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Ancient culture

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Passion for Asian art inspires curator at Victoria art gallery. News, Page A3

Jennifer Blyth tells us what’s happening in the Greater Victoria business community. Community, Page A13

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

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High-tech

Victoria woman wins $3M

ADVANTAGE Esquimalt Fire Department said to be first in province to use iPad technology on the job

L

t. Troy Saladana takes hold of the iPad mounted inside the fire truck and touches the screen of the tablet computer. It instantly reveals a map of the nearby Esquimalt Recreation Centre, which Saladana is pretending is the scene of a hazardous chemical spill. “We know the evac zone is here,” the Esquimalt firefighter says. “I can have this (information) sent to the (fire) chief.” He enters an email address and presses another icon on the screen with his finger, sending off a report detailing the type of hazardous chemical, location co-ordinates, wind speed and the size of the evacuation and quarantine zones. “Three years ago we were drawing stick figures on paper, and, if we were lucky, photocopying them and handing them out by hand,” Saladana says. Erin The team at the Esquimalt Fire Department McCracken believes it is the first firefighting department in B.C. to use iPads on the job. Reporting The Esquimalt firefighters have been trying out the iPads at their fire hall for the past two months. They credit the technology for its touchscreen features, speed, small size, portability, affordability, storage and Internet capabilities, among other qualities. The iPad technology is “so relevant, members of the department weren’t waiting for the fire department to supply them. They were bringing their own to use on the trucks,” says Esquimalt fire Chief Dave Ward. Ten days after mounting iPads inside the cabs of a fire truck and command vehicle, firefighters used one to take photos of a crash scene last week. The pictures can later be accessed by police or the fire team for further examination and debriefing. Don Denton/News staff

PLEASE SEE: iPads allow firefighters to store more info Page A10

We know it’s

Lt. Troy Saladana handles one of the Esquimalt Fire Department’s new iPads inside a fire truck. He says the touchscreen technology is more portable and user-friendly than the old data terminals.

Barbara Singer can thank a little bug for a big payday. The Victoria resident was feeling ill last week and went to the store for ginger ale. She also bought Scratch & Win and Lotto 6/49 tickets. “I won $25 on my Scratch & Win,” said Singer with a laugh. “I was so excited that I forgot all about my Lotto 6/49 ticket.” Singer went for lunch the next day at work with her prize money. “While out on my lunch at work I checked the Lotto 6/49 ticket,” she said. “I couldn’t believe my eyes. I just kept screaming ‘I won three freaking million dollars!’” The $3,301,611.40 Lotto 6/49 jackpot ticket was purchased at Don’s Market on Menzies Street. After checking her numbers, Singer calmly went back to work for the rest of the afternoon. “It’s all been such a blur. The first thing I want to do is go on a Hawaiian vacation with my family,” added Singer. There may be another lottery winner somewhere in Victoria – a $1 million Lotto Max prize sold in the Victoria area for the Jan. 27 draw still remains unclaimed. editor@vicnews.com

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A2 • www.vicnews.com

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www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com • • A3 A3



Preserving an ancient culture Passion for Asian Art keeps curator on the job for more than 30 years Laura Lavin News Staff

Ask Asian art expert Barry Till about the best thing he ever found in China, and he’ll probably tell you it’s his family. Till met his wife Paula there when he was a student and the couple eventually adopted their daughter Jasmine from China as well. “It’s a kind of mini-United Nations,” he jokes. Paula is originally Dutch and Till grew up in Saskatchewan. It’s a far cry from small-town Saskatchewan to China, but Till, who has been the Curator of Asian Art at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria for the past 30 years, heard the call of the ancient world early. “I always loved ancient things … I loved museums ever since I was young,” he says. Till’s eyes light up as he talks about the gallery’s Asian art collection. It’s one of the best in the country, he says. Till should know. He earned a BA and Masters in Far Eastern Studies at the University of Saskatchewan before attending England’s prestigious Oxford University to study for a Doctor of Philosophy. While at Oxford he won a scholarship to study in China. He spent the next year in Beijing and two consecutive years in Nanjing studying and learning Mandarin. In Nanjing he was the first foreigner to be selected as a model student. “San hao xue sheng – it means to excel in the three aspects – study, sports and attitude.” While studying in Saskatchewan, Till knew his future path would go one of two ways, toward being professor or working in a museum. His years in China solidified his path toward working with, and helping to preserve the culture he has come to love. There are more than 8,000 pieces of Asian art in the gallery’s collection – some 42 per cent of the total collection. “It’s not size, it’s the quality or the craftsmanship we look at for the value,” Till insists. The most intricate are paintings on pieces of ivory as small as a grain of rice. Then there are large paintings valued in the millions. Till’s fancy though, is taken by the tomb figures, small replicas of people and animals made of terra cotta clay. “It shows what they thought they needed in the next life,” he says. “Horses, dancing girls, servants, guards or warriors, even camels and foreigners in case they needed to trade anything.” One of his favourite pieces is a horse that is currently on display with the Enduring

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Barry Till, curator of Asian Art at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, in the gallery. Inset, a carved horse sculpture that is part of the Enduring Arts of China exhibit on at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria until May 6.

Arts of China, which runs until May 6 at the gallery. “It’s well crafted, a perfect horse with great expression on its face – it’s quite intense. From a variety of angles it’s very interesting to view,” he says.

Along with finding Chinese art and will donate it,” he says. “We items for the gallery’s borrow objects and once (the owners) see collection, Till gives how much it’s appreciated and feel it will go to a good home, tours in the gallery they will donate it.” and lectures about “I like to talk Art from Tibet and the exhibits. He South East Asia has also spends hours about art, especially added to the growimmersing himself ing collection as in the details of the art history aspect well. each piece. of it … if you focus “I’m very pleased “I like to talk to be located in a about art, espe- on the blood, sex and small place with cially the art his- gore, people find it pretty much free tory aspect of it rein to do my own … if you focus on very interesting.” - Barry Till exhibitions,” he the blood, sex and says. “That’s probgore, people find it ably what’s kept me here.” Putting together very interesting. “I always tell the truth,” exhibits and catalogues every three or four he adds. “I just concen- months also keeps him satisfied. “I’m constantly reading. I’m forced to learn more all trate on the more exciting parts.” Over his 30 years at the gallery he built the time. It’s becoming a challenge, learning the Asian collection from a small, mostly more and more – but it keeps the old brain Japanese grouping to what it is today mainly going.” llavin@vicnews.com through donations. “A lot of people collect

Respitality offers a night off for stressed families Natalie North News staff

New parents understand the value of a full night’s sleep, and the same couldn’t be more true for those of children with disabilities. For 12 years the Cridge Centre for the Family has offered a “respitality” service – a night of relaxation for families of children with

special needs. Through donated hotel accommodations and services, parents and guardians are afforded one night away to recharge at a hotel or resort. “We know that families who have a child with a disability are by and large very overwhelmed and the things they do are 24/7,” said Gyneth Turner, program representative. “It makes a huge

impact on families, on their quality of life, on feeling hopeful, on being refreshed. And, if they are married, it gives them a chance to reconnect with their spouse.” The Cridge arranges about 300 hotel stays annually for families referred to the service and another 100 gift and entertainment packages for parents who aren’t able to go away.

“One of the main comments that I get is: ‘Wow, I haven’t slept through the night since last year’s respitality,’” Turner added. “Typically, it’s not a program that has received any kind of government support,” said Candace Stretch, assistant manager of women’s and family services at the Cridge Centre. “We don’t have that core funding.”

To ensure the service continues, the Cridge is collaborating with a Victoria salon in hopes of generating some funds. The second annual Cut-a-thon for respitality runs from noon to 4 p.m. on March 4 at Headstart, 1-1315 Cook St. The event includes door prizes, a raffle and $15 haircuts. No appointments necessary. nnorth@saanichnews.com


A4 A4••www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,February February22, 22,2012 2012- -VICTORIA VICTORIANEWS NEWS

VicPD launches probe into lost riot gear

POLICE NEWS

Shotgun, ammunition and tactical vests among missing items, say police

Florida man nabbed for selling drugs

Ryan Flaherty News staff

Victoria police are asking the public to be on the lookout for a number of pieces of crowdcontrol gear which have gone missing. The items include tear gas canisters, pepper ball guns and ammunition, ARWEN rounds (a hard plastic baton used for crowd dispersal) and several tactical vests. But most worrying to the department is the absence of a Remington shotgun, which police use to fire non-lethal rounds, but which can also fire conventional 12-gauge shells. “This weapon is the source of our greatest concern, and my highest priority to recover,” said Chief Const. Jamie Graham. Graham would not say when the items went missing, nor do police know whether the equipment was stolen or if it has simply been misplaced. All the gear belongs to the department’s Crowd Management Unit, but while some of it is locked away until needed, other items are stored in police vehicles. There are no apparent signs of a theft or break-in to one of the vehicles, Graham said. The chief has launched two separate inves-

Ryan Flaherty/News staff

Examples of crowd-control equipment which recently went missing from the Victoria Police Department. tigations into the matter. The VicPD detective division will look into the circumstances surrounding the disappearance, while the professional standards unit will perform an audit of the internal policies and practices related to inventory management. “Clearly this is unacceptable. Whether the items were stolen, improperly disposed of or inadvertently misplaced, it is unacceptable not to know their current disposition. For that I take full responsibility,” said Graham. “I can promise, however, that we will do everything possible to recover these items and ensure that this doesn’t happen again.” Graham added that he knows whom the

items were assigned to, but that it would be premature to assign blame at this stage of the investigation. Although it is not labeled as such, the gear is easily identifiable as police equipment. The department warned that anyone coming across it should refrain from handling it, and contact police immediately either by calling 911 or, if they want to remain anonymous, Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477. “The worst scenario possibly in the world is some youngster gets ahold of one of these items and hurts themselves. We don’t want that to happen,” Graham said. reporter@vicnews.com

IN BRIEF

The case of a missing teen led to a case involving a suspected drug dealer. Victoria police detectives were looking for a missing teenage female and spotted someone matching her description on Feb. 13 around 1 p.m. She was walking near Oswego and Michigan streets in James Bay. They watched as she got into a car driven by an adult male. A few blocks later, she got out and walked away. Suspicious, police followed the car to Fairfield where they saw a man hop in the vehicle and then get out a few blocks later. Police stopped the car on Cook Street. A 26-yearold Florida man was arrested for trafficking in controlled substances. When the man was searched, police found crack cocaine.

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www.vicnews.com • A5



City takes step back on trash pickup Roszan Holmen News staff

Don Denton/News staff

Oh, Romeo Triad Sign installer Gazmend Halilaj adds the S to the end of the sign for Romeo’s Restaurant & Lounge which is currently under construction on the corner of Blanhsard and Fisgard Streets.

With apologies to residents for breaking a promise, a majority on Victoria city council voted to keep backyard garbage pickup. Coun. Marianne Alto said she felt “honour bound” to implement the garbage-collection option picked by the most residents in the city’s mail-in survey, as promised in December. She felt more swayed, however, by the need to find a balanced solution to this fractious issue. On Thursday, council endorsed the second most popular survey option: Option B entails biweekly collection for $183 per household. Crews will collect totes from the backyard, but drop them off at the curb. In the resident survey, 35 per cent voted in favour of this option, compared with 48 who voted for the $161 option A, entailing curbside pickup. Two factors swayed council’s decision. First, pressure from the workers’ union, CUPE Local 50, to preserve jobs. And second, an unforeseen complexity in

interpreting the survey results. A roughly equal number of residents voted for curbside pickup (option A) and backyard pickup (vote split between service options B and C). “The compromise being sought is actually right in front of us,” said Alto. “It’s option B … if the spirit of council is trying to accommodate a variety of different (concerns).” It wasn’t the only compromise presented, however. Both Coun. Shellie Gudgeon and Coun. Geoff Young presented ideas that melded aspects of option A and B. Neither won traction at the council table. Young argued residents who want backyard pickup be offered the gold-standard service at an additional charge. The city has already promised a specialized service to anyone with a disability, he pointed out. It shouldn’t be difficult to extend this service to people who are willing to pay for it, he said. Gudgeon looked to Saanich for a solution. That municipality offers sideyard pickup, meaning crews

collect garbage totes that are within 10 metres of the curb and visible from the curb. It’s a compromise CUPE Local 50 supported. “This is the best possible solution, since it has the potential to repair the relationship between the city and its staff … while seeking a compromise that will not alienate half the population,” said union representative John Burrows. “Sideyard service … literally brings the sides together, meeting halfway.” Despite CUPE’s support for this option, seven of nine councillors endorsed Alto’s motion instead at the governance and priorities committee meeting. Coun. Young and Coun. Chris Coleman were opposed. Coleman pointed out the city took “an awful lot of flack” after it surveyed its residents on the new Johnson Street Bridge design, but didn’t abide by the survey’s results. Council needs to be “exceptionally clear” in any future public surveys that results will be used for information only, he said. rholmen@vicnews.com Advertising Feature

Market on Millstream supports family’s cancer fight By Jen Blyth

VICTORIA

NEW LOCATION: 3170 TILLICUM RD. LOWER LEVEL OUTSIDE OF TILLICUM CENTRE BESIDE ZELLERS & BELOW OLD NAVY • 250-475-7501

Store Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:30am - 9:00 pm Sat. 9:30 am - 5:30 pm Sun. 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

When a child is rib, cut to your diagnosed with liking. Tickets are a life-threatening $5 each and are disease, the available from support of family, the checkouts. friends and the The winning community is ticket will be critical. drawn this With that in coming Saturday, mind, along with Feb. 25. its philosophy “It’s important of community for us to be Marion Taylor and son Tristan, 22, receive a donation from the service, the a part of the Market on Millstream’s Christine and Darryl Hein toward Tristan’s cancer treatment. Market on community Millstream and this is an welcomed Tristan Taylor options available in Houston, important local cause,” Darryl and his mom, Marion, to the Texas. The family has raised says. store last week to receive a about one-third of their “Tristan’s efforts put a face donation of $2,500 for the $100,000 goal to cover to the impact cancer has on Tristan Taylor Trust Fund, in the cost of the new cancer families everyday,” Christine support of the young man’s protocol and Tristan’s travel. adds. “We really wanted to battle with cancer. Treatment is expected to do what we could to support Tristan has been fighting take about a year. him and his family.” cancer for six years, since he In addition to the donation For more information was diagnosed at 16 with directly from the Market about the Tristan Taylor Trust neuroblastoma. However, “in on Millstream’s Christine and other fundraising efforts, the last few months it has and Darryl Hein, the store email mrtaylor64@hotmail. become clear that we are is also raising money com or visit the Tristan now waging an all-out war,” through donation tins at its Taylor Fundraising Page on Marion writes. check-outs and to date has Facebook. As his treatment options collected approximately For details about the here in Canada are nearing $1,000 thanks to the Market on Millstream’s an end, Tristan’s family has generosity of customers. initiatives, stop by the store launched a fundraising Also at the Market this in the Millstream Village campaign and the Tristan week is a meat draw in Shopping Centre or visit Taylor Trust Fund, to allow support of Tristan, with a online at themarketstores. him to pursue new treatment prize of $200 worth of prime com/millstream


A6 A6••www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,February February22, 22,2012 2012- -VICTORIA VICTORIANEWS NEWS

OXFORD FOODS PRICES EFFECTIVE ONE FULL WEEK WED. FEB 22 to TUES. FEB. 28, 2012

ALL VARIETIES

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Surfing the web for free anywhere in downtown Victoria is one small step closer to reality. That’s thanks in part to MeshMesh, a not-for-profit that aims to provide free Internet to much of the downtown core. “What we’re doing is for the benefit of the city, and once (businesses) realize that, they sign up,” said Liam McLachlan, project manager of MeshMesh. Businesses pay a one-time fee of $150. In return MeshMesh supplies a router that securely shares an Internet connection with the public. The business also gets an ad that appears on the screen of anyone using their network. “We also do some throttling. … That ensures people aren’t abusing the business’s network and they’re not there downloading movies, or spending hours on YouTube, or watching streaming video,” McLachlan said. “Our level of service that we want to deliver is the Internet circa 1999, 2000. It’s not super high-speed, but it’s faster than dial-up, and it gets people online to do email or basic (web browsing).” There are currently six businesses downtown on the MeshMesh network, but McLachlan says that will grow. Ken Kelly, general manager of the

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Downtown Victoria Business Association, says his organization is also launching free Wi-Fi in the downtown core next month. “The downtown will not be exhaustively or comprehensively covered, but our equipment will be strategically placed in eight zones downtown,” Kelly said. “This is a $25,000 investment by the DVBA in making the downtown techno-current. This is something that is increasingly becoming not as much a luxury, but an expectation from consumers.” Unlike volunteer-run MeshMesh, the DVBA’s equipment won’t tap in to existing Internet connections courtesy of participant businesses, but rather, it will provide an entirely separate network. “We’re not working through a middle man,” Kelly said. “It’ll be very current, and it will be a sound and solid signal.” MeshMesh recently won $3,500 from a local microfinance-type organization called the Awesome Sh*t Club to help further their cause. McLachlan says the money will go towards building a greater volunteer base to better enhance the network. “The more free Wi-Fi downtown the better. And with the two networks being complementary, that’s going to make downtown a lot better,” he said. For more on MeshMesh and to find out where their wireless network currently covers, visit openwifi.ca. kslavin@saanichnews.com

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Victoria city council has given the director of parks Kate Friars the green light to negotiate a non-binding agreement with a new baseball team for summertime use of Royal Athletic Park. Under debate are the economics of running the park and the concessions required to bring a baseball team back to Victoria, as well as specific issues regarding community uses and beverage sales. Most council discussion has taken

place in meetings closed to the public. “I didn’t vote in favour of this motion because I feel the city should retain operational control (of the park),” said Coun. Ben Isitt. Alex Kerr is president of the North Park Neighbourhood Association, where the Royal Athletic Park is located. “I’m not in favour of a single use of the park,” said Kerr. The Victoria Highlanders soccer season overlaps the baseball season, he pointed out. “They plan to use it as their home

park.” Kerr said the neighbourhood has not yet been consulted, but has requested to be consulted before any deal is signed. Mayor Dean Fortin has previously said that any deal must be fair to Victoria citizens. In 2010, the Victoria Seals left the Royal Athletic Park due in part to a disagreement with the terms of use of the park. The proposed team would belong to the West Coast League, a summer collegiatelevel league. rholmen@vicnews.com

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Vision Matters

Bridge to continue as planned Rail not in the cards Roszan Holmen News staff

A late-in-the-game request to consider building the Johnson Street Bridge strong enough to accommodate rail split councillors into two camps. Newly elected councillors Shellie Gudgeon and Lisa Helps voted in favour of Coun. Ben Isitt’s motion to change course on Feb. 16. Returning councillors voted to stay the

course. Isitt’s motion entailed preparing a request for tenders to continue planning a bridge with one major alteration: a higher construction standard allowing rail to be added to the span at a future date, if desired. Mayor Dean Fortin argued the move risked delaying the project and losing a $21 million federal grant. Coun. Geoff Young voted in step with his fellow returning councillors, despite a twoyear history of opposing council’s direction.

“I could see the merits of the motion, and frankly I was balanced on a knife edge on that one,” he said. Respect for the results of the referendum ultimately swayed his vote. “We did put a design in front of the public,” he said. “As you know, I didn’t support that design … (but) at the same time I am aware the public was consulted, they did see that design and vote for it.” In November 2010, 61 per cent of voters endorsed a borrowing bylaw for $49.2 million

to replace the bridge with a design that did not include rail.

Dismantling begins

Ruskin Construction will dismantle the rail portion of the Johnson Street Bridge from Feb. 22 to Feb. 25. On Wednesday and Thursday, crews will dismantle the electrical and mechanical systems. On Friday, the rail bridge will be lifted by the largest crane barge in Western Canada. Measuring 100 metres by 30 metres, the barge

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will fill the entire harbour underneath the bridge. Once lifted, the rail bridge will be lowered onto the barge. The process will take approximately 30 minutes and will close all traffic on the Johnson Street Bridge. For up to date information, visit www.johnsonstreetbridge.com. rholmen@vicnews.com

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250-361-4478


A8 • www.vicnews.com

VICTORIANEWS

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA

NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editor Laura Lavin Associate Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Victoria News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-381-3484 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.vicnews.com

OUR VIEW

NDP leader needs the West The man at the front of the race to replace the late Jack Layton as leader of the Opposition New Democrats in Ottawa was in town Sunday. Thomas Mulcair, the MP and NDP deputy leader from Outremont, Que., dropped by the University of Victoria for an informal gathering consisting mainly of party faithful from Vancouver Island. Mulcair, anointed as Layton’s Quebec lieutenant several Opposition party years back, is largely unknown to people in needs broadthis area. But with two based support of the region’s three MPs flying the orange of the NDP – they represent two-thirds of the region’s residents – wooing party members in Greater Victoria becomes important for any NDP leadership hopeful, especially those based thousands of kilometres away. Skeena-Bulkley Valley (B.C.) MP Nathan Cullen and Manitoba MP Niki Ashton are both considered longshots to win the leadership. The frontrunners in this race are all from Ontario or Quebec. True, Layton was from Toronto. But he developed a special kinship with voters on this coast, having visited here often before and during the leadup to the 2011 federal election. None of the current batch of hopefuls can claim such a relationship, but it’s incumbent upon them to at least lay the foundation for one. The big question is after the NDP crowns a new leader March 24, will the West, and specifically the Capital Region, have any more of a voice than it had in the Jack Layton era? If Mulcair were to win, would he focus on keeping the Quebecers happy who switched allegiance from the Bloc to the NDP? Or would he, like Layton in the preOpposition years, try to appeal to a broader base of Canadians, with a federal election at least three years away and the Conservatives holding a firm majority? With the majority of the party’s support still in Central Canada, we’re betting on the former rather than the latter. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@vicnews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Victoria News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

2009 WINNER

Last stand in B.C. beetle battle as has been the practice since 1987. As MLAs resumed their raucous Is it enough, in this era of climate legislature arguments over a shift, massive die-off and municipal auditor-general, fires? Doyle says no. the B.C. government’s “We noted a significant own watchdog cut gap between the total through the noise with a area replanted by devastating audit of the the ministry and the state of Crown forests. total area suitable for Auditor General John replanting,” the auditor Doyle’s survey of the writes. “The ministry has province’s vast forest not indicated how this comes at a critical time. low level of silviculture A team of forest ministry investment reconciles experts is examining the Tom Fletcher with its legislated situation at Burns Lake, B.C. Views mandate to achieve longto see if the Babine Lake term timber benefits and Forest Products sawmill to maintain or enhance can be rebuilt, after a future timber supply.” tragic explosion and fire on Jan. 20. And he criticizes the quality of Babine was one of a string of industry reforestation, describing high-volume mills along Highway a tendency to choose “the least16 in northwestern B.C. that have been working their way through the cost, least-risk approach to meet reforestation regulations, which enormous stock of decaying pine means planting lower-cost, fasterthat surrounds them. The “shelf growing species.” Species diversity life” of these trees is estimated to and adaptation are what is needed. extend to 2019, but that’s a bestCariboo North MLA Bob Simpson case scenario. In reality the expanse has watched pine, fir and spruce affected by pest and disease is beetles chew through his region, much more complex. march east through the Kootenays The B.C. government touts its and now the north and west. He “Forests for Tomorrow” program says the Burns Lake situation brings that started in 2005 with a boost into focus the biggest problem of federal funds to restock B.C.’s identified by the auditor: the poor burned and beetle-killed forests. state of B.C.’s forest inventory. More than 14 million seedlings are As much as three quarters of it is to be planted this year and up to 21.5 million next year. Total planting out of date, some by decades. Much of it is based on aerial photographs is about 200 million trees this rather than on-the-ground year, most done by industry as a assessment by foresters. Species condition of Crown timber licences,

have shifted. And at a time when climate factors have caused the most rapid changes in the 100-year history of the B.C. Forest Service, budget cuts and reorganization into a natural resources ministry have taken their toll. Even with the most recent appraisals completed last summer for four forest districts, including the Burns Lake district, the ministry still can’t say if there are enough logs available to rebuild Babine. Simpson says the industry knows the answer. Two of the world’s highest-capacity sawmills are at Houston and Vanderhoof, on either side of Burns Lake, and their huge salvage log supply is degrading and running out. A political intervention to “save” the Burns Lake mill would only take shifts away from others. An alternative would be to make Burns Lake a proving ground for bioenergy, to deal with the huge mass of trees that will never make lumber. Finally, a bright note for Burns Lake. The people and the economy are adapting. A job fair in the village offered entry-level as well as skilled positions at the Houston and Vanderhoof mills. There are more positions on offer at the Mount Milligan and Huckleberry mines and Enbridge, which has gas, solar and wind projects on the go. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘Political intervention to ‘save’ Burns Lake would take shifts from others.’


www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com •• A9 A9

VICTORIA VICTORIA NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,February February22, 22,2012 2012 

LETTERS Grannies protest nonexistent war How pathetic can people get? Your letters page in the Victoria News of Feb. 15 is dominated by a photograph of two naïvely stupid “Grannies” standing in the rain protesting a nonexistent war on Iran. Have these women and their comrades even considered why there is a possibility of a war with Iran? Probably not. Let’s look at the reasons why it could happen. Iran is a religiously militant country with total disregard for the human rights of its own people or others in the world. These are the people who stone women to death as adulterers because they were raped, who torture and execute men for being homosexual and who torture and imprison journalists and others who speak out against them. The list is endless. Internationally, they have funded and continue to fund and directly contribute to terrorism. The most recent

example is a failed attempt to blow up the Israeli embassy in Bangkok last week. Fortunately, they blew themselves up instead. With this background, this rogue nation is now openly and actively developing a nuclear industry that can, and invariably will, lead to nuclear weapons. They have already implied that the first target will be Israel, a country that the Iranian president is constantly saying should be “wiped off the map.” When requests from the UN to allow inspectors into the country to check for nuclear weapons development is denied, international trade sanctions were legally implemented. To retaliate against this move, the Iranians are threatening to close the Strait of Hormuz. Twenty per cent of the world’s oil passes through this strait. Loss of this oil would cripple most of Europe which is the biggest user of Middle Eastern oil. The Iranians are backing up their threat with massive

Readers respond: Victoria infrastructure deficit growing too quickly Besides the $500 million deficit, what about the share that Victoria will have to pay for the unnecessary sewage plant capital cost – maybe another $100 million? Then there is the LRT share – another $100 million? The Johnson Street Bridge – another $40 million? These big-ticket items are starting to add up. John Newcomb Saanich

Funding the infrastructure deficit will cost millions I recommend that a competent mathematician assess the effect of the 1.5 per cent annual increase in the mill rate proposed by the City of Victoria over the next 20 years. I have attempted this with webbased compounding formulae and my preliminary results indicate that property taxes will increase by about 35 per cent over the next 20 years, with no allowances for changes in any other operating components of the city’s budget, or any changes in the assessed value of properties. I don’t believe the proposed annual increase in the mill rate to cover the infrastructure deficit is sustainable, without a taxpayer revolt. Even retired seniors lucky enough to have pensions indexed for inflation at about two per cent per year will not be able to keep up with the proposed

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Members of the Victoria Raging Grannies Hatty Moss, left, and Alison Acker, held an informational picket to protest the U.S. threats against Iran. navy manoeuvres that are harassing internationally flagged oil tankers in international waters. No sensible person or country wants war. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people and countries out there who don’t care and don’t mind killing many people to support their own warped ideologies. Until alternatives are found, the world needs oil for fuel, fertilizers, chemicals

and even to make the plastic raincoats and umbrellas used by those misguided women in your photograph. So you may be older “Grannies,” but it is time to grow up and start protesting the things in this world that may actually help people in genuine need, and to not support a rogue nation whose main goals appear to be hatred and war. Michael Hubbard Esquimalt

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Victoria deficit, speeding, lawful access bill

rate of inflation in property taxes. They could lose their homes, or at the very least, be forced into making unhealthy adjustments to their lifestyles. Howard Willis Victoria

Speed traps don’t address the problem of speeding Judging by the shock expressed by Sgt. Shiels to the Victoria News (Speeding motorist stuns seasoned police officers, Feb. 17), speeding must be a rare event. If so, his efforts are unlikely to be a costeffective way to produce safe streets. Why not hire school crossing guards instead? Why not fund the speed bumps requested by citizens? Evidently we are paying these officers to man speed traps for hours each day that yield questionable safety results. Do they protect our children? Where’s the evidence? Is the revenue they produce even being spent on safety at school crosswalks? Show us the money. William A. Schwartzman California

Legislation has forefathers turning in their graves The proposed legislation that Vic Toews has brought to parliament that will allow warrantless wiretapping of law abiding citizens is absolutely disgusting, beyond the pale and smacks of fascism. The fact that he has compared opposers of the bill to sympathizers

of pedophiles and child molesters is unconscionable in the extreme. The right to privacy is in our constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms and this is an attack on our fundamental rights as Canadians. True patriots must stop this invasive and totalitarian nonsense before these traitors ruin our nation. Freedom of speech and privacy is our birthright as Canadians and no amount of smearing of the populace will stop that. To slide this rubbish into law under the guise of child protection is so utterly deceitful and slimy it boggles the mind. My grandfathers fought against this kind of fascism and are rolling in their graves. Gary Parker Victoria

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Victoria News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Email: editor@vicnews.com

Visit our other Black Press sites

JOHNSON STREET RAIL BRIDGE REMOVAL The dismantling of the Johnson Street Rail Bridge will occur from Wednesday, February 22 to Saturday, February 24. Navigation Channel Closure The navigation channel will be closed to all marine traffic beginning Wednesday, February 22 at midnight. It will re-open to marine traffic Saturday, February 25 at 6 a.m. Road Bridge Traffic The road bridge will remain open to vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians throughout most of the work, but traffic will be temporarily reduced to two lanes (one in each direction) to accommodate bridge work. Expect delays. Full Bridge Closure The bridge will be closed to all vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians: • Wednesday, February 22 from midnight to 6 a.m. • Friday, February 24 for rail removal by crane (30 minute closure, specific time TBA) • Saturday, February 25 from midnight to 6 a.m. For more information: www.JohnsonStreetBridge.com johnsonstreetbridge@victoria.ca 250.385.5711


A10••www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com A10

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA NEWS Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA NEWS

Police back online surveillance bill Erin McCracken News staff

Proposed federal legislation that is drawing heat from privacy critics would bring policing tools in line with the other G8 nations, police officers in the Capital Region say. The federal government’s proposed Bill C-30, known as the Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act, will soon be reviewed by a special committee before it returns to the House of Commons. If enacted, one component of the bill – which sparked the most public outrage – would require Internet providers

and cellphone companies to give inquiring police officers their customers’ names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses and Internet protocol addresses, which are unique identifying numbers. Currently, companies voluntarily turn over these details, without requiring a warrant, most of the time, Minister of Public Safety Vic Toews said publicly last week. But he said the process takes too long. Sometimes police aren’t given customer details they asked for, said Oak Bay police Chief Mark Fisher. “They’d tell you to get a warrant.”

The updated legislation would give investigators more time to track individuals posting online suicidal messages, Fisher said. Investigators would also be better able to trace threats made over the Internet, as well as dropped 911 calls, he said. Addressing controversy that the proposed bill would jeopardize individual privacy, Saanich police Sgt. Dean Jantzen said, “I can’t make a phone call and find out what your Internet browsing history is.” Police would still require a warrant to access that information, he said.

Under the new legislation, police will be required to keep detailed records of their information requests, which can be audited at any time, Fisher noted. The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police has been asking since 2000 for legislative changes that would bring Canada in line with other G8 nations. The Victoria Police Department declined to comment on the proposed legislation, but spokesperson Const. Mike Russell said, “VicPD does support Bill C-30.” The RCMP also declined to comment. emccracken@vicnews.com

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The department is in the process of storing all 150 volumes of its standard operating procedures, from fire bylaws and hazardous response guidelines to fire codes and building plans of apartments and other structures in the municipality, including schools, onto its iPads. With the touch of an icon, the team can now access information on businesses that may be due for an inspection, or the designs of vehicles involved in a crash, which can aid the team in rescuing trapped passengers. Firefighters can also bring up floor plans of a burning building. “If we’re running to a fire scene and we know it’s going to be at the high school (Esquimalt High), not that long ago we would use a big binder stuck in the back of the truck,” says Saladana. “Now I go like this and I click on this … and as fast as I can do this, there’s the floor plans for the school,” he says, pressing icons on the tablet’s touch screen. Before reaching the scene, an incident commander can access the building’s layout, occupancy and the location of fire hydrants. “And there’s a better chance the (information on) the iPad is more current and up to date, so that makes them more reliable,” Ward adds. The iPad technology has eclipsed the mobile data terminals mounted in most fire trucks, Saladana says, adding that compared to iPads, the terminals are not portable and don’t have Internet capabilities. Nor do they feature touchscreen technology. Esquimalt firefighters began using mobile data terminals in their trucks about five years ago, at least five years after other departments in the province began using different forms of the terminals in their trucks, says Saladana. “The other departments were ahead of us during that time,” Ward says. “We didn’t have the luxury of using the mobile data terminals (due to cost), but because (the iPads) are more affordable, we can now move forward and put these on the vehicles.” The department recently stopped using the data terminals. The terminals each cost about $5,000, which easily covers the cost of two iPads, the chief notes. Saladana believes the technology is “groundbreaking” for the emergency services industry, and says it’s only a matter of time before portable, touchscreen tablet computer technology becomes commonplace on the front lines. “It’s coming,” he says. “There’s no way of stopping it.” “The fire trucks will come with iPads on them,” Ward adds. emccracken@vicnews.com

What do you think? Give us your comments by email: editor@vicnews. com. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification.

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New licence delayed Licence filling a need for downtown event space Roszan Holmen News staff

When Victoria city council endorsed a new “patron participation” licence for the Fort Street Cafe in January, a lingering question remained. Would it “open the flood gates” for more requests from establishments? It seems the answer could be yes. The newly elected council reviewed its third request Feb. 16 at its governance and priorities committee meeting. Temple Events and Catering at 525 Fort St. seeks a change to its

food-primary licence that would allow it to host weddings, workshops, fundraisers, staff parties and the like. It’s filling a need, argued applicant Scott Kirkwood. “Currently the options for booking a party or event … in downtown Victoria are extremely limited,” he wrote. But letting patrons out of their seats proved surprisingly controversial. On one hand, the city is actively looking to encourage more downtown activity options not centered around drinking, said Coun. Charlayne Thornton-Joe. On the other hand, there’s a worry the restaurant will start acting as a bar, without having to pay the higher liquor-primary licence or participate in

Bar Watch, she added. While not concerned by the private-booking business model presented by Temple, council noted any changes to the licence could be sold to new owners with a different intent. Coun. Shellie Gudgeon, who is “in the bar business” brought up other concerns. A patron participation licence would bring the late-night bar crowd together with the underage crowd, who are permitted in restaurants. Temple has a licence to serve alcohol until 2 a.m. As the mother of a 15-year-old, Gudgeon said, “it could definitely be a slippery slope.” Council postponed any decision until March 1. rholmen@vicnews.com

City approves ban on feeding pests Roszan Holmen News staff

If feeding pigeons, doves or gulls is your passion, you better get to know the boundaries of the downtown. Victoria city council passed a motion forbidding people from feeding these birds in the core, where they have proven themselves to be an expensive nuisance for businesses. Companies have to remove nests around their buildings’ vents, said Coun. Charlayne Thornton Joe. At first council considered a blanket ban on feeding these three species of birds. Instead, it voted to restrict a no-feeding zone to a limited

JANUARY 13TH TO FEBRUARY 29TH

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Wen Juan feeds the pigeons on Yates Street. Juan saves his leftover bread crumbs and feeds the pigeons on the streets every day. area. Some people have a “deeply ingrained attachment” to feeding animals, said Coun. Ben Isitt. Council also passed a motion prohibiting people

from intentionally feeding deer, squirrels, raccoons or feral rabbits anywhere in the city. The fine for feeding restricted animals is $350. rholmen@vicnews.com

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Wednesday, February February 22, 22, 2012 2012 -- VICTORIA VICTORIA Wednesday,

NEWS NEWS

Giving kids a foundation for a healthy life School program teaches benefits of eating well, exercising

dents will have a chance to win even bigger prizes, like tickets to University of Victoria Vikes and Victoria Grizzlies games or the AdrenaLINE zipline adventure. Maureen Rowan, clinical co-ordinator for public health nurses with VIHA, said the program speaks to the role healthy lifestyle Ryan Flaherty choices play in setting kids up for future News staff success. “What’s really important is when you have Moms and dads will tell you, getting a child to eat their vegetables can be one of healthy choices around food and activity, the tougher obstacles parents can face. And that supports children’s growth, developin this age of Wiis and Blu-Ray players, con- ment and learning,” Rowan said. At Quadra elementary school, eight vincing the kids to go outside and play can classes are taking part in be a challenge of its own. the program. Some kids are That’s why a program “What’s really already well on their way to returning to a number of Capital Region schools this important is when you filling up the February section of their card. spring is trying to turn exer“Because I go to aftercise and healthy eating into a have healthy choices school care, we have a gym lifelong habit for students at a around food and and outside (time), and all young age. that together is like two and a The program, called Eat activity, that supports half hours (per day),” Grade Well, Get Moving! is a partner- children’s growth, 4 student Sage Mowat said ship between the Vancouver of her daily exercise totals. Island Health Authority and development and Some of the activities Mowat Greater Victoria recreation learning,” enjoys include soccer, footcentres. It offers a variety of - Maureen Rowan ball and rock climbing. prizes to kids who eat at least Meanwhile Mowat’s friend, five servings of fruits and vegetables and engage in at least 60 minutes of Grade 5 student Autumn Kay, is undaunted by the prospect of eating plenty of fruits physical activity each day. The plan is simple. Kids get a card to and veggies. “When I was little, my dad would put a track their progress. At the end of each month – the program runs for three – a bowl of Smarties down, and I’d eat a couportion of the card is torn off and entered ple then I would ask my dad for carrots into a draw for prizes, like T-shirts, recre- and broccoli with ranch dip,” Kay said. “He ation passes and pizza coupons. At the end would put a big bowl of it (out) and I would of April, when the program wraps up, stu- devour it.”

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Ten-year-old Sage Mowat, left, and 11-year-old Autumn Kay display their Eat Well, Get Moving! action cards and their healthy snacks at Quadra elementary school. The girls already understand the benefits of healthy lifestyle choices. “It keeps your body stimulated,” said Mowat, adding that it helps her in school, too. “You can concentrate more on your work.” The students at Quadra are just a few of the nearly 3,500 in Greater Victoria who have already signed up to Eat Well, Get

Moving! Rowan is hopeful that the healthy decisions don’t stop at school. “If this becomes a discussion at the dinner table while everybody’s sitting together and having dinner together, then it again reinforces and supports healthy lifestyle choices,” she said. reporter@vicnews.com


VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, February 22, 2012 VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, February 22, 2012

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www.vicnews.com • A13

Business heads to new digs Victoria garden and outdoor living store Dig This has picked up stakes, moving to the Bay Centre. With an exterior storefront on Fort Street, Dig This offers high-quality tools, garden dÊcor, seeds and expert advice on how to grow and design your patio or large-scale garden. You’ll also find a large selection of seeds, including many rare, heritage and organic varieties. Dig This has grown from a small store in Victoria in the 1980s to five stores on Vancouver Island and an extensive selection of garden-related products. Elizabeth Cull owns both the Oak Bay and Bay Centre locations.

4:30 p.m. Visit Deep Cove Auto Service at 10930 West Saanich Rd. ■ Peter Knapp’s Upanup Studios, a digital agency offering high-end web strategy, programming, development and design, has opened its doors in Cook Street Village, providing web solutions to the Pacific Northwest and Western Canada.

Awards & Accolades ‌

Ines Hanl’s The Sky Is The Limit Design garnered three awards from five nominations at the National Kitchen and Bath Association-B.C. Chapter gala in Vancouver. Hanl and long-time colleague Kimberly Lewis Manning have received New & Notable ‌ Jennifer Blyth 26 local, national and international Business Beat awards, since 2005. The Victoria Hospice Thrift ■ ExpediaŽ CruiseShipCentersŽ Boutique’s Bid for Bliss charity auction cruise consultants and franchise features 85 new wedding gowns and partners from across North America bridesmaid dresses donated to the recently gathered for their annual conference and boutique. President’s Circle Awards. Dress bids will be accepted through Feb. 25 Recognized from the Victoria area were Pam at 1315 Cook St. All proceeds support Victoria MacDonald, Sheila Kaul and Marni Horner Hospice which provides end-of-life care for local (silver award-winners), Margaret Statham, Lexia patients and families. Anklovitch, Julie Charlton and Barry Cole (gold You can view the gowns at the Victoria winners) and Sandy Perry (platinum winner). Hospice Thrift Boutique and online at www. ■ Brentwood Bay Resort & Spa has been victoriahospice.org/thrift-boutique. named in the Top 25 Hotels in Canada and ■ Ian Calvert is the new owner of Deep Cove the Top 25 Relaxation/Spas in Canada by Auto Service. TripAdvisor in its 2012 Travelers’ Choice Awards, After 25 years with Cadboro Bay Village now in its 10th year of honouring the world’s best Service and Saanich Auto Repair, Calvert hotels. welcomes customers to his own shop, which he Winners are based on millions of reviews and shares with the Deep Cove Co-op Gas Bar. opinions from travellers around the world. With three service bays, Calvert can perform diagnostic, repair, inspect and service all makes ■■■ and models. Doors open March 1 with a grand Send your business news to Jennifer Blyth at opening celebration March 3 from 8:30 a.m. to jblyth@telus.net.

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Couple establishes cancer research fund Danny and Sandy Jadresko directed their Valentine’s Day gift to the B.C. Cancer Foundation this year. The Saanich couple gave $100,000 to establish a cancer reseach fund in honour of Danny’s mother, an 11-year survivor of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. “We were impressed and inspired by the level of dedication the researchers and the caregivers have,� said Sandy, in a press release.

“Our hope is that others will be inspired and want to make an investment in their community,� added her husband, who describes the late Alex A. Campbell – a dedicated supporter of the B.C. Cancer Foundation – as a dear friend and mentor. “He inspired our interest in the leading-edge cancer research happening here on Vancouver Island.� The couple jointly run Woodsmere Holdings Corp. on Blenkinsop Road.

CHURCH DIRECTORY Your Guide to Local Houses of Worship Those who lose their life for Jesus sake and for the gospel shall save it. I can help you find him. Call Pastor Dave 250-479-0500

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A14 A14 • • www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com

THE ARTS

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA

Hot ticket: The Haywires, at the Eric Martin Theatre, 2328 Trent St. (Fort St. entrance).

NEWS NEWS

The Friends of Music Society are promoting sound relationships for mental health with a free community concert series. Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. the Haywires play new country and country hits from way back.

Seats take centre stage at arts fundraiser Laura Lavin

for one of my charity groups.” The festivities begin at 5 p.m. and include a champagne reception, a grazing supper, silent and live auctions and concert which begins with the Canadian Scottish Pipes and Drums and the Victoria Symphony playing together. Charman’s wish as he blows out the candles on this year’s cake is for the event to raise $300,000 for the three host organizations. “I grew up as a penniless orphan in England, I was never adopted. In my lonely life, music was a comforting thing,” Charman said of his dedication to making professional music more affordable. The “chair-ity” comes in with unique works of art provided by

News staff

A special “chair-ity” event is being held to mark one of Greater Victoria’s most prominent citizen’s 80th birthday. Philanthropist Eric Charman, who is well-known for supporting the arts, will be fêted at a bash hosted by the Victoria Conservatory of Music, Pacific Opera Victoria and the Victoria Symphony on March 4 at the McPherson Playhouse. “Eric’s greatest passion is music,” said Patrick Corrigan, executive director of Pacific Opera Victoria. “Due in large part to his lifelong work and dedication, Victoria has one of the most vibrant musical scenes in the country – one in which the opera, the symphony and the conservatory have tremendous donor support.” “They wanted to have a dinner to honour me on my 80th birthday, but I’ve been honoured enough,” said Charman. “If they want to tie me up on my birthday, they should have a function like we did for my 60th, 65th, 70th and 75th – on each occasion the party raised funds

Eric Charman, on stage in the Alix Goolden Hall, speaks during the announcement that Pacific Opera Victoria, the Victoria Symphony, and The Victoria Conservatory of Music will host an 80th birthday celebration for him on March 4 at the McPherson Playhouse. Don Denton/News staff

15 B.C. artists who used a chair as their subject. The one-of-a-kind chairs, from hand-painted upholstered chairs to paintings of chairs, will be offered in both silent and live auctions at the gala. “Honouring Eric Charman, who has worked tirelessly for many years on behalf of the Victoria Symphony and all the arts, is one of the most meaningful things that all of us in Victoria can do. The arts in this community owe Eric a debt that can never be repaid,” said Mitchell Krieger, executive director of the Victoria Symphony. “If there is one thing I would want it’s to encourage new people to come,” said Charman. “It will be a great evening, though $250 sounds expensive, you get a tax receipt for $100 and receive a gala performance.” Tickets for Eric Charman’s 80th Birthday Gala are $250. For those wishing to attend only the concert, a limited number of balcony tickets are available for $75. For tickets call 250-382-1641 or charmanbirthday@gmail.com. For more information go to www.pov. bc.ca. llavin@vicnews.com

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VICTORIA VICTORIA NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday, February February 22, 22, 2012 2012

www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com • • A15 A15



Carmen thrills Youth choirs unite for spring Experience 150 voices together as youth choirs collide for Awaken Spring! Chamber choir Vox Humana presents a collaboration with the University of Victoria Chamber Singers, the Victoria Conservatory of Music Chorale, Brentwood College Concert Choir, Pacific Christian School choirs and members of Ensemble Laude, Feb. 25 at Alix Goolden Hall, 907 Pandora Ave. The evening will include Eric Whitacre’s Three Songs of Faith and the premiere performance of a new work by Aaron Jensen. Tickets are $15 for adults over 25, $10 for seniors and free for people 25 and under. Find tickets online at voxhumanachoir.ca, in person at Long & McQuade, 756 Hillside Ave. and Ivy’s Bookshop, 2188 Oak Bay Ave., by phone at 250483-4010 or by email at info@voxhumanachoir.ca. nnorth@saanichnews.com

Pacific Opera Victoria is ready to take you to the steamy streets of Seville, where passion awaits and murder will be done. Carmen, one of the world’s most popular operas runs tonight and Feb. 24 and 28 with a matinée Feb. 26, at the Royal Theatre, 805 Broughton St. Bad, beguiling, and dangerous to know, Bizet’s heroine exudes life and draws all to her as moths to a flame. When she fixes on Don José as her next (but certainly not her last) lover, the naive but volatile young soldier hasn’t a chance. He is seduced into a life of crime. Tragedy is inevitable.

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Allyson McHardy as Carmen and Etienne Dupuis as Escamillo in Pacific Opera Victoria’s Carmen.

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Hard-rock cancer fundraiser in support of Esquimalt man

We’d be pleased to show you our report card.

The family and friends of Tristan Taylor hope an upcoming night of hard rock tunes will benefit the 22-year-old Esquimalt resident who is battling cancer. Taylor has neuroblastoma and says he is running out of treatment options. He is trying to raise $100,000 for an alternative therapy at the Byrzynski Clinic in Texas. The cost is not covered by B.C.’s Medical Services Plan. The upcoming fundraiser, featuring local bands Deckard Cain and Sexy Offenders, happens March 10, 7 p.m. to midnight, at the Esquimalt Dockyard branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, 622 Admirals Rd. Ticket holders must be at least 19 years old. Tickets are $10, and are available at the Legion, in advance or at the door. emccracken@vicnews.com

Area Liquid Waste Management Plan is now available for review by the public.

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An independent performance audit of the extent to which the CRD, participating municipalities and other responsible agencies have complied with their respective commitments defined in the Core

Of the Core Area Liquid Waste Management Plan commitments for the CRD, 61 of 66 individual commitments for the CRD were met and all five of the shared commitments for the CRD were met.

All of the commitments for the seven municipalities were also met. We are actively working to address the few outstanding commitments in 2012.

We’d like to know what you think of the audit report. Public feedback is encouraged through February 29, 2012. Copies of the report are available online at www.wastewatermadeclear.ca or in hard-copy at the CRD Fisgard office.

ARTS LISTINGS IN BRIEF

Feedback, comments and submissions can be

Rio Samaya Band plays for folk

emailed to contact@wastewatermadeclear.ca, referencing the 2011 Performance Audit of Plan Commitments, or mailed to:

Victoria Folk Music Society hosts the Rio Samaya Band, after open stage, March 4, 7:30 p.m. at Norway House, 1110 Hillside. Tickets $5 at the door.

Sentimental melodies meet Sabbath

Capital Regional District Attention: Dan Telford, Senior Manager, Environmental Engineering

Join Black Valley Gospel for their record launch at the Fort Cafe on March 3. Doors at 7, show at 9:30 p.m. Tickets in advance at the Fort Cafe and Picnic on Fort St.

625 Fisgard Street, Victoria, BC, V8W 2S6

See TED Talks live and local

TEDxVictoria is pleased to announce TEDxVictoriaLive 2012 at the Belfry Arts Centre, 1291 Gladstone Ave., on Feb. 29. Watch a full day of live streaming the TED conference in real time, as it happens in Long Beach, California. There will be four separate sessions to attend, check out the schedule at www.tedxvictoria.com. Tickets for individual sessions are available free at the Belfry box office or on their website (https://tickets.belfry.bc.ca). Although tickets are free, attendees are urged to book only for sessions which they are certain they can attend. Donations will be accepted at the door to help cover venue labour costs.

Tickets are available from the Royal and McPherson Box Office at 250-386-6121, or online at www.rmts.bc.ca. llavin@vicnews.com

opera version was created after Bizet’s death, it is the original version with spoken dialogue that Pacific Opera Victoria is presenting.

www.wastewatermadeclear.ca


A16 •www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com A16•

Wednesday,February February22, 22,2012 2012 --VICTORIA VICTORIA NEWS NEWS Wednesday,

COMMUNITY NEWS IN BRIEF

First Peoples celebrated at museum event

Children can foster a finer appreciation of the First Peoples in B.C. by making their own totem pole, drawing animal symbols and even using their teeth to make birch bark art. Royal B.C. Museum’s next Wonder Sunday event will celebrate many aspects of First Nation life. The showcase will also feature storytelling and demonstrations on drumand moccasin-making. Find out what life was like in a pit house. The closing ceremonies will include dancing. Pre-registration is not required. The event happens Sunday (Feb. 26), from 1 to 3 p.m., and cost is included with museum admission or membership. Please visit www.royalbcmuseum. bc.ca for details.

City pedicab licence numbers scaled back

the Maritime Museum of B.C. on Friday, March 16 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., enjoy an evening of song, dance and refreshments as they take you to the Emerald Shore with Cookeilidh and special guests, the O’Connor O’Brien Irish Dancers. Set in the museum’s beautifully restored 19th century courtroom, Music from the Shamrock Shore; A St. Patrick’s Day Celebration will delight all ages and have everyone feeling a little Irish. Doors open at 7 p.m., tickets can be purchased in advance in the Crow’s Nest gift shop of the Maritime Museum. Cost is $12; $10 for MMBC members; students and seniors and children 12 and under are free. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 250-385-4222 or go to mmbc.bc.ca.

After negative reaction from the industry, council scaled back its proposal to increase the number of pedicab licences available from 28 to 75. Coun. Lisa Helps amended her original motion, setting a new cap at 30 licences. Under the new vehicle-for-hire bylaw, the city will now hold a requestfor-proposals to allocate pedicab licences as they become available. Council deemed this process preferable to a lottery system to award licences.

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VICTORIA NEWS - Wednesday, February 22, 2012

www.vicnews.com • A17



Golden warriors

Saanich club wins U19 Tier 2 lacrosse provincials at UVic. Results online and in Friday’s News.

SPORTS

Cougars rest for playoff run Victoria Cougars enter playoffs on 15-game win streak Travis Paterson News staff

With a chunk of the team’s core injured and looking on from the stands, the Victoria Cougars still managed to walk through the Campbell River Storm with a 6-1 win at the Archie Browning Sports Centre last Thursday (Feb. 16). Before the game, captain Brody Coulter accepted the Andy Hebenton Trophy on behalf of the Cougars as the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League’s regular season champs – the fourth time the Cougars have finished first in the last six years. There may be some play“We’re a skilled ers in the junior and pro hockey worlds who are team but we don’t win superstitious about touching “lesser” awards along without working hard.” the way to a playoff cham– Brody Coulter pionship. Coulter isn’t one, gladly picking the Hebenton trophy up before the game. “It’s not the trophy we want. But no, there’s no superstitions.” With a first-round bye, the Cougars will watch the rest of the league start the playoffs this week. It gives the Cougars, including Coulter, who sat Thursday’s game out, a chance to jump into the second round with full health. Coulter, along with alternate captain Rhys Williams, Ben Kinshella, Thor Rosback and Trevor Chown, continued “rehabilitation” as on-ice assistants for the Victoria Ice Hawks minor hockey association’s shootout competition, which took place during the intermissions of Thursday’s game. “(The injured players) are probably playoff-ready but there’s no reason to rush them back,” said Cougars coach Mark Van Helvoirt. Even without Coulter, who dropped out of the scoring title race by missing the last two games, the Cougars brought enough intensity to bomb the Storm in front of hundreds of youth hockey players. Chris Bannister scored twice for the Cougars, and Sam Rice, Josh Wyatt, Wade Johnson and Nathan Chen-Mack

Cougars needed until the last game of the season to clinch the top seed. This year, the Cougars clinched first overall in mid-January. That created new mental challenges, which the Cougars clearly overcame, ending the season on a 15-game winning streak. “Clinching so early had its disadvantages. We took it one game at a time, like every game is the first game of the playoffs,” Coulter said. Except the playoffs are a different season, Coulter added. And this year there was no foe like last year’s Panthers to keep the Cougars razor sharp. “Right now, Saanich (Braves) is probably our biggest rival. (Obviously) playoffs are more physical. We’re a skilled team, but we don’t win without working hard. Saanich is also more of a skilled team. They have good defence and a strong goalie.” The Braves face Campbell River in the first round of the playoffs. The Cougars ended the regular season in Parksville on Saturday with a 4-2 win ■ Wed., Feb. 22: over the Oceanside GenerPeninsula at als. Josh Wyatt scored twice Oceanside; Campbell and Chris Bannister and River at Saanich Colin Minardi each scored (Pearkes arena), 7:30 once. Bryce Halverson got p.m. ■ Fri., Feb. 24: the win in net with 18 saves. Campbell River at Jones, Axford draw Saanich 6:30 p.m.; Oceanside at Peninsula for scoring trophy (Panorama), 7:30 p.m. Cougars assistant captain ■ Feb. 25: Peninsula Steve Axford and Braves at Oceanside ■ Feb. captain Ty Jones leapfrogged 27: Oceanside at Coulter for the scoring title Peninsula, 7:30 p.m.■ in the final week. Feb. 29: Peninsula at Jones and Axford will Oceanside; Campbell share the Doug Morton TroRiver at Saanich, phy, Jones with 34 goals, 41 7:30 p.m. ■ March assists for 75 points, and 2: Campbell River Axford with 25 goals, 50 at Saanich, 7:30 assists for 75 points. Coulter p.m.; Oceanside at finishes third with 68 points Peninsula, 7:30 p.m. (27 goals, 41 assists). sports@vicnews.com

Playoff sked

Travis Paterson/News staff

Victoria Cougars captain Brody Coulter holds the Andy Hebenton Trophy. With the award as the best regular season team, the Cougars will enjoy a firstround playoff bye. each scored once in the win. Netminder Evan Roch stopped 34 of 35 shots. Last season, the battle for the Hebenton and its right to home advantage throughout the playoffs went down to the wire between the Cougars and Peninsula Panthers. The

Squash juniors on top Cedar Hill’s squash tourney going national Travis Paterson News staff

Travis Paterson/News staff

Gavin Maxwell and Grace Thomas won the boys U15 and girls U15 trophies, respectively, at the Pacific North West Junior Jesters Squash Tournament, hosted by the Cedar Hill Squash Club, Feb. 17 to 19. This year 222 kids entered the 43rd edition of the annual tournament, which relied on 50 volunteers at three different venues.

Gavin Maxwell is only 14 years old but he’s already thinking about an NCAA scholarship, in squash. Victoria is rising within the national squash scene with players such as Maxwell, ranked third among U15 boys in Canada. “He might be our first player on the national junior team,” said squash pro Phil Green of the Cedar Hill Squash Club. Maxwell finished first in the under-15 boys open at the Pacific North West Junior Jesters Squash tournament at Cedar Hill Recreation Centre on Saturday. It’s one of many tournament wins for the St. Andrew’s Regional High School student this year. “I’d like to play for Canada one day,

and I hope to be able to get a scholarship, too,” Maxwell said. It was also a special day for Grace Thomas. “It’s the biggest tournament win for me,” said the 13-year-old, an up-andcomer who took the girls’ U15 trophy in just her second year playing. The annual jesters tourney usually features 160 to 180 entrants in the U19, U17, U15, U13 and U11 categories. This year, 222 youths entered and the tourney was played on 13 courts at Cedar Hill, St. Michaels University School and the University of Victoria’s Ian Stewart Complex. “Next year this tournament will be sanctioned as a selection event for the U17 and U19 national junior team,” Green said. It means more national team players will attend. The Jesters tourney will continue to aid in developing young talent with intermediate and novice levels, as well as the open category. sports@vicnews.com

Girls AAA Islands at Mount Doug The Claremont Spartans basketball team that were the AAA girls favourites last year just became the dark horse team to watch this year. The Spartans upset the Oak Bay Breakers at the girls’ AAA Lower Island finals on Saturday. The Mount Douglas Rams finished third, and are hosting the Spartans, Breakers, Spectrum Thunder and Stelly’s Stingers at this week’s AAA Island championship, Feb. 23 to 26. From the north division, Alberni, Dover Bay and G.P. Vanier will also attend. The Oak Bay Bays host the boys’ city AAA finals, Feb. 23 to 26. sports@vicnews.com


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Wednesday, Wednesday,February February22, 22,2012 2012 --VICTORIA VICTORIA NEWS NEWS

Vic to Vernon quite the stretch Gymnasts ready for B.C. Winter Games Travis Paterson News staff

It’s a long bus ride to Vernon, and Victoria’s athletes headed to the B.C. Winter Games are invited to stand up and stretch it out along the way. Luckily for Natalie Louis and Emily Bolink, stretching is their kind of thing. The pair of gymnasts, along with Coral Strugnell, will represent Greater Victoria at the B.C. Winter Games, Feb. 23 to 26. Athletes taking the bus, however, won’t arrive until 2 a.m., late Wednesday (Feb. 22) or early Thursday, depending on how you see it. In the words of one organizer, that means banking as much sleep as possible prior to the marathon bus ride today. “It’s the farthest I’ve ever gone to compete,” said Louis, a 12-year-old from View Royal. “I’ve never really travelled with a whole team. It’s a pretty big deal.” Louis trains at Lions Pride Gymnastics in Langford and is excited about getting together with all 15 Island (Zone 6) gymnast athletes. Most of all, Louis is hoping to match – and improve on – her second-place finish on the uneven bars in the tyro division (age 10 to 11) of last year’s B.C. championships.

Central Saanich resident who trains with Falcon Artistic Gymnastics Centre in Saanich. “Training and competing with a new coach is exciting but I’m also a bit nervous about it,” Bolink said. “Actually we both are nervous because we haven’t had the coach [one of four with the team] before.” With gymnastics broken into a series of disciplines, athTravis Paterson/News staff letes have a chance Gymnasts Emily Bolink, 13, and Natalie Louis, 12, to win multiple medare headed to Vernon to compete in the B.C. Winter als for their team. Uneven bars is the Games this week, Feb. 23 to 26. strength of Bolink and Louis, who will also compete in “Training and competing the floor exercise, the vault and the with a new coach is exciting but balance beam. Each discipline gets its own medal, I’m also a bit nervous about it.” with an overall ranking for the athlete who has the all-around highest total – Emily Bolink score. Zone 6 (Island-Central Coast) finBolink, 13, also finished second on the bars at last year’s provincials. She ished third at the 2010 B.C. Winter competed in the novice division (age Games in Terrace in the gymnastics 12 to 13), which is where Bolink and overall team standings, with Musa Niwa-Heinin and Alyssa Leblond repLouis will compete in Vernon. “Meeting new people and competing resenting Victoria. For more visit BCgames.org. in a new place are the (biggest things) sports@vicnews.com that come to mind,” said Bolink, a

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Hockey all day, night and day again Rink of dreams 24-hour hockey game returns Travis Paterson News staff

Their 24-hour charity hockey game was such a hit last year, rookie organizers Harp Sandhu and Kim Genereux expected a sophmore slump for 2012. But nothing could be further from the truth. “We’ve already got twothirds of the ice times booked up, which is more than we had in total from last year,” said Sandhu, of Macquarie Private Wealth. The entire branch of the downtown investment firm is on board this year as Rink of Dreams returns to Bear Mountain Arena, from noon on Saturday, March 31, until noon Sunday, April 1. The goal is to meet, and hopefully exceed, last year’s total of $104,000 raised for Victoria’s Help Fill A Dream Foundation, which will be the charity of benefit once again. “We cut the prices in

half for entries this year. Without any promotion, we’ve had some great interest from the hockey community, by teams and groups of players, all of it pro-active and unsolicited,” Sandhu said. Downtown lawyer by day and beer league hockey player by night, Nav Parhar is stepping into Genereux’s role this year. Parhar hopes to increase the local business and corporate sponsorships of the event. “The goal isn’t to have just a hockey game, but to create a family hockey festival that happens to have a hockey game going on at the same time,” Parhar said. Food, games, music, a beer garden and more are part of the festival activities Saturday afternoon and evening. Hockey entrants get two ice times and will be treated to a “pro atmosphere” in the dressing room. To register visit Rinkofdreamsvictoria. com, or call Sandhu at 250 -412-3412. sports@vicnews.com

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SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

To get started today, visit experience.cdicollege.ca or call 1.888.897.3871

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CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

AIRCAST BOOTS, medical, like new, 1 sz fits all male & female, $90. obo. (250)3802858 before 9pm.

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HOME MAKER/ companion cooking, cleaning, laundry and errands. Call Wendy (250)4798555.

5’ X 7’ RUG, blue pattern, $30. 3 knife self sharpener, $25 obo. Call 250-592-8509.

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HOME CARE SUPPORT

JUVENILE MALE Boxer. Not neutered. High energy adult dog. Very handsome! Asking $400. Call 250-361-0052.

FRIENDLY FRANK

FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME 55+ move in ready, many upgrades. (250)652-6782.

HOMES WANTED

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO COOK ST Village area. 1bdrm, hardwood floors. Heat, hot water, storage, parking incl $795 ns or pets. 250-595-5162

Call: 1-250-616-9053

www.webuyhomesbc.com

REAL ESTATE SERVICES LAND OF Orchards, Vineyards & Tides in Nova Scotia’s beautiful Annapolis Valley. Live! Work! Bring Business! Free Brochure - Website: www.kingsrda.ca Email: mmacdonald@kingsrda.ca Toll - free: 1-888-865-4647

BUYING OR SELLING?

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

ESQUIMALT

Unique Building Must see

Bach & 2 Bdrm. Very quiet, ocean views, Clean, well maintained. Adult oriented. Laundry, Sauna, Elevator, Hot Water, Heat. (250) 388-9384 FERNWOOD AREA Apt, large 2 bdrm, $875/mo. Avail now. Ref’s. 250-370-2226 to view.

Summer Intern

Black Press – Victoria Black Press-Vancouver Island requires a temporary full-time summer intern for its Victoria-based community newspapers. The job term runs for 13 weeks from June through to the end of August. The successful candidate will do general assignment reporting and photography. Night and weekend work is involved and a valid driver’s licence and car is mandatory.

Qualifications This position is open to students and recent graduates (within the last year or two) who are ambitious and who have a strong work ethic and a passion for journalism.

ROCKLAND AREA Apt, large bach, $570 mo, incls heat & hot water. Avail Feb. 1. Call 250-370-2226 for viewing.

Qualifications include a firm grasp of grammar, spelling and newspaper style. Previous reporting experience is an asset.

VICTORIA,

The student is expected to be web savvy, both in their use of social media as a reporting tool, and their ability to tell stories in a multi-platform environment, using video, podcasting and other tools.

GORDREAU APTS. Suites available. Please call 250-383-5353

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES

Interested candidates should send resume, clippings and cover letter by Feb. 29, 2012 to:

FERNWOOD: 2 bdrm + den, main., reno’d kitchen, N/S. $1500+ nego. (250)386-1203.

Kevin Laird Editorial Director-Greater Victoria Black Press 818 Broughton Street Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 or e-mail: klaird@blackpress.ca

SIDNEY- 3 bdrm (behind Thrifty’s) 1 bath. Reno’d. NS/NP. $1375+(250)656-4003

Thank you for your interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

www.blackpress.ca

GRANT MANOR, APARMENTS 6921 Grant Rd. Sooke

APARTMENTS FURNISHED

Bachelor and 1 bdrm. apts. Some newly renovated For further information and to view call

SIDNEY: FURNISHED Deluxe suite, newer. Walk to ocean & town. All incl. 250-656-8080.

778-677-4888

ROCKLAND APT, lrg 1 bdrm, incls heat/hot water, $750, (immed) 250-370-2226 to view

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


VICTORIA NEWSWed, - Wednesday, Victoria News Feb 22,February 2012 22, 2012

www.vicnews.com A21 www.vicnews.com •A21



RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

TRANSPORTATION

HOMES FOR RENT

HOMES FOR RENT

SUITES, LOWER

SUITES, LOWER

AUTO FINANCING

AUTO SERVICES

CARS

COLWOOD, 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath. 2 level home with an exceptional view. Mins to elem & sec schools. On bus route. Walk to beach & Royal Roads. N/S. Pets neg. $1900 mo + utils. Call 250-478-8146.

GLANFORD- Mar 1. 1100 sqft 2 bdrm, quiet/bright. Reno kitch & bdrm closet. w/d, full bath, storage, priv entr, sm yrd, near bus, amens. NS/NP, $1030, ht, h/w, hydro/internet incld. Refs. 250-704-0197.

SOOKE/METCHOSIN, furn’d, open concept, utils/TV/internet incl’d, $950 mo, 250-642-5859

DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

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FOR ALL VEHICLES in all conditions in all locations

2007 CUSTOM Chev HHR. Excellent condition. Loaded. White. 119,000 km, mostly hwy driven. On-Star. $11,900 firm. 250-755-5191.

ROOMS FOR RENT

GORDON HEAD- (close to Uvic) 2 bdrm, W/D, hydro, water incld. N/S. $1000. Avail Mar 1, Apr 1. (250)477-3434.

- BUYING - RENTING - SELLING -

www. bcclassified.com

OAK BAY/VICTORIA, $475 all inclusive, semi priv bath, W/D, on bus route, avail March. 1 or 15, 250-595-7610.

SUITES, LOWER CORDOVA BAY- 2 bdrms, W/D, hydro incld. Avail Mar 1. $920/mo. (250)658-4760.

NEAR BEAR Mtn- bright, spacious 2 bdrm, views, 5 appls, separate laundry, F/P, patio, yard. NS/NP. $1100 includes utilities. (250)391-8817. SIDNEY, BRIGHT 1 bdrm + den, above grd suite, new carpet, priv patio, all incl’d but cable/internet, N/P, N/S, $950 mo. Call 250-880-1414.

UPTOWN, 1 bdrm 820 sq ft, 3 storage rooms, patio, yard, parking, own ent., NS/NP, $860 inclusive, 250-886-5896.

SUITES, UPPER 2 BDRM UPPER Suite, Mayfair Mall area - newly reno’d, hrdwd flrs, fireplc, lots of parking! Shared utilities, $1175. Call Sunny at 250-858-4239

TOWNHOUSES

1-800-910-6402

FREE CASH back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery. INSTANT AUTO credit we can finance your auto loan in minutes, you Drive Home Now, or we can deliver to you. w w w. D r i v e H o m e N o w. c o m . 877-758-7311 or 250-7515205. WANT A vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in February, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

CASH PAID

250-885-1427

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

ISLAND AUTO Body, Paint & Upholstery. 25 yrs. 1210 Stelly’s X Road. 250-881-4862.

CARS

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES FOR SALE

1992, 26 ft TRAVELAIRE. Bright, clean, sleeps 4. Twin beds in back & fold down double bed. Immaculate condition. Full shower with skylight, generator, air conditioning, 91,000 km. $16,500. (250) 743-6036

SCRAP CAR REMOVAL SCRAP BATTERIES Wanted We buy scrap batteries from cars, trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 & up each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Toll Free 1.877.334.2288.

SERVICE DIRECTORY ESQ/GORGE, BRIGHT spacious, 2 bdrm grd level, on bus route, laundry, lrg fenced yard, N/S, N/P. $1100 mo incls all utils. Avail now. 250-384-5466

SIDNEY WATERFRONT- 1 bdrm. $1000 inclusive. Refs. NP/NS. (250)656-4003.

SIDNEY: NEW, 3 bdrm + den, laundry, NS/NP, $1700. Avail Apr. 1. Call 250-217-4060.

1994 BMW 325i- 4 door, power everything, sun roof, 6 pack CD changer, 210,000 miles. $2500 obo. (250)896-5065.

#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

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250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

CONTRACTORS

GARDENING

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

PLUMBING

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

AURICLE Lawns- cln up lawn garden hedge pruning soil tests & fertilize. (250)882-3129

GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323. GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778. PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades & maintenance. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

BUSINESS SERVICES FREELANCE Professional Writer. Compelling Web/Print Ad Copy. www.thewritingbutler.com 250-744-1555 - Fast!

CARPENTRY BENOIT CONSTRUCTION. Reno’s & Additions. Windows, Doors, Decks. 250-479-0748. CUSTOM PLANER- (Fir, cedar) baseboards, casings, crown molding (any shape). Call (250)588-5920. QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

CLEANING SERVICES #1 CAREBEAR CLEANING. Earth friendly products. House, office & rental. Senior discount. $25hr. 250-217-5507 ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (778)440-6611. ANNA’S CARPET CLEANING Truck Mount, Bonded, Insured Best Price! 250-886-9492. CARING BONDABLE work since 1985. Supplies & vacuum incld’d. Call (250)385-5869 SPOTLESS HOME Cleaning. Affordable, Experienced, Reliable, Efficient. (250)508-1018 WE LOVE DIRTY KITCHENS! House cleaning regularly or one time. 250-532-6858. welovedirtykitchens.com

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

CONTRACTORS CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

QUALITY WORK. All Renos & Repairs. Decks, Suites, Drywall, Painting. 250-818-7977.

DRAFTING & DESIGN DESIGN FOR PERMIT. w w w. i n t e gra d e s i g n i n c . c o m Call Steven (250) 381-4123.

DRYWALL AARON’S RENO’S Drywall, taping, texture. Insured/bonded. Free est. 250-880-0525.

ELECTRICAL 250-361-6193. QUALITY Electric. Reno’s plus. Visa accepted. Small jobs ok. #22779 AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

(250) 858-0588 - Tree Service - Landscaping - Lawn & Garden Clean ups - Hedge trimming & Pruning - Pressure washing - Gutters Free estimates * WCB www.mowtime.ca ARE YOU in need of a professional, qualified, residential or commercial gardener? www. glenwood gardenworks.com DPM SERVICES: lawn/gard, cleanups, pruning, hedges, landscapes, irrigation, pwr washing, gutters 15yrs. 250883-8141. OVERGROWN GARDEN? Cleanups. Pruning roses, fruit tree, hedges. John Kaiser 250-478-7314, 250-812-8236.

EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. GNC ELECTRIC Res/Comm. Reasonable rates for quality work. #43619. 250-883-7632.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376. FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

HANDYPERSONS

M&S OXFORD Home/Commercial Reno’s & Painting. Patio’s, Decks, Sheds, Hardwood and Trim. 25 yrs exp. Quality Guar. 250-213-5204.

Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603 AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002. AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com SENIOR HANDYMANHousehold repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP (BBB) All reno’s, kitchen, bath, custom showers. Anything concrete. 250-658-2656. www.wingfieldcontracting.com

MASONRY & BRICKWORK CBS MASONRY BBB A+ Accredited Business. Chimneys, Fireplaces, Flagstone Rock, Concrete Pavers, Patios, Sidewalk Repair. Replace, Rebuild, Renew! “Quality is our Guarantee”. Free Competitive Estimates. Call (250)294-9942 or 250-589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

HAULING AND SALVAGE

KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991. NORTHERN SUN Electric Comm/Res. $35/hr. Work Guaranteed. Any size job. (250)888-6160. Lic#13981.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

.... THE GARDENING GAL .... Quality Affordable Gardening. Renovations Maintenance & Cleanups.... 250.217.7708.

WATTS ON ELECTRIC, Residential, Commercial, Renovations. #100213. 250-418-1611.

CBS MASONRY BBB A+. Chimney, Fireplaces, Rock, Flagstone, Concrete, Pavers, Repair, Rebuild, Renew. “Quality is our Guarantee.” Free Competitive Est’s. Call (250) 294-9942/589-9942. www.cbsmasonry.com

#1 JUNK Removal & Hauling. Free estimates. Cheapest in town. Same day emergency removal. Call 250-818-4335. lalondejeff62@yahoo.ca $20 & Up Garbage & Garden waste removal. Senior Disc. Free estimates. 250-812-2279.

MOVING & STORAGE

CA$H for CAR$

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

GET RID OF IT TODAY:)

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton, 5 ton. Prices starting at $75/hr. 250-220-0734.

SEPTIC SYSTEMS. Bobcat Services, Mini Excavator, Full Size Excavator, top soil/gravel. Call 250-474-7384.

www.888junk.com

FENCING AAA. NO job too small. Fences, decks, installation & repair. References, affordable, experienced. Les (250)880-2002. ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462.

PAINTING

250-888-JUNK GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS 250-889-5794. DIAMOND DAVE Gutter Cleaning. Thorough Job at a Fair Price! Repairs, gutter guard, power/window washing, roof de-moss. Free no obligation estimates. A1 -AL’S V.I.P. Gutter Cleaning. Gutter guards, power washing, roof de-mossing, repairs, windows. Package deals! Insured. (250)507-6543. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB.

CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489. CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-920-8463.

PARRY’S HAULING We haul it all - FREE estimates. Call Shawn 250-812-7774

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

BLANCHARD HOME SOLUTIONS LTD. Specializing in Seniors Mobility Solutions, Reno’s, Repairs/Handyman Services, Kitchen/Bath & Basement stes, Licensed and Insured. 250-882-5274 .

SAVE-A-LOT HAULING Furniture, appliance, garden waste, we take it all! Always lowest rate, senior discount. Brad 250-217-9578.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Painting. Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years experience. 250-382-3694. A PROFESSIONAL Woman painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 25 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220. NORM’S PAINTING- 15% offQuality work. Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347. OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187. YOUR PERSONAL Interior Painter. No Job too Big or Too Small. Call Gilbert today for free quote. (250)886-6446.

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663. PRICED BY the job. No surprises. Guaranteed. 25 yrs, 2nd generation Master Plumber. 778-922-0334 Visa/MC.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS SHORELINE ROOFING. Reroofing specialist. WCB/BBB member. Quality & satisfaction guaranteed. 250-413-7967. shorelineroofing@shaw.ca

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046 PROF & custom installs of floor & wall tiles. Heated flooring, Custom Showers. Reno’s, new constr. Bob 250-812-7448

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. 18 yrs. Brian, 514-7079. WCB. NORM’S WINDOW cleaning & gutters. Reasonable rates. 250-590-2929, 250-812-3213.

WINDOWS ALFRED, ALFRED Quality Windows Wholesale, Discounts! 50 years Construction experience. 250-382-3694.


A22 •• www.vicnews.com www.vicnews.com A22

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA NEWS Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA NEWS

Hydro rates may rise due to debt

Interim increase in hydro rates approved Tom Fletcher Black Press B.C. Hydro

The 80-year-old Ruskin dam and powerhouse is getting an upgrade expected to cost up to $850 million. B.C.’s auditor general has criticized BC Hydro for deferring debt for projects such as the Fraser Valley dam, and then reporting a profit.

BC JoBs Plan: FORESTRY

British Columbia has traditionally been synonymous with forestry and today this industry is still one of the cornerstones of our economy, especially in many rural communities which strongly value and support timber harvesting. With over two-thirds (60 million hectares) of the provincial land mass covered in forest we can count on a healthy industry for many more years. B.C. has more than 110 lumber mills, over 70 with a capacity of more than 40 million board feet per year; 27 veneer, plywood and OSB (oriented strand board) mills, eight pellet mills, 18 pulp mills (six of which are also paper mills) and over 80 other primary processing mills such as chips, shake and shingle, pole, and log manufacturers. The forestry sector has a deep pool of skilled professionals and a highly trained workforce. Altogether the industry employs well over 50,000 well paid employees, often the life-blood of small towns. B.C.’s forest sector is definitely starting to recover from the last decade’s downturn. Since 2009, over two dozen mills have announced they are reopening or adding shifts. The importance of this industry to B.C. is demonstrated by the fact that 40% of the province’s regional economies are based on forestry activities, in more than 7,000 businesses. Western Forest Products include timber harvesting, reforestation, sawmilling logs into lumber and wood chips, and value-added remanufacturing in their product line. The company’s 3,000 employees are an integral part of WFP. They are known for their knowledge of the fibre base, skills in product manufacturing and dedication to customer service as well as their commitment to safety, community and environmental values. It was good news for Ladysmith when the company reopened the mill. 100% of the product generated will be shipped to China. One reason for growth in the industry is the Asian market. International buyers know that B.C. is a stable supplier of high-quality wood products; we can provide timber supply security. This secure supply, coupled with the fact our spruce, pine, fir, hemlock and balsam fibre baskets are among the richest in the world makes B.C. extremely attractive. The B.C. brand of wood products is well estab-

Advertisement

lished globally with market-leading shares in key countries such as China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. B.C. is also looking to be the first major country that deals in softwood lumber to establish its products in the India marketplace. Working with the federal government and industry, the Province has strengthened and diversified the B.C. forest sector by increasing market demand for softwood lumber throughout Asia. The global demand for bio-products from the forest is predicted to reach $200 billion a year. Renewable fuels, plastics, and chemicals for the pharmaceutical and food industries can potentially be manufactured by running wood fibre and residues through bio-refinery. B.C. has taken steps to make it easier for the non-lumber sector to source supplies of lower quality fibre. This includes fibre supply licences to cut to use logging debris that is left behind on landings and roadsides. Taking care of this natural abundance is critical. An amazing statistic is the fact B.C. has planted more than six billion trees since reforestation programs began in the 1930’s, and is on track to plant its seven billionth tree in 2013/14. We plant an average of 200 million trees each year. B.C. produces more wood products certified to environmental standards than any other region in the world and has 53 million hectares certified to one of three internationally recognized sustainable forest management certification standards. Growth now and in the future requires a solid foundation. B.C. created the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations to deal with increasing demands and pressures on the land base by taking a more integrated approach to managing B.C.’s natural resources. BC Hydro launched a two-phase Bioenergy Call for Power. Phase one has helped advance bioenergy development in Kamloops, Castlegar and Prince George, while phase two has done the same for Chetwynd, Fort St. James, Fraser Lake and Merritt. B.C. has also passed the Wood First Act to promote and encourage a cultural shift that will make wood the first choice for construction in the commercial and institutional sectors as well as residential. The future looks very bright for this most iconic of British Columbia industries.

The B.C. Utilities Commission has approved an extra 2.5 per cent interim increase in B.C. Hydro rates, which means a seven per cent increase in electricity bills starting April 1. The commission’s decision is a setback for the B.C. government, which conducted a costcutting review of B.C. Hydro last year that cut 700 jobs to bring the 2012 rate increase down below four per cent. The decision is still an interim rate increase. B.C. Hydro can argue for a reduction, which would result in a rebate on electricity bills if it is granted by the

A L Z H E I M E R S O C I E T Y O F B. C.

Title Sponsor

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other Canadian utilities. commission later this year. The practice can “mask the The commission ruled that the latest 2.5 per cent increase, true cost of doing business, creabout $5 a month on the aver- ating the appearance of profitage residential bill, is needed to ability where none actually pay down B.C. Hydro’s balloon- exists, and place undue burdens on future taxpaying deferred debt, ers,” he said. which was identiThe practice Doyle’s conclufied in October by sion that “there B.C. Auditor Gen- can “mask the does not appear eral John Doyle. true cost of doing to be a plan to Doyle reviewed reduce the balB.C. Hydro’s business, creating ance of these books and found the appearance of accounts” is supthat as of March ported by the util2011, $2.2 billion profitability where ities commission of the utility’s none actually exists.” decision. debt was placed in - John Doyle NDP energy deferral accounts. critic John HorDeferred expenses were forecast to grow to $5 bil- gan said the auditor’s report showed the B.C. Liberal governlion by 2017. Doyle said deferral accounts ment was using B.C. Hydro as an for major capital costs are an “ATM machine,” collecting $463 acceptable practice to smooth million in revenue last year and out rate increases, but B.C. forcing the utility to pile up debt Hydro’s use of it runs ahead of to do it.

Thank you to our volunteers, participants, donors and sponsors for making this year’s event a huge success. A special thank you to our event honoree, Vic Golinsky for sharing his story. The Victoria Investors Group Walk for Memories raised more than $40,000 this year! Community Sponsors & Supporters

Event sponsors

2012 Walk Committee

Cobs Bread The Corporation of the District of Oak Bay Edwards Brothers - Canada Investors Group Community Involvement Team The Island Big Band Marty the Marmot Joe Perkins of CTV Price’s Alarms Recreation Oak Bay Serious Coffee Soul 62 St. John Ambulance Blake Waters

Elizabeth Bennett Dee Govang Jason Heflin Joan Henderson Rick Peereboom Kathryn Ponech Christina Rippon Justin Robinson Mary Jane Tiller And the many other volunteers who donated their time to making the event a success!

Bronze Sponsor Regional Sponsor

Provincial Media Sponsors

Grand Prize Sponsor

Regional Media Sponsors Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

The Alzheimer Society of B.C. thanks our sponsors for their generous support. This is not an endorsement.

www.walkformemories.com 1-800-667-3742


A24 • www.vicnews.com

Wednesday, February 22, 2012 - VICTORIA

W We're putting our hearts into protecting the hearts and a lives of Canadians everywhere. Purchase a $2 heart at any Country Grocer location throughout h the th month of February. All proceeds will benefit the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon.

Thank you for your support! Visit www www.countrygrocer.com for more information.

C O U N T R Y Cereals V $ 97 A 4 L Deep Browned U Beans E $ 47

See our 16 page flyer filled with great value on all your favourites at www.countrygrocer.com

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Cranberry, CranRaspberry, Ruby Red Grapefruit

4

$ 97

3.78 L Limit 2 Total

CHILEAN

Frozen Pork Loin Back Ribs

$

3

48 per lb

7.67 Kg Family Pack

Mini Strudel Apple or Cherry

2/ 6

$ 00 6's

IN THE BAKERY

STAGG

Chili

7

$ 97

6x425 g While Stocks Last

KRAFT

Peanut Butter

6

$ 97

2 Kg Limit 2

KELLOGG'S

Tri Pack Kids Cereal

7

$ 97

1.07 kg While Stocks Last

Proud to be serving Victoria since 1984 Photos are for illustrative purposes only. Deposits and/or environmental fees extra where applicable. We reserve the right to limit quantities.

Specials in effect Wednesday Feb. 22nd - Saturday Feb 25th, 2012

4420 West Saanich Rd, Royal Oak • 1153 Esquimalt Rd, Victoria Open Daily 8am - 10pm

Offers valid at Royal Oak and Esquimalt Country Grocer locations only.

NEWS


Feb.22, 2012 VictoriaNews