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February 13, 2012

Vol. xxxVIVI, No. 8

An Associated Collegiate Press two-time national Pacemaker award-winning newspaper, serving as the voice of the students since 1922.

Riverside, CA | www.viewpointsonline.org

Recipe for success

Riverside City College

Features story see Pages 6-7 For a

Allison Perez / Interim PHOTO EDITOR

Sharp cutting: Amy Alfonsi, a student of the Culinary Arts program at RCC, chops up potatoes for a meal the class was preparing.

Amazing racing in downtown page 12

Marching Tigers lead the Rose Parade page 9

RCC fastpitch is off on the right track page 11


2 | February 13, 2012

Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

News

Celebrating Cesar Chavez The Riverside City College Diversity Committee is sponsoring a celebration of Cesar Chavez on March 27, 28 and 29. Events taking place at the Martin Luther King Jr. Teaching & Learning Center include United Farm Workers student skits, entertainment by the SAFE club, civil rights music, food, a migrant worker panel and information on Chavez. All activities will be held from 12:50-1:50 p.m. There will also be an evening reception and presentation on Chavez by United Farm Workers president Arturo Rodriguez and a screening of a Cesar Chavez documentary with a discussion of the movie.

Heat festival draws top talent This year’s UCR Heat festival will feature headliners The Airborne Toxic Event, as well as, hip hop newcomer and chart topper Mac Miller. Also performing are Major Lazer, Chiddy Bang, Iration, Karmin, Fei-Fei and Secret Panda Society. The festival is March 3 with a limited amount of free tickets for UCR students with an ID card. UCR students can purchase tickets for $27, while general public tickets are $47.50.

Mini concert during lunch at RCC Riverside City College’s Business Leaders of Tomorrow club is presenting The Webe and Friends Be Your Own Boss Tour on Feb. 16 12-2 p.m. in the RCC Cafeteria. The concert is hosted by Steve Lobel and 99.1 KGGI personality Diana Wehbe with performances by Mann, Audio Push, T. Mills, Loverance, Bobby Brackins, John West and Problem.

Fox ‘Cashes’ in on new stage show The music of Johnny Cash comes to life at the Fox Performing Arts Center in the new show “Ring of Fire.” The show features 38 Cash classics including “I Walk the Line,” “The Man in Black” and the title song “Ring of Fire.” Performances take place Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 18 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., with tickets ranging from $57 to $67. For more information go to foxriversidelive.com.

Scholarship contest for free tuition fees The deadline to enter the Riverside Scholars Association’s contest for free tuition is Feb. 16th. They’re $1 each and students may buy as many as they like. Prize is awarded as a maximum of $432 in reimbursement for enrollment fees for the spring 2012 semester. This prize is available even if fees are paid through financial aid.

Important information to remember • • • • • • • • • • • •

Here are a few important dates for spring 2012. Last day to add classes: Feb. 24 Last day to drop classes without a W: March 12 Graduation application deadline: April 1 Spring Break: April 8-14 Last day to drop classes with a W: May 16 Final exams: June 1-7 Graduation: June 8 Here are the office hours for essential student services. Admissions and Records, Counseling: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Bookstore: Monday-Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The City Grill: Monday-Thursday 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Health Services: Monday-Thursday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Student Financial Services: Monday and Thursday 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Tuesday 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and Wednesday and Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Allison Perez / Interim Photo Editor

new frontiers: Amy Vermillion, an associate professor of Nursing, leads a tour of Riverside City College’s new nursing, math and science complex.

Expanding to new technology RCC’s nursing, math and science complex will offer more than students can expect Destiny Rivera Interim Managing editor Riverside City College begins the 2012 spring semester with its new nursing, math and science complex opening to the public and serving students for the first day of class. Prior to its Feb. 9 grand opening, the RCC nursing program held a luncheon and tour Jan. 23, where guests were given the opportunity to view the inside of the new complex. “We have more than tripled our space,” said Amy Vermillion, an associate professor of nursing. “There is excitement, and there is fear; just because everything is new and just like moving in to anything that is brand new, there are glitches and so we are just trying to adapt to them as needed.” The new complex will provide more opportunities and reenact real life experience that nurses deal with in the workforce. “It is going to bring a new sense of realism to the student; it is going to house equipment,” Vermillion said. “The environment will be as though they are in a

real clinical environment with real patients, as close as you possibly can.” The extra space is much needed in the building; it provides for more equipment that will assist students in everything they need. “ We h a v e i n c r e a s e d o u r s p a c e tremendously which allows better learning, and more resources,” Vermillion said. “Allowing students to kind of spread out and learn, rather than them being on top of each other. There is more access.” Although there will be more space to enroll more students, Vermillion said the nursing program will not be increasing its enrollment because the college is not in the position to hire faculty due to the budget cuts that are occurring at the moment. “Our enrollment did double, and we are merging the Moreno Valley campus now with Riverside campus,” Vermillion said. “We are all in one place now.” “There are still a couple of classes that are offered at the Moreno Valley campus, but there are no other cohorts chancellor’s grant that we received a couple of years ago which we had increased our enrollment by 50 percent,” she said.

Visit www.viewpointsonline.org to read about and watch the recap of the nursing, math and science complex’s grand opening. Also like Viewpoints’ Facebook fan page by searching “Riverside City College Viewpoints” and follow @RCCViewpoints on Twitter for extra online news.


Viewpoints

News

February 13, 2012 | 3

Serving students since 1922

Jonathan Flike resigns as president

Flike resigns as president of Associated Students of RCC after an issue with his senate Javier Cabrera Editor in Chief Jonathan Flike submitted his resignation as president of Associated Students of Riverside City College on Jan. 17, after an issue with the Senate caused him to step down. According to Flike, the Senate, which was split between being his supporters and detractors, could not move forward with the focus he set for student government. Flike said he tried sitting down to settle the issue, but there was nothing that could keep the peace within student government. “Ultimately the differences were just personal and people weren’t able to sit down and say ‘we want to have a personal relationship and we don’t care how we feel personally; we’re just going to work with you and work with what needs to be done,’” Flike said. Flike said the issue resulted from all the actions student government took in the first semester he was president. “It stems from a little bit of my fault, I really pushed hard with advocacy with changing programs, things that the students requested of me when I was elected; I pursued those,” he said. “Student government wasn’t ready for those changes, so there were a

lot of growing pains.” Flike said the changes student government took in one semester were gigantic because it made changes such as removing the collegiate points system, starting the food’s program and advocating with departments to create changes in policies. “There were a lot of things that were changed that were requested by the students,” he said. “One change, let alone 20 changes, will cause a rift, so I just think we pushed too hard in that first semester, so (it was) better for me to leave so they can stay cohesive.” Flike said student government was not ready for the changes and those changes led to a lot of frustrations, because the Senate felt the decisions were being made without their approval. “I never acted without the approval my advisors,” he said. “There was approval but not what they were used to.” According to the constitution of the Associated Students of RCC, the president must do tasks, such as being head of Student Activities, and Flike said those were objectives he was not interested in doing as president. “Nothing says be a student advocate, nothing says to pursue student issues or change programs for the benefit of students,” Flike

said of the constitution. “My responsibly was to maintain the status quo and to be head of activities.” “It was my fault for not looking at the constitution and realizing that was my responsibilities was the president, because (of that) I did not feel that this is what I went in there for,” he said. Although Flike realized what were the duties of being president, he said he wanted to do more than be the head of student activities. “What I went (in) there (for) was to make solid change that the students can feel and see,” he said. “My vision is completely incompatible with the way the constitution is written and (with) what the students have decided are the responsibilities of the president.” Joey Reynoso, who will be acting as president of Associated Students of RCC for the remainder of the spring semester, said the issue was the lack of communication and transparency. “Although he has ideals that I admire and that people admire, there is a certain process that needs to be followed for things and he was being put up for review because of violations of those processes,” Reynoso said. “The dialogue was supposed to be so that he can understand that the people within student

Jonathan Flike government are thinking and perceiving of him so that he can continue on this semester a better leader who is going to take the feedback from his people,” he said. Reynoso said Flike was a person who had his heart in the right place, but that people do change and have certain things that they believe in. “It is about creating a dialogue and having open communication so that you can actually create (a)

Joey Reynoso perfect union, and ideally I think that is all what we are trying to achieve,” Reynoso said. “I wish him the best of luck, and I know he is going to achieve great things in whatever he is doing or attempting to do.” Flike said he will continue with what he does best which is be a student advocate, while Reynoso said Associated Students of RCC will continue doing advocacy and making sure that student needs are met.

Textbook woes continue at RCC Javier Cabrera Editor in Chief While students are returning back to Riverside City College from their winter break, many students are wondering how much their textbooks will be this semester and where they will be getting their textbooks. One option that students chose is the Bookstore on campus because the textbooks are available immediately and the textbooks are the specific ones that each instructor has assigned for his or her classes. But after paying off tuition fees, a parking permit and waiting for financial aid to arrive, many students are unable to purchase their textbooks at the Bookstore, so they explore other routes such as renting their textbooks from online websites. “I’ll buy older books, if possible, and rent if I have to have the newest editon,” David Doria said. In a survey conducted by Viewpoints on its Facebook fan page, RCC students agreed with Doria and they do similar actions with acquiring their textbooks via renting or buying online. In the survey most of the RCC students said they bought their textbooks cheaper on websites like Amazon, Ebay, Half.com and Craigslist. Stacy Weidner, manager of the RCC Bookstore, said it has been improving the new methods students are taking, such as renting textbooks, that way the cost will be

less for students. “It’s been incredible,” she said. “We have over 50 percent of the students from the three campuses Norco, Moreno Valley, and Riverside, are choosing renting.” “(We are) one of the most successful (colleges) in the country with a rental program,” Weidner said. “It’s been very popular.” Weidner said a lot of RCC students do not know about the Bookstore’s other methods of acquiring textbooks that it tries to promote the methods in every way possible such as on Facebook. “For the spring semester, 71 percent of our titles are digital options, and 63 percent is rental,” she said. One reason why RCC students do not buy their textbooks from the college’s Bookstore is because they feel they cannot resell their textbooks at the end of the semester. “When I tried to sell the book back, the Bookstore told me that they wouldn’t buy it because they already moved to another edition, even though that semester was the first time that particular book was used,” Doria said about his Norco College special edition Spanish textbook. “I paid about $120.” Justino Gomez, assistant manager of the Bookstore, said there are a number of reasons why it might not buy back textbooks such as the Bookstore might have enough textbooks for the class for the next semester, the professor of the class is not using that textbook anymore or the condition of the

textbook is not usable. In Doria’s case, the special edition textbook he is referring to is a packaged textbook that is designed for a specific class and is hard to acquire outside of the campus’ Bookstore. Gomez said these special edition textbook packages are created by the instructor of the class because the instructor is using a certain number of chapters from the original textbook and is adding them to other chapters of other textbooks to create a new special textbook. Gomez also said these special edition textbooks are created to save students money. Gomez used Computer Information System 1A as an example where if the student was to buy the access code alone the cost will be $132, where on the other hand if the student buys the bundle package that includes the textbook book and access code than the price will be $113. Gomez said the college and faculty works with the publisher to give RCC students the cheapest price. “We are here to serve the students and sell the books, giving students choices, by having rental choices and used books,” Weidner said. “Our business is to serve the students and make sure they have their books for the first day of class, so that they can have their education,” she said. Weidner said the Bookstore depends on the sale of textbooks.

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4 | February 13, 2012

Viewpoints

Opinions Serving students since 1922

Viewpoints Staff

EDITORIAL

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Javier Cabrera (951) 222-8495 viewpoints@rcc.edu eic@viewpointsonline.org INTERIM MANAGING EDITOR Destiny Rivera 951-222-8488 managingeditor@viewpointsonline.org INTERIM ADVERTISING MANAGER Leah Frost 951-222-8488 ads@viewpointsonline.org FACULTY ADVISERS Allan Lovelace Dan Evans INTERIM SPORTS EDITOR James Williams sports@viewpointsonline.org INTERIM PHOTO EDITOR Allison Perez photo@viewpointsonline.org INTERIM FEATURES EDITOR Sam Finch features@viewpointsonline.org

Allison Perez / Interim Photo Editor

The Price is right: Riverside City College students search high and low for bargains.

Textbook prices are the pain of students

INTERIM INSCAPE EDITOR Lizbeth Landeros inscape@viewpointsonline.org

STAFF Dominique Franklin Jarred Jackson

Students enrolled in Journalism 20 and 52 for the spring semester must attend one of the following orientation meetings:

In the first weeks of any semester, there is always stress for Riverside City College students. Many show up on campus wondering if they will get into the classes they desire, how long they will last driving around the parking lots to find a parking spot and where the money will come from to pay for their classes. Another issue that causes stress for students at the beginning of semesters is how they are going to afford their textbooks. After RCC students pay for their classes, parking permit and other supplies, their wallet has nothing but a handful of $1 bills, and the panic of how they are going to get their books comes into play. As soon as the first class session is over, many professors assign readings and homework assignments that are due at the next class session, and students scramble like headless chickens trying to come up with the book they need. Many decide to skip buying the textbook and print out photocopies of each page, but in a span of a semester, the cost of those copies add up to the total cost of the book if they were to buy it in the first place. Others borrow a classmate’s textbook for a few hours but that is not a good idea because at some point in the semester that classmate is going to get stingy and is going to need the textbook to study for midterms and finals. A large group of students rent or buy textbooks from websites like Chegg and Amazon, but the only problem is that these textbooks take two to three weeks until they are delivered and by then the students are behind in their classes.

Feb. 14, 15, 16 and 20 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

LETTERS TO THE

EDITOR

Letters to the editor should be kept to 250 words or less. Deliver letters to the Viewpoints office in the room behind the Assessment Building. Viewpoints reserves the right to edit letters for space and to reject libelous or obscene letters. Letters to the editor and columns represent the opinions of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the entire Viewpoints staff, Viewpoints faculty advisers, student government, faculty, administration nor the Board of Trustees.

And the last few who do not want to deal with all the hassle head to the Bookstore on campus to buy their textbook. Although textbooks seem to be expensive no matter where a student buys them, there might be some other ways to deal with the issue. Textbooks are needed and there is no way of getting around the problem, so RCC students need to come together to help one another out. There is one method some students do already—they go to the class they took the previous semester and auction off their textbooks to the new students enrolled in that class. Another method is that some students post fliers around campus advertising what textbooks they are selling. And even though those might be good ideas, many other students are not aware of those advertisements. What RCC students need to do is something like a book exchange fair where there is a designated area where students can go and exchange textbooks amongst themselves. Some RCC students have taken this approach online and created a Facebook fan page called “RCC books,” where students can post the textbooks they have for sale or the textbooks they are looking to purchase. This method was popular for a lot of RCC students on MySpace but not anymore since MySpace is nonexistent now. The bottom line is as long as there are classes that require textbooks, students need to acquire them, so if the student body can work with each other to make life easier for each other then textbooks won’t be a stress.

Viewpoints’ editorials represent the majority opinion of and are written by the Viewpoints student editorial board.

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Viewpoints is a public forum, First Amendment newspaper. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. © 2011 by the Viewpoints staff, Riverside City College, 4800 Magnolia Avenue, Riverside, CA. 92506-0528. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the Viewpoints Editor-in-Chief.


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February 13, 2012 | 5


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February 13, 2012 | 7

Chef serves up experience, passion Sam Finch interim features editor

Allison Perez / Interim Photo Editor

A cut above: Terrance Warren prepares meat for breakfast service at the Culinary Academy.

Allison Perez / Interim Photo Editor

knife skills: Chef Instructor Richard Gabriel demonstrates how to properly prepare meat, which is one of the most important lessons for students at the Culinary Academy.

Allison perez / Interim Photo Editor

setting the tone: Chef Instructor Robert Baradaran provides students with skills they will need in real world food service.

“ Ta b l e for three? Right this way please.” A dozen students in white uniforms bustled about the Riverside City College Culinary Academy restaurant setting tables and serving as hosts while others cooked in the kitchen. The air was heavy with the scents of breakfast being prepared and the sound of clinking plates and silverware. Chef Instructor Robert Baradaran strode through the throng, supervising. “The way the Academy is structured, we have a three-semester program, each semester being fifteen weeks,” said Baradaran, who was hired full-time in April 2004, the same year that the Culinary Academy established in 1996, came under new direction. “We have the freshman semester, and then a junior semester, and then a senior semester.” “In the first semester, the students are mainly introduced to proper service, waiting, and how to serve food safely,” Baradaran said. In addition to earning a certificate in safety and sanitation from the National Restaurant Association, freshmen learn the principles of cooking through lecture and begin breakfast cookery with the guidance of an instructor in the second half of the semester. “During the junior semester, the students study how to make basic stock, basic soups, variations of soups, and variations of basic sauces,” Baradaran said. “They also learn how to fabricate poultry, fish, and some meats. So through the junior semester they learn their basic competencies.” “When they move up to their senior semester, the students really apply everything they have learned in the first eight months toward the production of the restaurant because we serve breakfast and lunch,” Baradaran said. “With the extra responsibility in the final semester, seniors also compete against one another with their hot food and cold food cooking abilities.” Proud of the progress of the Culinary Academy, Baradaran reflected on the beginnings of his own career. “For as long as I remember, I was working in the food industry, since I was 16 years old,” Baradaran said of his teenage relocation from Iran to California. “It began as a way of survival, to pay the bills, and to pay for my schooling. It wasn’t until I was 25 that I realized I wanted to make a career out of this field.” “After I went to culinary school, I realized just how much love and how much passion I had for this industry,” he said. “I began working in a number of fine dining establishments, I paid attention to details, I kept my knives sharp, and I was always a quick learner.” From then on, Baradaran moved from California to the Midwest to work in renowned dining establishments such as Tony’s and Cafe De France, both in St. Louis, Missouri. “When I moved back to California in 2000, I wrote letters of interest to many schools because I wanted to teach, and I began teaching at the Los Angeles Community College District as an adjunct, part-time faculty,” Baradaran said. “Then in 2004 I accepted a full-time position here in Riverside.” For the first seven years that he served as an instructor, Baradaran taught the senior class, but he has now switched his focus to the freshmen. He remains more excited than ever about the future of the Culinary Academy, especially with the prospect of a new building closer to the Riverside City College campus on the horizon. “I think it’s going to be very prosperous times for the community, for the college, and the students and instructors alike,” Baradaran said. “I think it’s going to be a great opportunity for all of us to showcase our talents and our art.”

Taste the fruits of the Culinary Academy’s labor Tuesday through Friday: Breakfast- 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Lunch- 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. located at 1155 Spruce St. in Riverside


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

8| February 13, 2012

Opinions

Reaching the moon to be president Republican nominee Newt Gingrich is selling Americans on the idea of living on the moon

dominique franklin Staff Writer Americans should be gearing up for a bumpy election season. Laugh out loud stories have already broken news airwaves, and they’re only bound to continue as we approach the election date of Nov. 4. Republican nominee hopeful Newt Gingrich has created the current buzz that allows viewers to go, “huh?” In a recent Florida Republican nominee debate, Gingrich announced his plan to have a permanent base on the moon by the end of his second term. This proposed base, he predicts, will eventually lead to a new U.S. colony, and then probably a new state. Americans across the country were baffled at the idea of a new colony being on the moon, especially when most Americans still can’t see how our economic position is going to improve. Talk about being out of touch with the American public. However, a Yahoo! news story titled “Experts say Gingrich moon

base dreams not lunacy,” reveals that such an idea is not as ludicrous as many news stations make it seem. In fact, it’s an idea that has existed largely since 1969. Up until just three years ago, the U.S. was pouring billions of dollars into that very same idea. The cost of returning to the moon, and setting up a base is the one thing that truly keeps NASA from accomplishing such an amazing plan. Just last year, although Obama sought to suspend the moon plan, he still asked congress to present NASA with $805 million. Congress awarded them about half of what President Obama requested, $406 million. Ideas have been reoccurring of further space exploration, many came much sooner than Gingrich’s idea of having a colony on the moon. Obama asked that NASA aim toward a higher goal of being able to land humans on an asteroid, or on Mars. Yet all of these ideas have been far too expensive for the government to expand on. Both republican candidates and President Obama admit that furthering space exploration will have to be done on a private level. What Newt Gingrich said was laughable at first, but looking into it more will definitely reveal some merit. With the space program having being shrunk, Florida has seen

an evaporation of thousands of jobs that were once promoted by NASA, and funded by the federal government. It makes sense that Newt would choose that state to make his remarks. Another voyage to the moon has never been a bad idea. John F. Kennedy deciding that America was going to go to the moon spawned huge advantages for our country. Ingenuity had to increase remarkably, a task that we are still working on today. People who were divided came together for a cause, and celebrated briefly for one triumphant moment in American history; a task that still needs to be accomplished today. Scientists have admitted that while a colony on the moon is slightly farfetched, setting up a base is not such a bad dream. This information is not new either. A plan has been revolving in NASA for over 40 years. A government committee at the time suggested that NASA first create a winged, reusable space shuttle. Accomplished. Next, they suggested that a space shuttle be created. Almost completed. Finally a base be established on the moon. Why not continue with the plan? Of course the obstacle of funding will always linger. However, the advantages could out weight the costs. More jobs will be created; the U.S. will once again be seen as

Source: Wikimedia Commons the beacon of ingenuity, science, and engineering to the world. It will once again give Americans something to truly be proud of, just as it did in 1961. While I personally hate to admit it, Newt Gingrich’s idea of returning to the moon and creating an outpost has some merit. It’s an idea that has been in the works before he made his speech to Florida, and it’s an idea that should continue to be expanded on. Had he not mentioned the bit about setting up a colony, and going on to try and include the

moon as being a U.S. state, his idea may not have been laughed at so hard. Besides Newt, shouldn’t we make Puerto Rico a state before deciding to colonize and statehood the moon. Just an idea.

Continue reading Viewpoints political coverage as the 2012 presidential election approaches in November


Viewpoints

February 13, 2012 | 9

Serving students since 1922

Tigers start 2012 in rosy fashion Destiny Rivera

Interim Managing Editor

“Everything is coming up roses” for the Riverside City College Marching Tigers as they were the opening act and the official band of the 123rd Tournament of Roses Parade this year. While Gary Locke was in London fulfilling other responsibilities, Paul Locke took over for this event. Paul’s role is to write the drill each year. “It was an honor to open the 123rd Rose Parade. I am always blown away at the numerous people that line the streets to watch this parade with their video cameras, phones, iPads, and cameras and how happy everyone is,” Paul said. “It is the one day where everything in the world seems without problems and everybody is optimistic about the upcoming year.” Former drum major Kurt Kilgus was also a big help towards the production. “I’m credited as a marching/ visual staff member or instructor, I teach and correct the students marching fundamentals and technique, as well as help choreograph other movement/ visuals that they perform, and in the case of a parade, help “set” the parade block order,” Kilgus said. “I also help with teaching and correcting the music we perform, but a bigger role I have is to help Gary Locke with behind-thescenes logistics and organization of rehearsals and events,” Kilgus said. He also shared his advice to his fellow band members. “Take time to enjoy the audience, and not just focus on the band block formation.” Kilgus said. Although Kilgus does not

RCC Marching Tigers

showstoppers: Riverside City College’s Marching Tigers led the way for over six miles as the opening act of the 123rd Tournament of Roses Parade. prefer preforming in parades over field shows, he does appreciate the kind of event that they are and the exposure they provide. “More people saw us live, not to mention the millions or billions of TV viewers world-wide, in the opening minutes of the Rose Parade than saw us all fall season combined to perform our field show, which is our usual “thing” to entertain crowds,” Kilgus said. “In years when we’ve traveled in Indianapolis to perform in Lucas Oil Stadium...for the Bands of America Grand National Championships, the “pinnacle” of marching band competitions, the maximum capacity crowd that sees us is 35,000,” Kilgus said. “In the first several blocks of the

Rose Parade, around three times that many people enjoyed our sights and sounds. Then there was still the remaining six plus miles of parade route overflowing with people who saw and heard us.” For the band members performing in an event like the Rose Parade is a once in a lifetime experience. “I really enjoyed it, I thought it was a great experience,” said clarinet player Caitlyn Reeves. The excitement of the moment didn’t provide for a great night’s sleep, but Reeves didn’t seem to mind as adrenaline kept her up. “We’re supposed to sleep for four hours, but I think got maybe 20 minutes of sleep.” First year tuba player Steven

Devore just wanted to make sure to stay in the moment. “After finishing the Rose Parade it was an incredible feeling. I didn’t really know what to expect from it,” Devore said. “All the veterans in the band were saying it’s great feeling, take all the emotions in.” At over six miles long, the Rose Parade is one of the longest routes to tackle. Luckily for Reeves, veteran band members gave her sound advice. “To not overplay for the first couple miles because the last couple you would just die,” Reeves said. Both Locke and Kilgus put a lot of their time and dedication into this production.

“This year’s parade was truly magical, a once in a lifetime opportunity to perform and entertain,” Kilgus said. “The RCC Marching Tigers have had the privilege of that opportunity on six different occasions, including three of the last four years, and I’ve been extremely lucky to participate in four of them.” Locke’s thoughts throughout the parade were strictly on no dropouts. “Also, we had to alter the drum cadences a little to make sure that the trumpets had enough time for their lips to recuperate,” Locke said. Over all, he believes that this was the best production they have ever been a part of.

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Viewpoints

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Sports

February 13, 2012 | 11

Off on the right track

The Riverside City College fastpitch team is off to a hot start in the early season James Williams Interim Sports Editor

Baseball

Fastpitch

Men’s Basketball

Women’s Basketball

Season Record 1-1 Conference: 0-0 Next Game: Feb. 16 vs. Western Nevada 6 p.m.

Season Record 1-1 Conference: 0-0 Next Game: Feb. 15 at Saddleback 3 p.m.

Season Record 12-8 Conference: 6-2 Next Game: Feb. 15 vs. Orange Coast 8:30 p.m. at Cal Baptist

Season Record 7-17 Conference: 1-7 Next Game: Feb. 15 vs. Orange Coast 6:30 p.m. at Cal Baptist

Swimming/Diving Feb. 4

Waterman Relays at Palomar 9 a.m.

Feb. 10

vs. Cypress, Santa Ana and Golden West 12 p.m.

Feb. 24

Golden West Invitational 9 p.m.

March 2

vs. Orange Coast 1 p.m.

March 9

vs. Chaffey 9 a.m.

March 10 vs. Chaffey 10 a.m. March 23 vs. Saddleback and Fullerton 2 p.m. April 6

vs. Palomar 1 p.m.

April 13

OEC Dive Championships at El Camino 10 a.m.

April 14

OEC Dive Championships at El Camino 11 a.m.

April 21

Orange Empire Championships at Riverside 9 a.m.

April 28

State Championship at East Los Angeles 9 a.m.

Jan. 31

Men’s Tennis

Feb. 24

at Sacramento City 4 p.m.

Feb. 25

at Sacramento City 12 p.m.

Feb. 28

vs. Mt. SAC 6 p.m.

March 1

at Santa Ana 2 p.m.

March 3

at Cypress 12 p.m.

March 6

vs. Fullerton 2 p.m.

March 8

vs. Golden West 2 p.m.

March 10 vs. Irvine Valley 12 p.m. March 13 vs. Orange Coast 2 p.m. March 15 at Saddleback 2 p.m. March 20 vs. Santa Ana 2 p.m. March 22 at Santa Ana 2 p.m. March 24 vs. Cypress 12 p.m. March 27 at Cypress 2 p.m. March 29 at Fullerton 2 p.m. March 30 vs. Fullerton 2 p.m. April 4

vs. Santa Barbara 5 p.m.

April 5

vs. Cerro Coso 6 p.m.

April 10

at Golden West 2 p.m.

April 12

vs. Golden West 2 p.m.

April 14

at Irvine Valley 12 p.m.

Fastpitch

RCC 3 Los Angeles Pierce 6

Feb. 2

RCC 2 Desert 7

Feb. 1

RCC 9 Southwestern 1

Feb. 9

vs. Victor Valley 2 p.m.

Feb. 3

RCC 7 Long Beach City 2

Feb. 10

vs. Palomar 2 p.m.

Feb. 8

at Cerritos 3 p.m.

Feb. 11

at UC Riverside 2:30 p.m.

Feb. 9

vs. Canyons 2:30 p.m.

Feb. 14

at San Diego City 2 p.m.

Feb. 10

at Citrus 3 p.m.

Feb. 23

at Mt. San Jacinto 2 p.m.

Feb. 15

at Saddleback 3 p.m.

Feb. 28

vs. Cypress 2 p.m.

Feb. 16

at Cypress 3p.m.

March 1

vs. Irvine Valley 2 p.m.

Feb. 22

vs. Santa Ana 3 p.m.

March 6

at Fullerton 2 p.m.

Feb. 24

vs. Orange Coast 2 p.m.

March 8

at Saddleback 2 p.m.

Feb. 27

vs. East Los Angeles 3 p.m.

March 13 at Orange Coast 2 p.m.

Feb. 29

at Golden West 6 p.m.

March 15 at Mt. San Antonio 2 p.m.

March 1

at Fullerton 3 p.m.

March 20 at Cypress 2 p.m.

March 3-4 Fresno Tournament

March 22 at Irvine Valley 2 p.m.

March 7

vs. Santiago Canyon 6 p.m.

March 27 vs. Fullerton 2 p.m.

March 9

vs. Saddleback 2 p.m.

March 14

vs. Cypress 3 p.m.

Baseball

Feb. 3

RCC 3 East Los Angeles 4

March 16

at Santa Ana 2 p.m.

Feb. 4

RCC 10 Compton 1

March 17

vs. Ventura at Walnut 5 p.m.

Feb. 8

vs. Cuesta 2 p.m.

March 17

at Mt. San Antonio 7 p.m.

Feb. 10 vs. Fresno 6 p.m.

March 20

at Antelope Valley 3 p.m.

March 21

vs. Orange Coast 3 p.m.

March 23

vs. Golden West 2 p.m.

Feb. 11 vs. Fresno 1 p.m. Feb. 16 vs. Western Nevada 6 p.m. Feb. 17 vs. Western Nevada 6 p.m. Feb. 18 vs. Western Nevada 1 p.m. Feb. 21 at Mt. SAC 6 p.m. Feb. 23 at Sacramento City 6 p.m.

Men’s Tennis Season Record 0-2 Conference: 0-0 Next Game: Feb. 14 at San Diego City 2 p.m.

vs. Fullerton 3 p.m.

March 30

at Santiago Canyon 2 p.m.

April 3

vs. Cypress 6 p.m.

Season Record 3-0 Conference: 0-0 Next Game: Feb. 14 vs. Antelope Valley 2 p.m.

Women’s Tennis

Feb. 2

RCC 9 Victor Valley 0

Feb. 3

RCC 9 Imperial Valley 0

Feb. 6

RCC 9 Fresno 0

Feb. 10

vs. Palomar 2 p.m.

Feb. 14

vs. Antelope Valley 2 p.m.

Feb. 16

vs. Glendale 2 p.m.

Feb. 23

vs. Mt. San Jacinto 2 p.m.

Feb. 28

at Cypress 2 p.m.

March 1

at Irvine Valley 2 p.m.

March 6

vs. Fullerton 2 p.m.

March 8

vs. Saddleback 2 p.m.

March 13

vs. Orange Coast 2 p.m.

March 20

vs. Cypress 2 p.m.

March 22

vs. Irvine Valley 2 p.m.

March 27

at Fullerton 2 p.m.

March 29

at Saddleback 2 p.m.

April 3

at Orange Coast 2 p.m.

Track and Field

Feb. 10

vs. Golden West and Santa Ana at Cal State Fullerton 2 p.m.

Feb. 10

at Azusa Pacific 8 a.m.

Feb. 11

at Azusa Pacific 8 a.m.

Feb. 18

at Azusa Pacific 8 a.m.

Feb. 22

vs. Cal State Long Beach 2 p.m.

Feb. 24

vs. Saddleback 2 p.m.

March 2

at Cerritos 8 a.m.

March 3

at Cerritos 8 a.m.

March 9-10

Ben Brown Invitational at Cal State Fullerton

March 14-15 Conference Multi-Championships at Saddleback March 16-17 Aztec Invite at San Diego State March 22-23 Riverside Open March 30

at Orange Coast and Santiago Canyon at Orange Coast 2 p.m.

April 10

Regional Heptathlon and Decathlon Championships at Orange Coast 2 p.m.

April 10-11

Regional Heptathlon and Decathlon Championships at Cerritos 8 a.m. Regional Heptathlon and Decathlon Championships at

March 24-25Bakersfield Tournament March 28

Women’s Tennis

The Riverside City College Tigers fastpitch team opened the season 2-0 after being ranked No. 5 in the state. Marisa Gardea led the Tigers to a dominating victory over the Southwestern Jaguars, 9-1, in their season opener at the Evans Sports Complex. Gardea had two hits in two at bats, which brought in three of the Tigers nine runs against the Jaguars. “I think we did pretty good for the first time out,” said assistant coach Jose Ortega. Nichole Zink pitched four of the game’s five innings for the Tigers, only giving up three hits. Zink also gave up an unearned run, which was the Jaguars only run of the game. The Tigers handed the Jaguars their first loss of the season after a four game winning streak to open the season. “We did well (with) our aggressive base running,” said coach Michelle Daddona. “Our pitchers threw well tonight, only missing a few pitches and played well offensively.” In the second game of the season, the Tigers defeated the Long Beach City College Vikings 7-2 on the road after managing to capitalize on all four of the Vikings errors in the game. The Vikings took the early lead in the bottom of the first inning after Cassie Garcia brought in Danielle Hannan for the first run of the game. It was not until the third inning that the Tigers were able to answer back after missing opportunities in the opening innings of the game. Chelsea Crawley contributed bringing in two runs in the bottom of the third inning. Chelsea Rosario helped lead the Tigers offense going three for five hitting at the plate throughout the game. Rosario also batted in the last run of six straight unanswered runs in the third inning for the Tigers. Kendall Apodaca started the game for the Tigers, pitching the first four innings against the Vikings. In the four innings Apodaca pitched she managed to allow only one hit for the Vikings and giving up one run. Apodaca also struck out three Vikings players in her first win of the season. Zink closed the game, pitching the final three innings in relief for Apodaca. Zink allowed one earned run as the Vikings’ Melisa Sponholz brought in the run off a single toward midfield, for the second and last score of the game for the Vikings. Zink also managed to strike out seven Vikings batters in relief duty.

Cerritos 8 a.m. April 14

Mt. SAC Relays at Mt. San Antonio 8 a.m.

Jarred Jackson / Staff Photographer

starting strong: RCC infielder Chelsea

Crawley contributed two RBIs in the Tigers two wins to open the season.


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

12 | February 13, 2012

Inscape

Downtown hosts race through history Riverside college students race each other to learn something new about the city’s history Lizbeth Landeros Interim Inscape Editor While there was no Phil Keoghan, crazy taxi drivers or airport mixups, “The Amazing Race” did come to Riverside. Students from Riverside City College, UC Riverside, Cal Baptist University and La Sierra University competed against each other on Jan. 22 in the first annual “Amazing College Race” which was presented by the College Counsel of Riverside. The race led 60 teams of three throughout downtown Riverside where the contestants were given clues of different spots which included the Mission Inn, the Fox Theater and Mount Rubidoux. Lizette Navarette, who is the education coordinator of Riverside, said the purpose of the race was to connect students from all four campuses together and to introduce students to downtown Riverside. “Students running around downtown (allowed them to) really learn about (the city), and get to know the city,” she said. The College Counsel of Riverside decided to host the race in January because they wanted students to participate without any homework or exams in the way. “(The race) was at the beginning of the year, so it wouldn’t conflict with students in any major way,”

Navarette said. Each member of the winning team received a scholarship of $500. The winning team in the first annual “Amazing College Race” was “RS Crew,” sisters Jackelyn, Stephanie and Himelda Rivera of UC Riverside. The Rivera sisters were excited when they found out they won, and they said they did a lot to prepare for the race. “We drew our own map and researched a lot historical sites, and figured out main key points of what we would be asked during the race,” Jackelyn said. “We prepared just by researching and by getting to know the area.” Jackelyn said their only strategy was to run once they received a new clue. “The hardest part was running (at the end) because we ran the whole way from Mt. Rubidoux (back to the UC Riverside Arts Block),” Himelda said. “We were tired.” The hardest challenge for every team in the race was the clue at Mount Rubidoux because the mountain was a long distance from downtown, and many teams couldn’t find the spot near the mountain. “The hardest clue was at Mount Rubidoux,” Jackelyn said. “We thought ‘what bridge?’ they

Allison Perez / Interim Photo Editor

Team sisters: (Left to right) Sisters Hemelda, Stephanie and Jackelyn Rivera celebrate after they won the first annual “Amazing College Race” on Jan. 22. wouldn’t make us run all the way to Rubidoux and then back.” “We had 30 minutes to run there and then run back, and we pushed it,” she said. The sisters felt the race was a good idea and they were glad to be a part of it. “Having us run around the city, we got to know more of the history,” Jackelyn said. “We found out a lot about the

history,” she said. “We never knew President Reagan got married at the Mission Inn.” The sisters also felt that a lot of students from all four campuses represented their college in the race. “It was nice to see school spirit because at UC Riverside we don’t really see a lot,” Himelda said. “We saw a lot (of school spirit from) UC Riverside and RCC.”

Watch a video on the “Amazing College Race” now on Viewpoints’ YouTube channel at ViewpointsofRCC

Viewpoints - Feb. 13, 2012  

Riverside City College Viewpoints' first issue of the 2012 spring semester.

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