Page 1

THE Business Magazine Of Coastal Virginia

Leading Ladies FEARLESS FEMALES PAVING THE PATHS TO SUCCESS

FAMILY BUSINESS PHILLIPS DMC BRINGS THREE GENERATIONS OF DESTINATION MANAGEMENT

$

SKIRT THE RULES— BRINGING FLARE AND FEMININITY TO WORKPLACE FASHION MY VEGAN SWEET TOOTH A BUSINESS TO BAKE ON

INSIDE

MEETING AND BANQUET PLANNER— TRENDS AND INNOVATION IN BUSINESS MEETINGS

TM


This Year marks Abbitt Realty’s

70th Anniversary!

As a locally owned real estate company, we are very grateful and appreciative to the community that has helped us grow since 1946. Because of you, we’ve been able to offer rewarding careers, community involvement and the American dream of home ownership. As we look forward, we would like to say thank you in advance to help us continue to propel forward in the next 70 years! Thank you for your trust, Your Friends at Abbitt Realty P.S. A special thanks to all our military for your service.

4 AREA OFFICES SERVING

Property Management

(757) 223-7478

Apartments • Rental Homes Association Management Development • Commercial

GREATER HAMPTON ROADS & THE CHEASAPEAKE BAY & RIVERS AREA

2

Abbitt.com

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

11835 Fishing Point Drive Newport News, VA 23606 City Center at Oyster Point 757.599.3335


Celebrate the Holidays with Us!

Corporate Event Planning & Complete Production Themed Decor, Entertainment, Interactive Activities, Planning and Production Service, Equipment Rentals... and more...

Call today for a complimentary estimate of your next event! 1-844-293-6776 • 757-340-2212 • www.premiereventsinc.com

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

3


CONTENTS

11

FEATURE

37 Leading Ladies

Coastal Virginia’s fearless females are paving the pathways to success. Compiled by Barrett Baker, Kristen De Deyn Kirk, Melissa M. Stewart and Cathy Welch

SPECIAL SECTIONS

18

61 Meeting and

Banquet Planner Modern business meetings in Coastal Virginia move toward technology and teambuilding.

29

34

DEPARTMENTS 6

Publisher’s Note

8

Editor’s Note

26 Marketing/Branding

Biz Report

11 Dress For Success Skirt the rules

14 The Watercooler Trending topics and business news

18 Meet & Eat Chartreuse Bistro

20 Pencil It In Upcoming business and networking events

23 Networking News A recap of recent business events

25 Going Green 5 tips for starting an office recycling program 4

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Ask the Expert How can I use meetings and networking events to grow my company? Company Handbook How can my company offer flexibility in the workplace?

27 Legal How should I navigate the I-9 process for remote hires? Finance Which is the better choice, a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA?

28 Commercial Real Estate What factors should a company consider when searching for the ideal office location?

Beyond the Biz

29 Family Business Three generations of women at Phillips DMC help visitors experience Coastal Virginia.

32 Business Profile Tonya Deveau turned her sweet tooth into a sweet business.

34 Day in the Life Lynnhaven Dive Center introduces customers to an underwater world through scuba, snorkeling and swimming.

66 Created in CoVa CozyPure


The faces behind Cova Biz

Freelance Writers

Barrett Baker is

Creative Content Director at Raoust+Partners and Senior Writer/Editor at 2BCreative, providing freelance copywriting and editing services.

Chelsea Sherman is a freelance writer and communication specialist with an MA in Strategic Communication from Regent University. She lives in Virginia Beach with her husband Jake and their children, Emma and Isaac.

Account Manager

Kristen De Deyn Kirk has lived in and written about Coastal Virginia for nearly 22 years. She’s a proud LEAD Hampton Roads alumna and has received first-place writing awards from the Virginia Press Association, the Virginia Bar Association, the Virginia Council on Economic Education and the Public Relations Society of America for feature, business, news, government and newsletter writing.

Frank Moore brings

over 30 years of resultsdriven sales and marketing experience to his position as Account Manager with CoVa Biz. Through the years, he gained experience and provided leadership within the consumer goods industry with several companies including 28 years with Associated Distributors where he was Vice President/Director of Sales for the last seven years. Frank’s commitment to excel, along with his creativity and experience in building brands, prove to be an asset to his customers and make him a champion for new opportunities in CoVa Biz. Contact Frank for advertising and sponsorship info. 757-213-2491, frank@Covabizmag.com

Jamie McAllister is a freelance writer in Virginia Beach. In addition to writing for publications, she also works with corporate and nonprofit clients. Visit her online at McAllisterWE.com.

THE Business Magazine Of Coastal Virginia

TM

COVABIZ MAGAZINE AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 n

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 2

Leading Ladies FEARLESS FEMALES PAVING THE PATHS TO SUCCESS

LEADING LADIES | PHILLIPS DMC | LYNNHAVEN DIVE | COZYPURE

FAMILY BUSINESS PHILLIPS DMC BRINGS THREE GENERATIONS OF DESTINATION MANAGEMENT

$

SKIRT THE RULES— BRINGING FLARE AND FEMININITY TO WORKPLACE FASHION MY VEGAN SWEET TOOTH A BUSINESS TO BAKE ON

INSIDE

MEETING AND BANQUET PLANNER— TRENDS AND INNOVATION IN BUSINESS MEETINGS

COVABIZ 01 COVER 8_16 final.indd 1

7/19/16 2:42 PM

On The Cover Angela Reddix Founder, President and CEO of ARDX

at her office in Norfolk. Photographed by David Uhrin.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

5


PubLisher’s Note

Honoring Female Leaders

T

his issue of CoVa BIZ brings you a Who’s Who list of leading female professionals in Coastal Virginia. I commend all the wonderful women recognized in this feature and working women everywhere who find the means to balance a professional career with the all-important task of raising and caring for a family. Just as our region is blessed with a host of outstanding female business leaders and professionals, so too is VistaGraphics, the publishers of CoVa BIZ and numerous other regional titles. I am proud to say that we have our own list of leading ladies. With 62 full-time employees, just over half (32) are female. These women all occupy important roles with our company covering a wide spectrum of jobs from delivery personnel to our vice president of production. Ladies, you are all very important to what we do, and I’m very proud to have you as part of our team. We have a great story on a third generation, family-owned business, Phillips Destination Management Company. It’s always interesting to see how a family business is able to pass on a special company culture from one generation to the next. It seems that each successive generation also brings its own unique improvements and modernization. On the horizon for our October/November issue is our feature, Millennials On the Move, which showcases the top up-and-coming young business leaders in Coastal Virginia. The nomination process is underway at this time. This will be a really fun and exciting feature to present. The “fun and excitement” will continue at O’Connor Brewing Company, where we will be holding a reception honoring these top young professionals and their accomplishments.  I want to express my thanks to all of our readers and the businesses of Coastal Virginia for your many positive comments and your enthusiastic response to our first issue launched in June. Each issue gets more exciting to produce. To keep giving area business owners and professionals what they desire, we need to keep hearing from you—your likes and dislikes, what you’d like to see more of and aspects that we could improve. My contact information is below, and I invite your comments. Thanks so much for allowing us to share this with you.

Randy Thompson, Publisher 757-422-8979, ext. 101 Randy@vgnet.com

6

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


Virginia Beach’s Premier Private Club for Business Professionals State-of the art amenities for meetings and private functions

,

Reknowned for hosting special events ranging from 10 to 200 people

,

Exclusive, private dining facility with an elegant, yet relaxed setting

Barbara Lewis, President & Founder Brian Bierma, General Manager Photos by Ramone

Town Center City Club

222 Central Park Ave. #230 • Va. Beach, VA 23462 757-490-8317 • TownCenterCityClub.com

Give Your Guests A Dining Experience They Will Never forget!

River Stone Chophouse Offers Private Dining for Groups of 6 to 200 Guests. Rehearsal Dinners Birthdays Wedding Receptions Business Dinners

Centrally Located to Norfolk, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Newport News, and Va. Beach. www.riverstonechophouse.com

Give Your Guests A Dining Experience

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

7


Editor’s Note

Finding The Balance

H

ere’s a confession: During the process of forming questions to ask each of the Leading Ladies highlighted in this issue’s feature, I posed the query, “What’s your philosophy on finding a balance among

work and family life?” not just because I thought their answers would be interesting to read—but because it’s a balancing act for me as well. Being a full-time editor for two publications, a wife to a wonderful fellow and a mother to an amazing 2½-year-old definitely fills my life. But it fills my schedule, too, and some days, I feel guilty for not dedicating enough of my time to work or to my family—or to myself. The responses from our Leading Ladies eased my mind a little and helped me to realize that everyone’s balance is different. In some of their candid responses, these women voiced some acknowledgements I needed to hear, like, “Honestly, it’s been almost impossible for me,” and “My greatest challenge is finding time to take care of myself or occasionally putting my needs first,” and finally, “There is no perfect balance ... It’s about realizing the juggle of work and family is just that—a juggle! It’s a work in progress where we all do our best.” The sentiments shared on this subject, as well as other topics, like their keys to success, proudest moments and advice for other women in business, are splendid indications of how these ladies are thriving in their careers, making significant differences in their communities and inspiring men and women alike to do their best. Sometimes business plans happen, not in spite of, but because of family, as discovered in three stories

found in Beyond the BIZ. Phillips Destination Management Company is led by three generations of successful women. Lynnhaven Dive Center was passed from father to daughter, although it wasn’t originally in either of their plans. And My Vegan Sweet Tooth started after Tonya Deveau’s children noted how much their friends and family enjoyed their mom’s baked goods and encouraged her to turn that passion into a business. Both are excellent examples of how family and business can go hand-in-hand. I hope that this issue will inspire the leaders in you and influence somewhat of a balance, although, as noted, it may not be perfect. Our plates are full, but as long as our lives are fulfilled, the juggle is all worth it.

Angela Blue, Editor-in-Chief Angela@CoVaBIZMag.com

8

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


About us THE Business Magazine Of Coastal Virginia ®

1264 Perimeter Parkway, Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 757-422-8979 • www.CoVaBIZMag.com Publisher Randy Thompson Editor-in-Chief Angela Blue Senior Editor, Special Sections Melissa M. Stewart Senior Editor, Food and Wine/ Culinary Events Manager Patrick Evans-Hylton Assistant Editor, Web Anne Leonard Editorial Intern Carly Stunda Contributing Writers Barrett Baker, Kristen De Deyn Kirk, Jamie McAllister, Chelsea Sherman, Cathy Welch

Sales

Vice President of Sales & Distribution Paul Brannock

Account Executive Frank E. Moore Contributing Account Executives Christie Berry, Tony Conti, Brenda Whitlow, Gardner Winstead Customer Service Representative Kiara Davis Associate Account Executive Kendall Burns Lead Sales Graphic Artist Paul Cenzon

Production

Vice President of Production Holly Watters Creative Director & Lead Designer David Uhrin Associate Art Director Matt Haddaway Client Relations Manager Stacy Graef Contributing Designers Josh Haralson, Christina Sinclair, Kaye Ellen Trautman, Brian Woelfel

Web Design and Development

Web Creative Director Chris Murphy Senior Web Developer Brandon Litchfield Web Developer Caleb Whitehead SEO Analyst Michael Saks Internet Marketing Consultant William Warford

Marketing

Director of Marketing Lisa Davenport Web Marketing & Promotions Manager Kathryn Kelly Online Content Editor Rebekah Mulford

Photography

Director of Photography & Photo Editor Jim Pile Photo Editors Christina Sinclair, Jim Pile Contributing Photographers Angela Blue, Jeff Moore, David Uhrin, Holly Watters

www.covabizmag.com #covabiz

Circulation Manager George Carter Special Events & Style Coordinator Pamela Hopkins COVABIZ Magazine is published by

Follow us to stay connected with the Coastal Virginia business community

VistaGraphics Staff

Controller Anita Burns Accounting Manager Dawn Meehan Accounting Clerk Kelsey Stephens Production Manager Robin Cather Office Manager Tracy Thompson Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without permission is prohibited. Opinions in the magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent management views. Contributing photography supplied by Thinkstock.com memberships: Ghent Business Assoc., Olde Towne Business Assoc., tidewater builders assoc., virginia peninsula housing & builders Assoc., Hampton roads realtors assoc., Virginia Beach Restaurant Assoc., RETAIL ALLIANCE, Hampton roads chamber, Virginia Peninsula chamber, Eastern shore of virginia chamber, Franklin/ southhampton area chamber, isle of wight/smithfield/windsor chamber, williamsburg area chamber, glouCEster county chamber, york county chamber, williamsburg area association of realtors

For advertising and sponsorship info: Please contact Frank Moore at 757-213-2491 or at frank@Covabizmag.com

Don’t think and drive; just think... I’ll drive!

• Safety, security, and reliability are our standards of excellence.

• First class ground transportation company that provides to corporate travelers, travel agents, and retail clients. • Comfortable elegance with access to WiFi and power adapters. • Licensed and fully insured.

417 Thalia Rd., Ste. #104, Virginia Beach, VA 23452 757-567-0353 • www.getsetgo.us

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

9


THE Busin ess Magazi ne Of Coast ia in g al Virginia ir V l ta s a o C f O e in z a g a M iness THE Bus

Don’t miss a beat in the Coastal Virginia Business Community—

request your complimentary subscription today!

S BUSINES S

TIVE PERSPEC LOOK REGIONA

L OUT FOR 2016

LOCARLUCTION CONST WHAT’S

W

ING NO

HAPPEN

$

SMALL BUSINESS = BIG IN NOVATION 15 LITTLE

BUSINESSE S WITH LA RGER-THAN -LIFE IDEA S AT HOME WITH TOWNEBAN FOUNDER K BOB ASTO N

PLUS NG PLANNI

ESTATE RECAST MIC FO ECONO OFF ITH GE Q&A W ER KERSHN

K TH

E EX

PE

RT

S

AS ed ear how st y s Fir alysissand eing an thou bs b the 1 w jo d in ne ate . re c a.. are

It’sll A r A atte Mf O

e scl Mu

CoVa BIZ is “networking in print.” A place to meet the business personalities in Coastal Virginia, to be inspired by their successes and to learn from their missteps.

By

us sin um cullani i adips um edior ati ullumnsec , nons dae r? velec no iam reiun etu um nde et, endit impo voles sci s ibu t ve equo l iss recus a vent, uam au ns est sci t m ce atq quatiium no equ ibu lupita et pla sit sunte hic cons re vo eat nihitis dit, ra con imolo tesed idi om con volups sum lo len o ota rae ne cu do vo nt qu rae ecero apere ipsae m Nisti is et, rem st up olo cons am pos cus cum, int sol ea ips riae us beati us sim vid s sequanis et im es seque e res in ea equo m qu dio que m veres s san tquibu t, om io ns a inu aut m ate ut ne lor tot ias ute ic tat iquidu aepta si co e vo res i off it, tur icia co tur? Quiisqui as im nobisniam qu sam us. eaqu nih cupta . Ap assita enisc modit nonom quam s res pelib volut asima con ui tis sum aut eo cupta lorias sed qu sum conseq tes uodioquam volut aut prepe ntior id a oc do cone tatur ius m a quiat atin b oru illiqu miliq apid n ra ea tae ate et ate id et res tat op facep atia co m uo sus qu sediamis et qunihica est hicte etu Tis rat ion issum tur d qu odis por nus arc rum dolup tium ad qu od i seq us po lec sse i di im ius po iatem tem ex et solup i aut alianim atiass lenim d ve en lor mo il qu qu tur o be ri vo s mo sed d est, a do ers pic ti de nis i tem eostior que co cti um facea ese ess ele tate que nu ditio- cia ess sit rerum de de. Usda perun tati au a ali . dolor inctem ti asp uassi is sum, vello am, senbistio Uptas e pra utem is sap tat lup us lum . qu e nim do pit atq ta do nim rup . qu niscit ut de rem stis iste is eped m endaniaers dolup tatem om unto luptae om am ero di porio mil int ta tur equa it cto u str vo om hic tem molup ore apern ac lorem sus dolup, nons eictor t minu et llib era a arc quod ne labsi do iumen doles adion e fac pa vo ndus nim rum odis a i n ia eat o te cum tem qu etur perat net undi ge co lora ea rem lor t ita rem equi enias sandia eum tuste uam, orr ia velitailis do lestor el molit uta is mo . seq u san nons ipi i nos e. Ut ta tia fug em di aps am molup Ilic rit abor us da lup quam restib rum vendiatur placid ommo mo cus i e ha m m ve t en vo Ne elicta conet d eu quisc blaut inc nit ex lora di dolut lupta aliqu i volo- s sap quia saepe llam iquo rum d qu om s do utesto re, vo Di t, pre sa pe ti po uam, icimu iaut tem tae mo iuscil iis tas res ca t officamolup t au us. tate seq earchcim qu , con ellup cus. em ilit cates s ac abo. m nse lor et fac daeri ic tec genom secea untib lecep quam ti rei sam eu do ali bu pu dio el off tion ex es et do es ese lenita nti ur moiamo lo di rep exce ut pos labo. i ru po Do ia alit . Ut uias ti do dolor igenti ea qu em denim quosttatqu ust tas qu Ga s seq cta ia nis op sim ihi te s ad e lib de re et lat sim sin ta ia en tiu fug ui pel ritibu uam . Met verun ore qu lupien tam atis ti dolup seq , volor tius es aum ex dolliq tem icia ullab et do ia dolup inc ae ea debit volup erum t, ute rnatur rit bus, sa nd tatur, num qu us. accus Ha simus haria ta sp ritiun lo belorebu em rem dolup co es do t vo em ati molup nam, lat luptib s, ut dia ma lor am om moles essi ut nes do rcidu t. Ali debit as mmod ipsun do i sti an el bis qu t a tios unt lendio lam ea nihita accu t ips itatur is co us tes us ap t lam ucide m re, ut au odips vo net atiam r sim o to que volupcti us vend eu dit, pla la ve nit ien est atu re ille ui ap tiae um id in en Ut to om tat tem r? Ilitehenis ium ti cerd seq volupmporr edi lup nia sinctu r re et nsec dis ex lut ten vo na rep rio pla s co i on do se na pa rum ende pe sci iati Ul ui con dand at ibe minti atibu reic Leo dolor sitis erion cese iant. tisqu atecu ernat. nam inv pt rer ro e t en , ore qu pta a ne onseq r au qui co perep r millu umqu exerfer m sol m qu lupta aut qu da ep dit lique n ligniaaut et olu offici An vello ali acers plabo is rei um restru il anda t vo eles nosan i aruntiunt ve no , Un inv iur as simam, qu posam dolum ut ellut ceatiexceativolor ra as que et od rit nim rfe m ips dolume voleatem t inv s, illarrum id ea sam t. om t volut a cus pos prais ma nt upta- deliau atu solla su eaqu qui ut er re iti be cti co blab suntiurgnien run tur nim pro od t. t em rep rupta ero ut Tia ci me ce en dolorquun s re, fug odipi dendi etur, o ma tat t. eries ex nim te pe ve rsperf sit uscii evendism ew tem m laut osserr a dolupestrun licium iquidu mo st om osto nos re pe nda it b l Br mi sin eru e bis idi s rae te ve nih ori llit, di aru qu ue ca is ior On no mm d cid dia rum is rep nu t, Lo a. co n pa ide ic us t od ru s uo len dit un fug di po cusam s mo ctemq it pe hil ad el seq porib au dio aribu iende ant en atustr erc ti Ibu ne fug eosan uo rest, ciis am es r rem uid ut ap is . qu . Ige ut ut tate uia Liq sum seq M e id aces comn tis nt. corae , volup nseq acipi te ips tibero ea llestiurtem CO Z. BI dersp is ut sitis , cupta eru quia bus. e pores imus simo e volup qui ut de d iae busamquia pa co VA um qu Ax et, re ximen uo t as CO quiat me asinit ser fugias quatirum tem et, te W. anda is iliq on sit W W s exerugni ut iberi rrum borem cesto itateiur iatiur luptat ad ma i ab mos au est ped rie od to qu ex st, do lle bla qu aerfe ui ma hic turi ut nost m su sti veles ali i om adios nctur l Di m sitius a qu s seq tinti con tia pta doles reiur, qu am Ce t, no nim ign , quatilupta tec m a ndun stiate lore Loca mo quamdi re e ori do asi sund est do fac Qu it ab iae. Na enda mqua quia sus, s en nis dolor pore di um Ug gn reh us nis eu s am lor quun cesti stiur, nse vit ta tem ma sed sequibnitate ssi deutat mo l um ped cone co dolup , am m tur qui ve repele lesci l inihil tior ersta ati m oru of od spis itio do d enihi e run dolup aru sol ties ach” poria od nden prorep rnat landis eatiVarie the be commut ve lent expe ipicil maxim aut , e cus es do qu ut lab t quo ti tem nissit x on “se occa ti iumi alit, expli tasita aeste gnis eossiassinc idus, uist ecalignit il id ma um dolor quam s tqu dolup n seq qui qui aut nditio cus et, Ut ut volum in nis luptae ate et fac fuga. idem luptas io do tem atio s do luptat hil hit cta sin eni incipi et mo minv t pro even ssi ati ut res qui

r yea st sis Firnalyed 9 a ow new sh lion cts mil rodung p bei d in te a creae are th

ll Pu and ote ol qu me coics e. so raph her g go ear y canirst lysis 9 F na ed a ow new sh lion cts mil rodung p bei d in te a creae are th

A

15

3

800

Step up to CoVA BIZ: THE Business Magazine Of Coastal Virginia

Subscribe at www.covabizmag.com #covabiz

10

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

BRYAN STEPHENS A CHAMPIO N FOR THE CHAMBER

21

EXP ERT HOW MUC ADV ICE ABOUT MY H CAN I DO USE OF SOCEMPLOYEES’ IAL MEDIA? PROFESSION SERVICE AL COMPANIES S TRUST FOR YOU YOU COMPANY R


Biz Report Dress For Success

Skirt the Rules We treasure the versatility and chic simplicity of a classic skirt. Mix and match with varying tops, accessories and shoes; dress it up or dress it down—the skirt is indeed a stunning staple in a business woman’s wardrobe. But just as one size doesn’t fit all, neither does one color or one shape or one fabric. Have a little fun by bringing flare and femininity to workplace fashion with these splendid skirts found at local boutiques.

Pencil Skirt with Back Vent in Plantain by Lafayette 148 New York. Style MSL71H-8036. Available in sizes 0–18. From Frances Kahn, Virginia Beach, $348.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

11


Biz Report | Dress for Success

Skirt the Rules

Limited Edition: City Girl Midi Skirt in black and white. Fully lined; medium-weight fabric with stripes. Invisible side zipper closure. By TJ Sewer, Williamsburg, $99.

12

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Women’s Floral Satin and Tulle Skirt in cream. From Apricot Lane, Virginia Beach, $52.


Biz Report | Dress for Success

Johanna Skirt in Galaxy Blue by Lafayette 148 New York. Style MSL67R-6147. Available in sizes 0–18. From Frances Kahn, Virginia Beach, $348.

Peony Print Pleated Skirt. Midi length; pockets are included; fully lined; invisible back zipper closure. Dry clean only. By TJ Sewer, Williamsburg, $99.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

13


Biz Report | The Watercooler

Higher Education

Port Of Virginia Teams Up With TCC For Customized Training Program The Port of Virginia is training a new generation of employees and seeing an immediate return on their investment. The port transfers millions of dollars in equipment daily. With an aging workforce and a lack of drivers with commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs), they were hiring third-party drivers regularly, an expensive and time-consuming process. The port teamed up with TCC’s Center for Workforce Solutions, which has offered a CDL program for years. To make the training specific to the port and help meet employers’ needs, Workforce Solutions customized CDL training on-site at Norfolk International Terminals. The course began in February, both in the classroom and behind the wheel. The port required their employees to have their Class A licenses, which enables them to drive most vehicles. Since the program’s initiation, the Port of Virginia has saved a substantial amount of time and money, enabling them to have employees ready and able to transport materials when needed in lieu of hiring a third party. Learn more about the new training program at TCC.edu.

Small Business Of The Year

Mid-Atlantic Maritime Academy Named Hampton Roads Small Business of the Year The Mid-Atlantic Maritime Academy was named Hampton Roads 2016 Small Business of the Year at the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year Awards on May 24. The academy also received a $10,000 Chamber sponsorship package and entry into the Regional Small Business of the Year competition by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Since 2007, the Norfolk-based academy has been a vocational training center for students interested in the maritime profession or to advance their careers. Some of the courses offered include cargo handling and stowage movement, electronic navigation and basic firefighting. The academy trains 50–100 students at a time with about 2,500 trained each year. Learn more about the academy by visiting MAMAtrains.com.

Business Merger

JES Foundation Repair Merges With Evergreen Basement Systems JES Foundation Repair, with an office in Virginia Beach and with locations in Chester and Manassas, recently announced that it has merged with Evergreen Basement Systems, Inc., based in Appomattox and with locations throughout Southwest Virginia. Both privately-owned family businesses were established in 1993 and specialize in residential and commercial foundation repair, crawl space moisture control and basement waterproofing. The new Appomattox office will be added to JES’ three locations, extending their service area throughout the entire state. “The merger is part of the plan to take JES to the next level,” said Jesse Waltz. P.E., who co-founded JES with his wife, Stella. “It will solidify our market share throughout the entire state of Virginia.” 14

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016


Biz Report | The Watercooler

Environmental Education Virginia Wesleyan’s Greer Environmental Sciences Center Reaches Construction Milestone June 21 marked a new milestone in Virginia Wesleyan College’s history. The final beam to the college’s new Greer Environmental Sciences Center was signed by a group of faculty, students and friends. The 40,000-square-foot building will be completed in summer 2017 and will feature indoor and outdoor learning spaces for a more hands-on and immersive learning experience. The center will provide lab opportunities for students as well as expand collaborations with the Virginia Aquarium, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Brock Environmental Center, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and others. The building’s environmentally friendly construction and landscaping will demonstrate how a building can operate efficiently with consideration to the natural world. Once completed, the building will complement the college’s existing natural sciences building, Blocker Hall. For more information about the Greer Environmental Sciences Center, visit VWC.edu/GESC.

Vice Chairman of Pembroke Commercial Realty, Richard Olivieri.

Pembroke Mall Founders Vincent Olivieri, Richard Olivieri and Fred Napolitano.

Mall Milestone

Pembroke Mall Celebrates 50th Anniversary Pembroke Mall celebrated its half-century anniversary May 18 with a special presentation from Mayor Will Sessoms. The mall and its 21 stores opened their doors in March 1966 as Hampton Roads’ first indoor shopping center. Since 2003, the mall has undergone a massive transformation and has become one of Virginia Beach’s well-known landmarks. “It has been exciting to witness the revitalization of Pembroke Mall over the past few years,” says Ramsay Smith, president of Pembroke Commercial Realty, LLC. “We are proud that Nordstrom Rack, NEI and Fresh Market recently selected Pembroke Mall as the destination for their customers in the Hampton Roads area. More exciting announcements will be forthcoming in the near future as Pembroke Mall continues to provide our citizens and visitors with a great place to shop, eat, play and relax.” In honor of its 50 years of history, the mall asked visitors to share their favorite memories with the hashtag #PembrokeMallMemories to be displayed throughout the mall and on their Facebook page. For more information about Pembroke Mall, visit PembrokeMall.com. W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

15


Biz Report | The Watercooler

New In Town

Coastal Virginia Welcomes Big Businesses

T

he cities of Norfolk and Virginia Beach are buzzing with the excitement of new businesses, both recently established and coming soon. Norfolk Premium Outlets, Virginia’s newest upscale outlet center, officially broke ground in early June. Located at the major crossroads of I-64 and Northampton Boulevard, it will provide approximately 85 stores featuring high-quality designer and name brands at an impressive savings of 25–65 percent. The project, scheduled to be completed in the summer of 2017, will have a significant economic impact on the area, generating more than 500 construction jobs and 800 full-time and part-time employees once the center opens. IKEA, the world’s leading home furnishings retailer, has announced plans to open its much-anticipat-

ed Hampton Roads store in 2018. The store, which will be located at the northwest corner of Interstate 64 and Northampton Boulevard, will be 331,000 square feet and will feature a 300-seat cafeteria-style restaurant. Virginia Beach recently welcomed an L.L.

Biz Report | BY THE NUMBERS

By The Numbers Women At Work

277,154

9.4 million Number of women-owned firms in the United States as of 2015. (National Women’s Business Council)

16

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Bean store, which opened July 10 at Lynnhaven Mall. The 16,700-square-foot store will employ approximately 100 people and feature an assortment of active and casual apparel and footwear, ideal for our region’s proximity to natural resources and multiple opportunities for outdoor activities. Town Center is now home to Diamonds Direct, a 6000-square-foot showroom that features top-quality jewelry and a large selection of mounted and loose diamonds, eliminating the middleman to offer diamonds to the public at fair prices. Aldi is bringing one of its discount grocery stores to Kempsville Road. The 10,000-square-foot store will employ from 10–15 people and will open in the second half of 2016. The German-based company opened their first area location in Portsmouth last December. In early July it was announced that Sanjo Corte Fino, a Spain-based supplier to Stihl Inc., plans to invest $17.5 million to establish its North American headquarters in Virginia Beach. Sanjo is a family-owned manufacturer that designs and constructs progressive dies and stamping parts, assembles stamping parts, produces components with fineblanking and heat treatment processes and performs final machining, currently exporting to 27 countries across four continents. The plan will bring 85 new jobs to the area.

Revenue generated by women-owned firms in Virginia in 2015. (Chmura Economics & Analytics)

Number of woman-owned businesses in Virginia in 2015. (Chmura Economics & Analytics)

7.9 million Number of people employed nationally by a woman-owned business. (NAWBO.org)

57.2 billion


Biz Report | On The Move

On the George Bryan, Eastern Shore director for the Small Business Development Center of Hampton Roads, received the Chairman’s Award, given to a person who has worked on a special project or served in a unique capacity for the Chairman of the Board. Robert W. Cross, executive director of the Virginia Arts Festival, received the Visionary Leader Award, presented at the annual BRAVO! gala celebration hosted by LEAD Hampton Roads, a program of the Hampton Roads Chamber. Cross’s vision in creating Virginia Arts Festival 20 years ago has helped to make Hampton Roads a cultural destination for travelers worldwide and has become an integral part of the life of the region supporting the arts, tourism, travel and hospitality industries. James “Jimmy” Gray, president of Hampton Roads Committee of 200+ Men and CouncilmanElect for the City of Hampton received the Julian Hirst Alumni Leadership Award, presented at the annual BRAVO! gala celebration hosted by LEAD Hampton

65.3

Move

Roads. The Julian Hirst Alumni Leadership Award recognizes a graduate of LEAD who exemplifies excellence in community, civic and professional leadership. Mark Howell has joined the JamestownYorktown Foundation as director of education, one of two new positions in the Foundation’s Museum Operations and Education Division led by Senior Director Peter Armstrong. John Pham was named GEICO’s vice president of Virginia Beach regional operations. Pham will oversee all business functions for Virginia and North Carolina insureds, as well as GEICO’s military, motorcycle and recreational vehicle division. Kim Powers has joined the Hampton Convention & Visitors Bureau as Group Services Manager. Powers will primarily provide services for government associations and social, military, educational, religious and fraternal markets.

Average annual growth rate in the number of women-owned businesses in Virginia from 1997 to 2014. (Womenable.com)

The ranking of secretary/ administrative assistant as the most commonly held position for women in 2014. (United States Department of Labor)

80

Percent earnings ratio of men’s median earnings ($52,864) compared to women’s ($42,445) in Virginia in 2014. (aauw.org)

Congressman Scott Rigell, a graduate of the LEAD Class of 1993, received the First Citizen of Hampton Roads Award, presented at the annual BRAVO! gala celebration hosted by LEAD Hampton Roads. The award expresses gratitude to a citizen who is a tireless leader in the face of adversity and complacency and highlights the importance of thinking and acting with an emphasis on collaboration across traditional boundaries.

Joash Schulman, CBDX president, was the recipient of the 2016 CBDA President’s Award, presented during the CBDA’s 30th Anniversary luncheon. Schulman was chosen for his “cohesive and managed approach” to his involvement with the Central Business District Association.

Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives. The award recognizes outstanding performance in the field of Chamber of Commerce management in the Commonwealth of Virginia. George Wallace, Hampton’s outgoing mayor, has been named chair of Peninsula Airport Commission, which oversees operations at the Newport News/ Williamsburg International Airport. Nikki James Zellner has joined Germono Advertising Company as Senior Marketing Coach. Bringing much experience in traditional and digital media spaces, Zellner will help small to large businesses with coaching, strategy and buying needs across multiple platforms. Send updates on new jobs, promotions, honors and awards, along with a headshot, to Angela Blue at Angela@ CoVaBIZMag.com, with the subject line On the Move.

Bryan Stephens, president and CEO of the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce, was selected as “Chamber Executive of the Year” by the Virginia

2.4 million Percent of women with children under the age of 1 who participate in the labor force. (United States Department of Labor)

57.3

Working women will be eligible for overtime protection due to the new overtime rule, effective Dec. 1, 2016. (United States Department of Labor)

11

Percent of working moms who are afraid that their busy schedules are keeping them from spending quality time and making lasting connections with their children. (Care.com) —Carly Stunda W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

17


Biz Report | Meet & Eat

Meet & Eat

Chartreuse Bistro Story and Photography By Anne Leonard

C

hic, eclectic and modern, Chartreuse Bistro is a gem located in downtown Norfolk, where everyone bustles to their next appointment, whether it’s for coffee, to work or in my case, lunch. With plenty of parallel parking and parking garages available, Chartreuse Bistro is a short stroll away off of City Hall Avenue. Light indie music plays in the background, the sun shines through the floor-to-ceiling windows, and all is primed for a business meeting with my colleague. With a moniker as lush and charming as Chartreuse Bistro, the space certainly lives up to its name. Colorful flowers in mismatched vases are placed at each seating area. Claim a spot at the white tables flush against the wall, black, glossy tables next to the window or the cozy booth and rustic table in the corner; the bistro is perfect for small or larger groups. Welcomed 18

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016

by the bright, fresh décor, this fluid design element continues to our plates. Known for weaving the season’s flavors into their menu, it’s no surprise that corn, tomatoes and other summer suspects are folded into each item. We begin with a corn and turnip vichyssoise, which is essentially a cooked, creamy gazpacho. My colleague and I split the chilled soup, the perfect portion to prepare our palates for our entrées. The silky-textured soup springs with a burst of flavors. Freshly shaved corn kernels scatter across the top, a dollop of peach chutney is placed just so, and a drizzle of rosemary olive oil and a pinch of black sea salt sign off on this bowl of sheer goodness. Warm goat cheese and chopped eggplant fold into a delicate crepe for my entrée. Accompanied by a salad of ripe tomatoes, cucumbers, a savory garlic streusel and a velvety herb dressing, my entrée sends my taste


Biz Report | Meet & Eat

buds singing. My colleague’s Scottish salmon nestles atop a black bean puree, cauliflower and radicchio petals, which is then completed by a golden lime blanc sauce beneath. “The edges of the salmon were seared to a perfect crisp, and the flavors blended beautifully,” she says. With two courses under our, ahem, waistlines, dessert is surely the next choice. The fruit tartlet delivers a bounty of summer’s gems— blackberries and blueberries. Cloud-like pastry cream and caramel sauce sweeps across the plate, the tartlet offers a crunchy escape, and the earthy lavender ice cream balances out any of my too-sweet assumptions. Other menu items include a salad with ginger vinaigrette, almonds, cantaloupe and fennel; house made fettuccini; focaccia and a variety of unique sodas, including turmeric, cantaloupe and cucumber—all of which are crafted from the freshest, local, sustainable and organic ingredients. We finish this successful business meeting with two glasses of Sparkling Cardamom, a refreshing elixir of cardamom simple syrup, pods of the green spice and the key ingredient—champagne. Chartreuse Bistro is located at 205 E. City Hall Ave., Norfolk. Lunch hours are Tuesday– Friday, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dinner hours vary. To accommodate larger groups, call 757-965-2137 to make a reservation. Visit ChartreuseBistro.us to learn more. W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

19


Biz Report | PENCIL IT IN

August/September Events ASCE WORKSHOP: MODELING GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE WITH EPA-SWMM

Aug. 1–2: Professionals in the storm water management field will learn about a public domain hydrologic/hydraulic modeling tool, EPA-SWMM (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Storm Water Management Model), and its use in design of practices intended to control and mitigate the negative effects of urban runoff. Registration required. 8 a.m. Virginia Tech Newport News Campus in Wells Fargo Building. EventBrite.com

5LINX BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY EVENT

Businesses have found unique ways to meet the needs of those around them through community education, product donations, volunteerism and activism, internship opportunities, in-kind donations and more. Tell us what your company has been doing to make a difference! Visit CoVaBIZMag.com between Sept. 1–Oct. 7 to nominate your business for our Community Impact feature, focusing on CoVa’s most philanthropic companies. Selected businesses will appear in our Dec/Jan issue.

20

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Aug. 5: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. Sandler Training Hampton Roads, Norfolk. BizConnectHR.com

MILITARY RECOGNITION RECEPTION

Aug. 2: Learn how you can live a better life with the 5LINX Opportunity. Network with other business professionals from various industries and learn about the Power of Network Marketing. Invite-only event; RSVP required to receive VIP tickets. Hampton History Museum, Hampton. EventBrite.com

Aug. 5: To honor the men and women of the military, the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce holds two receptions each year to honor top military personnel from local commands. These receptions provide an excellent opportunity to network with members of the armed forces community. 3–5 p.m. Norfolk Waterside Marriott, Norfolk. 757-664-2572. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

COFFEE CONNECTION: VERSABILITY RESOURCES

NORFOLK CHAMBER CONNECT

Aug. 2: Tour VersAbility Resources, and learn how employees with disabilities can help your business thrive. Registration required. Free. 7:30–9 a.m. 2520 58th St., Hampton. VaPeninsulaChamber.com

Aug. 9: Meet with fellow Chamber members and build business relationships. Members only; registration required. 8–9 a.m. Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce, Norfolk. 757-664-2504. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

COFFEE DOWNTOWN: THE NO AGENDA MEET & GREET

PINK BAG LUNCHEON: GENERATIONAL IDEOLOGY IN THE WORKPLACE

Aug. 2: Make friends, not contacts. Free morning coffee, free on-street parking and great conversations in the nationally recognized innovation epicenter, Hatch. Show off your latest project or application, or sit back and be amazed. 8–9 a.m. Hatch, Norfolk. EventBrite.com

How Businesses Give Back

exchange ideas, conversations and referrals. Free. 8–10 a.m. Shoney’s Restaurant, Chesapeake. 757-9678910. EventBrite.com

NAWIC CHAPTER 137 LADIES NIGHT OUT

Aug. 2: National Association of Women in Construction hosts this opportunity to meet and network with fabulous women. Support 10–15 local, woman-owned businesses. Complimentary drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Free. 5:30–7:30 p.m. TowneBank Town Hall, Chesapeake. EventBrite.com

CHAMBER CONNECT

Aug. 3: Meet with fellow Chamber members and build business relationships. Registration required. 8–9 a.m. TCC Regional Automotive Center, Chesapeake. 757-664-2504. Events.HamptonRoadsChamber.com

CHESAPEAKE BUSINESS CONNECT

Aug. 5: Created to connect small business owners in Chesapeake with other local business owners to

Aug. 11: Luncheon explores the six living generations and their cultural influencers and ideology, reviews pre-millennial generations’ contributions to the workplace, evaluates millennials’ contributions and introduces the post-millennial generation. Featuring guest speaker Andrea Pierce, Assistant Director of Admissions at Saint Leo University. Registration required. Lunch included. Members $5. Others $10. Noon– 1 p.m. Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, Hampton. 757-3258162. VaPeninsulaChamber.com

THE GLOBAL LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

Aug. 11–12: Sharpen your skills and develop the people you lead. Topics discussed include Executing Ideas That Matter Most, Virtues That Accelerate Teamwork and Navigating Effectively Through Cultural Differences, among others. Individual $209. Team of 10-plus $189. Spring Branch Community Church, Virginia Beach. WillowCreek.com/Summit

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Aug. 12: Join BizConnect mem-

bers for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30– 9:30 a.m. CarLotz, Chesapeake. BizConnectHR.com

GBA MORNING SCHMOOZE—BIZCONNECT HAMPTON ROADS Aug. 17: 7:30–9:30 a.m. 318 W. 21st St., Norfolk. BizConnectHR.com

BUSINESS CONNECTION AFTER HOURS: CHESAPEAKE PAYMENT CENTER Aug. 18: Monthly networking event for business professionals. 5–7 p.m. Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, Hampton. VaPeninsulaChamber.com

STARTUP NIGHT Aug. 18: Meet other entrepreneurs, investors and tech enthusiasts who come together to network and watch demos of new local technologies. 6–9 p.m. Hatch, Norfolk. EventBrite.com

WOMEN’S BUSINESS CENTER ORIENTATION CLASS Aug. 18: Introduces you to the WBC at ODU Business Gateway and discusses available resources to help launch, grow and sustain your business. Learn about the WBC and the numerous resources available for women entrepreneurs, and get an overview of ODU Business Gateway Programs and meet WBC directors. Learn how to navigate the Small Business Administration’s website and utilize its online tools and classes for business planning. Free. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Innovation Research Park, Norfolk. EventBrite.com

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE Aug. 19: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. Starving Artist Café, Norfolk. BizConnectHR.com

BUILDING WEALTH AND EQUITY THROUGH FRANCHISING Aug. 25: Seminar designed to answer initial questions on business and franchising basics, such as the advantages to starting a business, a look at franchise ownership, misconceptions about franchising, building equity as a strategy and how to find the right franchise. $7. Noon–1 p.m. Hampton Inn & Suites, Chesapeake. EventBrite.com


Biz Report | PENCIL IT IN HAMPTON ROADS CHAMBER SENIOR ADVOCATE ROUNDTABLE

Aug. 25: The mission of the Hampton Roads Chamber Senior Advocate Round Table is to share information about local services for older adults, ages 55-plus, with businesses and organizations, and to help develop long-term relationships between its members for both educational and referral purposes. 4–6 p.m. Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce, Norfolk. 757-664-2561. Events.HamptonRoadsChamber.com

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Aug. 26: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. 101 S. First Colonial Rd., Virginia Beach. BizConnectHR.com

1ST TUESDAYS CAREER AND BIZ SHOW-UP “LET’S TALK MARKETING MYTHS, MAYHEM AND MAGIC Sept. 6: The TCE “757” Virginia Career & Biz Show-Up is for career changers, career seekers, LLCs, SOHO, 501(c)(3)s, small and virtual business owners, recruiters and employers. Free. 6:15–8:30 p.m. Aloft WXYZ Lounge & Bar, Chesapeake. EventBrite.com

CHESAPEAKE CHAMBER CONNECT

Sept. 7: Meet with fellow Chamber members and build business relationships. Registration required. 8–9 a.m. TCC Regional Automotive Center, Chesapeake. 757-664-2504. Events.HamptonRoadsChamber. com

NORFOLK CAREER FAIR

Sept. 7: Free. 11 a.m.–2 p.m. DoubleTree by Hilton Norfolk Airport, Norfolk. EventBrite.com

PINK BAG LUNCHEON: “THE POWER OF FOCUS: GETTING IN AND STAYING IN THE ZONE” Sept. 8: Attendees will learn four proven ways to get focused and stay focused on what matters most. Registration required. Members $5. Others $10. Noon–1 p.m. Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce, Hampton. 757-3258162. VaPeninsulaChamber.com

WOUNDED WARRIOR GOLF OUTING

Sept. 8: Recognize the Wounded Warriors, and connect with colleagues and friends on immaculate greens, well-placed bunkers and Arnold Palmer’s designed course of The Signature at West Neck in Virginia Beach. This golf outing

comes with the privilege of having a Wounded Warrior play on your team! Lunch and beverages will be served on the links. Teams of four will include three golfers from your company and one Wounded Warrior. 11:30 a.m.–5 p.m. The Signature at West Neck, Virginia Beach. 757-664-2537. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

BUSINESS CONNECTION AFTER HOURS: CHESAPEAKE PAYMENT CENTER

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

HAMPTON ROADS CHAMBER SENIOR ADVOCATE ROUNDTABLE

Sept. 9: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. 921 First Colonial Rd., Ste. 1707, Virginia Beach. BizConnectHR.com

COFFEE CONNECTION: BAYPORT CREDIT UNION— NEWPORT NEWS Sept. 13: Registration required. Free. 7:30–9 a.m. Bayport Credit Union, 12512 Warwick Blvd., Newport News. 757-325-8162. VaPeninsulaChamber.com

VA BEACH CHAMBER CONNECT

Sept. 13: Meet with fellow Chamber members, and build business relationships. Members only. Registration required. 8–9 a.m. Dale Carnegie Training/Wade Powell and Associates, Inc., Virginia Beach. 757-664-2504. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

STARTUP NIGHT

Sept. 15: Meet other entrepreneurs, investors and tech enthusiasts who come together to network and watch demos of new local technologies. 6–9 p.m. Hatch, Norfolk. EventBrite.com

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Sept. 16: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. Storybook Studios, Chesapeake. BizConnectHR.com

GBA MORNING SCHMOOZE—BIZCONNECT HAMPTON ROADS Sept. 21: 7:30–9 a.m. 318 W. 21st St., Norfolk. BizConnectHR.com

PORTSMOUTH/SUFFOLK CHAMBER CONNECT

Sept. 21: Meet with fellow Chamber members and build business relationships. Registration required. Keller Williams Elite—Western Branch, Chesapeake. 757-664-2504. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

Sept. 22: Monthly networking event for business professionals. 5–7 p.m. Falcon Creek Luxury Apartments, Club House, Hampton. 757-325-8162. VaPeninsulaChamber. com

Sept. 22: The mission of the Hampton Roads Chamber Senior Advocate Round Table is to share information about local services for older adults, ages 55-plus, with businesses and organizations, and to help develop long-term relationships between its members, for both educational and referral purposes. 4–6 p.m. Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce, Norfolk. 757-664-2561. Events.HamptonRoadsChamber. com

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Sept. 23: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. College Park Executive Suites, Virginia Beach. BizConnectHR.com

THE GLASS: EVOLVING THE BUSINESS WOMAN

Sept. 27: Breakout sessions to enrich your career, your mind and your life. The luncheon keynote speaker is Helen Dragas, President and CEO of the Dragas Companies. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. KROC Center, Norfolk. 757-664-2518. Events. HamptonRoadsChamber.com

GBA MORNING SCHMOOZE—BIZCONNECT HAMPTON ROADS Sept. 28: 8–10 a.m. The Adventure Park at Virginia Aquarium, Virginia Beach. BizConnectHR.com

BIZCONNECT MEMBER WEEKLY COFFEE

Sept. 30: Join BizConnect members for weekly coffee, and hear advice from other business owners. Bring guests to connect with BizConnect members and ideas for partnership opportunities. 8:30–9:30 a.m. 517 W. 21st St., Norfolk. BizConnectHR.com

Have a business or networking event to share? Email Angela@ CoVaBIZMag.com.

63Good Ideas to manage your finances and keep more of what you earn.

Are You Receiving Creative Ideas From Your Advisor?

Idea #9

The 17 fringe benefits that owners of companies can receive without offering it to other employees.

Idea #2

How to use a “non-deductible IRA” to open a Roth IRA even if your income is too high to qualify for a Roth IRA. I would be happy to share more of my ideas with you. Donald S. Hannahs, CFP® and Founding Partner

2247 W. Great Neck Road, Suite 201 Virginia Beach, VA 23451 (757) 271-8824 For a free monthly newsletter or to learn more, please email: dhannahs@psgplanning.com Securities through Triad Advisors, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory Services through 2247offered W. Great Neck Road, Suite 201, Va Beach, VAoffered 23451 Planning Solutions Group, LLC. Planning Solutions Group, LLC is not affiliated with Triad Advisors.

www.psgplanning.com

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

21


CKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEM UNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN ACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDO AWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION P ACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? GS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DR STY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSP SEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED EVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? NDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODE TION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELL G DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? NGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN F ACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDO CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PRO Foundation RepairFLOORS? CRACKED Crawl Space ConcreteSTICKING Lifting DOORS ACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN DRYMoisture WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? OORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TER GS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DR STY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSP SEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED EVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? NDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODE TION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELL Owned & Operated by Professional Engineers G DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? NGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN F ACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDO Jesse Waltz, PE & BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION P AWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, Stella Waltz, Owners ACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? GS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DR *Any job over $3,000. Good only when presented at time of free inspection. Not to be combined with any other offer. STY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSP SEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED EVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? NDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, RODE 22 | TION PROBLEMS? CRACKED BRICKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? MUSTY SMELL

We “Get Down” To Business!

FREE Inspections & Estimates!

Call 877-838-9443!

SAVE $500* www.jeswork.com

CO V A B I Z

august/september 2016


MENT? MOLD Biz Report | NETWORKING NEWS N FLOORS? OWS? NASTY Beach Bash and Annual PROBLEMS? Kickball Tournament S? BOUNTERMITES, The Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce celebrated their RY WALL? annual Beach Bash on June 2 at Neptune Park at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront. Chamber members and guests strolled PACE? WET through exhibitor booths featuring products and services of more than 40 local businesses. Chamber President and CEO Bryan Stephens awarded the winning kickball team from the D BRICKS? Hampton Roads Sports Commission’s joint Annual Kickball Tournament, which was held earlier in the day. ? STICKING ENTS? FOUNLS? STICK? MOLD & FLOORS? OWS? NASOBLEMS? S? BOUNCY RMITES, Business Connection After Hours RY WALL? The Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce acknowledged Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month at their June 16 Business PACE? WET Connection After Hours held at Tidewater Physical Therapy, Inc., who hosted the event with The Health Journal. D BRICKS? ? STICKING Transformational ENTS? FOUNTransit Summit LS? STICK? MOLD & The Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce partnered with Hampton Roads Transit (HRT) FLOORS? and Rail-Volution at the Transformational Transit Summit held June 27 at the Westin Virginia Beach OWS? NASTY Town Center. The Transformational Transit Summit’s purpose was to explore before-andPROBLEMS? after impacts of light rail transit in economically vibrant cities/regions, to raise awareness of the S? BOUNtransformative impact potential of light rail and to provide access to national experts’ insights TERMITES, and how-to information. Speakers included President/CEO of Hampton Roads Transit William Harrell, Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms, RY WALL? President/CEO of Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce Bryan Stephens, CEO of Rail-Volution PACE? WET Dan Bartholomay, and Chairman Emeritus for Williams Mullen, Tom Frantz. D BRICKS? For publication consideration, email your business or networking event photos to Angela Blue at Angela@CoVaBizMag.com with the subject line Networking News. ? STICKING ENTS? FOUN23 LS? STICKING W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m


Biz Report | NETWORKING NEWS L to R: Hayward Broom, ABBTech; Sue McKechnie, Sweetwater Cuisine; Frank Moore, CoVa BIZ.

L to R: Misty Prewitt, Misty Saves the Day; Chris Rice, Music Makes You Happy; Christine Warfel, Alzheimer’s Association Southeastern Virginia Chapter.

L to R: Sue McKechnie, Sweetwater Cuisine; Kim Moss, Studio Center.

L to R: Tina Knight, Adventure Park; Laura Payne, TopGolf.

A delightful assortment of miniature pastries and treats from Sweetwater Cuisine.

Premier Events provided a green screen for guests to have their pictures on a keepsake faux magazine cover.

CoVa BIZ Southside Launch Party Photography By Holly WaTters

On June 2,

as the very first issue of CoVa BIZ made its way to desks across Coastal Virginia, we brought together the area’s top movers, shakers and decision makers for an evening at Virginia MOCA to celebrate the inaugural issue, which featured small businesses, professionals serving professionals, continuing education, luxury real estate and much more. Invitees networked with company CEOs, chairpersons, presidents, owners and the like while enjoying cocktails, delicious Southern fare provided by Sweetwater Cuisine and an unveiling of the magazine cover. Guests topped off the evening by having their photo taken for a souvenir faux magazine cover provided by Premier Events. Thanks to all who attended, Sweetwater Cuisine, Virginia MOCA and Premier Events for making the evening a success. 24

CO V A B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Sweetwater Cuisine provided an enticing mix of Southern-inspired noshes.

Zack Miller and associates from Hatch, who graced the cover of the inaugural issue of CoVa BIZ, along with Publisher Randy Thompson and Editor-in-Chief Angela Blue.


Biz Report | NETWORKING NEWS L to R: Tom and Wendy Powell, The Addison Group; Stephen Korving, Korving & Company; Becky McIntyre, Free Agents Marketing; Susan Long-Molnar, Managing Communications Consulting; Alyson Gemes, Managing Communications Consulting.

L to R: Billy Lockard, Max Media; William Warford, CoVa BIZ; Chuck Egan, WAVY-TV 10; Megan Groff, WAVY-TV 10.

L to R: Jennifer Hill, Rubin Communicaitons; Jamie McAllister, freelance writer; Zack Miller, Hatch; Angela Blue, CoVa BIZ.

L to R: Derek Mason, Tide Radio; Ali O’Hara, Local Voice; Joel Rubin, Rubin Communications; Eric Lackey, JES Foundation Repair.

For publication consideration, email your business or networking event photos to Angela Blue at Angela@CoVaBizMag.com with the subject line Networking News.

going green

5 Tips for Starting an Office Recycling Program

A

re you looking to start an office recycling program but aren’t sure where to begin? Pam Boatwright, River Star Business Programs Manager at the Elizabeth River Project in Portsmouth, has the solution. She works with dozens of businesses to help them become better stewards of the environment and is passionate about recycling. The following five tips, courtesy of Boatwright, will get your office’s recycling program up and running in no time. 1. Partner with the pros. To start your business’s recycling program, contact a local recycling company. These companies know every detail about the recycling process and will work with you to establish a pickup schedule for your company. 2. Figure out what you will be recycling. Not everything is recyclable. Copy paper and aluminum cans qualify, but the paper napkins and greasy pizza boxes left over from the company lunch don’t. The recycling company you partner with will give you a list of items they accept for recycling. Start small, and don’t try to do too much too soon. Focus on recycling the most common items in your office, such as paper and plastic, and add more as time goes on.

3. Spread the word. Hold a quick training demonstration for your staff to explain what is and isn’t recyclable. Educational posters placed above recycling containers throughout the office act as helpful reminders. 4. Make it easy. Don’t put the recycling bins in the deepest, darkest corner of the office. Use brightly colored containers for recycling, and place them next to employees’ desks and work stations, next to the copy machine, in the kitchen and in the conference room. 5. Reap the rewards. Some recyclable items are worth cold, hard cash, including aluminum cans. Hold a can drive throughout the year, and then reward your team with a party to thank them for their dedication to improving the environment. Or take a vote and donate the money to a nonprofit chosen by staff members. —Jamie McAllister

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

25


Ask The Expert Marketing/ Branding How can I use meetings and networking events to grow my company?

R

elationships are the cornerstone of your business. People do business with people they know, like and trust. Entrepreneurs typically make a point to do business with people who are recommended to them or who live in their community. They are looking to succeed—with local entrepreneurs by their side. How do you meet those people? Local events and gatherings. Maybe you’re asking, “How can going to meetings full of people in suits help me?” Here are three ways you can benefit from attending networking events. 1. Listen so you can learn. Networking events get a bad rap sometimes because of a few misguided actions. You may see some people approach the gatherings as a way to collect business cards and immediately offer services for sale. But strangers may not be ready to open their wallets just yet. Instead, approach the experience as a way to learn about the other person. Ask questions, and then pause. If you listen, you might be able to figure out if you can solve a problem that entrepreneur is facing. If you can solve a problem, you’re halfway there, and a future coffee date may end up benefitting you both. 2. If you say you’re going to do something, do it. Did you offer to follow up with a proposal, an article or a connection with another person? If so, make sure you carry it out. The person who offers to do something and doesn’t follow through will easily be forgotten. By making the connection or following up with a promised phone call or referring new business, you’ll definitely make an impression. 3. Keep going. In networking situations, seeing someone once or twice a month creates familiarity—and familiarity can breed business. Once you dispense the “What do you do?” or “Where are you from?” questions, you can move into discussions on topics that allow you to really learn about a person. You can then find out if there’s common ground and the potential for a business connection. How does this strategy grow your company? One relationship at a time.

About the Expert

Cheryl Tan is a host for Hampton Roads Business Weekly, which airs on WVEC Sunday mornings at 9. She is the founder of Tan Media LLC, a media strategy company based in Virginia Beach, and author of the book, Get the Media You Deserve, a field guide for entrepreneurs who want to be seen as experts in their field. Visit her website at CherylTanMedia.com, where she tells the stories of entrepreneurs who have become media darlings. Follow her on Twitter @CherylTan. 26

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Company Handbook How can my company offer flexibility in the workplace?

A

lthough it is certainly true that all employees value flexibility, women (and particularly women with children) are likely to rank flexibility as a top priority. In order to attract and retain highly qualified and talented female employees, employers should consider offering some form of flexibility. The first step is to determine if a flexible workplace policy can work and, if so, for which employees. After all, some positions truly require physical presence during regular business hours, such as receptionists or in-person salespeople. Employers also need to ensure that their job descriptions support the determination in terms of eligibility for the flexible benefits. The next step is to determine which type of specific flex benefits to offer (i.e. teleworking, modified daily schedules, compressed workweeks, etc.). Employers should then establish a formal company policy related to flexibility, which will help to avoid the potential unequal treatment of employees. The policy should include a statement of its purpose and will set forth the eligibility criteria for using the flex benefits, the flex benefits available to employees, the process for requesting a flex schedule and grounds upon which the flexible arrangement may be terminated. It is also a good idea to reiterate what is likely already contained in an employee manual—that the flexible arrangement between the employer and employee does not change the employee’s at-will status under Virginia law. Here are some of the things to watch out for when implementing a flexible work policy: Consistency is key. Employers should be careful to administer any flexibility policy in an equal way to all eligible employees to avoid any potential claims of discriminatory treatment. If teleworking is permitted, keeping track of non-exempt employees’ time to avoid any potential overtime issues can be a challenge. If employees can access confidential information remotely, employers need to take steps to ensure that employees safeguard that information and may want to require employees working remotely to sign an agreement committing to do so. If employees intend to use personal electronic devices for work reasons, employees need to clearly establish that they are then permitted to inspect any such devices and remove any of the employer’s information from it if necessary. Provided that the implementation of a policy is well considered in advance, the establishment of a flexible workplace policy can be of great benefit to employers. Employees often report that they will be both more loyal to their employer and productive if they are permitted some flexibility in the workplace—a win-win for everyone.

About the Expert

Elaine Inman Hogan is a partner with Crenshaw, Ware & Martin, P.L.C. She serves as the Practice Group Chair for the Employment Law Group and focuses her practice on assisting employers and management in the areas of compliance and litigation. Subscribe to Elaine’s Employment Law Blog at VaEmployerLaw.com.


Ask The Expert Legal

Financial

How should I navigate the I-9 process for remote hires?

About the Expert

Anne C. Lahren is an attorney at Pender & Coward, P.C. where she manages the Immigration section and focuses her practice on immigration, employment law, litigation and family law. Contact her at ALahren@ pendercoward.com.

W

hen looking to save for retirement, you may wonder which type of individual retirement account (IRA)—Traditional or Roth—is the better choice. The answer will depend on your age, income and tax bracket. Then compare the rules and tax benefits to help choose the account that is right for you. As long as you have earned income, you can contribute to either. You must be under age 70 ½ to contribute to a Traditional IRA, but you can contribute to a Roth IRA at any age. The amount of income you earn dictates how much you can contribute to a Roth IRA—or whether you even can. (Check with your tax or financial advisor to determine the amount you may contribute to a Roth.) Traditional IRAs have no income restrictions. The maximum amount that you can contribute is the same for both types of accounts. For 2016 that amount is $5,500 if you’re under the age of 50 and up to $6,500 if you’re age 50 or older. The biggest difference between Traditional and Roth IRAs is when you receive a tax benefit. Both types of accounts allow you to defer taxes while your money is in the account. You may be able to claim a tax deduction for your contributions to a Traditional IRA for the year that you make them. Roth IRA contributions are never tax deductible. However, once you are retired, withdrawals from a Traditional IRA are generally treated as ordinary income and are subject to income taxes. Qualified Roth IRA distributions in retirement are tax-free. This benefit of Roth IRAs can save you thousands of dollars over the course of your retirement. Another major difference between Traditional and Roth IRAs is something known as “required minimum distributions” or RMDs. Traditional IRAs require you to take RMDs from your account beginning at age 70 ½. Roth IRAs have no RMD requirements. This means that you will never have to take any money out of your Roth IRA if you do not want or need to and can potentially leave more to your heirs. For some people, the ability to claim a tax deduction in the current year pushes them toward choosing a Traditional IRA. For others, the ability to withdraw money from a Roth IRA in retirement tax-free—and the flexibility to decide whether to take a withdrawal at all—is the main deciding factor. Because there are so many rules, it is a good idea to consult with your tax and financial professionals before making the final choice.

About the Expert

Disclaimer: This column is for informational purposes and should not be considered personalized investment advice. Everyone’s circumstance is different, and individuals should seek investment advice based on their unique financial situation. All investments are subject to risk, including loss of principal.

E

mployers must verify the employment eligibility of all workers through examination of selected document(s) from the employee and completion of Form I-9. This is a simple process when the employee appears personally with the physical document(s) required, allowing the employer to determine if they reasonably appear to be genuine and relate to the employee presenting them. But what happens with a remote hire? In the increasing realm of telecommuting and remote work sites, new hires may not be willing or able to travel to a business’s home office to present their document(s) in person to the hiring manager to complete the I-9 process. If the employer cannot examine the documents in person, it must designate an authorized representative to meet with the new hire, verify the document(s) presented and complete the I-9 on the employer’s behalf; an employer cannot rely on a photocopy or webcam to examine documents. The authorized representative can be anyone designated by the employer who is willing to examine the required documents and complete and sign form I-9. The authorized representative is not required to have any specific agreement with the employer; however, the employer is liable for any violations committed by the authorized representative in connection with the I-9 completion and verification process. It is critical for the authorized representative to understand that the employee selects whichever document(s) he or she wants from either List A (one document) or Lists B and C (one document from each) to establish identity and work authorization. Neither the employer nor authorized representative may dictate which document(s) the employee must provide or require any additional documentation beyond the requirements listed on form I-9. Requesting specific or additional documents constitutes “document abuse” and subjects the employer to penalties. The employer must also carefully ensure that all workers are treated equally throughout this process to avoid potential claims of discrimination. Penalties for noncompliance with I-9 requirements range from first offense fines of $100 per violation up to $1,100 per form for failure to comply with I-9 requirements or committing document abuse. Penalties for employers who knowingly hire unauthorized workers can be significantly higher.

Which is the better choice, a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA?

Stephen J. Korving, CFP® is President and Chief Investment Officer of Korving & Company, an independent registered investment advisor that specializes in helping people plan for and live their ideal retirement. Visit KorvingCo.com to sign up for their weekly newsletter. Follow him on Twitter: @KorvingCo.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

27


Ask The Expert Commercial Real Estate

S

What factors should a company consider when searching for the ideal office location?

electing the right site for the office location of your business is a decision that is not typically made lightly or quickly. Office lease terms can range from a minimum of five years to 15 years, and therefore the right selection can be instrumental or, in some cases, detrimental, to your business’s success. Finding an environment that matches your business needs is key. What factors are important to your business? Is it critical for your office to be located in close proximity to suppliers or perhaps close to other businesses that you work with on a frequent basis? Should the office be easily accessible to customers with an abundance of parking space and reasonable traffic levels to ease their convenience? Is there a need for a well decorated, high-end space that will leave a lasting impression on visitors and be consistent with your business’s brand and image? What kind of space can the business afford in order to remain profitable? Although cost may be the first thought that comes to mind for many business owners when considering office locations, it should never be the only consideration. An additional, yet crucial factor that has gained popularity in recent years and has made its way to the top of the search criteria is talent attraction and retention. Can a particular office location have a positive impact on productivity? Can it boost employee morale? And perhaps most importantly, does it really help

attract and retain the best employees with the right skill sets? If your business is dependent on employing young, innovative professionals with unique skills and expertise, consideration should be given as to the type of office location that would attract these candidates. Evolving in recent years, today’s recruits look for a work environment where they can work, live and play all within a walkable environment which also provides opportunities for professional growth, colleague interaction and occasions to socialize. This is quite characteristic of millennials who are currently the largest generation in the U.S. labor force and who are looking for something very different: the energy of a downtown location. The greater Hampton Roads area has much to offer when it comes to selecting the ideal location for your business, ranging from suburban office parks to downtown urban areas to scenic waterfront options. The key is finding the right fit for your business needs—and those of your employees.

About the Expert

Shelly Hampton serves as president of asset management at Armada Hoffler Properties. She oversees the management, leasing and operations of the company’s portfolio which consists of office, retail and multifamily properties. Learn more at ArmadaHoffler.com/Asset-Management.

Café (with onsite private room) and Full Service Catering

Your vision, Our artistry. It’s a perfect marriage. Award winning caterer in the eastern region of Virginia, Sweetwater Cuisine is the caterer you depend on to create a unique reception. Your guests will be raving for years to come. Weddings • Rehearsal Dinner • Bridal Showers Engagement and Private Parties Corporate Catering • Unique Vintage Rental

4216 Virginia Beach Blvd., Ste. 140, Virginia Beach, VA 23452 •

28

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Flowers and Cake by: Daevid Reed, Janet Smith of Wesson Mississippi Flowers by: Isha Foss Design • Photographer: We Are The Mitchells

757.403.7073 • www.sweetwatercuisine.com


Beyond the Biz Family Business

Destination To Success Three Generations Of Women At Phillips DMC Help Visitors Experience Coastal Virginia Story By Chelsea Sherman Photography By David Uhrin

O

n the fourth floor of a condominium complex in Norfolk’s Waterside district, a mother-daughter team spends their days meticulously planning the excursions, tours and reunion events of thousands of visitors to Coastal Virginia. Walking into the condo, Brooke Phillips Garrett can be seen in her office, busily taking calls with a bright smile on her face. The back balcony of the unique office space provides a breathtaking view of Nauticus and the pier where incoming cruise ships take harbor for their day stops in Norfolk. Anne Phillips, president of Phillips DMC and Brooke’s mother, takes in a deep breath as she surveys the morning view. The picturesque scene is fitting for the Phillips’s family business, as many of their customers come and go from these very landmarks. Phillips DMC, the premier designation management company in Coastal Virginia, began as a tour guide service in 1978 by Anne’s motherin-law, Marjorie Phillips.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

29


Beyond the Biz | Family Business

ABOVE: From left to right: Anne, Marjorie and Brooke stand outside the Half Moone Cruise terminals where many of their customers come and go. LEFT: Nancy Baker, one of the team’s beloved tour guides, prepares guests for a visit to Williamsburg. BOTTOM: Brooke and Anne in front of one of the many amazing sights their travelers experience, Battleship Wisconsin in Norfolk.

Marjorie approached the Convention Bureau with a request to take people on tours and was met with overwhelming support. At the time, she was 50 years old and had never worked outside the home before. She realized there was a need for a tour service in Coastal Virginia, and Marjorie Phillips Tours was born. “She was a trailblazer,” Anne says. “There was no business like this in Coastal Virginia at the time.” Most of Marjorie’s business in those early days came from World War II reunion groups. The groups often consisted of up to 500 people, and Marjorie might have 15 groups in a month. Anne joined the business as a tour guide, then took over the business in 1998 when Marjorie decided it was time to retire. At that time, World War II reunions were becoming less frequent, and the business, now called Phillips Tours, was beginning to branch out into other areas. By 2006, when Anne’s daughter Brooke came aboard as vice president, the business had become a full-fledged destination management company and was aptly renamed Phillips DMC. Taking over the business for her mother-in-law was an exciting and challenging move for Anne. “I didn’t know much about running a business yet, but I loved the industry, and I had a great mentor in my mother-in-law. I was grateful she wanted me to take over,” Anne says. Phillips DMC now has four main areas of service: military reunions, cruise ships, conventions and receptive business (tour groups). The business is a one-stop-shop for these groups for planning their stay in Coastal Virginia.

30

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


Beyond the Biz | Family Business

YOUR FACILITIES MAINTENANCE SOLUTION CENTER Make Beach Chemical & Paper Co., Inc. your One Stop Shop! With over 2,000 line items in stock and thousands more available from some of the industry’s leading manufacturers, we can supply all your facilities needs. Whether it’s janitorial, housekeeping, maintenance shops, break rooms, office, safety supplies or equipment sales and service, we have you covered. Call us today and schedule an on-site consultation. One of our qualified sales representatives can provide you with the best products to suit your needs and offer competitive pricing to meet your bottom line.

SIMPLIFY YOUR SUPPLY NEEDS! CALL US TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION (757) 427-2002 1356 London Bridge Road | Virginia Beach, VA 23453 P: (757) 427-2002 | F: (757) 430-1663 | TF: (800) 922-8843

info@beachchemical.com | www.beachchemical.com

p a s A u g Sep t2 0 16

From the time they step off the cruise ship, airplane or tour bus, Phillips DMC arranges the group’s itinerary based on their preferences. A group interested in history might want to spend several days exploring the Historic Triangle, while cruise ship passengers coming in for a day-long shore excursion might be more interested in a walking or biking tour of Norfolk, lunch at a popular restaurant and a trip to MacArthur Center. Whatever the needs of the group are, Phillips DMC is the group leader’s point of contact for the entire trip. With Anne and Brooke at the helm, the company also employs Anne’s daughter-inlaw, Erin Phillips, as marketing director, Shannon Heisler as operations manager and Megan Anderson Morris as marketing and communications manager. They also have 15 independent contractors consisting of tour guides and staff that handle the day-to-day operations with guests. Working with your family every day might seem like a stressful arrangement, but the Phillips ladies count it a blessing. “We just have fun together,” Brooke says. “It’s fun working with my mom every day. We get along well, and we also work well together, so we always have a great time.” Anne, who is the first person in Virginia to earn the prestigious Destination Management Certified Professional certification, is the bigpicture creative to Brooke’s detail-oriented, logistics-focused expertise. The pair has organized all types of tours and events in their 10 years in business together. From 3,000-passenger cruise ships to motor coach groups to military veteran reunions, the Phillips family has done it all. In 2009, the company coordinated the transportation for the commissioning of the USS George H.W. Bush, which included 44 motor coaches, dignitaries flying in on private jets and arranging all transportation for the Bush family. “When you’re dealing with the logistics of these events, there are so many moving parts, and so much work goes into making it all come together,” Brooke says. “There are some times when we’re just holding our breath hoping things will work out the way we planned. It’s exhilarating.” Now nearing its 40th year, Phillips DMC is bustling with business and no signs of slowing down. “I feel really blessed and fortunate to have this relationship with Brooke and also with Marjorie,” says Anne. “To say we’ve been in this for almost 40 years—and to see the idea my mother-in-law had all those years ago blossom into the business we have today—is truly incredible. And it’s so gratifying that she’s here to see it.”

Jeremy Domozick is a local business attorney who believes in taking a straightforward, simple approach to the law. He bills on a project or flat fee basis. If you’re interested in meeting to discuss your business, please call Jeremy at (757) 965-3747. Or, feel free to check out his upcoming seminar:

Contracts for Business Owners: Avoiding Common Mistakes July 27, 2016. 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM Meyera Oberndorf Central Library 4100 Virginia Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, VA 23452 There is no cost to attend; however, seating is limited so please RSVP to (757) 965-3747

Areas of Practice:

Contracts • LLCs & Corporations • Purchase Agreements • Buy/Sell Franchises • Leases • Business Law • Succession Planning • Estate Planning

Jeremy J. Domozick, Esquire W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

31


Beyond the Biz | Profile

e r u t n e V n a g e V A

ness A Sweet Busi o t In th o o T t wee Turned Her S u rin a e v e D a y By David Uh Ton s o t o h P | r te Allis By Jamie Mc

32

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


Beyond the Biz | Profile

W

hen Tonya Deveau chose to become a vegan more than 20 years ago, she had no idea she was also choosing her future career. Deveau, a lifelong resident of Virginia Beach, stopped eating meat in high school, and over time she eventually cut dairy products from her diet. Now, as a vegan, she doesn’t consume or use any animal products in her daily life. Although her diet changed, Deveau’s sweet tooth remained as strong as ever, so she sought ways to recreate her favorite sugary treats, minus the butter and eggs. When her children, daughter Madison and son Darin, saw how much their friends and family enjoyed what Deveau baked, they encouraged her to start a business. Deveau decided to give it a shot, and in 2012 she and her husband, Rob, established My Vegan Sweet Tooth. She made all of the pastries in her home and sold them online, but within a few years, demand exceeded the kitchen space, and in May of 2015 the couple opened a brick-and-mortar location near Loehmann’s Plaza in Virginia Beach. “It was a struggle to jump through hoops and deal with red tape so we could purchase the space and get everything set up,” Deveau says. “But this location ended up working out perfectly for us.” Outside the bakery’s large front window, a steady stream of traffic flows by on Virginia Beach Boulevard. Step inside, and the shop is open and welcoming, with tables arranged along the wall. There is also a cozy nook near the door where customers can sit and enjoy a treat and a cup of coffee with a friend. The bakery case is filled with a variety of goodies to choose from, including muffins, cookies and the shop’s signature cinnamon rolls. All of the products are made from scratch and are 100 percent vegan, meaning no animal products are used in the recipes. There are also numerous glutenfree selections. “For those with food allergies and sensitivities, being able to eat even a doughnut can be a very big deal,” Deveau explains. Deveau spends her days elbow-deep in cinnamon roll dough, baking hundreds of the frosted delights every week. The recipe she uses is a vegan version of the one her mom used, and it is a closely-guarded family secret. Only Deveau and her son Darin know the magic formula. It takes three hours to create a batch of cinnamon rolls from scratch, and Deveau doesn’t cut corners. “You can’t rush delicious,” she states.

Deveau’s two children are the greatest successes in her life, and she loves having them as part of the business. Darin, a budding baker, works two days a week in the shop. He has created several menu items, including a bite-sized version of the popular cinnamon rolls. Deveau’s daughter, Madison, also contributes her ideas and enthusiasm to the family business. In addition to her children and husband, the staff at My Vegan Sweet Tooth includes Deveau’s younger sister, Renee. While her family may be her strongest supporters, they are not her only fans. In April of 2016, the cinnamon rolls from My Vegan Sweet Tooth took first place in a contest held by The Virginian-Pilot. Running a small business takes lots of work and long hours, but Deveau also finds

immense pleasure in being an entrepreneur. She sources a lot of the products she uses in her bakery—from the coffee and tea that fill customers’ cups, right down to the zinnias that decorate the tabletops—from other local businesses. In keeping with her animal-friendly lifestyle, Deveau also donates a portion of her proceeds to two animal rescue programs. Customers often ask Deveau when she will open another location, and her son is eager for her to expand the bakery into a vegan diner, but Deveau is happy with her business as it is. “All of those things are possibilities,” she says. “But right now, I love what I do, and I want to concentrate all of my energy on this shop.” Learn more at MyVeganSweetTooth.com.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

33


Beyond the Biz | DAY IN THE LIFE

Dive Right In Lynnhaven Dive Center Introduces Customers To An Underwater World Through Scuba, Snorkeling And Swimming Story and Photos By Angela Blue

W

ith its roof covered in palm thatch and a storefront adorned with tiki columns, Lynnhaven Dive Center stands out among other businesses on North Great Neck Road. Lindsey Hillier-Hotchkiss emerges from the glass doors, rolling a rack of wetsuits outside. Inside, customers browse an assortment of diving and snorkeling gear, T-shirts, flip flops and other apparel, sunscreen and more. “I love showing people all the beautiful stuff that’s underwater,” Hotchkiss remarks as she references a display of underwater photography gear. Having completed over 1,000 dives in her lifetime, it’s safe to say that she’s familiar with the underwater world. Her ownership of the business seems like a natural fit, although it wasn’t a planned one. “I had two older brothers, and my dad always kind of groomed them to take it over,” she remembers. Her father, Mike Hillier, founded Lynnhaven Dive Center (now shortened to LDC) in 1977. A former marine biology teacher, he had fallen in love with diving and set out, with his wife, in search of the perfect place to open a dive center. They traveled up and down the East Coast and finally settled on Virginia Beach as an ideal location.

34

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


Beyond the Biz | DAY IN THE LIFE Hotchkiss had no intention of taking over the business and instead started her career as a trauma nurse. But then her dad was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer with a prognosis of six months to live. “We all just shook our lives apart,” she explains. Her family considered selling the dive shop, but her attachment to the business changed those plans. “We all grew up with this huge passion for diving,” Hotchkiss says. “I wanted my kids to grow up here and do all the same things. So I left my career and came here.” Now, 12 years later, her dad is cancer-free, and Hotchkiss is in a career that makes her happy. “I still feel like I’m helping people in a way,” she says. “People are dealing with all the stress of their lives, and they do diving, and it takes them away from everything.” She owns the business with her husband, Scott. Today, he’s sitting at a desk working at his computer. A solid white cat, Barnacle, happily paces around his office, lending to the convivial and easygoing atmosphere of the business. The couple met through diving (naturally) when Lindsey hired Scott to work at the center. They have four children, ages ranging from 3 to 20, and they spend a lot of time together on the water—or, rather, underneath it. The center employs about a dozen people year-round. During summer, their busiest season, an additional dozen or so come on board to instruct scuba and swim lessons. A heated indoor pool allows them to continue instruction year-round, with swimming classes starting as early as 6 months, snorkeling for ages 5 and up and Scuba Rangers for ages 7–10. Hotchkiss instructs swimming classes on occasion, but most of her time is spent keeping up with the many facets of the business—the charter boat they run, swimming and scuba classes they offer, summer camps for young divers, regional and international scuba excursions, as well as day-to-day tasks such as bills, scheduling, marketing and running the website. Along with the retail portion of the business, they sell scuba equipment for government/commercial use, and they operate an equipment service center. Blake Hughes is the service department manager and has been servicing equipment at LDC since 2001. “When Lindsey’s dad opened the shop, he sold so much equipment and kept such a good reputation up that I still fix things that are 20–30 years old,” Hughes says. Hotchkiss concurs, “It’s the reputation that my dad built when he started here and all the relationships he made.” LDC has owned several dive boats in its business history like the Cindy Loo, named

Beautiful

STACKABLE RINGS

for the Just Because gift

5304 Providence Road, Virginia Beach | 757-200-0609 | MadisonJewelers.com #BecauseItMatters

Coastal Virginia’s Premiere Destination Management Company Since 1978 Conventions & Corporate Programs Tours & Activities Culinary Experiences Event Production Team Building Cruise Line Shore Excursions Military Reunions

757-623-4400 • PhillipsDMC.com

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

35


Beyond the Biz | DAY IN THE LIFE

TOP LEFT: From left to right: Scott Hotchkiss, Lindsey Hillier-Hotchkiss, Luke Gray, Blake Hughes, Capt. Matt Morrison. TOP RIGHT: Students start off snorkeling and then quickly transition to scuba in LDC’s pool. “It’s really impressive watching them in the water,” Hotchkiss says. MIDDLE RIGHT: A young diver demonstrates the proper way to check her air pressure. BOTTOM and MIDDLE LEFT: LDC’s retail store offers everything needed to snorkel and dive.

36

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

after Hillier’s wife, and the Miss Lindsey, which Hotchkiss remembers them buying when she was about 5 years old. “After the last recession, I had to make probably the hardest decision I’ve ever had to make as a business owner—to sell the boat,” she says. Their current boat, Miss Mackenzie, is a 34-foot Baja catamaran that transports up to six divers at a time to explore nearby wrecks. Although it’s smaller, it serves their needs well. “You have to be willing to change and not get so attached,” Hotchkiss says. Along with diving locally, the center plans about six diving trips each year between Virginia and Florida. They also plan larger, international dive trips coordinated for groups of 15–60. “We know the places, and we know the people,” Hotchkiss expresses. “It’s just so much more fun to go together as a group with dive buddies.” A few of their destinations include Florida Springs, Key Largo, Maldives, Cayman Brac, Honduras and Cozumel. “In August we see whale sharks,” Hotchkiss says. “Everyone wants to snorkel with whale sharks.” We head upstairs, and Hotchkiss opens the door to a room decorated with remarkable

underwater photos from local photographer Chuck Guthrie. Scuba camp instructor Greg Curry sits at a table with a group of kids ages 10 and up. Curry, who’s been teaching for over 20 years, runs a year-long Scuba Squad program where kids come in once a month during the school year. This year, the group is piloting a program from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) called the Ocean Guardian Kids Club, where they’ll learn about marine conservation. In another room down the hall, Scuba Ranger camp leader Stephanie McKinney is showing pictures of an underwater habitat in Key Largo to a group of 7–10-year-olds. They’ve been in the camp each morning for the past week, and today is their graduation day where their parents come to the dive center to see what the kids have learned. The group heads downstairs to begin assembling their scuba gear as proud parents observe, offer words of encouragement and snap photos with their smartphones. McKinney monitors the group, offering assistance when needed and giving high-fives and elbow bumps as praise. “What really makes us special is our instructors and our people,” Hotchkiss says. “We have a passionate group.” After gathering their gear, the group of students heads into the pool, where they demonstrate diving hand signals and practice sharing an air supply with their diving buddy, an important safety skill. “We plan on getting as many swimmers as we can learning to swim safely,” Hotchkiss expresses. The kids in the pool gather for a final group photo, each holding up their OK hand signals and smiling proudly. These smiles, Hotchkiss notes, are her favorite aspect of the job. “After they go diving the first time or start getting more confident diving or see that stingray or have that amazing animal encounter—the smile on their face is the most rewarding part.”


Compiled by Barrett Baker, Kristen De Deyn Kirk, Melissa M. Stewart and Cathy Welch

LeadingLadies Coastal Virginia’s Fearless Females Are Paving The Pathways To Success

W

hich characteristics make a leading lady? Is it someone with a successful, rewarding career who demonstrates excellent and fair management? Is it a woman who gracefully balances her roles of work and home life? Is it a female who influences positive change within her community and inspires others to do the same? While there’s no one answer to the question of what establishes a great female leader, we considered a combination of these traits when we invited this admirable group of women to participate in our feature. Get to know these Leading Ladies on the pages ahead as they discuss their business roles, their successes and their proudest moments and share valuable advice for business—and for life.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

37


LeadingLadies

Shelley Smith President and CEO of Premier Rapport

S

helley Smith grew up in a household where her dad was a sole entrepreneur. She worked in the family business, a flea market and restaurant in Scottsburg, Indiana. At 19, she began work with Marriott as a part-time desk clerk, and 14 years later she was an area general manager. She transitioned to the franchise world of hotel businesses, taking one chain of hotels from two to eight and another from eight to 32. It was during that time when she had the epiphany that it was not about bricks and mortar but about people. Today, she is the face behind Premier Rapport, Inc., a coaching and consulting firm focused on the client’s entire business acumen. Leadership development is the biggest focus, helping individuals, teams and companies level up their game. Shelley is past president, a director and member of Peninsula Women’s Network. She is part of Peninsula Society of Human Resource Management, a Boys & Girls Club volunteer speaker, The Honor Foundation mentor helping Navy SEALs to transition and a board advisory facilitator for Network Peninsula Peer Board. Her first book, The Connection: The Playbook for Business Owners & Executives will soon be followed by her second book, Brass Ovaries: Earn Yours.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? Helping individuals, leaders, teams and companies level up their game. When you’re in one-on-one conversations, workshops or strategic meetings, you’re helping uncover their opportunities, getting to the root cause and coming up with solutions they get excited about. There’s nothing better than that. When I get repeat business and referrals, it fills my heart knowing I must be doing something right.

38

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? I have found that as women, we all have different fears that hold us back while men typically take the fear and thrust themselves forward or find someone to quickly help them overcome it. Another big thing is that women business owners or executives do not do a good job of creating an advisory board that holds them

accountable. Women think they have to be able to do it all themselves and not ask for help. Men automatically connect with people they know: friends, colleagues and peers. They completely bring them in, and it gives them structure. Some people say the “Good Ole Boy Network” is a bad thing. I think women should have a “Good Ole Girl Network.” There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I strive for that. Do I think it’s easy? Absolutely not. My family definitely keeps me balanced. If I was alone, I would work 24/7. I very intentionally block my calendar. It doesn’t just have business stuff; it has personal stuff, too. Learn to set boundaries, and whatever those boundaries are, stick to them. What do you feel has been the key to your success? It’s my nofear approach. I push myself out of my own comfort zone and don’t let things hold me back too much. It’s because of the why—my kids. You have to connect to your intent: what is your why? When you have something that is a fear that’s stop-

ping you, know why you have to do this. That’s been key for me. I strive to always supersede expectations. And when I give my opinion, I’m connecting it back to something I’ve been through and my own lessons learned. What has been your proudest moment? It was getting my first book out there. In high school, I was a straight-A student but not always in English. My English teacher brought me up in front of the classroom during my senior year as the example of how not to write. So now I’m 51, and that has stuck with me. To put out a book and now with two underway, that’s crazy to me. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? You must create and have authentic connections. Be clear about your intentions. Work your plan. Be open for pivots because pivots will need to happen. That very first thing we think we’re going to do is never how it ends up. So be ready for it. Work your strengths. Stay in your lane filled with people who complement you. Circle yourself with people who will continually help you up your game. You are the company you keep just as much as you are what you eat. —CW PHOTO BY JIM PILE


LeadingLadies

C

arol Curtis describes herself as the eternal optimist. “One of the more inspiring quotes I know is from Jim Valvano: ‘Don’t give up; don’t ever give up,’” she says. “And I truly believe we can help to make this world a better place one child at a time, one adventure at a time.” It’s this positive, hopeful attitude that powered Curtis as she became founder and president of Noah Enterprises, Inc., a general contractor in Virginia Beach with a regional office in Williamsburg and a strong supporter of organizations that help people. She’s a local from Chesapeake who knows just how far Tidewater Community College can take a dedicated student-turned-business owner: It’s where she earned her associate’s degree in civil engineering. In 2004, she opened her business to work on government, commercial and private sector projects. In 2015 and 2016, her company was named Virginia Business Small Employee Best Places to Work. She sits on the TCC Education Foundation Board, An Achievable Dream Virginia Beach Board, Old Dominion Athletic Foundation (ODAF) Board and the Hampton Roads Military and Federal Facility Alliance Board. She’s also a volunteer with TCC’s Women’s Center, an alumni of the Civic Leadership Institute Class of 2014 and leads her company’s partnerships with TCC Women’s Center, CHKD, ODAF and An Achievable Dream. Despite many responsibilities, Carol maintains a fun sense of humor—as seen in her answer below about “women having it all.”

What excites you the most about the work that you do? Watching others achieve more than they thought they could. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them?  I do believe that women face unique challenges in business. Men and women are basically different, but if you focus on the goal and not the fact you are a woman working toward a goal, you will have a much better chance of success. Embrace the challenges and focus on success. I choose to succeed not because I am a woman but because I love what I do. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I always say the woman who said we should have it all was really a man. Balance is an interesting concept, and what defines balance is probably different for different people. My philosophy on finding balance is staying focused and realizing what really is important. Balance isn’t always 50/50; there are times we have to give more to one part of our lives than the other. Being able to accept this and embrace it makes it work.  If you are always trying to ensure everyone gets equal attention, you will drive yourself crazy. What do you feel has been the key to your success?  Determination to succeed at whatever I’m focusing on and surrounding myself with like-minded, positive people, and if by chance we don’t succeed at something, then being sure to regroup and focus on what we can do better the next time.

Carol R. Curtis
 President/General Contractor of Noah Enterprises, Inc.

What has been your proudest moment? Personally, when my son texts me and says, “You are the best mom ever,” and I know he means it. Professionally, there have been so many proud moments; the best of those is when our team wins a safety award on one of our projects. Safety is our first priority on all our projects. Winning a safety award means everyone went home at the end of the work day. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Always be proud you are a woman. Focus on your goals, and as you achieve them, give back. Remember where you came from; raise the bar; love what you do; be humble; be kind; do the right thing; take care of yourself; and enjoy life as there are no redos. —KDK

PHOTO BY David Uhrin

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

39


Delceno C. Miles Marketing Executive, President and CEO of The Miles Agency

40

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

PHOTO BY David Uhrin


LeadingLadies

D

elceno Miles established The Miles Agency, a minority- and woman-owned marketing and public relations firm, in 1989. Her well-respected company has worked with clients throughout the region such as the cities of Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Portsmouth and Newport News as well as the United States Navy, Hampton Roads Transit, CocaCola, Pizza Hut, Virginia Power, Norfolk State University, Old Dominion University and Hampton University. Outside of the office, Miles is known for being very involved in her church, mentoring young professionals and engaging with the community—she maintains leadership roles on several prominent boards and has received various awards and recognitions. She was named the 1999 Woman of the Year Award by the Alpha Chi Chapter of the Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc.; Virginia Beach NAACP awarded her its 2009 Community Service Award; she was honored by Inside Business with its Women in Business Achievement Award in 2009; the YWCA named her its 2011 Woman of Distinction in Communications; and she recently received the 2012 Corporate Supporter of the Year from the Girls With Goals Alliance. Miles was inducted into the 2013 Inaugural Hall of Fame by the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals and the Urban League of Hampton Roads Young Professionals, and Tidewater Community College awarded her the 2013 Silver Star Award for Jobs/ Entrepreneurship. She graduated with a degree in psychology from Stanford University, where she earned a full academic scholarship. Miles also completed the Advanced Management Education Program at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University as well as the Minority Business Executive Program at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College. She received her M.A. in Strategic Communications at Regent University, where she is currently an adjunct professor.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? Each day is different. I’m never bored. I love helping my clients resolve their marketing and communications challenges. I’m also passionate about my internship program, where I mentor the next generation of communications and marketing professionals. I learn from them as much as they learn from me. I truly enjoy working in the community as well. I serve on several boards of nonprofit organizations that do so much to make Hampton Roads a fantastic place to call home. I’m currently the president of the Virginia Aquarium Foundation board of trustees—what an exciting and educational place for the entire family! I also serve on the boards of the American Red Cross, Dominion Virginia Power Community Advisory Council, Opportunity Inc. (a regional workforce development agency), City of Virginia Beach Minority Business Council, Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce (Virginia Beach and Regional boards) and the Beachevents Steering Committee. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? Businesswomen have many of the same challenges as men, especially if they own the company—financial stability, growth strategies, talent recruitment/retention, etc. Some exceptions may include being taken as seriously in a field dominated by men, e.g. technology, science, engineering, construction, etc. The best way to overcome any challenge, regardless of gender, is to deliver excellence every time and be relentless in top-quality client/customer service. It helps to not give up at the first or 100th failure. Failure gets you a bit closer to success if you choose to learn from it. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I don’t juggle. I prioritize. When it’s time to work, I work. When it’s time for family, I’m all in. Women can have it all—we just don’t have to do it all at once. What do you feel has been the key to your success? That’s easy. God, family and satisfied clients who pay on time—in that order. What has been your proudest moment? As I mentioned earlier, I love working with interns. I’m so proud of those who have gone on to become professionals themselves. My website gives a couple of testimonials from past interns—TheMilesAgency.com/Internships.htm. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Remember, you’re not alone. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Join professional associations and be fully engaged— don’t just be a member. Failure is not the end but part of your learning process as you close in on your success. Find a good mentor who is where you want to be, and then become a patient and compassionate mentor to those who are where you used to be. —MMS W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

41


Nancy Creech President and CEO of Virginia Beach Events Unlimited t/a Virginia Beach Neptune Festival, and partner, Ayers Associates

42

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


LeadingLadies

N

ancy Creech, whose resume features nearly every arts, service, community and business organization in Coastal Virginia (really … former Virginia Beach City Council; board member or committee member for Virginia Aquarium Foundation, Virginia Beach Arts & Cultural Advocacy Committee, Headquarters Hotel Steering Committee, Alcohol Review Board, Sandler Theater Steering and Fundraising Committee, City of Virginia Beach Resort Area Advisory Committee, Virginia Aquarium Foundation Board, Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Virginia Beach Police Foundation, International Special Events Society, Light Rail Now, Hampton Roads Navy League, Governor’s School for the Arts Foundation, Virginia Musical Theater, Virginia Beach Vision, Inc., USS Gerald Ford and nearly 20 more) is inspiring in both words and deed. “You have to have both vision and guts,” she says. “Sharing your vision in a way that makes others see the picture you’re drawing and become excited. It is grabbing your courage in both hands and taking that ‘leap of faith’ that says we may not know exactly ‘how,’ but together, success is attainable. When it is backed by enthusiasm, framed by a history of positive results and fueled by confidence, people will want to go where you will lead them.” With words like that, it’s no wonder that Creech’s service to Coastal Virginia spans decades into the past—and most likely the future.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? The pure joy of seeing people enjoy what we do and knowing that together we have pulled it off is like an aphrodisiac. Watching staff and volunteers being passionate about our impact on the community makes me eager for the next opportunity. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? Women and men are different, and everyone is confronted by challenge. Women have unique and very powerful abilities to make things happen. The key is to capitalize on your strengths. Men don’t think better than women; just differently, and that difference can be used to advantage. Respect for both males and females with whom you work is absolutely necessary, and each of us must build respect for ourselves. That means we must concentrate on our own responsibilities. Efficiency is doing the right thing. Effectiveness is doing the thing right.

PHOTOS BY David Uhrin

There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? Nobody has it all. You have to set and keep your priorities straight. Balance requires you to be flexible, open to change and constantly learning from others, from experience and from failure. Always be willing to step back and regroup. Involving your family in what you do allows them to appreciate what you do and makes them a part of your working life. What do you feel has been the key to your success? There are three kinds of power in this world: monetary, political and the power of persuasion. By far persuasion tops them all. Think Winston Churchill, Ronald Reagan and other leaders. Persuading people to buy into your vision is how you build a team. If you want to grow, you must be curious and never cease learning. Surround yourself with people you consider smarter than you. Giving credit to others is among the best attribute you can have.

What has been your proudest moment? There are so many: Watching someone you have mentored achieve success, seeing a vision become a reality, building a team and seeing it coalesce. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Learn, learn, learn, read, read, read. Stay curious and open to ideas and opportunities. Keep your professional and private lives in perspective. Get involved in all kinds of endeavors. Never worry about who gets credit. Credit has a way of coming home eventually. And finally, enjoy life and what you do. If you don’t, go do something else. —KDK

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

43


Cheryl McLeskey Commercial and Residential Real Estate Development and Property Management/ President and Chief Executive Officer of McLeskey

44

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


LeadingLadies

What excites you most about the work that you do? It has been my dream to honor my late husband Wayne McLeskey’s legacy. One of my favorite parts of my job is working with my wonderful team at McLeskey to build strong landlordtenant relationships. One person can only do so much, but a cadre of people can achieve results in a great way to ensure that you will make a difference in your community. The act of service has been transformative in my life personally. One of my passions is to make an impact in Hampton Roads by serving on numerous boards. We at McLeskey have always believed in giving back and helping those less fortunate by getting involved in charitable events. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what is your advice for overcoming them? One challenge that women face in business is the idea that we must behave as our male counterparts would. Women tend to have a more tender, emotionally driven side and focus on personal relationships within business. This is an excellent method that offers us an advantage as long as we are business-driven in our focus.

C

heryl McLeskey considers herself to have been blessed by good fortune and opportunities that were beyond her wildest dreams. But if you look at her track record over the years, one will find that luck favors those who go in search of it. As chief executive officer of McLeskey—a commercial and residential real estate development and leasing company headquartered in Virginia Beach—Cheryl McLeskey is in charge of a staff of 30 professionals who oversee McLeskey’s assets. Those properties include The Virginia Beach Fishing Center, Lynnhaven Dry Storage Marina, MarketSquare (previously known as the Lynnhaven Shopping Center), Lynnhaven Convenience Center, Newtown Convenience Center, Colony Office Building, Washington Square Townhomes and Red Oaks Mobile Home Park, to name a few. In addition to her duties as CEO, McLeskey is a licensed pilot who volunteers her time to fly burn victims and their families to treatment centers in Region 7 (appointed to the Virginia Department of Aviation by former Governor McDonnell and reappointed by Governor McAuliffe), which includes Coastal Virginia and Virginia’s Eastern Shore. A firm believer in giving back to the community, McLeskey is on the board of directors of the Military Aviation Museum, chairs the finance committee for Cycle for Survival, Virginia Beach, is on the Virginia Beach board of directors for Towne Bank, is on the advisory council for Stop Abuse, and is on the board of directors for the Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center. In 2015, she became the first woman in the 42-year history of the Ocean City White Marlin Open to win the tournament. Also in 2015, she was selected as one of Virginia Lawyers Weekly’s Most Influential Women of Virginia. She has been a licensed real estate agent in Virginia since 1979, and she is a Master Swimmer, as issued by the U.S. Masters Swimming Association. In fact, in her younger years as a competitive swimmer, she once held the state record in California for the 50-meter backstroke in a Masters race for 30–35-year-olds.

There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? It all comes down to how we define work/life balance. I define it as the ability to work hard, be passionate about your work, but also make time for yourself in your personal and spiritual life. Part of that is to exercise and eat healthy. What do you feel has been the key to your success? Live by the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” What has been your proudest moment? Being inducted into the 2016 Hampton Roads Hall of Fame by Junior Achievement. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Follow your heart, have a positive attitude, and you can create the life of your dreams. If you are of a giving and a forgiving spirit, you shall reap the benefits. —BB

PHOTOs BY David Uhrin

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

45


Katy Blevins Somer Chambley

and

Co-Founders of Modern Femme™

46

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


LeadingLadies

K

aty Blevins is a social media strategist, small business consultant, content expert, motivational speaker, copywriter and life coach. Somer Chambley is a website designer, social media strategist, photographer, speaker and visionary. Together they created the Modern Femme™ Movement, with a mission to equip and empower women from all walks of life to do better and be better, both individually and as a community. The movement is also working to establish a global definition of success that allows all women to thrive personally and professionally, building a legacy of home and dynamic access to better opportunities for the younger generations who will be taught to lead with humility, gratitude, acceptance, creativity and collaboration.

What excites you most about the work that you do? KB: Modern Femme™ has only made it this far because of the creativity, generosity and willingness of others to show up and contribute with their expertise, their interest, their ideas and their trust in designing a community where individuality and acceptance thrive over salary brackets and professional accolades. It is thrilling for us to see women from diverse backgrounds, spanning multiple generations, come together in likeminded passions to support, inspire and motivate each other toward our individual definitions of success. Watching those walls break down and feeling the deep relief that comes with the transparent relationships and the freedom to be open and honest is both humbling and overwhelming. SC: I want to inspire other people. I love seeing others break through everything that holds them back from taking the risk to succeed, whether it’s at home or in business. I am excited about the work we are doing because it’s breaking down walls within myself and helping me to grow, and I know this will positively impact my children and other women I come in contact with. I wish for every woman and little girl to be empowered to chase their dreams without preconceived limited beliefs and seek authentic connections with other human beings. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what is your advice for overcoming them? KB: The challenges that women face in business today are sitting in the forefront of the global dialog. We’re all aware of the income

PHOTOS BY David Uhrin

disparity and similar obstacles that females regularly face in the workplace. That being said, the challenges we are working through are not specific to women. All human beings experience the challenge of balancing a personal and professional life. We work with women because that is what we “know” and our sweet spot as educators and motivators, but the pressure to perform at the expense of your family and personal wellness is really a global issue that every single person on this planet encounters during every season of life. We have crafted a world where professional success and personal fulfillment are presented as an “either/or” instead of an “and.” We should not have to make that decision. SC: I believe the biggest challenge for women in business is finding a mentor who has been down the entrepreneurial path to guide them. It’s difficult to find and connect with women who are in the same industry who thrive on community that will show others what worked and what didn’t in their businesses. We need to break down this one simple wall of scarcity—that there is enough success to go around—and supporting and encouraging others to succeed will not reduce your capability to succeed as well. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? KB: There is no perfect balance. The pressure we face comes from our expectation that this “ideal” exists where you can do everything and be everything to everyone and still have a perfect figure, styled hair, a smile on your face and not an ounce of stress in sight. Social media and our obsession with

our highlight reels have diluted our ability to empathetically understand real life. We are always trying to be something else, be something better, be someone else. Modern Femme™ is about being yourself. It’s about realizing the juggle of work and family is just that—a juggle! It’s a work in progress where we all do our best. SC: We can have it all. It takes work, and it isn’t easy, but it is attainable. We are the only ones holding ourselves back. Dedicating time to give attention to each aspect of our life is required though. We cannot focus on just one area of our lives and expect the other areas to be waiting for us without having something fall out of balance. We must be more mindful of the way we spend our time and really honor the time we have in each day. I must stress though, if we aren’t taking care of ourselves, we are serving neither our family nor our business fully. What do you feel has been the key to your success? KB: The key to my success was realizing that being myself and being honest about the challenges I was facing in life, both inside and outside of the workplace, opened doors for me to connect on a more human level with the people around me. Those deep connections fueled my personal and professional growth. I had a great job, lots of money, top of the mountain, breaking sales records … you name it. But my marriage was in shambles; I was overly anxious and brutally unhappy. That wasn’t success. It was chaos. Ordering my life on my terms had a powerful result. A happy, peaceful, inspired me was able to thrive in my personal life and in my professional life. Times two.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

47


SC: I truly believe the key to my success is knowing that I cannot do it all myself. I am a visionary, and I thrive on dreaming and coming up with new ideas and figuring out how to bring them to life. I have a harder time with bookkeeping and finances. Thankfully, there are people in our community who thrive in those areas. I certainly couldn’t do it without recognizing that there are amazing talents living within every person. When those talents are unleashed, there is no stopping the potential growth, personally and professionally. What has been your proudest moment? KB: Rebuilding life for myself and my children after the divorce gives me a huge sense of pride, mainly because the joy I have found in embracing my journey as a mother and as an entrepreneur has given me the great honor of fixing a lot of the mistakes I made before. I am proud and grateful to be thriving now and also humbly watching to be sure I don’t stumble into society’s expectations for my small business and veer off course again. I have found my happy place and have created the life I want for my children. That discovery is my most cherished asset, and I protect it fiercely. SC: I take pride in the little things: raising kind-hearted and loving children; celebrating and honoring my husband’s hard work and integrity; watching small business owners taking huge leaps they never dreamed of taking and reaching heights they never imagined. Every day is a gift, and I am so proud that so many women are opening their hearts and minds to Modern Femme™ and their inner bad-asses. I’m so excited to see Hampton Roads blaze the trail for global change. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? KB: Use your resources. Build your tribe. Surround yourself with people who will help you navigate the ups and downs of life as a small business owner and will truly celebrate your success with no hidden agendas. Release the pressure to be what you think others want you to be, and embrace the power that is uniquely you! Craft your own version of success, and give yourself the freedom and the permission for self-care, wellness and fulfillment outside of your work. SC: Dream big! Put pen to paper and put everything you ever wanted out into the universe. Become aware of any negative, unconscious thoughts that are creating against what you want consciously. You are worthy, and you are not alone. Surround yourself with positive, encouraging and likeminded people who will push you to be your best self. —BB

48

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


LeadingLadies

Kim Curtis President and Chief Executive Officer of Tidewater Home Funding, LLC

I

n addition to leading Tidewater Home Funding since 2008, Kim Curtis has been a previous panelist at the 5th Annual Virginia Women’s Conference and the 2012 Small Business Insight Minerva Awards recipient that celebrates achievements in the workplace, the complexities of being a business owner and recognizes women who excel as leaders to make local communities a stronger center of commerce. She is currently the chair of the ODU Educational Foundation Board’s Executive Committee, a member of ODU’s E.V. Williams Center for Real Estate and Economic Development (CREED) and is a founding member of ODU’s Women’s Initiative Network (WIN).

What excites you most about the work that you do? No day is ever the same. Every day we are putting a puzzle together to help people—individuals—make the single largest financial purchase of their lives. No person, family or situation is the same, and it is exciting to find a solution to help a family or a single working parent achieve homeownership. My excitement comes from watching our people—the greatest asset—move a company forward in a very challenging industry and to actually enjoy and embrace change with our customers’ best interest at heart. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what is your advice for overcoming them? I should have been a racehorse. I have blinders on. I don’t see those challenges, though I do know they exist. Some of the challenges are generational, some are self-induced and some real. There are more men in senior level positions, and we need more women to step up in leadership roles, to put themselves “out there,” even if it means getting knocked down or rejected. The more we try, the better chance we have to get where we want to go. My advice? Don’t overthink situations because you may dwell on some-

Courtesy Photo

thing that really isn’t material or real. Get out of your comfort zone—and do it often—because you’ll eventually overcome the barriers holding you back. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I am the least qualified to answer this question since my husband and I have no children, by personal choice. For all my friends and colleagues, I have great respect for their professional accomplishments while raising a family. As an outsider looking in, I know a lot of women who are very successful, have families and do balance it all. If you want it all, you will figure it out. If you do not, then you take a different path. There is no wrong road here; it is personal choice with the willingness to accept the responsibility and consequences. What do you feel has been the key to your success? Hard work, determination, persistence, resilience, willing to take risks, lack of fear, timing, an incredible support system growing up and an amazing life partner, my husband, who is a great

sounding board and supports what I do and the hours I work. What has been your proudest moment? I used to think it was being the founding partner of one of the mid-Atlantic’s largest independent mortgage lenders. Today, it is surviving the worst financial crisis in my work history and helping to keep a company alive. Several of our employees have said that if I had not come on board when I did, they do not believe the company would have survived. Those are humbling words that I will never forget, and they push me to accomplish the next “proudest moment.” What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Don’t sweat the small stuff because it will only distract you from the larger picture. Don’t be afraid to take a chance or to fail as both are critical on the path to success. Stay away from negative people, but understand them as they will provide examples to learn from. And always remember it is harder to do the right thing than the wrong thing. I live by that, and I can tell you it is hard, but it’s worth every painful moment! —BB

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

49


LeadingLadies

Mary Liebert Fugere Director of the Hampton Convention & Visitor Bureau

M

ary Fugere has been in the convention and visitor bureau business for nearly two-and-a-half decades, first serving as tourism sales manager for the Norfolk Convention and Visitors Bureau while attending Old Dominion University before joining the Hampton Convention and Visitor Bureau in 1995. She started out in media and community relations and rose to interim executive director in September 2014. She officially assumed the role of director in January of this year. As such, she leads the marketing and sales efforts of 14 full-time and 12 part-time employees dedicated to promoting Hampton as a convention, athletic and leisure destination. She is also recognized by the Convention Industry Council as a Certified Meeting Planner.

What excites you most about the work that you do? I am passionate about Hampton’s potential as a tourism destination. Many cities have one or two appealing qualities that make them a desirable place to visit. Hampton has a long list that sets the city apart from other leisure, meeting and sports destinations. Between the CVB team and Hampton’s incredible stakeholders—Fort Monroe, Virginia Air & Space Center, Boo Williams Sportplex and Hampton University, to name a few—we have an exciting, game-changing decade ahead! Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what is your advice for overcoming them? I’m not sure there are unique challenges that women in particular face. We live in a world of technology that ensures we are reachable and accountable 24/7. That’s a lot to ask of an individual. Nonetheless, I think there’s a better understanding in society that people serve many roles and that we each have obligations beyond the workplace. It’s important to be “present” for those who are with you. I strive to exceed the expectations that others have of me and don’t take it lightly when I let myself down. Smartphones allow us to manage expectations, but every now and then we need to turn the devices off. 50

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I envy women who seem to gracefully glide through the workweek with time for the gym, spiritual fulfillment and service to multiple organizations. My greatest challenge is finding time to take care of myself or occasionally putting my needs first. I believe in leading by example, and a healthy, wellbalanced lifestyle is important for all of us. I enjoy being physically active but am constantly racing against the clock. I’m searching for the sweet spot that allows me to be successful in marketing Hampton, being the best parent and wife I can be and making myself a priority now and then. It’s easy to schedule time for myself but even easier for me to cancel it because of PHOTO BY JIM PILE


some demand that may seem more important at a given moment. For busy schedules, I suggest turning that you-time into a family or office activity. It becomes a teambuilding experience from which you and others benefit, and you will not be as likely to cancel. What do you feel has been the key to your success? Empathy. I have been gifted with the ability to understand others’ positions and their reasoning behind them, and because of this I am capable of identifying the opportunities that exist to bridge opposing interests. What has been your proudest moment? I can’t say I have one “proudest” moment. I am proud to be the director of

the Hampton CVB and am honored by the incredible team of individuals who have chosen to work with me to take Hampton to its destination potential. I work with phenomenally dedicated individuals who share my passion for tourism. As a parent of two teenagers, I am consistently proud and amazed at the individuals they have become and the life lessons they share with me. We can learn so much from our children. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Don’t fear success. Be the best you can be and know you succeeded—and you will—because of your tenacity and because of your unique gifts. —BB W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

51


LeadingLadies

What excites you the most about the work that you do? We help people, and who would not love that! And I get to work with wonderful people who also love helping people. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? Everyone has challenges, so the advice I would give anyone, but it may be more specific to women, is to “Ask.” Women, more than men, seem to have a tendency to wait to be recognized for their hard work and successes. They should ask for the projects and positions they believe they are capable of accomplishing and ask for the pay increases and promotions they believe they have earned. And ask “Why not?” when they do not get what they believe they deserve. 

Carol Ormond President and CEO of AAA Tidewater Virginia

C

arol Ormond, a Norfolk native, started her career at AAA Tidewater Virginia about 39 years ago. Her job: working the switchboard. Her willingness to start at the bottom was coupled with an eagerness to watch, listen and learn as then AAA president J.T. Timmons led the organization. Her responsibilities grew, going from the switchboard to officer manager and then an administrative manager. Eventually, she landed in the top spot. During her tenure at AAA, Ormond has seen the market change from one that often relied on personal help to plan travel to an Internet society where information is readily available online. A leader with a vision such as Ormond, who has served on the AAA National Strategic Planning Committee and the AAA Accreditation Commission, has made it possible for AAA to expand its service and stay strong. “I know our organization from the bottom up,” Ormond shares. “I also am always ready for and excited about improvement and changes.” She has also used her business savvy to help the United Way of South Hampton Roads, Bon Secours Hampton Roads, the YWCA and the CIVIC Leadership Organization Alumni Committee.

52

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? This is a bad time in my life to try to answer this question. My husband has a serious illness; I am taking care of my two elderly parents; and I just unexpectedly lost my sister. Family is my priority, and I have recently taken time out to take care of my family. But I am fortunate in that I have a very strong management team at AAA. They have not missed a beat and have kept the organization on track in my absence. What do you feel has been the key to your success? I have built a phenomenal leadership team and empowered them to do their jobs, and they keep me informed. I have also been willing to take calculated risks along the way, trying new services and new ways of providing services to our members. What has been your proudest moment? This job can be humbling, truthfully. I do not have one particular moment that stands out as my “proudest,” but I am proud every time I see one of our service trucks on the highway on the way to assist a member in need, or when I walk past one of our insurance agents who is helping a member understand her coverage, or when I encounter one of our travel agents helping a couple plan their honeymoon, or a family reunion, or the trip of a lifetime. Just seeing our folks fulfilling our mission makes me very proud every day.  What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Work hard, stay humble, be bold, and give yourself permission to “clock-out” when you need to do so. —KDK PHOTO BY David Uhrin


LeadingLadies

Sara Baldwin Mosaic Artist/Founder and Creative Director of New Ravenna


T

he road less traveled is paved by artist and business owner Sara Baldwin. While thousands of artists abandon their dreams for a “safe” career when they graduate from high school, Baldwin chose to study fine arts at the University of Pennsylvania, where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Although she studied mostly fine art painting, she also created her first mosaic design, a mural of Eve in the Garden of Eden, while working on her degrees. She returned to the Eastern Shore in 1991. With $500 secured after convincing her parents to invest in her, Baldwin launched New Ravenna Mosaics in an empty house on the family farm. Three years later, Baldwin won “The Most Creative New Business Contest” sponsored by New Woman magazine and the National Association of Female Executives. She was one of 1,700 applicants. Baldwin received the top prize of $25,000 and was featured in New Woman’s November issue. Today her business spans a city block in Exmore and employs about 100 people with a payroll totaling over $3 million, a major impact on the Eastern Shore’s economy. Baldwin heads up Sara Baldwin Design as well and sells boutique collections of mosaics. Her work produced at both businesses and purchased through more than 200 independent showrooms turns heads in homes, hotels, restaurants, casinos and historic buildings worldwide. Heard of Tom Hanks, Madonna and the Duponts? They’ve all accented their homes with Baldwin’s work.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? I love blazing new trails with an underutilized medium. As our name New Ravenna suggests, we’ve established ourselves as a company that takes an ancient tradition and puts a uniquely American spin on it. People love our designs because they withstand the test of time in any style home. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? Balancing family life and work is still the classic challenge. When I watched The Intern with Anne Hathaway and Robert DeNiro, I wondered if anyone had been spying on me. I think it is important to pay attention and realize when we need to readjust both our expectations and our methods for creating harmony.   There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? Honestly, it’s been almost impossible for me. Now that I have hired a CEO and that my youngest is 16, I finally feel like I have a balance after 25 years in business. I have to constantly remind myself that “balance” is a living, breathing entity and to respect it as such. What do you feel has been the key to your success? Persistence, good instincts and a dream team of cohorts. What has been your proudest moment? My proudest moment was when we were chosen to represent the state of Virginia for This Built America. It is a program produced by AOL that is devoted to the companies re-imagining and rebuilding American manufacturing. They chose one company from each state. I was very proud that we represented the state where I was born and raised and where we have invested so much into strengthening our community. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Identify good advisors and cultivate them. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Join a peer group like EO (the Entrepreneur Organization), TAD (The Alternative Board) or Vistage. Chances are, all of your problems have been rehearsed (and solved) a million times before. It is a sign of courage to ask for assistance. Read the E-myth Revisited. Now. Reading that book was a pivotal moment for me. —KDK

PHOTO BY Stewart Ferebee

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

53


LeadingLadies

Angela Reddix Founder, President and CEO of ARDX

54

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

PHOTOS BY David Uhrin


A

RDX—a multimillion-dollar healthcare management consulting firm—provides compliance, communication and education solutions for the government, commercial, nonprofit and academic clients. In its first decade in business, it has provided approximately $600,000 to the local community and more than 9,000 volunteer hours. Much of this success can be attributed to its founder, Angela Reddix, a visionary thinker with a strong commitment to her company and community. Reddix is a member of the United Way’s Tocqueville Society, as well as the Women’s Leadership Council and African American Leadership Society. She currently serves as a board member for Junior Achievement, Komen Foundation and the YWCA. In 2013, she was recognized as an extraordinary woman business owner by Old Dominion University’s Business Gateway, and in 2014, Reddix was selected as an honoree for the Still Hope Foundation’s Entrepreneurial Excellence Award. Reddix received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from James Madison University, a master’s in organizational development from Bowie State University and is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in business at Oklahoma State University.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? The ability to make a difference in the world. I have experienced the fortune to build an organization from one person to more than 125 individuals all with the mission of serving America’s most vulnerable populations—seniors and children in healthcare. Creating inspired solutions to healthcare implementations and now leveraging that to impact poverty through workforce development as a partner to the Baltimore City Social Services. Seeing this happen through innovative solutions that we create as a team— that is energizing. Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? I would never assume that there are specific unique challenges faced across the broad spectrum of all women in business. A theme that I find common with many women business leaders that I have interacted with seems to be having a heart for people. Therefore, it is sometimes so difficult to not try to see the good in all individuals and believe that you can nurture them to success. From my experience, that leads to much heartbreak. There must be boundaries set that allow you to have a productive working relationship while still having compassion for the individual. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? I learned throughout my career to modify my expectation of balance. I see balance not as a daily goal but a cumulative view of my life. There are many important dates in our lives, but it all comes down to the date we are

born and the date we leave the world. The grade for juggling isn’t given at the end of the day but the average of my time on earth. What do you feel has been the key to your success? The first key has been defining what success means to me. When I have used my Godgiven gifts and talents to build a platform that makes positive contributions to my community, I have been successful. None of this would be possible without a tremendous support system, my second key to success. That system includes a life partner that allows me the flexibility to be authentically myself and children who embrace the need to be flexible and understand clearly that we all play a role on the team, even if you are 3 years old. My final key to success as a business owner is those core employees who believed in the vision before there was hard evidence of success.

What has been your proudest moment? In April my husband and I celebrated 21 years of marriage and reflected on the business we have grown, the lives we touched, the faith we built and the three fantastic children that we have raised. I must say, that was the proudest moment as we shared laughs and through it all realized we genuinely still liked each other. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Envision, lead and grow. Stop and take a moment to envision what you would like your life to be. This takes being selfreflective and being comfortable and confident in who you are. Being truthful with yourself about strengths and admitting your weaknesses. Lead yourself in the direction of your future. Don’t wait to be led, but identify for yourself those individuals to connect with that will assist you down the path toward your vision. —MMS W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

55


Debra Dandridge Executive Director of Dress for Success Hampton Roads

56

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


LeadingLadies

D

ebra Dandridge has always had a tremendous love of people and human behavior. Her background in sales, real estate and as an airline flight attendant serves her well in her current endeavor as executive director of the nonprofit Dress for Success Hampton Roads (DFSHR). She co-founded the nonprofit’s Norfolk-based affiliate, which opened its doors in January 2006. DFSHR offers long-lasting solutions that enable women to break the cycle of poverty, providing professional clothing to secure employment, as well as job search access, resume help, mentoring and more. In 2014, they boasted a 68 percent employment rate. The organization’s vision (as stated on their website) is a world where all women are financially independent, are treated with dignity and respect and are directly impacting their lives and those of their families. DFSHR aspires to a world that fully harnesses the power of women and recognizes their role in economic sustainability. Dandridge attributes her guiding principle in her career to The Golden Rule, something that her mother enforced daily.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? Working with the women we serve. We get so many different women. The face of who we serve is so different from age to educational background. Life can make a turn that you were not expecting. We have amazing women who have overcome some tremendous circumstances.

What do you feel has been the key to your success? Remaining authentic, humble and open to advice. I majored in sociology at Norfolk State University. I believe my greatest strengths are my interpersonal skills. I build relationships easily, am empathetic and grateful. I’ve had success in a lot of areas, and I have been able to bring those experiences to Dress for Success.

Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? One challenge we face as women is lack of confidence. For a large majority of us, the challenge is getting them believing that they can. I feel like most successful people have mentors. The challenge for us is to go for whatever it is we want and having the support that will allow us to do that. It may be a mentor that’s had a business and takes you under their wings and gives you a greater confidence. A lot of us think about what we might not be able to do. We don’t think about all the wonderful stuff we can do.

What has been your proudest moment? When I look back, it was probably the whole process of bringing our affiliate to Hampton Roads and opening our doors. Most of the things I had done before were other people’s things. I was proud to be able to start something that was going to have an impact on women and the community.

There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? Everybody’s balance is different. Find that balance that is unique for you. I think you can have whatever you want. You just have to be satisfied that this is the best that you absolutely can do. When we started Dress for Success, I was the one who took care of the day-to-day operation. Back then, my daughter was 9 years old. I can’t tell you how many tennis matches I missed, with sadness and guilt. We count the ones we miss, but I made a lot more than I missed. Find that cohesiveness within your family. If it means doing one less of something, then that’s your balance.

PHOTOS BY JIM PILE

What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Remain authentic. We can only be the best people we can be. We have the power to change us, to be better spiritually, emotionally and financially. Make sure you have a passion for the business you want to get into. That’s where you find the most success. I tell the women, do not try to get into something as a career because you think you are going to make money. It’s that passion that is the fuel you need in this difficult economy. Passion overrides everything else. It gives you the fuel to have sustainability and no regrets. Stay focused on your mission. Find out what your purpose is—what you are passionate about—and get on that path. —CW

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

57


LeadingLadies

Jodi Moore Newland Caterer, Restaurateur and Owner of Sweetwater Cuisine. Founder and Executive Director of Daniel’s Grace.

J

odi Newland prides herself on making a lasting impression. She adores when her catering clients let her know that their guests talk about her food and event design for years to come. Spreading this sort of joy through her passion for serving gourmet versions of Southern classics inspired her to start Sweetwater Cuisine 11 years ago. In 2011 Sweetwater’s off-premises catering success expanded when Newland opened a new location offering lunch and dinner service as well as a special event venue for evening events. But Newland’s predisposition for making people happy doesn’t stop with her signature sweet potato biscuits. She partners with charitable organizations such as Vanguard Landing, End Watch Foundation and The Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia. In 2014, she took her dedication a step further by starting Daniel’s Grace, a foundation focused on sustaining cancer families by providing financial assistance for daily living needs.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? We create memories of a lifetime. We get to be a part of the most important moments in people’s lives—what an honor that is.     Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? There are a number of challenges that women face, but probably the greatest challenge is the expectation for success in multiple areas of life. Not only are we expected to excel in our business, but we are also expected to run our households successfully, be involved in our communities and grow both personally and professionally. Each afternoon, I make my schedule for the following day in the notebook that holds all the details of my life—including family activities—and then prioritize it. While I don’t accomplish my entire list each day, I am able to constantly refocus. What isn’t completed moves to the next day’s list. I schedule days to work from my office at home and am able to accomplish more from uninterrupted time, as well as work on household tasks. Working while everyone else is sleeping is also a tool in my bag. I use time in traffic and at red lights to read my current professional book (no, I am not kidding). Make use of every moment you have!   There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? Juggling work and family life is the most difficult part of being in business. The demands of work are so great that sometimes there is little time left for much else. One of my mentors once told me that it is important to work and play every single day. While this is easier said than done sometimes, I always work in moments with family every second that I can and make sure that I am there for all of the important events, even if that means sacrifice at work.   What do you feel has been the key to your success? Passion. Finding what you love to do and figuring out how to make a living at it is key. God provided me a way to do just that. He prompted me, and I had to have a willingness to follow and take risks. Even then, nothing is easy. Nothing can be accomplished without persistence, diligence and a great work ethic. With these things, one can always persevere.   What has been your proudest moment? Making a mark in the lives of others through Daniel’s Grace is a dream come true. The success of Sweetwater Cuisine was what made that possible. Together these two organizations have helped many families who are battling cancer. I can’t describe the feeling I experience when I hear the words, “Thank you so much. We would not have survived this without you.”     What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Follow your heart, and don’t let anyone discourage you from achieving your dreams. Set goals. Work hard each and every day in focused pursuit of those goals, and always be forward-thinking. Realize that sometimes failure is a blessing. Failure opens doors to new and better things—go with it, and don’t live looking in the rear-view mirror.   —MMS

58

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

PHOTOS BY Amanda Keepers


W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

59


LeadingLadies

Barbara Lewis Founder and President of Town Center City Club

A

t age 65, Barbara Lewis, the founder of Charm Associates, had an idea as she decided to close her 30-year-old modeling and manners school: Bring business leaders together in a city setting where they could entertain clients and turn acquaintances into friends. She saw the possibility of a perfect location as talk of Town Center grew. About two years later, Lewis had secured deposits totaling $1 million from potential members, and Town Center City Club was on its way to becoming the place to wheel and deal. Since 2004 when City Club opened, members have found Lewis answering the phone, directing employees and chatting with old and new friends alike. It’s all part of making Coastal Virginia a business-friendly place. Lewis has worked tirelessly to create such a community, raising more than $2.5 million for Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Musical Theatre and other organizations such as the Lynnhaven River Project.

What excites you the most about the work that you do? I think of Town Center City Club as a kind of home away from the office. You can do work in a quiet corner if you like or you can network. I love it when someone says, “I want a new mortgage” or, “I need to work with someone in IT.” I say, “Let me introduce you to so-and-so.” Are there unique challenges that women in business face? What are they, and what’s your advice for overcoming them? I’ve always been an individual. My dad and husband always believed I could do whatever I wanted, and they wanted to help. I believe in treating men and women with the same courtesy and respect, instead of in an adversarial way. I’ve found men supportive of women; when I used to run an awards program for outstanding women, more often it was the men doing the nominating. My advice is to not look for a slight that’s not there. There’s an ongoing debate about women in business “having it all” and the juggling of work and family life. What’s your philosophy on finding a balance? With our first son, I stayed home, and with our second, I worked. My husband was never chauvinistic. He would say to me, “OK, what (housework) do you want to do tonight?” If I said “bathe the baby,” he’d say, “OK, I’ll do the dishes.” What do you feel has been the key to your success? Persevering. Rome wasn’t built in a day. I worked for two years putting the club together; I had to have 200 members before I could get a lease. I kept going. It could be hard to ask someone to write a check for $2,500 for something he hadn’t seen. I had to earn people’s trust. Once we started construction, I had to stay committed and see it through. What has been your proudest moment? I’m proud of my two wonderful boys, and I have to say I was proud at my recent 80th birthday party. So many people came out, and many people had nice things to say about me. I believe it’s because people trust me and take me at my word. You hear so many buzzwords these days, words you’re supposed to include on your resume or it’ll be thrown out. The basics of life are simpler than that: Do what you say you’re going to do; keep your word. Sometimes you have to be a little flexible with others, say if they have to change lunch plans, that’s OK. But you want people to take you at your word. What’s the best advice you can offer other women in business? Number one, be a good citizen; be patriotic. Do some service work; join an organization that serves your community. Number two, be charitable. Know you’re lucky to have what you have. You don’t have to be wealthy. Maybe being wealthy is you had breakfast and someone else didn’t. You’re lucky to be a have and not a ‘have not.’ Number three, keep your bottom line in the black. Otherwise, you can’t do the first two things. —KDK 60

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

PHOTO BY JIM PILE


2016

THE Business Magazine Of Coastal Virginia

Meeting Planner Planning a company meeting? New trends go beyond PowerPoint presentations and boxed lunches. Find out the latest ways to engage employees, create connections and boost morale.

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

61


Conferences that Count Modern Business Meetings in Coastal Virginia Move Toward Technology and Teambuilding By Chelsea Sherman

The Founders Inn & Spa

Y

ou walk in, grab a boxed lunch, take a seat next to someone you recognize from your department, perhaps making a little small talk as you settle in. The speaker fires up a PowerPoint presentation, and you try to be attentive as you sit through yet another presentation on quarterly earnings or cash flow projections. This is the business meeting of the past. Times have changed, and corporate get-togethers have evolved to meet the changing ecosystem of professional organizations. At the forefront of this change is the increased use of technology. While this does mean business meetings are seeing an upswing in audiovisual tools and technological gadgets, these tools are not replacing faceto-face interaction between team members. They are more often being used to enhance the experience and help fuel discussion and interaction. At The Founders Inn and Spa in Virginia Beach, technology is an integral part of the meeting experience. “Founders Inn was built from the ground up to do meetings. The meeting spaces have built-in LCD projectors and drop screens,” says Melissa Georges, Director of Sales and Marketing for Founders Inn. Founders Inn recently boosted their Internet to increase bandwidth throughout the entire space, from the guest rooms to the conference wing and even outside. “At many of these meetings, every single attendee is CONTINUED ON PAGE 64 >

62

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


York River Oyster Company located in the beautiful York River Yacht Haven Marina in Gloucester Point, Virginia.

Experience a breathtaking view of the York River. Reserve one of our many private rooms for your banquet and/or meeting.

8109 Yacht Haven Rd., Gloucester Point, VA 23062

804-993-7174 • www.yorkriveroysterco.com

Join us for Sunday Brunch Ask about our daily specials Hours: 11am–9pm Offering a fresh take on seafood, chicken, steak, pork, pasta and of course, oysters! Featuring raw oysters from the best local vendors and specially selected offerings from around the world. The perfect setting for your banquet and/or meeting.

BESTof Readers’ Choice AWARDS 2014

Open daily 11am–9pm No Reservations Needed. Just Come on Over!

323 Water Street, Ste A-1,Yorktown 757-875-1522 • www.riverwalkrestaurant.net Private Event Room

Successful Meetings

Start Here

5700 Atlantic Ave., Virginia Beach, VA 23451 Group Sales 757-428-4752 WyndhamVirginiaBeach.com

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

63


< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 62

Wyndham Virginia Beach

64

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016

connected on their phone or iPad. Our WiFi is complimentary because in this day and age, it’s an unspoken need. It’s as important as a chair,” Georges says. The prevalence of technology as an element of business is undeniable. Coworkers can go days without seeing each other face-to-face in the office, solely using instant messaging or videoconferences to communicate. The result is that business leaders are increasingly looking for ways to get their team members engaged with one another in person. This has led to an increase in teambuilding meetings, especially for larger corporations that have a diverse group of employees. “Many of these organizations are looking for ways to bridge the gap from the older generation to millennials within the company,” says Courtney Wydra, Director of Sales and Marketing for Wyndham Virginia Beach. “Face-to-face teambuilding is a crucial way for them to get to know each other on a more personal level and interact with people they wouldn’t normally have the chance to talk to.” Founders Inn also helps facilitate teambuilding activities for business meetings. These activities include culinary challenges in the banquet kitchen, cupcake competitions and even activities to benefit charitable causes. “We had a group that did a competition building bicycles as a teambuilding activity. The bicycles ended up going to local kids in foster care, and the kids actually got to come in and ride the bikes around the ballroom,” Georges says. “Teambuilding that ties into community responsibility is something we’re beginning to see a lot of.” Teambuilding during business meetings is an important way for today’s organizations to build camaraderie among employees, as well as hone important skills, such as leadership, communication and customer service. These types of activities often require multiple spaces to allow for breakout sessions, and local conference centers are prepared to meet that need. “Founders Inn has 25,000 square feet of meeting space, including more than 20 breakout rooms. They feature builtin kiosks specifically designed for continuous refreshment breaks,” Georges says. At the Virginia Beach Oceanfront, no hotel rivals the meeting space available at the Wyndham, which provides 16,000 square feet of meeting space and the ability to host nine concurrent meetings. Culinary creativity and attention to special dietary needs are also coming into play in modern business meetings. “One thing we often hear from corporate customers is they want a break from the routine boxed lunch. They want something more creative and interesting,” says Sue McKechnie, Sales and Marketing Director for Sweetwater Cuisine. In response, Sweetwater Cuisine offers a wide range of food options to suit an organization’s needs. Companies often opt for a buffet, which allows for even more interaction between team members throughout the event. Catering to the company’s creativity often spans beyond the food and into the meeting itself. Companies looking to shake things up sometimes employ a theme for their meeting—adding a casual and fun element to what is typically considered a formal gathering.


“We love when a company lets us know what their vision is for their meeting. Then we allow their vision to become our artistry,” McKechnie says. Wydra is seeing similar trends at the Wyndham. “We’ve seen everything from a ‘live’ mermaid in the middle of the dinner table to a James Bond impersonator,” she says. Businesses are continually working to align their values with the values of their team members—a trend that can be seen in many companies’ corporate meetings and retreats. “There are several companies that encourage their employees to bring their families along with them to corporate events and retreats,” Georges says. In these instances, companies will plan corporate activities during the day and fun, inclusive events in the evening. This gives families a chance to explore Coastal Virginia while the employee participates in the meetings. Today’s business meetings are vastly different experiences from meetings taking place just a few years ago. The focus of these meetings is increasingly moving toward building successful teams, fostering a healthy work environment and engaging with the community. Employees are being seen as more than cogs in the corporate wheel—they are crucial elements to a company’s success, and today’s business meetings are finally reflecting that truth.

For sponsorship opportunities and vendor reservation Contact Lisa Davenport at Lisa@vgnet.com January 28-29, 2017 At The Virginia Beach Convention Center #CoVaWineFest

CoVaWinefest.com

Set Sail

for a bygone era aboard

The Yorktown Schooners

Serenity & Alliance Try a Private Charter for your next corporate party!

Your ship has just come in!

Group rates for private charters • Box lunch or catering options available Departing from Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown 757-639-1233 • info@sailyorktown.com • sailyorktown.com

W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

65


Beyond the Biz | Created in cova

In 1991, Cheryl Hahn

founded Tomorrow’s World, a mail order catalog filled with green living products for the home (one of America’s very first eco-friendly stores, in fact). In 2001, the energy shifted to producing bedroom items made only from natural, sustainable materials, and that’s when the brand CozyPure® was born. “Our products offer an alternative to sleeping safely surrounded by nature’s ingredients,” Hahn explains. Consumers looking to reduce exposure to chemicals often choose CozyPure® bedding to create a cleaner, nontoxic home. “Keeping with our environmental mission, we also don’t make products for planned obsolescence, unlike most manufacturers,” Hahn notes. “We design for long-term enjoyment so your bedding will stay in your bedroom, not the landfill.” All items, from their mattresses, mattress pads and blankets to their organic pillows, cotton sheets and collection of baby bedding is crafted inside their Norfolk workshop and shipped directly to consumers all across the country. 757-480-8500 | CozyPure.com Want to recommend a product created in CoVa? Let us know: Angela@CoVaBIZMag.com

66

C O VA B I Z

|

august/september 2016


W ww . C o v a b i z m a g . c o m

67


Web Design Services | SEO Reputation Management | Mobile Apps Social Media Management | SEM

A DIVISION OF VISTAGRAPHICS, INC.

For more information contact: William Warford

l

757-422-8979 ext. 152 william@vgnet.com

CoVaBiz Magazine Aug/Sept 2016  

The business magazine for all of Hampton Roads and Coastal Virginia!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you