__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

SPECIAL EDITION

VIEWPOINTSONLINE.ORG

yFOOTBALL

Tigers shut down Panthers

2

yAIR SHOW

viewp

Jets soar through the sky

NOVEMBER 9, 2015

4

yHOMECOMING

Clubs welcome community

6

ints

An Associated Collegiate Press two-time national Pacemaker award-winning newspaper, serving as the voice of the students since 1922.

R

I

V

E R

S

I

D

E

C

I

T

Y

C

O

L

L

E

G

E

CENTENNIAL EDITION

Timeline looks back 100 years ALEXIS NAUCLER @alexisnaucler

R

iverside City College’s first president, who the different buildings were dedicated to, the first clubs and organizations of RCC and prominent people of the college’s history. These were a few of the things viewers learned about the history of RCC, formerly known as Riverside Junior College, as they watched the Centennial Film on Nov. 7 during the campus 100 year celebration.. With help from multimedia g r a p h i c a r t i s t To n y R i z o , Instructional Media Technician Armando Castro was in charge of putting together the film. For the past five years, Castro has been compiling photos from the Digital Library archives and fellow faculty members. The film was in the form of a timeline, broken up into decades, starting from 1916 to the present and had a very simple, black and white theme to it. Thanks to the Thompson Act

of 1907, high school districts were able to offer postgraduate courses, which led to the establishment of a two-year junior college. With advancements in education in the community and the nation, citizens of Riverside felt it was time to have a junior college to prepare local students for professional careers. In March 1916, the Riverside School Board voted to establish a junior college, the City of Riverside was only 46 years old at the time. Riverside Junior College has become the eighth junior college in California. Starting in September 1916 to 1981, classes for the junior college were held in 14 rooms of Riverside’s Polytechnic High School. “The junior college is an extension of facilities for acquiring a higher education to those who have hitherto completed their course with the high school,” said superintendent Arthur N. Wheelock in his Oct. 12, 1916 speech entitled “What It is and What It Offers.” “It sends him up better fitted to go on.” In the first semester of the

college, there were 114 students, 14 faculty members and 22 classes. The first president was Hugh Law, who served as the Chief Administrative Officer from 1916 to 1919. Law also served as the principle of Poly High School. Since its beginning, RCC was a place for students to express themselves and work with other students with the same interests. Clubs and organizations present at RCC during its early years included Student Government, Alpha Gamma Sigma. In 1928, the Wheelock Gymnasium was built and dedicated to Arthur N. Wheelock. On April 28, 1985, Riverside Junior College’s Admissions and Counseling. In Nov. 2012, the building was remodeled and rededicated in his honor. Following World War II, the return of Veterans increased the college’s enrollment from 184 students in 1944 to 1,097 students in 1946. During this increase, Riverside Junior College changed its name to Riverside City College on June 4, 1945.

See FILM on Page 7

PHOTO COURTESY OF DIGITAL LIBRARY ARCHIVES

NAME CHANGE: Banner from 1948 showcasing Riverside City College’s previous name, Riverside Junior College.

Community marches through the town Football CRYSTAL OLMEDO @Crystal__Olmedo

The smiling faces of the Riverside City College community lined Magnolia Avenue awaiting the Centennial Parade procession that began at the Riverside County Courthouse and ended at RCC. Many were cheering and yelling, “Go RCC, Go RCC!” Students sat on the islands between the lanes of Magnolia Avenue to catch a glimpse of the parade. International students Amanda Gao and Christina Yang, both from China, are pursuing a degree in accounting, shared their thoughts about RCC and its Centennial Celebration. “We want to see the fireworks, that’s going to be great,” Yang said. “RCC is a bigger campus than we have gone to. Our previous school only had one building and RCC has so many, sometimes we get lost.” Gao continued. “We came at the perfect time when

TYLER REESE | VIEWPOINTS

MARCH: Riverside City College Marching Tigers make their way down Magnolia Avenue during the Nov. 7 Centennial Parade. RCC was getting ready for their 100 year celebration.” The parade featured various RCC organizations, clubs and departments includingThe Associated Students of Riverside City College, RCC Marching Tigers, Cheer and Dance team, School of Nursing, Sport Hall of Fame, The Center for International students and programs, Tiger Backers, which are sponsors of RCC, and many

more. “It was exciting walking in the parade. I like seeing our club and the float that they built,” said Sedtavut Nilaad, winner of homecoming king for the 20152016 academic year. Art Alcaraz, who served as director of Diversity & Human Resources for Riverside Community College District from July 2006 – April 2014, introduced the parade participants

near the corner of Magnolia Avenue and Terracina Drive. “I worked for (RCCD) for about eight years and they asked me to announce so, of course I said yes,” Alcaraz said. Students from Moreno Valley College also designed a float for the parade, being that the school is coming up on its 25 year mark. “I think as a college (RCC) is growing and it shows it’s support for the community,” said Frankie Moore, coordinator of Student Activities. “With RCC turning 100 and Moreno Valley College turning 25 it’s nice to just be apart of that historical moment. We have members of student government here with us today as well as the homecoming court.” Several members of Performing Arts Riverside and RCC Fine and Performing Arts walked in the parade dressed as the cult classic Frankenstein creation, representing their production “Young Frankenstein.”

See PARADE on Page 7

dominates LAURA M. TAPIA @LMTreporter

The Riverside City College football team dominated Chaffey College, 41-7, giving the team its worst loss of the season Nov. 7, the Tigers’ must win centennial homecoming game. The Tigers are tied up with Mt. San Antonio (Mt. SAC) and Long Beach City College (LBCC) in the National Central League. Losing this game was not an option for RCC as only the top seed of the league goes on to playoffs. Head coach Tom Craft spoke of the game’s significance coming off a big win versus No. 1 LBCC, who was undefeated prior to facing the Tigers. “When you have a big crowd like this, there’s a lot of people that probably didn’t get to see

See FOOTBALL on Page 2


2

November 9, 2015

Viewpointsonline.org

Football team rattles Panthers Riverside City College defeats Chaffey College at home to keep their playoff hopes alive FOOTBALL from

Page 1

that game last week,” Craft said. “We really wanted to play well tonight, this could be our last (home) game of the season. We don’t know that, but it could’ve been so we wanted to finish well.” Although the football team ended the night’s centennial celebration, it led from the start against the Panthers. Running back Seth Acda led the team with two touchdowns, including the Tigers’ first touchdown of the night, and 131 rushing yards. Despite the team being banged up in the running game, Acda spoke about his performance during the game and his value of his position on the team. “It’s an honor to be the starting running back for RCC,” he said. “It took a lot of hard work. I needed to step it up as a freshman because we have so many injuries. I just had to step it up.” The Tigers defensive presence was also key in their win versus Chaffey. Wide receiver Sebastian La Rue had an huge 80-yard punt return in the second quarter that extended RCC’s lead to 13. La Rue acknowledge the feat and thanked his teammates for giving him the chance to make the play. “It was pretty far and exciting, (but) I had a lot of key blocks,” he said. “KJ Young he came and sold out, (along with Quentin) Galloway he came all the way across the field. I just really thank my blocking. They gave me a lane, gave me an opportunity and I just took advantage of it.” The Tigers ended the first half with a 20-0 lead and continued their hot streak when Tareke Lewis came out and intercepted a Panthers’ play within the first minutes of the second half.

STACY SORIANO | VIEWPOINTS

MUST WIN: Riverside City College linebacker AJ Hotchkins goes for a tackle against Chaffey College’s quarterback Levi Plante. Hotchkins had seven tackles in the victory over the Panthers, 41-7, Nov. 7. The Tigers forced four interceptions including two from Tareke Lewis and two from Isaiah Armstrong. La Rue spoke about the team’s defensive performance after the game. “We were unbelievable, really wish we could of kept a shutout,” he said. “We had some mishaps at the end that we have to correct but … we had a pretty lights out game. We made plays, we made turnovers and gave our offense a lot of chances to get into the end zone.” Quarterback Ian Fieber stayed hot throughout the game throwing for three touchdowns, 278 yards and 21 completions , while Young

led with 112 receiving yards. “I started off slow, but I got it going and it showed,” Fieber said of his performance. “We got the offense clicking and like I said the defense helped out tremendously so I felt pretty good.” Not only did the Tigers total 224 rushing yards and 242 punting yards they also prevented Chaffey’s duo of quarterback Levi Plante and wide receiver Marquis Wimberly from scoring a touchdown for the first time this season. Fieber stated that although there were no special sentiments coming into this game the team continues to have the same work ethic needed to make it to the

postseason. “Same emotions every week, he said. “(We) just keep working hard, keep winning we (have) to win to stay alive so that’s our goal.” The team is still scheduled to face Citrus College on Nov. 14. With both Mt. SAC and LBCC defeating Citrus by at least 10 points, the Tigers can’t afford their third loss away from home

if they are to move onto the postseason. Craft stated that if there is a three way tie in the league, the second tie breaker will come down to who the highest nonranked conference teams have defeated.

GALLERY: Visit us at viewpointsonline.org

TYLER REESE | VIEWPOINTS

INTERCEPTION: Riverside City College defensive back Isaiah Armstrong intercepts a pass against Chaffey. Armstrong had two interceptions in third quarter including one in the endzone.

STACY SORIANO | VIEWPOINTS

OFFENSE: (Left) Tigers running back Seth Acda rushed for 131 yards against the Panthers.

(Bottom right) Riverside City College quarterback Ian Fieber threw for 278 yards in the conference game held at Wheelock Stadium on Nov.7.


Viewpointsonline.org

Community doors

BROOKE CARY | VIEWPOINTS

REACHING OUT: Carol Wohlke (far left) and Whitney Ortega represent Cal Works, Foster Kinship

and Care and Guardian Scholars. Members welcomed RCC visitors, handed out fliers and celebrated past years of service to foster youth at RCC’s Centennial Celebration. BROOKE CARY @CaryBrooke

Riverside City College hosted an open house for the Centennial Celebration, where various clubs and programs spread out over campus to celebrate the history of RCC and inform students of current programs. Near the planetarium at RCC, Astronomy professor Scott Blair stood by a solar telescope. Despite the axiom to avoid direct staring into the sun; students, alumni and passers-by were invited to (safely) look through the telescope and see the sun’s flames. The H-Alpha filter telescope which viewers used blocks all radiation coming off the sun other than a particular wavelength of radiation, safely allowing it’s viewers to stare into the sun without risking damage to their eyesight. Blair has been teaching astronomy at RCC for 22 years and looks forward to the future. “I came here in the mid-80s and I haven’t left since,” he said. He took astronomy from Robert Dixon, a former professor of astronomy, who taught for 26 years and whose name marks the Dixon building. “As long as RCC’s been here, we’ve been teaching astronomy. I’m just carrying the torch,” Blair said. In the RCC’s Athletic Hall of Fame were several student athletes representing one of RCC’s more recently developed clubs, the Student Advisory Athletic Council. The club aims to “bridge the gap between lower campus and upper campus,” according to Andrew Coupe, acting president of the club. “It’s been a slow progress,” Coupe said. “But personally I’ve started to know more of upper campus. I never knew about senate stuff and ASRCC, let alone who represented them.” Two representatives from each of

RCC’s 19 sports act as leaders for the teams. The goal is to encourage RCC’s sports teams to collaborate with other clubs and get more involved in upper campus life. RCC was not the only school represented by clubs on campus. Eric Salinas, an RCC Alumnus also invited members of the Emotion Regulation Lab from UC Riverside to the centennial event. C a r m e n Te l l e s , t h e recruitment manager for UCR’s Emotion Regulation Lab along with other members of the club were passing out fliers and inviting families to come visit the lab. The open house part of RCC’s centennial celebration was spread through all of campus, but a concentration of RCC clubs and tables were set up in the quadrangle. RCC’s culinary academy showed off their skill by making fresh crepes by order, serving them sprinkled in powered sugar and selling baked goods to support their program. R C C ’s S u p p l e m e n t a l Instruction, the Math Learning

Center, Financial Aid, RCC’s School of Nursing, the Honors Society, Foster Kinship and Care and one of RCC’s newer clubs, La Casa, are just a few of the other groups which were represented on campus. Hundreds of hands contributed to putting the event together. In fact, there seems to have been more helping hands than attending hands. Some participants had learned about the celebration just two days prior, but were still able to help out and attend the event. “The history of RCC is so long, it has a good educational foundation,” said Hank Huang, a Chinese international exchange student studying Computer Science in his second year at RCC. “Everyone is kind. This college is like a big family.” Although there were mixed reviews and expectations of student body and community turnout for the earlier parts of the day, hundreds of members at the school showed dedication and investment in the RCC community. That is something worth celebrating.

November 9, 2015

3

For more on Riverside City College’s Centennial Celebration pick up a copy of Viewpoints around campus newsstands on Nov. 19

Do you really know yourself?

Start the most fascinating adventure of your life, with this book. Embark on a series of simple yet powerful techniques you do yourself, guided by the author.

SeLF AnALYSIS by

L. ROn HuBBARD Learn to know yourself and not just a shadow of yourself.

BROOKE CARY | VIEWPOINTS

L. Ron Hubbard Life Exhibtion 323-960-3511 exhibition@lronhubbard.org

INTO THE SUN: RCC Astronomy professor Scott Blair helps

students and centennial event guests use a solar telescope to safely look into the sun.

© 2007 CSI. All Rights Reserved.


4

November 9, 2015

Viewpointsonline.org

Flyin’ through the sky

TYLER REESE | VIEWPOINTS

STARS AND STRIPES: Inland Empire Wing of the Commemorative Air Force Paratroopers glide down onto the football field of Wheelock Stadium during the air show as a part of Riverside City College’ s Centennial Celebration.

Roaring skies TYLER REESE

@Reeses__Puff

From a low humming tone to a deafening roar, various planes in formation made many runs in the skies over Riverside City College’s Wheelock Stadium. “I thought it was wonderful the way we worked with Riverside and the people that do this sort of show, that we had the chance to see what happened in the past and we’re celebrating our hundred years so it’s right in line with that,” said Doug Graham, ASRCC adviser. To kick off the show, 11 skydivers jumped out over the stadium and proceeded to rocket down toward the earth below them, each had a different array of smoke trails and pattern of aerial maneuvers for the crowd below to enjoy. After deploying their parachutes the sky divers deployed their own streamers and banners that glided effortlessly behind them. “Fun! Oh my gosh, it was so great just watching them, one of them had like the longest tails and luckily one carried one of our banners, so that was nice,” said

Graham. “It’s something I would never want to do but it’s so interesting.” Soon after the sky divers landed on the field, the aircraft were called in and flew over the stadium with a thunderous rumble. Many planes were seen such as a C-53 Skytrain, L-4 Grasshopper, a P-40 Warhawk and P-51 Mustang. “Awesome, I overuse the word but the facilities are looking in great shape and the football field was great for the paratroopers to land and we had no trouble getting the planes over the targeted area,” said Air Boss Col. Pete Downes, Jr. The aircraft’s made several runs over the stadium ensuring the crowd below got several views of the various planes in the show. For the last run of the air show a squad of four T-6 Texans flew in a missing man formation which is where one of the four planes turn away from the other three and let the three man formation take the lead. “I think it met my expectations and I don’t think it could’ve been too much better, maybe the timing of the aircraft but sometimes that’s the way it happens in air shows,” Downes said.


Viewpointsonline.org

November 9, 2015

5

Centennial gets vintage with it TYLER REESE

@Reeses__Puff

Sleek waxed bodies that lay low to the ground spread out along Fairfax Avenue for anyone’s enjoyment whom may be around. “The Corvette club I’m with called me and said they needed Corvettes for the parade to hall dignitaries and a couple days ago I found out there was going to be a car show after the parade so after I got done with the parade i came over here,” Danny Arant a Parade/Car Show participant said. The car show Riverside City College held on its Nov. 7 Centennial Celebration held this such vibe. When the parade arrived on campus, the cars were lined up so that they would be in position for the show. Arant owns one of the 200 total commemorative edition 1953 Corvettes made. The frame of the car was made out of a 2004 Corvette C5 convertible and then converted to fit a modernized version of the 1953 model. “1953 was the first year for Corvettes, this guy in Michigan he built this and he tried to sell it to G.M. (General Motors) to use for the 50th anniversary,” Arant said. “ It was his vision of what a ‘53 Corvette

would look like if G.M. built it today. However, it’s not an exact replica but a modernized version.” Other vehicles displayed at the Car Show were a custom 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon and 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle Super Sport, plus a 1968 Pontiac GTO and a 1963 Chevrolet Impala. “The parade was awesome, especially when I got to see all the old cars, but when the Car Show started and i could finally get up close, my heart skipped a beat pretty much,” attendee Julio Elizondo said. “I love older cars especially since when they have been restored.” The show started promptly at 10:30 a.m. when the parade, which started in downtown Riverside, ended at RCC’s campus. The car show later ended approximately at 1 p.m. The only thing to be heard at the end of the show was the rumbling of engines and owners putting their pedals to the metal. “The Show was a cool little tad bit to add after the parade ended, also just being able to see all the cars up close rather than from far away is an awesome experience all by itself,” Isaiah Rendley said. “Overall it was a cool experience to see everything up close and I’m looking forward till later today for the tailgate party and football game.”

Cruisin’ through the streets

TYLER REESE | VIEWPOINTS

LOWRIDER: Attendee’s fill the streets of Fairfax Avenue to look at the vintage cars that were in attendance Nov.7 for Riverside City College’s Centennial Celebration.


6

November 9, 2015

Viewpointsonline.org

Homecoming lights the sky

History was made as Riverside City College celebrated its centennial during homecoming CRYSTAL OLMEDO @RCCviewpoints

Members of Riverside City College’s homecoming courts eagerly anticipated the coronation at the pregame activities of the Nov. 7 homecoming football game. Homecoming queen hopeful and Alpha Gamma Sigma Honor Society Secretary Ilka Serrano shared her thoughts about how running for the homecoming court helped her to build relationships with her fellow court members. “I enjoyed the time I got to spend with my fellow candidates. We had such a special bond and now we are so excited for each other,” Serrano said. “No matter what happens we’re going to come away from this with all these memories.” Instead of collecting votes this year candidates collected points from competing in homecoming games, including a lip sync, as well as individual interviews and giving speeches before a panel. “We didn’t want to do a voting contest because we didn’t think that was fair to students … the people you know or getting out and saying, ‘vote for

me’ really shouldn’t determine whether you’re as enthusiastic as another candidate or more academically prominent” Kaitlin Glenn, ASRCC campus activities council said. Court member and Ujima club member, Jazmyn Williams, said she was impressed with the etiquette of the court candidates. “I went into this not really knowing what to expect. The moment I stepped in the room, it was just a lot of love. We didn’t downplay each other. During the games we were just cheering each other on,” Williams said. “Our school in general is accepting school. You can see it in the diversity of our clubs and the presence of high morals and ethics here.” For the first time in Riverside City College’s history there was a tie for the title of homecoming queen. Lizzette Capul and Christina E. Henderson were both crowned queens by last year’s queen and ASRCC vice president, Rakhee Uma. Sedtavut Nilaad was crowned homecoming king. “It’s perfect, it’s something different and something new,’ Henderson said. Capul shared a similar

sentiment in response to the results. “I am truly honored to share the title of homecoming queen with Christina and enjoy being homecoming king and queen with my friend Sedavut Nilaad,” Capul said. “We made history and I hope people remember this when they look back at RCC’s Centennial.” Andrew Lalyre won runner up for RCC homecoming king. “I feel absolutely honored. This is the first time I’ve ever done anything like this, so being a part of something as special as the Centennial is honestly a very nice privilege to have,” Andrew Lalyre RCC homecoming court member said. The half time show included performances by RCC’s Cheer and Dance team. The cheer team showed of their school pride with an energetic performance to a medley of songs including “Black Betty” by the band Ram Jam and “Back in Black” by AC/DC. Alexis Buck and Eden Vanderberg first year cheer team members said the energy was great.

See HOMECOMING on Page 8

VICTOR DURAN | VIEWPOINTS

BLAST: Instructor Jeremy Buckley conducts Riverside City College Marching Tigers during RCC’s 2015 Homecoming halftime show.

DAVID ROMAN | VIEWPOINTS

ROYALTY: (Left to right) Riverside City College 2015 Home-

coming court Lizzete Capul, Sedtavut Nilaad and Christina E. Henderson

Campus Views

Campus Question:

What does RCC mean to you?

“RCC is an opportunity. It’s a good way to help yourself move forward and do better in life.” - Gage Ramirez, athletic trainer

“RCC means family and opportunity for everyone.”

“Home away from home. This is the second home, this is where you wanna be, ya know? We wanna offer everybody something and RCC has a lot to offer.” - Pete Aneiro, athletics department

“A 100 years of celebration. It’s amazing we’ve been open this long. We’re an educational institution, we work for the students, we’re there for the students and we want them to succeed and we’ll continue for another 100 years.” - Doug Graham, ASRCC advisor

“RCC means legacy to me. I went here as a student before I went on to a university. And coming back as a faculty member it feels like home. This is where I cheered even in high school. So when I come back here it feels familiar. Home, legacy. ” - Rachelle Fawcett, Cheer coach

“Right now it means everything. RCC stands for justice, for empowerment, for excellence, for culture and (for) pride.” - RCC President Wolde-Ab Issac

“It’s home away from home. It gives you the chance to dream and be who you wanna be. This is where you learn who you can be.” - Christina E. Henderson, co-homecoming queen

- Greta Cohen, administrative assistant

Campus Views is an open forum for Riverside City College students to voice their own opinions, views and ideas.

“I guess what RCC

means to me is friends. It means family. My future and my dance tream and just keeping busy.” - Taylor Kinney, dance team


Viewpointsonline.org

November 9, 2015

7

‘Young Frankenstein’ lives on TREVA FLORES @RCCviewpoints

“ Yo u n g F r a n k e n s t e i n ” resurrected from the stage at the Landis Performing Arts Center on Nov. 7. The musical is an adaptation o f t h e 1 9 7 4 f i l m “ Yo u n g Frankenstein” with music and lyrics written by Mel Brooks as well as the book written by Brooks and Thomas Meehan. It was an interesting adaptation from the movie. The musical was entertaining and made the audience laugh with slapstick comedy and mature humor. “Young Frankenstein” is a comedic approach in telling the classic Mary Shelley novel about a Doctor who resurrects a dead body, creating a monster. The musical begins with the celebration of Doctor Victor von Frankenstein’s (Johnny Fletcher) death. Victor’s grandson, Doctor Frederick Frankenstein (Larry Raben), is then alerted that he has to leave his fiancé Elizabeth Benning (Chelsea Emma Franko) behind and travel to Transylvania to resolve issues regarding his grandfather’s property. Upon arrival Frederick meets his new hump-backed assistant Igor (Emerson Boatwright), his beautiful new assistant Inga (Anne Montavon) and the creepy housekeeper Frau Blucher (Tracy Lore). As Frederick explores his grandfather’s castle he discovers a hidden lab and a book that explains how to revive the dead. He decides to carry on the “family business” by creating his

PARADE from Page 1 “The best part of the parade was hanging out with all of the student volunteers. It’s nice to be around the youthful exuberance of students of all ages,” Jennifer Lawson, theater box office coordinator said. “I love supporting the students … RCC is such an iconic institution. I’ve only been here for 18 years, but I don’t think people really realize where it all began.” The Centennial events were a collaborative effort of past and present RCC students, faculty staff and members of the community that support RCC. For example, media recording for the event was handled by Tony Rizo, multimedia graphic

VICTOR DURAN | VIEWPOINTS

THE RETURN: Riverside City College students wear Frankenstein-like face paint and attire during the kickoff parade for the campus’ centennial celebration event from the Riverside Courthouse back toward RCC on Nov. 7. own monster, which doesn’t turn out the way he expected. Without spoiling the end with too many details, the rest of the play comprises of the town villagers trying to kill the monster, Frederick’s fiancé catching him in mischief and true love being found by each of the characters at the end of the play. The musical was a funny interpretation with some added changes in the beginning to establish more background, but it wasn’t the same as the movie. The movie was hilarious with Gene Wilder portraying Frederick in the original film

and Raben was an excellent replacement when it came to looking the part and being a great performer on Landis stage. The one song that lived up to expectations was “Puttin’ on the Ritz,” which was featured in both the movie and the musical. It was funny and interactive as the audience clapped along to the actors performing on stage. The most hilarious song was “Please don’t touch me” as Elizabeth sang goodbye to her fiancé while being carted around on a luggage carrier. She didn’t move from that spot as different cast members pushed

her around for the duration musical, including the “Finale Ultimo” when the company took its final bow. Overall the musical was cheesy and mindless entertainment as the performers danced around stage, making it the best show possible with a mediocre script. The orchestra portrayed the mood of the musical well with upbeat tunes to accompany the comedic moments and provide eerie sounds for the “horror” aspects of the show. Set design transformed the stage well, although the

artist who is a former student and graduate of RCC. “They’re going to have to drag me out kicking and screaming,” Rizo said. “I love the inclusiveness of RCC.” “I remember working on a project with Bud Tedesco and thinking, ‘oh my gosh I did this with you 20 years ago,’” Rizo added. There were also dignitaries such as RCC President WoldeAb Isaac, Mayor Rusty Bailey, and RCCD Chancellor Michael Burke, in the parade. “I think it went well, it was nice to see people coming out to celebrate. Looking at the citizens who are proud of their home college,” Isaac said. “It was a very good way to thank

the people and show them what they mean to us and show them that our celebration was their celebration.” Assemblyman Jose Medina served as the grand marshal for the parade. He formerly served three terms as an RCCD Board of Trustee member. The celebrity grand marshal was Jimmy Espinoza from the band Thee Midniters. The band wrote a song about Cesar Chavez, an American farm worker union labor leader and civil rights activist that RCC’s named a building after. “It was a wonderful day in Riverside. There’s nothing bigger than having a 100 year birthday party and anniversary. Riverside is so proud of the

contributions that RCC had made to the community,” said Rusty Bailey, mayor of Riverside.“My grandpa and wife graduated from RCC … there’s no better reason to be apart of it than celebrating and thanking the institution that has impacted life.”

SPECIAL THANKS TO James H. Williams Alexis Naucler Laura Tapia Crystal Olmedo Victor Duran David Roman Carol Leal Tyler Reese

Brooke Cary Jenny Aguilar Lawrence Manns Giovanni Pascotto Stacy Soriano Treva Flores Megan Ruiz

background screen was a bit outdated it did its job of setting each scene. There was a really cool double effect as a transparent screen was used to create rain as well as lightning that illuminated the stage. T h e s t o r y o f “ Yo u n g Frankenstein” is a classic and although the musical didn’t live up to expectations it was still worth watching because of the performers and their amazing vocal talents. Performances will continue with 2 p.m. showings on Nov. 14 and 15 along with evening shows on Nov. 13 and 14.

FILM from Page 1 Fast forward to the present, RCC’s current president is Wolde-Ab Isaac, there are over 12,000 students enrolled,19 sports teams and 71 clubs and organizations. “RCC has been a such an incredible institution for all these years and has impacted so many lives and educated so many

PHOTO COURTESY OF DIGITAL LIBRARY ARCHIVES

NEWSROOM: Riverside City College students work on “The Arroyo” newspaper in 1936.

students,” Rizo said. Information comes from the film and Riverside publication titled “A 65 Year History.”

REACH US: NEWSROOM PHONE: (951) 222-8488 E-MAIL: viewpoints@rcc.edu MEMBER:

Associated Collegiate Press

Journalism Association of Community Colleges

California Newspaper Publishers Association


8

November 9, 2015

Viewpointsonline.org

HOMECOMING from Page 6

STACY SORIANO | VIEWPOINTS

The dance team performed to Michael Jackson’s “Working Day and Night,” with a flash mob of at least 100 people which included RCC musical theater ensemble, under the direction of Jodi Julian, associate professor of theater arts. The routine was choreographed by associate professors of dance, Rita Chensworth and Mark Haines. “We tried to include as many people as possible, but it is challenging when you have so many,” Haines said. The crowed was practically silent during the dance performance with the exception of the members of the cheer team cheering for them on the sidelines. RCC’s Marching Tigers blew away the audience with their powerful percussion and overall skill as they played “Legend of the one-armed sailor” conducted by

VICTOR DURAN | VIEWPOINTS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MEGAN RUIZ

DAVID ROMAN | VIEWPOINTS

Jeremy Buckley, under the direction of Gary Locke, associate professor of music and Sheila Locke, music specialist. “Because of Gary and Sheila Locke, who have been here for 32 years, they are known as Hollywood’s band. They have been in more movies and music videos because of their support,” Haines said. “This experience has been great and rewarding and we have loved every minute of it. We will be retiring June 10,” Sheila said. “We will be taking 358 people to Paris at the end of December, about 150 from RCC and surrounding high schools and marching on the Champs-Elysees which has not been open for a parade since Hitler. It’s a big deal and it’s why we stayed another year.” The halftime performance ended with a stunning firework show which delighted all in attendance.

STACY SORIANO | VIEWPOINTS

VICTOR DURAN | VIEWPOINTS

Profile for RCC Viewpoints

RCC Viewpoints' Special Centennial Issue: November 9, 2015  

Viewpoints Special Riverside City College Centennial Celebration Issue: November 9, 2015 - Stories in this issue include the day long event...

RCC Viewpoints' Special Centennial Issue: November 9, 2015  

Viewpoints Special Riverside City College Centennial Celebration Issue: November 9, 2015 - Stories in this issue include the day long event...

Advertisement