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Celebrating Alex

Spooky Halloween

Thrifty Foods co-founder remembered for his loyalty, and generosity. Community, Page A4

Critters of all shapes and sizes celebrated Halloween events in Victoria. Community, Page A15

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

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Ship’s crew proves charity begins at home Roszan Holmen News staff

Among the 250 members on board HMCS Vancouver, currently off the coast of Libya, there are a lot of stubbly-faced men. Avoiding their daily shaving obligation is a privilege that comes with a price: a donation to the ship’s favourite charity. At first women on board didn’t have an equivalent opportunity for breaking the grooming rules, said navy Lt. Matthew Mitchell, who led this year’s charitable campaign. Now, that’s been rectified. For a donation, women win the right to paint their nails. There have also been hot dog sales and other fundraisers. In total, they’ve raised more than enough to launch a breakfast program at Vic West elementary school. Mitchell learned how big the need is for breakfast programs through his fiancée, who is a teacher in the area. “It surprised me, because we’re such an affluent society,” he said, calling from a phone onboard the ship. The Greater Victoria school district helped out by pinpointing a worthy recipient school. “It’s touching that they would consider people in their community who are at-risk, because we would consider the ones in the military to be the ones at risk,” said Joe Cardle, principal of Vic West elementary. “You have these people who are serving overseas, away from their families, yet the activities they’re involved in reminds them of why they are doing this and the people they’re supporting.” HMCS Vancouver left for the Mediterranean Sea in July. “Its a morale thing,” explained Mitchell, of their efforts. “It helps us stay connected to home.” rholmen@vicnews.com ■■■

Turn to page A8 to read more about the breakfast program, and the role it plays in Vic West, an economically diverse neighbourhood that’s growing fast.

Photo submitted

All baby animals are adorable, but these miniature goats won’t grow much bigger. They are a popular feature of the Beacon Hill Children’s Farm, but they could soon be common to backyards in Victoria.

Chickens, ducks and goats, oh my! Victoria considers allowing miniature goats on city lots Roszan Holmen News staff

O

n Chris Adams’ corner lot in James Bay, passersby can see chickens and ducks. It’s a big hit with children in the neighbourhood. Not only do the birds provide the family of three with four to seven eggs a day, the ducks also root out slugs from the veggie garden. “They love them,” said Adams. Adams is hoping to soon add two miniature goats to his small urban farm. Not only would they produce milk, but they also eat pests of the plant variety: broom and bramble. Miniature goats are perfect for urban agriculture, he said. They grow nearly a metre tall, depending on variety, and make less noise than some varieties of dogs. “Especially in pairs, they are fairly quiet,” Adams

said, adding goats are social creatures, and bleat more when they’re lonely. The City of Victoria is open to exploring a bylaw change to allow miniature goats on residential lots. Council, however, isn’t ready to jump in just yet. On Thursday, it passed a motion to have staff examine how much it would cost to prepare a full report on the issue. Coun. Philippe Lucas put forward the motion. “It would be for food security reasons, so for the production of cheese and yogurt,” he said, adding Seattle and Portland already allow miniature goats in yards. Aside from food security, Adams’ suspects his twoyear-old son will enjoy having the goats as pets. “He loves the goats at the Beacon Hill petting zoo,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons we were really thinking about them, because goats are very personable. They really enjoy contact with people.” If permitted, the family plans to convert a portion of its unused garage into a barn, and create a green roof onto which the goats could climb and munch. rholmen@vicnews.com


A2 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

www.vicnews.com • A31

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

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www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com •• A3 A3

VICTORIA VICTORIA NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,November November2, 2,2011 2011 

Four make bid official for CPR terminal building

CIVIC

ELECTION Nov. 19

’11

Greater Victoria Harbour Authority outlines three-stage plan for revitalization, single ferry terminal Erin McCracken News staff

Black Press

A screen shot of Dean Fortin’s website displaying the City of Victoria logo. Local experts say the mayor didn’t do anything wrong displaying the logo, but others disagree.

Dean Fortin’s use of city logo on website raises questions Roszan Holmen News staff

Without prompting, mayoral candidate Paul Brown is quick to offer that he’s chosen not to use the City of Victoria’s intellectual property as part of his election platform. To do so would be unethical, he said. The comment was a dig at Mayor Dean Fortin, whose own campaign website boasted the city’s logo. While not contrary to any election laws, it’s a practice some other incumbent mayoral candidates in B.C. have chosen not to follow. No city logo can be seen on the campaign website for Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson, Duncan Mayor Phil Kent, or Nanaimo Mayor John Ruttan. “Branding is a key asset to any organization or campaign,”

explained Ruttan, via email. “I believe that using the City of Nanaimo logo (which is the city’s brand and not mine) would be slightly misleading as I am not appealing to voters on behalf of the city. As well, using the city’s logo on my material may weaken my own brand’s impact.” Branding preferences aside, experts in the field say there’s no problem with Fortin’s actions. “This seemed to me to be business as usual,” said Janni Aragon, senior instructor of political science at the University of Victoria. “I don’t think there’s a problem here.” As an incumbent, Fortin has the right to show his current record, she added. Michael Prince sees it in the same light. “It doesn’t trouble me, for some reason,” said UVic’s Lansdowne professor of social policy.

More troubling, he said, is the city newsletter, called Connect, which profiles all of the councillors in each issue. “The timing was sensitive,” he said of the latest publication mailed on the city’s dime to every household during the campaign period. As for Fortin, he was surprised to learn of the city’s logo on his website, when asked by the News. “That’s got to come down,” he said. The city logo was removed from the mayor’s website when the News checked Monday afternoon. rholmen@vicnews.com

What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification.

Four applicants now have their fingers crossed they will be the chosen one to move into the CPR Steamship Terminal building. The Greater Victoria Harbour Authority is the latest to submit its application to property landlord, the Provincial Capital Commission, on deadline day – last Friday. Bob Wright of Oak Bay Marine Group, the Maritime Museum of B.C. and Matt MacNeil of Vic Pub Co. were the original three to apply for tenancy at the Belleville Street building. The commission cancelled the process in the spring because the applications didn’t meet its requirements. On Monday, Wright and museum officials confirmed their continued interest. The harbour authority is proposing one full restaurant, a light-menu eatery, up to three high-end tourism retail stores and exhibit and attraction space for the first and second floors. Offices, though not those belonging to the authority, would go in on the third and fourth levels. “The idea is to get life and activity in the building year-round,” said CEO Curtis Grad. “For 40 years it’s been pay-on-entry and we’d like to bring levels one and two back to public use.” In its proposal, the not-for-profit outlined a broader vision to one day have departing ferry passengers walk through the CPR building into a new single ferry terminal next door. That would replace and consolidate the Black Ball and Victoria Clipper ferry terminals, which currently operate on Provincial Capital Commission-managed property. If those terminals come down, a portion of the property could be developed into civic space, said Grad. “Museum, performing arts, festival space, (space for) First Nations – there are a number of ideas that need to be vetted with all the stakeholders,” he said. The Provincial Capital Commission’s board of directors will choose the site’s tenant on Nov. 24. Leasing negotiations should finish in December, and the tenant will be able to start preparing the building in January so that it can move in later in the year. Meanwhile, the Maritime Museum of B.C. has said it has funding partners waiting in the wings to help fund its plan to move to the building, if its application is approved. It’s estimated the move to the Inner Harbour would bring 125,000 visitors a year through its doors, up from the 20,000 people who visit its current Bastion Square location. “We desperately need a new attraction downtown. We’ve lost a lot of attractions in the last 20 years,” said Jamie Webb, president of the non-profit Maritime Museum of B.C. Foundation. “You’ve got to give people a reason to stay another day, or come period.” Matt MacNeil, Vic Pub Co. owner, did not respond to interview requests. emccracken@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com A4 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Alex Campbell’s life celebrated Co-founder of Thrifty Foods remembered as a loyal and generous man Erin Cardone News staff

As the dramatic voice of Ken Lavigne flooded the hall, an emotional Jo Campbell stood and embraced her children and grandchildren. Lavigne sang Time to Say Goodbye to conclude a celebration of the life of Thrifty Foods co-founder Alex Campbell Sr. on Sunday, evoking tears from not only Campbell’s family, including his wife, Jo, but a vast number of the 1,200plus people who attended. The crowd mourned a man

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Jo Campbell gives a hug to a guest at a celebration of life ceremony held for her husband, Thrifty Foods co-founder Alex Campbell Sr. at the Victoria Conference Centre. Approximately 1,200 friends, family and employees attended the public event.

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Two Victoria street people have contracted tuberculosis and one has been isolated and is being cared for in hospital, the Vancouver Island Health Authority said Friday. Because TB can be contagious among those who don’t have proper housing or diets, the city’s street population has been warned they are at risk if they have had close contact with the two victims whose names have not been released to the news media. The first case was diagnosed in late September and the other last week, said Dr. Murray Fyfe, VIHA

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because of their living conditions. “We are working closely with other agencies in the downtown area to contact people who may have been exposed and to encourage them to come forward for testing,” Fyfe said. TB is not highly infectious like the flu or measles. A treatable illness that requires drug treatment for up to a year, TB symptoms include prolonged cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, fever or nights sweats. VIHA said anybody showing TB symptoms should call 811, the health unit or their family physician. editor@vicnews.com

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“the smile in the aisle” for his presence at his Thrifty Foods stores. Campbell’s three children were “proud of his honesty, integrity and confidence,” said Campbell. Campbell wasn’t one to lose his cool in business or at home, he didn’t make rash decisions and was unfailingly loyal. Having lost his own father at a young age, Mack shared a personal note: “Death can end a life, but it can never extinguish love or end a relationship.” The Campbell family left the celebration after dozens of hugs from friends in the room, all of whom had come to pay respects to a generous philanthropist and successful business owner who touched countless lives on the Island. ecardone@vicnews.com

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described as an intelligent entrepreneur, an avid boater and a father with a sense of humour by speakers at the event – friends and business associates who got to know Campbell over many years. Campbell died Oct. 11. He was 70. CTV Vancouver Island news anchor Hudson Mack hosted the celebration. Lavigne’s four songs drew many tears from the audience, especially Danny Boy, which was one of Campbell’s favourites. Local piper James Troy’s music brought out tissues as well. Held at the Victoria Conference Centre, the celebration was decorated by large arrangements of white orchids, irises and roses. Before the hall filled for the 1 p.m. event, people stood and talked, many hugged each other and made introductions

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www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com ••A5 A5

VICTORIA VICTORIANEWS NEWS--Wednesday, Wednesday,November November2,2,2011 2011 

No decision yet on park road closures Roszan Holmen News staff

More public consultation is needed before the city can proceed with plans to eliminate some of the roads and parking stalls within Beacon Hill Park. So far, community feedback has been mixed on the plan to cut parking stalls to 583 from 753, and reduce almost a quarter of the park’s paved roads. The parks department plans to transform some of the vehicle routes into paths for pedestrians and cyclists. Roads and parking would be preserved to all major landmarks to ensure accessibility. While some people objected to the project’s price tag of $530,000, others spoke in favour at the council

First poppy Cpl. Justin Nicholson, right, gets ready to pin the first poppy on Lt.-Gov. Steven Point at Government House last week. Poppies went on sale throughout the region last Friday. Proceeds from poppy sales go toward veteran programs and youth charities. Remembrance Day is Nov. 11.

meeting held Oct. 27. The Beacon Hill Park Traffic Management Plan “will benefit the park by increasing and better protecting greenspace; visitor enjoyment will be increased as noise and pollution are reduced,” wrote park historian Janis Ringuette, in a letter to council. “I know several previous efforts to reduce vehicle traffic were derailed by a minority of opponents,” continued Ringuette, who has written extensively on the subject. “This council has consistently advocated more walking and biking… The perfect place to put this goal into practice is in our largest city park.” Council voted to postpone any decisions and directed staff to do more community consultation. rholmen@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Library lending out museum passes Libraries are not just for books anymore, thanks to a new partnership between the Greater Victoria Public Library and Royal B.C. Museum. Twenty family passes, which allow for free admission to all galleries and exhibitions at the museum, are avail-

able for borrowing on a week-long basis from any of the 10 branches in the region. Family passes allow two adults and up to three children free general admission. For more information on how to borrow one of the family passes, please go online to gvpl.ca.

Randall Garrison, MP ESQUIMALT–JUAN DE FUCA Constituency office is now open to serve constituents: address:

A2–100 Aldersmith Place Victoria V9A 7M8

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We are here to assist constituents with Federal government programs and services. RG-ad-BP-1108.indd 1

8/11/11 9:55:44 AM

Celebrate the 6th Annual Tree Appreciation Day

Tree Appreciation Day provides an opportunity for the community to come together to plant a forest for future generations. Join the City of Victoria in planting trees and shrubs in Arbutus Park and participate in free “Right Tree, Right Place” and “Banding for Winter Moth” information sessions. Participants are asked to bring their own tools and gloves as supplies are limited. Dress for the weather as the event will happen rain or shine. Sunday, November 6, 2011 10 a.m. – noon Arbutus Park 2925 Washington Avenue Registration is not required. Refreshments will be served. For more information: visit www.victoria.ca and click on What’s New?

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A6 • • www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com A6

Wednesday, November November 2, 2, 2011 2011 -- VICTORIA VICTORIA Wednesday,

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Report cards won’t include students’ grades Arnold Lim News staff

Don’t blame your kid if his or her report card isn’t up to snuff. Unless a deal is reached on the ongoing labour dispute involving B.C. teachers, report cards will do little more than record how often students were absent or late for school. “Unless your son or daughter is taught by a principal or vice principal, there will not be a mark, work habit or comment,” said Greater Victoria School District superintendent of schools John Gaiptman. “We can all agree report cards are an important source of information for parents. It is regrettable we are not sending out the report cards that parents are used to seeing.” Report cards will be sent out between the second week of November and the first week of December. Teachers consider filling out report cards to be administrative work, which they have not been doing since their work-to-rule campaign began two months ago. Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association president Tara Ehrcke said parents can still get all the information they need by talking to their child’s teacher, which she suggests might be even better than what parents get from a piece of paper. “Teachers have been advised by the union to continue communication about student progress with

BROCCOLI CROWNS

Young Life of Victoria is turning 50 this year and has a celebration and reunion planned for anyone involved with the Christian youth outreach organization over the past half century. The event happens Saturday (Nov. 5) at the Bear Mountain Westin Resort. Young Life operates clubs in four

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parents and students,” Ehrcke said. “I think that a face-to-face conversation or phone call can provide more depth or understanding than what is on a report card. Report cards are very prescriptive using coded marks. It is actually fairly restrictive. I think in a lot of cases parents will get more info than a report card will show.” Both sides continue to work towards a resolution before the spring report cards. The last contract with B.C.’s 41,000 public school teachers expired in June. In addition to wage and benefit increases, the B.C. Teachers’ Federation wants restoration of class size and special needs support rules, after a court ruling gave the government a year to consult with teachers on appropriate levels. The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association was expected to apply to the B.C. Labour Relations Board this week for a declaration on report cards and the option of reduced pay for reduced work. Teachers are also refusing playground supervision and most routine contact with administration. There has been little progress on talks for a new contract. “If parents feel the information is insufficient we encourage them to contact the teacher,” Ehrcke said. “We don’t want any parent to feel they are in the dark or don’t know about their student’s progress.” editor@saanichnews.com – with files from Tom Fletcher

Young Life celebrates 50th anniversary

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high schools in Greater Victoria, as well as doing outreach with at-risk youth and providing opportunities to attend its summer camp. Tickets are $30 per person or $50 per couple and can still be purchased online at younglife.ca/ victoria50 or by calling Bill Okell 250-479-8453. editor@oakbaynews.com

CHURCH DIRECTORY Your Guide to Local Houses of Worship Seek Jesus Christ while you can find him. Call upon him while he is available. I can help you find him. Call Pastor Dave 250-479-0500

Parish of St. Peter & St. Paul

Rev. Lon Towstego Saturday, 4 pm Common Ground Praise & Worship Sunday, 8:30 am Holy Communion 10:30 am Family Eucharist (all ages). St. Paul’s Historic Naval Garrison Church 1379 Esquimalt Rd.

250-386-6833

www.stpeterandpaul.ca

To book a space call Shelley Westwood at 250-381-3633 Ext. 263


VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

POLICE NEWS IN BRIEF

Dance party keeps cops busy Victoria police had a busy Friday night when about 2,000 people — mainly university and college students — invaded downtown Victoria for what was called a Decentralized Dance Party. Worried about the safety of the revellers, the police broke up the event around 10:30 p.m. at the derelict Hudson Bay Parkade at Fisgard and Blanshard streets. Police said the party was mostly incident-free and organizers were co-operative with police. However, police deployed the Marine Rescue Unit to rescue an intoxicated female who fell into the water at Ship's Point. Booze was also a factor the entire weekend as police responded to lots of fights, disturbances and loud house parties across the city. The 911 communications centre received more than 100 calls from citizens in a five-hour period Saturday.

Bus stop attack leaves man, 50 injured A 20-year old Esquimalt man is suspected of attacking a man in his 50s who was waiting for a bus at Douglas and Yates streets on Saturday night. The two men fought on the ground, and the older man was kneed in the chest. After a bus driver phoned 911, the victim got on the bus and collapsed. The attacker was seated in the back of the bus when the police arrived and arrested him. The victim was taken to hospital for treatment of cracked ribs. Police say both men had been drinking. The younger man faces a possible charge of assault causing bodily harm.

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www.vicnews.com • A7



Protesters seek help from police ‘Illegal campers’ harassed by people legally in Centennial Square, says VicPD Rudy Haugeneder News Staff

Several night calls from Occupy Victoria protesters requesting help to remove obnoxious and noisy rowdies raiding the Centennial Square tent city over the weekend put Victoria police in a confusing situation. It put police between a “rock and a hard place,” Const. Mike Russell said about calls from protesters he described as “illegal campers” wanting police help to move out people legally in the square. Russell said there were quite a few calls. Protest spokesperson Anushka Nagji last week said the People’s Assembly of Victoria, which organized the protest, had been forced to establish a “vigilance detail” of four men to patrol the tent city at night to ensure it remained quiet and peaceful. She said the problems generally happen after downtown bars close

and rowdies shout obscenities and other slurs at protesters trying to catch some sleep. Until this weekend nothing had happened that the security detail hasn’t been able to diffuse, including handling a tiny element of Victoria’s homeless community “bent on creating problems,” said Nagji. Meanwhile, Victoria city council last week gave thumbs up to the Occupy Victoria tent protest. With only Coun. Geoff Young opposing, council agreed to support Occupy Victoria as long the the protesters remain peaceful and restrict themselves to using “non-violent assembly” to get their message out. The protest is part of a “worldwide citizens’ movement to address historic and existing inequalities in financial and governmental institutions, policies and practices,” council said. “The People’s Assembly of Victoria represents local resident participation and public engagement in this global protest and dialogue,” the motion read. Council’s action effectively ends any threat of using police to clear out Centennial Square protesters who have set up about 50 to 60 tents in the square. The Downtown Victoria Business

Association plans to set up a large temporary public skating rink in the same space later this month. Protest spokespeople and the DVBA have been meeting regularly to reach a compromise. Although no formal agreement has been reached to shift some tents into an area of the square that won’t interfere with the ice rink, Nagji said most protest campers “don’t mind moving.” But it’s not unanimous, she said. Some protesters don’t like the idea of relocating and might not move due to the unwritten rules of the camp where individuals cannot be forced to accommodate the rest. “It’s up to them themselves to decide whether to move,” said Nagji. Mayor Dean Fortin said he has no deadline on how long the city will allow the protest camp to remain. Fortin said the city won’t take police action as long as the situation remains peaceful and no criminal activity takes place. “Right now we have no deadline,” said Fortin, adding he is closely monitoring what happens at other Occupy protest camps to get a feel for what might happen next in Victoria. “I’m going day by day,” he said. editor@vicnews.com

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NOTICE OF MEETINGS Wednesday, November 2nd Arts, Culture & Special Events Advisory Committee 7 pm Council Chambers Monday, November 7th Council 7 pm Council Chambers Thursday November 10th Access Awareness Advisory Commitee 4 pm Council Chambers For further information, please call 250-414-7135 or our website @ www.esquimalt.ca/council

It’s time to put on your thinking cap. In order to meet our waste diversion goals, we’re planning on diverting kitchen scraps produced by businesses from Hartland landfill. So we want to work with you to implement a material diversion program that fits. And we need your thoughts on how best to do it. So please take our online survey. Visit our open house. Respond to our letter to businesses. Get involved and be part of the recipe for a more sustainable region.

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www.vicnews.com A8 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

NEWS

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The city’s fastest growing neighbourhood, with a changing reputation. Thanks to the dedication of an active food security group, residents can harvest plums, pears, veggies and herbs on many plots of public land. Community volunteerism is growing, but more are needed to help take the new community centre to the next level.

Big changes afoot More than any other neighbourhood, Vic West faces big-impact land-used changes and development from all sides. • To the East: A new bridge linking to downtown will significantly alter the gateway to the neighbourhood, ease the commute for bicyclists, and open up a one-acre section of land where the s-curve now sits. Thanks in part to pressure from the community association, city council committed to transforming this space into a park in October. Options for the park include city-wide attactions, such as an amphitheatre. • To the South: The Victoria International Marina awaits the green light. Despite widespread opposition from the community, federal approval for the marina near Lime Bay Park is likely. The proposal also calls for two commercial buildings, including a restaurant and coffee shop. • To the North: Enhancements are likely for Vic West’s other two bridges. The city plans to widen the Bay Bridge to better accommodate cyclists and pedestrians. The upgrade is on the books for 2011, but has been delayed. The Capital Regional District is also considering lighting the Selkirk Trestle bridge to brighten the way for commuters using the Galloping Goose Trail. • Through the middle: The E&N Rail Trail is nearing completion in Vic West. The trail, hugging the rail line, will eventually connect the Johnson Street Bridge to Langford.

Roszan Holmen/News staff

Patti Parkhouse (middle) picks edible berries from the neighbourohod’s newest community garden, outside the Vic West Community Centre. Executive director Suzette Delmage, right, aims to build the new centre into the neighbourhood village, or hub. At left is community association president Nan Judd.

Vic West benefits from population boom Roszan Holmen News staff

Starting at 8:15 a.m. in the covered courtyard of Vic West elementary school, kids spread jam on toast or cheese on bagels. Some warmly-dressed parents operate the toaster and hand out yogurt. This is the new breakfast program, launched Oct. 4, thanks to a donation from HMCS Vancouver. “It builds community,” says Muriel Southern, a Vic West resident. While her kids eat breakfast at home, they enjoy coming for a snack. The volunteer-run program also brings parents together, she said. Every day, nearly 40 kids come early for a meal before school begins. Everyone is welcome. “We are identified as an inner city school, which means there are some families with some needs, obviously,” said school principal Joe Cardle. The school of 180 kids represents the full economic spectrum, as does the neighbourhood sur-

rounding it. Down the street, social housing intermingles harmoniously with starter homes and grandly-fixed up historic houses. In decades past, crossing the bridge from downtown meant entering the ’hood. Residents routinely found needles in their yards. Today, poverty still exists but it’s under the radar. If any stigma lingers, it hasn’t stopped the masses from moving here. Vic West was identified by the last census as the city’s fastest growing neighbourhood, by raw numbers. In a five year span ending 2006, a net total of 410 people moved in. A population estimate predicts well over 1,000 more will follow by 2016, due to the progress of several large-scale developments, such as Dockside Green, Railyards, BayView and Roundhouse. Alongside this population growth, neighbourhood spirit has fluorished. In 2005, the community association led the creation of a visions map, in response to the massive

City of Victoria graphic

development. Instead of simply marking roads, it pinpoints community amenities such as historical sites, art installations, music cafes, and wildlife in the sea surrounding the peninsula. The process engaged hundreds of people and spawned many initiatves, such as the annual fall corn roast and the Vic West Art Quest. Vic West also paved the

way for community gardens in the city. At first, the idea was rejected because there were no policies to guide them, so Vic West resident and current Victoria MP, Denise Savoie, helped to write them. Now, there are three community gardens in Vic West, with a fourth on the way. “It’s not really about growing a vegetable,” said Patti Parkhouse, leader of

the Food Security Collective. “The main reason is for community building.” The food-security group has led guerrilla gardening on boulevards and recently launched community dinners and kitchens. In September, ripe pears on a tree in Raynor Park prompted a gathering of people equipped with long poles, a tarp and a ladder. After the harvest, they met again to make several pear dishes together. Last year, the community association faced an unexpected challenge when the YMCA pulled out of its Vic West location. Taking over the facility as a community centre was a risk, admits association president Nan Judd. While the move came with city funding for staff, it also depended heavily on the volunteer board. “We’re essentially running a business,” said Judd. Building a dedicated group of volunteers to help run the centre is one of the next goals, said executive director, Suzette Delmage. As the Y pulled out,

the centre lost a neededday care. While Delmage doesn’t have the staff to replace it, she’s figuring out ways to meet a range of community needs, in part through partnerships. For instance, Music Explorers is a free class for kids thanks to instruction by a University of Victoria music group. In the years to come, the City of Victoria plans several enhancements to the neighbourhood, resulting from its new Official Community Plan. They include revitalizing areas under development. At first, the city wanted to plan the neighbourhood in two phases. “We just clearly said no,” Judd said. “We want it all to be done together.” Otherwise, she said, the result would be more piecemeal development, such as the high-end condos in the Songhees area, cut off from the rest of Vic West. “It’s a deadzone,” said Parkhouse. “Everyone agrees it should have been mixed-use,” added Judd. rholmen@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com • A9 www.vicnews.com • A9

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011  VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Small condo units eyed for Esquimalt development Erin McCracken News staff

Call them small or call them cozy. Condo units between 330 and 430 square feet could be coming to Esquimalt – the smallest living spaces proposed for the township within the last decade. Council examined plans at a committee-ofthe-whole meeting Oct. 24 for a modern-looking, 43-unit, four-storey residence at 529 Comerford St., beside Esquimalt’s public safety building. Council peppered

developer Leonard Cole with questions about unit size and his plans for 20 parking spots for 43 units. He said though the living spaces are small, he does not compromise comfort for space, and feels confident the spaces will appeal to single people and seniors. “They still have all the luxury of a 1,000-squarefoot space,” Cole said, adding that because of their size the units can be purchased at a lower price point, starting at $139,000.

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Coun. Lynda Hundleby said she looks forward to hearing from nearby residents, who will be notified about the proposal and invited to speak at a future council meeting. “It’s the first of its kind and it bears for us to think it through,” she said. Coun. Bruce McIldoon

worried that limited on-site parking would prompt some tenants to buy and sell spots. “We’re going to have a secondary (non-taxable) market in selling parking spaces,” said McIldoon. “It looks great now. You’ve got to look at it in 10 years. This is a very high-density development.”

All-candidates meeting receives funding boost

Still, council voted in favour of moving the project forward to the next stage, which includes seeking public input. emccracken@vicnews.com

What do you think? Give us your comments by email: editor@vicnews. com.

Organizers of Esquimalt’s all-candidates meeting will receive a $700 grant from the township. Township council agreed to help the Esquimalt Chamber of Commerce and the Esquimalt Residents Association cover the rising cost of renting the Esquimalt High school’s theatre, where the event will happen on Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. “We see this as a benefit to governance,” association member Karen James told council. Still, Coun. Alison Gaul was concerned that council’s financial contribution could be viewed as a conflict of interest. Councillors Meagan Brame and Lynda Hundleby, who are seeking re-election, did not take part in the discussion or vote. emccracken@vicnews.com

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A10 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

EDITORIAL

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

CBC takes national pulse This week officially marks the 75th anniversary of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a national icon that continues to prove that news and culture can be cool. The CBC is a gem that all of us can treasure, and in very personal ways. While it offers a wide variety of programming on radio and television, designed to suit varying tastes, it stops short of trying to be all things to all people. Instead, it sticks to its mandate of presenting the best this country has to offer, along with the inevitable warts. When CBC Victoria opened 13 years ago, it only enhanced the appeal of the national network, offering more localized content and further forging a link between Canada’s three coasts. The public broadcaster continues to rank at or near the top of listenership in the Capital Region, no doubt for its combination of local, regional and national information and entertainment. Where else can you tune in and hear everything from in-depth news interviews and musical retrospectives to comedy and even the odd serialized drama? There are people who believe taxpayers shouldn’t be funding the public broadcaster when not everyone watches or listens. But the CBC remains one of the few institutions we can trust to remain as truly Canadian as hockey, politeness and beavers. That national thread is something we need to cultivate and embrace.

Report cards not for administrators News that B.C. teachers will likely not be issuing fully filled-out report cards is troubling. Not only are letter grades a critical way for parents to confirm how their children are progressing, teacher comments often indicate such intangibles as work habits, citizenship and social interaction. Report cards are not merely administrative, as the teachers’ union would have us believe. They give parents confirmation of information heard in conversations with both teachers and their children, and must be kept separate from work-to-rule guidelines. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009 WINNER

Zalm joins Hydro conspiracy club a European Union plot for world The smart meter installation van domination. arrived on my street last week, as Vander Zalm asserts that smart B.C. Hydro’s smart grid project meters and appliances create such heads toward the halfway mark. a powerful surveillance This system will not network, “they’ll even only detect outages, know what you’re electricity loss and theft, cooking.” it enables a voluntary There are those who time-of-use system where claim smart meters can users can get a discount tell what channel your TV by shifting consumption is on, but this is the first to low-peak times. You I’ve heard about them could even set up wind or detecting whether you’re solar generation that the having eggs or oatmeal for meter would record and breakfast. subtract from your bill. Tom Fletcher And who might “they” But apparently no B.C. Views be? one wants to talk about “The big picture is that. Black Press papers of course that we’re continue to run letters moving to globalization,” Vander with exaggerated or false claims Zalm intones. “Eventually we’ll be that stoke baseless fear of radio governed out of Brussels, Belgium waves. or someplace like that. And this Where is this coming from? I’m all ties into that. They can monitor grateful to the anonymous smartwhat’s happening anywhere in the meter foe who started sending me world. It’s Big Brother. We’ll be updates from “Citizens for Safe totally controlled.” Technology,” a loose collection of He stops just short of what I’ll call U.S. and Canadian activists that the Full Tinfoil, a belief that these claims to include doctors, lawyers radio waves control minds directly. and other professionals. Wildlife artist Robert Bateman Not much is professional about also makes an ass of himself in a the Canadian content on their brief video, where he describes website. hiring someone to come in and A video starts with a juvenile detect “hot” wiring in his Saltspring union parody showing executives Island mansion. (A surprising plotting to sell B.C. Hydro to number of self-appointed smart General Electric. meter experts sell measuring and Then it moves to an apparently “shielding” services.) serious interview with Bill Vander A reader sent me a local Zalm, who expands on his earlier newspaper commentary by Nelsonconspiracy theory about the Creston MLA Michelle Mungall, harmonized sales tax being part of

basically a vague summary of NDP talking points about smart meters being too expensive and a possible health threat. This is interesting, because the City of Nelson owns its own power utility, which started installing wireless meters in 2004. They finished last year, with no protest. I asked Mungall why. She was on the city council that chose a different model, a “drive-by” meter. They broadcast readings every 15 seconds and still need meter readers, who no longer have get out of their trucks. B.C. Hydro’s meters signal only three or four times a day, but one of the often-repeated false claims about them is that they secretly transmit much more often with some sort of damaging energy pulses. And yet these granola-loving West Kootenay folks cheerfully endure a 24/7 bombardment of what are essentially brief cellphone signals. Mungall said Nelson council specifically rejected a smart grid system “because of the cost.” Somehow retaining meter readers saves the city money. She noted that rural parts of her constituency are serviced by B.C. Hydro, and some people are very concerned. I’ll bet they are. Not just in West Kootenay, but a few other remote areas known for production of B.C.’s number one cash crop. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Not much professional content is on the Citizens for Safe Technology website.’


VICTORIA NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 2, 2, 2011 2011

www.vicnews.com • A11



LETTERS

A paradise for deer is unnatural Why do some people not understand? In rural and semi-rural areas there is husbandry involved in looking after wildlife. In the wild, predators take care of overpopulation and therefore there is no damage done to the environment. In urban areas such as Greater Victoria, there are no predators to keep the numbers down and get rid of sick animals as well. Where will we be in 10 years’ time when every little fawn multiplies and every mother deer gives birth to sickly fawns. The odd cougar will not do.

Everybody who has grown up in rural areas knows this. People who live an urban life have this sentimental “Bambi” feeling. Deer’s life was once a struggle for survival, but they have now arrived in paradise in Victoria and their numbers are growing. Karin Hertel Saanich ■■■ On Oct. 28 at 3 p.m. in one block along Lockehaven Drive, I counted two wellantlered bucks, each with its harem of five does, all munching garden greenery. Now it’s rutting season. Twelve deer

could easily become 22 deer by this time next year if the bucks impregnate all the does. And this is only the tip of the “deerberg” in Ten Mile Point. In a matter of weeks a cull could dramatically reduce this population. Let’s hope the CRD deer management plan becomes a deer action plan to end this problem once and for all. Culling the deer in Victoria can’t happen soon enough. Sandy Argue Saanich

www.vicnews.com • A11

Opportunity for Public Comment On Commissioner’s Coastal Ferry Act Review

The British Columbia Ferry Commission, the independent regulator of BC Ferries, has been mandated by the provincial government to review the Coastal Ferry Act and to make recommendations on potential changes to the Act which would better enable the commissioner to balance the financial sustainability of the ferry operator and the interest of ferry users. The commissioner has been conducting public consultation meetings in coastal communities served by BC Ferries and is inviting additional input on a number of key issues described in a series of discussion papers. These issues will be considered by the commissioner during his review of the Act and deal with interests of ferry users, financial sustainability objectives, the balance between the two, price cap regulation and cross-subsidization. Visit www.bcferrycommission. com/reports-press/whats-new/coastal-ferryact-review/ for copies of these discussion papers. Comments on these papers or any other issue relevant to the Coastal Ferry Act review can be e-mailed to info@bcferrycommission.com or mailed to BC Ferry Commission, RPO Hillside, Box 35119, Victoria BC, V8T 5G2. For further information on the review, please visit www.bcferrycommission. com. Deadline for comments or submissions is December 5, 2011.

Esquimalt Parks & Recreation

National Children’s Day

Jeffrey Hodgins kneels while pointing to a sign he chalked onto the pavement at the Occupy Victoria site in Centennial Square. The message reads: “Land Reform, Free Market, Land is: Housing, Production, Food, Life.” Don Denton/News Staff

Protesters hurting their own cause Re: Downtown ice rink faces human obstacles (News, Oct. 26) I was just reading the article about the protesters camping out in Centennial Square. First: I support the plan of having the outdoor skating rink set up in Centennial Square. I think it’s a wonderful community idea. I was looking forward to coming downtown on Nov. 26 to watch it open. Second: Why are the protesters allowed to camp out in the square? They should be removed. To me, they’re like litter and should be cleaned up. I’m sure some are “professional” protesters and most likely could care less about the rink; they just want to be part of any protest going on. It’s a real shame that they protest something that is going to hopefully be something to help bring the communities closer together.

I wish the protesters luck in winning this silly ordeal. Cathy Laycock Esquimalt ■■■ Re: Downtown ice rink faces human obstacles (News, Oct. 26) It’s is time to stop catering to the Occupy Victoria protesters. Stating your case is one thing, but getting in the way of the public enjoyment of an outdoor rink does nothing but interfere with ordinary citizens having fun around

the holidays. I don’t understand how not allowing my family and me to go skating and drink hot chocolate helps change global economic policy. Why can’t they just move to another spot? I can only speak on my behalf but by being a nuisance you only harm your cause, not promote it. Hopefully this will get resolved in time for the rink to be built and both sides will put aside their agendas and allow those of us who are not

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Email: editor@vicnews.com

involved to have a little fun. Colin Day Victoria

Law-abiding citizens have reason to worry Re: Handgun seizure a worrisome trend (News, Oct 26) You report that local law enforcement is more fretful at the number of illegal handguns on Victoria streets. Well imagine how the rest of us feel. After all, armed officers are not likely to be raped. They are not expected to submit to muggings. They are not required to remain passive victims during a home invasion. It is law-abiding citizens who have been stripped of the right to bear a firearm for self-defense that should be worried at this tacit confession by the authorities that they are unable to keep weapons out of the hands of criminals. Dave Killion Victoria

Saturday, November 19th 10:00am-2:30pm Esquimalt Recreation Centre A free event for the entire family! Join us in celebration of National Children’s Day. Activities include Kindergym & Bouncy Castle, Face Painting, Kids Craft Zone, Art Display, Coast Capital Free Swim (12:30-2:30pm), and performances by Vibestreet Dance Studios. Refreshments include muffins, juice and coffee.

Visit esquimalt.ca or call 1.250.412.8506 for info. 527 Frazer Street • twitter: @EsquimaltRec facebook: Esquimalt Parks & Recreation

esquimalt.ca/recreation 250.412.8500


A12 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

NEWS

CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT NOTICE OF ELECTION BY ACCLAMATION and NOTICE OF ELECTION BY VOTING and NOTICE OF ADVANCE VOTING OPPORTUNITIES and NOTICE OF OTHER VOTING PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the electors of the Township of Esquimalt that the following candidate has been elected by acclamation: Mayor – One (1) to be elected Surname

Usual Names

Jurisdiction of Residence

DESJARDINS

Barbara

204–453 Head St. Esquimalt, BC V9A 5S1

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the electors of the Township of Esquimalt that an election by voting is necessary to elect six (6) Councillors and nine (9) School Trustees, and that the persons nominated as candidates and for whom votes will be received are: Councillor – Six (6) to be elected Surname

Usual Names Jurisdiction of Residence

BRAME DIXON HODGINS HUNDLEBY McKIE MORRISON SCHINBEIN STEFFLER

Meagan Sandra Dave Lynda Bob Tim David Josh

Usual Names Jurisdiction of Residence

ALPHA Catherine BRATZER David FERRIS Tom HOLLAND Jim HORSEMAN Bev LEONARD Elaine LORING-KUHANGA Edith McEVOY Michael McNALLY Diane NOHR Deborah ORCHERTON Peg PAYNTER Rob PITRE David RAND David STERN Richard YOUNG John A.

TAKE NOTICE that the above is a synopsis of the proposed bylaws and that this synopsis is not intended to be and is not to be understood as an interpretation of the bylaws. The full bylaws may be inspected at the Esquimalt Municipal Hall office, 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, BC during regular office hours, Monday to Friday (except Statutory Holidays), 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, or by visiting the municipal website.

477 Joffre St. S. Esquimalt, BC V9A 6C7 938 Wollaston St. Victoria, BC V9A 5B2 2-1115 Craigflower Rd. Esquimalt, BC V9A 7R1 816 Elrick Pl. Esquimalt, BC V9A 4T1 954 Lampson Pl. Victoria, BC V9A 5A1 208-1315 Esquimalt Rd. Esquimalt, BC V9A 3P5 211-925 Esquimalt Rd. Esquimalt, BC V9A 3M7 102-1360 Esquimalt Rd. Esquimalt, BC V9A 3R2

School Trustee – Nine (9) to be elected Surname

BYLAW NO. 2757 – “Zoning Bylaw, 1992, No. 2050, Amendment Bylaw [No. 197], 2011, No. 2757” would amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding a new zone - Esquimalt Village – Mixed Use Multiple Residential [RM-EVP] the intent of which is to accommodate high density Mixed Use Apartment, Commercial and Institutional development. The proposed RM-EVP zone specifies permitted uses, building setbacks, the maximum building height, maximum lot coverage and floor area ratio as well as off-street parking requirements.

695 Polyanthus Cres. Victoria, BC V8Z 2J3 1023 Leeds Pl. Saanich, BC V8X 4B8 2811 Prior St. Victoria, BC V8T 3Y2 1975 Renfrew Rd. Shawnigan Lake, BC V0R 1W2 3931 Rainbow St. Victoria, BC V9X 2A3 570 O’Connell Rd. Victoria, BC V8Z 2C4 4169 Quadra St. Victoria, BC V8X 1L3 4345 Gordon Head Rd. Victoria, BC V8N 3Y4 353A Linden Ave. Victoria, BC V8V 4G1 943 Hampshire Rd. Victoria, BC V8S 3S4 2653 Cedar Hill Rd. Victoria, BC V8T 3H1 1333 George St. Victoria, BC V8S 1A8 4208 Rossiter Dr. Victoria, BC V8N 4S7 405-649 Bay St. Victoria, BC V8T 5H8 1658 Feltham Rd. Saanich, BC V8N 6A6 204-850 Rupert Ter. Victoria, BC V8W 2K2

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY given to the electors of the Township of Esquimalt that a vote will be held on the following question: “Are you in favour of the Township of Esquimalt adopting amendments to Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 2646 and Zoning Bylaw No. 2050 that would facilitate development of Phase One of the Esquimalt Village Plan which would include a mix of residential, commercial and civic uses in two buildings, one of which may be up to 12 storeys in height, on the site of the old municipal hall and old public works yard? Yes or No”

SYNOPSIS OF PROPOSED BYLAWS BYLAW NO. 2756 – “Official Community Plan Bylaw, 2006, No. 2646, Amendment Bylaw [No. 10], 2011, No. 2756” would amend the Official Community Plan to create a new Development Permit Area [DPA No. 6] with design guidelines for buildings and the public realm within Phase 1 of the Esquimalt Village Plan. The design and form of the mixed use development is intended to create a pedestrian-oriented “high street” along Esquimalt Road, with a new public plaza anchoring the project and bringing civic use and activity to the streetscape. Civic use space is incorporated into the plan to contribute to the established civic core around the Municipal Hall and Public Library site.

GENERAL VOTING DAY will be open to qualified electors of the Township of Esquimalt on:

Saturday, November 19, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 am and 8:00 pm Esquimalt Municipal Hall 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, BC ADVANCE VOTING OPPORTUNITIES will be available to qualified electors as follows:

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 & Wednesday, November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 am and 8:00 pm Esquimalt Municipal Hall 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, BC ELECTOR REGISTRATION There is no need to pre-register to vote as the registration of all electors for this election will take place at the time of voting. You will be required to make a declaration that you meet the following requirements: • 18 years of age or older • Canadian citizen • resident of BC for at least 6 months immediately preceding voting day • resident of OR registered owner of real property in the Township of Esquimalt for at least 30 days immediately preceding voting day, and • not otherwise disqualified by law from voting.

Resident electors will also be required to produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature). Picture identification is not necessary. The identification must prove both residency and identity. Non-resident property electors must produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature) to prove identity, proof that they are entitled to register in relation to the property, and, if applicable, written consent from the majority of the property owners. A Non-resident Property Elector Consent Form is available at the Municipal Hall or on the municipal website. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION on the bylaws or the voting process, please visit www.esquimalt.ca/elections or contact:

Anja Nurvo, Chief Election Officer, Ph: 250-414-7135 or Marlene Lagoa, Deputy Chief Election Officer, Ph: 250-414-7114 or Email: elections@esquimalt.ca Anja Nurvo, Chief Election Officer


www.vicnews.com • A13 www.vicnews.com • A1

VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011  VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

CIVIC

ELECTION Nov. 19

’11

JOSH STEFFLER Age: 32 Occupation: Spa therapist; baker at Esquimalt Country Grocer. Platform priorities: Smart development and growth, no future tax hikes, engaging more residents in future decisionmaking processes, sustainable growth at municipal hall, putting sewage treatment, policing and light-rail transit to a referendum and increased government accountability. Contact: JoshSteffler. wordpress.com

Esquimalt council candidates

DAVE HODGINS Age: 62 Occupation: President and CEO, Tartthail Consulting. Platform priorities: “Citizen-centered action-oriented” services to provide more opportunities for individuals, families and businesses, as well as first-rate public safety, development, infrastructure and environmental services. Contact: www.DaveHodgins.ca

TIM MORRISON Age: 40 Occupation: Communications co-ordinator, B.C. Assessment Authority. Platform priorities: More open government and communication from municipal hall, property tax relief, better policing and to stop the Capital Regional District’s sewage plan. Contact: www.TimMorrison.ca

SANDRA DIXON Age: 52 Occupation: Retired. Platform priorities: Senior and student safety, increased police presence, lower tax increases, responsible development – capping buildings in residential areas at four to six storeys, and improving traffic congestion, business diversity and government openness. Contact: Email sandradixon. esquimaltvotes@ yahoo.ca

DAVID SCHINBEIN Age: 58 Occupation: Sales representative, Commissionaires Victoria. Platform priorities: Emergency management and planning, municipal financial accountability, lobbying B.C. Transit to improve busing schedules for shiftworkers, maintaining a good relationship with CFB Esquimalt and keeping green space in the town square. Contact: Email schinbein@shaw.ca

BOB McKIE Age: 62 Occupation: Retired owner/operator for Loomis Courier and D.H.L. Courier. Platform priorities: Regionalized policing, ensuring regional sewage treatment facilities aren’t built in Esquimalt, responsible development, maintaining a small-town feel and ensuring financial accountability at Municipal Hall. Contact: Email rjmckie@telus.net.

LYNDA HUNDLEBY Age: undisclosed Occupation: Retired; pharmacist in various positions. Platform priorities: Financial accountability, community consultation, best solutions on sewage treatment, development options to broaden the tax and customer base and effective protective services. Contact: Email Lmhundleby@shaw. ca or visit members. shaw.ca/Lmhundleby

MEAGAN BRAME Age: 42 Occupation: Earlychildhood educator Platform priorities: Continue working with municipal staff for transparency, encouraging community input and to be the voice for children, youth and families. Contact: Email mbrame@islandnet. com

For more comments from the candidates go online to www.vicnews.com

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

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La Nina forecasts vary, but good to be prepared New meters better in a crisis, B.C. Hydro says Rudy Haugeneder News staff

Greater Victoria will be hit hard this winter as the La Nina phenomenon makes its return, says a prominent U.S. based weather forecasting company. However, Environment Canada doesn’t think the cold and stormy weather will be as severe as Accuweather is suggesting. B.C. Hydro, whose crews and infrastructure would bear the brunt of a brutal cold snap, isn’t planning any changes to its usual winter preparations. But thanks to smart meters, it will be easier for B.C. Hydro to pinpoint outage locations, even when customers are asleep and

don’t know the power has gone out, said company spokesperson Ted Olynyk. The information will make it easier for B.C. Hydro to dispatch repair crews to the most critical sites serving the most people, he said. For those worried they will be caught in a deep freeze without sufficient emergency supplies to stay comfortable, Olynyk said it’s good for families to ensure they have an emergency kit ready at home to deal with natural disasters, including a major earthquake. “People need to prepare,” he said. “Have an emergency plan for any extreme.” La Nina, which is the opposite of El Nino, is a regular weather pattern that brings colder air than normal to Canada as well as higher than usual snowfalls to the West Coast. editor@vicnews.com

Visit Montana’s CooKhouse

www.vicnews.com • A15 www.vicnews.com • A15

Pets dress to impress Below: Nine-year-old Eric the bulldog, owned by Tara Clarke, seems quite content to be dressed as a bullfrog at Market Square for the sixth annual Werewoofles Wag’oween Halloween costume contest for pets on Saturday. The event sponsored by Woofles Barking Boutique raised money for Broken Promises and Hug-ABull. Left: Noodle, a chihuahua owned by Christie Annear, looks nervous dressed as a lobster in public at Werewoofles Wag’oween. Sharon Tiffin/News staff

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA NEWS Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA NEWS

A16 • www.vicnews.com

On the search for shelter Erin McCracken News staff

Coming up with solutions to provide shelter for the region’s home-

Until November 6, 2011 There are 2 Sico retailers in your area. Find yours at sico.ca/retailers

less requires Jen Book to put on her creative thinking cap. When faced with forecasts calling for nights of extreme wind, freezing

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Our Place Society, St. John the Divine Church and the Victoria Native Friendship Centre, beyond the usual yearround emergency shelters. The protocol’s typical operating season runs from Nov. 1 until March 31. But extreme-weather shelters are also needed in outlying areas of the Capital Region to serve vulnerable people closer to home. Book, the protocol’s regional co-ordinator, continues to look for spaces in Langford, Sooke, Sidney and Esquimalt to include on the protocol list. “Our hope is to actually create shelters within their regions so we’re not having to transport people around so much,” she said. It’s important to find the right type of space, said Book, adding the shelter must be able to offer clients a minimum of eight hours of sleep, among other criteria. “We have a lot of communities that are interested and that are wanting to participate in this project, and at this time, based on the difficulty of finding space or shelter, ... we’ve had to find other solutions,” said Book. That means working with community partners throughout the region, such as police, to connect with the homeless and let them know where they can turn. Other creative measures include arranging for them to be picked up and brought to the shelters, or covering the cost of their transit fares for the trip in from the Swartz Bay ferry terminal or Sidney. “Our concern is that we might not be able to assist those people that might be in crisis, especially if we end up with a really heavy dump of snow,” Book said, adding that’s where communicating with community partners plays an important role. “Up until the point where we can get the municipalities participating in the program and actually get shelters out in those areas, this is how we have to navigate this process.” The protocol is also in need of coats and rain gear. To contribute or volunteer, please visit vewp.net. emccracken@vicnews.com


VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011



www.vicnews.com • A17

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A18 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

Carpenter Dominic Mason died in 1989

Tomorrow, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll renovate the playroom at the local homeless shelter. As a carpenter, Dominic renovated homes for his clients. As a child, he and his mother found a home in a shelter when times were hard. A counselor there showed Dominic a future filled with opportunity, and he never forgot that life-changing vision. Thanks to

a bequest in his will, a few more children will have a chance to build their dreams. Include your favourite cause in your will or estate plan. Contact a charitable organization, lawyer, financial advisor or local LEAVE A LEGACY TM program to learn how.

Consider a gift in your will for your favourite charities. Joy, 250-415-6089 Natasha, 250-721-6001

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VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011 OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

www.vicnews.com • A19 www.oakbaynews.com • A13



THE ARTS

Quote along with Ron, dress the part Victoria Film Festival presents Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, Nov. 12, 7 p.m. at the Vic Theatre, 808 Douglas St. Tix: $10 +HST at the door.

Guitarist Brad Prevedoros, left, percussionist Niel Golden and flutist Greg Joy combine their disparate musical styles on their new CD, Three Worlds. Their CD release concerts go Friday and Saturday (Nov. 4 and 5). Photo contributed

Breaking down musical borders Innovative Vancouver Island-based trio records their first compilation CD Arnold Lim News staff

One new album, two concerts and three award-winning musicians. The debut compilation, Three Worlds, features the Latin-influenced guitar of Brad Prevedoros, the Asian-inspired, bluesy percussion of Niel Golden and the celtic folk stylings of Greg Joy. It is integrated with such non-traditional instruments as the hammered dulcimer and hang (a flying-saucer shaped metal percussion) and boasts a sound that is truly the trio’s own. “Even though we come from diverse places, it really works well whenever we perform (together),” Golden said. “We have an ease of getting along … we understand each other musically and otherwise. We are breaking down borders as we go. It is part of the beauty of the new age.” The unique musical palette of the Vancouver Island trio includes more than 30 albums of musical experience between

them. The new 15-track release serves more than anything else. We are all over notice that music without lyrics can still 50 now and we have to do things because we enjoy it, as opposed to marketing ourspeak volumes. “What we do is music that makes people selves,” Prevedoros said. “I see people that are so aggressive and feel good. Loosely defined as relaxation try to make it. I just want to music … People kind of get enjoy myself.” into a mesmeric mood. It is “Even though we Enjoyment is what the uplifting,” Prevedoros said. group hopes to share with “I just like people to come from diverse their audiences as they relax and enjoy it and not places, it really works perform two CD release have to feel like I’m singconcerts this weekend, in ing songs about lost loved well whenever we Sidney and Victoria. ones or (hardships) in the perform (together).” “The evening is a journey world. There is so much – Niel Golden that goes through various crap going on in the world influences of India, Spain, it is always nice to get people out of that space. That is what I’m try- Irish celtic music. Be transported for two hours on a musical journey that crosses ing to do.” Recorded at Golden’s home studio borders and takes you to new places,” between January and September of this Golden said. “Whenever we perform, audiences enjoy year, Three Worlds was in some ways about letting go of the business side of music, what we do and ask us where is the CD?” After three years performing together after 30 years of performing and recording and multiple Canadian Western Music and and with Three Worlds under their belt, that question has now been answered. Juno award nominations. editor@oakbaynews.com “We see it as an opportunity to have fun

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Three Worlds at home ■ Brad Prevedoros, Niel Golden and Greg Joy celebrate the release of their first CD together, Three Worlds, with two concerts. ■ The first happens Friday (Nov. 4), 8 p.m. at the Mary Winspear Centre, Pat Bay Highway and Beacon Avenue in Sidney. ■ The second goes Saturday (Nov. 5), 8 p.m. at St. Ann’s Academy, 835 Humboldt St. ■ Tickets are $20 for each concert, available in advance at www. marywinspear.ca (Sidney) and Munro’s Books, 1108 Government St. (Victoria) or toll free (credit card only) at 1-888-539-5319.

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Vancouver talent agent Richard Lucas stands with a Lucille Ball dress he owns that is being auctioned as a fundraiser for the Canadian College for Performing Arts and the Vancouver Performing Arts Lodge. The Lucille Ball gala happens Friday (Nov. 4) at the Fairmont Empress Hotel.

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Taking an idea and running with it was the evolution of the Canadian College of Performing Arts’ upcoming event and fundraiser. This Friday’s (Nov. 4) “Lucille Ball,” a tribute to the late comedienne and madcap star of stage and TV, began with an idea to auction off an item of memorabilia. “Richard Lucas, a talent agent in Vancouver who ended up teaching on our faculty, has an authentic Lucille Ball gown and he wanted it to go to charity,” said college director Ron Schuster. After conversations around how to best do that, the idea came up of hosting an all-Lucy event in Victoria. “We’ve got 24 lovely Lucies that will be floating around – all of our students will be dressed as Lucy or (fellow I Love Lucy characters) Fred

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It’s been 30 years since the death of renowned American jazz pianist Bill Evans, but the music he made lives on. The Bill Evans Project jazz quartet will perform Friday (Nov. 4) at Hermann’s Jazz Club, 753 View St. The Montreal-based group is made up of bassist Michel Donato, pianist Francois Bourassa, saxophonist Frank Lozano and drummer Pierre Tanguay. They’ll play music in support of their fall-released album Autour De Bill Evans, dedicated to the music of Evans, with a range of swing, ballads, bop and cool mixed in. Tickets are $19 in advance, available at the Victoria Jazz Society, Lyle’s Place, Ditch Records and the Royal and McPherson Box Office, or online at www.rmts.bc.ca. Showtime is 8 p.m.

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or Ricky Ricardo or Ethel,” Schuster said. Among the festivities will be a recreation of the physical comedy classic scene featuring Lucy and Ethel working on a chocolate assembly line that goes crazy. A memorabilia booth will be set up for fans looking for Lucy items, and Lucas will be on hand sharing stories about times on set with Ball over the years. Among the silent auction and raffle items up for grabs are a Warhol-style portrait of Lucy by local artist Christopher Lucas, and a two-week stay in Hawaii. The dress auction proceeds will be split between the college and the Vancouver Performing Arts Lodge. Tickets for the fundraiser, $115 each, are available at the college, 1701 Elgin Rd. in Oak Bay from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. editor@oakbaynews.com

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Ballet group performs Prokofiev classic

A new Victoria-based ballet troupe is putting on a production of

Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf. ZarYevka Ballet performs the coming-of-age story on Saturday (Nov. 5) at Metro Studio Theatre, 1411 Quadra St. at 2 and 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 by calling 250590-6291. For more information, visit peterandthewolf.ca.

Authors reading at the library

From free access to almost every sporting event, to the aftermath of D-Day and the Clayoquot logging blockade, the Greater Victoria Public Library is hosting a series of free readings this month. The readings start tomorrow (Nov. 3) with sports writer Jim Taylor discussing his book And to Think I Got in Free! from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Emily Carr Branch, 3500 Blanshard St. On Nov. 9, Mark Zuehlke reads from Breakout from Juno, 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Central branch. Nov. 12 sees author Betty Krawczyk read from This Dangerous Place, 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Emily Carr Branch. For details, visit www.gvpl.ca. ecardone@vicnews.com


www.vicnews.com •• A21 A21 www.vicnews.com

VICTORIA NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,November November2, 2,2011 2011  VICTORIA

On the job Roszan Holmen News staff

It’s not for the profit margins that Patrick Thompson suits up in dive gear to change or repair a boat propeller. “In all honesty, (the money) is very comparable to any journeyman trade,” says Thompson of his commercial diving business. The challenges of plying his trade under the water, however, are greater. “It’s a very difficult way to make a living,” he says. “We’re on call 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. It’s a lifestyle ... and I do it because I love doing it.” Thompson runs one of a handful of local commercial diving companies, with various niche specializations. Situated at the Esquimalt Graving Dock, Thompson’s South Coast Diving employs six divers and specializes in boat repair. His clients include the Department of National Defence, the Canadian Coast Guard and B.C. Ferries. “A lot of people think you can’t achieve (many types of ship repair) in the water,” Thompson says. His challenge is to figure out how to do the work without drydocking the ship -a more expensive and lengthy process. It’s dangerous work, he admits, but risks are mitigated with good training. “I’m not saying I’m immune to any incidences – I have had my share – but we learn from our experiences and we are very conscientious,” Thompson says. His company requires employees to have training in welding, fitting and heavy-duty mechanics, as well as a prerequisite sixto-nine-month diving certification. Fully qualified employees are rare, says Thompson. To cope, he hires qualified divers and pays to send those with promise through trade programs at Camosun College, such as welding and propeller technician programs. “Everybody’s a diver

below the surface

but not too many of them show the skill and aptitude to actually invest in,” he says. Candidates must carry an unrestricted 50-metre certification in surface-supply diving, which means a diver’s air supply comes through a tube from the surface, rather than scubastyle, where divers draw air from a tank on their back. Right now, the training is only

available in Eastern Canada or the United States, but that may change. One Sidney-based commercial dive school might expand its programs to fill the gap. Cory Beaudry runs B.C. College of Diving and a company called CamCor Dive Services. He launched his business as a “broke young man with a gutsy pitch.” At the time, he’d just been laid off from a job

as a diver for a salmon fish farm near Tofino. “We were thinking about going onto welfare and we were down to our last $20,” Beaudry recalls. He had a dive boat and four dive tanks, so when a diving contract came up at a fish farm, he put in a $200,000 bid. He won the bid -but with one caveat. “They brought me in but said, ‘Your price is too cheap, we don’t want you to go bankrupt in the first

CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TAKE NOTICE THAT A PUBLIC HEARING will be held on Monday, November 7, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, Esquimalt Municipal Hall, 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, B.C., to allow the Public to make representations to the Municipal Council respecting matters contained in the following amending bylaw: Zoning Bylaw, 1992, No. 2050, Amendment Bylaw [No.205], 2011, No. 2772 Zoning Bylaw, 1992, No. 2050, Amendment Bylaw [No. 205], 2011, No. 2772 provides for a change in the zoning designation of 856 Esquimalt Road [Lot A, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP80973] and 858 Esquimalt Road [Lot 2, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan 23904] shown hatched on the map below from C-6 [Licensed Liquor Establishment] and C-2 [Neighbourhood Commercial], respectively, to CD No. 80 [Comprehensive Development District No. 80].

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Dr. Ngan Huynh

year.’” He renegotiated a higher price, and still retains the contract. These days, his dive college offers a fiveweek occupational scuba course, and a six-week course for restricted surfacesupply diving. He has 16 students a year. rholmen@vicnews.com

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CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TAKE NOTICE THAT A PUBLIC HEARING will be held on Monday, November 7, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, Esquimalt Municipal Hall, 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, B.C., to allow the Public to make representations to the Municipal Council respecting matters contained in the following amending bylaws: 1) Official Community Plan Bylaw, 2006, No. 2646, Amendment Bylaw [No. 12], 2011, No. 2773 2) Zoning Bylaw, 1992, No. 2050, Amendment Bylaw [No. 202], 2011, No. 2768 1.Official Community Plan Bylaw, 2006, No. 2646, Amendment Bylaw [No. 12], 2011, No. 2773 Bylaw No. 2773, provides for a change in the land use designation of Lot B, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210 [1037 Lyall Street] and Lot A, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210 [1039 Lyall Street], shown hatched on the map below, from Single and Two Unit Residential to Institutional. 2. Zoning Bylaw, 1992, No. 2050, Amendment Bylaw [No. 202], 2011, No. 2768 provides for a change in the zoning designation of Lot B, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210 [1037 Lyall Street] and Lot A, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210 [1039 Lyall Street], shown hatched on the map below, from RS-1 [Single Family Residential] and P-1 [Public/ Institutional] respectively to P-5 [Community Care Facility].

Site Location: Lot A, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP80973 [856 Esquimalt Road] Lot 2, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan 23904 [858 Esquimalt Road] The general purpose of this change in zoning is to facilitate redevelopment of the subject properties as two, 12 storey, multiple family residential towers, including commercial retail units at the grade level in the southern building.

Site Location: 1037 Lyall Street [Lot B, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210] 1039 Lyall Street [Lot A, Section 11, Esquimalt District, Plan VIP17210]

The subject properties are part of Development Permit Area No. 2 - Commercial. Should the proposed amendment be approved, a development permit, controlling the form and character of development, including the landscaping, would be registered on the property titles.

The general purpose of these changes in OCP land use designation and Zoning designation is to facilitate the assembly of the two subject parcels and the construction of one, 3 storey, 30 client, group home replacing the existing group home building which does not appropriately meet the needs of the residents.

AND FURTHERMORE TAKE NOTICE that copies of the proposed Bylaw and relevant background documents may be inspected at the offices of Development Services, Municipal Hall, 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, B.C., anytime between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and Statutory Holidays] until November 7, 2011.

AND FURTHERMORE TAKE NOTICE that copies of the proposed bylaws and relevant background documents may be inspected at the offices of Development Services, Municipal Hall, 1229 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, B.C., anytime between the hours of 8:30 a.m and 4:30 p.m. [excluding Saturdays, Sundays and Statutory Holidays] until November 7, 2011.

BARBARA SNYDER DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

BARBARA SNYDER DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT SERVICES


A22 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

NEWS

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 61 (GREATER VICTORIA) NOTICE OF ELECTION BY VOTING NOTICE OF ADVANCE AND VOTING DAY OPPORTUNITIES PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to the electors of School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria) that an Election by Voting is necessary to elect, for a three (3) year-term commencing December, 2011 terminating after the election held in 2014 in accordance with the legislation in the Local government Act (2014), to fill the offices of Trustee on the Board of Education of School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria) and that the persons nominated as candidates at the Election by Voting, and for whom the votes will be received are listed below: SCHOOL DISTRICT TRUSTEES – NINE TO BE ELECTED: Surname ALPHA BRATZER FERRIS HOLLAND HORSMAN LEONARD LORING-KUHANGA McEVOY McNALLY NOHR ORCHERTON PAYNTER PITRE RAND STERN YOUNG

Given Names Catherine David Tom Jim Bev Elaine Edith Michael Diane Deborah Peg Rob Dave David Richard John A.

Residential Address

695 Polyanthus Crescent, Victoria, BC V8Z 2J3 1023 Leeds Place Victoria, BC V8X 4B8 2811 Prior Street, Victoria, BC V8T 3Y2 1975 Renfrew Road, Shawnigan Lake, BC V0R 1W2 3931 Rainbow Street, Victoria, BC V8X 2A3 570 O’Connell Place, Victoria, BC V8Z 2C4 4169 Quadra Street, Victoria, BC V8X 1L3 4345 Gordon Head Avenue, Victoria, BC V8N 3Y4 353A Linden Avenue, Victoria, BC V8V 4G1 943 Hampshire Road, Victoria, BC V8S 3S4 2653 Cedar Hill Road, Victoria, BC V8T 3H1 1333 George Street, Victoria, BC V8S1A8 4208 Rossiter Drive, Victoria, BC V8N 4S7 405- 649 Bay Street, Victoria, BC V8T 5H8 1658 Feltham Road, Saanich, BC V8N 6A6 204-850 Rupert Terrace, Victoria, BC V8W 2K2

General Voting Day will be opened on Saturday, November 19, 2011, to qualified electors of School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria) at the following places: The Corporation of the City of Victoria Burnside Community School Central Baptist Church Cook Street Village Activity Centre George Jay Elementary School James Bay Community School James Bay New Horizons Centre Margaret Jenkins School Oaklands Elementary School Quadra Elementary School Gymnasium Sir James Douglas Elementary School Gymnasium Sundance Elementary School Gymnasium Victoria West Community Centre

3130 Jutland Road 833 Pandora Avenue 380 Cook Street 1118 Princess Street 140 Oswego Street 234 Menzies Street 1824 Fairfield Road 2827 Belmont Avenue 3031 Quadra Street 401 Moss Street 1625 Bank Street 521 Craigflower Road

The Corporation of the Township of Esquimalt The Corporation of the Township of Esquimalt Municipal Hall

1229 Esquimalt Road

The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay Monterey Centre Monterey Middle School Gymnasium Emmanuel Baptist Church

1442 Monterey Avenue 851 Monterey Avenue 212 Cedar Hill Cross Road

That portion of the Corporation of the District of Saanich lying within School District 61 (Greater Victoria) Campus View Elementary School Gymnasium 3900 Gordon Head Road Cedar Hill Middle School Gymnasium 3910 Cedar Hill Road Cloverdale Elementary School Multi-Purpose Room 3427 Quadra Street Cordova Bay Elementary School Gymnasium 5238 Cordova Bay Road Doncaster Elementary School Gymnasium 1525 Rowan Street Frank Hobbs Elementary School Gymnasium 3875 Haro Road Glanford Middle School Gymnasium 4140 Glanford Avenue Gordon Head Middle School Gymnasium 1671 Kenmore Road Hillcrest Elementary School Gymnasium 4421 GreentreeTerrace Lochside Elementary School Gymnasium 1145 Royal Oak Drive Prospect Lake Elementary School Gymnasium 321 Prospect Lake Road Reynolds Secondary School Gymnasium 3963 Borden Street Royal Oak Middle School Gymnasium 4564 West Saanich Road Spectrum Community School Lunchroom 957 Burnside Road West Tillicum Elementary School Gymnasium 3155 Albina Street Victoria Pacific Rim Alliance Church Gymnasium 792 Townley Street The Town of View Royal View Royal Elementary School Gymnasium

218 Helmcken Road

That portion of the District of Highlands lying within School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria) District of Highlands Municipal Hall 1980 Millstream Road That portion of the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area lying within School District No.61 (Greater Victoria) View Royal Elementary School Music Room 218 Helmcken Road And such voting places shall be open between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m.

ADVANCED VOTING OPPORTUNITIES shall be available at the following places on the dates and hours stated: FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA AT VICTORIA CITY HALL, 1 CENTENNIAL SQUARE (DOUGLAS AND PANDORA) on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Monday, November 14, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT AT THE DISTRICT OF ESQUIMALT MUNICIPAL HALL, 1229 Esquimalt Road, on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Wednesday, November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF OAK BAY AT THE OAK BAY MUNICIPAL HALL, 2167 Oak Bay Avenue, on Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 and Wednesday November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE CORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF SAANICH LYING WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF SCHOOL DISTRICT 61 (GREATER VICTORIA) SAANICH MUNICIPAL HALL, 770 Vernon Avenue, on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Monday, November 14, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL AT THE VIEW ROYAL MUNICIPAL HALL, 45 VIEW ROYAL AVENUE on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Wednesday, November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THAT PORTION OF THE DISTRICT OF HIGHLANDS AT THE DISTICT OF HIGHLANDS MUNICIPAL HALL, 1980 MILLSTREAM ROAD on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Wednesday, November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. FOR THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF THE RURAL PORTION OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 61 (GREATER VICTORIA) LYING WITHIN JUAN de FUCA ELECTORAL AREA OF THE CAPITAL REGIONAL DISTRICT AT THE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 62 (SOOKE) BOARD OFFICES, 3143 JACKLIN ROAD, on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 and Wednesday, November 16, 2011 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. NOTE: SCHOOL DISTRICT BALLOTS ARE PART OF THE BALLOTS OF THE DISTRICT OF OAK BAY, DISTRICT OF SAANICH AND CITY OF VICTORIA AND MAY BE AVAILABLE FOR MAIL IN BALLOTS UPON REQUEST TO THE MUNICIPALITY AT WHICH YOU MAY WISH TO VOTE. ELECTOR REGISTRATION To register as an elector at the time of voting, you will be required to make a declaration stating that you meet the following requirements: • 18 years of age or older • Canadian citizen • Resident of BC for a least 6 months immediately preceding voting day • Resident or registered owner of real property in the School District for at least 30 days immediately preceding voting day, and • Not otherwise disqualified by law from voting. Resident electors will also be required to produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature). Picture identification is not necessary. The identification must prove both residency and identity. Non-resident property electors must produce 2 pieces of identification (at least one with a signature) to prove identity, proof that they are entitled to register in relation to the property, and, if applicable, written consent from the other property owners. Given under my hand at Victoria, B.C. this twenty fourth (24th) day of October, 2011. Thomas F. Moore Chief Election Officer


VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011 VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

B.C. Ambulance dispatch centre moves to Langford Parking station also relocates from Colwood for better access to highway

B.C. Ambulance Service plans to relocate its Vancouver Island dispatch centre and Colwood ambulance station to an earthquake-ready building on Leigh Road, near the Spencer Road interchange. The two-storey building will house four ambulance bays and the dispatch service on Langfordowned land across from Spencer’s Pond. The project has a June 2013 deadline and the new facility is expected to employ about 60 people. “The ambulance service will have great access to the highway and the core area,” said Langford fire Chief Bob Beckett, who was involved in discussions for establishing a new station in Langford. The ambulance service plans to move its Island

communications centre from the Vancouver Island Technology Park in Saanich to Langford by July 2013, one of three such centres in the province. At the same time, the three-bay ambulance station on Jacklin Road would become redundant and would shut down. The ambulance service is leasing the building from Langford for 20 years and will pay about $500,000 per year in operating costs and rent, according to lease documents. Although the city owns the land, Keycorp Consulting in Langford is financing and constructing the building. Mayor Stew Young said Langford is acting as a “flow through” between the development company and B.C. Ambulance. “It is a three-way partnership, but there is no money in it for the city,” Young said. “Langford is a flow-through. The contract is with us, and we have a contract with the person who will own the building.” B.C. Ambulance spokesperson Kelsie Carwithen said the motivation to move to a new building is about improving patient care in the region and the West Shore. editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Passport price hike on horizon

Victoria

Edward Hill News staff

Rudy Haugeneder

Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012

News staff

By this time next year, you could be paying up to $225 for a new Canadian passport – called an ePassport and good for 10 years. It will include an electronic chip encoded with your name, gender, and date and place of birth and a digital portrait of your face. But until then the standard five year passport will continue to cost $87. Beatrice Fenelon, a spokesperson with Passport Canada, confirmed the new ePassport is to be launched before the end of 2012 but no decision has yet been made on the price because the agency is “still in the process of consulting Canadians.” She said the agency will also continue to offer five-year passports and that children’s passports will not exceed five years. Prime Minister Harper recently paid $225 for a diplomatic ePassport, causing speculation that the price he paid will become the new rate for all ePassports. editor@vicnews.com

www.vicnews.com • A23

www.vicnews.com • A23



BEST BUY – Correction Notice NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE BEST BUY OCTOBER 28 CORPORATE FLYER On the October 28 flyer, page 8, please be advised that this product: Toshiba Smart Blu-ray Disc/DVD Player BDX2250 (WebCode: 10176444) is NOT 3D Capable as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

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Why the questions Doc? Occasionally a patient is uncomfortable when I ask personal questions. A column like this gives me a chance to explain the reason for unusual questions that an optometrist may ask you. Every optometrist wants to know the reason for your visit. This is known as the “chief complaint.” However, to accurately determine if you are at risk of any eye diseases, a full “case history” has to be taken. General health questions about you and your blood relations are important. Many illnesses can affect vision. You’d be wise to bring a list of any medications you take. Many medications have potential visual side effects. Optometrists always ask about your occupation and hobbies to determine how you use your eyes. Then we can make suggestions as to which type of glasses and/or lenses would provide you with the best visual performance at work and play.

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A24 A24 • • www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice

NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP OCTOBER 28 CORPORATE FLYER Please note that the incorrect image was used for Toy Story 3D Trilogy in Blu-ray (M2192433) advertised on pullout page 4 of the October 28 flyer. This boxset consists of 3 discs, NOT 11 discs, as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

Wednesday, Wednesday, November November 2, 2, 2011 2011 -- VICTORIA VICTORIA

take a look Program seeks vicnews.com relief from pain Rudy Haugeneder

CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

NOTICE Dennison Park Public Open House The Township of Esquimalt is inviting the public to attend the Second Public Open House to provide input regarding safety concerns in Denniston Park. Tuesday, November 8, 2011 5:00 – 7:00 pm Esquimalt Municipal Hall Council Chambers 1229 Esquimalt Road For additional information, please contact The Township of Esquimalt at 250-414-7108

Learn more at a Tuesday info session: november 8, 2011, 5:00pm January 10, 2012, 5:00pm february 21, 2012, 5:00pm City University of Seattle in Victoria 305-877 Goldstream Ave. Langford, BC V9B 2X8

SP3375

www.CityU.edu/Canada The term “university” is used under the written consent of the Minister of Advanced Education effective April 11, 2007, having undergone a quality assessment process and been found to meet the criteria established by the minister. City University of Seattle is a not-for-profit and an Equal Opportunity institution accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

Severe chronic pain that resists treatment comes in many forms. But it doesn’t have be crushing, even though statistics show one in four people suffer from chronic pain. And that’s why Dr. William Davis, the medical director of the Royal Jubilee Hospital’s pain program is hosting a Finding Hope in the Midst of Pain forum in the hospital’s Begbie Hall on Nov. 10 – to teach what pain is and how to manage it. About 600 people use the hospital’s pain clinic every month, Davis said. Another 400 people visit the Vancouver Island Health Authority pain clinic monthly at a Nanaimo hospital. The RJH pain clinic has more than 2,000 Greater Victorians on file. Outlined in the two-hour session will be the latest pain management techniques for reducing pain and restoring

normal physical movement. Davis will also describe how the body’s pain system works and what changes occur when the agony persists. As well, a panel of pain patients will share their experiences using different treatments, pain management and recovery. Seating for the forum, which starts at 6 p.m., is limited so registration is required (www. viha.ca/pain_program). The cost is by donation. Pain not only causes physical discomfort, says the RJH pain clinic website, but it can also wreck a person’s ability to carry out normal activities such as housework, physical exercise and maintaining meaningful employment. It interferes with sleep, appetite and emotional wellbeing. Also commonly associated with pain are increased depression, anxiety, anger, feelings of helplessness, isolation and hopelessness. editor@vicnews.com

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NEWS NEWS

CONCRETE • ROOFING • MASONRY SEALANTS

Don Denton/News staff

Head stand A gull cleans its wing feathers while standing atop the head of a statue that adorns the roof of the B.C. legislature.

MAYOR’S OPEN DOOR Mayor Dean Fortin welcomes the opportunity to meet with citizens to discuss their issues and concerns during “Open Door”. Friday, November 4, 2011 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Mayor’s Ofce, City Hall 1 Centennial Square No appointment necessary.

MESSAGE TO PROPERTY OWNERS MAINTENANCE OF DRAINAGE SYSTEM Now, before winter rainstorms arrive, is the time for home owners to check gutters, downspouts and perimeter drains around the house to ensure everything is working properly.

1.Clear your gutters and downspouts of all leaves and debris. Ensure that they remain clear through the winter 2. Have your drain system cleaned and repaired if necessary. Remember, drain tiles will plug over time with mud, silt or roots, and in some cases, may even have failed due to age.

Foot pain? Did You Know?

Bunion and Hammertoe deformities can be treated successfully with prescription podiatric foot orthotics and digital orthoses, (Toe Straightener) We also offer complete foot and nail care by Chelsea, our Certified Foot Care Nurse. MSP clients covered when applicable. Blue Cross/DVA clients welcome.

For a Consultation call:

Dr. Glenn Cornwell, Dr. of Podiatric Medicine 1711 Cook Street, Victoria 250.386.9353

WING’S

3. Ensure that any surface drain, such as those located at the bottom of the driveways and stairwells, are clear of mud and debris and remain clear through the winter.

RESTAURANT

The Municipality will make every effort to keep road side catch basins clear. Residents are requested to help by not depositing or allowing the accumulation of leaves in the curb and gutter.

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VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, November 2, 2011

How to reach us

Travis Paterson

250-381-3633 ext 255 sports@vicnews.com

www.vicnews.com • A25



SPORTS

Winter on its way? Think Canadian Tire.

Women win Vikes Shootout, men third

Braves take bite out of Cougars Braves captain ready to win Travis Paterson News staff

A changed mindset and new approach to hockey is all part of the new Ty Jones. The Saanich Braves captain had plenty of reasons to be frustrated to start the 2011-12 hockey season, namely getting dropped from the junior A Cowichan Capitals of the B.C. Hockey League. The Spectrum hockey academy grad was the first star in the Braves 5-3 win over the Victoria Cougars at George Pearkes arena on Friday. Jones scored two goals. including the game winner, as the Braves rallied from a 3-1 deficit with four Ty Jones straight goals. It’s the first time the Braves (5-7-3) defeated the Cougars (13-2-1) this season and evens the home-andhome series, which started with a Cougars 5-2 win at Archie Browning arena on Thursday. Jones was the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League rookie of the year in 2009-10 and was named captain of the Braves by coach Brad Cook shortly after returning to the team this year. It was an easy deci-

sion for Cook, who coached the Braves that season before leaving for a stint as an assistant with the BCHL’s Victoria Grizzlies. But Jones didn’t come to terms with his return to the Island’s junior B hockey league overnight. He started slow in the points column and was ejected from back-to-back games on Sept. 29 and 30. “It was a rough start. I’m definitely more relaxed, trying to be a leader for the team on the ice and in the room,” Jones said after the Thursday win. The 18-year-old is the latest example of a local player finding his game after being cut from junior A, an annual occurrence on the junior circuit. “There was some frustration coming back from Cowichan, but I’m happy being back with the Braves and living at home,” Jones said. “We (were) making too many mental mistakes. Now I just want to see us get some wins, especially in onegoal games.” The Braves’ story has repeated itself the past few seasons. A solid program that has developed players such as Wade Murphy, leading scorer of the Victoria Grizzlies, the Braves continually play second fiddle in the win column to local rivals the Cougars and Peninsula Panthers.

Photo by Christian J. Stewart Photography

Shawn McBride of the Saanich Braves battles Anthony Bonner of the Victoria Cougars during the annual Pink in the Rink fundraiser at Pearkes Arena, Oct. 28. The Braves won 5-3. “We’re right there, we’ve beat (North Division leaders) Comox and now Victoria,” Cook said. “We’re learning how to win. And some of that is with the returning players, not just the young guys finding their way.”

Player of the week Also scoring for Saanich in the win over Victoria on Friday was Jack Palmer, Sheldon Trees and Jaden Schmiesser (empty net). Prior to the weekend Jones was named Island league player of the week for scoring two goals and two assists, while taking zero penalty minutes in two games. The Braves

lost 4-3 in a shootout to the Peninsula Panthers on Oct. 19 and won 6-3 over the Campbell River Storm on Oct. 23. The Braves host the Oceanside Generals at Pearkes arena Friday (Nov. 4) at 6:30 p.m. sports@vicnews.com Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League Standings Victoria Comox Peninsula Kerry Park Saanich Oceanside Camp. Riv.

GP W 16 13 15 11 14 7 15 7 15 5 16 6 15 4

L OTL 2 1 3 1 6 1 8 0 7 3 9 1 11 0

GF 73 72 58 56 60 56 49

GA Pts. 38 27 48 23 61 15 65 14 68 13 77 13 67 8

A two-over-par total was enough for Megan Woodland to earn herself and the University of Victoria women's golf team first place at the Vikes Shootout, Oct. 24-25, at Cordova Bay Golf Course. It’s the Vikes women’s second team title at the Shootout. UVic scored a total of 623 (309 and 314), nine shots ahead of Concordia University. The University of Alberta was third at 674. Woodland hit two of her six birdies in the final round (70 and 76, 146) and was four shots ahead of second-place finisher Sara Molyneux (Concordia). The Vikes men’s team was in third spot in the team standings. James Holland was the Vikes’ top male. Holland shot 70 and 75 for a 145 total, tying him for fourth spot. The Shootout concludes the fall competitive season for golf. San Diego’s Point Loma Nazarene University will host the next event, Feb. 5 to 7. UVic hosts the Royal Canadian Golf Association championship at Cordova Bay Golf Course May 28 to June 2. sports@vicnews.com

Vikes men, women heading to soccer playoffs A pair of goals by Jaclyn Sawicki gave the UVic Vikes women’s soccer team a surprise berth in the Canada West playoffs next week. Sawicki scored the gamewinning goal in the 80th minute against the Fraser Valley Cascades to give the Vikes a 2-1 win at UVic on Saturday. With the win, UVic stole possession of fourth place from the Calgary Dinos, the final playoff spot in the Canada West conference. Goalie Steph Parker earned the win. First place Trinity Western (Langley) hosts the Canada West semifinals on Saturday (Nov. 5) with the final going Sunday. UVic will play Trinity Western and UBC (second) will play Alberta (third) in the other semifinal. Things are just as rosy in the men’s camp with the Vikes hav-

ing swept their way through the Prairies. Rookie Craig Gorman scored the only goal in a 1-0 shutout over the Saskatchewan Huskies on Saturday. Gorman scored again on Sunday, as did Cam Hundal as the Vikes ended a perfect weekend with another shutout, 2-0 over the Alberta Golden Bears. Daniel Kilpatrick was in net on Sunday and Elliot Mitrou on Saturday. The wins clinch first place for UVic in Canada West, meaning the Vikes will host the Canada West playoffs Saturday (Nov. 5) and Sunday at Centennial Stadium. Trinity Western and UBC will play in the first semifinal, noon on Saturday. The Vikes draw Alberta in the second semifinal at 2:15 p.m. The Canada West champion-

ship is scheduled for Sunday at 2:15 p.m.

Vikes help win Pan Am rugby sevens gold

Four ex and current Vikes were part of the first gold medal-winning rugby sevens team at the Pan American Games on Sunday. Current Vikes Sean Duke, Nathan Hirayama, Phil Mack and ex-Vike John Moonlight joined James Bay’s Sean White and CastawayWanderers Nanyak Dala and Ciaran Hearn, among other players, on Team Canada. Canada edged Argentina 26-24 in the gold medal match after a close 21-19 win over the U.S. in the quarterfinal. Hirayama figured prominently kicking three conversions against Argentina and the U.S. sports@vicnews.com

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

University of Victoria Vikes’ Amy Lawrence, No. 22, heads the ball next to Fraser Valley Cascades’ Shelby Beack, No. 8, during the Vikes 2-1 win at Centennial Stadium on Saturday. Jaclyn Sawicki scored both Vikes goals, clinching a spot in the Canada West semifinals at Trinity Western this weekend.


A26 • • www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com A26

Sports stats Running Vancouver Island High School Cross Country Championships, Oct. 26 at Beaver Lake Park Boys team results Place (Points) School 1. (64) Dover Bay

Time

2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

(82) Oak Bay Liam Kennell Taylor Chan Liam Farrar Simon Psotka Evan Carey Graham Landells Benjamin De Jong

21:15.29 22:17.28 23:07.04 23:27.30 23:37.04 23:38.04 24:48.06

3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

(83) Claremont Lehm Maguire Connor Foreman Jordan Kinghorn Parm Johal Austin Barber Sam Prette Graeme Walker

20:52.79 20:53.55 23:11.28 23:30.06 24:13.05 24:47.56 25:16.54

4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

(97) Mount Douglas Thomas Getty Tyler Norman Joel Taylor Ethan Getty Nathan How Mohand Khouider Ryan Niezen

21:17.53 21:42.53 23:20.05 23:31.29 24:21.04 24:46.32 25:08.57

5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

(104) Reynolds Seamus Maguire Erik Evans Drew Peacock Jon McKay Thomas Thierbach Thomas Kempster Nic Miller

21:56.06 22:41.31 22:51.05 23:51.78 24:04.80 26:53.79 27:31.04

6 1 2 3 4 5 6

(152) Glenlyon Norfolk School Ben Weir 21:13.05 Mikey Declare 23:57.31 Laim Shillingtom 24:07.04 John Sharpe 24:30.80 Evan Letkeman 24:54.81 Matt Zava 28:19.06

7. (234) Highland SS 8. (260) Carihi

Wednesday, November November 2, 2, 2011 2011 -- VICTORIA VICTORIA Wednesday,

9. (276) Belmont 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Jericho O’Connell Ray Frang Jordan Fenn Brock Holland Gerry Dandan Kane Johnston Eric Spaven

22:21.78 26:42.79 27:18.31 27:22.31 27:42.57 28:24.56 28:54.05

10. (287) Shawnigan 11. (302) St. Michaels University 1 Liam Knightley 24:03.04 2 Cole Turner 25:48.06 3 Samuel Jackson 27:33.81 4 Danny Park 27:38.06 5 Gabe Lunn 27:55.55 6 Justin Chiu 28:15.05 7 Min Hyuk Park 28:27.30 12. (313) Campbell River Christian 13. (324) Brentwood 14. (326) Nanaimo District 15. (388) Lambrick Park 1 Julian Fell 2 Michael McCue 3 Camilo Valbuena 4 Kevin Kuo 5 Curtis Darnell Girls team results Place (Points) School 1. (48) Nanaimo District

26:44.31 27:00.28 29:32.29 29:34.79 32:25.31 Time

2. (49) Oak Bay 1 Maddie Secco 2 Madelyn Brunt 3 Elise Butler 4 Morgan Roskelley 5 Heather Van Tassell 6 Emily Mills 7 Gillian Briggs

16:44.04 16:45.55 16:52.29 16:57.05 17:44.30 17:58.79 18:26.78

3. (74) Mt. Douglas 1 Caleigh Bachop 2 Katelyn Hayward 3 Farisha Arensen 4 Brianna Perry 5 Chloe Mead 6 Lindsay Cole 7 Becky Wilder

16:31.05 16:40.78 17:32.56 18:48.05 18:50.04 19:22.05 20:24.28

4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

16:32.54 16:35.04 18:17.30 19:49.07 20:23.56 20:43.54 20:46.79

(119) Spectrum Megan Kinghorn Brittany King Nichola Kennell Ayre-Anna Aitchison Olivia Cass Ashley Everett Lesley Cambridge

5. (130) Dover Bay 6. (156) Carihi

FUTURE SHOP – Correction Notice Please note that this dishwasher found on pg 20 of the Oct 28 flyer was incorrectly advertised as part of the KitchenAid Stainless Appliance Package (with 10172505/10169198) & was priced separately at $799.99. The correct dishwasher included in this package should be the KitchenAid KUDC10FXSS model (10162814), priced separately at $799.99. Customers can purchase the previously advertised KUDE60HXSS dishwasher separately for the regular price of $1699.99. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers.

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7. (168) St. Michaels University 1 Stephanie Wong-Harrison 18:59.29 2 Sarah Taylor 19:07.05 3 Alexis Thind 19:11.05 4 Jackie McKay 19:15.56 5 Valentina Rodriquez 19:27.78 6 Chrissy Robillard 19:58.31 7 Christina Chewyl 19:58.78 8. (223) Reynolds 1 Klara Hlavon 2 Sara Lax 3 Amy Bruce 4 Sarah Nuttall 5 Sally Schubach 6 Elizabeth Underhill

18:29.54 19:44.04 20:06.80 22:17.31 22:31.80 23:03.80

Top-22 boys 1 Lehm Maguire 2 Connor Foreman 3 Joel Deschiffart 4 Ben Weir 5 Liam Kennell 6 Thomas Getty 6 Thomas Oxland 8 Peter Oxland 9 Garrett Dunlop 10 Tyler Norman 11 Seamus Maguire 12 A. Commandeur 13 Taylor Chan 14 S. Commandeur 15 Jericho O’Connell 16 Nic Ascui 17 Haven Ullstrom 18 Erik Evans 19 Drew Peacock 20 Calvin Jennings 21 Liam Farrar 22 Jordan Kinghorn

Mt. Doug, Oak Bay going to B.C.’s Claremont runner wins Island cross country title Travis Paterson

9. (248) Brentwood Guntime School 20:52.79 Claremont 20:53.55 Claremont 20:54.55 Nan.Christ. 21:13.05 Glenlyon 21:15.29 Oak Bay 21:17.53 Mt. Doug 21:30.29 Dover Bay 21:38.79 Dover Bay 21:40.32 Dover Bay 21:42.53 Mt. Doug 21:56.06 Reynolds 22:16.05 Highland 22:17.28 Oak Bay 22:18.53 Highland 22:21.78 Belmont 22:23.78 Dover Bay 22:25.53 Timberline 22:41.31 Reynolds 22:51.05 Reynolds 22:57.04 Shawnigan 23:07.04 Oak Bay 23:11.28 Claremont

Top-22 girls Guntime School 1 Miryam Bassett 16:22.28 Nanaimo 2 Marita Deschiffart 16:22.79 Nan. Christ. 3 Erica Deschiffart 16:27.30 Nan. Christ. 4 Caleigh Bachop 16:31.05 Mt. Doug 5 Megan Kinghorn 16:32.54 Spectrum 6 Brittany King 16:35.04 Spectrum 7 Katelyn Hayward 16:40.78 Mt. Doug 8 Carly O’Sullivan 16:43.05 Nanaimo 9 Maddie Secco 16:44.04 Oak Bay 10 Madelyn Brunt 16:45.55 Oak Bay 11 Andrea Lyon 16:48.80 Fran. Kels. 12 Elise Butler 16:52.29 Oak Bay 13 Morgan Roskelley 16:57.05 Oak Bay 14 Rachel Elliott 16:59.29 Dover Bay 15 Chloe Hegland 17:06.28 Parkland 16 Jenaya Pynn 17:16.83 Wellington 17 Rebecca Bassett 17:23.31 Nanaimo 18 Tkia King 17:23.54 Nanaimo 19 Tatianna Haggard 17:23.82 John Stubbs 20 Farisha Arensen 17:32.56 Mt. Doug 21 Ally Martindale 17:44.04 Arbutus MS 22 Heather Van Tassell 17:44.30 Oak Bay

News staff

When track and field star Katelyn Hayward of Mount Douglas secondary put her own ambitions aside to finish the four-kilometre Island cross country championship at Beaver Lake Park with a twisted ankle last Wednesday, it meant the end of her cross country season, but a provincial berth for her team. Nanaimo District secondary won the Island girls team trophy at Beaver Lake and will head to provincials in Kelowna on Saturday (Nov. 5). The top four boys and girls teams each qualify seven runners to the B.C.’s, with Mt. Doug and Oak Bay the only Island schools sending both. Dover Bay (first), Oak Bay (second), Claremont (third) and Mt. Doug (fourth) will represent the boys. Nanaimo (first), Oak Bay (second), Mt.

Doug (third) and Spectrum (fourth) will represent the girls. Hayward and Mt. Doug teammate Caleigh Bachop were favoured to compete for the top spot. Bachop finished fourth, Hayward seventh. The effort marks the latest achievement in Mt. Doug’s attempt to restore the glory it enjoyed as a cross country powerhouse under legendary coach Stan Gill in the 60s, 70s and 80s.

“If (Hayward) stops, our girls team doesn’t go to B.C.’s.” – Bernie Kidd

“If (Hayward) stops, our girls team doesn’t go to the B.C. championships,” said teacher sponsor and coach Bernie Kidd. “It was extremely courageous of her. She ran for the team.” Hayward, a Grade 12 student, is Canada’s top steeplechaser for her age and the standing B.C. high school champion in the 3,000-metre, as well as the record holder in the 1,500m. She’s currently being courted by uni-

versities and had every reason to pull out of the race. Because of the injury Hayward won’t be attending provincials. “It’s Mt. Doug’s best Island result in two decades,” he added. Kidd credited coaches Steve Murenbeeld and Al Niezen for preparing Mt. Doug’s best cross country team since Gill stepped down in the 1990s. “We’re all excited about the prospects at provincials and looking forward to getting another crop of strong runners from Arbutus middle school next year,” Kidd said.

Duo tops on Island Powerful Claremont duo Lehm Maguire and Connor Foreman finished the 6.7-km boys race one second apart in first and second, respectively, leading the Claremont boys to provincials. Claremont took fourth overall, displacing the Reynolds boys team which ended up in fifth despite managing three top-20 finishes: Seamus Maguire (11), Erik Evans (18) and Drew Peacock (19). sports@vicnews.com

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VICTORIANews NEWSWed, - Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Victoria Nov 2, 2011

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SUNSET LODGE CRAFT SALE! 952 Arm St., Sat, Nov. 19th, 9am-2pm. Rent tables for $15. 250-385-3422 ext 225

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INFORMATION HAVE QUESTIONS about the upcoming Victoria Municipal Election? Visit victorivotes.ca for information, candidate interviews and more.

LEGALS NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: DIANA ELIZABETH KOLERSKI, DECEASED formerly of 1230 Balmoral Road, Victoria, BC NOTICE IS HEREBY given that creditors and others having claims against the estate of the above deceased are hereby required to send particulars thereof to Stewart Johnston, Executor named hereunder care of 1521 Amelia Street, Victoria, BC, V8W 2K1, on or before December 5, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the said estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims of which he then has notice. STEWART JOHNSTON Executor By his Solicitors SJ Law corporation

U-Haul Self Storage Victoria Claims a Landlords Contractual Lien against the following persons goods in storage at: 644 Queens Ave., Victoria (250) 381-2271 Zubin-Nader Doktor 1008 37 Ave., W. Vancouver 2068 Greg Sakell P.O. Box 142, Savary Is., Lund 3041A Kim Hughes 419 Menzies, Victoria

Claims a Landlords contractual Lien against the following persons goods left in storage at: 790 Topaz Ave., Victoria (250) 382-4711 105 Randall Bethel #10 - 1501 Glentana Rd., Victoria 119 Marc Poliquin #102 - 2536 Wark St., Victoria 201H David Mahabir #115 - 1615 Belmonte Ave., Victoria 209 David Fagir 1340 Liberty Dr., Victoria 211 Unknown 790 Topaz Ave., Victoria 217 Hassan Al Mualem 1573 Begbie St., Victoria 218 Naomi Kennedy 853 Burdett, Victoria 220 Skylar Soper 1635 Cook St., Victoria 268 Shawn Wignall #3 - 869 Swan St., Victoria 272 Cerise Trupp #404 - 2136 Ridge Rd., Victoria 333 Kennith Best 3022 Donald St., Victoria 357 Joshua Malone-Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Agnolo

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A sale will take place at the Storage location on Thursday, November 17, 2011. Viewing 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. Sealed bids will be opened at 4:30 p.m. Room contents are personal / household goods unless noted otherwise. Bids will be for entire contents of each unit.

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Wednesday, Wed, November - VICTORIA Nov2,2,2011 2011, Victoria NEWS News

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CONSTRUCTION COMPANY requires Dispatch Manager Central Interior. Must ensure smooth, efficient scheduling of material delivery & perform operational tasks for truck fleet. Candidates will be organized, proactive and work well under stress. Experience in trucking an asset. Forward resumes to paverswanted@yahoo.ca.

THE British Columbia Forest Safety Council (the Council) was created in September 2004 as a not-for-profit society dedicated to promoting forest safety in the sector. The initial focus and tasks of the Council were set out in the report of the Forest Safety Task Force, which created a comprehensive strategy to dramatically improve the safety record of the BC Forest Sector. The Council is currently seeking candidates for the following job postings in our Nanaimo office: Director, Business Services Reporting to the Chief Executive Officer, you will lead the Council’s strategy development, business and reporting processes. Working with industry, Council staff and other external agencies you will be responsible for Council business management and leadership for business planning, reporting, communications and information technology. You have experience with managing and developing project business plans, working with diverse stakeholder groups, and possess excellent analytical and problem solving skills. In addition to being an outstanding problem solver and excellent communicator, you have the ability to evaluate and drive change across the business to translate business requirements into actionable plans and strategies. In addition to relevant education, you have at least 5 years working experience, preferably in forestry. Manager Falling Programs Reporting to the Director, Training and Program Development, you will manage and provide oversight for all the Council’s falling programs, including development and implementation of programs, policies, training and quality assurance for QSTs ((Qualified Supervisor Trainer),)and trainers, oversight for the faller certification program, falling supervisor certification, dangerous tree blasting program, chainsaw training and new faller training program. You are the spokesperson for the Council on faller training and faller-related issues. You advise on the technical and regulatory quality of Council training standards and represent the Council ,with industry, associations, regulatory bodies, and at meetings and other venues. The successful applicant should have a minimum of 10 year’s related forest industry experience, with 5 years in a supervising or managing role. Preference given to those with experience in managing or supervising fallers. The applicant should also have a good working knowledge or understanding with the BC Falling Training Standard, Occupational Health and Safety Regulations (OHSR) relating to forestry and falling activities. For more complete posting information, please visit www.bcforestsafe.org or send your resume to the attention of: careers@bcforestsafe.org

VICTORIA- RESIDENT Manager couple for 70+ unit building. Minor maintenance/upkeep & rental. Competitive wage, Benefits. Flexible start date. Locally based business. Fax 250-920-5437.

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HELP WANTED Alberta earthmoving company requires a Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. You will work in a modern shop and also have mechanics truck for field work. The job is at Edson, Alberta. We require that you have experience on Cat crawlers and or Deere excavators. Call Lloyd at (780)723-5051. BURGER KING VICTORIA is currently hiring Full-Time Food Counter Attendants for our Colwood & New Downtown location on Douglas & Johnson Street. All shifts. Wages $11.35 p/hr. Apply in person at 1681 Island Hwy or email: burgerkingjobs@yahoo.ca CITY OF YELLOWKNIFE Lifeguard/Instructor. Come join the adventure in the Diamond Capital of North America! The City of Yellowknife is currently seeking an enthusiastic and qualified individual to assume the position of Lifeguard/Instructor at the Ruth Inch Memorial Pool in Yellowknife. The City offers an attractive salary of $54,270-$63,652 plus housing allowance, comprehensive benefits package and relocation assistance. For more information on this position and the qualifications required, please refer to the City of Yellowknife’s web page at: www.yellowknife.ca or contact Human Resources at (867) 920-5603. Submit resumes in confidence no later than November 11, 2011, quoting competition #602138U to: Human Resources Division, City of Yellowknife, P.O. Box 580, YK, NT, X1A 2N4; Fax: 867-669-3471 or Email: hr@yellowknife.ca

Holbrook Dyson Logging Ltd Has vacancies in the following job: Heavy Duty Mechanic. Details can be seen at http://hdlogging.com/ Fax resume to 250-287-9259 NATIONAL POST/Vancouver Sun, early am home delivery, small car req’d. 250-474-6495 We are still hiring - Dozer & excavator operators required by a busy Alberta oilfield construction company. We require operators that are experienced and preference will be given to operators that have constructed oilfield roads and drilling locations. You will be provided with motels and restaurant meals. Competitive wages, bonus and transportation daily to and from job sites. Our work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Call 780-723-5051.

HOME CARE/SUPPORT F/T LIVE-IN Caregiver 1 child 2yrs 9months, Victoria $9.50/hr, 40hrs/wk. Own room in private home, $325/month room/board deducted. Grade 12, min. exp. 1yr F/T within last 3yrs or 6 mths training in child care. Speak/Read/Write English. Swahili & Kikuyu an asset. Crim. record check, First Aid required. Call Jane 250-588-9270

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Garage Sales #ALLÖ  ÖTOÖPLACEÖYOURÖGARAGEÖSALEÖADÖ ANDÖRECEIVEÖ&2%%ÖBALLOONS ÖINVENTORYÖANDÖTIPÖSHEETSÖ ANDÖBRIGHTÖYELLOWÖGARAGEÖSALEÖSIGNSÖ GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

THE SACRED Health Church Bazaar is on Saturday, November 5th, 2011 from 9am2pm. FREE ADMISSION and parking. 4040 Nelthorpe St. All proceeds to charity. Raffle, home baking, books, tea room, ethnic foods, jewelry, attic treasures, Lucky 7, silent auction, crafts, hamburger and hotdog stand.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Secret Shoppers Wanted! Earn $$$ While You Shop! We seek Shoppers for well paying survey jobs. You can earn money while shopping. It’s a stress free part time job which won’t disturb your present work; also if unemployed you can work it as a full time job. Interested applicants should refer all resumes/applications to our email: tronltd@365trade.net

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

TRADES, TECHNICAL BANNISTER GM Requires Journeyman Automotive and Collision Technicians. Situated at the foothills of the Rockies, 1.5 hours to Edmonton or Jasper, Edson offers outdoor enthusiasts a great living opportunity. Signing bonuses, moving allowances and top pay for the right candidate. Contact dean@bannisteredson.com SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, benefits, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net WELDERS WANTED. Journeyman 2nd and 3rd year apprentices with tank manufacturing experience. Automated Tank Manufacturing Inc. Located in Kitscoty, Alberta. 20km West of Lloydminster is looking for 15 individuals that want long term employment and a secure paycheque. Journey wages $33. $37.50/hour. Wages for apprentices based on hours and qualifications. Benefits, training programs, full insurance package 100% paid by company, savings plan for retirement, profit sharing bonus. Join a winning team. Send resume to: cindy@autotanks.ca or fax 780-846-2241. Phone interview will be set up after receiving resume.

M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660. NEED CASH TODAY? ✓ Do you Own a Car? ✓ Borrow up to $20000.00 ✓ No Credit Checks! ✓ Cash same day, local office www.REALCARCASH.com 250-244-1560 1.877.304.7344

LEGAL SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

PETS PETS TOY FOX Terrier, 28 mos. Reg’d male, all shots + access’s, $750, 1-250-932-8426

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE BUILDING SUPPLIES

EDUCATION/TUTORING

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FINANCIAL SERVICES $10 MILLION AVAILABLE for Land Purchase/Development and Joint Ventures. Management Consulting and Business Plan services. Call 1-866-402-6464.

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad & get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-981-5990.

FREE ITEMS FREE: QUEEN sized box spring mattress and metal frame. Call 250-721-5380.

FRIENDLY FRANK 3-SEATER SOFA, $65. Coffee table, glass top, $25. (250)881-8133. 6 LARGE Spider Plants$2/each. 250-652-4199. SMALL TRUNK, lock and key, $50. firm. 250-595-6734. WIFA PROF. figure skates, sizes 5.5/3.5 (girls), $35. Snow shovel $20. Call 250-544-4322

FUEL/FIREWOOD ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391.

MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231.

DO-IT-YOURSELF Steel Buildings, priced to clear, make an Offer! Ask about Free Delivery, most areas! Call for Quick Quote and Free Brochure,1-800-668-5111 ext 170 FURNITURE & MATTRESS Sale! Up to 50% OFF & No HST on Tools & Hdwe. BUY & SAVE 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca Visa, M/C NEWSPRINT ROLLENDS$2-$10. Fridays only, 8:30am to 4:30pm. #200-770 Enterprise Cres, Victoria. Goldstream Press Division.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700 BOOKS BOOKS & antique paper collectibles. Qualified appraisers. House calls for large libraries. Haunted Bookshop (Est. 1947)250-656-8805 SOOKE BASIN waterfront. 2 bdrm condo, recently renovated. In quiet neighbourhood. $900. N/S, pets ok. Call 250516-1408.

REAL ESTATE

PERSONAL SERVICES

IN-HOME TUTORING All Grades, All Subjects. Tutor Doctor. 250-386-9333

CAN’T GET Up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help! No obligation consultation. Comprehensive warranty. Can be installed in less than 1 hour. Call now 1-866-981-6591.

THE NICEST OCEANFRONT PARK 1 BDRM- $840. 2 BDRM - $950. Heat, hot water included. New kitchen/bathroom. No smoking! (250) 388-4943 or (250) 813-2134

HOMES WANTED

VICTORIA,

WE BUY HOUSES

GORDREAU APTS. Suites available. Please call 250-383-5353

Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

COTTAGES SAANICHTON SMALL 1 bdrm cottage. References req’d. $750 inclusive. No pets. Avail immed. 250-652-3345.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

Call: 1-250-616-9053

www.webuyhomesbc.com

SAXE POINT- 1 bdrm & den in 3-plex, W/D. N/S pet ok, near park & bus. $850. Equitex, (250)386-6071.

MORTGAGES Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

OTHER AREAS

APARTMENTS FURNISHED MacKENZIE/ QUADRA. Studio/ 1 bdrm condo, resort style. Includes indoor pool, hot tub, gym, billiards/games. New carpet/ furniture. 1/2 block bus/ Airporter/ mall. On route UVic/ Uptown Centre/ DND. $925. (250)380-2737.

SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords, fast delivery. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com or 1877-902-WOOD.

ARIZONA BUILDING Lots! 50% OFF! 15, AAA+ View Lots. $0 Down! Starting $99/mo! Guaranteed Financing! Near Tucson’s Int’l Airport www.sunsiteslandrush.com Call 1-800-659-9957 Mention Code 7.

NORTH VANCOUVER. NEWLY renovated/Fully Furnished 1bd/1ba located on Lonsdale Avenue, Lower Lonsdale, close to schools and metro stations, short/long term stay. Utilities includes Electric, Gas, Heat, Water, On-site laundry, Parking. $575/mo utilities inclusive. accurateted@yahoo.com for pics and arrangement.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

RENTALS

SIDNEY: FURNISHED Deluxe suite, newer. Walk to ocean & town. All incl. 250-656-8080.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & Save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT

APARTMENT/CONDO

HOMES FOR RENT

ESQUIMALT (NEAR Naden), 1 & 2 bdrm suites, avail immed, on bus route, near shopping, clean & quiet. Starting at $700. 250-385-2004.

WHY RENT when you can own? 0% down; $1600/mo. Call 250-360-1929 Binab Strasser - Re/Max Alliance.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


VICTORIANews NEWSWed, - Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Victoria Nov 2, 2011

www.vicnews.com A29 www.vicnews.com •A29



RENTALS

Are your kids begging for new games?

fill plz

TRUCKS & VANS

AUTO FINANCING FREE CASH Back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or bad credit call Stephanie 1-877792-0599 DLN 30309. Free delivery www.autocreditfast.ca

GOLDSTREAM, (SINGLE) 1400sq ft, furn., deck & yard, lndry, hi-def TV, own bath. $650 inclusive. (250)884-0091

SUITES, LOWER

circulation@vicnews.com circulation@saanichnews.com circulation@goldstreamgazette.com www.vicnews.com www.saanichnews.com www.goldstreamgazette.com

BEATERS UNDER $1000

SUITES, LOWER

SHARED ACCOMMODATION

250-360-0817

TRANSPORTATION

COLWOOD- 2 level, 1 bdrm. 5 appls, $800 inclusive. NS/NP. 250-380-0700.

SENIOR LADY in Vic West, furn’d room, $455 incls utils, cable, local phone, small appliances, parking, park nearby. No cooking. 250-380-1575.

It’s so easy to get started... call

TRANSPORTATION

HOMES FOR RENT

FAIRFIELD- FULLY furn rm in lrg 1/2 duplex, close to bus, shopping, ocean, village, quiet person. Refs. $525 mo Avail Nov 1. (250)388-7600.

A paper route can provide money to buy new games for your computer, XBox or Wii or cover the cost of a cell phone each month.

TRANSPORTATION

SIDNEY- 3 Bdrm Rancher. Complete Reno. 1 bath, 1056sq ft flat cul-de-sac lot. NS/NP. $1,600. Lease. Firm Management, 250-544-2300.

ROOMS FOR RENT

TAKE ON A PAPER ROUTE!

RENTALS

BRENTWOOD BACHELOR Large, ground level. Priv. entrance, parking, close to bus. NS/NP. $750. (250)652-9454.

GLANFORD. IMMED. 1100 sq.ft. 2 bdrm, lower, bright. Reno’d kitch, bdrm closet. W/D, full bath, storage. Quiet, priv. entr., sm yrd. Near bus, amens. NS/NP. $1050. ht, hw, hydro. Refs. 250-704-0197. LANGFORD. BRIGHT, new 1 bdrm. Lvl entry. W/D, NS/NP. $800. incl. utils (250)220-8750 SIDNEY- 2 bdrm bsmt suite, 1 bath, priv ent, $1100 utils incl, Nov 15. NS/NP. 250-665-6987 SIDNEY- LRG 1 bdrm bsmt suite, living & bonus rm, own laundry, shared utils. N/S pets? $800. (250)656-4584, 250-886-9411. TRIANGLE MTN., lge furn’d 1 bdrm, laundry, brand new S/S appl’s, all inclusive, N/S, N/P, $950, (Immed). 250-474-6469

TOWNHOUSES

WANT A Vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in November, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

AUTO SERVICES $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

$0-$1000 CASH

For Junk Cars/Trucks

Will tow away any car or truck in 45 mins. FREE!

TowPimp.com 250-588-7172

toll free 1-888-588-7172

CARS

$50-$1000 CASH

HANDICAPPED VAN- modified for wheel chair passenger. For more info, (250)478-4476.

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST!

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

SERVICE DIRECTORY SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

COLWOOD 1-BDRM Bright ground-level. Utils incld, cat ok, N/S. $825. 250-478-4418

SIDNEY, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 2 story townhome, F/S, D/W, close to beach & town, N/S, small pet neg, avail Nov. 1, $1300. Call 250-208-4894.

CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSET! 250.388.3535

with a classified ad 250.388.3535

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES HAULING AND SALVAGE

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

DRYWALL

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

MALTA DRYWALL & Painting. Residential/Commercial. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: specialize; tree pruning, hedges, tree & stump removal, fall clean-up, hauling, power washing. 23yrs exp. WCB.

TAX

250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades. FALL SPECIALS! WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440. V.I.P. GUTTER Cleaning. Gutter guards, all exterior, power washing, roof de-mossing, spray, windows. Package deals! Insured. (250)507-6543 WE SWEEP your roof, clean your gutters & remove your waste. Fair prices. Insured. Fred, (250)514-5280.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

250-477-4601

CARPENTRY ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656. BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748.

CARPET INSTALLATION DARCY’S CARPET & LINO. Install, repairs, laminate, restretch, 35 yrs. 250-478-0883. MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (778)440-6611. CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278 NEED HELP cleaning your house? Call Dorothy at (250)478-8940.

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

CONTRACTORS ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656. CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ELECTRICAL

AURICLE LAWNS- Fall aeration & fertilize, hedges, irrigation blow-out, bulbs. 882-3129

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

COMPLETE PROPERTY maintenance programs. Monthly, weekly visits. Yard Cleanup pros. (250)885-8513.

ELECTRICAL Contractor for Hire. Installations, repairs. $40/hr. Bonded, Licensed, Insured. (250)590-0952.

DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141.

EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981. WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858. RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

GARDEN OVERGROWN? Big cleanups our specialty Complete garden maint. Call 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

- Lawn mowing - Hedge trimming - Garden clean up - Leaf Clean up - Power washing - Gutter Cleaning - Aerating - Irrigation Maint.

(250) 858-0588 www.mowtime.ca

PREPARATION FOR Fall, Winter & Spring. Professional garden & landscape services. Maintenance, design & installations. Call (250)474-4373.

ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. MALTA FENCING & DECKS. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462. U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-382-8602.

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, gutter guard, power washing, roof de-mossing. Call 250-889-5794. GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463. ✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858. PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

IRRIGATION/SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

MOVING & STORAGE

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

PAINTING ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. NORM’S PAINTING. Quality work. Reasonable, Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347

HOME IMPROVEMENTS ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656. IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com MALTA DRAIN Tiles. Replace and Repair. BBB member, best rates. (250)388-0278. MALTA HOUSE Renos & Repairs. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278.

INSULATION MALTA BLOWN insulation & batting. Removal. Best rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

WE’RE ON THE WEB

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS FOUR 12 ROOFING Licensed insured. BBB member. Re-roof new construction. 250-2167923. www.four12roofing.com SHORELINE ROOFING. Reroofing specialist. WCB/BBB member. Quality & satisfaction guaranteed. 250-413-7967. shorelineroofing@shaw.ca

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507. MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

IRRIGATION Winterization Special! $59.95 Oak Bay Irrigation & Landscape Lighting. (778)440-1883.

C.B.S. Masonry Brick, Stone, Concrete, Paving, Chimneys, Sidewalks, Patios, Repair, Replace, Re-build, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee” Free Est’s & Competitive Prices. (250)294-9942, 589-9942 www.cbsmasonry.com

HANDYPERSONS

250-217-0062 GARDEN CITY GREEN Hauling & Recycle junkremovalvictoria.com

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603 AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. RENO MEN. Ref’s. Senior’s Discount. BBB. Free Estimates. Call 250-885-9487. Photos: happyhandyman.co MALTA HANDYMAN. BBB member. Best rates. Please call (250)388-0278. SENIOR HANDYMAN Household repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

FENCING AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. Glowing References. Insured. Affordable. 15+yrs. experience Call Les at (250)880-2002.

250.388.3535

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

PLUMBING FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544. KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663. PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC. RAINTEK SPECIAL! Keep your basement dry with RainTek! Camera inspection & roto-rooting of your perimeter drain tiles for $129. www.raintek.ca 250-896-3478.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TELEPHONE SERVICES A PHONE Disconnected? We Can Help. Best Rates. Speedy Connections. Great Long Distance. Everyone Approved. Call Today. 1-877-852-1122. Protel Reconnect.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046 TILES, GRANITE & glass blocks. (250)384-1132 or (250)213-9962.

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.


A30 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

We’d like to know you better. Please take our 5 minute survey and we’ll enter you for a chance to win… $500 CASH!! OR ONLINE AT:

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www.vicnews.com The Victoria News

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5. Are you or someone in your household planning to purchase a new or used vehicle in the near future? If so, what type and when? Next 3 months Car Minivan Pickup Truck Compact SUV Full size SUV Camper or Trailer

N I W $ 500!

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Dining out Car detailing Manicure, pedicure, hair styling Clothing, shoes & accessories Pre-made or ordered-in meals Movies and entertainment Plants, owers, candles, etc Festivals or live theatre Golf Tickets to professional sports Trips to a casino Chocolates, baking or confections Pet grooming

Sometimes

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Never

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

7. Are you planning to purchase any of the following in the near future? Yes within 3 months

Appliances Furniture Home improvement products Home improvement contractor or service Outdoor furniture or features TV, computer or tablet Cell phone Mini-holiday 3 days or less Major travel

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Yes within 6 months

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

8. Does anyone in your household plan to purchase real estate in the next 12 months? yes First home New build home Custom build home Detached house Duplex Condo Resort property

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

no

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

9. Do you....? Frequently Shop locally for most goods and services ❍ Feel local service and relationships are ❍ important to earn your business Research online prior to store purchase ❍ Buy online ❍ Visit www.vicnews.com for local news & information ❍ Engage regularly with social media ❍ (Facebook, Twitter etc) Use or like coupons ❍ Buy mostly brand name items ❍ Buy mostly bargain items ❍ Shop in Saanich for some goods and services ❍ Shop in Langford for some goods and services ❍ Shop in Vancouver for some goods and services ❍

Never

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Sometimes

Never

❍ ❍

❍ ❍

10. Do you...? Frequently Listen Listen Listen Listen

to to to to

the radio a local radio station CBC radio satellite or mp3

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

11. Do you live in Victoria? ❍ Yes ❍ No If no, please specify_________________________________________ First and Last Name___________________________________________ Email address ________________________________________________ Daytime phone number ________________________________________

Please mail or drop offf completed survey to: 818 Broughton Street Victoria, BC V8W 1E4 Or you can fill out the surveyy online…

no plans to buy

❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Sometimes

Or you can visit vicnews.com and click on the “Survey and Win” banner. One survey and entry per person. Must be 19 years or older to participate. Contest deadline Nov. 18, 2011. Cash prize accepted ass awarded. Winner will be a random draw of all survey entries.

NEWS


A32 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - VICTORIA

You’ll feel like family!

C O Asparagus U N $147 T R Smoked Y Ham Nuggets V $ 97 A 6 L U Sliced Chicken E or Turkey MEXICAN PREMIUM QUALITY TENDER

lb $3.24/kg

SJ IRVINE

900 g

IN THE DELI

MAPLE LEAF NATURAL SELECTIONS

INCREDIBLE SAVINGS

Watch for our

Reusable Bags

99¢ everyday and

Thermal Bags

3

$ 99

FROM CHINA COUNTRY GROCER

Mandarins

3 C

$ 97

5 lb Box

OUNTRY

GROCER

Apple Pie

2/ 7

$ 00

8 inch

GOLD SEAL

Sardines

4/ 3

$ 00

125 g Limit 8 Total

Weetabix Trial Size

5/ 5

$ 00

200 g

PRIMO

Tomatoes

99

¢

796 ml Limit 6 Total

PUFFS

Facial Tissue

Buy One Get One Free $ 99 FLYER EVERY FRIDAY 175 g Regular Retail $5.99 6x132's

in select Saanich News, Victoria News, Goldstream News Gazette & Peninsula News Review

everyday

3

Limit 2

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1984 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Nov. 2nd - Saturday Nov. 5th, 2011

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt Rd, Victoria Open Daily 8am - 10pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country Grocer locations only.

NEWS


Nov 2 2011 VictoriaNews