Page 1

viewpoints An Associated Collegiate Press two-time national Pacemaker award-winning newspaper, serving as the voice of the students since 1922.

R

I

V

E

R

S

I

D

E

C

I

T

Y

C

O L L E G E

VIEWPOINTSONLINE.ORG

VOL. XCIX, NO. 8

FEBRUARY 8, 2018

Chancellor, interim president named Wolde-Ab Isaac takes on role of chancellor after tenure as Riverside City College president

Irving Hendrick appointed as interim president

SAMANTHA BARTHOLOMEW INTERIM NEWS EDITOR

In a unanimous vote, the Board of Trustees appointed Wolde-Ab Isaac chancellor of Riverside Community College District on Dec. 12. “It is with extraordinary sense of humility and honor that I accept this appointment to serve as the fourth chancellor of RCCD, a great and mature institution anchored in a rich history and tradition of pride and excellence,” Isaac said. Isaac has more than 35 years of experience as an educator. He was hired by the district in 2006 as dean of Health Science at Moreno Valley College. In 2012, he was named vice president of Academic Affairs at Riverside City College, and later as interim president of RCC before being appointed the college’s president in 2015. “Dr. Isaac’s leadership is evident in many community organizations and partnerships within our district,” Board President Tracey Vackar said. “He embraces collaboration through shared governance with the District stakeholders and uses research-based evidence to support new initiatives.” “I pledge to do all I can to have Riverside Community College District be recognized as a leader, champion for student success and student equity, and thereby redeem the trust and faith bestowed on me,” Isaac said. “Dr. Isaac assumes the helm of our great institution as a highly accomplished immigrant with an impressive academic and professional resume and impeccable track record at the time that some of our citizens, our diverse student population and the immigrant communities, especially those from nonwestern societies, are being treated in some of the most despicable manner in our modern society,” Faculty Association President Dariush Haghighat said in a statement. Isaac intends to prevent himself from becoming disconnected from the daily struggles and successes that take

GEOVANNY GUZMAN | VIEWPOINTS

Wolde-Ab Isaac speaking to the Board of Trustees about the state budget Feb. 6. place outside the district office by maintaining an office on each of the district’s three college campuses. “I believe that is very important that I am continuously connected to the frustrations people have and, hopefully, to the aspirations they have,” Isaac said. “I want to listen more to their expectations of what kind of support they need from the district office.” “The fact that Dr. Isaac has been with the district for the past 12 years, knows our district, its students, staff and programs, our local cities and communities and has a leadership reputation in the region, further solidifies the selection to lead this higher education district into the future,” Board secretary Mary Figueroa said. For Isaac, the transition from college president to chancellor has made him determined to mend the disconnect he feels has overtaken the district as a whole. “Right now, we function as five separate entities that do whatever they like and whatever

CONTACT US Newsroom: (951) 222-8488 Editor-in-Chief: (951) 222-8495 viewpoints@rcc.edu

their plans are,” he said. “The most pressing matter is putting together a strategic plan that establishes a shared mission, vision and develops overarching shared goals that binds all of us together as one district made up up of five components that operate best when they are united.” Developing a strong strategic plan is one of the goals at the forefront of Isaac’s first few months as chancellor, saying that “a good and comprehensive strategic plan becomes a glue that binds all of us to the same mission and to the shared overarching goals.” According to Isaac, a good strategic plan has three attributes: it clarifies the journey of where the district going and how they’re getting there, it establishes a clear delegation of responsibility and creates a clear line of accountability and it allows the district to build a transparent work entity. At the Dec. 12 Board of Trustees meeting, Figueroa brought up the 2017 City of

FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Riverside Innovation Report and her concerns about the minimal mentions of RCCD and how its perceived lack of community impact affects the district’s mission. “If our presence in the community is not visible then we are failing,” Isaac said. “It is my job to make myself accessible to the community and its various organizations and committees, to answer people’s questions and concerns as well as celebrate our district’s achievements and share them with the community.” “I tell people I work like a turtle,” Isaac said. “A turtle does not go back, so if the going gets tough, if someone gets in the way, a turtle shrivels up, but always comes out to continue the journey.” “I tried to build a culture of never losing the territory you’ve gained and show perseverance, determination and, in some senses, stubbornness. Has the going gotten tough? Yes. Have there been times we’ve abandoned, ran away from and dismantled whatever we are doing? No.”

JOIN VIEWPOINTS See page 3

RCCVIEWPOINTS

Irving Hendrick, a longtime higher education leader, has been named interim president of Riverside City College. Hendrick succeeds WoldeAb Isaac, who was named chancellor of the Riverside Community College District in December. Hendrick’s appointment as interim president was approved Jan. 16 by the college district’s Board of Trustees. A national search is planned for a new president for RCC, which has approximately 22,000 students. “Dr. Hendrick has been my mentor during the past 12 years of my service at the district, I am therefore confident that his extensive knowledge of the educational system in California and his impressive record of leading our colleges and the district will serve students, faculty, staff and the community well,” Isaac said in a statement. “I look forward to working with him as we conduct a search for the next president of RCC.”

INDEX VOL. XCIX NO. 8 February 8, 2018

NEWS

1

LIFE

5

EDITORIAL 7


2

News

February 8, 2017

Board discusses state budget

NEWS BRIEFS Campus closed for President’s Day Riverside City College will be closed for Presidents’ Day during next week. Classes are not scheduled for Feb. 16 and Feb. 19. Normal class scheduling will resume Feb. 20.

Parking Grace Period The parking grace period for the Spring 2018 will be from Feb. 12 thru Feb. 25. As long as a student/visitor is parked in a white-striped student parking space only, they will not be subjected to being cited for a permit violation during the parking grace period. RCCD will begin actively citing for all parking permit violations Feb. 26. GEOVANNY GUZMAN | VIEWPOINTS

Aaron Brown, second from right, summarizes the state budget to the Board of Trustees Feb. 6. SAMANTHA BARTHOLOMEW INTERIM NEWS EDITOR

During their regular meeting Feb. 8, the Board of Trustees discussed the impact Gov. Jerry Brown’s latest state budget will have on Riverside Community College District. In his budget plan for 201819, Brown is moving beyond a traditional formula that funds colleges based primarily on how many students they enroll. Under Brown’s plan, no community college campus would receive less money than it did under the 2017-18 formula. However, future funding would be tied to enrollment size, how many students receive state financial aid based on being from low-income families and the number of degrees and certificates granted and the share of students who completed them within three years. The budget document says the new formula seeks “to improve the incentives for districts to focus on improving student success while providing districts with local flexibility to do so.” Brown also called for money to give community colleges the option to offer one year of free tuition to eligible students. In addition, he proposed three percent increases in state funding to both the University of California and the Cal State systems, triggering some to warn that the increases are insufficient and that tuition hikes may be required. However, that may not be enough to avoid tuition increases that both universities are considering even though Brown

States are considering a $228 rise, above the current $5,742 tuition for California full-time undergraduates. Brown said he wants Cal State to keep improving its graduation rates, which most recently was 22.6 percent within four years and 59.2 percent in six years. He also called on UCs to show more efficiencies and to reduce its controversial spending at its central headquarters which was exposed in a recent state audit. At UC schools, system president Janet Napolitano and Board of Regents chairman George Kieffer issued a statement expressing disappointment that the $92 million in extra general revenue “is less than we anticipated under the framework we established -- Bill Hedrick with the governor.” They noted that the governor’s plan does not include specific funding for option to cover the first year of UC’s plan to add 2,000 California tuition for any eligible student if undergraduates in fall 2018 and its the schools revise their programs desire to add 500 more graduate to improve the chances of earning students. Timothy White, chancellor of a degree. To be eligible for the new the 23-campus Cal State system, funds, colleges would have to expressed his criticism in a adopt a series of reforms, such as statement, calling the budget’s partnerships with K-12 schools, proposal to increase revenues by additional guidance and other $92 million “both concerning and changes as spelled out in the law. surprising” since the system asked In 2015-2016, 43 percent of for a $263 million hike. According to White, Brown’s the state’s more than two million community college students plan “could reverse any progress qualified for free tuition as low- made in the last decade — income students through a fee diminishing student access, success, waiver California College Promise limiting degree attainment and Grant, formerly called the Board of depriving California’s industries of skilled professionals.” Governors waiver. An update to the budget will Both systems this year hiked tuition for the first time in six come out in May, and the state years. Now UC systemhas raised legislature and the governor must the possibility of another increase come to agreement on the final of between $288 and $348 on spending plan for 2018-19. “What I’m gathering here is top of the current $12,630 tuition and mandatory system fees for that we are winners in this budget,” California undergraduates, not Trustee Bill Hedrick said. “We’re including room and board. Cal going to be on the plus side of this.” wants to keep tuition unchanged. Brown proposed giving the community college system $120 million to begin creating an online community college that would first enroll students in late 2019. The plan is to use $100 million over seven years to create the college and fund it annually at $20 million. The budget also includes $46 million to fund a “free tuition” bill the Gov. and the legislature approved last year. The law gives colleges the

“We’re going to be on the plus side of this.”

Tax Form 1098-Tavailable on Webadvisor The 1098-T tax form is available for students and is used to calculate any tax credits you might receive. The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 (TRA97) introduced several tax incentives for students. The Hope Scholarship & Lifetime Learning Credits are tax credits to individuals with qualifying educational expenses who file a tax return. To apply, students must log onto their Webadvisor, look under ‘Supplemental Applications’ and click on ‘EOPS Supplemental Applications.’ In-person technical help is available at the Computer Support Desk in the Digital Library at Riverside City College.

EOPS accepting applications The final day to apply for EOPS, or Extended Opportunity Programs and Services, is Feb. 9. EOPS is a student support program implemented to help recruit, retain and assist the academic success of low-income and educationally disadvantaged students by providing them with the tools and resources for achieving a higher education. Services offered through the program include priority registration, textbook vouchers, one-on-one tutoring, academic counseling, transfer information and assistance, as well as regalia for transferring students. To apply, students must log onto their Webadvisor, look under “Supplemental Applications” and click on “EOPS Supplemental Applications.”

Charles A. Kane Building recieves certification The Charles A. Kane Building has become the sixth building in the Riverside Community College District to receive a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification. LEED is the most widely used green building rating system in the world. LEED provides a framework to create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings. The certification is a globally recognized symbol of sustainability achievement and encourages a process designed to inspire project teams to seek innovative solutions that support public health and our environment while saving building owners money over a project’s life cycle.

Chancellor welcoming reception A welcoming reception will be held for Chancellor Wolde-Ab Isaac Feb. 22 at 4:30 p.m. in the Riverside Community College District Office. Isaac has more than 35 years of experience as an educator, faculty member and administrator. He came to RCCD in 2006 as dean of Health Science at the Moreno Valley campus. In 2012 he was named vice president of Academic Affairs at Riverside City College, and later as interim president of RCC. In 2015, he was appointed as Riverside City College’s 11th president. “Those who know my background will understand when I say that I am a perfect example of the profound truth that education is the most powerful social and economic equalizer,” Isaac said.

Last Day to Add Classes Riverside City College’s Career Center will begin holding workshops to enhance student success in the Charles A. Kane Building. “Align your Personality with Your Future” is planned for Feb. 20 from 12:50-1:50 p.m. “Resume and Cover Letter Writing” is scheduled for Feb. 26 from 10-11 a.m.


SAY HELLO TO YOUR NEW RIDE UNIVERSITY & IOWA UNIVERSITY & LEMON MARKET & 12TH EB MARKET & 11TH WB

UCR

60 E UNIV. AV UNIVERSITY & CHICAGO

RIVERSIDE CITY COLLEGE

91

VE AL A VE NA O T ING

TR CEN

RCC students already get unlimited rides on RTA buses. But here’s another

ARL

RIVERSIDE PLAZA

reason to ride. RTA’s brand-new RapidLink Gold Line is now providing weekday express service to RCC with buses arriving every 15 minutes.

NOL IA

AVE

RapidLink comes with its own brand of buses and stops, serving 14 locations

MAG

along Magnolia and University avenues. CAL BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

ADA MS S

T

So leave your gas-guzzler at home and swipe your student ID to ride 91

the bus. It’s better

VAN B

FOR SCHEDULE AND ROUTE INFORMATION, GO TO

GALLERIA AT TYLER

RIVERSIDETRANSIT.COM OR CALL (951) 565-5002.

UREN

BLVD

KAISER MEDICAL CENTER

MAG NOL

IA A VE

MAGNOLIA & LA SIERRA

MAGNOLIA & MCKINLEY

91

W GRAN

CORONA TRANSIT CENTER D

6TH

6TH & BELLE

ST

15

HOURS OF SERVICE: BUSES DEPART EVERY 15 MINUTES. Mon. – Fri.: 5:30-8:30 a.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m.


LIFE

February 8, 2017

5

“Noone can come and claim ownership of my work. I am the creator of it, and it lives within me.”

Prince

Rock out with Jesus Christ -

Performance Riversides proudly presents ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ at Riverside City College IMARI REDE INTERIM LIFE EDITOR

Trying not to fidget while sitting in a dusty church dressed in your steam pressed Sunday’s best, and singing hymns about Jesus. Not that appealing, right? Performance Riverside’s production of “Jesus Christ Superstar” will give you a new perspective of who Jesus really was. “The story is really fascinating,” said Daniel Berlin who plays Annas. “It’s not the normal way you learn about the last days of Jesus Christ.” The characters are based off of people from the Bible who have dynamic traits. “There is a lot of weight that goes into playing Jesus (such as) the emotions, the context,” said Nicholas Sloan who plays Jesus Christ. The cast shows the audience every internal and external battle of the production with ease while hitting all the high notes. The cast and crew members are more than ecstatic to get on stage and show off all that they’ve got. “This is my all time favorite

GEOVANNY GUZMAN | VIEWPOINTS

Clockwise from top: Jesus (Nicholas Sloan), Peter (Will Hues), Judas (Richard Bermudez), Mary Magdolen (Blair Lynn Strong) give all that they’ve got and more in a dress rehearsal on Feb. 6 in Landis Performing Arts Center.

production. I used to listen to a recording on vinyl as a kid,” said Will Hues who plays Peter. He and other cast members know this musical as a staple in the musical theater world and are honored to be a part of a professional production such as what Performance Riverside is bringing to the stage. “This is my first professional play,” said Riverside City College theater major Nayoko Edwards. “It’s really organized, nothing like high school [theater].” Audiences will be entertained by highly skilled performers including those down in orchestra pit. “It’s really exciting to have live theater in Riverside and be a part of it,” said Krystin Cowan, who plays bass in the orchestra. The entire set was constructed by two members of the theater department staff, Jason Graham and Raymond Couture. “The RCC community has a chance to see live, professional theater, there’s no reason to not come,” said assistant theater professor Nathaneal Johnson. The musical runs from Feb. 9 - 18 in the Landis Performing Arts Center at RCC. For tickets, visit performanceriverside.org.


6

February 8, 2017

Life

Halftime show disappoints many Justin Timberlake’s performance at the 2018 Super Bowl fails to bring sexy back IMARI REDE INTERIM LIFE EDITOR

Justin Timberlake had a chance to redeem himself after the Janet Jackson fiasco during the 2004 Super Bowl Halftime Show and he blew it. Timberlake performed solo at Pepsi’s 2018 Super Bowl Halftime Show on Feb. 4 and while his performance was loved by many, he cannot stray from criticism on the internet. His performance resulted in an instant reaction on the internet of children saying “Where is Lady Gaga?” and memes of the “Super Bowl Selfie Kid” googling “who is Justin Timberlake?” Timberlake opened with his lead single “Filthy” from his latest album, “Man of the Woods” before pulling out the hits from his 20+ years of mainstream fame. He sang “SexyBack” early on in his set and the cheesiest reword came out of JT’s mouth “lemme see what you’re twerking with.” Twerking was not a pop phenomenon in 2006 and it didn’t help him bring sexy back anyway. One of the most memorable, as well as controversial, moments was his tribute to Prince. Rumors

of a hologram swirled for weeks He brought Prince back, not as a hologram, but as a projection while Timberlake sang “I Would Die 4 U.” Yes, the Super Bowl was i n P r i n c e ’s h o m e t o w n o f Minneapolis, but Prince deserved better than Timberlake in his non matching outfit and balding look that he tried to serve. It was pretty cool how he had so many people invested into the show; dancers, back up singers and various musicians. He should really thank all of those people because all in all they saved him in a world without autotune. Now for the finale, there really wasn’t one. It was anticlimactic and the ending was only known because the announcer thanked viewers for watching. Timberlake was still in the crowd and his last words were “Super bowl selfies” after descending from the crowd of selfie hungry fans including the young boy now known as the “Super Bowl Selfie Kid.” Time Magazine even published an article about the instant internet fame the the kid already has. Timberlake may have some new competition out here.

ILLUSTRATION BY EMMA CARLSEN


February 8, 2017

7

Students reach out for support

Editorial

Views

ILLUSTRATION BY IMARI REDE

There are many stereotypes that come with being a college student. Some of the most popular stereotypes include having stress-induced breakdowns in the library, eating the cheapest food money can buy and surviving day-to-day college life with a single digit bank account balance. These are joke subjects passed between students in between classes and internet memes shared on each others’ social media pages. But how often do the jokes reflect reality? We, the Viewpoints Editorial Board, believe that students should not have to choose between getting their education, keeping a roof over their heads or preventing themselves from going hungry. No one should. While many would believe that college students’ financial worries stem primarily from the cost of tuition, a 2016 report put out by The Institute for College Access and Success suggests otherwise. Tuition amounts to only 20 percent of community college students’ total costs, according to the report. Instead, basic needs such as housing and food, as

well as transportation, textbooks and other supplies are the real cost drivers. “When financial aid helps cover costs beyond tuition, students can spend more time in class and studying instead of working longer hours to pay the bills,” said Debbie Cochrane, TICAS research director and primary author of the report. “Even with free or very low tuition, students are facing serious financial challenges that undermine college affordability and completion.” Many students take on the hardship of working a full-time job while maintaining a full-time course load, often at the expense of their grades and overall wellbeing. The average California minimum wage is $10.50 an hour, meaning that, on average, students would have to work 119 hours to earn enough money to pay for textbooks alone. These are 119 hours per semester that the student is not studying and getting schoolwork done. When discussing the student debt crisis, most people focus on the rapid growth in outstanding debt and several recent milestones, such as student

loan debt exceeding credit card debt in 2010 and auto loans in 2011 and passing the $1 trillion mark in 2012. But these milestones don’t tell us much about the impact of all that debt on the students who must borrow to pay for a college education. Average student loan debt at graduation has been growing steadily over the last two decades. In 1993-94, about half of bachelor’s degree recipients graduated with debt, averaging a little more than $10,000. In 2017, more than two-thirds of college graduates graduated with an average debt of $35,000, tripling in two decades. Student loan debt is increasing because government grants and support for postsecondary education have failed to keep pace with increases in college costs. This has shifted much of the burden of paying for college from the federal and state governments to families. The government no longer carries its fair share of college costs, even though it gets a big increase in income tax revenue from college graduates.

Viewpoints’ editorials represent the majority opinion of and are written by the Viewpoints’ student editorial board.

LETTERS

STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Dominique Redfearn (951) 222-8495 viewpoints@rcc.edu

TO THE

INTERIM NEWS EDITOR Samantha Bartholomew viewpoints.news@gmail.com INTERIM SPORTS EDITOR

INTERIM MANAGING EDITOR Samantha Bartholomew viewpoints.managing@gmail.com

viewpoints.sports@gmail.com

ADVERTISING MANAGER Samantha Bartholomew viewpoints.advertising@gmail.com

viewpoints.photo@gmail.com

INTERIM OPINIONS EDITOR viewpoints.opinions@gmail.com INTERIM LIFE EDITOR Imari Rede viewpoints.artsentertainment@gmail.com

INTERIM PHOTO EDITOR

REPORTER

Emma Carlsen

JOURNALISM SPECIALIST Matt Schoenmann matthew.schoenmann@rcc.edu

EDITOR Letters to the editor should be kept to 250 words or less and include contact information. Deliver letters to the Viewpoints office in the room behind the Assessment Building. An electronic copy is required. Viewpoints reserves the right to edit letters for space and to reject libelous or obscene letters. Letters to the editor and columns represent the opinions of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the entire Viewpoints staff, Viewpoints faculty advisers, student government, faculty, administration nor the Board of Trustees.

PRINTING SCHEDULE

FACULTY ADVISERS Allan Lovelace Matt Schoenmann

NEWSROOM PHONE: (951) 222-8488 E-MAIL: viewpoints@rcc.edu Associated Collegiate Press

Journalism Association of Community Colleges

March

1

Photo deadline:

March

1

Ad deadline:

March

1

Next issue:

March

8

Viewpoints is a public forum, First Amendment newspaper. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval.

MEMBER:

REACH US:

Copy deadline:

California Newspaper Publishers Association

© 2017 by the Viewpoints staff, Riverside City College, 4800 Magnolia Avenue, Riverside, CA. 92506-0528. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the Viewpoints Editor-in-Chief.


8

February 8, 2018

Riverside City College Restrooms Accessible Restrooms

Orange

N

8'0 "= E:1 AL SC

17 PARKING LOT “M”

Orange Grove

E E

Accessible RTA Bus Lines B

Bike Racks

$

Pay Parking

ET ET

Elevators

Emergency Telephones Free Speech Area

24

Healing Garden

ET

TUNNEL

ET

Nature Trail

$

PARKING LOT “Y”

ET

ET

22

25

16 PARKING LOT “V”

PARKING LOT “K” MEN’S

ET ET

$

13A ET

ET

PARKING LOT “Z”

13

ET

L-12 L-11 L-10

B

L-9

20

L-8

ET

ET

18

Terracina Drive

ET

ET

10

8

E

ET

E

ET

ET

11

1

3

ET

ET ET

ET

ET

12

ET

ET

ET B

Fairfax Avenue

Fairfax Avenue ET

2A

ET

L-3

2B

7

E

27

ET

$ PARKING LOT “F”

PARKING LOT “G”

33

5

Terracina Drive

5A E

4

PARKING LOT “E”

28

PARKING LOT “D”

2A.

2B. 3.

Business Education (Alan D. Pauw) Independent Living Program (ILP) Technology Support Services 5. Music 5A. Music Annex 6. Music Hall (Richard M. Stover) Dean, Fine and Performing Arts Marching Tigers 7. Landis Performing Arts Center 7A. Landis Annex 8. Martin Luther King, Jr. High Tech Center Academic Labs Academic Support & Community for Academic Progress (CAP) Center for Communication Excellence Math Learning Center STEM Center Tutorial Services Writing and Reading Center 9. Viewpoints 10. Planetarium (Robert T. Dixon) 11. School of Nursing Healing Garden 12. Math and Science Building 13. Student Center (Ralph H. Bradshaw) Aguilar Patio Bookstore Cafeteria/Food Services Citrus Room Hall of Fame Health Services Heritage Room Student Activities Upward Bound 13A. ASRCC Student Government 14. Bookstore 15. (Cesar E. Chavez) 16. Sports Complex (Samuel C. Evans)

PARKING LOT “P” PARKING LOT “U”

ET

ET

ET

$

PARKING LOT “Q”

35

Digital Library & Learning Resource Center Academic Senate/CTA Auditorium Glenn Hunt Center for Teaching Excellence Instructional Media Center Transfer Academy La Casa WL Lab Student Services and Administration (Dr. Charles A. Kane Student Services and Administration Building) Academic Affairs Admissions & Records Assessment Center Auxiliary Business Services/Cashier Business Services CalWORKs/Resource Center Career/Transfer Counseling Disability Resource Center Evaluations Extended Opportunities Programs & Services (E.O.P.S.) Financial Aid Outreach Completion Counts Welcome Center President’s Office Student Employment Services Student Financial Services Student Services Transcripts TRIO Student Support Services Veterans’ Services Administration (O.W. Noble) H.O.M.E. Room (The Ujima Project) Mailroom/Admin Service Center Quadrangle (Arthur G. Paul) Art Gallery Dean, Languages, Humanities and Social Sciences (LHSS)

ET

$

7A

Ramona Drive

1.

ET

ET

M a p Ke y PARKING LOT “C”

ET

L-1

B

Cridge

34

L-2

26

ET

ET 6

RTA BUS LINES 10 & 12

L-4

29 RTA BUS LINES 1, 2, 13

32

L-5

15A

15

PARKING LOT “H”

L-6

14

E

Riverside Avenue/Mine Okubo Avenue

Brockton Avenue

19

L-7

9

E

$

31

KIN G “N” LOT

ET

L-13

PAR

37

36

PARKIN G LOT “J”

E

30

Saunders Street

21

ET

ET WOMEN’S

Saunders Street

PARKING LOT “T”

4.

17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27.

28. 29.

30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37.

Baseball Field Softball Field (Ab Brown) Early Childhood Education Ceramics Art Gymnasium (Arthur N. Wheelock) Athletics/Coaches’ Office Fitness Room Stadium (Arthur N. Wheelock Field) Weight Room Nature Trail (Arlene & Robert F. Richard) North Hall College House Riverside Aquatics Complex Technology B International Students Center Printing & Graphics Center Technology A Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Career/Technical Education Welding Automotive Technology Lovekin Complex College Safety and Police, L1 - 3 Gateway to College (GTC), L4 - 9 Photo Lab & Studio, L12 - 14 Tennis, L10 Tennis Courts (Fran Bushman) Gymnasium (Catherine S. Huntley) Dance Pilates Studio (Eleanor H. Crabtree) Warehouse Facilities, Maintenance, & Operations Cosmetology Alumni House - 3564 Ramona Drive Foundation Parking Structure Practice Field Updated 02/17

Viewpoints Fall 2017 issue No. 8 Feb. 8, 2018  
Viewpoints Fall 2017 issue No. 8 Feb. 8, 2018  
Advertisement