Shinsuke Minegishi: recurring cycles

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Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles

Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles

vernon public art gallery vernon, british columbia canada www.vernonpublicartgallery.com


Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles


shinsuke minegishi recurring cycles Vernon Public Art Gallery March 16 - May 17, 2017

Vernon Public Art Gallery 3228 - 31st Avenue, Vernon BC, V1T 2H3 www.vernonpublicartgallery.com 250.545.3173


Catalogue of an exhibition held at the Vernon Public Art Gallery 3228 - 31st Avenue, Vernon, British Columbia, V1T 2H3, Canada March 16 - May 17, 2017 Production: Vernon Public Art Gallery Editor: Lubos Culen Layout and graphic design: Vernon Public Art Gallery Copy editing: Kelsie Balehowsky and Jennifer Webb Cover image: nfinite flow, 2016, ed. 30, wood engraving, 6.25 x 5.5 in Photography: Shinsuke Minegishi unless indicated otherwise Printing: Get Colour Copies, Vernon, British Columbia, Canada ISBN 978-1-927407-34-9 Copyright Š 2017, Vernon Public Art Gallery All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, except as may be expressly permitted by the 1976 Copyright Act or in writing from the Vernon Public Art Gallery. Requests for permission to use these images should be addressed in writing to the Vernon Public Art Gallery, 3228 31st Avenue, Vernon BC, V1T 2H3, Canada. Telephone: 250.545.3173 Facsimile: 250.545.9096 Website: www.vernonpublicartgallery.com The Vernon Public Art Gallery is a registered not-for-profit society. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee/RDNO, the Province of BC’s Gaming Policy and Enforcement Branch, British Columbia Arts Council, the Government of Canada, corporate donors, sponsors, general donations and memberships. Charitable Organization # 108113358RR.

This exhibition is sponsored in part by:

BRITISH COLUMBIA ARTS COUNCIL Supported by the Province of British Columbia


table of CONTENTS

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Executive Director’s Foreword · Dauna Kennedy

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Introduction · Lubos Culen

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Shinsuke Minegishi: Deeply Rooted · Kiriko Watanabe

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Artist Statements · Shinsuke Minegishi

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Works in the Exhibition

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Selected Biography · Shinsuke Minegishi

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Executive Director’s Foreword

It is my pleasure to welcome back Shinsuke Minegishi to the Vernon Public Art Gallery with his latest body of work entitled recurring cycles. Shinsuke first exhibited his work here as part of the inaugural Okanagan Print Triennial in 2009. He is best known for his work in combining various print media such as wood engraving (traditional), lithography, and screen printing. Currently Shinsuke works as a studio technician at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design as well as a Continuing Studies Instructor. Contributing to the critical dialogue of this exhibition is our guest writer, Kiriko Watanabe, Assistant Curator at the West Vancouver Museum. Watanabe is the published co-author of Selwyn Pullan: Photographing Mid-Century West Coast Modernism and has received the Advocates of Architecture Award from Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Thank you to all of the contributors to this project as well as our funding partners, the BC Arts Council, the Regional District of the North Okanagan, and the Province of BC, whose continued support enables us to produce quality exhibitions and publications such as this for our gallery visitors. Local support from our Board of Directors, members, donors and community supporters is also instrumental in our overall success and very much appreciated. I hope you enjoy this exhibition. Dauna Kennedy Executive Director Vernon Public Art Gallery

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introduction · shinsuke Minegishi: recurring cycles

Shinsuke Minegishi is a Vancouver-based artist working across several print media, including woodcut, linocut, wood engraving, lithography and screen printing. He often combines various print technologies and creates images which reference the human condition through the use of symbolic pictorial elements. Minegishi’s images often portray archetypal forms from the natural world in combination with a portrayal of ambiguous spaces that are at once earth like while they also communicate the vastness of cosmic space. Other images in this exhibition juxtapose results of human activity with the images of natural growth and renewal. Minegishi’s exhibition recurring cycles is a contemplative and philosophical engagement with universal cycles of the ‘beginning’ and the ‘end’ which is transposed to lives, births and deaths of people, namely Minegishi’s close family members and friends. As he points out, the exhibition recurring cycles is based on his life experiences and reflection on the cyclical nature of universal phenomena. The exhibition recurring cycles consists of a selection of works from three closely related bodies of work which trace a contextual trajectory of a human condition reflected in personal and collective experiences. The series of works that Minegishi produced in 2013 under the title fragility is a personal reflection on the cataclysmic event and its aftermath known as the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tōhoku, Japan. The massive earthquake caused a tsunami wave, extensive flooding, landslides, fires, buildings and infrastructure damage and nuclear incidents which included radiation releases.1 Perhaps the most devastating was the enormous toll on human lives and a difficult period of the country’s reconstruction of destroyed and damaged infrastructure. The works in fragility were executed predominantly as black and white lithographs with collage elements evoking a somber look at city environments. The source images that Minegishi used were derived from photographs of urban settings portraying buildings, roads, overpasses and some interior spaces which were digitally manipulated to show structural fissures and objects at precarious angles as if suspended in the moments of being dislodged from their stability. The images carry a foreboding psychological tension of unbalance and demise. In contrast to the black and white works in fragility, two large prints in the series are rendered in full colour. Contrary to the photo-based images of the lithographs and collage works which portray real locations in a city, the two large prints are a symbolic representation of the Image on page 6: fragility: downtown, 2013, ed. 4, lithography and collage, 16 x 11 in Photo: Blaine Campbell 7


resurrection: leaf, 2013, ed. 12, screen print, woodcut, wood engraving and collage, 10.5 x 7 in


forces of nature and its possible impact on our way of life. The print titled fragility: civilization features two distinct visual elements superimposed on what appears to be a photo based image of vegetation: an obelisk and a stream of water, both rendered in a cartoon-like format. Minegishi juxtapositions these two elements which directly reflect the power of nature and fragility of human kind. Throughout the history of civilization, obelisks have been considered a symbol of human achievement and ingenuity, but in Minegishi’s composition, the wave or stream of water visually dominates the obelisk, a clear message of dominance of the forces of nature over the achievements of various civilizations. Similarly, the print titled fragility: technology also features cartoon-like images of power plant cooling towers, two releasing clouds of white smoke and the other two towers are depicted toppled and with a pool of discharge surrounding it. However simple the depiction is, it is hard not to connect this image to the events in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant following the earthquake in 2011; a radiation release and contamination of a large area for years to come. In Minegishi’s print, the power plant cooling towers are dwarfed by an unnamed force depicted as a head positioned dominantly above. After the completion of the fragility series, Minegishi produced a sizable body of prints under the title resurrection comprised of the imagery portraying the promise and possibilities for a ‘renewal’ as is reflected in generally affirmative images and characterization of positive social, individual and ecological existence. The works are infused with the feeling of reawakening and growth which encompass urban and natural environments depicted in vibrant colours. The promise of the ‘renewal’ on a human level is also partially and symbolically expressed in the titles of the works, specifically in the prints where the central subject matter is a baby, children and family. While these prints contain images of people derived from the manipulation of lensbased source images, the work titled resurrection: men contains additional elements of wood engraving featuring anthropomorphic outlines of standing bodies which contain the swirls of galaxies and stellar space within. This image perhaps references the believed existence on various levels connecting the earthly with the cosmic continuation of life whether as a memory, a metaphor, or something imagined. In addition to the balanced and elevated portrayal of humans in the resurrection series, Minegishi also composed images which encompass urban and natural environments. In contrast to the structures out of balance and at the brink of a collapse portrayed in the fragility series, the urbanscapes in resurrection are intact. Images of urban environments are further complemented by plant and animal forms referencing renewal and growth. The images of plant and tree buds and leaves contain within themselves the images of deep space which underpins perhaps the references of the interconnectedness of all universal existence. 9


infinite flow, 2016, ed. 30, wood engraving, 6.25 x 5.5 in


While the subject matter of the works in the fragility series were in large part based on references and narratives of actual historical facts, the works in resurrection are a personal interpretation of the aftermath and a renewed belief in humanistic values instilled in individuals, their families, communities and the society. The exhibition titled recurring cycles which followed is couched in Minegishi’s ontological inquiry about the nature of being, death and rebirth. Minegishi situates all of these time-base occurrences concerning human life and cosmic events in metaphorical compositions using both representational and abstract imagery. These concepts are further extended to encompass the notions of universal phenomena of endless cosmic cycles realized in small delicate wood engravings featuring vignettes of deep space incorporated in larger images. In addition to Minegishi’s use of symbolic representational imagery of urban and natural environments, plant and animal forms, and water, an additional series of ten prints feature non-representational abstract colour field works which offer the viewers a ground for associative engagement and the resulting feeling of luminous voids and spaces. Juxtaposed simple geometric line-like shapes placed in the centre of each print provide a visual cadence for a symbolic reference for the constant beginning and the constant completion of a cycle which occur simultaneously. The exhibition recurring cycles tracks the trajectory of Minegishi’s personal engagement with historical occurrences and their aftermath which affected lives and society. His experiences inspire his artworks which are in turn gradually encoded with visual and symbolic references of looming destruction, then focus on renewal and regeneration, and finally offer a philosophical stance of understanding the universal order and its timeless cycles. Some works connect Minegishi with his heritage through the use of culturally implied symbols and at the same time, his abstract non-representational works offer arenas for the viewers’ felt experiences not articulated in a language form. While the works in the series fragility set the background and narratives which metaphorically refer to factual events, the works in the resurrection series propose a positive vision for the immediate future of a people and a nation. Finally, the works in the recurring cycles series are based in Minegishi’s contemplative disposition of tapping into the mysteries of the natural world and its evolution while reflecting on the enigmatic time-space continuum of the universe. Lubos Culen Curator Vernon Public Art Gallery Endnotes 1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_T%C5%8Dhoku_earthquake_and_tsunami 11


Shinsuke Minegishi: Deeply Rooted

by Kiriko Watanabe Shinsuke Minegishi observes the world around him as a kind of microcosm, composed of multiple layers, coexistent imaginings, and conflicting beliefs. An idea pops into his head, which might have been sparked by something as spontaneous as seeing a poster pinned on a wall or a half-opened box left on a deserted street. He develops that idea over time, bringing his intense creativity into collision with his observations of everyday life and philosophy, which then find expression in the prints he creates. Unique forms, metaphysical themes, and optical effects recur in Minegishi’s work as part of his distinctive visual vocabulary. As Minegishi develops his artistic vision, he thinks in terms of series, within which individual prints are given singular identities, each expressing successive stages of visual effect and deeper emotive possibilities. His use of mixed media, such as silkscreen, linocut, and engraving, adds texture to his work, both complicating and illuminating his interest in the interaction between humans and the natural world. For Minegishi, the 2011 great earthquake and subsequent tsunami and nuclear disaster off the Pacific coast of Tōhoku, was “the most harrowing day of my life; not knowing the safety and whereabouts of family and friends for hours on end”, leading to a “perpetual state of shock” in his home country.1 The experience had a profound emotional impact on Minegishi, heightening his awareness of the frailty of the human condition, and resulting in the creation of his fifteen-print series, fragility. The three colour prints in this series, technology, civilization, and system, explore the theme of nature versus economic development. In these prints, the artist overlays his woodcuts with images of fallen leaves, simultaneously showing the process of decomposition in the natural world, and creating a powerful metaphor for the extent of the debris created by the disaster as seen from a distance. The breakdown of numerous organic matters back to the ecosystem is interrupted by added linocut and silkscreen components that depict human activities, which often interfere with nature. Accompanying the colour prints are twelve black and white lithographs capturing ordinary scenes of densely-arranged spaces in the country’s busy capital, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. fragility: station (2013) depicts Shinjuku station, local

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trains, and an overpass connected to adjacent department stores, all of which combine to service several million people a day. These structures are depicted as deeply split and sliding down, challenging the equilibrium we so easily take for granted. In these works, Minegishi calls urgent attention to human vulnerability against the forces of nature over which we have no control. Every living creature has its universe, says Minegishi, who often integrates fragments from nature into his landscape photographs.2 In his 2014 limited-edition print series, resurrection, the artist both pursues the primordial meaning of life and death and vividly explores abstract concepts of space and time. Here, the artist references a particular sphere of the cosmos through a combination of silkscreen, lithography, wood engraving, and woodcut by merging colourful abstract shapes and figures, real and surreal representations, and black and white urban landscapes with bleak country terrains. Pictures of the artist and his family in Japan are incorporated into this body of work, along with other beings, some of whom are alive, others who are clearly dying. From a distance, the vivid colours, marked by high-contrast boundaries, suggest the vital force of life, yet a closer look reveals subtle hints of decay and death. The title, resurrection, references the three-year, continuous recovery process following the earthquake that devastated northern Japan, and the accompanying uncertainty as to whether the world might never be the same again. Well-considered motifs in Minegishi’s work are sometimes renewed in new contexts, creating threads through series that invite closer examination. The artist explains that he often deals with the notion of water in his work, as H2O is essential to life, making it one of the most important substances in the world.3 Much of the human body is comprised of water and we cannot survive without it. Likewise, Minegishi harnesses layers of graphic power to express a range of elements within the natural and built environment, from people, plants, and animals, to oceans, mountains, and buildings. In recurring cycles, Minegishi ambitiously incorporates meticulously detailed wood engraving with other printing techniques, resulting in a combination of refined tonal ranges with colourful compositions and dynamic depth, guided, in part, by natural wood grains. His long preoccupation with the cycle of birth and death is rooted in his experience of losing his family, relatives, and

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neighbours, as well as his fear of losing his mother to cancer. This preoccupation is explored in this body of work through representational patterns, which suggest the passing of time. Minegishi’s mother, Ryoko Minegishi, an award-winning poet and illustrator, has been a significant influence on her son’s creative development throughout his life. From an early age, Minegishi was exposed to symbolically rich images from his mother’s art collection, which included several prints by Minegishi’s childhood art teacher Masaaki Tanaka, a Japanese painter and printmaker, who later gained international recognition for his vivid silkscreen prints of matsuri (Japanese festival) imagery. In particular, Minegishi recalls an engraving called Woman and Fish (1973) by German artist Günter Grass, who is perhaps best known for his postwar novel, The Tim Drum (1959). Grass’s etching, which was hung at the front entrance of Minegishi’s family home, impressed him greatly for its aesthetic boldness and religious connotations.4 Many years later, his understanding of Grass’s work and his interest in the function and circulation of hemoglobin in the bloodstream found expression in a large-scale work, recurring cycles: woman and carp. Minegishi’s investigation of rhythm, repetition, and pattern, combined with textured elements that symbolize life, is further explored in recurring cycles through the incorporation of abstract shapes and intense imagery, some of which depicts the hydrological cycle and the food chain, beginning with plants and ending with animals.5 In this work, Minegishi attempts to visually express the linear nature of passing time by prompting the viewer to examine his prints across the series. His repeated questioning of the meaning of death is given force through his rich vocabulary of carefully calculated inked impressions across the surface of the paper. Printmaking appeals to Minegishi for the craft it requires and the opportunities it presents to combine traditional components with contemporary twists, and to experiment with various techniques and processes, while translating his visual and conceptual ideas onto paper. The multiple-blocks technique, for example, using a key block and a separate block for each colour, is labour-intensive, time-consuming, and difficult. Minegishi explains that “the act of printing requires a great deal of concentration and physical effort.”6 The number of creative options, some of which are technically complicated and require a high level of skill, are a part of the process that makes printmaking so attractive for this artist. After living in North America for nearly thirty years, Minegishi continues to be deeply rooted in his Japanese heritage through the act of printmaking, exhibiting a high quality

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of professionalism and mastery. Working with a range of external influences, Minegishi’s dedication to his chosen medium allows him to create works that convey multiple meanings and exceptional effects, establishing him as a distinctive voice in the world of contemporary printmaking. Endnotes 1 Shinsuke Minegishi, fragility, Burnaby Art Gallery, 2013, p.16. 2 Shinsuke Minegishi, interviewed by Kiriko Watanabe, Vancouver, September 3, 2016. 3 Shinsuke Minegishi, interviewed by Kiriko Watanabe, Vancouver, September 3, 2016 and January 15, 2017. 4 Shinsuke Minegishi, interviewed by Kiriko Watanabe, Vancouver, January 15, 2017. 5 Ibid. 6 Shinsuke Minegishi, fragility, Burnaby Art Gallery, 2013, p.38. Kiriko Watanabe is a Vancouver-based curator with a special interest in West Coast modern art, architecture, and design. Born and raised in Japan, she was one of the first to graduate with a master’s degree in Critical Curatorial Studies at the University of British Columbia, in 2003. Her dedication to raising awareness about West Coast midcentury modern architecture and design earned her a Metro Vancouver 2010 RAIC Advocate of Architecture Award of Excellence from the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada/Architecture Canada. Her curatorial practice also involves in critical investigation of contemporary art practice, postmodern geography, and cross-cultural influences.

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Shinsuke Minegishi: Statements fragility

In March 2011, an immense earthquake and tsunami hit Tohoku, the northeast region of Japan. As a person of Japanese descent, the live footage of the demolished sites shocked me beyond belief. It was the most harrowing day of my life; not knowing the safety and whereabouts of family and friends for hours on end. In the cities and towns close to the epicenter, methods of communication and transportation were completely shut down for months. The eastern half of Japan experienced shortages of water, food, gasoline, and power for an extended period of time. The radioactivity leaking from the dysfunctional nuclear power plant continues to this day. Japan, which is an economically and politically stable and technologically advanced country, collapsed. When I visited Tokyo in June (3 months after the impact), the country’s order and functionality had not recovered and the shortages of power and food remained. It seemed as if the whole of Japan was depressed and in a perpetual state of shock. As I witnessed the disorder and chaos in this urbanized system, I realized how fragile and vulnerable human civilization was. It was terrifying to recognize that our nation, which took thousands of years to develop, and the security we feel on a daily basis could be destroyed in a fraction of time. This fragility series is based on the notion of the susceptibility of the human condition and ultimately; human civilization. resurrection

After witnessing the disaster and chaos caused by the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, I observed man’s determination to survive, and the willpower needed to rise from this unthinkable event. At the same time, people all over the country spontaneously reacted. Many rushed to the site to volunteer. Others, who were unable to physically help, assisted however they could, including donating food, clothing, bedding or financial aid. Japan is a small island country, built and located on oceanic tectonic plates. The whole nation is surrounded by sea and more than 70% of its land is mountainous. Many of the mountains are volcanic. Historically, due to its vulnerability, Japan has faced a continuous series of devastations. 16


I viewed a country which realized the importance of social groups, specifically the family, and witnessed Japan as a whole becoming closer and tighter. This movement and the spontaneous desire for people to help one another occurred intuitively. It was instinct and seemed as if it was embedded in their DNA to do so. It was beautiful to perceive people’s aspiration to rise from the cataclysm and support others. Families were getting together and becoming stronger. These observations became the notion of my resurrection series. recurring cycles

When I was growing up in the old and traditional part of Tokyo, my family members, relatives and all the neighbors had an intimately close connection. Every time someone died, I personally witnessed a cold and still body on a futon before it was placed in a coffin. During my childhood, I was very confused and had a hard time understanding the meaning of death. I am now in my late forties and have increasingly experienced the death of those close to me. I have witnessed loved ones go through the process of aging as they approach their ultimate deaths. At the same time, I have also seen the birth of new lives. The recurring cycles of birth and death have been repeated since the very beginning of time. All that exists in this world; including us, all living creatures, the stars, and universe have been repeating the cycle of birth and death at their own rate. recurring cycles series was created, based on my notions of and interest in this remarkable sequence of events.

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works in the exhibition

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recurring cycles: woman and carp, 2016, ed. 2, screen print and wood engraving, 40 x 116.5 in



recurring cycles: guardian, 2016, ed. 3, screen print, litography and wood engraving, 42 x 30 in


recurring cycles: rain, 2016, ed. 3, screen print, litography and wood engraving, 42 x 30 in


recurring cycles: stars, 2016, ed. 3, screen print, litography and wood engraving, 42 x 30 in


universe, 2016, ed. 20, wood engraving, 5 x 6.25 in


recurring cycles I - X, 2016, ed. 4, screen print, litography and flocking; 10 prints, 30 x 22 in each













recurring cycles: dandelions, 2016, ed. 4, screen print and collage, 30 x 22 in


recurring cycles: fern, 2016, ed. 4, screen print and collage, 30 x 22 in


recurring cycles: grass, 2016, ed. 4, screen print and collage, 30 x 22 in


recurring cycles: ivy, 2016, ed. 4, screen print and collage, 30 x 22 in


fragility: civilisation, 2013, ed. 3, screen print, woodcut and linocut, 39 x 89 in Photo: Blaine Campbell



fragility: technology, 2013, ed. 3, screen print, woodcut and linocut, 39 x 89 in Photo: Blaine Campbell



resurrection: children, 2014, ed. 3, screen print, lithography, 43.5 x 30 in


resurrection: family, 2014, ed. 3, screen print, lithography, 43.5 x 30 22 in


resurrection: men, 2014, ed. 5, screen print, lithography, 30 x 22 in


resurrection: baby, 2014, ed. 3, screen print, lithography, 30 x 22 in


resurrection: salmon, 2014, ed. 5, screen print, lithography, 30 x 22 in


resurrection: tree, 2014, ed. 5, screen print, lithography, 30 x 22 in


Shinsuke Minegishi

www.shinartist.com BORN

1970

curriculum vitae

Tokyo, Japan

EDUCATION

2008 2005 1998-95 1996 1994-93

Wood Block Lithography. Tama Art University, Tokyo, Japan ImagOn Photo Intaglio with Catherine Stewart. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada Graduated in Fine Art with a major in Studio. Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver, Canada Alternative printmaking technique. Study under Seishi Ozaku. Tama Art University, Tokyo, Japan Fine art study. College of the Sequoias, Visalia, California, USA

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

2017-03 2011-06 2001 2001-98

Continuing Studies Instructor. Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Sessional Undergraduate Studies Instructor. Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Printmaking Instructor. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada Printmaking Instructor. ELST Design Studio, Vancouver, Canada

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

2017-06 2009-04 2004 2004-98 2000-95

Studio Technician. Print Media. Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Studio Manager. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada Board of Director. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada Member of Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada Member of Dundarave Print Workshop, Vancouver, Canada

GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS

2016 2010

The Canada Council for the Arts. Travel Grants The Canada Council for the Arts. Travel Grants

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2002 2002 1997

The Canada Council for the Arts. Visual Arts-Creation/Production Grants to Professional Artists Program The Canada Council for the Arts. Travel Grants Scholarship. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Vancouver, Canada

PUBLIC LECTURES

2016 2015 2014 2013 2011 2011 2010 2005 2004 2004 2003

Open Studio, Toronto, Canada. Kawalabo, Tokyo, Japan. West Vancouver Museum, West Vancouver, Canada. Woodcut lecture/ demonstration Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada. Artist and Curator Talk with Jennifer Cane Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, Canada. Wood engraving lecture/ demonstration Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Japanese Inspiration: The ‘Creative Print’ Movement Behind Cape Dorset’s Inuit Prints with Maiko Behr Workshop OM, Print House OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan Print media Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Printmaking Department, Tokyo Zokei University, Tokyo, Japan Vancouver Public Library with author Barbara Hodgson and publisher Rollin Milroy. Discussing the elements and the process of publishing the Good and Evil in the Garden Printmaking Studio, Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver, Canada

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2016 2016 2016 2014 2014 2013 2012

Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition. Art Zone Kaguraoka, Kyoto, Japan. Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition of Prints: recurring cycles. Striped House Gallery, Tokyo, Japan. Shinsuke Minegishi: Fragility to Resurrection. Open Studio Print Sales Gallery, Toronto, Canada Shinsuke Minegishi “resurrection”. Art Beatus, Vancouver, Canada Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition of Prints: resurrection. Striped House Gallery, Tokyo, Japan Shinsuke Minegishi. Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada Shinsuke Minegishi “memory of an existence”. Striped House Gallery, Tokyo, Japan

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2011 2010 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2002 1998 1997 1996

Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition of Prints. “in a box”. GALLERIE Malle, Tokyo, Japan Transfer and Transformation. Print Exhibition by Shinsuke Minegishi. Art Beatus, Vancouver, Canada Shinsuke Minegishi-Print Exhibition. Nostalgia. Gallery OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan Tamaki • Inochi (cycle of life). Striped House Gallery, Tokyo, Japan circles, targets, elements. Malaspina Printmakers Gallery, Vancouver, Canada Memory within Cells. Gallery OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan SHINSUKE MINEGISHI. An Exhibition of Wood Engraving, Prints & Limited Edition Books. Wessel & Lieberman Booksellers, Seattle, U.S.A. Works by Ann McCall and Shinsuke Minegishi. Malaspina Printmakers Gallery, Vancouver, Canada Shinsuke Minegishi Prints Exhibition. Gallery OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan Origin of Nature. Community Arts Council of Vancouver, Vancouver, Canada Watashi-no-Kamiwa. Gallery EVE, Tokyo, Japan Relief and Intaglio Prints. Dundarave Print Workshop Gallery, Vancouver, Canada

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2017 2016 2016 2016 2016

2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2014 2013 2013 2013

Color Expressions: Art and Design Perspective. Fountain Gallery, Purdue University, Lafayette. USA Season’s Greeting Exhibition. Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada Summer Salon. Open Studio, Toronto, Canada. Summer Group Exhibition. Art Beatus, Vancouver, Canada. Eddition Tools. Digital & Traditional Printmaking. Project Space Gallery, SUNY Oneonta Fine Arts Gallery, Oneonta, New York, U.S.A. Process/Expression: Prints/Impressions. Langley Centennial Museum, Langley, Canada Art Toronto 2015. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada Ichiyo-Kai Tokyo Exhibition. Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan The Japantique Odyssey. Tokyo Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan Practice. Creative work by Emily Carr University shop + studio technicians. Concourse Gallery, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Art Toronto 2014. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada WINTERLUDE. Group Show of Gallery Artists. Art Beatus. Vancouver, Canada Art Toronto. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada Open Studio’s 100 Prints. Palais Royale, Toronto, Canada

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2012 2012 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2006

Art Toronto 2012. The 13th Toronto International Art Fair. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Toronto, Canada TECHNICAL surfaces: Creative work by Emily Carr University technicians. Concourse Gallery, Emily University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada PrintHouse OM 35th Anniversary. Workshop OM Members’ Print Exhibition. Yokohama Civic Art Gallery, Yokohama, Japan Faculty Show ‘10. Concourse Gallery, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada In Edition: A 20 year Malaspina Printmakers’ Retrospective. Grand Forks Art Gallery, Grand Forks, Canada Faculty Show ‘09. Concourse Gallery, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Traversing Spaces: a group show featuring Karen Curry, Nancy Fox, Shinsuke Minegishi. Print Sales Gallery, Open Studio, Toronto, Canada The 150th Anniversary of the Opening of the Port of Yokohama International Print Exchange Exhibition. Yokohama Creative City Center, Yokohama, Japan The 12th Workshop OM Prints Exhibition. International Exchange Exhibition. Culture Floor, Hamaoka Course and Hotel, Shizuoka Country Club, Shizuoka, and Gallery OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan Faculty Show ‘08. Concourse Gallery, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Print Parallels: a Collaboration of Two Print Studios. Kayo Gallery, Salt Lake City, U.S.A. and CityScape Community Art Space, North Vancouver, Canada Kuradashi. Saint Paul Gallery, Maebashi, Japan Prints Tokyo 2007 (International Print Exhibition Tokyo 2007) hosted by Japan Print Association. Sakima Art Museum, Okinawa, Japan text form material meaning. summer institute on book arts. Concourse Gallery, Emily Carr Institute of Art +Design, Vancouver, Canada Re-Identification. Trilateral Print Exchange Exhibition. Het Stadshuis, City Hall of Utrecht, Centrum Beeldende Kunsten Utrecht, Het Gebouw Leidsche Rijn, World Art Delft, and Galerie Werfkade 16, Netherlands Curriculum. Contemporary pieces by leading educators of printmaking. Malaspina Printmakers Society Gallery, Vancouver, Canada The Continuing Studies Faculty Show, Queen Elizabeth Theatre Mezzanine Gallery, Vancouver, Canada

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2006 2006 2006 2005

2004 2004 2003 2003 2003 2002 2001 2001 2001 1999 1999 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1997 1996

all sorts, An Exhibition of Emily Carr Faculty. Concourse gallery, Emily Carr Institute of Art + Design, Vancouver, Canada Re-Identification. Trilateral Print Exchange Exhibition. Pendulum Gallery, Vancouver, Malaspina Printmakers, Vancouver, Capilano College, North Vancouver, and Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, Canada 30X30: New Directions in Printmaking. Burnaby Art Gallery. Burnaby, Canada Re-Identification. The Trilateral Print Exchange Exhibition 2005 JAPAN. Gallery OM in Shin-Yokohama, Celest Gallery in Yokohama, 
Saint Paul Gallery in Maebashi, J Trip Art Gallery in Shibuya, Inomachi Japanese Paper Museum in Kochi, and Nagasaki Peace Museum in Nagasaki, Japan THE ART OF PRINTMAKING. OMEGA GALLERY, Vancouver, Canada Under Pressure. CityScape Community Art Space, North Vancouver, Canada CULTURE artificial conditions. Curated by Debra Dedyluk. Window • gallery • space, Stride Gallery, Calgary, Canada THINK PRINT RELATE. Gallery 83, Vancouver, Canada Year of Japan-Japan Arts Fest. UBC Asian Centre Auditorium, Vancouver, Canada pacific printers. SNAP Gallery, Edmonton, Canada Malaspina Printmakers Society Prints Exhibition. Gallery OM, Shin-Yokohama, Japan Asian Heritage Show. Richmond Art Gallery, Richmond, Canada Malaspina Printmakers 101 Prints. Performance Works, Vancouver, Canada Malaspina Printmakers Society Annual Members Show. Seymour Art Gallery, West Vancouver, Canada Malaspina Printmakers 101 Prints. Performance Works, Vancouver, Canada Mini-Print Suite. small prints Gallery, Bob Prittie Metrotown Branch Public Library, City of Burnaby Art Gallery’s off-site space, Burnaby, Canada Every Grad Needs… Community Arts Council of Vancouver, Vancouver, Canada Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design Student and Faculty Printmaking Exhibition. Organized by Emily Carr institute and Canadian Consulate General in St. Petersburg. St. Petersburg Spring Fair, Russia emily carr institute of art and design graduation show 1998. Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver, Canada Five-Man Show. Malaspina Printmakers Society Gallery, Vancouver, Canada 101 Prints exhibition. The Great Hall of the B.C. Law Courts, Vancouver, Canada Dundarave Print Workshop Members Show. Arts Council Gallery, New Westminster, Canada

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AWARDS AND INVITATIONAL EXHIBITIONS

2016 2015 2013 2013 2013

2012 2011 2011 2007 2007 2005 2005 2004 2004 2003 2002 2001

ART ZONE KAGURAOKA PRIZE. The 7th The Kyoto International Woodprint Association Exhibition. Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, Kyoto, Japan INVITATION. ThinkSmall8, the eighth biennial international miniature invitational exhibition. Artspace, Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. ENCOURAGEMENT PRIZE. The Awagami International Miniature Print Exhibition. Hall of Awa Japanese Paper Museum, Tokushima, Japan INVITATION. CT-International Print Biennial. Centre 3 for print and media arts. Hamilton, Canada INVITATION. ThinkSmall7, the seventh biennial international miniature invitational exhibition. Artspace, Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. INVITATION. CT-International Print Biennale. Taller Cultural, Santiago de Cuba PRIZE OF EXCELLENCE. The 3rd Tokyo Screen Print Biennale. Japan Artists Association Gallery, Tokyo, Japan McCLAIN’S PRIZE. The 6th The Kyoto International Woodprint Association Exhibition. Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, Kyoto, Japan INVITATION. THINKSMALL4! fourth biennial International Miniature Invitational Exhibition. Artspace and art6, Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. INVITATION. Donetsk International Charity Exhibition Auction of Works of Modern Artists “Art for the City”. Museum of Modern Arts in Donetsk, Donetsk, Ukraine HONORARY MENTION. THE 5TH INTERNATIONAL MINI-PRINT BIENNIAL CLUJ2005. National Museum of Art, Cluj, Romania INVITATION. Think Small 3! Third Biennial International Miniature Invitational. Artspace and art6, Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. INVITATION. INVITATIONAL EXHIBITION OF TAIWAN INTERNATIONAL MINIPRINT. Organized by the Institute of Fine Arts of the National Taiwan Normal University. Taipei, Taiwan JUROR’S AWARD and PURCHASE AWARD. Sixty Square Inches 14th Biennial Small Print Exhibition. The Robert L. Ringel Gallery and the Stewart Center Gallery at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, U.S.A. GRAND PRIZE. The 4th Kyoto International Woodprint Association Exhibition. Kyoto City Museum, Kyoto, Japan INVITATION. The International Small Engraving Salon Carbunari 2002(the fourth edition). Florean Museum, Romania INVITATION. The International Small Engraving Salon Carbunari 2002 (the third edition). Florean Museum, Romania 57


2000 2000 2000 1999 1997

HONORABLE MENTION. The 4th Latin American Exhibition and the 1st international Exhibition of Miniprint in Rosario 2000. the Bemardino Rivadavia Cultural Center, Rosario, Argentina FIRST PRIZE AWARD. The First Biennial International Miniprint Exhibition. Dundarave Print Workshop Gallery and New Leaf Editions, Vancouver, Canada INVITATION. The 1st Cheju International Print Art Festival. Gallery of Cheju Student Culture Center and Sogwipo City Kidang museum, Cheju, Korea INVITATION. The first edition of the INTERNATIONAL SMALL ENGRAVINGSALON Carbunar. Organized by the FLOREAN MUSEUM. Florean Museum, Romania AWARD OF MERIT. The First Annual Art of the Book exhibition contest. Vancouver Public Library, Vancouver, Canada

ADJUDICATED EXHIBITIONS AND ART COMPETITIONS

2015 2009 2008

2008 2004 2003 2003 2002 2002 2001 2001

The Biennale internationale d’estampe contemporaine de Trois-Rivières. Trois- Rivières, Québec, Canada The First Okanagan Print Triennial Exhibition. Vernon Public Art Gallery. Vernon, B.C., Canada The 13th International Biennial Print Exhibition, R.O.C. National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung, Taiwan, China the 4th edition of the Biennale Voir Grand, a large format print biennial. Atelier Circulaire, Montréal, Canada The Third Biennial International Miniprint Exhibition. Dundarave Print Workshop Gallery and New Leaf Editions, Vancouver, Canada The International Print Biennial in Beijing 2003. Beijing Yan Huang Art Gallery, Beijing, China THE INTERNATIONAL PRINT AND DRAWING EXHIBITION. On the Occasion of 60th Anniversary Celebration of Silpakorn University, Thailand. Silpakorn University and Exhibition hall 4th floor, The Silom Galleria, Bangkok, Thailand The 11th International Exhibition SMALL GRAPHIC FORMS, POLAND-LODZ ’02. Male Formy Grafiki, Miejska Galeria Sztuki, Lodz, Poland Global Matrix International Print Exhibition. The Purdue University Art Gallery, Indiana and The Wright State University, Ohio, U.S.A. THE 3RD INTERNATIONAL MINI PRINT BIENNIAL CLUJ-2001. National Museum of Art Cluj-Napoca, Romania The Print Grand Prix Triennial Competition In AOMORI 2001. Aomorishimin Museum, Aomori, Japan

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2001 2001 1999 1999 1999 1999

1998 1998 1998 1997 1997 1997

The 10th International Biennial Print and Drawing Exhibition 2001, R.O.C. Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan, China The Boston Printmakers 2001 North American Print Exhibition. 808 Gallery at Boston University, Massachusetts, U.S.A. THE SECOND INTERNATIONAL MINI-PRINT BIENNIAL CLUJ-1999. National Museum of Art, Cluj-Napoca, Romania The Manitoba Printmakers’ Association PanAm Print Exhibition. <SITE> GALLERY, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada The 10th International Exhibition SMALL GRAPHIC FORMS, POLAND-LODZ ‘99. Male Formy Grafiki, Miejska Galeria Sztuki, Lodz, Poland The 2nd INTERNATIONAL “EX LIBRIS” EXHIBITION. Organized by the University Library of Rijeka and the Committee for Organization of Celebration of 50th Anniversary of Foundation and Activity of the Council of Europe. “KORTIL” GALLERY, Rijeka, Croatia The 3rd INTERNATIONAL MINIPRINT TRIENNIAL FINLAND. Organized by the Graphic Artists Association of Lahti and Lahti Art Museum, Lahti, Finland The Allied Arts of Whatcom County Eighteenth Annual NORTHWEST INTERNATIONAL ART COMPETITION. The Whatcom Museum ARCO Exhibition Gallery, Bellingham, Washington, U.S.A. The 4th edition of the biennale internationale d’art miniature. Salle AugustinChènier, Ville-Marie, Quebec, Canada The 3rd International Biennial of small format print Leskovac ’97. Art Gallery SUNCE and gallery of National Museum, Leskovac and National Museum –Graphic Studio-, Belgrade, Yugoslavia The First International Mini-Print Biennial, Cluj-1997. the Gallery of the Union of The Fine Artist from Romania, Cluj, Romania The 19th International Independante Exhibition of Prints in Kanagawa. Kanagawa Prefectural Gallery, Yokohama, Japan

Exhibition catalogues and pamphlets

2013 2008 2007 2006

SHINSUKE MINEGISHI. Fragility. Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada circles, targets, elements. SHINSUKE MINEGISHI. Malaspina Printmakers, Vancouver, Canada Curriculum. Contemporary pieces by leading educators of printmaking. Malaspina Printmakers Gallery, Vancouver, Canada The Relief Print. Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada

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2006 2005 2003 2001 1998

30x30: New Directions in Printmaking. Burnaby Art Gallery, Burnaby, Canada “Re-Identification”. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Canada, Shin-Yokohama Printmakers Association, Japan, and Grafisch Atelier Utrecht, The Netherlands THINK PRINT RELATE. Gallery 83 and Powell Street Festival Society, Vancouver, Canada RICHMOND art gallery Exhibiting Artists and Programming. Richmond Art Gallery, Richmond, Canada SHINSUKE MINEGISHI. ORIGIN OF NATURE. Community Arts Council of Vancouver, Vancouver, Canada

BOOK PUBLICATIONS

2016

2012 2012 2008 2006 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2002 1997

Illustration. Yume miru tamago to sora no ao written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by Shoshi Yamada, Tokyo, Japan Illustration. Itsushika Kaze ni Naru written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by Shoshi Yamada, Tokyo, Japan Illustration. TYPES / PAPER / PRINT. The HM Type Specimen Book written by Rollin Milroy. Published by Heavenly Monkey, Vancouver, Canada Illustration. Mother written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by Suijin-Sha, Tokyo, Japan Essay and Illustration. Nomi No Kai. Published by Wessel & Lieberman Booksellers, Seattle, U.S.A. Story and Illustration. The Tale of Three Black Boxes. Heavenly Monkey Editions. Vancouver, Canada Illustration. The Shadow over INNSMOUTH written by Howard P. Lovecraft. Published by HEAVENLY MONKEY. Printed by Black Stone Press. Vancouver, Canada Essay and Illustration. Ars Anatomica. Published by HEAVENLY MONKEY. Vancouver, Canada Illustration. Good and Evil in the Garden written by Barbara Hodgson. Published by HEAVENLY MONKEY. Vancouver, Canada Illustration. As If It Were a Love Letter written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by France-Do. Tokyo, Japan Illustration. INNSMOUTH written by Howard P. Lovecraft and the INNSMOUTH LOOK. Published by HEAVENLY MONKEY. Vancouver, Canada Illustration. Watashi-no-Kamiwa (my god) written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by France-Do. Tokyo, Japan

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1996 1981 1976

Illustration. Kako-karano-Tegami written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by France-Do. Tokyo, Japan Illustration. Michi no Kisetsu ni Ikiruno wa written by Ryoko Minegishi. Published by Shinya Sosho. Tokyo, Japan Illustration. Shuukan no tame no Dessan written by Mitsuko Minegishi. Published by Shinya Sosho. Tokyo, Japan

ARTICLES AND REVIEWS

2016 2014 2013 2013 2011 2010 2009 2009 2008 2007 2007 2006 2006

Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition of Prints : recurring cycles. Asahi Shimbun Newspaper (Japan) June 21st, 2016. Vol. 46729. Page 3. SHINSUKE MINEGISHI Art Beatus by Robin Laurence. PREVIEW (Vancouver, Canada) Nov/Dec/Jan 2014/2015 Vol. 28 No.5. Page 25 Engraving his mark on the West Coast by Carmen Lam. Burnaby NewsLeader (Burnaby, Canada) May 29, 2013. Page A8 Visual arts critics’ picks, Shinsuke Minegishi by Robin Laurence. The Georgia Straight (Vancouver, Canada) February 28- March 7. Volume 47 Number 2358. Page 33 FOCUS: Shinsuke Minegishi by Kanna Kitakaze. Vancouver Shinpo (Vancouver, Canada) December 1. Vol. 49. No. 33. Page V-17 Shinsuke Minegishi; This Month’s Local Artist by Mayumi Kobayashi. Oops Japanese Magazine (Vancouver, Canada) November 5, 2010, Vol. 13 No.21. P. 32 Canadian wood engraving by Gerard Brender A Brandis. MULTIPLES. The journal of the society of wood engravers (London, England) May 2009. Page 8-11 Hanga Artist Shinsuke Minegishi by Kanna Kitakaze. Vancouver Shinpo (Vancouver, Canada) April 16. Vol. 31. No. 16. Page V-5 book art object. The Codex Foundation, Berkeley (Berkeley, USA). Edited by David jury. Page 187 and 188 Nomi No Kai by Shinsuke Minegishi. Amphora, No.147 October 2007, THE ALCUIN SOCIETY (Vancouver, Canada) Page 20 Shinsuke Minegishi by Ray Statham. CHOP. Quarterly Newsletter of the Malaspina Printmakers Society (Vancouver, Canada) February. Page 5 Shinsuke Minegishi: Minutiae of the Imagination by Suzan Gransby. The Relief Print-Exhibition Catalogue. Burnaby Art Gallery. City of Burnaby Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services, Canada. October 24-November 26 Shinsuke Minegishi: Exploring the realms of the mind where mystery and fantasy reside by Claire Emiko Fant. International Examiner (Seattle, U.S.A.) Nov. 15 - Dec. 5, 2006. VOL. 33, NO. 22. Page 10 61


2006 2004 2004 2004 2003 2003 2002 2002 2001 1998

Printmaking Artist, Shinsuke Minegishi by Kanna Kitakaze. Vancouver Shinpo (Vancouver, Canada) February 9. Page V-5 Printmaking Artist, Shinsuke Minegishi by Ryo Kunieda. Oops! Japanese Magazine (Vancouver, Canada) December 17, VOL.7 NO.27. Page 29 Freedom of the Press. Malaspina Printmakers keep their art form from becoming an endangered species by Robin Laurence. The Georgia Straight (Vancouver, Canada) Volume 38 Number 1913 August 19-26 Page 57 Costly, rare and already gone by Nancy Lanthier. The Vancouver Sun (Vancouver, Canada) 21 February. Page F17 The Reason It must Be Printmaking by Shinsuke Minegishi. KIWA NEWS No.5/6 (Kyoto, Japan). December. Page 4/5 SHINSUKE MINEGISHI, combining western and Japanese wood engraving traditions by Rolling Milroy. Amphora, No.130 March 2003, THE ALCUIN SOCIETY (Vancouver, Canada) Page 5 Shinsuke Minegishi Exhibition by Yasuo Ogawara. Print House OM Imprimerie 03 (Shin-Yokohama, Japan). 1 September. Page 3 Shinsuke Minegishi by Shinsuke Minegishi. CHOP. Quarterly Newsletter of the Malaspina Printmakers Society (Vancouver, Canada) February. Page 7 Carving a revival in wood by Chris Bryan. The Review (Richmond, Canada) 3 May. Page12 Artist, Shins uke Minegishi by Kaori Saito. Vancouver Shinpo (Vancouver, Canada) 29 January. Page 38

GALLERY REPRESENTATION

2017-10 2017-10 2017-07 2017-06 2015-98 2014-06 2010-02 2005-04 2003-97 2000-95 1997

Art Beatus Gallery. Vancouver, Canada Janice Wong Studio. Vancouver, Canada Saint Paul Gallery. Maebashi, Japan Open Studio. Toronto, Canada Malaspina Printmakers Gallery. Vancouver, Canada Wessel & Lieberman Booksellers, Seattle, U.S.A. Gallery OM. Shin-Yokohama, Japan Dear Gallery. Vancouver, Canada Gallery Poem. Tokyo, Japan Dundarave Print Workshop Gallery. Vancouver, Canada Gallery Eve. Tokyo, Japan

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COLLECTIONS

Langley Centennial Museum. Canada The Bank of Montreal. Canada National Bank of Canada, Canada The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade in Ottawa, Canada Canadian Chancery in Tunis, Tunisia National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts. Taiwan, China Sakima Art Museum, Japan Penrose Library, University of Denver, U.S.A. Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, U.S.A. The Arthur Jaffe collection at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, U.S.A. Simon Fraser University, Canada Burnaby Art Gallery, Canada Pepperdine University, U.S.A. Merril Collection, Toronto Public Library, Canada Permanent collection of the National Taiwan Normal University Art Gallery, Taiwan University of California-San Diego, U.S.A. Purdue University Galleries, U.S.A. Vancouver Public Library-Special Collections, Canada University of British Columbia, Canada University of California–Los Angeles, U.S.A. University of Alberta, Canada McGill University, Canada University of Iowa, U.S.A. Silpakorn University, Thailand The British Library, England Kyoto International Woodprint Association, Japan Florean Museum, Romania Art Gallery SUNCE, Yugoslavia Contemporary Graphic Fund from “Octavian Goga“ Cluj County Library, Special Collections Department, Romania. Malaspina Printmakers Society, Canada

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Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles

Shinsuke Minegishi recurring cycles

vernon public art gallery vernon, british columbia canada www.vernonpublicartgallery.com


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