.” The students will wear the shirts at the Elks Southeast District Hoop Shoot competition that will take place in January at Mt. San Jacinto College.

Brown said a high percentage of the department’s demand is between 8 and 10 p.m. “The traditional method of looking at how you deal with that demand is just simply add more stations more people,” he said. “I think the community was very clear in their support of the fire department, in particular what we need to get accomplished.” Brown said that residents want the department to be innovative and contemporary. “The peak demand unit is very unique but represents one of very similar steps I’ll be taking as we move forward with the operational changes as part of Measure U,” he said. “I’m excited about it.” Brown said he must give credit to the relationship his department has formed with the Firefighters

Association. “There is no ‘I’ in team and they really, truly have a very solid working relationship, make no mistake about it,” he said. “We are not going to agree on everything but in general, we have a fantastic working relationship. They are supportive and most importantly they understand that we need to embrace innovation and not be afraid to do the things that we need to do to make Hemet Fire even stronger.” As far as the new firefighters, Brown said they’re extremely talented and are a great addition to the department. “Our newest members represent the future of the organization. We are proud to have them join the Hemet Fire Department Team,” said Brown.

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January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

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The Three Amigos challenge community to fundraise for Reality Rally, Michelle’s Place Breast Cancer Resource Center Taryn Murphy VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

Last year they raised $13,000 for Reality Rally. This year, they’re back and ready to beat their previous mind-boggling fundraising record. Reality Rally’s “Three Amigos” Rick Fortin, Steven Pickett and John Vataha are challenging the community to join them and are hoping to pass on their passion for endless fundraising. The Reality Rally is a three-day nonprofit team event to raise money for Michelle’s Place Breast Cancer Resource Center. The “Amazing Race” style event will be held April 6-8 in Old Town Temecula for the seventh year. Over 300 dedicated volunteers and over 100 sponsors have made the Reality Rally an exciting event for the whole family. Reality Rally will donate 100 percent of its net proceeds to Michelle’s Place to help those impacted by breast cancer. Fortin is a high school math teacher who lives in Alpine, California. The father of three kids spends most of his time with his family, and just celebrated his 21st wedding anniversary. Though two of his children are grown up and in college, his 9-year-old son will be at home for a while yet. Fortin coaches his son’s soccer and baseball teams. “I’m pretty much a family person,” he said. Pickett, father of five and grandfather of 10, resides in Emory,

Oklahoma. He describes himself as a “pretty simply kinda guy.” Picket is a machinist; he remanufactures parts for construction equipment and enjoys playing golf in his free time. His favorite show is “Survivor.” He said it has become almost an obsession; he’s applied to be on the show multiple times. “We’re getting close,” he said.  Vataha is self-employed and the father of three grown children. He lives in Scottsdale, Arizona, with his wife, “doing that whole emptynester thing.” The couple made the move to Arizona five years ago after tiring of the long winter months in Pennsylvania which inhibited them from enjoying the outdoors. He loves to stay active, mostly hiking and biking, he said. The three friends share a love for the reality show, “Survivor.” Fortin’s obsession with “Survivor” and Survivor casting calls has thrived for many years, though his family laughs at him because he’s never been chosen as a contestant. After meeting Pickett on Facebook through a blog for “Survivor” fans, he won tickets to a “Survivor” finale show and invited Pickett to tag along. At the event, they met Vataha and ever since, all three have stayed touch. “Even of my lifelong friends,” Fortin said, “they’re probably two of the best friends that I have. I can’t say enough about them.” After meeting former “Survivor” cast member Gillian Larson at the fi-

nale show, Fortin invited her to speak at his high school, and later received an email from her regarding Reality Rally. He contacted the other two amigos about the event, and they’ve “been doing it ever since,” he said. “Being a big fan of ‘Survivor,’” Pickett said, “Gillian has always been great friend of mine.” Once Pickett met her and learned of her plans for Reality Rally, he was excited to participate. Together, the Three Amigos determined to compete in the race. “I would literally do anything for John or Rick,” Pickett said. “It’s unbelievable how strong our friendship is.” Vataha became aware of Reality Rally after Pickett mentioned the event. “He called me up one day and said, ‘I just heard about this thing and we’ve got to do it.’” Pickett knew about Vataha’s competitive nature. Thinking Reality Rally sounded like a neat challenge, they joined Fortin to see how good they really they were at “Survivor”-type competitions, Vataha said. The Three Amigos are excited to raise fund for Michelle’s Place Breast Cancer Resource Center. “You realize this isn’t just a charity,” Fortin said. “Every time we meet those parents, I just give them a giant hug.” He explains that he thinks of Michelle’s Place as his own charity, because the cause has become so personal to him. “I love Michelle’s mom and dad; they’re wonderful, wonderful

Wife of Menifee firefighter struck by truck continues to improve Stephanie Lai VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

After receiving tragic news in which Melissa Bonney was struck by a truck, Menifee Firefighter David Bonney and his family has been under the assistance of the Fire Family Foundation. Hit while in a crosswalk after dropping off their daughter Kiya at school early in December, Melissa was sent to intensive care at Inland Valley Medical Center in Wildomar. Treated for a severe head injury, she was in a chemically-induced coma to assist her recovery. While inopportune with holidays approaching, David Bonney and their children, 8-year-old Kiya and 10-year-old Caiden bore the weight of the circumstances by remaining optimistic alongside Melissa’s doctors. “Melissa has made tremendous

strides in her rehabilitation. She is walking, slowly, but without assistance. She is talking, and feeding herself, dressing herself,” the Family Fire Foundation reported. “She still has a little difficulty remembering some words and she is having a problem with her eyesight, but all in all she is on track or even advanced in her recovery.” Bonney’s doctor allowed her to go home to spend Christmas Day with the family and if everything goes as planned she should be released from acute care rehabilitation sometime in mid-January. The family wishes to express their gratitude for their friends and for the Fire Family Foundation who have shown tremendous help and support. The nonprofit has worked with the family and those in similar situations extensively to cover medical costs not already insured as well as ancillary expenses the family encounters

people. For us, it translates into the fact that everyone has been touched by breast cancer in some way or some form,” Pickett said. “The way they do things, and the way they help these ladies is top notch.” He hopes that places like Michelle’s Place can be made available in all states. “The first year it was all about the competition. We might have seen the name Michelle’s Place, but we really had no idea what that was all about,” Vataha said. It wasn’t until the second year that the Three Amigos visited Michelle’s Place as part of the Reality Rally weekend. The visit gave them a visual of what had previously been “just a charity that sounded like a neat thing.” “You can donate thousands of dollars to a big charity, and you get a standard thank you letter in the mail, and you don’t know much about where the money went,” Vataha said. “But when you hear about how many women were saved last year, and what kind of services they do at Michelle’s Place, it just makes you feel more personally connected.” Fortin hopes to bring out the competitive side of all Reality Rally fundraising teams. When a team gets close to the Three Amigo’s fundraising records, it motivates them to work harder. “If you think you’re better than us, then raise more money than us,” Fortin said. Pickett hopes to motivate all Reality Rally teams to raise as much money as they possibly can. “Don’t just raise what you want to try to raise, raise as much as you possibly

can,” Pickett said. He reminds fundraising teams that each additional hundred dollars provides an additional mammogram for a woman in need. “I haven’t had anyone in my immediate family or extended family, but I’ve had friends that have had it,” Pickett said. “It needs to be focused on and taken care of.” Vataha said that he wants fundraising teams to focus on the “evolution of thought” that the Three Amigos went through. Over time, the team began to realize that fundraising wasn’t just about acquiring the minimum amount to qualify for the race. Fundraising was a continuous effort to raise more and more money, even after reaching their goal. “We’re trying to give people a message that says, ‘Hey guys, while you’re still on that platform, with 15 minutes of fame, do something with it,’” he said. “Don’t just be satisfied that you raised the minimum amount of $400, think about the next 100 or 200 bucks. These are services that are being provided to real people.” All in all, the Three Amigos hope to make the idea of fundraising tangible for Reality Rally participants. Their stories are encouragement for event attendees and participants with the drive and motivation to never say, “That’s good enough.” This year the Three Amigos challenge everyone to keep pressing on, even after reaching their desired goals. Don’t stop. You might just raise $13,000, like the Three Amigos.

during the critical recovery. Founded by Firefighters First Credit Union, Fire Family Foundation acts when tragedy affects firefighters and fire victims. Fire Family Foundation offers immediate assistance to firefighters and their families, fire victims, fire departments and charities. The foundation strives to bring the community together as a “Fire Family,” for its inaugural year in 2008 was motivated from assisting 9/11 New York Fire Department along with Los Angeles’ officers. Fire Family Foundation has established the Bonney Family Fund to help support this fire family and the medical costs not covered by insurance, as well as ancillary expenses the family will encounter during these critical times. All donations to Fire Family Foundation are tax-deductible. To make a donation to the Bonney Family Support Fund, visit www.FireFamilyFoundation.org.

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

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Linfield Villages to provide positive community benefits

The on-site bistro cafe will be available to residents and the public. Pictured here is the outdoor bistro area at Generations Paradise Village in National City.

Linfield Villages will have an indoor lap pool.

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Local residents Chris and Cindy Kostecka had been looking for a quality senior living opportunity for Cindy’s mother and were very frustrated with their options. They ended up choosing one in Vista despite it not being convenient. “We were excited when we heard about Generations’ plan to come to Temecula and build Linfield Village,” Chris Kostecka said, “Their philosophy, scope and plan is just

Courtesy photos

what we have been looking for and more.” Linfield Village, a retirement community partnership between Linfield Christian School and Generations, will be built on 14 unused acres on the 105-acre Linfield campus. The project is still under development with city engineers and the Temecula planning department with an expected groundbreaking in 2017. The community will feature residences for independent living, assisted living and memory care,

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including studio, one and two bedroom apartments, penthouses and cottage-style homes for independent living; studio and one and two bedroom apartments for assisted living; and friendship and private apartments for memory care. The homes will be available on a monthly rental basis with no buy-in fee. Linfield Village will be unique in Temecula and the surrounding area because of amenities and benefits not only for the residents, but also for the Temecula community. These include both economic benefits as well as well as lifestyle and recreational opportunities. When completed, Linfield Village will create over 100 full-time jobs and employ 30 part-time employees. These range from entry level to senior management positions such as administrators, accountants, nursing staff, care givers, cooks, wait staff, fitness trainers, activities, maintenance and transportation to name a few. The jobs created will produce annual payroll income over $4.5 million, and will also result in a significant increase in property taxes on the existing land and improvements. Food, supplies and other support services will be purchased from local businesses as well. “Seniors today want and expect new types of housing, services, activities and amenities, different from previous generations,” Generations CEO Chip Gabriel said. “An interactive and multi-generational campus will offer this. We are not aware of any developments like this in greater Riverside or surrounding counties. Linfield Village will serve both the residents of greater Temecula and the friends and family of Village residents who will relocate here. “It has been Generations experience that approximately 80 percent of the residents will be those who currently live within a 10-mile radius of the site,” Gabriel said. “These individuals currently do not have the type of housing and lifestyle that this development will provide. It will allow them to age in place and not have to leave the community for services. The remaining 20 percent of the residents will move into this community,

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typically because they have an adult child that lives in the area.” Generations has plans to widen the main access road, Rancho Vista Road, to four lanes and the community has plans to reduce potential traffic impact. Linfield Village will have its own transportation including a bus, van and town car that residents can access for use in and around the community. Scheduled outings during non-school commute times, to shopping, restaurants and entertainment will use these community transportation services. “It has been our experience that once residents move in and get adjusted to their new home, the majority drive very little after that,” Gabriel said. This development will create no demand on the local school system, as it is an age-restricted community. In addition to compatibility with their mission, landscaping spaces and architecture, for Linfield Christian School, the economic impact will be significant. The land parcel sale for the joint project will allow Linfield to lower their debt from previous infrastructure upgrades and stabilize their tuition. Once the project reaches capacity benchmarks and is cash flow positive, distributions from the joint venture management company will be generated. This sustainable income will allow Linfield Christian School to provide more competitive teacher salaries and add new programs, such as their science, technology, engineering, art and design and math or STEAM program and a four-year biomedical program. It will also help with deferred maintenance projects on campus such as athletic fields and facilities, elementary and pre-K facilities, academic buildings and classroom improvement and expansions. Other benefits go well beyond the economic impact. It will be a state-of-the-art campus integrating seniors with the greater community. Linfield Village has a campus center with pedestrian walkways that adjoin amenities such as restaurants and dining options, fitness and wellness facilities, fine arts and entertainment amenities, bank, medical clinic and various meeting room facilities. “Our mission is enhancing lives and celebrating the excitement of living,” Gabriel said. Some of the shared usage features with the local communities include a 300-seat indoor theater with full theater seating, acoustics, stage and professional lighting and sound. This theater will house a full schedule of movies, stage produc-

tions and special events for yearround entertainment open to the community. The wellness center, open to city residents, “is a key to our core value of vitality where we engage all aspects of wellness,” Gabriel said. “It includes top-ofthe-line exercise rooms, aerobics room, therapy rooms, hot tub, spa services and a lap pool.” The village includes additional shared usage amenities such as a medical clinic, large and small conference rooms with audio/visual equipment, a board room and outdoor 9-hole putting course. The common public area has planned a full restaurant, bistro, cafe for coffee and light refreshment, salon, gift shop, intra-faith chapel and credit union. The adjacency of the Linfield Village to the Linfield Christian School will foster synergies and opportunities that will benefit both parties. The school will have access to the facilities such as the theater, fitness complex and restaurant; the Generations residents can enjoy sporting events, fine arts performances and Village contact. Linfield’s mission of a Christcentered education includes student community service, a part of which can be spent interacting with and ministering to the residents of the Village. “Our seniors throughout this country have much to offer in the way of experience and knowledge but are often marginalized in our youth-conscious culture,” Gabriel said. Gabriel emphasized that Generations manages each of their properties and they are not turned over to management companies. “We want to be good neighbors to the Temecula community for a long time to come,” Gabriel said. “Importantly, the Village will be designed with architectural integrity and sustainable business practices and features with the intent of long term operations and ownership by the sponsors. The plan is to blend in and capture the spirit of the best local design features here in Temecula to enhance the community of which we will become an integral part.” The project is currently at the final stages of the entitlement process with many of the approval steps completed. Two community meetings have been held and a number of issues and concerns have been addressed by Generations, including architectural design changes to improve neighbor sight lines. “This is an exciting project,” Chris Kostecka said. “We look forward to having Cindy’s mother living closer to us and our kids.”

Elks participate in CHiPs for Kids Toy Drive

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Temecula Valley Elks Lodge No. 2801 and the California Highway Patrol’s Temecula area office participate in CHiPs for Kids toy drive to give gifts to needy children in the local community. Pictured from left are Officer Bill Strom, Elks Lodge members Ken Hauer and Bob Courtesy photo Walker and Lt. Brian Gonzales.  

TEMECULA – This year the Temecula Valley Elks Lodge No. 2801 participated in the CHiPs for Kids toy drive sponsored by the California Highway Patrol Temecula area office. All toys donated will be

delivered to needy children in the local area. Elk members and friends donated over 50 different toys. Due to their help, the toy drive was a huge success and greatly appreciated by the California High Patrol.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

A-7

Local POLICE from page A-1 for public safety (police and fire). Both departments were hit hard during extended recessionary periods; city cuts, reduced manpower and resources resulted in slow emergency response times and an increase in crime. Brown plans on adding 35 more police officers in a “troop surge,” including 16 police officers, two sergeants and a lieutenant in 2017. The City Council Chambers were filled to capacity by City Council Members, chamber of commerce staff and members, business leaders, community residents and police officers for the badge-pinning ceremony. Brown gave a description of the Hemet PD badge. “Prominently placed in the center of the badge is the official seal of the city of Hemet. This central feature serves as a reminder of the rich history of the city and the Hemet Police Department – both established in 1910. The seal is draped on both sides by the flags of the State of California and the United States of America representing the people and constitutions every officer swears to support and defend. The lake and mountains depict the natural beauty of the valley and the rising sun reminds us of our bright future. Three ribbons adorn the badge and make it unique to the Hemet Police Department and the officer who wears it, bearing the officer’s rank and personal identification number. Finally, the badge is cast in the shape of a centurion shield as a symbol of personal protection and public trust. The edge of the shield is trimmed in birch rods bound together with leather straps. These were carried by ancient Roman guards as a symbol of “strength through unity.” “According to state law, the badge is issued and authorized by the chief of police and is worn over the heart as a constant reminder of the oath we take and the enormous responsibility that comes with it. “This is important to the growth and future of our community,” said Hemet Mayor Linda Krupa, “The Hemet PD is a close-knit family and they need the community’s support, to know that we have their back. When you see them, wave, honk, say ‘I love you.’” City Council members Michael Perciful and Karlee Meyer also expressed their thanks. Brown first called up new hire Officer Travis Hamby for the Oath

The badge of new Hemet Police Officer Travis Hamby, before a pinning ceremony, Jan. 4. The appointment of Officer Hamby, and the promotion of three current Hemet police officers with the Special Operations Bureau are the first expansions within the department funded by Measure U.

From left, Hemet Police Chief Dave Brown prepares to initiate the promotion of Glen Brock to Police Lieutenant, Gabriel Gomez to Police Sergeant, and Bryan Cunningham to Police Corporal.  Shane Gibson photos

baskets and certificates from Congressman Raul Ruiz, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez and State Senator Mike Morrell to each of the officers. “We’re only as good as the service we provide to our commu-

Law Offices of Morton J. Grabel In Temecula Hemet Police Lieutenant Glen Brock, has his daughters Katelyn (left), 8 and Madelyn, 6, help pin his badge to his uniform during a special promotion ceremony held at the Hemet City Council Chambers, Jan. 4.

of Office. He was pinned by his father David and wife Veronica. Hamby grew up in Encinitas and started his law enforcement career as an Explorer Scout. He holds a B.A. degree in Criminal Justice from Southwest Texas State University. Hamby has 10 years’ experience with the San Diego Police Department. “I have worked the gang areas in San Diego – Pacific Beach, Mission District,” said Hamby, “and I hope to put that experience to use here in Hemet. This is a nice, mature community with growth opportunities and I want to do my little part to bring it back to the way it was. There is a lot of potential for growth here.” Hamby also hopes to contribute in the future in training, hiring and investigations. Cpl. Bryan Cunningham was joined by his wife Melissa and son Thomas, as daughter Ava pinned the badge to his uniform. Cunningham, a four-year Marine Corps veteran, served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He served two years with the Riverside Sheriff’s Department before transferring to Hemet PD in 2012. He was hired under the “Vets to Cops” grant funded by the U.S. Department of Justice. Cunningham has served as a patrol officer and a detective on the Crime Suppression Unit and has been awarded the Police Cross. He will now serve as field supervisor in the Patrol Division. Gabriel Gomez was promoted to police sergeant and will serve as watch commander in the Patrol Division. Gomez was pinned by his father Gabriel, and step-father Tony. Gomez has been with Hemet PD since January 2002. He “spent six years adjusting the insurance rates of wayward Hemet drivers,” quipped Brown. Gomez was promoted to corporal in 2012 and has served as acting sergeant. In 2014 he was assigned to the Detective Bureau. Gomez has also been a vital member of the Joint Hemet/ Murrieta Regional SWAT team.

Police Sgt. Glen Brock was promoted to Lieutenant and will serve as commander of the Support Services Division. He was joined by his wife Laura and daughters Katelyn and Madelyn. Brock served six years with the Los Angeles Police Department and joined Hemet PD in 2006 where he has served as a patrol officer, school resource officer, detective on the Crime Suppression Unit, and team leader on the Crisis Negotiation Team. “I’m excited,” said Brock, “I work here. I live here and I see the quality of life issues that our community faces every day. I appreciate the community’s support and recognition for the hard work and good job that I try to do.” “The business community has long recognized the need for additional officers and the Hemet San Jacinto Valley Chamber of Commerce has worked hard to get Measure E and Measure U on the ballot,” said Michael Carle, Chairman of the Board for the HSJVC. “Safety is a top priority for our businesses and we want our police department to know we are partners with them in that mission.” The chamber provided welcome

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Contact our Community Relations Office Free naturalization test preparation for information about this event. materials will be made available.Reserve now and move in by Mar 31, 2017, and receive a special apartment rate! Attend and learn what is expected Reserve now and move in by Mar 31, 2017, and receive special apartment apartment rate! Reserve now and move in by Mar 31, 2017, and receive aa special 27350 Nicolas Road • Temecula, CA 92591 and how to navigate the immigration process. (951) 491-3477 This program is presented by USCIS, Riverside County Law This is a limited time offer only with limited availability, certain conditions apply. Library, and the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library. Registration is required. To sign up or for more information, contact the Models will will be be available available to to view. view. Models Temecula Law Resource Center Contact ourwill Community Relations Office Models be available to view. Contact our Community Relations Office Contact our Community Relations Office at (951) 693-8902 or email lawliforinformation information about this this event. Office Contact our Community Relations for about event. to schedule a tour (by appointment only)! brary.temecula@rclawlibrary.org. for information about this event. RCFE License pending

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nity,” said Brown. “Thanks to the community’s passage of Measure U we will be able to improve that level of service with the resources we need to do our jobs with excellence.”

EXPERIENCE ALWAYS MATTERS

Temecula Public Library presents a naturalization information session TEMECULA – A Naturalization information session will be led by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services community relations officers Thursday, Jan. 19, at 5:30 p.m. at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library, located at 30600 Pauba Road. Topics covered at this free session will include the naturalization process, the new naturalization test, and rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizenship. This session will offer a step-by-step description of the naturalization process.

Hemet Police Corporal Bryan Cunningham, hugs his daughter Ava, 4, after she helped pin her dad’s badge to his uniform during a special promotion ceremony held at the Hemet City Council Chambers.

Deadline to call in: Mondays before 3pm Deadline to submit online: Mondays by 5pm

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

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Local chapter of 100+ Women Who Care to kick off new year with meeting MENIFEE – Another year of windfall donations to local charities is slated to kick off Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 7 p.m. when the Temecula Valley Chapter of 100+ Women Who Care conducts its first meeting of 2017. Doors for the meeting will open at 6:30 p.m. While the inaugural year of meetings were hosted at Leoness Cellars Winery, in 2017 meetings will take place at the Paradise & Pines venue, located at 30065 Woodbine Lane in Menifee. First year membership in this women’s philanthropic organization exceeded organizers’ expectations, with as many as 125 women writing checks to local charities. With a more centralized Southern Riverside County location, inquiries and RSVPs for the quarterly meetings this year are already on the rise. Launched in January 2016, the local chapter of this international organization is credited with more than $43,000 in donations to four local charities: Young Life, Hope’s Community Closet, Project TOUCH and Western Eagle. Hundreds of Riverside Country residents of all ages were the recipients of school clothing and supplies, housing assistance for the homeless, camp scholarships, w w w . m y v a l l e y n e w s . c o m

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free meals and services provided by the four organizations selected at the quarterly meetings. Open to women of all ages and backgrounds, the local chapter of 100+ Women Who Care is a fun way to meet up with friends, co-workers and neighbors and make a difference in the valley. There are no requirements for volunteering or fundraising, nor does the chapter have any overhead expenses. Quarterly meetings last only one hour, and members bring their checkbook to write out a $100 tax deductible donation to the winning organizations. Members nominate

charities and three are invited to make a brief spontaneous presentation at the meeting. Members vote by secret ballot and whichever organization receives the most votes from members in attendance is declared the quarterly recipient, and all members then write out a check to the charity. “We have more than 100 women each quarter waiting to write out a check to a local charity in need. There couldn’t be an easier way to make an immediate impact in our community,” said Cathy Early, spokeswoman for the organization. “Some women also have employ-

ers who will match contributions to the charity donations made by their employees, which further increases the total funds that can be awarded locally,” she said. In order to participate and nominate a local charity, women must complete a commitment form online, attend one quarterly meeting and make a donation to the winning organization. All members are expected to make the $100 donation to the winning charity each quarter. If unable to attend a meeting, women on the roster still commit to make the $100 donation. Comprised of women of all ages

and backgrounds, there are more than 350 similar chapters in operation around the U.S. and in several foreign countries. Karen Dunigan, former mayor of Jackson, Michigan, pitched the concept to her friends and colleagues 10 years ago and the first chapter was organized November 2006. For more information about the new local chapter or to make a donation online, visit www.100womenwhocaretv. weebly.com, email a representative at 100WWCTV@gmail.com or visit them on Facebook.

San Jacinto City Council further strengthens marijuana ordinances Tony Ault TAULT@REEDERMEDIA.COM

The San Jacinto City Council unanimously added two new ordinances that will prohibit the cultivation of marijuana in the agricultural areas of the city without a permit during the Jan. 3 council meeting held at the San Jacinto High School Library. It was pointed out to the council by staff that certain agricultural areas of the city permit non-conforming agricultural uses or areas that do not come under the auspices of the city’s new marijuana laws. Without the new ordinances presented to the council that evening, those areas might be used for marijuana cultivation without the required permits. The original marijuana ordinances passed by the city in recent months require growers to follow specific rules for the cultivation of the drug

including a special permit and fees. Cultivation of marijuana in the city is now restricted only to recreational or medicinal use and must be in an enclosed residential area or designated commercial area. The city ordinances still follow the spirit of the recent voter approved California state law permitting recreational use of marijuana and grows inside of private homes. Possession, cultivation, transport and sales of marijuana is still seen as illegal under federal law. The statewide voter approved marijuana law permits six marijuana plants to be grown inside of a home for local cities and counties but all other related issues on the growth, cultivation, transport and sales of marijuana or its derivatives can be regulated by the local authorities. San Jacinto City Ordinance 16-17 passed 5-0 by the City Council Jan. 3, amends Chapter 17 of the city

Development Code deeming commercial marijuana cultivation will be agricultural. If the agricultural area is rezoned commercial for marijuana cultivation it will still fall under the strict marijuana ordinances. “Nothing herein shall be construed to grant any special rights or privileges to commercial marijuana cultivation over other agricultural uses,” the amended ordinance reads. It points out “Commercial marijuana cultivation shall not be allowed on any property that is located to the east of North Sanderson Avenue or to the south of Cottonwood Avenue,” and such use “must be in compliance with a commercial marijuana cultivation permit (or permits) issued in accordance with San Jacinto Municipal Code, Chapter 9.28B. The regulatory permit must be issued before the commercial marijuana cultivation.” The City Council also passed an

“urgency ordinance” that essentially protects the city from state infringement on its local marijuana cultivation ordinances. San Jacinto City Urgency Ordinance 16-18 clarifying that existing agricultural uses many engage in the cultivation of recreational and medical marijuana as a means to protect and encourage the continuation of agricultural activities with the city. It recognizes that since marijuana is a unique agricultural product that is strictly regulated and controlled, imposing additional restrictions on marijuana cultivation uses is a reasonable way to protect “the public health, safety and welfare.” It notes by restricting outside marijuana grows in the more developed areas of the city it will control the “potential secondary effects of marijuana cultivation” and still encourage development.

Blotter Man fatally struck trying to cross freeway

Rollover crash causes major injuries in Temecula

MURRIETA – A man who was struck by multiple vehicles when he attempted to dash across Interstate 215 in Murrieta after his car broke down was identified Tuesday, Jan. 9, an as a 23-year-old Chula Vista resident. Julian Martinez was killed about 8:20 p.m. Sunday on the southbound I-215, about a quarter-mile north of Clinton Keith Road, according to the California Highway Patrol. Officer Mike Lassig said Martinez’s vehicle broke down on the northbound side of the freeway, and he successfully traversed northbound lanes, reaching  the center divider wall, which he jumped over, intending to continue to the west

TEMECULA – Firefighters had to extricate at least one person from a car that flipped over three times Sunday, Jan. 8, near a Lake Skinner Recreational Park kiosk. The crash happened shortly before 3:30 p.m. at the intersection of Borel Road and Warren Road,

side of the interstate. “The victim entered the southbound traffic lanes, into the path of (a  2004 Infiniti), whose driver could not avoid him,” Lassig said. After the Infiniti driver hit Martinez, three other vehicles also struck him, according to Lassig. “All parties stated that numerous other vehicles struck (the victim)  before emergency personnel arriving on scene,” he said. Martinez was pronounced dead moments later by Riverside County Fire Department paramedics. No one else was injured. An autopsy was pending. Lassig said it’s possible the victim was intoxicated.

Sedan, semi collide on Interstate 15 WILDOMAR – A sedan collided with a big rig on Interstate 15 in Wildomar Friday, Jan. 6, causing the smaller vehicle to overturn in the center divider. The crash happened about noon in the southbound lanes of the freeway, near Baxter Road, according to the California Highway Patrol. Witnesses told the CHP that the sedan ran into the tractor-trailer, then flipped over in the grassy area between the north- and southbound sides of I-15. The trucker was not hurt and pulled to the shoulder of the free-

way. The person at the wheel of the sedan, whose identity was not disclosed, was treated at the scene by Riverside County Fire Department paramedics, but apparently did not require hospitalization. Debris from the wreck was scattered in the fast lane of the freeway,  requiring a temporary closure so officers could sweep it clear, according to reports from the scene. The other two lanes were unobstructed, and traffic was moving slowly through the area. The crash remained under investigation.

according to the California Highway Patrol. A CHP dispatcher said the wreck caused major injuries, and it was possible at least one person would need to be airlifted to a hospital, but did not know how many people were hurt.

Felons accused of stealing safe from apartment building arraigned MURRIETA – Two felons accused of stealing a safe from a Murrieta apartment complex pleaded not guilty Friday, Jan. 6, to felony and misdemeanor charges. Christopher Lee Mongenel, 37, of Fontana and Joseph Alan Nycum, 41, of Rialto were arrested in November after the alleged breakin at the Silverado Apartments in the 25100 block of Vista Murrieta Road. Both men were charged with felony burglary and a misdemeanor count of  being in possession of burglary tools. They were arraigned before Riverside County Superior Court Judge Mark  Mandio, who scheduled a felony settlement conference for Jan. 18 at the  Southwest Justice Center in Murrieta. Mongenel is free on a $30,000 bond, while Nycum is free on $90,000 bail. According to Murrieta police, shortly before 3 a.m. Nov. 12, the defendants allegedly forced their way into the business office of the apartment complex and carried out

the metal safe, dumping it into a vehicle driven by Mongenel. A witness spotted the activity and called 911, providing a description of the two cars that raced away from the building immediately after the burglary, Lt. Tony Conrad said. Patrol units caught up with the vehicles moments later on Los Alamos Road, as they were preparing to enter Interstate 215. Officers signaled the drivers to stop, and they complied, Conrad said. Mongenel, Nycum and 39-yearold Crista Love Otting were detained without incident. A search of the one car turned up the safe and burglary tools, according to Conrad. All three were taken into custody. However, prosecutors ultimately decided not to charge Otting. According to court records, Mongenel has prior convictions for auto theft, conspiracy to commit a felony and grand theft. Nycum has priors for  assault, grand theft and possession of controlled substances. Both men have served time in state prison within the last five years.

RIVERSIDE – A 22-year-old homeless woman and her male partner are  under investigation for allegedly burying a newborn who died in their care near Riverside Municipal Airport, authorities said Friday, Jan. 6. The two transients, whose identities were not released, have not been  arrested but are at a location where detectives can easily find them, according to Riverside Police Officer Ryan Railsback. He said the police department’s Child Abuse Unit was alerted to the  infant’s death Wednesday by Riverside County Child Protective Services, whose case workers interviewed the woman at a hospital, after she had given birth to a second child. The mother admitted delivering her first child at a homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River bottom a year earlier, according to Railsback.

She told CPS personnel that the infant was stillborn or died immediately after she delivered it, Railsback said. “The mother claimed she and the father buried the deceased baby ... in an open field along the 5800 block of Central Avenue, directly behind Riverside  Municipal Airport,” the officer said. With the help of the Riverside Fire Department’s search-and-rescue canine, investigators uncovered the newborn’s remains Thursday night, Railsback said. “Any details as to cause or approximate date of death are pending the coroner’s investigation,” he said. The woman and her partner – the deceased child’s father – were placed  in a temporary shelter with the help of the city. The county took custody of the second child. Anyone with information was asked to contact Riverside Police Detective Karla Beler at (951) 353-7125.

Felon shot with own gun while trying to kill man Transients bury lifeless baby sentenced BANNING – An ex-con who when the defendant became irate, near airport, police say was shot with his own pistol while trying to kill a man during a drug deal gone bad was sentenced Friday, Jan. 6, to 15 years in state prison. Brady Charles Shirley, 21, pleaded guilty in December to attempted murder with a sentenceenhancing gang allegation for the attack in June. In exchange for his admissions, the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office dropped a felon with a firearm charge and a making criminal threats count against him. Superior Court Judge Mark Johnson certified the terms of the plea  agreement and imposed the sentence stipulated by the prosecution and defense. According to Hemet police Lt. Eddie Pust, about 4:30 a.m. June 15, Shirley and the victim, whose identity was not released, were negotiating a  drug transaction in the 1100 block of Rosalia Avenue

pulled a pistol and leveled it at the other party. Court papers state that the victim grabbed the gun and pushed it away, just as Shirley opened fire. A bullet went through the man’s shirt but did not hit him. According to the prosecution, as the struggle continued, the handgun discharged a second time and a bullet struck Shirley in the lower right leg, inflicting a flesh wound.  Pust said Shirley then retreated toward his residence, and the victim walked toward his, shortly after which patrol officers arrived and detained  both men, ultimately arresting Shirley after speaking with witnesses. The parolee was treated at a hospital, then booked into jail. The victim was uninjured. According to court records, Shirley is a two-strike felon, though details about his prior offenses were not disclosed.  He will not be eligible for parole until 2029.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

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Opinion Editor’s Note: Opinions do not necessarily reflect the views of the Valley News staff. We invite opinions on all sides of an issue. If you have an opinion, please send it as an e-mail to valleyeditor@reedermedia.com, or fax us at (760) 723-9606. Maximum word count 500. All letters must include the author’s name, address and phone number. The Valley News reserves the right to edit letters as necessary to fit the publication’s format.

Wacky weather warrants wish for drought recovery Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

We’ve had a lot of rain lately. I mean a lot of rain. I know that it’s needed and I am not complaining, mind you, just making an observation. We went to drought tolerant landscaping a couple of years ago and everything in the yard took off gangbusters once we got it all in the ground. I was shocked at how fast it all grew, overtaking everything and now I often find myself struggling to find the time to care for my usually overgrown yard. The good news is there haven’t been many weeds – up until now, that is. I hate weeding, probably due to growing up on a farm where as kids my sisters and I were expected to weed the garden and if we didn’t

the repercussions were frightful. After the recent rains, I have noticed weeds springing to life in my beautiful, yet overgrown yard. It seems like yesterday there were none, but today, man, oh, man, do I have a lot of weeds to pull. So much so that I am considering hiring a gardener just to get out of having to do it myself. Those nasty little buggers are everywhere! I know we need the rain, but it barely seems to stop before another storm rolls through, not giving me enough time to take care of the yard between storms. I would imagine before this year’s rainy season is over, my yard will be a veritable jungle of drought resistant landscaping and weeds. While I hate the chore of weeding, I love seeing the rain, watching it splatter across the pool deck and

into the pool in big, fat droplets is something that just makes my heart happy. Still being fairly new to the area, I was super excited about last year’s el Nino, only to be disappointed by the amount of rainfall that I had hoped for, but didn’t receive. It seems to me that we have already had more rainfall this year than we did last, so I pulled up some facts and figures to compare. During the 2015/2016 rainy season, I think we were all disappointed in the amount of rain we received but totals as reported for Temecula were 11.12 inches in wine country and 8.82 inches in South Temecula. San Jacinto, East Hemet and Lake Elsinore all saw a good amount of rain, at 11.03 inches, 10.91 inches and 10.10 inches respectively. In Northwest

California’s Capitol, a state treasure Marie Waldron SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

Working in the Capitol building is a wonderful privilege. The building is much more than just a seat of government; it’s a living museum of California history. California’s state capital was permanently moved to Sacramento in 1854, after temporarily locating in other cities including Vallejo, San Jose and Benicia. The current Capitol building was completed between 1860 and 1874. Minor attempts at reconstruction were made over the years, but nothing major occurred until 1972, when earthquake safety concerns led to a proposal to demolish the building

and replace it with a completely new structure. Fortunately, the decision was made to rebuild and reinforce the old building to bring it up to modern standards. That decision resulted in a lot of meticulous restoration work to safeguard the building while retaining its historic character. For example, to reproduce the interior, old photos were extensively used. The marble mosaic on the 2nd floor is all original; 600,000 pieces were removed, polished and reinstalled. Many of the original statues had deteriorated over time and had to be replaced, but five originals remain, including symbolic depictions of Justice, Education and Industry. Water resistant copper was

Murrieta 9.70 inches was reported, with Central Murrieta not faring quite as well at 8.12 inches of the wet stuff. French Valley recorded 9.27 inches and Wildomar recorded 6.59 inches of the wet stuff. De Luz had the highest amount recorded last year coming in at 12.19 inches. All were below the average rainfall with the exception of San Jacinto who just eeked by its average by 0.13 inches. This year is where things get interesting. To date for the 2016/2017 season, Temecula Wine Country has recorded 6.89 inches, Temecula has 6.09 inches, San Jacinto is reporting 7.70 inches, East Hemet has reported 7.08 inches and Lake Elsinore has reported 6.06 inches. Over in Northwest Murrieta 6.32 inches of rain has fallen so far, central Murrieta has seen 5.61

inches, French Valley is reporting 6.46 inches and Wildomar is already almost at the same amount as it was last year at 5.76 inches total. DeLuz again looks to be the big winner so far at 9.01 inches for the season. I should mention these totals, taken from weathercurrents. com, are only through Jan. 4, with more rain on the horizon. While I am no weatherman, if you look at the comparisons and the rain keeps coming, we could be on track to surpass last year’s totals and maybe even our annual average, something I sincerely hope happens in spite of all those pesky weeds. After all, isn’t it time we get some relief from this long-term drought? But hey, it’s only my opinion.

Uncle Bob’s hosts successful toy drive

placed in the dome, and since the gold ball and gold leaf on top of the Capitol had deteriorated, they were replaced with electroplated gold and stainless steel. Crystal chandeliers were replaced with fluorescent lights, and the capitol’s 30 foot marble columns, each weighing 11 1/2 tons, were reinforced. Signs in the Assembly and Senate read, respectively: “It is the Legislator’s duty to establish just laws,” and “It is the Senator’s duty to guard the liberty of the people.” For me at least, this magnificent old building stands as a staunch reminder that those duties must be fulfilled.

High cost of medical care in California Ed Hubler SPECIAL TO VALLEY NEWS

Ever wondered why medical costs are so high in California, the highest in the nation, and in particular Riverside County, the 5th highest in California? Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, establishes the fees doctors and hospitals are allowed to charge Medicare patients, but generally only pay 80 percent of those fees. Patients are left to cover the remaining 20 percent. Many people enroll in Medicare health maintenance organizations or HMOs, or they buy Medicare supplemental policies to help cover the gap. For example, in the past year patients with Medicaid paid $2,116, people insured by the Veterans Health Administration paid $2,367, people with employer-sponsored insurance paid $5,492, patients with Medigap policies paid $5,670, patients insured by a Medicare HMO, paid $5,976, and people with traditional Medicare and no supplemental insurance paid $8,115 on average, out-of-pocket costs. Hospitalizations, poor doctor choices and prescription drugs are a main driver of out-of-pocket costs. On Oct. 1, I received a letter from our primary care physician that he was leaving Hemet Community Medical Group effective Nov. 1. He had been our primary care physician for over 5 years. I called him to discuss continuity of care at University of California Irvine Medical Center, where my wife was diagnosed and was being treated for pancreatic cancer. UCI Medical Center was the second opinion that I requested after the first incompetent doctor, Dr. Raghuwanshi of Southland Gastroenterology Medical Group, in Hemet Community MG’s network said that my wife didn’t have cancer. Our old primary care physician suggested that she stay with Hemet Community MG to insure that my wife had continuity of care at UCI Medical Center, including estab-

lished referrals. After discussing this idea with him, I called Hemet Community MG, told them that since my primary care physician was leaving their management group we needed a new primary care physician for my wife and asked them to please send me a complete list of all of the doctors in their network. On Oct. 25, my wife received a letter from her insurance company, stating that some meathead was our new primary care physician. In the new Health Net Medicare Advantage HMO Plan Provider Directory, this doctor isn’t even listed as a primary care physician. He is listed as a family practice doctor. I called Hemet Community MG to ask them what was going on. Hemet Community MG said that since we hadn’t picked a new primary care physician, the insurance company picked one for us, and that this doctor was our new primary care physician. When I looked up this slug on the internet, I could tell that he was not someone that anyone would ever pick to be their physician, let alone their primary care physician. After numerous calls to Hemet Community MG, I finally speak to customer service supervisor Doreen at Hemet Community MG for the second time Oct. 31, and she agrees to send me a complete list of all of the doctors in their network. Unfortunately, she only sends a partial list of doctors. It wasn’t until Nov. 9 that I finally did receive a complete list of all doctors in their network. Why do you suppose it took Hemet Community MG almost 40 days to send me a complete list of all of the doctors in their network? The reason is quite simple, they have some number of poor doctors in their network who don’t care about good quality health care but completely rely on the insurance companies to provide clients to them. On Oct. 21, my wife spent 11 1/2 hours in the operating room at University of Irvine Medical Center

hospital for a Wipple procedure in relation to her pancreatic cancer. She was released on Saturday, Oct. 29. When she was released from the hospital, she had a catheter, and an appointment was set up for her to have the catheter removed on Monday, Nov. 7 at the UCI Urology department. On Friday, Nov. 4, I get a telephone call from the UCI Urology department stating that Hemet Community MG would not authorize the procedure. I was somewhat surprised that Hemet Community MG would not authorize the removal of my wife’s catheter by the UCI urology department. Hemet Community MG told us that we had to go to our primary care physician, who has never seen us and was selected by our insurance company, to be referred to a urology doctor in their network to have the catheter removed. Let me explain how it works. You visit the primary care physician. Cha ching! He sends you to the urology doctor. Cha ching! Cha ching! Then you go back to the primary care physician for follow up. Cha ching! Cha ching! and Cha ching! It just doesn’t make sense unless you are just in it for the money and to hell with good quality health care. On Thursday, Nov. 10, a social service worker from the Riverside County Department of Public Services was standing at our door with a Temecula police officer wanting to know why my wife isn’t seeing her primary care physician. Hemet Community MG is trying to harass and intimate us by using the Riverside County Department of Public Services because we will not go along with their scam to help them defraud Medicare. If most insurance bills were paid directly by the insurance companies, instead of through a third party like Hemet Community MG, medical care would cost far less, and health care would be significantly better.

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Father-son duo Bob and Ryan of Uncle Bob’s Sports Bar & Grill host Toys-for-Tots toy drive during the holiday season. They saw a great response from the community, allowing them to fill a truck to overflowing with gifts for needy children. Courtesy photo

Dear Editor, We are very proud to share that our Uncle Bob’s Sports Bar & Grill community raised over $3,500 in donations during our recent TOYSFOR-TOTS toy drive! We had some amazing help from our local businesses, youth organizations, neighborhood community and our dedicated guests and staff. A special thank you goes out to the dozen of young men and women sailors from the 1st Marine Division that helped us out with our community drive. My Dad was a very proud Marine during WWII. He ran TOYS-FORTOTS every year for as long as I

can remember. After his passing at 93 years old, my son Ryan and I wanted to continue his efforts. This year we were able to overflow an entire truck with generous toy donations! We at Uncle Bob’s are so grateful and proud of our community and the generosity that everyone showed. That effort is part of what makes the Temecula community so special. We are proud to be a part of this great community, call you all friends, and together to be able to help so many children this Christmas season! Many thanks, Uncle Bob

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

A-10

Entertainment

American Cancer Society’s annual Bark for Life event returns to Murrieta Stephanie Lai VALLEYSTAFF@REEDERMEDIA.COM

In honor of animals who have been caregivers to cancer survivors and other canines who had cancer themselves, Kristine Crothers has planned yet another annual Bark for Life in Murrieta. Fundraising for American Cancer Society, Bark for Life offers a chance to fund cancer research through the mutual support of cancer survivors and their furry friends. This year, teaming up with Relay for Life they hope for an even larger outcome during their Jan. 14 event. Widely successful in the previous year, Bark for Life Murrieta raised approximately $2,800, however Crothers has full hopes to reach $3,000 in this year’s event based on donation projections and advertising. Crothers and her partners Cathy Leseberg and Cathi Hill have made several adjustments from their previous events to make Jan. 14 even stronger. “Before we had no entertainment so this year we made sure to add that. Also in the past, we’ve had cancer research there, but I have new resources this year. We will actually have a table for cancer survivors and cancer caregivers because survivors wouldn’t be survivors without their caregivers,” Crothers explained. The added tables will offer more dimension to the event as visitors will have more sources of information. Kicking off the event, will be

opening ceremonies with Relay for Life Murrieta to put on a larger spectacle. Various contests will be put on with categories such as costume contests, look alike and best trick with first, second and third place dogs recognized. Concluding the opening with a Hawaiian dance performance by Pangelinan Polynesian Review. The walk itself will take place after and will be followed by guest speakers from the American Cancer Society. We will have a prayer ceremony for the ones we’ve lost and the ones that are there. At the end, we take a lap as a big group,” Crothers said. Symbolic in nature, the end commemorates loved ones as Crothers has had her share of lost loved ones and hopes to honor them through raising money to facilitate further cancer research. Beginning three years ago, Crothers’ passion to work with the American Cancer Society has inspired the event as she now strives to help grant funds to programs researching particular cancers and various programs. As Crothers stated, ACS assists with the “Look Good, Feel Better Program which provides women with makeup and wigs for self-confidence and empowerment. ACS also assists in Road to Recovery which is a program that helps cancer patients get to and from treatment when they do not have transportation. Volunteers will take their time to help out these patients.”

A “Murrieta Bark For Life” participant walks with her dog in the American Cancer Society fundraising event held at Town Square Park Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015. The 2017 event will mark the third year the event is held in the city. Shane Gibson photo

With the ambition to provide a day of information, Bark for Life has the support of many local businesses who will be present at the event. Kahoots Pet Store, Absolute Grooming and Camp Bow Wow are among the many pet friendly businesses featured during the day. “A lot of the event is donated. I’ve gone to many local businesses and our team of three work to advertise out to the community,” Crothers

said, “Murrieta is a great community that will come together. When they set their mind to something, they believe in it.” All food vendors assist the cause as well through paying a vendor fee, which is reported to automatically be donated to ACS. The event itself is free, but donations are encouraged. Registering for contests has a fee, but walkers themselves will be given incentives

for the funds they raise such as event T-shirts. With high expectations, anyone interested in the event can go to relayforlifemurrieta.org or call Crothers at (559) 936-3114 for more information. Come out to Murrieta Valley High School Jan. 14, from 9 a.m. to noon for a family friendly event and cause worth barking about.

California Chamber Orchestra to perform a century of inspiration TEMECULA – The California Chamber Orchestra will recreate a concert from a century ago at their Saturday, Feb. 4, performance at the Old Town Temecula Theater. “We’re going to explore how classical music was performed in

1917 and how it was perceived by American audiences,” Artistic Director and Conductor Dana Zimbric said. “I want our audience to really get a sense of what’s changed and what’s stayed the same across the years. This is also an opportunity for

the California Chamber Orchestra, and our supporters, to look forward and imagine how our orchestra may look in 2117.” The inspiration for this California Chamber Orchestra concert took place Saturday, Dec. 1, 1917, featur-

ing the New York Philharmonic with Conductor Josef Stransky in the Cascade Ballroom on the 22nd floor of the Hotel Biltmore. The Biltmore was New York’s newest luxury hotel, adjacent to Grand Central Terminal. Both the hotel and the railroad terminal were just 4 years old. Across the ocean, World War I raged, and Russia’s October Revolution had occurred less than one month before. But the ladies and gentleman of the New York Philharmonic Society were there for a gala private concert to thank them for supporting the Philharmonic. The California Chamber Orchestra will perform works from at that original concert; those works are still audience favorites. “There’s a Haydn symphony, music by Debussy, Wagner’s ‘Siegfried Idyll,’ a Chopin Nocturne, and Rossini’s Overture to ‘The Barber of Seville,’” Zimbric said. “This is music that was popular in 1917. In fact, Josef Stransky was criticized at the time for playing too much ‘popu-

lar’ music. It remains popular today because people love to hear it. And musicians enjoy playing it.” To augment the music, Zimbric will share photos from the time period. “We want to do as much as we can to recreate the atmosphere of that Biltmore concert,” she said. “We’re having local drama students from Murrieta Mesa High School who will dress in 1917 costumes. And weather permitting, we’ll have Rebecca and Darrel Farnbach’s Model T on display in the courtyard outside the theater.” The California Chamber Orchestra’s concert, “Hotel Biltmore NYC 1917,” will take place  Saturday, Feb. 4, at 7:30 p.m. at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater. Tickets are $32 for adults, $27 for seniors and $10 for students. Children age 10 and under can attend for free with an accompanying adult or senior. For tickets and information, visit the ticket office, call (866) 653-8696, or visit  www.CalChamberOrchestra. org.

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January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

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Dining in the Valley

Seafood delight at Bluewater Grill

[Above] Bluewater Grill’s Gemelli Pasta with Shrimp and Scallops is absolutely delicious with huge shrimps and a generous serving of sweet scallops with a savory sauce is a sure winner that will please every palate.

The fresh fish counter at Bluewater Grill.

John Farrell FOOD COLUMNIST

My first encounter with the Bluewater Grill was in Redondo Beach. My friends and I were walking down the dock in Redondo and spotted what looked like a great spot for a cocktail and some appetizers. It happened to be a place called The Bluewater Grill. Love at first sight is the only way to describe how impressed we were at the atmosphere, the food and friendly service. It was a bit later when my son decided to take me for my birthday. He knew how much I loved seafood and told me of a new restaurant in Temecula. As I’m sure you guessed, it was the new Temecula location for the Bluewater Grill. I was very pleasantly surprised, to say the least. As soon as I sat down I knew I wanted to start off with a cup of New England clam chowder. Please... I hoped it was as good as I remembered from my first visit. It was! The first thing you notice upon walking into this casual and classic seafood restaurant is the fresh fish counter. It contains most of the fresh daily fish available to the consumer. Then there is a lovely outside patio area and a very nice fully stocked bar area with specialty drinks abound. There is even a Sunday brunch that is available with bottomless mimosa Champagne for a reasonable extra charge. I have tried several different entries and appetizers and all have been amazing. My favorites are the swordfish for dinner and the fish and chips for lunch. My wife recently tried the seafood skewers for lunch and loved them. I have not gotten to try their happy hour specials yet but with appetizers and beers ranging from $4 to $6, I’m

John Farrell photos

sure it’s great. The menu also contains several steak options and salads for the landlubber. Don’t forget the children. There is a special menu just for them. It is no wonder that Bluewater Grill was voted Best Seafood in Wine Country. It would be remiss of me if I didn’t mention one other aspect of the Bluewater that sets it apart. That is the service. The staff is knowledgeable, attentive and most of all so friendly you would think you’re family. On our last visit, we were served by a young lady by the name of Gilmarie. Even though it was packed for lunch, (always a

good sign) Gilmarie was able to take excellent care of us. Even the manager, Max, was able to take the time to make sure our meal was up to snuff. You have to try the Bluewater. It is sure to delight. The Bluewater Grill is located at 26700 Yenez Court in Temecula. The hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday thruThursday, Friday from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. and Sunday 10:30 a.m. till 9 p.m. For more information, you can look online at bluewatergrill.com or call them at (951) 308-2722. This is truly a restaurant worth visiting.

The Fish and Skewers at Bluewater Grill are hand-cut on the premises and includes sword fish and tilapia. Each bite just melts in your mouth.

Bluewater Grill Manager Max Letorto welcomes diners to the popular Temecula eatery.

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS CHILDREN AND TEENS: Jan. 13 – 5:30-7:30 p.m. Family Science Adventures at Pennypickle’s Children’s Museum, 42081 Main St. Temecula. There is always a surprise waiting for you so join in on the fun! Tickets and Information: (951) 308-6376. Jan. 16 – All Sessions. Monday Madness at Professor Pennypickle’s Children’s Museum, 42081 Main St. Temecula. Come have some fun and have an adventure Pennypickle’s style. Cost: $5 per person over age 2. Tickets and Information: (951) 308-6376. Jan. 16 – 10 a.m. to noon or 12:30-2:30 p.m. Hogwart’s Potion Mixing Master Class at Pennypickle’s Children’s Museum, 42081 Main St. Temecula. Professor Pennypickle has enlisted the aid of Professor Severus Snape to share some of his most secret potion recipes for us to concoct... this could be wizard-y. Be sure to wear your Hogwart school clothes so you don’t get in trouble with the principal... a lab coat will do if you haven’t been sorted into the proper House yet. Tickets and Information: (951) 308-6376. ENTERTAINMENT: Jan. 12-15 – 8 p.m. Songs for a New World 2017 at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater, 42051 Main St. Presented by The Barn Stage Company in association with the Temecula Valley Symphony and Temecula Presents. This contemporary song cycle weaves characters and history together, illuminating the timelessness of self discovery. Featuring an all-star cast and a live onstage band, Songs For A New World  promises to be an unforgettable theatrical experience. Jan. 15 performance at 2 p.m. Tickets and Information: (866) 693.8696. Jan. 14 – 7 p.m. Speakeasy at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. Speakeasy is live traditional Jazz of the 20s to 40s. Performances feature the house band, Second Hand Jazz with vocalist Rosalie Porter, in rotation with prominent southern California Traditional Jazz artists. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 15 – 3 p.m. Classics at the Merc presented by California Chamber Orchestra will be at 42051 Main St. Temecula. Classics is a weekly chamber recital series where an individual musician or small ensemble performs a wide range of music. The performers are all working professional musicians or advanced conservatory students. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 15 – 6 p.m. Dixieland at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. With rhythms ranging from strong toe tapping to the familiar blues progressions. Dixieland music is as American as Apple Pie. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8693. Jan. 16 – 7 p.m. danceXchange presented by Dance Theatre Collective of Southern California in association with Temecula presents. danceXchange is a monthly showcase presented in various settings at the theater to bring the local dance community together in celebration of varied and eclectic dance community and all it offers. No audition is necessary. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 19 – 7:30 p.m. Jazz at the Merc, 42051 Main St. Temecula. Featuring: Peter Paul Hofmann and Beppe Pilotto (The Italians!) with Markus Burger, Sherry Willliams and Jim Linahon. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 19-22 – 1, 4 and 7 p.m. Wizard of Oz 2017 presented by City of Temecula Youth Musical Theater at the Old Town Temecula Community Theater, 42051 Main St. Follow the Yellow Brick Road in the Broadway Youth Production. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 21 – 7 and 9 p.m. Country Live at the Merc, 42051 Main St.

Temecula. Live Country music show featuring the house band backing up the Valley’s hottest country artists. Tickets and Information: (866) 653-8696. Jan. 21 – 7 p.m. Tribute Mania: Tribute to Queen at the Historic Hemet Theatre, 216 E. Florida Ave. Queen Nation recreates the image, sound, and stage persona of vintage Queen. Fans will be amazed at the retrospective journey. From We Will Rock You, Another One Bites the Dust and so many more. Tickets and Information: (951) 658-5950. Jan. 21 – 7 p.m. Sandii Castleberry: Roots of American Music at Diamond Valley Arts Center, 123 N. Harvard St. Hemet. Sandii Castleberry and Paul Carman take their audience on a musical tour through America, learning about the multicultural origins of songs and instruments. Tickets and Information: (951) 652-3822. Jan. 25 – 6:30 p.m. The Valley Winds Concert Band is looking for you if you are musically inclined and play an instrument. Rehearsals for the spring season will be held in the Band Room at Temecula Valley High School. No audition is necessary. Information: www. ValleyWinds.org or info@ValleyWinds.org. COMMUNITY EVENTS:

Jan. 14 – 1-4 p.m. Bowling for the Kids at the AMF Hemet Lanes, 2850 W. Florida Ave. This is a fun afternoon for the whole family while supporting the community. Sponsored by the Hemet Woman’s Club this fundraiser will support the new Hemet Public Library’s Children’s activity Center.   Cost: $25 per person (includes shoes) Must be pre-registered to participate. Information and Registration: (951) 238-8569. Jan.14 – 10 a.m. Walking Tour of Old Town Temecula. Experience Old Town in a whole new way as your tour guide shares stories and events that bring Temecula’s past to life. Tour departs at the Temecula Valley Museum; 28314 Mercedes St. Tour is 1.5 hours. Cost: $5 per person and children must be accompanied by an adult. Information: (951) 694-6450. Jan. 16 – 7:30-11 a.m. MSJC’s 11th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Breakfast at the San Jacinto campus Library, 1499 N. State St. “Continuing the Dream: The Struggle for Social Justice,” will feature a full breakfast, an art contest, presentations on the theme of the day, a gospel performance and African drummers and dancers. This is free and open to the public. Seating is limited and guests must RSVP for admission by Jan. 11 by calling Professor Willie Hamilton (951) 487-3685 or whamilto@msjc.edu. Jan. 19 – 6-7 p.m. Parent Support Group for parents of young adults battling chemical dependency. Education, Peer Support, Intervention Tools, Peace of Mind. Experience strength and hope at 41877 Enterprise Circle N, Suite 100 Temecula. Information: Erin (951) 719-3685 or Lizabeth (951)348-8976. Support group sponsored by Hill Alcohol and Drug Treatment. www.HillRecovery.com. Jan. 30 – 3-5 p.m. Taste of the Valley and Business Expo at the golden Village Palms, 3600 W. Florida Ave. Hemet. Free Admission, entertainment, vendors and more. This expo is sponsored by the Hemet/San Jacinto Valley Chamber of Commerce. Information: (951) 658-3211. WORKSHOPS, MEETINGS and ANNOUNCEMENTS: Registration is Open at Mt. San Jacinto College for spring semester. Registration is open now for students wishing to enroll in classes at Mt. San Jacinto College for the spring 2017 semester. Instruction begins on  Jan. 17  for students who want to receive an

associate degree, transfer to a fouryear university or earn a career certificate.  MSJC also offers late-start classes, which begin on March 27, and Friday-only classes. New and returning students are encouraged to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for 2017-2018 by the deadline of Jan. 1, 2017. Visit msjc.edu for more spring 2017 important dates, events and information about the college, its programs and other services. Jan. 16 – 11 a.m. Temecula Valley Newcomers Club to meet at Wilson Creek Winery, 35960 Rancho California Road ,Temecula. If you recently moved or have lived in the Temecula Valley for many years and want to meet people and have fun, then give Robin a call (951) 428-0940. Paid reservations are required at least one week before luncheon. For reservations call Ann (951) 677-7149. Jan. 19-22 – 6-9 p.m. Be a good Samaritan and become a TIP Volunteer in Southwest Riverside County. Trauma Intervention programs is looking for caring people willing to be part of a team of citizen volunteers trained to provide emotional and practical support to victims of traumatic events. No experience necessary. These modern-day Good Samaritans will be called to emergency scenes by emergency response personnel to comfort families, help emotionally traumatized victims, provide support and more. Information and Registration: Magdaoftipswrc@ gmail.com or (951) 698-2453. Jan. 26 – Noon Murrieta Nafe monthly meeting will be at RJ’s Sizzlin Steer with guest speaker Gillian Larson, founder of Real-

ity Rally. Gillian will share how she got the idea for Reality Rally, what it’s done so far, what are her dreams for the future for this great nonprofit and what is planned for 2017 in April and how you can get involved as a volunteer. Information: Robbie (951) 255-9200. Jan. 27 – 9-11 a.m. Professional Development Series at the Temecula Valley Entrepreneur’s Exchange, 43200 Business Park Dr. Temecula. Information and Reservations: Brooke: (951) 6765090. NOW – Older Adults Needed for Balance Study. This study will be conducted by the Geri-Fit Company and Balance Tracking Systems. To qualify you must be over the age of 65 and not involved in strength training exercises. Classes to be held at Kay Ceniceros Senior Center, 29995 Evans Road in Menifee. Tuesday/Thursday 3-3:45 p.m. or Monday/Wednesday 9-9:45 a.m. There is no cost to be in the study. Information: Fran (951) 694-6873. NOW – MSJC Child Development and Education Centers are now enrolling and offer child care and preschool for children 18 months through five years, are open to students and the community and offer several enrollment options based on family income and need. The centers, located in San Jacinto and Menifee, are open  Monday  through Friday, from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Information: San Jacinto: (951) 4873605 or Menifee: (951) 639-5605. NOW – Sun City Certified Farmers Market is held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday in the parking lot of the Menifee United Church of Christ, 26701 McCall Blvd. Vendors offer produce,

crafts, food and more. Information: Pamela (951) 491-4111. NOW – Memoir Writing Group every second and fourth Monday from 1-3 p.m. at the Mary Phillips Senior Center, 4845 6th Street, Temecula, everyone has a story, join them and write. NOW – Parent Support Group available for parents whose children of any age struggle with addiction. Education, Skills, Support. Every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 43397 Business Park Drive. Suite D8, Temecula. Information: (951) 775-4000 or info@thecenter4lifechange.com. NOW – Clippendales meet the second Monday of each month 6 p.m. The Elks Ladies, an Elks Auxiliary of the Lake Elsinore/ Wildomar Elks Lodge 2591 has formed a club call the “Clippendales.” The object of this club is to send manufacturers coupons to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan to be redeemed for products at their commissary and other stores. NOW- Lake Elsinore/Wildomar Elks Lodge 2591 hosts Bingo at the lodge each Thursday to raise funds for its charities. Occasionally the lodge arranges for additional Bingo games to help community groups raise funds as well. Lodge 2591 is located at 33700 Mission Trail, Wildomar. Information: (951) 674-6804. NOW– 3:30-4:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesday afternoons Senior Fitness Program is offered at the Lake Elsinore Senior Center, 420 E. Lakeshore Drive. Participants should bring a set of 2 or 3-pound dumbbell weights and water to drink. Space is limited. Information: Lisa (951) 533-2612.

Temecula to celebrate Mozart’s birthday with piano concert at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library TEMECULA – The city of Temecula’s Community Services Department, in partnership with the Yiyi Ku Piano Studio, will present the annual concert celebrating Mozart’s birthday and his genius works with piano solos, duets and a concerto movement Friday, Jan. 27, at 4 p.m. at the Ronald H. Roberts

Temecula Public Library, 30600 Pauba Road. Born in 1756, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was considered by most experts to have been a child prodigy and a musical genius. He defined the Classical era with over 600 works. Attend the free event featuring

classical piano selections presented by Ku’s piano students, followed by cake, coffee and punch in celebration of Mozart’s birth Jan. 27. For more information on this event and other Arts, Culture and Entertainment events, please visit www.TemeculaCA.gov or call (951) 240-4268.

Teen Program ‘College Prep: Financial Aid & Student Loans’ at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library TEMECULA – An exciting life at a dream college is in sight. Pave the way by attending the teen program, “College Prep: Financial Aid & Student Loans,” Monday, Jan. 23, from 7 p.m. at the Ronald H. Roberts Temecula Public Library, 30600 Pauba Road. High school students have com-

pleted everything they need to apply to college. They aced their exams, earned a great SAT score, completed multiple college applications, and perfected their personal essay. They’re ready for college, but how will they pay for textbooks, housing, meal plan or and tuition? Learn useful tips

from Ashlynne Van Selus from Wells Fargo about financial aid and student loans. Sponsored by the Friends of the Temecula Libraries, this program is for teens, grades 7-12. Space is limited, and carpooling is encouraged. For additional information, please call (951) 693-8900.

Crossword puzzle by Myles Mellor "In the buff" by Myles Mellor

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Wine CountryTemecula

January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

A-13

VALLEY NEWS

JANUARY 13, 2017

South Coast Winery’s annual Bridal Showcase offers inspiration for future brides  Kim Harris VALLEYEDITOR@REEDERMEDIA.COM

With breathtaking views and amazing sunsets, South Coast Winery Resort & Spa is a wedding site like no other in Temecula Valley Wine Country. Future brides and their grooms are invited to tour the winery and all it offers during the annual Bridal Showcase Feb. 26. Leah Marie photo

Attendees of South Coast Winery Resort & Spa’s annual Bridal Showcase will see winery locations, such as the Courtyard reimagined with specific themes limited only by the designer’s own inventiveness. Leah Marie photo

Future Brides in attendance at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa will be able to sip awardwinning wines while touring the venue at the winery’s annual Bridal Showcase Feb. 26.

Award-winning wines and mouthwatering appetizers await those in attendance at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa’s annual Bridal Showcase Feb. 26. Justin Hulse photo

Leah Marie photo

The Ballroom at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa is always a popular Justin Hulse photo wedding reception site.

Wine Country map courtesy of Temecula Valley Winegrowers

When it comes to planning a wedding, many brides find themselves overwhelmed with the number of decisions that need to be made. From finding the perfect wedding dress designed to make her feel like a princess, to cakes, caterers, photographers and choosing a venue, future brides and their families are faced with a variety of arrangements that are needed to create the wedding of their dreams. So what’s a girl to do to avoid all the stress that seems to go hand-inhand with planning a wedding? The answer is easy, visit South Coast Winery, Resort & Spa during their Bridal Showcase. With a variety of vendors from florists to photographers, the annual event has everything a future bride needs to plan her happily ever after. “The South Coast Bridal Showcase gives engaged couples the opportunity to visit the property and envision what the wedding of their dreams might look like here at the winery,” the winery’s Senior Catering Manager Stacey Chrisman said. In one breathtaking location designed to make wedding planning a breeze, the Bridal Showcase at South Coast Winery Resort & Spa will offer future brides, their friends and family the opportunity to visit a variety of vendors from throughout the Temecula Valley. “This year’s Bridal Showcase will be the best yet,” Chrisman said, adding that after taking a year off from the event, this year’s showcase will be, “Bigger, better and more creative.” “We are partnering with Temecula’s best wedding vendors to reimagine our favorite fairytales in each space featuring a different theme,” she said. “Each vendor is unleashing their imagination to create some of the most beautiful of wedding themes for the event.” According to Chrisman, visitors will have the opportunity to tour the winery’s stunningly beautiful wedding venues, villas and hotel while enjoying a sampling of some of South Coast’s award-winning wines and delicious appetizers. The Tasting Room, Vineyard Rose Restaurant and Grapeseed Spa will be open all day if visitors want to experience everything South Coast has to offer. Now in its 10th year, the Bridal Showcase will feature photographers, DJ’s, florists, wedding planners and designers, cakes and desserts, rental companies, attire and hair and makeup and “of course representatives from our resort and spa,” Chrisman said. The winery’s exclusive vendors will meet with those in attendance and offer complimentary, expert wedding advice and ideas as well as wedding specials and promotions that are only offered during the Bridal Showcase. “Happily ever after begins here, so for couples booking the day of the showcase, South Coast will be offering a discount off our wedding packages,” Chrisman said. “Those attending can expect to see some incredible offers from our vendors for booking as well.” To take advantage of the discounts offered by South Coast Winery Resort & Spa, brides should be prepared to submit their contract and a nonrefundable deposit. Space is limited at the winery so booking early is always a superb idea. Admission is free for the one-day

Bridal Showcase, which is scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. South Coast Winery Resort & Spa is located in the heart of Temecula Valley Wine Country at 34843 Rancho California Road. Those wishing

to attend can RSVP by calling (951) 587-9463, ext. 7275. To learn more about the winery, visit www.southcoastwinery.com. For bridal updates, decor ideas and tips, follow @SouthCoastWineryWeddings on Instagram.

Wine Country Events Calendar Friday, January 13 6-7 a.m., 10-11 a.m.

Bootcamp, Passion4Ftiness, Cougar Vineyard & Winery

2-4 p.m.

Gourmet Cheese Artisanal Tour & Wine Tasting, Avensole Winery

5-8 p.m.

Live Music, Lilah Vener, Avensole Winery Restaurant

5-7 p.m.

Live Music, Sebastian Sidi, Meritage at Callaway Winery

5-8 p.m.

Live Music, Raye Zaragoza, Cougar Vineyard and Winery

5-8 p.m.

Live Music, Kim Horn, Leoness Cellars

5:30-8 p.m.

Live Music, Brian Stodart, Restaurant at Ponte Winery

6-9 p.m.

Karaoke Night, Bel Vino Winery

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Alaina Blair, Lorimar Winery

6-10 p.m.

Live Music, Gaby Aparicio, Fazeli Cellars

7-9:30 p.m.

Legends of the West Dinner Theatre & Variety Show, Longshadow Ranch

7-10 p.m.

Live Music, Ruben V, Miramonte Winery

10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Lindsey Carrier, Avensole Tasting Room Patio

5-8 p.m.

Live Music, Joel Reese, Avensole Winery

11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Bailey Estate Club Tasting

12-4 p.m.

Live Music, VIB, Bel Vino Winery

12-4 p.m.

Live Music, Travis Miller, Wilson Creek Winery

1-2:30 p.m.

Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region Cooking Class, Europa Village

1-3 p.m.

Paint Nite, Mount Palomar

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Michael Dwyer, Robert Renzoni Vineyards & Winery

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Callaway Courtyard

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Nathan Rivera, Danza Del Sol Winery

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Naomi Balcombe, Fazeli Cellars

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Pavilion at Oak Mountain Winery

3 p.m.

Gulp With Goats, Lemon Ranch Animal Sanctuary

5:30-8 p.m.

Live Music, Joe Baldino, Ponte Restauramt

6-9 p.m.

Live Music, Old School, Lorimar Winery

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wine Bingo Night, Monte de Oro Winery

7-9 p.m.

Salsa Night, Fazeli Cellars

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wine Bingo Night, Monte de Oro Winery

7-10 p.m.

Live Music, Bluefish, Miramonte Winery

10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Craft Faire, Maurice Car’rie Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Izon Eden, Avensole Winery

2-4 p.m.

Gourmet Cheese Artisanal Tour & Wine Tasting, Avensole Winery

11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Dog Day Sundays, Carol’s Restaurant at Baily’s Winery

12-4 p.m.

Live Music, Jeff Brinkman, Bel Vino Winery

12-4 p.m.

Live Music, Tim Cash, Wilson Creek Winery

1-3 p.m.

Paint Nite, Mount Palomar Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Danielle Taylor, Europa Village

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Anna & Aris, Leoness Cellars

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Dustin Jake, Lorimar Vineyards & Winery

1-4 p.m.

Live Music, Robert Renzoni Vineyards

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Vivien gaines, Danza Del Sol Winery

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Tony Suraci, Fazeli Cellars

1-5 p.m.

“Sounds of Sunday”, Monte De Oro Winery

1-5 p.m.

Live Music, Pavilion at Oak Mountain Winery

2-5 p.m.

Live Music, Kylie Jordan, Cougar Vineyard & Winery

Courtesy photos

Saturday, January 14

Sunday, January 15

UPCOMING EVENTS Jan. 14, Salsa Night, Fazeli Cellars Winery Jan. 14, Winter Wine Bingo, Monte De Oro Winery Jan. 20, Aloha Series, Nathan Aweau/Benny Chiong, Leoness Cellars Jan. 21, Copa Cabana Night, Monte De Oro Winery Jan. 25-26, 2nd Annual Cougar Meets Italy, Cougar Vineyards & Winery Jan. 26, Sip N Paint "Springtime in Paris", Falkner Winery Jan 28-9, Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association Barrel Tasting Jan 29, Epicurean Lunch, Monte De Oro Winery

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

A-14

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VALLEY

B

Section

NEWS

January 13 – 19, 2017

www.myvalleynews.com

Volume 17, Issue 2

Sports

Valley Showcase pits top San Diego teams against local high school basketball programs

Great Oak’s Jason Bush (22) hit four 3-pointers against Orange Glen Saturday, Dec. 7, in this year’s Valley versus San Diego Showcase. Annette Saenz photo

Temecula Valley’s Bryce Denham (35) and Rancho Bernardo’s JJ Overton (22) tip off the evening’s nightcap, a triple overtime battle won by visiting Rancho Bernardo 99-93. David Canales photo

C.J. Stevenson goes up for two of his 12 points against Orange Glen High School of San Diego. Annette Saenz photo

JP Raineri Sports@ReederMedia.com

For the fourth straight year, high school basketball teams from San Diego hit the road over the holiday break to test teams in the area in the “Valley Showcase.” This year it would be five teams from around the area that faced off against some of the best teams in San Diego Saturday, Dec. 7, in the showcase showdown held at Temecula Valley High School. The “Valley” teams were represented by Perris and Elsinore from the Sunbelt League and Vista Murrieta, Great Oak and Temecula Valley from the Southwestern League. The first game saw the Perris Panthers take out Mt. Carmel in the final seconds, 55-53. Perris was led by senior point guard Marcus Jones, who scored 20 points against the Sundevils. Other top Perris point contributors were Bryan Montgomery (13), Romeo

Benevidez (11) and P.J. Martin (5). Mt. Carmel sophomore, Torrey Thomas, kept the visiting Sundevils in the game until the final seconds with his 17 points. Game two pitted Elsinore against Escondido, who controlled the game the entire time, finishing off the Cougars, 66-50. Elsinore senior Zach Lipps brought down 17 rebounds on his way to 21 points while fellow top Tiger, Anthony Reyes, had a team high 22 points. Junior Donald Fabela was another top scorer for Elsinore with his 17 points. Vista Murrieta, who found themselves on the CIF watch list this week, went up against Carlsbad in game three of the day. With their fierce attack, and in dramatic fashion, the Broncos blasted past the Lancers in the last minutes of the game, picking up their 12th win of the season with their 46-43 victory. Vista Murrieta, who has a senior heavy roster, were led by

Sean Mitchell (2) was the top scorer for the Golden David Canales photo Bears with 18 points.

P.J. Slaughter’s 9 points. Michael Carongcong and Cole Clark scored 7 points each, while Ravi Alston, Nate Duran and sophomore Trevon Ridley scored 6 points apiece. Senior’s Stone Stapleton (11 points) and Bronson Montgomery (10 points) led the Lancers, who are now 10-6. In the fourth game of the showcase Great Oak ousted Orange Glen, 65- 51, behind junior Zach Hickey’s 15 points. Senior Jason Bush scored 14 for the Wolfpack, while juniors, Jacob Rodriguez (13 points), C.J. Stevenson (12 points) and Christian Ross (8 points)

Vista Murrieta, behind seven points of Michael Carongcong, defeated Carlsbad 46-43 in this year’s Valley Showcase at Temecula Valley David Canales photo high school.

helped beat the Patriots. Orange Glen led by senior Trevor Owens with 16 points. With the San Diego teams facing a potential sweep, the fifth and final game proved to be best game of all. In a dramatic triple overtime thriller, Rancho Bernardo helped their San Diego allies keep some clout as they battled the Golden Bears to a 99-93 victory. Led by 6’5” senior JJ Overton (29 points), the Broncos got the best of the Golden Bears in the third overtime period. Other top scorers

for Rancho Bernardo were Taylor Zeimantz (20 points), Christian Wagner (17 points) and senior Andrew Thornton (15 points). Senior guard, Shaun Mitchell, led the Golden Bears with 18 points, while Bryce Denham (17 points), Dante Navarro (13 points) and senior Camden Parenti (12 points) all helped with their top scoring efforts. League play begins for all the valley teams this week with tipoff times mainly set for 7 p.m. on their perspective days.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-2

Sports

Valley players represent Washington State University in Holiday Bowl

Former Chaparral football standout, Darrien Molton (3) eyes a fumble along with University of Minnesota WR, Eric Carter (9), in Washington State’s 17-12 loss in the National Funding Holiday Bowl. Scott Padgett photos

Joe Naiman Sports@ReederMedia.com

from Murrieta and a Vista Murrieta High School alumnus.  Mitchell is a senior from Lake Elsinore who previously played at Elsinore High School and Riverside Community College. “We’ve got some players from here,” said WSU head coach Mike Leach. “Over time we’ve started to get more.” Washington State is located in Pullman and is one of 12 schools in the Pacific Athletic Conference.  Leach noted that Southern California is a PAC-12 region, since that is the only top-level football conference in the area. Leach added that with the possible exception of Corvallis, where Oregon State University is located, Pullman is the only college town in the PAC-12. “As good as this conference is, they’re all urban settings except for us,” he said. San Diego is also a former hometown of Leach’s wife, Sharon, who moved from San Bernardino to San Diego when she was in seventh grade and attended Pershing Junior High School and Patrick Henry High School before leaving San Diego to attend Brigham Young University. Morrow was an honorable mention all-conference selection for 2016 and was the first Cougar running back to earn all-conference

The 2016 Washington State University football team included five former valley players, and three of those played in the National Funding Holiday Bowl game Dec. 27 at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego. Darrien Molton was Washington State’s starting cornerback and had three solo tackles along with an assisted tackle in the Cougars’ 17-12 loss to Minnesota. Jamal Morrow shared running back duties and rushed five times for 13 yards while also catching four passes for 20 yards. Treshon Broughton saw action as a cornerback in the Holiday Bowl and had an assisted tackle. Greg Hoyd III and Jeremiah Mitchell were also on the WSU roster. Molton is a sophomore from Temecula and a Chaparral High School graduate. Morrow is a junior from Menifee who was previously at Heritage High School. Broughton is a college senior who moved from Tustin to Murrieta while in high school, attended Vista Murrieta High School, and also played at Fullerton Community College and Riverside Community College before joining the Cougars. Hoyd is a sophomore

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Washington State’s Jamal Morrow (25), a Heritage High School standout, shared running back duties rushing five times for 13 yards with four catches for 20 yards in the National Funding Holiday Bowl.

honors since 2009, when what is now the PAC-12 was the PAC10.  During WSU’s 13 games in 2016 Morrow gained 575 yards on 90 carries and caught 48 passes for 499 yards while scoring five rushing touchdowns and five receiving touchdowns. He also returned three punts for 131 yards and two kickoffs for 23 yards, and his 1,217 allpurpose yards led the team. During the regular season Morrow broke the Cougars’ all-time career record for receptions by a running back; he has 142 career catches to date and the previous record of 120 was set by 1987-89 player, Steve Broussard. Morrow also holds the singleseason team record for receptions by a running back; his 61 catches in 2014 broke Broussard’s school record of 59 which was set in 1987 and Morrow’s 48 catches during 2016 share fourth place on the all-time list of WSU running backs. Morrow was also a team captain for 2016. “Most versatile running back that we have,” Leach said. Morrow only started three regular-season games in 2016 but started four in 2015 and 11 in 2014.  He had 87 rushes for 351 yards and 61 catches for 460 yards in 2014, and in 2015 he carried the ball 53 times for 347 yards while catching 33 passes for 294 yards and four touchdowns. Although Morrow did not play for the Cougars in 2013, he was on the scout team which emulates the formations of the upcoming opponent during practices and was named the Scout Team Offensive Player of the Year. Molton started all 13 games in 2016 and had 71 tackles comprised of 54 unassisted and 17 assisted tackles while also forcing one fumble. He started 11 games during the 2015 season and earned freshman All-American honors for his 44 tackles including 34 solo stops, one interception, four pass breakups,

Five former valley players are on the 2016 Washington State University football team and three of those played in the National Funding Holiday Bowl game Dec. 27 at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego.

one fumble recovery and one forced fumble. “He’s been a big part of our secondary,” Leach said. Broughton made his first career start in the Cougars’ 2016 opener against Eastern Washington University and played in all 13 games during the season. His 17 tackles in 2016 consisted of 14 solo ones and three assisted stops, and he also had one interception and one forced fumble. He played in seven games during 2015 and made one unassisted and two assisted tackles. “He’s gotten real competitive,” Leach said. Hoyd, who is a linebacker, had three solo tackles and one assisted tackle in the three games he played during 2016. He played in one game during 2015. “Getting better all the time. Good work ethic,” Leach said. Mitchell, who was a defensive lineman, appeared in two games during 2016 and two in 2015. “He has struggled with injuries,” Leach said.

Treshon Broughton, formerly of Vista Murrieta, saw action as a cornerback in the Holiday Bowl for the Cougars.

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Pole vaulting has become very popular in the area and just as with most sports, this specific one has gained a following locally that keeps young student athletes engaged outside of their normal track and field season. Enter Temecula’s Vaulter Club, which has a unique approach and understanding to the meaning of pole vaulting and direction to having a fun and meaningful pole vaulting track and field club experience. With their training being just a stone’s throw away from the Promenade Mall, Temecula’s Vaulter Club began servicing the Southern California area in September 2015 as a means to not necessarily look for the best athlete, but for the dedicated athlete with the qualities to be the best. Within a year of forming, Vaulter Club and their travel team began the travel aspect and recently headed to Queen Creek, Arizona, for their eighth pole vault meet of the 2016 fall and winter travel circuit, which was the first time that the travel team had ventured out for the conventional circuit. Held Dec. 17, at Dean Starkey’s Pole Vault facility in Arizona, pole vaulters of all ages from middle school through masters partook in the meet, with many personal records being made. Local college students were on hand to help facilitate the event and former college athletes as well, which made the event a fun and well-balanced activity for the young and older pole vaulters.

Temecula’s Vaulter Club, which began servicing the Southern California area in September 2015, recently headed to Arizona for their eighth pole vault meet of the 2016 fall and winter travel circuit.

Vaulter Club will head to the National Pole Vault Summit in Reno, Nevada, during the second week of January to compete. Courtesy photos

Next up for Vaulter Club is the National Pole Vault Summit in Reno, Nevada, which will be held Jan. 12-14, is where all of the teams will unite once again and get some jumping in before their last travel destination for the season. Vaulter club offers private lessons to teach members how to

pole vault from start to finish and home school and private school programs are invited. They also have a year-round club team that teaches the sport of pole vaulting from basic to advanced level. To find out more visit www.vaulter. club. Email staff@vaulter.club, or by phone at (951) 445-2598.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-3

Sports Community Baseball Day brings local players into focus for Major League Scouts

Former Major league Baseball player, Allan Dykstra, preps the baseball players in attendance about what to expect during Community Baseball Day at Murrieta Mesa High School Sunday, Jan. 8.

JP Raineri Sports@ReederMedia.com

For most professional baseball players, the road to the big leagues is long, full of unknowns and takes thousands of hours of dedicated practice and workout time. “That will always be the case,” says former professional baseball player, Allan Dykstra. “There is no shortcut to the MLB; it takes hard work and dedication, a type of dedication that sets one apart from the rest.” Dykstra, who was drafted 23rd overall by the San Diego Padres in the first round of the 2008 Major League Baseball Draft, knows what it takes to get through the profes-

sional ranks and loves to teach the lessons he has learned during his career to up and coming players. In fact, Dykstra was on hand Sunday, Jan. 8, at the first ever Community Baseball Day, held at Murrieta Mesa High School, to lend his expertise to the hundreds of youth baseball players in attendance for the day’s event. The Community Baseball Day came at just the right time during the holiday vacation as a break in storm systems gave the coaches and coordinators just enough time to get the fields ready for the day filled with baseball. Not only was a youth camp put on, but hundreds of players showed up to showcase themselves, hoping to be seen by player development coaches and major league

Dodger’s great, Reggie Smith, speaks to young players and their families about what he learned from the game during Community Baseball Day Sunday, Jan. 8. JP Raineri photos

scouts in attendance. The idea behind the day came from quite a few individuals, but was spearheaded by a new local organization called, It’s Bigger Than Sports, a nonprofit sports development and assistance organization, which Dykstra also works with. Heath Thomas, the nonprofit’s executive director, and Mishael Israel, a Seattle Mariners team assistant scout, began pounding the pavement a little less than a month ago to get this day off the ground, which it did, with much success. Seven-time MLB All-Star Reggie Smith, a who played on the Dodgers’ 1981 World Series team, spoke to the players and families, as did Murrieta Mayor, Rick Gibbs as well

as one of the nation’s top prospects, Garrett Mitchell, a senior at Orange Lutheran High School. Mitchell currently plays center field and will play for UCLA next year. All delivered a simple message about keeping the game fun, enjoying the time spent playing and always striving to do your best as a player and teammate. The morning consisted of workout sessions for the older players and a youth camp for the younger players that ranged in age from 8 to 10 years old. Once the lunchtime ceremony was over and the VIP speakers delivered their messages, players that were chosen for afternoon prospect games got to compete for a chance to really showcase their skills. The major plus for players that attended was

the idea that grasped everybody’s attention, which is that the Seattle Mariners will run a “scout ball” program at Murrieta Mesa for invited high school players later this year. “The high school teams in this area are really good,” Gary Patchett, the Mariners’ Southern California scouting area supervisor said of the Southwest Riverside County teams. “Murrieta Mesa wining the CIF Div. 1 Championship this past year was huge; Temecula Valley winning it three years ago really put the area on the map and then not to mention the other leagues out here, there is just so much talent for it being a very untapped area. We are excited to have a presence here in the near future.”

Local riders gear up as Monster Energy Supercross Championship Series kicks off in Southern California Murrieta’s Jason Anderson thrust himself into the Supercross spotlight last season and finds himself on the leader board in fourth place after the first race of the 2017 series. Currently in 10th place on the leader board, Menifee’s Cooper Webb comes into the 2017 Supercross series with a title on his mind. Jeff Kardas photos

ANAHEIM – Monster Energy Supercross, an FIM World Championship, is back as fearless athletes, including four from the valley, chase victory in two racing events held at Angel Stadium in the most physically and mentally demanding sport on the planet. For more than 40 years Monster Energy Supercross has thrilled audiences of all ages, continually positioned as one of the world’s fastest growing sports. The world’s premier off-road motorcycle championship series hit Anaheim Saturday, Jan. 7, for the annual debut race of the 2017 season (followed by a second Anaheim racing event scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 21) and opened to a sold-out crowd of 45,050 fans inside Angel Stadium. This 17-race battle to crown a champion features the ultimate battle of man and machine, highlighted by a star-studded international field of competitors chasing the sport’s most

sought after trophy. For two actionpacked events, fans throughout the greater Los Angeles/Orange County area will have the chance to watch reigning back-to-back champion Ryan Dungey in his quest to claim a third straight title, fighting to fend off his fiercest rivals inside Angel Stadium. Competitors from at least nine different countries have chased their supercross dream onto U.S. soil for 2017 and local competitors Weston Peick (Wildomar; Suzuki), Cooper Webb (Menifee; Yamaha), Dan Reardon (Menifee; Yamaha) and Jason Anderson (Murrieta; Husqvarna) find themselves among the mix. After dedicating their lives to the pursuit of victory by putting in countless hours both in the gym and on the motorcycle, all are competing for the chance to be called the best in the world. Following the most high profile move of the offseason, Team Honda

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HRC’s Ken Roczen took the checkered flag more than 16 seconds ahead of Dungey, for this third Anaheim opener win in four years. Roczen lead the entirety of the 450SX Class Main Event for his 10th career win, which ties him with Chad Reed and James Stewart for the most Anaheim opener wins of all time. “It’s like I’ve been saying [all week], I’m just bringing that much more focus [into the season] and

I’m super fit,” said Roczen. “I had a lot of fun out there. The track got rough, and since they tamed it down it helped out a lot once it got rough. We’ve got to keep our head on our shoulders, bottom line.” Murrieta’s Jason Anderson had the best placing by taking fourth in the 450SX Class Results, Peick placed eighth overall and Cooper Webb rounded out the field with a tenth place finish.

In the Western Regional 250SX Class Main Event, Troy Lee Designs/ Red Bull/KTM’s Shane McElrath captured his first career win, also leading the entire race, while Menifee’s Dan Reardon came in seventh.  The 2017 Monster Energy Supercross season continues next Saturday, Jan. 14, with the second round from San Diego’s Petco Park. The action can be seen live on FS1 starting at 7 p.m. PT / 10 p.m. ET. 


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-4

Education

Measure V Citizens’ Oversight Committee calls for applications LAKE ELSINORE – The Lake Elsinore Unified School District governing board is currently seeking qualified community members to serve on an independent Measure V Bond Citizens’ Oversight Committee for the purpose of informing the public on the use of bond proceeds from the district’s Measure

V bond program. At their regular board meeting on Feb. 23, the board will appoint up to 11 individuals to serve for a term of two years, without compensation, not to exceed two consecutive terms. Excluded from membership to the Citizens’ Oversight Committee are district em-

ployees, district officials and any vendor, consultant or contractor of the district. The board is seeking interested individuals from diverse backgrounds including one community business representative, one senior citizen representative, one taxpayer organization represen-

tative, two parent or guardian representatives of children within the district, two parents or guardians who are also active in a parentteacher organization or school site council and four at-large representatives. The application deadline is 4:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 3.

The official application form and information concerning Measure V and the Measure V Citizens’ Oversight Committee can be found on the district’s website at www.leusd.k12.ca.us, or by contacting Dr. Gregory Bowers, assistant superintendent of facilities and operations, at (951) 253-7015.

Voters in San Jacinto Unified School District approved Measure Y to improve local school facilities

The Measure Y campaign team gathers to celebrate their preliminary success on election night. Courtesy photo

SAN JACINTO – Voters in the San Jacinto Unified School District boundary approved Measure Y, a local Proposition 39 general obligation school bond measure for SJUSD facilities and technology upgrades to improve student safety, instruction and learning on Nov.

8. The bond measure required 55 percent voter support, and final official election results for Riverside County were posted Dec. 6, with 72.92 percent voter support for Measure Y. “We thank all the voters for the support we received, because

our schools truly are aging and outdated,” Seth Heeren, SJUSD’s assistant superintendent of business services, said. “We know the state of our classrooms impact teaching and learning, and we need the right tools and surroundings to equip students in and for the 21st century. Now we can really make headway with use of these bond funds.” The district plans to apply for facility funds from the state since the California Public School Facility Bonds Initiative, also known as Proposition 51, was also approved by statewide voters in November. Only districts that pass a local school bond qualify for additional state funding for new construction and upgrades. “It was also important the statewide bond measure was approved because it will really help our local bond measure dollars go further for

our priority projects,” Michael Collins, director of SJUSD’s facilities and operations department, said. “We wanted to be eligible for 50 percent funding for new school construction or 60 percent funding for modernization projects, and we hope to now act quickly to secure those additional funds.” SJUSD Superintendent Diane Perez believes the bond measure effort was so successful because of the district’s significant increase in graduation and college-going rates. “Our local campaign co-chairmen, Mr. Calvin Smith and Mrs. Sandra Peñaloza, did an amazing job of rallying the troops and sharing the great things happening in our schools,” Perez said. “We can’t thank the chairmen enough for their support, as well as our district leadership team that worked many nights and weekends, and I thank

the incredible community of San Jacinto for investing in our kids.” The district formally recognized the campaign supporters at their Board of Trustee regular meeting Tuesday, Dec. 13. Heeren noted that the next step for SJUSD will be to focus on the most critical facilities and technology needs, as well as safety and security upgrades and present the priority project schedule to board for approval. The district will also seek necessary additional members for their authorized bond measures independent citizens’ oversight committee that monitors bond finances to ensure the public on strict use of bond proceeds. For more information about or to apply to be a member of the independent citizens’ oversight committee, contact Mary Diaz at mldiaz@sanjacinto.k12.ca.us.

Biola University names 27 local students to dean’s list LA MIRADA – The following area students were among the 1,575 students who were named to the fall 2016 dean’s list. Biola students are placed on the dean’s list to honor those with a grade-point average of 3.60 or higher while enrolled in 12 or more credit units and whose cumulative grade-point average is at least a 3.20. Zachary Brisson, Jennifer Carrion, Julie Ghironzi, Kenneth Grant, Kylie Kitabjian, Aimee Sanchez, Kathleen Smith and Morgan Smith

of Murrieta were recognized on the dean’s list for their academic efforts. Ian Wanamaker and Emily Jackson from Sun City were named to the dean’s list. From Temecula, Bailee Bac, Logan Bac, Amanda Beshay, Caitie Donovan, Victoria Dunbar, Emily Ednoff, Kelcey Parker, Wilma Peery, Kelsey Post, Jenny Rulison, Melissa Velazquez, Olivia Velazquez, Melissa Way and Moriah Wilson were all honored with

placement on the dean’s list. Margaret Langworthy, Megan Scharpen and Joshua Shirey from Wildomar were also named to the dean’s list. “Inclusion on the Biola dean’s list is an indication that this student is performing exceptionally well in a rigorous academic program,” Patricia Pike, vice provost for undergraduate education, said. “Our dean’s list students are bright, motivated, engaged, competent and personable. They are already

demonstrating the characteristics of success that results from applied intelligence and that will support future endeavors in society, community, career and family life.” Biola University is a leading Christ-centered university in Southern California that offers a premier, nationally ranked education and has been named one of the nation’s up and coming universities by U.S. News & World Report four times in the past five years. Founded in 1908, Biola is committed to

the mission of biblically centered education, scholarship and service equipping men and women in mind and character to impact the world for the Lord Jesus Christ. With more than 6,300 students at its Los Angeles-area campus and around the world, the university offers more than 150 academic programs through its six schools, covering a variety of bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees. For more information, visit www.biola.edu.

Jacob Ray of Murrieta admitted to Cornell College MOUNT VERNON, IOWA – Cornell College is proud to announce Jacob Ray of Murrieta, was admitted for the fall 2017 semester. S e l e c t e d b y C o l l e g e s T-

hatChangeLives.org, Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa, is a national liberal arts college with a distinctive One Course at a Time curriculum. The focused schedule

Teachers See the

provides students the chance to dive into their studies, to focus more intensely on the disciplines of their choice, and to learn authentically, shedding the confines of the traditional classroom to study offcampus, pursue research or accept an internship without missing out on other classes.

Cornell is nationally recognized for its value, including by Kiplinger finance magazine, which included Cornell on its list of the 100 best values in private colleges for 2016, and the Fiske Guide to Colleges, which named Cornell College one of the 24 Best Buys among private colleges. Ninety-three percent of

Cornell graduates earn their degrees in four years. In 2013 Cornell was named one of the 25 colleges with the best professors by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. For more information, visit www.cornellcollege.edu.

Lisa Roundtree of Menifee graduates from Roger Williams University

Possibilities

BRISTOL, RHODE ISLAND – Roger Williams University announced that Lisa Roundtree of Menifee, graduated with a Bachelor of Science in paralegal studies in August 2016. With campuses on the coast of Bristol and in the heart of Providence, Rhode Island, Roger Williams University is a forward-

In Jennifer Swanson’s high school English class, seniors master material that prepares them for college and careers, gaining writing and communication skills to benefit them throughout their lives.

thinking private university committed to strengthening society through engaged teaching and learning. At Roger Williams University, small classes, direct access to faculty and guaranteed opportunity for realworld projects ensure that its nearly 4,000 undergraduates - along with hundreds of law students, graduate students and adult learners - gradu-

ate with the ability to think critically along with the practical skills that today’s employers demand. Roger Williams is leading the way in American higher education, confronting the most pressing issues facing students and families - increasing costs, rising debt and job readiness.

Wadstrom inducted into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi BATON ROUGE – Sarah Wadstrom of Canyon Lake, California, was recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the one of the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Wadstrom was initiated at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Science in Boston, Massachusetts. Wadstrom is among approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni to be

Arroyo High School, Expository English Class, Teacher: Jennifer Swanson ’96, M.A.Ed. ’99

Azusa Pacific’s School of Education prepares educators like Jennifer to see and cultivate the potential in every student. Graduates go on to make a lasting difference as creative, collaborative professionals and dedicated advocates for those they serve. Qualified educators are needed as never before to help meet a growing shortage in California. Start your degree or credential in education at APU’s Murrieta Regional Campus, and become the next great teacher, counselor, or administrator who transforms lives.

sity of Maine and headquartered in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society. The society has chapters on more than 300 college and university campuses in North America and the Philippines. Its mission is “to recognize and promote academic excellence in all fields of higher education and to engage the community of scholars in service to others.”

Ogin graduates Air Force basic training SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS – U.S. Air Force Airman Gregory J. Ogin graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland in San Antonio, Texas. Ogin is the son of Wayne A. and Linda L. Ogin of Temecula. He is

Programs available online and at

6

initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction. Founded in 1897 at the Univer-

locations throughout Southern California

Attend an information meeting on January 26 at 6 p.m. at the Murrieta Regional Campus, located on Murrieta Hot Springs Road.

a 2013 graduate of Chaparral High School, Temecula. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic

warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Vista Murrieta High School graduate inducted into National Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society

Register today at apu.edu/education/meetings/.

School of Education apu.edu/explore/education

20260

HAMILTON, N.Y. – Colgate University is proud to announce its newest members of the Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society. John Bennett of Murrieta is one of 118 Colgate students in the class of 2019 inducted into the honor society this year.

Phi Eta Sigma, with chapters on 378 campuses nationwide, is the country’s oldest and largest honor society for first-year college and university students in all disciplines. Colgate offers 54 majors to a diverse student body of approximate-

ly 2,900 undergraduate students, and supports 25 Division I athletic teams. The university’s 575-acre campus in rural central New York is renowned for its beauty and for the important role it plays in the student experience.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-5

Health

Learn to protect yourself and loved ones from strokes

Dr. Terry A. Rondberg Special to Valley News

Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke. Forty more seconds, another stroke. More than 795,000 strokes each year. Of these, more than 140,000 people die, making strokes the third leading cause of death in the country. According to the National Stroke Association, we could easily slash

that number by at least 80 percent - right now! Yet, the answer to prevention isn’t in drugs or surgery. Medicines have proved to be dismal failures in avoiding strokes, especially the popular use of statin therapy. Despite the fact that the drug industry sold more than $14 billion in statins in 2015, more than a dozen studies have shown that when used for prevention of strokes in otherwise healthy people with no personal history or symptoms of heart disease, statins do very little, if anything, to prevent a heart attack or stroke. They do, however, pose major health risks. In 2013, the Food and Drug Administration issued new warnings about statins, noting they can cause cognitive or brain-related impairment, such as memory loss, forgetfulness and confusion; an increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of Type 2 diabetes; and an increased risk of muscle damage. Other medical approaches have been equally ineffective and dangerous. In May 2013, the government stopped a medical stroke study of different treatments for a brain condition that can cause strokes. Early

results suggested invasive therapies were riskier than previously thought. “From what we can see, our current methods of intervention may pose a greater hazard for health than letting the natural history run itself out,” Columbia University neurologist Dr. Jay Mohr said. He is one of the lead researchers. If we can’t protect ourselves with drugs, how do we prevent strokes? Experts all agree; patients can improve their health by following a wellness lifestyle, improving overall health and well-being, and strengthening the body’s immune system. The human body is remarkably capable of warding off diseases when allowed to do so with the aid of good diet to control weight, cholesterol and blood pressure; stress management techniques to relieve physical, mental and emotional tension; and immediately stopping unhealthy habits like smoking, drug use and drinking alcohol. In recent years, the health community has discovered another important factor: a strong immune system. For a long time, stroke and other injuries to the brain were associated with inflammation caused by a reaction of the body’s immune

system. This association led to the use of drugs specifically meant to weaken or hinder the immune system. Recent brain research is proving that theory totally wrong. Most notable is the work of a team of scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, led by Professor Michal Schwartz of the Neurobiology Department. “My group … decided to re-examine the assumption that the brain is hurt by any immune activity, because it didn’t make sense,” Schwartz said. Their findings, published in Nature Neuroscience, found that immune cells contribute to maintaining the brain’s ability to maintain cognitive ability and cell renewal throughout life. They also found that immune cells might also be key players in the body’s maintenance of the normal healthy brain. That’s good news for potential stroke victims. Maintaining a strong immune system as well as elevating overall well-being levels takes a multi-disciplinary approach. One component of that approach is energy medicine; specifically, a scientific method I developed for correcting interference in muscles, fascia, nerve, and blood vessels in the sub-occipital muscles

of the upper neck. Relieving this brainstem tension allows your body to function more efficiently and increase your total well-being. It can also strengthen your immune system which can prevent many diseases and conditions, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and stroke, etc. The fact is drugs or surgery should always be the last resort. I believe it is wise to be proactive and protect patients by encouraging a wellness lifestyle. For more information on wellness care, visit www.temeculawellnesscenter.com or call Temecula Wellness Center at (951) 699-5000. For over 40 years, Dr. Terry A. Rondberg, owner of the Temecula Wellness Center and bestselling author, has utilized chiropractic, acupuncture and Ayurvedic  medicine to heal people. He earned a diploma in energy medicine, where he developed a cutting-edge system using the latest technologies in neuroscience, bioenergy and nutrition to help people of all ages achieve maximum health and fight chronic illnesses and pain.  For more health news and unique stories, or to comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

Prepare for Medicare Part A and B price changes in 2017 Nathaniel Sillin Special to Valley News

If you’re eligible for Medicare or will be in the coming year, there are a few changes you should know about for 2017. An increase in the Department of Labor’s Consumer Price Index means there’ll be an increase in Social Security benefits and Medicare Part B premiums. For most recipients the increases almost offset each other, but those who aren’t covered by the “hold harmless” provision, about 30 percent of recipients, face a larger Part B premium increase. These changes, along with several others, will go into effect soon, and you should consider how they could affect your budget. Since 1975, Social Security ben-

efits have had an automatic cost-ofliving adjustment. The adjustment depends on the CPI and helps keep your benefits in line with the rising cost of goods. There wasn’t a COLA for 2016 benefits, but there is a 0.3 percent adjustment for next year. Meaning, you’ll get an additional $3 per $1,000 you receive in benefits. The estimated average monthly benefit for all retired workers is expected to increase $5, from $1,355 to $1,360. The COLA also affects Medicare Part B premiums, the part of Medicare that covers some types of procedures and medical equipment. However, for about 70 percent of Medicare recipients, the Social Security Act’s “hold harmless” provision prohibits an increase to Medicare B premiums of more than the previous year’s COLA

adjustment. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, “hold harmless” recipients will pay $109 per month, an increase of $4.10. If you aren’t in the “hold harmless” group, Part B premiums could increase by about 10 percent. You could fall into that group if you are a new enrollee, are enrolled in Medicare but don’t receive Social Security benefits, get billed directly for Medicare Part B, receive Medicare and Medicaid benefits and your state Medicaid programs pay your Part B premium or are a high-income earner subject to an income-adjusted premium. For people not under the “hold harmless” provision, the premium depends on the recipient’s or couple’s, when filing a joint tax return,

New study underway for heart attack care

A new clinical trial aims to reduce damage to the heart from heart attacks. Courtesy photo

LA JOLLA – A physician at Scripps Health Prebys Cardiovascular Institute has become the first in the Western United States to treat heart attack patients with a new supersaturated oxygen system in an attempt to reduce permanent damage to their heart muscle. The recent treatments of two San Diego men were part of an ongoing clinical trial examining the effectiveness of the experimental SSO2 system and technique in combination with angioplasty, stenting and medication. Scripps is the only site in California participating in the nationwide study called IC-HOT or Evaluation of Intracoronary Hyperoxemic Oxygen Therapy. “A heart attack is like a house fire, the longer it takes to put it out, the more structural damage that is done,” Dr. John C. Harrington said. “By infusing higher concentrations of oxygen into the artery responsible for the heart attack, we can decrease the size of the area of heart muscle that is damaged because it is deprived of oxygen.” Harrington is the interventional cardiologist leading the study at Scripps. Every year nearly 1 million people in the United States have a heart attack, typically caused when the blood flow carrying oxygen to the heart is reduced or blocked. Although the standard for heart attack care is angioplasty and stenting, for many patients those treatments aren’t enough to salvage dead or damaged heart tissue that was starved of oxygen. During SSO2 therapy, developed by the Irvine biotechnology company TherOx, saline is drawn into a chamber in a disposable cartridge inserted into the treatment system. Supersaturated oxygen is sprayed into a second chamber and mixed with the saline. The patient’s

blood is circulated through a third chamber where it mixes with the SSO2 saline. The blood-oxygensaline solution is then directed by catheter into the patient’s coronary artery where it infuses the capillary bed and surrounding heart tissue. The procedure takes about one hour. The IC-HOT study seeks to enroll 100 patients who suffer their first heart attack and receive SSO2 treatment within six hours of first experiencing symptoms. The study’s primary aim is to validate the safety and effectiveness of the therapy system. Enrollment is expected to be completed by February 2017. In a previous trial of an earlier generation of the TherOx system which didn’t involve Scripps Health, heart attack patients experienced a median reduction of 26 percent in the size of the damaged area of their heart muscle tissue compared to angioplasty and stenting alone. The treatment of heart attacks has advanced greatly over the past few

decades, leading to improvements in mortality rates and decreased hospital stays. Minimally invasive catheter procedures, which deliver stents, angioplasty balloons and other treatments to the heart through veins and arteries, have greatly reduced the need for open heart surgeries. Still, more needs to be done. Patients with nearly identical characteristics, including age, risk factors and cardiovascular muscle damage from the same type of heart attack, can receive the same treatment but experience very different outcomes. “One patient may have preserved heart function while the other may have a large area of heart tissue death,” Harrington said. “Clearly there are additional factors that need to be explored to reduce heart muscle damage. The hope is that people receiving SSO2 treatment will leave the hospital with a less damaged heart.”

adjusted gross income. The lowest monthly premium for individuals who have an AGI of $85,000 or less or for couples with an AGI of $170,000 or less will increase from $121.80 to $134 a month per person. On the high end, for recipients with an AGI over $214,000 or for couples with an AGI over $428,000 the monthly premium will increase from $389.80 to $428.60 per person. Most people don’t have to pay Medicare Part A premiums, but you could still have to pay a deductible or coinsurance for some Part A benefits. The deductible for inpatient hospital coverage, which helps cover the first 60 days of care, will increase from $1,288 to $1,316 per benefit period. Daily coinsurance for the 61st through 90th day of treatment will increase from $322 to $329. Daily coinsurance for day 91 on will rise from $644 to $658.

Each day past day 90 counts toward your lifetime reserve. You have a maximum of 60 lifetime reserve days; after which you could be responsible for all costs. Skilled nursing facility care is completely covered for your first 20 days. Daily coinsurance for day 21 to 100 of skilled nursing care will increase to $164.50. You could be responsible for all costs beyond day 100. The Part B annual deductible will also increase, from $166 to $183. Generally, after you’ve met your deductible, you’ll pay 20 percent of Medicare-approved costs for services covered by Part B. The bottom line is Social Security benefits, Medicare Part B premiums and Part A and B deductibles and coinsurance will increase in 2017. Whether you’re covered by the “hold harmless” provision or not, take steps to understand which changes could affect you and alter your budget accordingly.

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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-6

Business

Visit Temecula Valley elects 2017 executive board and directors TEMECULA – Members of Visit Temecula Valley, the region’s official tourism-marketing organization and resource for visitors, recently elected the 2017 executive board to serve one-year terms. VTV members also re-elected incumbent directors for three-year terms. VTV members named Cherise Manning of A Grape Escape Balloon Adventure as chairman of the executive board. The additional 2017 executive board members selected are John Kelliher of Grapeline Wine Tours as first vice chairman, Ken Westmyer of Quality Inn Temecula Valley Wine Country as first vice chairman of the Tourism Improvement District advisory board, Scott Wilson of Pechanga Resort and Casino as second vice chairman, Bill Wilson of Wilson Creek Winery as treasurer and Melody Brunsting of Melody’s Ad Works as secretary. The 2016 chairman of the board, Tom DeMott of Temecula Creek Inn, continues in 2017 as a VTV board director. Re-elected to the board were incumbents Robert Renzoni of Robert Renzoni Vineyards, Ken Smith of Galway Downs and Jan Smith of Inland Management Group. The 2017 VTV board also includes Kim Baily of Baily’s Old Town Temecula, Kym Espinosa

of Promenade Temecula, Denis Ferguson of Net Result Hospitality & Development Group, Kathy Lindeman of Holiday Inn Express Temecula, Crystal Magon of South Coast Winery Resort & Spa, Marie Pranger of Springhill Suites by Marriott Temecula Wine Country, Carlos Palma of Palomar Inn Hotel and Greg Roberts of Embassy Suites by Hilton Temecula Valley Wine Country. Welcoming 2.7 million visitors each year, the Temecula Valley tourism industry had a 2015 economic impact of total direct travel spending by visitors into the local economy of $696 million. This impact represented a 4.7 percent increase over 2014. Supporting nearly 7,400 jobs, Temecula Valley tourism generated earnings of a record $237 million, a 6.9 percent increase. The VTV board votes on organization decisions, oversees the financials and activities of the nonprofit organization and represents stakeholders to provide compelling reasons to visit and stay the night. All board members contribute to the 501(c) (6) nonprofit organization on a volunteer basis. In 2008, the governing board of the then, Temecula Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau implemented the branding initiative,

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Visit Temecula Valley elects their 2017 executive board: Cherise Manning of A Grape Escape Balloon Adventure, Ken Westmyer of Quality Inn Temecula Valley Wine country, Scott Wilson of Pechanga Resort and Casino, Bill Wilson of Wilson Creek Winery, Melody Brunsting of Melody’s Ad Works and Tom DeMott of Temecula Creek Inn. Courtesy photo

Temecula Valley Southern California Wine Country. It has proven very effective in attracting visitors including high-value, culinary travelers who use their discretionary income to enjoy food, wine and related activities, thereby infusing monies directly into the local Temecula Valley economy. In 2014, companion to the 10year anniversary celebration of

Karyn Vaughn, E.A. Special to Valley News

Business owners beware. Several filing deadlines have changed beginning this month. Forms W-2, 1099, 1065 (Return of Partnership Income) and 1120 (Corporate Tax Return) all have new due dates. These changes are accompanied by higher penalties for late filing or non-filing. The logic behind these changes is

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Visit Temecula Valley is online at www.VisitTemeculaValley.com. The Temecula Valley Visitors Center is located in downtown, Old Town Temecula at Third Street and Mercedes Street and adjacent the Old Town Temecula public parking garage. To learn about VTV membership, please call (888) 363-2852 or (951) 491-6085.

The Tax Lady, earlier due dates for businesses

Guess What’s Dropping In!

Volume two

the TVCVB organization, the governing board unveiled the new Visit Temecula Valley corporate identity. Like Visit California in 2011, Visit Napa Valley in 2012, and Visit Santa Barbara in 2013, the new moniker establishes a better focus, is easier to remember, and helps create desire to discover and experience all that Temecula Valley has to offer.

to provide the IRS with more timely information for data matching in its campaign to combat fraudulent refunds. Under the previous rules, some taxpayers were receiving refunds before their W-2s had reached the IRS. If there was a mismatch of data or a completely fabricated return, the information was coming too late to prevent the fraud. Form W-2 has always been due to employees by Jan. 31, but employers previously had an additional 30 to 60 days to file them. That deadline has just moved and now coincides with the date the form is provided to the employee, Jan. 31. Extensions will now be granted only in extraordinary circumstances or catastrophe and in IRS-speak that mean almost never. Form 1099-MISC is also now due to the IRS by Jan. 31 when reporting nonemployee compensation payments in box 7. This change would primarily include payments to self-employed persons. When reporting rents or other payments not in box 7, the deadline is still March 31 to file electronically. Additionally, penalties for late filing of form 1099 will double from their previous level. The penalty for non-filing of 1099s will increase from $100 to $250 per form. If the non-filing is considered intentional, the penalty jumps to $500 per form. This penalty can add up very quickly, so please observe the obligation to file 1099s and be sure to do it on time. The Return of Partnership Income was due April 15 in the past; it is now due March 15. This change is helpful to partners who

wish to file their personal returns without an extension. Often the Form K-1 from the partnership caused a delay for the individual return, but the 30-day leeway will now help with this problem. The previous due date for corporate tax returns was March 15; it has now been moved to April 15. In the case of an S-Corporation, the same situation applies as to partnerships. The individual taxpayer needs the Form K-1 from the corporation to file the personal tax return. This method worked well when the due date was March 15. The logic of moving it to April 15 is a bit of a mystery to everyone. Perhaps with the change in the Form 1065 due date, the IRS believed that tax preparers would rebel with early due dates for all business returns. Be sure to contact the payroll service or professional adviser early this year to get these forms filed timely. Many businesses will be unaware of the changes until the deadline is very close, and there could be a backlog to get the assistance needed. For a do-it-yourself paper filer, buy those red 1099 and W-2 forms soon. Karyn Vaughn is an Enrolled Agent and business consultant. She has been helping taxpayers for 30 years. She has extensive experience in tax matters for individuals, corporations, partnerships, LLCs, trusts, estates and IRS settlements. Her status as an E.A. allows her to practice in all 50 states and to represent taxpayers before the IRS. To submit tax questions for this column, email Karyn Vaughn at karyn@karynvaughn.com or visit www.karynvaughn.com.

Metropolitan Water District approves preliminary design for Lake Mathews Disaster Recovery Facility upgrades Joe Naiman janiman@reedermedia.com

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California approved the preliminary design phase for upgrades to the Lake Mathews Disaster Recovery Facility. The Dec. 13, MWD board action also appropriated $250,000 for that work and found that the upgrade of existing facilities was categorically exempt from California Environmental Quality Act review. The planned upgrades include structural strengthening of the roof connections, bracing of the interior walls, and slope stabilization at the building’s perimeter. The Lake Mathews Disaster Recovery Facility houses electrical switchgear, telecommunication hardware and information technology servers and equipment. The purpose of the facility is to provide off-site information backup in case the information technology systems at MWD headquarters in Los Angeles are out of service. The facility consists of a 1,600 square foot masonry building with a flat steel roof and includes a data center which houses telecommunications and computer equipment along with servers and an electrical room which houses an uninterruptible power supply for the data

center. The facility also supplies power to the Lake Mathews administration building and to the lake’s junction shaft. A seismic assessment conducted in 2013 revealed that the building could be damaged if a major earthquake occurs. The facility is also only 8 feet away from the edge of a 50-foot-tall slope. The crest of the slope has eroded over the years, and unless the erosion is curtailed, the foundation of the Lake Mathews Disaster Recovery Facility building could be compromised. The preliminary design phase activities include geotechnical investigations, preparation of conceptual layout drawings, development of a construction cost estimate and preparation of environmental documentation. GeoPentech will perform the geotechnical investigations which will include drilling test borings, laboratory testing and assessing potential hazards such as landslides and slope instability.  MWD staff will perform the other design-related activities. The $250,000-appropriated amount will cover $184,000 for the technical activities, $30,000 for project management and $36,000 for contingency. The preliminary design phase is expected to be completed in August 2017.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

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Valley News July 1, Anza Comm Elecown that ll High Schoo stude nt l to thements pment on the y by the Anza SpeciaInvest for to qualif Bonsa hosted sponsored by Neighbors! will be room s Ranch develo nt ber s and signatures differe Hall and . Danny Stones Tri-Ti p Novem A-4 have class enough s a for littlethe Hello hadFriend evdiscus ive OT, page tric Co-opup his famou or until which San Diego ht I’d initiat and oneThe aboutvisor s Thougthe see BALL cooki ng from 6 to 9 p.m.get there electi on. this week to know of Super to topic 2016 ertyneeds a Board ent or tools barbecueTip runs out so t report ery garden equipm Counwhat comes with t ation d an impac . the Tridesser the meal garden and that’s of has ordere onal inform in the B-1 offi- early. 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Banta West-Marine CorpsMargarita Ranch $1.75 and Spring Cente r, reside familyate public it’s importin their Edward As aadequ Triplett and a kind and with a county’s unity see SERV 11,000 Santa ations anniversary years, Gen. should local the Comm g. nearly today at ry is golden2 meetin e living onso the t their Corps Brig.Marine Corps Install caring son ian young manson had left the Lake out of luck city positi Sale at more than a dozen ceremony to do Tim O’Lea Aug. to continuin a nce art and commitmen Marine within ofU.S. l, ct,” said Writer notassista projehelp command allow them ous Christ She said her Lord and Canyon ency occur that that brought “I’m receive ds of pieces Saturday, do and anding genera a change of July 15. ensure . “I Staff ve thisInc.ecan homesto life to the – the second big heart.” . She an emerg at Home, appro artists, hundres to the show comm ton, ained.” were ce during distinguished . Jacob Diann reward ed by Tem- rededicated his out to others ers this on matter States. safely. Rightvisor the artists es maintattendance were included Lt. the audien on Camp Pendle $25,000 many visitor puttingB-3 ng s with this g Marin In Most of sales and were west United today.”A kind to be approv years – has was reachi both been membh in which ic Site however, Gen. Super see page June 11. Histor had show – South all about trainin ry guests r, Maj. familiesupport, ber ballot but not noted es and Churc of its past two next with their “It’s of familiall the milita David H. Berge Brig. Gen. ETON information said they at the Bridge Cox over the L happy forward to the Novem D key care N ecula the Greg who not PE is d for rotta, Banta Gen. taking man have for years Adm. looking appealed C A M P Edwa rd D. Marine and Super visor tted initiativecount . been y offerea 24-year-old ay of his Temecula. sure we do that now Lewis A. Crapaey and Rear the spring of consubmi letter also makin g at the center d artist for Sut whoGen. command of not only ved by in case Brig. that the ,” Banta Thomas Weidl in the doorw Triplett’s il’s public safety Marine resources to ing and Gayle The feature tiona l was appro uished Rich. in the future was) killed Debra relinqms mediu is still to the counc ations West, eton, to n of MCI- Markham of the tradi to the what rtmen t of Plann (PDS still ent. to do that her art – which show was apartm rer(s) is Servi ces Corpsgs,Install Camp Pendl during but about the missio Depa paintin reward ized after Old cerns. many of ing eton. In lieu n of flowe rs ula,” the murde showed ceramics, oil and as lopm ent sam-Base y’s Plann The first generals’ and J. Killea Camp Pendl at said Corps “To date, streets of Temec was author ment is friends prese ntatio incominga n t a a n d Deve and the count s. Kevin and ceremony , West, MCB includingvase sculptures finisheGen. active – ants and pressed the wandering the are not safe!” ng ing and next assign Support B Brig. staff . one of comm Ranch House intricate murals and fauxartists Banta’s rt of Resolute rt is a outgo s e s , M o l l y d to have a tions from Town merch musician recent wrote. “We she is worki s Commission r a chang electe are varia of a slain an action. 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Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-8

Real Estate / Home & Garden Recent Home Sales

List of transactions from selected cities in Southwest Riverside County • 138 closed transactions for 1/2/17 - 1/8/17.

www.srcar.org • (951) 894-2571 Murrieta 26529 Jefferson Ave.

Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce’s 2015 “Sterling Business of the Year” Murrieta Chamber of Commerce’s 2014 "Medium Size Business of the Year" City

Address

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

Anza

39860 El Toro Road

$177,000

1248

3BR

2BA

29

Canyon Lake

24298 Cruise Circle Drive

$440,000

1631

3BR

2BA

30311 Clear Water Drive

$532,000

2254

3BR

2BA

22158 Crusader Place

$327,000

1592

3BR

2BA

29831 Sloop Drive

$379,000

1498

3BR

44675 Bantam Way

$115,000

1248

23981 Warren Road

$427,500

1058

3103 Elder Way

$214,000

1392

Hemet

Lake Elsinore

Menifee

Hemet 2355 E. Florida

Menifee 27070 Sun City Blvd.

City

Address

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

City

Address

Sale Price

Sq. Ft.

Bedrooms

Bath

Days on Market

Menifee

28771 Escalante Road

$340,000

2795

4BR

3BA

9

Temecula

40643 Baccarat Road

$699,000

3062

4BR

3BA

111

165

29339 Starring Lane

$363,000

2824

4BR

3BA

83

43127 Avenida Cielo

$324,000

1523

155

26565 Lazy Creek Road

$270,000

1236

3BR

2BA

68

40194 Gallatin Court

$405,000

1774

3BR

3BA

144

3BR

3BA

41

29134 Lakehurst Court

$345,000

2201

3BR

3BA

58

43020 Bigh

$525,000

2939

43

5BR

3BA

137

2BA

14

26765 China Drive

$249,900

1427

2BR

2BA

3

32030 Woodside Court

$490,000

3293

4BR

4BA

147

2BR

2BA

144

28723 Broadstone Way

$241,694

1273

2BR

2BA

6

44019 Rivo Court

2BR

1BA

20

28073 Whittington Road

$360,000

2516

5BR

3BA

6

39600 Parkview Drive

$319,000

1319

3BR

3BA

61

$452,500

3468

4BR

4BA

3BR

2BA

151

29250 Annandale Road

$244,000

1408

3BR

2BA

4

99

32385 Gardner Drive

$293,000

1400

3BR

2BA

50

41940 Whittier Avenue

$230,000

1425

3BR

2BA

147

30401 Pine Creek Drive

$297,000

1342

3BR

2BA

9

39482 Seraphina Road

$392,100

1827

4BR

2BA

29

5613 Corte Heraldo

$359,000

2030

3BR

2BA

96

28348 Little Lake Court

$390,000

2730

3BR

3BA

17

31462 Pennant Court

$460,000

2874

4BR

3BA

53

1921 Balsawood Drive

$234,900

1700

3BR

2BA

37

39315 CALLE DE SUENOS

$1,700,000

6690

6BR

8BA

63

42056 Calabria Drive

$334,900

1855

3BR

3BA

22

320 Acacia Avenue

$171,000

956

2BR

1BA

50

38561 Calle De La Siesta

$228,000

1440

2BR

2BA

140

41676 Avenida De La Reina

$380,000

1788

3BR

3BA

47

2383 Garland Way

$250,000

1551

3BR

3BA

7

22944 Montanya Place

$465,600

3646

6BR

4BA

119

31929 Calle Espinosa

$375,000

1508

3BR

3BA

20

3612 Chianti Drive

$265,000

2360

4BR

3BA

51

28187 Amaryliss Way

$380,000

2301

4BR

3BA

42

42985 Corte Cabrera

$350,000

1300

3BR

2BA

84

4315 Amber Ridge Lane

$228,000

1376

3BR

2BA

64

$465,000

2095

3BR

2BA

71

45298 CALLESITO BURGOS

$435,000

2693

4BR

3BA

54

741 Johnston Avenue

$129,900

1139

2BR

2BA

14

42744 Mountain Shadow Road

37

30

37

2BA

3BA

4BA

3BR

5BR

4BR

1277

2337

1700

$319,900

$440,000

$374,000

23739 Cork Oak Circle

32245 Placer Belair

46875 Garrett Drive

13

28

43

1BA

3BA

3BA

2BR

4BR

3BR

912

2156

1753

$113,000

$390,000

$350,000

1560 Westwood Place

23864 Castinette Way

31839 Green Oak Way

24022 Via Astuto

$295,000

1230

3BR

2BA

15

38320 Liefer Road

$399,500

1860

3BR

2BA

10

38211 Via La Colina

$259,000

1512

2BR

2BA

41

27415 Lock Haven Court

$370,000

2147

3BR

3BA

26

40972 Oak Creek Road

$456,000

3606

5BR

3BA

7

30795 Avenida Buena Suerte

$579,000

2165

3BR

2BA

68

25144 Corte Pico

$408,300

2253

4BR

3BA

9

42075 Sweetshade Lane

$231,000

1235

3BR

2BA

2

37521 Vineyard Knoll Drive

$365,000

1858

3BR

3BA

22

41874 Vardon Drive

$375,000

1760

3BR

2BA

2

39753 Princeton Way

$275,000

1654

3BR

3BA

7

31847 Via Tafalla

$396,000

1935

4BR

3BA

55

26442 Oaklington Road

$425,000

2736

5BR

3BA

11

31191 Mountain Lilac Way

$265,000

1104

2BR

2BA

7

30110 Redding Avenue

$505,000

4506

5BR

5BA

19

45644 Rainbow Canyon Road

$349,900

1342

3BR

2BA

10

27230 Red Maple Street

$509,000

3532

5BR

3BA

7

42614 Remora Street

$315,000

1444

3BR

2BA

20

37669 Sprucewood Lane

$405,000

2570

4BR

3BA

16

40277 Atmore Court

$395,000

2000

4BR

3BA

4

40295 Via Ambiente

$323,000

1263

3BR

2BA

48

44957 Checkerbloom Drive

$393,500

1807

3BR

3BA

5

26956 St Julian Circle

$422,900

2052

4BR

3BA

4

42822 Santa Suzanne Place

$400,000

2028

4BR

3BA

1

24738 Leafwood Drive

$310,000

1828

3BR

3BA

11

31271 David Lane

$235,000

1101

2BR

2BA

35

36378 Provence Drive

$415,000

2173

5BR

4BA

5

44023 Rivo Court

$325,000

1218

3BR

3BA

15

401 Brinton Street

$110,000

976

2BR

1BA

146

31099 Camino Del Este

$303,400

1120

3BR

2BA

28

2114 Possum Court

$278,000

2723

4BR

3BA

20

1986 Portal Drive

$253,900

1869

4BR

3BA

74

3052 Coffeeberry Way

$320,900

3322

5BR

4BA

74

1873 Villines Avenue

$280,000

2553

4BR

2BA

9

178 Pico Avenue

$162,000

876

2BR

1BA

47

2854 Burgundy Lace Lane

$330,000

3704

5BR

5BA

4

247 Quandt Ranch Road

$193,000

1154

3BR

2BA

33

1159 Navajo Court

$211,389

2214

4BR

3BA

7

691 5th Street

$18,100

3248

4BR

5BA

11

29076 Waverly Drive

$167,923

1618

3BR

2BA

15

29767 Fox Creek Drive

$365,000

2630

4BR

3BA

126

26704 Oakmont Drive

$240,000

1596

2BR

2BA

59

28550 Delphinus Drive

$285,000

1522

4BR

2BA

7

26704 Oakmont Drive

$240,000

1596

2BR

2BA

10

45405 Calle La Paz

$570,000

2954

4BR

3BA

331

260 San Carlos Drive

$45,000

960

2BR

1BA

2

43089 Babcock Avenue

$235,000

1902

3BR

2BA

12

4715 Shasta Blue Lane

$304,000

3082

5BR

3BA

7

876 Aria Road

$247,000

2020

4BR

2BA

17

440 Thornton Avenue

$165,000

1508

3BR

2BA

21

4355 Hollyvale Lane

$260,000

2137

5BR

3BA

0

2393 San Arturo Avenue

$116,000

827

2BR

1BA

4

17696 Sutherland Avenue

$245,000

1384

3BR

2BA

101

3257 Mountain Street

$348,000

2330

4BR

3BA

49

35403 Foxwood Court

$390,000

3230

5BR

3BA

76

268 Broadway Street

$220,000

1206

3BR

2BA

17

36400 Lantana Court

$380,000

3066

5BR

3BA

116

31675 Rockridge Circle

$337,250

2647

4BR

3BA

53

39563 Strada Scala

$371,745

2487

4BR

3BA

45

15632 Vista Way

$215,000

1386

3BR

3BA

43

17370 Mcbride Avenue

$210,000

1176

3BR

2BA

40

15160 Coral Court

$337,000

1901

4BR

3BA

30

32875 Winnepeg Place

$275,000

1274

4BR

2BA

22

234 White Oak Road

$242,250

1316

3BR

2BA

22

17625 Sutherland Avenue

$217,000

1044

2BR

1BA

24

404 Franklin Street

$250,000

1007

3BR

1BA

58

4158 Alderwood Place

$410,000

2852

4BR

3BA

5

34290 Woodmont

$305,000

1767

4BR

3BA

4

31586 MILLCREEK Drive

$365,000

2382

4BR

3BA

78

29201 Overboard Drive

$313,000

1650

3BR

2BA

134

33296 Lazurite Way

$355,000

3098

4BR

3BA

107

30587 Spring Lake Way

$307,500

1655

3BR

3BA

76

27828 Whittington Road

$370,000

2877

4BR

3BA

77

29810 Garden Grove Drive

$450,000

3794

5BR

4BA

33

32735 Tucker Road

$382,000

1792

3BR

2BA

17

Murrieta

San Jacinto

Sun City

Temecula

Wildomar

35962 Butchart Street

$470,000

3620

5BR

3BA

166

20691 Donielle Court

$511,000

2784

4BR

3BA

60

35796 Country Park Drive

$365,000

2635

4BR

3BA

32

35665 Balsam Street

$351,500

1670

3BR

2BA

69

33609 Tamerron Way

$323,900

1875

4BR

3BA

28

35230 Portola Place

$465,000

3217

5BR

3BA

51

21233 Vine Street

$259,000

1708

3BR

2BA

5

22392 Hillshore Court

$265,000

965

3BR

2BA

10

35760 Iodine Springs Road

$495,000

2744

4BR

2BA

18

34508 The Farm Road

$255,900

1380

3BR

2BA

1

34612 Rye Lane

$378,888

1492

3BR

2BA

5

Water districts’ savings rebound in November, officials say RIVERSIDE – A half-dozen water agencies in Riverside County conserved more water in November compared to a year ago, according to recently released figures. Of 21 agencies reporting, the cities of Hemet, Indio and Norco, along with the Coachella Valley Water District, the Eastern Municipal Water District and the Lake Hemet Municipal Water District, achieved a higher rate of conservation compared to the same period in 2015. The numbers represent how much water was saved using November 2013 as the base period against which all measurements are compared, un-

der a formula established by the State Water Resources Control Board. The majority of water agencies countywide were within 10 percentage points of their previous year-over-year savings. However, in a few cases, agencies were off by double digits. The largest disparity was recorded by the city of Perris, which was nearly 18 percentage points below its year-ago savings. The BeaumontCherry Valley Water District was next, with a 14 percent gap. The Temecula-based Mission Springs Water District’s conservation rate was not even a whole number,

Metal Roofing • Shade Covers • Steel Buildings •

but that figure, -8.1 percent, was close to what had been recorded at the same time in 2015. The Idyllwild Water District, the Salton Community Services Water District and the San Gorgonio Pass Water Agency are not counted in the state’s tally. Those agencies don’t serve enough customers – fewer than 3,000 each – and hence are exempted by the state from consumption reports. Drops in monthly water savings have been expected after hundreds of agencies statewide began resetting their conservation standards based on results of so-called “stress tests” in June. The tests gauged whether agencies could “bank” enough water to meet demand in the event of another three “dry years” with below-average

precipitation during California’s rainy season. State Water Board Chairwoman Felicia Marcus said the latest results statewide revealed “Californians are continuing to conserve.” According to the State Water Resources Control Board, statewide water savings totaled 18.8 percent in November, compared to 19.6 percent in October and 20.2 percent in November 2015, all of which was measured against consumption levels in the same months of 2013. The cumulative savings between June 2015 and November 2016 was 2.35 million acrefeet or 764.8 billion gallons of water. In April 2015, Gov. Jerry Brown issued an executive order mandating a 25 percent reduction in state

water use until Feb. 29 of this year. The statewide target fell just short, coming in at 23.9 percent. Brown issued a revised order toward the end of last winter that kept mandatory cuts in place, but with modified conservation targets that more closely reflected individual agencies’ supply and demand realities. The new self-determined targets came into being thanks to the stress tests and will remain in effect until February. Ordinances enacted by the water board based on the governor’s order are still valid, including restricting how some outdoor watering takes place, such as a prohibition against the hosing down of sidewalks, and limiting how some businesses use water.

Why homemade is better for Fido

760-690-2891 Lic #961382

Kim Harris valleyeditor@reedermedia.com

Let’s face it, everybody loves treats. For humans, there is nothing better than a nice piece of creamy

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milk chocolate after a long day at work or perhaps some fresh, juicy grapes on a hot afternoon, our fourlegged friends are no different. According to the American Animal Hospital, “making your own dog treats is typically quite cost-effective.” Especially if you already have many of the ingredients on hand not to mention the health benefits of making your own treats specially formulated for your dog’s own needs. If your dog is overweight or poor dental hygiene you can incorporate special ingredients that can help to optimize your dog’s health. Parsley, a key ingredient in many dog treats helps to combat bad breath and for pups in need of a little weight loss you can alter the recipes with low calorie ingredients such as pumpkin puree. When making your own treats, you have complete control over the ingredients which allows you not only to leave out additives, preservative and fillers, but to focus on your pup’s favorite flavors such as peanut butter or bacon. “If your dog has sensitivities to certain ingredients or is on a special diet, you don’t have to spend a lot of money on specialty items when you can simply make it at home,” The American Animal Hospital

said. Pay attention to calorie counts to make sure your dog has a nutritionally balanced diet and to prevent obesity. Michele Howard’s Homemade peanut butter dog treats INGREDIENTS • 1 cup whole wheat flour • ½ cup creamy peanut butter • ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce or mashed banana • ¼ cup vegetable, chicken or beef stock • bone shaped cookie cutter INSTRUCTIONS Preheat oven to 350°. Combine flour, peanut butter and applesauce in a large mixing bowl. Add stock and stir until wellcombined. The dough will be thick. Once combined use your hands to press the dough into a ball. Place dough ball on a flat service (with a sprinkle of flour if needed) and roll out evenly with a rolling pin. Dough should be about ¼ inch thick. Use a cookie cutter to cut the dough into desired shape and place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 18 minutes or until golden brown. Store in an airtight container.


January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-9

Over 1200 HOmes sOld! Carlson

Follis CalBRE #00799622

CalBRE #00968586

760.206.3993

KimandKenRealEstateGroup.com ~ A Portion of every sale Goes to support various local and National Charities ~

WE’RE WINDERMERE’S #1 TEAM IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BECAUSE WE PUT OUR CLIENT’S NEEDS FIRST!

133

sOld In 2016

with 5 star Reviews «««««

Why list with Kim & Ken? ♦ Maximum Exposure (Homes Appear on Tens of Thousands of Websites) ♦ Strong Link to Ready, Willing and Able Buyers (Over 5,000 Buyers in our Data Base)

♦ Market Our Homes with Cutting Edge Technology ♦ Sell 46% of Our Own Properties (Immediate Response to All Inquiries) ♦ Consistently Get Our Clients Asking Price or Above Asking Price ♦ Sell Quickly with the Least Amount of Inconvenience to You ♦ Strong Negotiation Skills (More Money in Your Pocket!) te ga

+

5 d5

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ke

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r ea

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a us

bl

e

Fallbrook $498,747

Canyon Lake $338,747

Murrieta $328,747

Gated 55 and better Fallbrook Community for your convenience and security. One level view home boasts large rooms, volume ceilings, wood floors and much more. Fabulous outdoor area for your projects and enjoyment. This private location with views to Palomar mountain. Activities daily in this sought after community. Ready for you now!

Canyon Lake upgraded one level home boasts solid wood crown molding, window casements, wood floors with solid wood upgraded base, quality window upgrades, wood sliders & dramatic fireplace in living room. Kitchen has granite counters, breakfast bar & newer stainless appliances. Large covered patio & fenced yard. Seller wants this one sold now!!

Check out this area! Definitely in the path of future development! Neighborhood commercial zoning and just a short distance off the freeway. Currently a manufactured home and detached 3 car garage are the improvements. Totally flat and usable property. Bring your business ideas and receive rental income while you are processing your plans.

OPEN HOUSE SAT 1/14 & SUN 1/15 • 12-4PM 17783 Weaving Lane, San Diego

CO

MM

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Ial rO

OM

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San Diego $709,747

Murrieta $988,747

Fallbrook $428,747

Located at the end of a cul-de-sac street in popular Westwood master community of Rancho Bernardo. Excellent schools & convenient for shopping, or freeway commuter needs. Completely rebuilt in 2008, making this the newest home in the neighborhood! Highly upgraded with stainless applcs, wood flooring, high ceilings, granite and tile. Master balcony.

Three-Suite Industrial building in Elm Street Business Park. All suites have an office build out including private office, reception area and handicap friendly bathroom. Heating and A/C included in all office areas. Well maintained and well located business park that is 100% occupied. Priced below comps for quick sale.

Welcome to your inviting Fallbrook Home close to downtown. Drought tolerant landscape in front and back frame your freshly painted home. Lovingly cared for and meticulously maintained. Bathrooms have been re-done incl new master vanity and tile surround. All windows except 2 have been replaced. Tankless water heater. Newer heat & A/C system.

HHHHH

More 5-Star Client Reviews Than Any Other Local Agent Ken Follis 760.803-6235 KenFollis.com kenfollisrealtor@gmail.com | 746 S. Main Ave., Suite A, Fallbrook

Cal BRE #00799622

Kim Carlson 760.434.6873 KimCarlsonHomes.com kim@kimcarlsonhomes.com |

Cal BRE #00968586

*This information is derived from Sandicor MLS 2016 data.


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-10

Real Estate / Home & Garden

Kim & Ken – a winning team in real estate Tom Ferrall tferrall@reedermedia.com

More than three years ago, Kim Carlson and Ken Follis decided to form the Kim & Ken Real Estate Group. The honeymoon isn’t over. “We communicate together probably more than we do with our spouses,” said Follis with a laugh. “We watch out for each other and want the best for each other,” said Carlson. Carlson and Follis were topproducing realtors who worked across from each other at an office in Carlsbad. In observing each other operate, Carlson and Follis soon realized they shared the same business values, starting with the desire to provide clients with outstanding customer service.

“For us, it was just like-minded people wanting to give their customers the very best service possible,” said Follis of why they decided to form a partnership. “Although we agree on almost everything, there’s still enough difference that when we collaborate and put things together, we are truly one plus one equals three.” “I think having those same core morals and values,” said Carlson of the key to their successful partnership. “And that we do do business the same way. You know, most teams do not succeed. If you look statistically, they fail. So it’s truly such a blessing for us to work with one another and have it work as it does. We feel very fortunate.” Carlson and Follis refer to their clients as “clients for life” and

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treat them like friends. For the last four years, Carlson and Follis have hosted a Client Appreciation Party for past and present clients. The parties have ranged from murder mystery dinners to the Beach Boys theme of this year’s bash. “We’ve been so blessed with what they have given us, we wanted to do something for them,” said Follis. “It also allows us to meet people and see our clients in a different light than the business setting of going through the stressful transaction from start to finish. And we just like to cut a rug with them.” Carlson said their customers have a lifetime invitation to attend the parties. “We have clients for life, so they are invited for life,” said Carlson. Clients also get free use of Kim and Ken’s moving van, which they purchased last year and also offer to charities. “We offer the van, we don’t offer the people (movers),” said Follis with a grin. “That’s a key thing.” “If one of our clients for life wants to move something themselves, they can use the van at no cost – just leave it filled with gas,” said Carlson. The friendly, easygoing nature of Carlson and Follis, combined with first-class service, have made the duo very popular with both buyers and sellers. “One of the things that I think Kim and I are most proud of, is that our past customers love us,” said Follis. “We love that they love us, because this is not an easy industry.” “When you look online [re-

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views], like at the Zillow testimonials, we have 96 five-star testimonials, which is more than any other agent around,” said Carlson. “That’s huge, because the majority of our business is from past clients or referrals of their friends and family.” The excellent customer service is the result of a team effort, said Carlson. “People are buying a service, so you want to make sure that they’re well taken care of from beginning to end,” said Carlson. “So we actually have four people on staff that work directly under us, and all they do is serve our clients. One of them is a marketing manager, we have a listing manager and a client specialist, and once they get into escrow, they deal with our business manager. “Our client specialist’s whole job is to talk with them throughout and make sure everything’s fine that they’re happy and getting their feedback,” continued Carlson. “There’s Ken and I and four other people, so there’s six people they hire for the cost of one. They get six people that are just attentive to their needs, so it’s kind of like a spa,” concludes Carlson with a laugh. “A real estate spa,” chimes in Follis. Carlson, who entered the real estate industry in 1987, and Follis, who started in the business in 1980, have both lived in Fallbrook since 1998. Their knowledge of the local market is also a huge asset for buyers and sellers. “It’s imperative to make sure you have a local Realtor,” said Follis. “That’s key. We see so many out of area listings in our town and they’re not priced accurately for what the market will bear, and the bad thing about that is it puts an unrealistic expectation into the minds of the seller. When you’re trying to make a move toward something, and plan toward something, it’s really going to deter that. Because if you think you’re going to get more than you’re really going to get, or something like that, it puts your plans on

hold, and then you have to realign.” “You have that, and then you have the opposite too,” said Carlson, “where they undervalue them, and people don’t get as much money as they could have. A tract home, anybody can go figure out what a tract home is worth. But you come out here and we have it all. We not only have tracts, but we especially have your big, huge custom homes, older homes and lot sizes are different. You have to take it all into consideration.” “Square footage is not created equal,” added Follis. When selling a home, Follis said hanging the right price is key. “Every home has a sweet spot,” said Follis. “If you put it in the sweet spot, it’s going to work, and then we take over, because our marketing will definitely create a sense of urgency, and that’s what you want to see.” “We do massive amounts of marketing for all of our homes to make sure they get out there in every avenue there is,” added Carlson. In dealing with Kim & Ken, clients get a pair of individuals who truly love their jobs. “It’s helping people,” said Carlson. “We love all of our clients, buyers and sellers. But it is that joy and pleasure that you get with first-time homebuyers when you’re able to call them and say, ‘you just got your home.’ Or with the seller, when you tell them, ‘they just signed the contract, we got you full price.’ It is sheer joy and pleasure to be able do that, because you’re like, ‘Yea!,’ and you’re celebrating together.” “They always say if you love what you do, it’s not like work or a job,” said Follis. “This is more like a lifestyle. I don’t consider this work.” The Fallbrook office of the Kim and Ken Real Estate Group is located at 746 S. Main Ave., Fallbrook, CA 92028. For more information, call (760) 434-6873. To comment on this story online, visit www.myvalleynews.com.

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January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-11

Real Estate / Home & Garden Nine home buying traps to avoid in 2017

Congratulations! TO OUR 2016 AWARD WINNERS TOP AgENT

TOP lISTINg

TOP SAlES

Tyler Culton

Tyler Culton

Larry bubley

TOP lISTINg TEAM

TOP DOllAR vOlUME

TOP TEAM SAlES

George & Jessica

Tyler Culton

George & Jessica

TOP TEAM

TOP TEAM DOllAR vOlUME

George & Jessica

George & Jessica

TOP 12 SAlES Larry Bubley Jessica Terpstra Dianne Treadwell Vivian Arias Tyler Culton Frank Young

TOP 12 lISTINgS

Mike Culton Alan Hardman George Williams Greg Treadwell Doug Ford Carrie Mazzotta

Tyler Culton Jessica Terpstra Dianne Treadwell Carrie Mazzotta Frank Young Mike Culton

Alan Hardman Jose Constantino George Williams Greg Treadwell Vivian Arias Larry Bubley

OPEN HOUSE 1/12 thru 1/15 10am-4pm at Kirby Village

HWY 74 (Florida Ave) or Ramona Expressway to Sanderson, to Esplanade East to Kirby, One half block North.

Mike Mason Special to Valley News

A systemized approach to the home buying process can help you steer clear of these common traps, allowing you to not only cut costs, but also secure the home that’s best for you. No matter which way you look at it, buying a home is a major investment. But for many homebuyers, it can be an even more expensive process than it needs to be since they fall prey to at least a few of the many common and costly mistakes which trap them into either paying too much for the home they want or losing their dream home to another buyer or, (worse) buying the wrong home for their needs. A systemized approach to the home buying process can help you steer clear of these common traps, allowing you to not only cut costs, but also secure the home that’s best for you. Bidding Blind: What price should you offer when you bid on a home? Is the seller’s asking price too high, or does it represent a great deal? If you fail to research the market in order to understand what comparable homes are selling for, making your offer would be like bidding blind. Without this knowledge of market value, you could easily bid too much or fail to make a competitive offer at all on an excellent value. Buying the Wrong Home: What are you looking for in a home? A simple enough question, but the answer can be quite complex. More often than not, buyers have been swept up in the emotion and excitement of the buying process only to find themselves the owner of a home that is either too big or too small. Maybe they’re stuck with a longer than desired commute to work or a dozen more fix-ups than they really want to deal with now that the excitement has died down. Take the time upfront to clearly define your wants and needs. Put it in writing and then use it as a yard stick with which to measure every home you look at. Unclear Title: Make sure very early on in the negotiation that you will own your new home free and clear by having a title search completed. The last thing you want to discover when you’re in the backstretch of a transaction is that there are encumbrances on the property such as tax liens, undisclosed owners, easements, leases or the like. Inaccurate Survey: As part of your offer to purchase, make sure you request an updated property survey which clearly marks your boundaries. If the survey is not current, you may find that there are structural changes that are not shown (e.g., additions to the house, a new swimming pool, a neighbor’s new fence which is

extending a boundary line, etc.). Be very clear on these issues. Undisclosed Fix-ups: Don’t expect every seller to own up to every physical detail that will need to be attended to. Both you and the seller are out to maximize your investment. Ensure that you conduct a thorough inspection of the home early in the process. Consider hiring an independent inspector to objectively view the home inside and out and make the final contract contingent upon this inspector’s report. This inspector should be able to give you a report of any item that needs to be fixed with associated, approximate cost. Not Getting Mortgage Pre-approval: Pre-approval is fast, easy and free. When you have a pre-approved mortgage, you can shop for your home with a greater sense of freedom and security, knowing that the money will be there when you find the home of your dreams. Contract Misses: If a seller fails to comply to the letter of the contract by neglecting to attend to some repair issues, or changing the spirit of the agreement in some way, this could delay the final closing and settlement. Agree ahead of time on a dollar amount for an escrow fund to cover items that the seller fails to follow through on. Prepare a list of agreed issues, walk through them, and check them off one by one. Hidden Costs: Make sure you identify and uncover all costs – large and small – far enough ahead of time. When a transaction closes, you will sometimes find fees for this or that sneaking through after the “subtotal” fees such as loan disbursement charges, underwriting fees etc. Understand these in advance by having your lender project total charges for you in writing. Rushing the Closing: Take your time during this critical part of the process, and insist on seeing all paperwork the day before you sign. Make sure this documentation perfectly reflects your understanding of the transaction, and that nothing has been added or subtracted. Is the interest rate right? Is everything covered? If you rush this process on the day of closing, you may run into a lastminute snag that you can’t fix without compromising the terms of the deal, the financing or even the sale itself. Call us today at (951) 296-8887 and get the information you need enabling you to make an informed, educated sound decision. Questions regarding available inventory and/or other real estate matters please contact, Mike@ GoTakeAction.com. Mike Mason, Realtor® & Broker/Owner of MASON Real Estate. LIC: 01483044, Temecula Valley resident for 30+ years, Board of Director (since 2011) Southwest Riverside County Association of Realtors® (SRCAR).

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SECLUDED 50.52 Acres with 360 irrigated Pomegranate trees. WATER: Good well + EMWD Domestic and Irrigation to the property. Retention pond with gravity feed irrigation. POWER: So Cal Edison. This property perfect for GROWING, ORGANIC, CITRUS or other farming or livestock endeavors. INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY: 3 Bedroom, 1248 sqft Mobile Home (on 10 Acres) rented for $1450 per month. Approved Tentative Parcel Map for 4 (additional) 10 Acre parcels. Property has gentle slope, viewing pads with magnificent views! Perfect for custom Estate Homes. RECREATION: Shooting Range, off road, pond, wildlife, great for horseback or hiking. PRICED TO SELL NOW!

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(951) 658-7211 www.brubakerculton.com


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-12

Market at a glance (As of January 8, 2017) Temecula No of Homes Sold

Murrieta

33

21

(333) 319

(343) 319

Average Selling Price

$391,721

Average List Price

$778,906

Median List Price

Inventory of Properties Listed

Asking Price per Square Foot Average Days on Market

Wildomar 11

Lake Elsinore

Canyon Lake

Hemet

San Jacinto

17

5

20

(137) 128

(130) 120

(376) 348

$297,078

$419,500

$331,947

$259,585

$224,165

$215,729

$355,800

$488,980

$399,248

$296,774

$266,557

$263,885

$417,900

$349,000

$424,900

$389,950

$274,450

$237,450

$249,995

$161

$169

$203

$150

$158

$147

$148

91

(220) 203

$443,890

$376,381

$675,952

$417,611

$539,000

$459,900

$211

$180

4

Sun City

73

(104)

16

Menifee

(85)

10 (123)

116

134

121

102

89

142

66

94

150

128

Most Expensive Listing

$7,400,000

$5,500,000

$999,900

$1,198,000

$1,600,000

$729,000

$975,000

$1,649,000

$1,500,000

Least Expensive Listing

$192,500

$149,000

$150,000

$164,990

$149,000

$227,000

$149,000

$57,000

$59,000

Average Age of Listing

18

18

22

22

29

12

30

39

27

% of Properties w/ Price decrease

36%

40%

32%

32%

40%

26%

33%

29%

22%

% of Properties Relisted (reset DOM)

13%

12%

13%

6%

15%

8%

10%

5%

5%

% of Flip properties (price increase)

7%

7%

10%

7%

3%

6%

10%

8%

8%

Median House Size (sq ft)

3071

3015

2550

2049

2060

2619

1672

1621

1648

8,001-10,000

8,001-10,000

8,001-10,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

6,501-8,000

Median Number of Bedrooms

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

3.0

4.0

3.0

3.0

4.0

Median Number of Bathrooms

3.0

3.0

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.0

2.0

2.0

Seller (39.5)

Seller (42.5)

Seller (51.6)

Seller (45.2)

Seller (43.3

Seller (46.2)

Seller (46.8)

Seller (46.5)

Seller (43.7)

Median Lot Size (sq ft)

Market Action Index*

*This Index measures the current rate of sale versus the amount of inventory. Index above 30 implies a seller’s advantage. Below 30, conditions give the advantage to the buyer. Market data provided by Escrow Leaders (Altos Research) and is current as of 01/09/17. Sales Data provided by SRCAR (MLS) and current as of 01/08/17 Boxes with multiple entries have previous week’s numbers (in parentheses) and this week’s number for comparision purposes. Strong Trends (multiple weeks) in each area are indicated by color: green indicates upward trend; pink indicates downward trend. Valley News makes no representation as to the accuracy or completeness of this data.

Animal Friends of the Valleys

Pets of the Week

Special: All cats/kittens, pit bulls and Chihuahua adoptions are just $5 (spay/ neuter fees, if applicable, are additional). Dog & cat adoption fees include a microchip, basic shelter vaccines (excluding rabies), and a free vet check.

Hi, my name is Elza. I’m a 4-year-old spayed, female poodle mix. I am a very cuddly girl. I enjoy sitting in a lap and just relaxing. I am good with dogs and kids. I would make an amazing pet. I am all ready to go home with you! Intake Number: 280476  

Hi, my name is Anani. I am a 8-year-old spayed orange and white cat. I am a very sweet girl. I get alone with kids, dogs and cats. I am litter-box trained and get along with cats. I can’t wait to find my “fur” ever home. I am already to go! Intake Number: 259539

Website: www.animalfriendsofthevalleys.com Address: 33751 Mission Trail, Wildomar, CA 92595 Phone: (951) 674-0618 • Hours of operation: Monday, Tuesday,  Thursday, and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Retrievers & Friends

My name is Molly. I am a beautiful 3-year-old English Bulldog. I am friendly and walk on the leash but have not had much training. I need special eyedrops for my eyes. I came into the shelter with my friend Tonka, but we don’t need to be adopted together. I am looking for a loving home. For more information on Molly, please visit the Retrievers and Friends website at www. retrieversandfriends.com or call (951) 696 2428.

Ramona Humane Society

My name is Buster. I am about 2-years-old and super sweet with a great personality. I am neutered, good with other dogs, up-to-date on my shots and am looking for a loving home. Intake Number: 110307/R209782

My name is Mistletoe. I am a bit shy at first, but once I get to know you, I am very sweet. I am about 2-years-old and good with other cats. I am litter-box trained, upto-date on shots, de-wormed and spayed. I am looking for loving home. Intake Number: 107929/R208304

For more information on Buster, Mistletoe and other great pets for adoption, contact the Ramona Humane Society at (951) 654-8802 or visit www.ramonahumanesociety.org. Courtesy photos

Business Directory

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ELECTRICIAN

Bookkeeping & Payroll Services

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OFFICE SPACE

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Project Management Solutions, LLC

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760-859-4839 Oscar's Landscaping Services Full Decorative Landscaping including: Low Voltage Lighting, Artificial Turf, Sod, Rock Design, Irrigation, Planting & Hauling Call for FREE Estimate

(760) 717-0731 Masonry

WYNDHAM MASONRY Pavers, stone, brick, block, retaining walls, repairs, all masonry FREE ESTIMATES LIC#916586

(951) 677-2728 PAINTING

GREG’S QUALITY PAINTING • Interior and Exterior • Repaint Specialist • Quality work, Quality materials • Serving the Temecula Valley, Murrieta and Fallbrook since 1982 • Competitive prices • License #499346

951-692-0247

(951) 923-6015

ELECTRICIAN

951-461-2973 or 949-589-0110

Landscaping

WOOD’S PAINTING CONTRACTORS Interior ~ Exterior Professional Workmen! Reasonable Rates, Free Estimates Lic#700305 Fallbrook / North County 760-728-1796 / 760-723-1736 Temecula 951-246-0350 / 951-676-6530 www.woodspainting.com

Why RENT when you can OWN? Specializing in Medical office space Right space/Right lender/Custom Builds available

John Grant (951)775-0615 officeprojectmanagement.com

PIANO LESSONS

Individual or Group Children and Adults John and Audrey Teachers with Degrees

(951) 672-9051 PIANO TUNING

Fuhr Piano Repair, Restoration and Tuning Call Bob Fuhr

Or Free Recorded Message

(800) 611-0726 #1041 24 hours a day

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PAVING

(760) 206-3993

Mike Jones Paving • Resurfacing • Slurry Seal • Chip Seal • Crack Filling • Patching • Brick Pavers • Concrete • Striping Free Estimates!

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mj.pavetheplanet@gmail.com PLUMBER

RETIRED PLUMBER Looking for SMALL JOBS Drain stoppages also VERY Reasonable rates

Ron (951) 692-2802 since 1976 Lic # 335784

Ponds - Fountains

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760-717-0338

KimAndKenRealEstate@gmail.com

Kim Carlson Kim@KimCarlsonHomes.com

(760) 434-6873 KimCarlsonHomes.com CalBRE# 00968586

Ken Follis KenFollisRealtor@gmail.com

(760) 803-6235 KenFollis.com CalBRE#00799622

WINDERMERE REAL ESTATE Homes & Estates 746 S. Main Ave., Suite A Fallbrook 760-230-8401 www.windermere.com

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January 13, 2017 • www.myvalleynews.com • Valley News

B-13

Classifieds

Crossword puzzle answers from page A-12 1

S

2

C

14

M A

17

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20

G O

3

A Y E S

4

B

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59

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$59 $79

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All Renewals

2 convenient locations: Winchester (Hemet) ~ Temecula

New Patients


Valley News • www.myvalleynews.com • January 13, 2017

B-14

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

NEW LISTINGS

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Love a view with land for vineyard or grove? Charming 3 BD 2 BA home has that & so much more. Separate site w/water, electricity & inviting camper for overnight guests or caretaker. Possible barn or guest quarters? 160049084 $429,000

170000836

$525,000

A rare opportunity to build your custom home in the neighborhood of J.B. Ranch, an areas of custom homes on private home sites. This 2.13 parcels features a gentle building site studded 4 BD, 3.5 BA all w/granite counter tops, private office, formal dining room, with oak trees. 170000457 $195,000 double master suites, one w/ fireplace, gourmet kitchen w/ center island, granite counters & walk-in pantry. Stunning high end lighting fixtures, central vacuum, $789,000 4.59 Acres fronting paved road with income zoned heating & air, dazzling pool & spa. 160060813 from Sprint Cellular. Upscale rural Fallbrook community. Panoramic views. Partial Fencing. Small avocado grove. Build your dream home while benefiting from this income producing parcel! Part of parcel map 04684. Just minutes to the quaint community of Fallbrook and only 20 minutes to Temecula. Enjoy the best of San Diego’s peaceful country living. Within minutes to beautiful Pacific Ocean beaches, world class casino entertainment & dining. 160009452 $310,000 Field of Dreams! Outstanding all useable 25 acre ranch with 5306 SF, 3 BR Second parcel APN #110-350-15. 7.84 acres, has home, private irrigated baseball field, 13 stall horse barn, 6 pastures w/well water meter & a percolation report from 11-78 - irrigation, huge car collector’s barn, pool, original farm barn & much more. will need updating. Animal designator “M” 160004017 $3,250,000 160055539 $125,000

OUR COLDWELL BANKER VILLAGE PROPERITES AGENTS: Don Bennetts Kimberly Biller Judy Bresnahan

Pat Bresnahan Abby Elston Susie Emory

Cynthia Hauff Lorene Johnson Paul Kavanaugh

Eddie Harrison Bret Hasvold Chris Hasvold

Jane Felton Jerry Gordon Linda Gordon

Ruth Kavanaugh Cathy Kudroshoff Cheryl Pizzo

Susie’s Home Collection... Professionalism with a Personal Touch.

760-525-9744 s u s i e @ cbvillage. c o m

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE# 01079037

Vicki Robertson Jordan Rochlis Nancy Schrimpf

Geri Sides Tom Van Wie Marianne Yeager

Jessi Scrape Donna Shanahan Janice Shannon

N ew Year... N ew Beginnings... Looking Out for Your Best Interest

Jerry & Linda Gordon

Jerry: 760-519-5279 Linda: 760-519-7199

CalBRE #01140954 CalBRE #01035328 VILLAGE PROPERTIES twogordons@gmail.com | www.twogordons.net

THE FEEL OF COUNTRY LIVING WITHOUT THE DRIVE. Your own haven with this 2314 sf ranch style home nestled on an acres of trees, flowers and shrubs $556,000 just minutes from town.

Coming Soon!

EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITIES. Home sits on just over a gentle acre, fully fenced & gated. 3BD home has formal LR w/vaulted ceiling & skylights, fplc & wood floors. Kitchen has new ss applcs & propane cooktop. $580,000

Hilltop Views

Cheryl Pizzo & Don Bennetts

Enjoy the beautiful hilltop views on 13+ acres. Family compound, that offers both the main home, plus two bedroom guest house. Need appointment to preview.

Specializing in Fallbrook For 30 yearS

Cheryl 760-468-2218 Don 760-822-3284 CalBRe# 00815495

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

Calbre# 01450115

LORENE JOHNSON Personal Dedicated Service

Marketing Fallbrook for 35 years

760.522.2588

LoreneRealtor@aol.com

$795,000

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE# 00612840

East Ridge Home!

Custom East Ridge home features spacious great room floor plan that opens to the kitchen and sunny breakfast room. The home has ample built in storage, book shelves, linen storage and even a work bench in the garage. East Ridge is a gated community with clubhouse, pool, tennis courts, walking trails and RV storage. Offered at $429,900

Wonderful Community

HILLTOP LOCATION IN EXCLUSIVE WILT ROAD AREA

Just minutes to the I-15 commute corridor. Stunning Hacienda inspired estate is beautifully designed and fully appointed offering casual comfort with a seamless blend of indoor & outdoor living. 3 en’suites plus an optional 4th currently used as an office with private outside entrance. Courtyard casita brings bedroom total to 5. U-shaped hacienda w/courtyard pool & dining. Come for a visit, stay for a lifetime. Offered at $1,590,888

Donna Shanahan 760-522-7112

donna@cbvillage.com CalBRE #01193680 VILLAGE PROPERTIES

Playgrounds, walking trails + easy access for your work commute and the perfect entertaining backyard makes this home the sweetest place to live. Large semi open floor plan. Master BD w/large walk-in closet, 2 BD w/Jack-and-Jill BA and the 4th BD downstairs w/ full bath across hallway. $469,000

Jessi scrape

Looking to Buy or Sell a Home? Searching for that perfect parcel to Build your Home?

760.419.9802

Contact me for All Your Real Estate Needs.

sellwithjess@gmail.com

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE #01929597

Tri-Level Private Home Single Story Custom on 1.07 View Acres. Appx 3758 sq ft, 4BD, 3BA, Recently painted inside and out, near new Custom pool, Plenty of room for entertaining + 3 car garage. Beautiful Views. Call me for more details! Offered at $899,000

18.64 View Acres overlooking Diamond Valley Lake and Temecula. Private and peaceful with spectacular views and usable area’s. This parcel will require a well for water. Dirt road access from De Portola Parkway. Call listing agent for more details. Seller will consider financing with a substantial down payment. Offered at $135,000

Call Tom Van Wie 760.703.6400

GERI SIDES, GRI, BROKER ASSOCIATE

tvw@sbcglobal.net CalBRE #01412145

Bring the family to this TriLevel 4 BD home. Family room w/wet bar. Wood floor leads to kitchen and a wonderful deck. Located on a private street near schools, bank and shopping. Very private backyard. Many ceiling fans.

1ST IN CUSTOMER SERVICE AWARDS

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

Offered at $459,000 2015 Outstanding Performance Recipient

Call Today 760.207.8497

VILLAGE PROPERTIES

CalBRE#00414751

760-728-8000 • www.CBVillageProperties.com VILLAGE PROPERTIES BRE #01934791

River Village: 5256 So. Mission Road, Suite 310, Bonsall Fallbrook: 1615 So. Mission Road, Suite C

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Equal Housing Opportunity


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