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Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

viewpoints An Associated Collegiate Press two-time national Pacemaker award-winning newspaper, serving as the voice of the students since 1922.

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Spotlight: Counselor Garth Schultz Page 8

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Swim and dive are eighth in state Page 12

INSIDE

NEWS................. 2 A&E.................... 5 FEATURES........ 7 OPINIONS.......... 9 SPORTS.............12

Chancellor search takes to forum

Vol. XCIII, No. 13

Page 2

LUIS SOLIS / PHOTO EDITOR

F I R S T C A N D I D AT E : Kathryn Jeffery is the first of three prospective chancellor’s to visit the Riverside Community College District in an open forum at all three colleges. The forum at Riverside City College was held in the Digital Library May 13.

Viewpointsonline.org | May 15, 2014


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News

Serving students since 1922

N EWS BRIEF S Follow us @rccviewpoints

Accounting office moves location Business and Financial Services moved to a location off the Riverside City College campus May 1. Bill Bogle, Riverside Community College District Controller, alleged that the move was the result of a request by the chancellor of Riverside City College, Irving Hendrick. The reason for the move was to consolidate departments. College House is an historical building, and Bogle isn’t sure what plans if any are in store for the vacant structures. The new location is in the district office building located on Spruce Street on the third floor. The move was originally scheduled for last fall, but it had to be delayed until work could be completed on the new offices. The staff packed up the offices themselves and then had Burges Moving and Storage make the transfer. The cost of the move was unknown to staff. The move has left office vacancies on RCC’s lower campus. North Hall was headquarters to accounting, finance and purchasing, while College House was home to risk management and legal.

Jeffery looks at RCC chuckle from the 27 people in the crowd. “And I thought oh Jeez, this is really going to be one of those things where I feel separated from the group.” Jeffery managed t o m a i nt a i n he r engagement by st rolli ng dow n towa rd t he bu l k of the crowd and evading the stage in favor of interaction. LUIS SOLIS/ PHOTO EDITOR PROUD: President Wolde-Ab Isaac introduces She also proved Kathryn Jeffery from the stage in the DL Auditorium i n t elligent and while Jeffery stands at audience level May 13. adaptive as people asked questions and she geared JOSA LAMONT NEWS EDITOR her examples in the direction of the attending community. Kathryn Jeffery presented Though Jeffer y was her qualifications as a finalist forthright and frank, and even at in the Riverside Community one moment she began to tear up College Dist rict chancellor when discussing how much she search in a forum May 13 in felt for Japanese internment camp the Salvatore G. Rotella Digital victims, she was personable and Library Auditorium. at ease. The forum at Riverside City “I think that they treated me College represented the last differently because I’m a woman of three stops for her campus of color,” said Jeffery. “And and dist r ict tou rs. Facult y actually, some people treated and students were given the me differently because I’m a opportunity to pose questions woman period. I think I deserve, to the candidate and provide and should be, where I am. So if feedback that will be presented I’m in this position, as president to the Board of Trustees. of Sacramento City College, I Jeffery has a 30-year career think I should be. I think I own in academics, and most recently that position. And so I try not to was made the f i rst female even think about the fact that I’m president of Sacramento City a woman in the job.” College in 2008. The chancellor position at “You never know how many RCCD gives the Texas Ph.D people you’re going to have, and graduate an opportunity to grow I had this anxiety of this sea of as a leader and a chance to people because of the size of contribute to the community and the college,” Jeffery said with a

build a legacy. Jeffer y is fundamentally collaborative in her leadership style, and inherently oriented to diversity as she expressed in her specific experiences with people from her world travels. The for mer president of Hennepin Technical College in Minnesota related specific examples of collaborating in her past for fundraising, arts programs and athletics to how she would use that experience to excel with the theater director, the athletic director and other faculty asking questions in the audience. She engaged questions directly, and with an emphasis on relationship and connection. W hen facult y addressed concerns they had with the study abroad program, Jeffery pulled from her diverse and traveled background to emphasize the lessons she drew from her travels to the Caribbean, Africa and Europe. She elaborated how getting to know different cultures helped her to work better with her office team when coming back home, and how she stresses the significance of travel to being more accepting and open to other cultures and variety. The remaining candidate forums will be Tod Burnett on May 18-20 and Michael Burke on May 28-30 Burnett will present in the Digital Library Auditorium from 1- 2:30 p.m. May 20. Burke will answer questions in the Digital Library Auditoriumfrom 2 - 3:30 p.m. May 30.

Fashion brings people together

Downtown Riverside partnership brings together through fashion show that showcases styles through collaboration. DANYEL WHYTE STAFF WRITER Retailers su r rou nding the Mission Inn showcased the creative com mu nit y of Dow nt ow n R ive r side w it h clothing and fashion. R iverside Com mu n it y College contributed through hair & makeup and added to the art of the city by styling more than 100 different models at the Destination Style Spring Fashion Show on May 2. Centered in the middle of University and Mission Inn Avenue, the show was hosted by the Riverside Downtown Partnership, which manages the business improvement district of downtown Riverside. Since their debut in 2012 this was Destination Style’s largest Fashion Show with about 30 participating downtown retailers and over 100 models. The event attracted press, art goers, local cosmetolog ist s a nd Mayor Rusty Bailey. The fashion show was kickedoff with a special performance by Ballet Folklorico De Herencia

Mexica na a nd R iverside Repertory Theater. The turnout was greater than anticipated. This represented the first of two fashion shows held annually to promote downtown Riverside as the premier destination fashion district of the Inland Empire. The Spring/Summer half will be followed by the Fall/Winter show in October. House of Flames, Kelley’s Boutique, MP Couture, Vanity Haus and Sultry Vamps were some of t he ret ailer s who participated in the show. Models of all ages auditioned for a chance to present vendor merchandise in the show. “It was family friendly; my daughters were in it,” said Bailey. “It was great for the small familyowned businesses in downtown.” This isn’t the f irst year for RCC to be involved with Destination Style. The college partnered with the city in 2012 to give cosmetology students the opportunity to showcase their skills in a professional setting. “RCC Cosmetolog y d id an amazing job bringing the retailers’ visions into existence,”

said Christie Collins the Public Relations representative for downtown Riverside. Senior students fashioned hair and underclassman worked with makeup. “Here at t he school we typically work on older women and the fashion show was more current,” said Sharon Park an RCC student. Students were given a theme with pictures of the model so that they could visualize what to create to showcase their creativity and bring attention to the retailer. “Peter Westbrook, Program Director and his team were absolutely wonderful to work with,” said Robbie Silver, the com mu nications and event liaison. “The creative work of his students upgraded the quality of the Show.” The next show will take place in the fall, as another business oppor t unit y for downtown. The same retailers will be participating with new themes to express the culture and creativity of the community.


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May 15, 2014 | 3

Serving students since 1922

Cupcakes for a cause

Illustration by: Nicholle Salvatierra

NICHOLLE SALVATIERRA STAFF WRITER T he r e i s not h i ng mor e f ulf illing than donating to charity; unless it’s filling up on delicious cupcakes at the same time. IE Shine On hosted their second annual Cupcake Fair at the Riverside Convention Center on May 4. Proceeds from the event were donated to California Riverside Ballet as well as Community Connect. Community Connect provides programs including breast cancer resources, a food pantry, services for veterans a nd fa m ilies as well as housing services.

Guests attending the event were able to purchase tickets which could be exchanged for a delicious cupcake from any of the 16 participating bakers. The tasters were then able to vote for their favorite flavors as well as decide which booth was the best decorated. Booth Decorating contest win ner Sabr ina Loos f rom Dreamy Little Cupcakes attended the cupcake fair for the first time. “I am very detail oriented,” said Loos, standing beside her booth covered in purple frills and cupcakes decorated with fondant butterflies. A lo ng w it h t r a d it io n a l chocolate and vanilla cupcakes, participants displayed some of t h e i r u n i q u e f l a vo r e d treats. There were lemon and lavender, jamaica as well as the Professional Unique Flavor winner Tamale con Mole from Viva Los Cupcakes. The favorite among the crowd was the buffalo chicken f lavor [desi]gn cakes & cupcakes. Both amateur and professional contestants were ranked in the competition. Amateur contestant Cup 2 My Cakes won the division as well as the amateur unique ingredient with their brown sugar Kahlua cupcake. Q ue e n Si n’s C up ca ke s,

caramel macchiato flavor ranked first in the professional category. Many contest ants had been baking for years, and have attended other baking competitions. “I’ve been baking ever since I was 13,” said Caroline Zaki, from Sweet Caroline Bake Shop. Z a k i b a ke d pi n e a p ple coconut cupcakes that were a hit among tasters but did not place in the competition. Along with the tast y treats handed out at booths, 16 other vendors attended the fair including: California Cake Decorations & Supply Co., Molinos Coffee, Mothership Scrapbook Gal and Community Connect. Between devouring delicious cupcakes, attendees were able to burn some of those calories at the Active Zone, which had Real Ryder bikes provided by FITT Cycle. After burning a sweat, you could freshen up by receiving a free massage courtesy of Kinetic Mind Body or a Vive Beauty Lounge makeover. The fair was a great place to bring children to get their faces painted, take pictures at a photo booth or hang out with other children while being supervised by Seeking Sitters.

EACH MIND

MATTERS

EVERYBODY’S GOT PROBLEMS. YOU ARE NOT ALONE. TALK IT OUT AT

City council renames Central Avenue

To make the Riverside Plaza easier to locate, Central Avenue is getting a partial name change for a half-mile. From Highway 91 to De Anza Avenue, Central Avenue will be renamed Riverside Plaza Avenue as determined in a May 6 vote by the Riverside city council. None of the residents or businesses will need to change their addresses, but the new name will be shown on highway and street signs to help drivers locate the plaza. The name change will cost a few thousand dollars for new signs but city officials said renaming the street was the best way to publicize the plaza.

Taube presents Guatemalan journeys TYLER REESE STAFF WRITER

Rhonda Taube is an instructor in art history at Riverside City College and held her “Journeys of the spirit and body: performance, gender and globalization in highland Guatemala” faculty lecture on the K’iche Maya in the Salvatore G. Rotella Digital Library Auditorium May 8. “I was surprised how full the auditorium was, I’ve never seen it so full,” said Montana Calderon an RCC student. Taube talked of her ancestry before starting her lecture, to make a comparison of the struggle her great grandmother had in the First World War to the K’iche Maya’s. Taube described how the K’iche Maya women had to keep their family out of harms way because of the advancing armies. “I love how she incorporated her own background, said Patricia Avila dean of instructions for career and technical education. “It made the lecture warm and personal.” Taube described how the K’iche Maya and countless other communities struggled when the Civil War was going on. Rebels were resisting the dictatorship government rule and because of the resistance by rebel fighters the government deployed troops and invaded many small communities. Not only were small communities invaded, but they were also forced to move away from their homes and into camps made by the government. Despite decades of Civil War and struggle the K’iche Maya recuperated to their normal habits and cultural ceremonies in just a few of years. The K’iche Maya are one of 20 groups of indigenous tribes in Guatemala, all with their own language. The 20 tribes share a sacred pre-Hispanic 260-day calendar because their shorter calendar represents the harvest and spiritual enlightenment, according to Taube. Taube spoke of when she was still a college student and how Guatemala fascinated her. The struggle and hardships of the K’iche Maya inspired Taube to fly to Guatemala and study abroad. While living in Guatemala Taube learned that priestesses and priests commence all of the K’iche Maya’s ceremonies such as ceremonial dancing, festivals and other public ritual performances. During the lecture Taube played videos of all the ceremonies Taube studied while living and working in Guatemala. Taube has also had the great honor of taking part of many ceremonies. “It was inspiring when she added her own journey and how it motivated and attracted her to work in Guatemala,” said Avila. Taube also spoke of her many good friends still living in Guatemala that she still talks to today. Thanks to today’s technology she is able to communicate with her friends via Facebook. “I thought it was cool when she said she was still able to keep in contact with her friends,” Calderon said. With a smile on her face and a sigh of relief Taube ended her lecture with a thunderous applause from her audience. RCC president Wolde-ab Isaac presented Taube with a gift of appreciation for all of her hard work and efforts.

For The Record:

REACHOUT HERE .COM

In the May 1 issue of Viewpoints on page 14, the photo cutline misspelled Galapagos as Galpagos. On the same page an image is attributed to Googe, but it is supposed to be Google In the same issue on Page 12, the election feature does not give credit to the author, who is Hannah Labato. In the same issue on page 15 in the softball column under sophomores, three names are listed when they should’ve been four. The names are as follows: Austin Schmidt, Desiree Broussard, Jaime Munoz and Amanda Venegas

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News

Serving students since 1922

Riverside City College map of crimes Represents a crime location Refer to graph for numerical association

Illustration by: JACKIE TREJO

4

5 8 3

6

4

1

1

7

2

2 9

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Code # 1

C RIME

Date

Crime

LO G

Time

Location

Status

May 9

Grand theft of money/ labor/ property

5:18 p.m.

Landis Performing Arts Center

information only

May 10

Grand theft of money/ labor/ property

3:53 p.m.

Landis Performing Arts Center

Inactive

May 2

Hit and run: property damage only

1:32 p.m.

Parking Street/ Tennis Courts

Pending

May 8

Hit and run: property damage only

5:02 p.m.

Lot F

Pending

3

May 6

Petty theft: building/ vehicle

8:40 p.m.

Martin Luther King Building front patio

Inactive

4

May 7

Burglary

3:50 p.m.

Wheelock Field

information only

May 7

Burglary

4:17 p.m.

Administration room 122

information only

May 5

Burglary

12:52 p.m.

Library

Inactive

May 8

Violation parole resisting parole officer/

6:31 p.m.

Lot K at scoreboard

Cleared by adult arrest

2

5

emergency medical 6

May 11

Vandalism: deface property

8:17 a.m.

Dental Education

Information only

May 1

Vandalism less than $400

12:50 p.m.

Humanities Building

Inactive

7

April 30

Petty theft

3:51 p.m.

Art Gallery Quad 144

Pending

8

May 2

Outside warrant/ misdemeanor

8:56 a.m.

Student Services

Cited and Released

9

May 5

Display unauthorized disabled placard

4:23 p.m.

Parking Street/ Tennis Courts

Cited and Released

10

May 7

Driver with no licence

6:48 p.m.

Public Roadway

Cited and Released


Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

May 15, 2014 | 5

ARTS & E NTERTAINMENT

RCC’s art community celebrates Student Honors Exhibition displays past and current students’ artwork ALEJANDRA GARCIA

the exposition is amazing, but ultimately one had to be chosen. And the winner of the award was Many proud instructors, Pam Raney. families and friends circled She created a sculpture that around the Quad Gallery catching resembled something from the up and admiring the splendor medieval times. She used pieces of colors in every piece. The of palm tree leaves that created a atmosphere was like one of a big capsule intertwined with webs, family party. only to reveal a tiny nest that Riverside’s art community holds a small dragon. came together for the Student “I’m excited,” Raney said. Honors Exhibition at the gallery “(Isaac) picks a piece out of the to celebrate and admire the whole show. I’m very proud.” accomplishments of Riverside Raney has been living in City College’s art students May 8. California for three years, and she has been taking art courses at RCC since moving from England. Raney developed her skill, and it shows in her winning piece, “Cradle.” Another of the few award winners was Mollie Ong. She won an award for excellence in beginning drawing. “Honestly, I didn’t think I was going to win,” Ong said. “I’m shocked.” Ong’s winning piece was a self-portrait she made out of charcoal. It took one week during winter session. She JOSE MIRANDA / SPECIAL TO VIEWPOINTS OPEN EYES AND EARS: Students, family and faculty enjoy re- described her relationship with her creation as a “love/hate freshments in the art gallery as awards for the night are given. relationship.” STAFF WRITER

R C C ’s a r t i n s t r u c t o r s assembled together for the anticipated award ceremony. The chatter came to a silence when Gallery Coordinator Leslie Brown welcomed families and friends. The first award of the night was the president’s award, which was presented by RCC President Wolde-Ab Isaac. Isaac had a tough decision to make when choosing a piece that stood out the most from the entire gallery. Every piece in

‘Spider-Man 2’ keeps true to comics RAFAEL RIOS STAFF WRITER

Swinging onto the big screens once again is your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. “With great power come great responsibility,” and the responsibility in cinematically displaying one of the most well known superheroes has been handed down after the first trilogy. The web head, not unfamiliar with being on the big screen, returns for his fifth time, but only for the second time since the franchise got its reboot. Originally titled “SpiderMan,” the new name has changed to “The Amazing Spider-Man.” The first “Spider-Man” trilogy ran from 2002 to 2007 and was directed by Sam Raimi. The main cast included actors such as Tobey Maguire (Peter Parker/Spider-Man), Kristen Dunst (Mary Jane Watson), and James Franco (Harry Osborn). “The Amazing Spider-Man” started with the release of the first film in July of 2012 and is currently being set up for a villainous sequel, which will include 6 currently unknown villains known as “The Sinister Six.” Both films were directed by Marc Webb. The main ensemble for both

films include Andrew Garfield (Peter Parker/Spider-Man), Emma Stone (Gwen Stacy), Sally Field (May Parker), Dane DeHaan (Harry Osborn) and Jamie Foxx (Electro). Evidently, with the change in director and the beginning of a new story line, the Sony Pictures Studios owned franchise has made many changes. The cast chosen for this film does an excellent job portraying the characters and their roles in this film, but there were points in the movie where the CGI was slightly too animated, and made it difficult to distinguish whether it was a cartoon film or a live action film. These problems mainly consisted during the battles between Spider-Man and Electro. Andrew Garfield does a great job in his role of a sleeker, wittier, more dramatic Spider-Man than we’ve seen. The story takes off with Peter having to deal with his love for Gwen Stacy and the promise he made to her father, that he’d stay away to keep her safe. It’s clear that he does not want to keep this promise, but he is still being haunted by Gwen’s father and being Spider-Man’s love interest puts her at a high risk. Eventually realizing that being Spider-Man gives the

people of New York hope and that saving people is an important role that has been given to him by fate, he decides to keep his promise. Troubled by his decisions, he goes on a quest to find out what happened to his parents and slowly stumbles onto more questions and troubling truths. Parker is faced with many obstacles along the way, such as the electrifying menace, “Electro” terrorizing the city. The reboot of the franchise is slowly piecing together a bigger picture of what’s to come with our hero and what bigger quests and troubles are heading toward him and the city. The romantic portion of the film was convincing, but Electro who could have been a promising villain, was under utilized. For many comic-book fans, it will be pleasing to see that part of the story was used from issue 121 and 122 of “The Amazing Spider-Man” comic book. The film earned 91 million during the opening weekend and was ranked first in around 4,324 theaters, beating its predecessor, which earned 62 million and was ranked first in 4,318 theaters. The new addition to the franchise sparks up emotions in audiences around the country, making it the top movie in its opening weekend.

Her major is currently undecided, but Ong wants to transfer to the California Institute of the Arts and possibly study story character design. Dayna Gregg, an art professor at RCC, also presented an award. Gregg described the award winner, Rafael Mejia to be dedicated, always on time and never slacking off. He submitted two portraits, which garnered universal praise. Mejia was influenced by the old master style, which come from painters such as Rembrandt. He also noted artists Sargent and Whistler as major influences on his developing style on painting

and drawing. An Art Club Scholarship award was also given out, which Angelica Wilkinson earned through her expressive portraits and her dedication to the arts. Not everyone who participated won an award, but everyone received recognition and praise over their dedication and commitment for their artwork. “(The faculty) are so dedicated, and they are so proud of you just like I am.” Isaac said to the crowd. “All of you are excellent.” The Student Honors Exhibition show ends May 29.


Viewpoints

6 | May 15, 2014

News

Serving students since 1922

ASRCC election results:

Tandy  Dang  and   Laura  Tapia,  317  

Orozco and Rudolph win

Ray  Orozco  and   Ryan  Rudolph,   320   Rayan  Elhamra,   187  

Megan   Contreras,  330  

John  Finnegan,   189  

PRESIDENTIAL VOTES 642 VOTES CAST

Olivia  Wilbur,   248  

Ravneet  Kaur,   198  

Student   SENATE VOTES Votes,  632   642 TOTAL CAST Arturo  Quiroz,   204  

Rakhee  Uma,   237  

TOTAL STUDENT BODY 17,000 STUDENTS

Joe  Palmer,  233  

Student   Body,   16368  

Megan Contreras: 51 percent Olivia Wilbur:39 percent Rakhee Uma: 37 percent Joe Palmer: 36 percent

Arturo Quiroz: 32 percent Ravneet Kaur: 31 percent John Finnegan: 29 percent Rayan Elhamra: 29 percent

percentage points based on

NICHOLLE SALVATIERRA STAFF WRITER ASRCC elections experienced a record-breaking voter turnout May 6-7. This election rallied 642 total votes, a large improvement from the last year’s student trustee election, which had only 15 participants. What made this election different was the addition of an online voting feature on WebAdvisor during the election. Instead of waiting in line or being rushed between classes to vote, students were able to vote in the comfort of their own home or to use one of the many available computers on campus. Chief Justice Tandy Dang was one of the students pushing in favor of a webenhanced form of voting. “I thought it would be best to have voting be available online since more people are interested in technology,” said Dang. Using the WebAdvisor feature allowed students to read statements from the candidates at their leisure before voting. Students were then asked to vote for one President and vice president candidate, and as many Senator candidates as desired. T he r a ce bet we e n pre side nt ial

candidates was close, with Ray Orozco and his Vice President Ryan Rudolph winning by three votes. “I never strategized to win personally, but to promote elections overall,” said newly elected president Orozco. “Both my running mate and I put a lot of effort into promoting elections across campus.” Candidates for student government visited classes to give presentations in order to encourage students to vote. Candidates for both president and vice president were experienced members of student government with Orozco serving as the Inter-Club Council Co-Director and Dang serving as Supreme Court Chief Justice. Their vice president picks are also experienced in the way student government functions. Rudolph, served as a Senator while Dang’s pick Laura Tapia is active as a BOC director. While the votes ran in favor for Orozco as president, Dang is still able to continue serving in student government. At this time Dang is unsure what position he will be filling. The current student government will continue their term until the end of the semester. Over the summer members will receive leadership training by past

642 votes

LUIS SOLIS/ PHOTO EDITOR

WILL VOTE FOR FOOD: ASRCC Supreme Court Pro-Tempore Charlie Zacarias gives out

pizza to encourage RCC students to vote on the steps of the Martin Luther King Building May 6.

members such as president Doug Figueroa. Figueroa will be ending his term and transferring to UCSB where he is still striving to be involved in student

government at his new campus. The newly elected student government will begin their new position starting in the fall semester.


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May 15, 2014 | 7

Serving students since 1922

Band still rocks after 30 years

IMAGE COURTESY OF: GARY LOCKE

MARCHING MADNESS: The

RCC Marching Tigers performing their “Spies and Superheroes” show.

EDITH NORIEGA STAFF WRITER

R ive r side Cit y C ol lege Marching Tigers jumped into tune celebrating their thirtieth anniversary, performing for the opening ceremonies for the USA Water Polo Championships on May 19 and on a new music video with Weird Al Yankovic with a June 3rd release. Marching band director, Gary

Locke and assistant director, Sheila Locke started the RCC Marching Band in August 1984 with only 16 members showing up for the first band camp. “It’s hard to believe that it’s been so many years since that ‘first ever’ band camp at RCC, way back in August of 1984 when only 16 potential members showed up,” Locke said. “But here we are, about to open our thirtieth band camp, this time with over 200 members expected, and it’s still just as exciting.” When Locke was first hired there was nothing. No members, no instruments, no uniforms, no band room, nothing to start the band, but sheer will power. Locke was in charge of creating something that would be the “visible classroom” for RCC, representing the college in a way that no other club or organization or sports team could. Kane, the RCC president at the time, gave the idea of starting the band at RCC to Locke. “If the band could provide energy and entertainment at athletic events and create a positive feeling toward RCC via their perfor mances and appearances, it would help everyone, all departments, “Dr. Kane said. “The first five years were difficult,” Locke said. “You have to remember that this was before the Internet. I didn’t email and or text potential students. All of the recruiting was done through snail mail and endless phone calls, trying to drum up business

for a group that had just been born, no history, no reputation to stand on.” After a lot of work, things st a r t e d t o fal l i nt o pla ce. T he RCC band t raveled to Eu rope, Canada and Japan and continued to work hard to improve, appearing at ribboncuttings, groundbreakings, grand openings, political rallies and corporate functions. “We did half-time shows for the San Diego Chargers and Los Angeles Raiders, yes that was a long time ago, and the L.A. Rams, played for opening days for the California Angels and at Dodgers Stadium,” Locke said. RCC’s Marching Tigers have since grown into one of the most well-known and talented college marching bands in the world and were once formerly a competitive marching band, but eventually moved on to bigger projects after placing an unprecedented seven times as the guest exhibition group at the Bands of America Grand National Championships. The Marching Tigers have also been known as musical a mba ssa dor s t o t he world per for m i ng i n places li ke: Switzerland in 1985 at the “Fetes de Genève Parade” in Geneva, “Queen Victoria Days Parade “in Canada in 1986, “Moomba Festivale Parade” in Melbourne Australia in 1992, a total of seven times at the “Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade” and “Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.” Part of celebrating its years of excellence the Marching Tigers

have been invited to the “New Year’s Day Parade” in Paris on Jan. 1, 2016. Besides being a g reat educational adventure, this event will be historic. It’s going to be the first time in this famous city’s history that they are going to allow the parade to take place on the historic Champs Elysees, the worlds most famous boulevard with several French monuments also on the street, including the Arc de Triomphe and the Place de la Concorde. Inland Empire Magazine selected Gary Locke as one of the “ top 25 people of the past 25 years” in its May 2001 special an niversar y issue. He has been vice president of the Southern California School Band and Orchestra Association and is i n demand as a clinician, adjudicator and g uest conductor throughout the Southwest. He holds a bachelor’s degree in music e d u c a t io n f r o m t h e University of Redlands and a California Teachers Credential from California State University at San Bernardino. He’s since been inducted into the La Serna High School H a l l of Fa m e , signifying his position as being one of the most famous graduates of

that Whittier, California school and recently, on April 2010 the Riverside Community College District presented him with the Faculty for Teaching Excellence. “What the band provides to its members is a lot more than right notes and wrong notes, it teaches them how to be,” Locke said. “We’re working together towards a common goal and they are learning the most important things: discipline, commitment a nd fol low- through.”

IMAGE COURTESY OF: GARY LOCKE

Model United Nations offers a glimpse into world affairs AMINA SAMREEN SALAHUDDIN

ASST. FEATURES EDITOR In the current world, where there is injustice and a disregard of basic human rights prevailing abundantly, getting to know civil rights, food security and making the world a better place to live seems to be the need of the hour. This is what the Riverside City College Model United Nat ion s t e a m t e a che s a nd promotes. It acts as a source to give students the power of knowledge, skills required and a channel to prove the students’ capabilities. MUN also helps students get familiar with international issues and understand the workings of the United Nations. This year, the MUN team won outstanding delegation

award at National Model United Nations New York conference in April and also won a position paper. RCC allows its students to understand the political workings of the world and provides an opportunity to participate in the world affairs and also have opportunity to win awards. “The students are groomed in three aspects: public speaking s k i l l s , w r it i ng s k i l l s a n d research skills, before finalizing the st udent delegates for a conference,” said Argie Hill, the MUN head delegate. “The main idea of the program is to train and educate students and make them capable in a way that they themselves help the agencies or government fix issues.” I n orde r t o joi n M U N, a student needs to enroll in

Political Science 10A during the winter session and should hold a valid passport to travel to international conferences if need be. The course teaches students the dynamics of multilateral diplomacy and enhances student’s skills in negotiation, public speaking, leadership, research, writing and teamwork. “I had joined RCC in the year 2012 as a freshman, and came across RCCM U NT si n c e I w a s ve r y mu ch interested in politics but did not know how to channel my interest,” Hill said. “MUN gave me a good platform to get more politically aware of the world around me.” Continued on page 8

IMAGE COUTESY OF: ARGIE HILL

EXPLORE: Riverside City College Model United Nations students get the opportunity to attend conferences all over the world.


8 | May 15, 2014

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Serving students since 1922

RCC Spotlight

Green Day trumpeter brings his journey to RCC

STEVEN SMITH/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

ROCKSTAR IN HIDING: Garth Schultz has worked at RCC since 1998, when he was a student worker. Today, he works as a counselor in the Admissions and Counseling Building where he helps students to achieve their own career goals.

DANYEL WHYTE STAFF WRITER

People wouldn’t expect a counselor from Riverside City College to have toured with Grammy award-winning band Green Day. However, counselor Gar th Schultz has explored the world, gone on tour with alternative and punk rock bands and ended up back to where he started, RCC. With a 16-year connection to the college, Schultz has impacted the lives of many incoming and transfer students. He believes that community college is a great place to find a personal identity and enjoys sharing its value. “Working as a counselor is my identity,” Schultz said. “I don’t see myself as a musician.” Schultz began with an interest in music and theater at a young age. His brother played drums for a septet band based out of Riverside known as The Skeletones, which landed Garth the position of playing trombone. He later joined the punk-ska band Goldfinger and played for them until he took he took his role as the trumpet and trombone player for Green Day. “One thing kind of leads to another,” Schultz said. “It wasn’t that I was seeking out

new opportunities, one just kind of fell in my lap.” His best experience with Green Day was when they toured in Italy. “We went to the Vatican,” Schultz said. “The art was so overwhelming, the sight of the place, there were original pieces of art and statues that were mind blowing.” He didn’t practice while in Italy. Before shows, they would do a sound check to make sure the quality of their sound was good. Sometimes he had days in between performances to explore. “It was great being young without having a care in the world,” Schultz said. Prior to his musician history and involvement in Green Day, Garth served as a US Marine in Japan, Camp Pendleton and the Persian Gulf. In late 1999, after his time over seas, Garth used his GI bill to complete his associate degree at RCC. “They walked me through the process back then and I try to do the same for incoming veterans,” Schultz said. Although he does not limit himself to veteran students, Garth enjoys relating to their ne e d s a nd a n s we r i ng a ny questions they might have.

IMAGE COURTESY OF: GARTH SCHULTZ

ROCK ON, GARTH: In addition to touring with world famous band Green Day, counselor Garth Schultz was also a brass player for The Skeletones. (Pictured: sitting in white shirt)

“I want to help people who are as lost as I was when I stumbled through those doors,” Schultz said. Schultz recently impacted Juan-Carlos Moran, a recent transfer student to RCC. “He immediately helped me with both class and VA (Veteran Affairs) benefit information,”

Moran said. “Thanks to Garth I was awarded a $1000 scholarship. I have to say that for the amount of times that I have met with him he makes me feel as if I have known him for years.” To this day Garth Schultz continues to impact peoples lives through his past experiences. “I have done more than just

counseling things so I am in a good place to advise students about all that is out there,” Schultz said. As time passes, and RCC continues as a stepping-stone for many students, Schultz will continue his role in students’ lives, to get them where they need to be.

Model United Nations offers real world political experience to the students of RCC (continued from page 7) In MUN, students are often given the opportunity to travel t he world to i nter nat ional conferences, all paid for by RCC. There are four conferences each semester, three regional and one either nat ional or

international depending upon the schedule. Students can actively participate in these regional conferences as well, one of which is hosted by RCC itself, and some conferences are a two-day event. At the MUN conferences, students assume the role of

diplomats, each representing different countries in different c om m it t e e s a nd prog r a m s of the United Nations. They discuss different topics ranging from ter rorism and nuclear security to the environment and human rights.

“It is good because students get a fairly good amount of exposure and experience, which they can utilize later, like me,” Hill said. “I am a strong advocator of human rights myself, and have also helped agencies at the grass root level on the issue of violence

against women and learned a lot through my research skills here at RCCMUN.” According to Hill, some of the former students of MUN obtained jobs as staffers of congressmen and have found other opportunities in politics.


Viewpoints

May 15, 2014 |

Serving students since 1922

OpinionS

VIEWPOINTS

9

EDITORIAL

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Travis West 951- 222-8494 viewpoints@rcc.edu MANAGING EDITOR James H. Williams viewpoints.managing@gmail.com ADVERTISING MANAGER David Roman viewpoints.advertising@gmail.com JOURNALISM SPECIALIST Matt Schoenmann matthew.schoenmann@rcc.edu FACULTY ADVISERS Allan Lovelace Jim Burns NEWS EDITOR Josa Lamont viewpoints.news@gmail.com OPINIONS EDITOR viewpoints.opinions@gmail.com FEATURES EDITOR Valerie Osier viewpoints.features@gmail.com

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY: LUIS SOLIS

Elevate the permits

SPORTS EDITOR James H. Williams viewpoints.sports@gmail.com ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Alyssa Aldrete viewpoints.artsentertainment@gmail.com

When members of the Viewpoints staff took a walk around the campus of Riverside City College, we noticed a number of beautiful and historic buildings on campus that have been kept up to date, but even then there are still flaws. For all that is maintained on campus, one thing that is often overlooked by maintenance appears to be the elevators on campus. Frankly, some of them smell like dumpsters and shake like an earthquake. Take a look around the inside of the elevators and you may notice the permits for the respective elevators and will notice the inspection date and the date in which those permits expire. These dates may be cause for concern when students notice how far back some of the elevators they use every day may have last been checked. The elevator near the art building has to rank amongst the poorest elevators on campus and the lack of an updated permit speaks to that. Recently, we rode the elevator and noticed the expiration date on the permit was May 8, 2012. One of our members thought maybe the dirty and shaky elevator was up to date after all when he saw a temporary permit on it, but after a careful inspection that permit had expired May 8, 2013. The lack of an updated permit should bring up cause for concern for elevators on the RCC campus. How safe should students feel about the lack of care for elevators? Members of our staff also noticed that at least two elevators, both of which were installed next to or inside the renovated Wheelock Gymnasium, have both recently been inspected and given an expiration date as of March 6, 2014 and given a follow-up date as of March 24, 2014. Coincidence or not, one of the most frequently used elevators is the one located near Terracina Drive in the parking structure, which expired March 7, just one day after the Wheelock Gym elevators had expired. This begs the question, why wasn’t the most frequently used elevator given an updated permit? The wear and tear on the elevator

PHOTO EDITOR Luis Solis viewpoints.photo@gmail.com ONLINE EDITOR Marissa Bostick viewpoints.online@gmail.com DIVERSITY EDITOR Charles Wagner

STAFF Aaron Beltran John Braxton III Alejandra Garcia Mariah Green-Hill Ashley Hefner Oscar Hernandez Mark Howard Cherish Jones Lucinda Matthews Patricia Meija Jasmine Mikulak Brittany Nikodym Edith Noriega Dianne Thi Nguyen

Alexandria Ortiz Terre’ Rabb Victoria Randall Tyler Reese Rafael Rios Amina Salahuddin Nicholle Salvatierra Daisy Sanchez Maranda Shain Steven Smith Mykaela Taketa Alicea Thomas Jackie Trejo Danyel Whyte Dominique Williams

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shows its lack of maintenance and attention. The gum on the floor, the shaky ride down the five levels of the parking structure and the scratched out screen on the inside that tells you what floor the elevator is on. In addition to the mess inside the elevators, on two separate occasions during the winter semester a person (presumably homeless) was found camping over night. The safe thing to do would be to take the stairs, however, what if the stairs were not a option for students if they were put into this situation? The problems do not stop there for the elevators on our campus. There have been times when the elevators do not work at all and students have gotten stuck inside. Members of our staff have experienced this in one of the Wheelock Gym’s elevators during the 2013 summer session. They were stuck for at least 30 minutes before help arrived because maintenance service had to drive from an off campus location. This alone should worry students. If one of the new elevators can stop working, what would prevent older elevators from breaking down, especially with the lack of an inspection according to the dates on the permit. It is unacceptable for students have to feel unsafe and skeptical about the elevators they have to use to get to class. What happens if a student gets stuck in one of the elevators and is late for class? Will help be available? Prevention of an accident is always the solution, but how long will the permits stay expired before someone other than the students notice.

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Viewpoints

Serving students since 1922

10 | May 15, 2014

Opinions

Campus Conversations When you think of RCC’s elevators, what comes to mind? Interviews by Ashley Hefner and Photographs by Steven Smith

“They don’t work. They seem very old.” “Sometimes I prefer the stairs though for exercise.” - Saifullah Faruq “They are cool and convenient.” - Amare

Biabuni

“Lazy. I only use them when I’m tired.” -Mohamed Eia “Well, they are old and half of them don’t work, and some are very hard to find.” - William Gonzalez

“I think they are convenient and they are better than the stairs.” -Alissa Green


Viewpoints

Opinions

May 15, 2014 | 11

Serving students since 1922

An insider’s perspective of the WRC partner’s frustration, and you’re aware that the magic has taken a dive. So, you decide to sit down and write a love letter for him … His response doesn’t look anything like the first time around,” Schmidt said. A few stories have appeared in Viewpoints the last couple of months which shed a less than optimal light on the writing and reading center. Life sometimes does not work the way we want it to, and good intentions do not equate with the expectations we put into our endeavors. I thought, as a student and now as a writing tutor trainee, it might be interesting to shed a little bit of a different take on the writing center. If you are currently enrolled in an English composition course, you probably know that once a week, you have to spend an hour in the writing center. I spend 3-5 hours per week in the writing center as well, but from a different perspective. (English 4 is the Writing Center’s Tutor training course) The class is usually pretty small, ten or so students semester. The current English 4 course has six students in it, including myself. During the semester we intern in the writing center to help out other students with their English and writing skills.

You might find yourself asking, what’s that got to do with writing a love letter to my professors? During the spring semester, tutors in the writing center are available to students Monday through Friday by appointment, which can be booked online. The web address to make an appointment is riverside.mywconline.com. We can assist writing students to improve their papers significantly. To be a tutor in the writing center, completion of English 1A is mandatory in order to qualify to take the training course. All the tutors know the writing process and we deal with it on a daily basis. We know the tricks of writing, and how to herd a student down the right path to a more successful paper. Another route that a student could take to improve their paper is by walk-in. Appointments always come first, but if the tutor has cancellations, or has no appointments, we can see students who walk in the door seeking help. You might be reading this article and thinking “I’m not in an English course, but I do have a history paper due here soon.” Great! There is a way for any discipline’s students to get writing help, no matter if you’re in an English course or

have two choices: pull your post down and apologize or back it up and stand firm for your view even though it’s deemed offensive by the Internet community. Either choice, results you being influenced by social media. Not the people in your day to day life who affect you daily, but random strangers who happened to come across your post. MYKAELA TAKETA Since last year, the population ASST. OP ED of Twitter has grown to 241 You wanted to share an idea million accounts, according that’s amusing or relatable and to About.Twitter.com, while you post it on social media. Facebook posted it hit its’ 1 billion Before you can blink an eye, account mark in October 2012. your account has over one As social media continues to hundred dislikes and flagged grow, so does its influence on our for inappropriate content that everyday lives. So it would not be offended countless others. You a surprised that the influence of these two social media websites impact us in a SUMMER PROGRAMS considerably negative light. The w r o n g tweet or Facebook post could jeopardize a business, a person, or group’s integrity and reputation. Transferring to a 4-year university? Get a Many f a m o u s head-start on your science requirements people fall victim and finish them in one summer! to submitting Or squeeze in those final credits that just offensive posts didn’t fit into your schedule this year to o n t o t h e i r respective graduate on time! profiles. Pat The SUMMER PROGRAM at LA SIERRA UNIVERSITY offers Sajak, the Wheel a variety of science and other disciplines classes at a special of Fortune host, discount rate. Registration is now open. Space is limited. ‘proclaimed’ his www.lasierra.edu/summer or call 951.785.2148 heterosexuality through Twitter that had more

than 700 retweets and 800 favorites. It might be seen as a parody of famous actors and celebrities coming out with their homosexuality. However, such a potentially harmful tweet could threaten his career. It has been seen with the gay rights protest against the CEO of Chick-fil-A Dan Cathy and his anti-gay tweet that motivated gay rights protesters. That single tweet started a campaign of boycott against the fast-food chain. Having easy access to social media should intimidate us into being hesitant about what we post. I feel that there should be a consideration on what we share especially if you are a representative of some organization. Unfortunately, Dan Cathy didn’t think about what he tweeted and thus suffered the consequences. Ultimately, social media has now become an essential part of our identity and therefore should influence us to be wary of what we share on social networks. The days of us sharing ideas have now been jeopardized because of one post, one tweet or Instagram picture that can ruin our reputation and credibility. Whether you have heard the saying or not, ‘once it’s on the Internet, it’s there forever’ and you can’t alter it and say you didn’t mean it. So be conscious of what you post. Even if you don’t see it as offensive. Someone somewhere will disagree with it, flag it down, and influence you to be politically correct.

WAYNE FIKE

SPECIAL TO VIEWPOINTS Katherine Schmidt, director for Western Oregon University writing center, gave a lecture to incoming students a few years ago. She had to explain what its writing center does and how it helps students earn better grades. She began her part of the presentation far differently than she had in the past. “We’ve all undoubtedly been involved in a relationship or two.” Schmidt said. This one comment captured the attention of the entire audience and kept their attention throughout the discussion that followed. Schmidt went on, “let’s say that one day your partner says to you, ‘In case you haven’t noticed, the romance is gone from our relationship. I’ve decided I want you to write me a love letter, and I want it by Friday,’” Schmidt said. This one sentence spurred a debate and conversation with students like no other. The students agreed with her that if the lover had to ask, no matter what the outcome of the letter, good, bad or indifferent it would in fact not rise to the occasion and expectation. She continues, “Let’s go back in time, for a moment. You observe your

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not. Simply fill out a short form, have it signed by an instructor or counselor, and you can register for ILA-800 that has no cost to the student and renders no units. You will be given a registration code to add. Any student can get an ILA-800 from Denise Kruizenga-Muro, the director of the WRC. Katherine Schmidt made the best connection to show students the relationship between student and professor. If you remember, I told you about a lover who had to ask for a love letter and one that did not. In the instance the lover had to ask for the letter, all the students in the audience agreed the dissatisfaction was due to having to ask for the poem. Conversely, the letter that was written back in time, and prior to the request being made had quite a different reaction. Why? Again, the students all were in agreement. Because it was not asked for, and it was not expected.

Students who wait to get a poor grade and see ‘go see tutoring’ on a paper are on the receiving end of that request. Those students who go to tutoring on their own accord, without having to be told or asked, are being proactive with their own grades. Schmidt explained it in this fashion, “Imagine, for a moment, what it’s like for a professor to receive a paper which has an unsolicited Writing Center confirmation slip attached—there was no prompting. As a professor myself, I can testify to the fact that it’s much like finding a surprise…” Students who are proactive, who go and see tutors without being prompted by their instructor and submit the tutoring slip with their papers are actually writing love letters to their instructor. Will you be a student that waits to be prompted? Or would you rather surprise your instructor with a love letter of your own?

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All the opinions in this section are the opinions of the writers are the writers alone. The opinions in this section do notSession directly reflect Ads_RCC_3.917x10in_2014 the opinion of the entire Viewpoints staff. CEL Summer Newspaper April 9, 2014 5:41 PM summer ad.indd 4

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Viewpoints

12 | May 15, 2014

Serving students since 1922

SportS

“I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.” - Michael Jordan

Tigers make a splash at finals VALERIE OSIER STAFF EDITOR The Riverside City College swimming and diving season has wrapped up with the Tigers’ eighth place finish in state after the CCCAA state championships, held at East Los Angeles College May 1-3. With about 35 teams competing in the finals, several teams coming out of Orange Empire Conference ranked in the top 10, including: Orange Coast College, Golden West College and RCC. According to the Tigers women’s swim and dive coach Doug Finfrock, the OEC is one of the toughest conferences, and to have three teams from the same conference go to state is impressive. “We exceeded expectations,” Finfrock said. “(The Tigers) had set a goal this year, based on our talent and what we had with being top 10 in the state, and we ended up finishing in eighth place.” Finfrock stated the relays stood out the most at state for the Tigers. The women’s 800-yard freestyle relay team of Tiffanie Perez, Keonni Obert, Celena Peters and Emmie Betz set a program record by 3/100 of a second and came in seventh overall. This year’s team was a young composing of 22 freshmen and only seven sophomores.

Finfrock said some of the swimmers to keep an eye out for next season are Alexa Lane and Katy Holmes. Although Holmes had been out of the water for over a year, Finfrock knew she had the capabilities of going to state. “For her to be out of the water then to make the strides she made this year in order to make state and start to return to form and everything, was really good to see,” Finfrock said. The men’s team also did well at state, setting several school records. Freshman Seva Eagle set four school records in the 50, 100 and 200 freestyle events, as well as the 100 butterfly. Similar to the women, the men stood out in their relays and set a school record of 6:58:81 in the 800 freestyle relay. The swimmers on that relay team, Eagle, Nathan Diaz, James Reyes, and Brandon Seay, also set the school record in the 400 freestyle relay with a time of 3:09:23. “We feel good about being in the top 10...what we’re happy about was that everyone swam personal best times this year,” Jason Northcott, the Tigers men’s swim coach, said. “A lot of these guys have trained in a lot of different places, but to know that we got the best out of everybody,

JASMINE MIKULAK/ ASST. PHOTO EDITOR

FINALS: Riverside City College swimmer Daisy Hudson practicing the butterfly stroke during the season. and the guys committed to the team and we set a couple of school records, some in relays and some in individuals, but knowing that we were able to do those things is something we can look back on and we can be proud of this season and the efforts we put forward.” In one of the more exciting races, Reyes came in just a second behind the winner in the 1,650yard freestyle, with a personal best time of 16:17:75. “What was exciting about that race was that James gave the leader a 25 second lead with just 250 (yards) to go and he had his kick in the end and brought it within one second,” Northcott said. “He was gaining on him so fast that if

we had about 25 more yards, he would’ve probably won the race, but he ran out of pool.” Four divers went to state and performed well. Amy Bruns finished third overall in state on both 1-meter and 3-meter dives and James Terrell Mauldin finished second out of 16 in the 1-meter, just four points behind the champion. “I have a feeling that I could’ve taken first place for the 1-meter, but I unfortunately, messed up on my first dive and that cost me,” Mauldin said. “But otherwise, I feel OK about my performance I’m glad I ended on a good note.” This season was the first season with Finfrock as the head coach

of the women’s team after Dave Almquist retired in 2013. “I had the privilege of working with coach Almquist for 10 years,” Finfrock said. “I feel like he taught me a great deal and really mentored me along the way and let me be more than just an assistant coach, and really kind of let me be like a co-head coach with him. But, if I spent my time trying to fill his shoes, I think I’ll probably drive myself crazy. I’ve got to try continue the success here at RCC with the aquatics programs and kind of make out my own path and my own name along the way. There won’t be another Dave Almquist.”

RCC captures first golf title on home course Congratulations to the RCC men’s track and field team for winning its sixth state title in seven years. JAMES H. WILLIAMS MANAGING EDITOR

The Riverside City College Tigers won the golf program’s first California Community College Athletic Association Championship at the Victoria Country Club in Riverside May 12. The Tigers clinched the title win over the College of the Canyons Cougars following a tiebreaker after both teams shot a 734. The tiebreaker was decided by both team’s sixth golfer. Chabot College finished third overall with a total score of 744 followed by San Jose City College

with 750. In the afternoon round, the Tigers’ Chad Hambright shot 6-over a par of 72, which was one shot ahead of Cougars’ Mike Steward, who shot a 79. In the overall individual standings, Eric Cross was the highest amongst the Tigers with his sixth place finish with a 73 in the morning round and a 71 in the afternoon round to finish with a total score of 144. Josh Roquet finished seventh overall for the Tigers with a total score of 145 following scores of 74 and 71 in the two rounds. The Cougars’ Sidney Wolf

finished at the top of the overall individual standings with a total score of 139. Cross and Wolf received a individual medalist honors following the finals. With the state title victory the Tigers became the third team to win the state title in their city in the 65-year history of the event, joining the programs such as Bakersfield College in 1979 and most recently Saddleback College at the end of the 1994 season. The Tigers qualified for the state finals following a finished second in the Southern California Regional Championships behind the Cougars May 5.

For more information on the Tigers’ latest victory check out the Viewpoints website.

Tigers shutdown by the Falcons of Cerritos College in SoCal regional ALEXANDRA ORTIZ STAFF WRITER

The Riverside City College softball team ended the season with a record of 28-13, and took third place in the Orange Empire Conference. The season has come to an end, and with it the pasta is gone, no more extra inning thrillers and no more screaming at the top of your lungs cheering for the Tigers. In her 15th season as coach,

Michelle Daddona put together a talented group of women to take on the Orange Empire Conference and make another run for the state title. The Tigers started the season strong beating almost everyone they faced, during the first half of the season giving them a strong hold at the top of the conference standings. The Santa Ana Dons had not beaten the Tigers in over two years. The Dons turned their losing

ways against the Tigers around by sweeping them in every meeting between the teams in conference play this season. It seemed like no matter what the Tigers tried to do there was no way of beating the Dons this season. During the second half of the season the Tigers tried to keep a hold of a strong winning streak, unfortunately they were not able to keep up and got handed with four losses to end the season.

Even though they ended up in third place for the conference the Tigers still had the potential to make a post season run. The Tigers’ pitching had started to come together, defense had come out strong for the last couple of games and we all knew they had power hitters. Unfortunately, the Tigers had become dependent of late innings come backs and that finally caught up with them. In the first round of the post

season the Tigers faced the Cerritos Falcons. The first game was a close one with the Tigers coming up short in a 5-3 game. For the second game in the best of three series, it was all about the Falcons as the Tigers were unable to score and avoid the 4-0 shutout, which ended their 2014 season. Despite the team losing four sophomores, the Tigers are left with a strong foundation for the 2015 season.


Viewpoints Issue #13 May 15, 2014