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H A R R I S B U RG

TIGER TIMES

Presorted Standard ECRWSS U.S. Postage Paid Permit #1 Harrisburg, SD 57032 200 Willow St. Harrisburg, SD 57032 605-743-2567 x5026 tigertimes.harrisburgdistrict41-2.org

FEBRUARY 2014 Serving the Harrisburg School District and Surrounding Community

DISTRICT TO PRESENT FIRST MS & HS MUSICAL WITH OLIVER!

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he Harrisburg School District is excited to announce its first-ever musical that will combine the talents of middle school and high school students! Oliver!, a musical theatre classic, will be performed April 3 & 4, at 7pm, and April 5, at 1pm and 7pm, in the Harrisburg Performing Arts Center.

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his is a great opportunity for many students in the district to perform on stage and a chance for the Harrisburg community to attend a fantastic showcase of student talent. By adding a spring musical to the Theatre Department’s season, the Harrisburg School District hopes to create a new family-friendly spring tradition.

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he Theatre Department is looking forward to having a huge cast for this production! All middle and high school students interested in performing are encouraged to audition.

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uditions will be held in the High School Performing Arts Center. HS students will audition February 11 (3:15pm) & 13 (3:45pm), and MS students will audition February 12 & 13 (3:45pm). The cast consists of eleven singing leads (5 girls, 6 guys) and

several choruses that will be filled with dozens of girl and guy students.

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udience favorites include the roles of Oliver, The Artful Dodger, Fagin, Nancy, Bet and Bill Sykes. Other memorable characters include Mr. Bumble, Widow Corney, and Mr. and Mrs. Sowerberry. A workhouse chorus, Fagin’s gang of pickpockets, pub goers, and London merchants and shoppers also give our girl and guy performers the chance to sing, dance and bring this Dicken’s story to life.

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here will be a parent informational meeting on Tuesday, February 4, 3:45pm, in the Harrisburg Performing Arts Center. Future announcements will be made on the PAC’s Facebook page (facebook.com/ HarrisburgPerformingArtsCenter) and info will also be posted at NorthMSmusic. shutterfly.com. Adult volunteers will be needed for sewing, set construction, prop finding, and student supervision. Be looking for more info about these needs via school announcements, Tiger Times, the PAC Facebook page and the North MS Music website. SEE OLIVER, ON PAGE 5

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS SATURDAY, FEB 1

THURSDAY, FEB 13

Boys Basketball vs. Aberdeen Central

Wrestling Quadrangular

MONDAY, FEB 3 After Prom Committee Meeting, 7 pm HS Pops Concert, 7 pm TUESDAY, FEB 4 Wrestling vs. Watertown THURSDAY, FEB 6 Girls Basketball vs. Brandon Valley School Board Meeting, 6:30 pm FRIDAY, FEB 7 Girls Basketball vs. Yankton SATURDAY, FEB 8 FFA Sweethearts/Sadie Hawkins Dance, 9 pm

FRIDAY, FEB 14 No School Rushmore Challenge Debate Tournament SATURDAY, FEB 15 Boys Basketball vs. Pierre MONDAY, FEB 17 No School - President’s Day TUESDAY, FEB 18 Basketball Doubleheader vs. Sioux Falls Christian WEDNESDAY, FEB 19 Tiger Nation Meeting, 7pm

MONDAY, FEB 10

FRIDAY, FEB 21 Boys Basketball vs. Brandon Valley

Early Release - Parent Teacher Conf. (Elementaries & High School)

SATURDAY, FEB 22 Basketball Doubleheader vs. Sturgis

Kindergarten Registration

MONDAY, FEB 24

TUESDAY, FEB 11

School Board Meeting, 6:30 pm

Early Release - Parent Teacher Conf. (Middle Schools)

TUESDAY, FEB 25 Boys Basketball vs. Watertown

HARRISBURG, SOUTH DAKOTA

IN THIS ISSUE

COMMUNITY

Award-Winning Artist Deb Gengler-Copple At Robin’s Nest 2 Why Belong to Harrisburg American Legion & Auxiliary? 2 Exercise Programs Available to Community @ Shalom Lutheran 2 Coupons, Coupons, Coupons!!! 2 Registration For The 14/15 Year Open At Shalom Preschool 2 HUMC Walking Club 3 Hall of Fame Inductees Announced 3 Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce Membership Drive 3 Interested in Submitting a Community Event? 3 The Connection is now Arise Church! 3

DISTRICT What Common Core Is……And Isn’t. 4 Harrisburg Schools Spring Book Fairs  4 Kindergarten Registration 4 Oliver5

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER HIGH SCHOOL What NOT to do this Valentine’s Day 8 Student Council in the News 8 Harrisburg’s Emergence of School Spirit 8 Mount Marty Dual Credit 8 Ashton Auch Wins FCCLA District IV Chair and State Officer Position8 THE Experience of Being Recruited 8 The Great Chemist Zachary Merrick 9 The Impossible Task of Staying Warm 9 Basketball Transition to “AA” 9 The Few, The Brave, The Wrestlers  9 Senior Class 9

NORTH MIDDLE SCHOOL 7th Grade Characters Harrisburg North 8th Graders Heading to Pierre!

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SOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL 6th grade  Robotics On The Rise 8th Grade Happenings

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ENDEAVOR ELEMENTARY Kindergarten14 Recess Relief 14 Endeavor Performs At The Sioux Falls Sky Force 14

EXPLORER ELEMENTARY Explorer SPED Classrooms

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FREEDOM ELEMENTARY Twitter in the Classroom

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JOURNEY ELEMENTARY CELLS and magnification come to Journey Elementary

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COMMUNITY AWARD-WINNING ARTIST DEB GENGLER-COPPLE AT ROBIN’S NEST

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hen it comes to enthusiasm for nature and wildlife, artists are some of eb is presently entering art shows throughout the Midwest, and is the most fervent champions. Award-Winning Wildlife Fine Artist Deb going to be represented at The Robin’s Nest on Saturday, February Gengler-Copple has chosen oil and pastels to express her self artistically 15, 2014 from 1-5. and to communicate a powerful connection with nature and wildlife.  Deb is from Hubbard, Nebraska, received a BA degree from Morningside College, Sioux City, IA and worked as a graphic artist, but her passion for painting wildlife has redirected her career and taken her to the national parks to photograph and view wildlife firsthand.  The artist is a Signature member of the Pastel Society of America, as well as Artists For Conservation and has won a number of awards, including an honorable mention in the International Pastel 100 Competition. She is also a three time Nebraska Habitat Stamp winner, and received  first place from the Phippen Museum Western Art Show in Prescott AZ.  Her work helps support a number of wildlife causes, including Pheasants Forever, Ducks Unlimited, Defenders of Wildlife, and The Wolf and Grizzly Center of West Yellowstone. 

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eb’s paintings of wolves portray a calm, unassailable strength or a quiet, forlorn loneliness. Her big horn sheep denote power and movement. Her bison are formidable.  The immediacy and richness of her works derive, at least in part, from her ability to immerse herself completely in the natural world, closely observing every nuance about her subjects, their behaviors and their movements. What is important to the artist is experiencing the animal, seeing how it interacts with others, and feeling the excitement of the opportunity to being there.

Win this print entitled "Just The Two of Us"

WHY BELONG TO HARRISBURG AMERICAN LEGION & AUXILIARY?

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he American Legion is America’s largest supporter of veterans and is Veterans helping veterans, families and communities. The American Legion is the nation’s largest and most powerful organization of U.S. wartime veterans and their families. Today, it counts 2.4 million members who operate through nearly 14,000 posts across the United States and beyond.

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he Harrisburg American Legion Post (Legion) was chartered on July 25, 1919, as Alvin Dempewolf Post 45. The articles of incorporation of the post were issued on September 7, 1923. The first Commander was Charles J. Dempewolf of Harrisburg. Current Commander is Dewey Hessaa.

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he Legion meets the 2nd Monday of every month at 7:00pm. There are many programs supported by the Legion. Some of the programs supported locally are: Boy Scouts, American Legion Baseball, Boy’s State, South Dakota Highway Patrol Youth Trooper Academy and many more youth programs. In addition, we participate in the Harrisburg Days Parade with the colors and we participate in activities at the schools for Veteran’s Day.

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e have a memorial service at the Pleasant View Cemetery on Memorial Day with an Avenue of Flags and an outdoor Memorial service for all deceased veterans. We sponsor pancake breakfasts throughout the year and a Chili Feed for Veteran’s Day to honor all veterans.

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he American Legion Auxiliary (Auxiliary) is the largest women's patriotic service organization in the world. The Auxiliary supports the American

EXERCISE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE TO COMMUNITY @ SHALOM LUTHERAN CHURCH

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uesday and Thursday evenings from 7:30-8:30 pm (except the 2nd Tuesday of each month). This exercise group is free and available for any age or gender. We meet in the Church Fellowship Hall and use various exercise tapes to work out to. Also, if you do not want to work out but want to get in a walk, the church is open at the same time so you can simply walk the halls to stay active in the cold weather.

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he Church also offers yoga classes on Monday evenings that are open to the community. Classes are held on Mondays from 6-7:15. You must be over 13 to participate. Cost begins at $40 for 4 classes.

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ou can get additional information on these classes by contacting shalomnur@iw.net or call Lanelle @ 214-2104.

Legion and honors the sacrifice of those who HAVE served and those who ARE SERVING this country by enhancing the lives of our veterans, military, and their families, both at home and abroad. For God and Country, we advocate for veterans, educate our citizens, mentor youth, and promote patriotism, good citizenship, peace and security. We are the nearly 800,000 wives, mothers, daughters, sisters, grandmothers, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters of veterans who have served our great country during times of war AND PEACE. Some of us are even veterans ourselves.

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he Auxiliary meets the 2nd Sunday of each month at 1:30pm. We actively support Girl's State, participate in the Auxiliary Poppy program and the Memorial Day Service at Pleasant View Cemetery. For fundraisers we provide lunch after the Memorial Day service and we have a "Pie Break" after the Harrisburg Homecoming Parade.

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f you are interested in becoming a member of the American Legion you can contact Commander Hessaa at adempewolf45@gmail.com or by mailing 48096 274th Street, Canton, SD 57013. If you are interested in becoming a member of the American Legion Auxiliary you may contact Alice Upshaw, President at adempewolf45.aux@gmail.com or the above address.

COUPONS, COUPONS, COUPONS!!!

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id you know coupon-clipping is one of the National American Legion Auxiliary's activities that support members of the military and their families overseas? Manufacturer coupons expired up to six months can be used. The Harrisburg American Legion Auxiliary participates in this activity. If you have coupons you don’t use you can help our overseas military and families by sending coupons to the American Legion Auxiliary, 48096 274th Street, Canton, SD.

REGISTRATION FOR THE 14/15 SCHOOL YEAR OPEN AT SHALOM PRESCHOOL Class Offerings:

Transportation available.

3 Year Olds T/Th 9:00-11:30 am

Classes fill on a first come, first

Cost: $88.00/month

serve basis.

4 Year Olds M/W/F 9:00-11:30

More information and registration

a.m.

form can be found at:

Cost: $124.00/month

http://shalompreschool.shutterfly.

Pre-K M-Th 9:00-11:30 a.m.

com/aboutus

Cost: $150.00/month THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 2


HUMC WALKING CLUB When: Tuesdays and Thursdays Time: 10 am devotions, 10:15 am walk, 11:00 am coffee fellowship Where: Harrisburg United Methodist Church Why: With winter upon us, it makes it hard to get out and exercise, come stay warm and slip free as we walk throughout the church. While you are walking we are hoping you will pray for our church, community, state and world. The coffee pot will be on, and you are invited to stay for coffee and fellowship after your walk. Bring your friends!!!!

HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES ANNOUNCED

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he Harrisburg High School Hall of Fame Committee and Tiger Nation are proud to announce that five individual nominees and two athletic teams have been selected to the 2014 Class of the Harrisburg High School Hall of Fame. The inductees include one community contributor: Charles “Cab” Benson, one coach/administrator: Dwight “Ike” Hoover, one fine arts performer: Kristie VerMulm McManamy, two athletes: Chris Stoebner (Class of ’99- Basketball, Football and Track), Jodi (Marshall) Hemiller (Class of ’90-Basketball, Track, Cheerleading) and two athletic teams: The 1993 11B State Championship Football team, in the “Championship Team” category and the 1972 Football Team in the “Outstanding Team Achievement” category.

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he Harrisburg High School Hall of Fame was founded to promote pride in Harrisburg High School and to honor alumni, faculty, staff, and friends who have made outstanding accomplishments in their communities and their lives since they have been associated with the school. The Hall of Fame will help preserve and strengthen the school motto “Building Strong Foundations for Success”. In addition, these recognitions are for the

THE CONNECTION IS NOW ARISE CHURCH!

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n 2006, a new church called The Connection became a part of the growing Harrisburg community. Over the past two years, The Connection has had a growing relationship with her sister church, The Crossing, in Sioux Falls.

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t the end of 2013, the two bodies voted to become one church, called Arise! Arise is excited to begin this new chapter in Sioux Falls and Harrisburg, and as part of that new chapter, we look forward to moving from our current worship location at the High School to our new location at the North Middle School on February 9. Our worship service begins at 10am, and Sunday school is available starting at 9:15. Anyone is welcome to join us! purpose of honoring and perpetuating the individuals who have excelled and provide our students with examples of what to dream and aspire to be.

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he Harrisburg High School Hall of Fame honors former student athletes, fine arts performers, their coaches and other individuals who have contributed outstanding accomplishments towards Harrisburg High School extra-curricular activities. The 2014 class of inductees will be honored during a banquet and induction ceremony to be held at the Harrisburg High School on Friday, April 11th, 2014. There will be a social hour in the High School Gymnasium beginning at 5:30pm, with a sit-down dinner served at 6:30pm. Following the meal, an induction ceremony honoring the Hall of Fame Inductees will be held in the Performing Arts Center, followed by the senior athletic awards presentation. Tickets are limited and advance purchase is required. The cost of tickets is $16 for adults and will be available to the general public at www.wearetigernation.com beginning February 3rd. All tickets must be purchased by April 4th.

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arrisburg High School, the Harrisburg Tigers Hall of Fame Committee and Tiger Nation congratulate all the inductees and their families!

urther media inquiries should be directed to Scott VanDerMillen, Harrisburg Activities Director to: scott.vandermillen@k12.sd.us.

HARRISBURG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEMBERSHIP DRIVE Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce is starting their 2014 membership drive. Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce is in its second year of existence and our goal is to bring the business community together and to develop strong local networks. The Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce offers information and advice on local business matters and a great opportunity to promote and expand hometown businesses focusing on betterment of the Community and improved quality of life for Harrisburg businesses and residents. We offer two types of memberships - business and individual. Some of the benefits of being a member are: Advertise In: New Resident Welcome Kit Newspaper Community Guide Electronic Sign Facebook Marketing Member of Economic Development Board

Chamber Sponsored Events/Activities: Easter Egg Hunt Trick or Treat Scavenger Hunt Breakfast with Santa Monthly Chamber Luncheons Networking Sources Facebook Marketing

Business member annual rate is $80. Individual membership annual rate is $20. New in 2014!!! We are excited to announce this new opportunity to residents. Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce now offers membership not only to businesses but to all residents over 18 years of age. With this membership you will be included in all Chamber communications, invites to monthly luncheons ($6 cost per lunch attended) and included in events offered to Chamber members. Becoming a member is a great way to network with businesses and learn what is going on in our Community! If you are interested in becoming a business or individual member please contact: YOGA CLASS HarrisburgChamber@gmail.com • Moderate intensity LIKE US ON FACEBOOK at Harrisburg Chamber of • Lead by certified Yoga Instructor Commerce

INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING A COMMUNITY EVENT? If you have a for-profit community event to submit, please visit our website at tigertimes.harrisburgdistrict41-2.org to purchase a 3”x5” space. You can also upload your logo to include in the ad, $30. Not-for profit community events can be submitted free-of-charge. One-line events on the front page Community Calendar can be submitted free-of-charge.

with 25+ years experience •Open to community, ages 13 + • Location: Shalom Lutheran Church • Date/Time: Monday evenings from 6-7:15 pm • Cost: punch cards available for different $ amounts • 40$ for 4 classes, • 72$ for 8 classes, • 96$ for 12 classes, • OR drop in fee for 12$ per class Contact for more info:

Shalomnur@iw.net

or call or text Lanelle @ 214-2104 THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 3


DISTRICT WHAT COMMON CORE IS……AND ISN’T. JIM HOLBECK, SUPERINTENDENT

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o doubt you have been hearing some conversations on Common Core Standards. I don’t believe in my tenure as a school person have I seen something that has had so much misinformation being passed around.

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have heard from critics that the curriculum is both too easy and too hard. I have heard that it doesn’t make kids learn facts. Not true. Kids still learn facts but they also are being taught more “how to learn.” Wouldn’t you want your own child to have that ability?

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o preface, I am a strong supporter of Common Core, as are most all school superintendents in the state and the country. I can also say that I have heard of many many teachers also showing their support of Common Core.

hat is it? It is a “guide” for schools to use to pick their curriculum. It is not curriculum. They are standards for us to follow. How we teach and what we teach is still in our individual school’s control. When we teach the curriculum however is laid out in the Common Core Standards. hy is that important on when we teach different curriculum? Because in the past, when students moved from school to school and from state to state, and in a school like Harrisburg, even from building to building, we found that kids were at all different places in their learning. Everyone did things their own way. Some kids moving to our schools were way behind where we were, and some came here ahead of where we were. You can imagine how detrimental that is to students. The goal of Common Core is that wherever you live, you should be at the same place, learning the same “standard” material. When you move from the 3rd grade from South Carolina to South Dakota, you step right into the same place in your learning. The same goes if you move from Sioux Falls to Harrisburg. What a great advantage for kids and for school teachers, in our mobile society.

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n the past, curriculum was shoot and miss. We were at the mercy of textbook companies to tell us what to teach, but many schools and individual teachers all created what they thought was important to teach in their rooms. Some students got an enriched curriculum and some were taught materials that were irrelevant for what someone needs to be successful in college or careers. Local control? More like local chaos.

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ur teachers with Common Core can today still mix in their expertise. They can still stop and “smell the roses” when the events of our world make us see the value to teach to what is happening in the world today.

HARRISBURG SCHOOLS SPRING BOOK FAIRS Three Harrisburg schools will be holding book fairs in February. These book fairs offer students, parents, and community members the opportunity to support our libraries and promote books and reading by purchasing books. Posters and small items like erasers will also be available. North Middle School fair will be open for student shopping February 6, 7, 10, and 12 from 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. The book fair will also be open on February 11 from 7:30 am to 8:30 pm, with extended hours so that parents and students can shop during conferences. Journey Elementary and Endeavor Elementary will hold their book fairs on conference night, 1:30 pm to 8:30 pm, Monday, February 10th. If you are unable to attend the book fair, you can shop online by following the book fair arrow link on the library page of each school. Celebrate books and visit our book fairs in February.

oes it make curriculum harder? Yes, in some cases. However it is also necessary. We are teaching math earlier than before. Where we once used to teach Algebraic facts to high school students, those skills are today moved more and more into lower grades. oes it make curriculum too easy? NO. I will not apologize if people think we are making learning harder. We need to pull ourselves up by the bootstraps and do what it takes to make this country stronger and to compete worldwide. To do that means to increase the rigor of our curriculum.

have heard that Common Core is government control over kids, brought on by President Obama. Actually it was started by most of the Governors of our states during President Bush’s term years before President Obama was in office. Most of these Governors were Republicans. Today it is endorsed by President Obama, as he also believes in the importance of our whole nation learning what it takes to make our country stronger and to compete with other countries. This isn’t a Republican or a Democrat plan. It is an educational plan.

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have also heard critics say it is the movement of the United Nations to take over our country. Seriously? They convinced most of our Governors and our Presidents to give up our country???

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f this is taking away local control, then why are the school administrators predominately for it? Why was our last Governor for it, and our present Governor today in support of it? Why are teachers across the state for it? Why are curriculum directors behind it? Because the people who have looked it over see the value in it. We need to trust those who are in education here in South Dakota know what they are talking about.

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hen you hear the hysteria against Common Core, stop and question the logic behind it. If it is “hard to believe” then I would venture you are probably right. It isn’t believable.

KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION Monday, February 10, 2014, 2:00 pm to 7:00 pm Harrisburg Public Schools will be registering children for kindergarten for the 2014-15 school year. Children must be five (5) by September 1, 2014 to be eligible for kindergarten. Please bring the following to registration: 1. State Certified Birth Certificate 2. Immunization Record Appointments will be set during registration for Kindergarten Assessments on April 22nd and April 24th. Please register in the office of the school in which your child will attend. Please call the school at (605) 743-2567 and listen for the options if you have any questions. Endeavor Elementary 2401 W. 95th St. • Sioux Falls, SD 57108 Explorer Elementary 4010 W. 82nd St. • Sioux Falls, SD 57108 Freedom Elementary 1101 Tom Sawyer Trail • Harrisburg, SD 57032 Journey Elementary 6801 S. Grange Ave. • Sioux Falls, SD 57108 Liberty Elementary 200 Willow St. • Harrisburg, SD 57032

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 4


PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

OLIVER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

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he production staff is getting anxious to see the talent in both middle schools come together with the talent at the high school! The production staff includes: Dr. Kip McKee/ Harrisburg Arts Council and the Harrisburg School District (Producers), Michael Smith (Director), Melissa Olson (Assistant Director/Vocal Director), Jaren Guetter (Choreographer/Production Manager), Jason Groon (Pit Orchestra Director), Libby Gould (Vocal Assistant), Kendra Dexter (Costumer) and Jack Mortenson (Tech Director).

Storyland Children’s Theatre and Discovery Mime Theatre performed for over 1500 people at the PAC’s 2nd Annual Children’s Theatre Festival, on January 10 & 11. Children and adults, alike, enjoyed familiar songs, audience interaction and fun characterizations, at this year’s event. THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 5


Travel to China in January 2015 with

Or hear them at their HOME CONCERT following their 2014 Regional Tour Friday, February 7, 2014 • 7:30 p.m. Harrisburg Performing Arts Center Tickets: augietickets.com

Dr. Paul R. Schilf, conductor

At the Heart of the Arts

www.augie.edu/arts

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 6


1oo% of first-time, full-time freshmen receive financial aid.

UPCOMING CAMPUS PREVIEW DAYS Friday, March 7

Friday, April 25

4 Make your own visit at usiouxfalls.edu/admissions. 4 USF offers more than 80 undergraduate academic programs,

and 100% of freshmen receive financial aid.

ACCEPTED STUDENT DAYS Monday, February 17

Performance Scholarship Audtition Day

Friday, March 28

(605) 331-6600 || usiouxfalls.edu THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 7


HIGH SCHOOL WHAT NOT TO DO THIS VALENTINE’S DAY

MOUNT MARTY DUAL CREDIT

CHRISTIAN TRAINOR

MORGAN TE SLAA

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alentine’s Day is a day for love. It’s a day to show that special someone just how much you really love them. For a girl, Valentine’s Day is a day where that guy of her dreams delivers flowers to her school with a five foot teddy bear and a card that reveals his undying love. A day where that hot guy brings a guitar to school and serenades her in the cafeteria in front of all of B lunch. Or possibly, a day when her Prince Charming shows up at her door step, on bended knee, with a box of chocolates, reciting a personalized poem he wrote about her unfaltering beauty. For us guys, Valentine’s Day is a day of doom. A day that comes after many hours of plotting and planning and racking our brains to find the perfect way to show our girl how much we care. A day where we invest our many months of hard earned savings on that special gift just for her. A day where, no matter how much money we spend, how much time we spend planning, or how much thought we put in, we will inevitably fail. To ensure every gal has her dreams fulfilled, and every guy avoids that fall-on-your-face failure, here are five things not to do on Valentine’s Day: • • • •

Buy her exercise equipment/gym membership Buy her surveillance jewelry with a tracking device Take her on a romantic date to McDonalds Tell her, “I would have bought you chocolate, but you need to watch your weight,” while handing her a basket of fruit • Choose Valentine’s Day to tell her, “I’m really not that into you”

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or Harrisburg High School, 2013 was a year of numerous changes regarding the education system. One of the major changes includes implementation of the mod schedule for the freshmen class. It was a vast change for both students and teachers. The change was difficult for administration in the beginning, but it was worth it due to the benefits that students obtained. Additionally, Harrisburg has teamed up with Mount Marty, located in Yankton, to provide Harrisburg students the option for dual credit. Students enrolled in the dual credit system can obtain credits going toward high school and college graduation. Unfortunately, dual credit is only offered for a select few of the Advanced Placement classes. One of, the stipulations of the dual credit system includes that the instructor must have a Masters Degree in the content area. The Mount Marty dual credit program works like this: a student taking the dual credit AP course will get credit for high school and college as long as that student receives a C grade average or above.

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his new program has peaked the interest of many students and parents, since students have the option to gain college credits. This is very advantageous for students and provides an accurate way of accessing knowledge of material because many students are not ideal test takers and may not do as well with the AP test while having received an exceptional grade over the course of the year.

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STUDENT COUNCIL IN THE NEWS

ASHTON AUCH WINS FCCLA DISTRICT IV CHAIR AND STATE OFFICER POSITION

o whether you are hoping to receive that perfect gift, or striving to give that perfect gift, keeping these five tips in mind will help ensure a lovefilled Valentine’s Day for all.

BROOKLYN DEVRIES

hile talking to fellow peers, they agreed that the Mount Marty program is a great way of encouraging students to go above and beyond. Harrisburg is doing a great job with advancing its students’ education and providing an easy transition to college level education.

TRACY KERN n the month of January, the Harrisburg High School Student Council n Monday, January 20, 2014, Harrisburg FCCLA Chapter president, has continued their fundraising efforts with the sale of brownie sundaes. Ashton Auch, was sworn in as FCCLA District IV Chair position at the The money raised will add to the fund for the Children’s Miracle Network District IV FCCLA Meeting in Alcester-Hudson. This position will also allow donation. Each year at state student council, each council donates a sum of Ashton to serve as a South Dakota FCCLA Officer for the 2014-2015 school money to the Children’s Miracle Network of South Dakota and with support year. from the student body in our fundraising endeavors Harrisburg continues to be one of the largest donors. shton was elected into this position after competing with other individuals in these four categories: personal interview, FCCLA ooking towards February, the Harrisburg High School student council knowledge fact test, application, and speech. Ashton was formally looks to become matchmakers on valentines day. The opportunity will be sworn in as District IV Chair at the January 20th District Meeting and will be available for students to take compatibility tests and purchase their results sworn in as a state officer at the 2014 FCCLA State Meeting this upcoming to find the perfect valentines day date. April.

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HARRISBURG’S EMERGENCE OF SCHOOL SPIRIT CADE BERRY

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hroughout my four years at Harrisburg High School, I have seen the cultivation of a hardy school spirit. When I arrived at Harrisburg High as a freshman and walked these halls for the first time, there was a sense of school spirit, yet it seemed as if there was some sort of intangible glass ceiling that we had hit as a school when boasting our school spirit, and yes I say boasting because I believe that school spirit is one of the few things you can and should boast about. Each year, though, I have seen droves of people show their school pride in countless ways, whether it be wearing tiger wear, supporting school programs by purchasing from fundraisers, dressing up during homecoming/spring fling week, or simply by attending sporting and fine arts events that occur during the school year.

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here are countless factors I attribute to this outstanding phenomenon, but there are two in particular that I would like to point out. The first being the new breed of Harrisburg student. I do not know how or where this new hybrid student came from, but I love it! This student not only strives to be the best in the academic aspects of their school life, they strive to be a part of something bigger and better than themselves to make their community a better place, whether it be a sports team to give the town a team root for or a fine arts event to serenade us with the special sounds of Harrisburg’s own. The second factor is the extraordinary adults that surround us. This means everyone from our parents to teachers, administration, coaches, advisors, and everyone in between. We know that any one of you make and will continue to make sacrifices each and every day in order for us to succeed and make our lives the best they can be, so kudos to you. This school district would truly not be what it is today without your selfless acts.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 8

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THE EXPERIENCE OF BEING RECRUITED MORGAN BEANER

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any people don’t experience the process of being recruited for a sport or any other activity. The process for me as I pursued Augustana College was very interesting and noteworthy. I have played softball since I was able to, and my dreams were always to get the chance to play in college. As I got, older I realized how important it was to get myself out there, either by putting a video on the Internet, a portfolio with all my achievements and awards, contacting certain coaches or schools I was interested in going to, attending off season camps, or by inviting the coaches to watch me play. I went on to emailing the coach at Augustana College and talking about what my future plans as a player and future student were. After talking for a couple months, I started to look further into the college and make sure it was something I wanted to do. I didn’t want to make my decision because of the softball scholarship; I wanted to make the decision based on the college and the academic part of my career.

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had information out there and it made me markable by many coaches. Once I had their attention, I was able to narrow myself down to a couple colleges. For me, it was really obvious which school I would be attending because Augustana was the first college to make an offer for me, and they also had the programs I was interested in studying throughout my college career. After I made my decision, the paper work began to come through the mail and through email from the softball coach at Augie. I had many forms to fill out that included the NLI form, NCAA Eligibility Center registration, apply for schooling, and the paper that I actually signed on signing day.

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aving this opportunity was very exciting, and I would recommend to people that if you have a dream and a goal, then stick to it and don’t give up on it. You never know when the chance will present itself to you.


THE GREAT CHEMIST ZACHARY MERRICK

SENIOR CLASS

KORI FINK

KIANNA SMALLFIELD

o you wonder who the guy is that walks around in a pair of rocking kicks and a cardigan? That, my friends, is Mr. Zachary Merrick. Besides being one of the best-dressed teachers, Mr. Merrick is also a very smart man, hence why he majored in Chemistry. Zachary teaches Advanced Chemistry and Physics. Personally, I think the extra challenges of Chemistry are worth it if you have a teacher like Mr. Merrick! Besides the first couple days of school, there has never been a dull day in his chemistry classes. Mr. Merrick’s class is the class I get most excited to go to, and I know I’m not the only one who feels this way! One of the greatest things about Mr. Merrick is that he is Keloland famous! If you are ever bored or feeling down, you need to go and watch the video that he is in; it is bound to put you in a good mood! If you want a teacher who you can relate to and one you can joke with, Mr. Merrick is the teacher for you, as long as you don’t mind some homework. As much as I tell Mr. Merrick I don’t like him, he will forever and always be mine, and many other students, favorite and most memorable teacher. Keep calm and Chemistry on.

ur senior class is like one big family. No, we might not all hang out outside of class, or we might not all talk to one another outside of the classes that we are in. Yes, we have our different groups of friends. These are the athletes, the drama students, oral interp. kids, FCCLA/HOSA/FFA members, student council, band and choir students, and the creative, artsy students. Yes, there could be tension with a couple of people, but overall when someone is going through a tough time, we’re there for each other. If a friend or relative passes away, or someone gets into a car accident, or anything that is going on in someone’s life to where they’re struggling and they need someone to be there to talk to and just to know that no matter what everything will be okay, we as a classmate, and as a friend, are always there for one another. We will always have each other’s backs, even if we aren’t in the same “group” as one another. Our memories and our friendships that were made over the years together will always be with us and have prepared us for our lives after high school.

D

O

THE IMPOSSIBLE TASK OF STAYING WARM

BASKETBALL TRANSITION TO “AA”

JORDAN BROCK

EVAN KELLY

W

T

inter has come, so things have cooled and this year is especially cold. he transition from an “A” school to a “AA” school is often full of many I figured I should suggest some winter apparel to wear. First thing to ups and downs. Some of the changes in moving from an “A” to “AA” do is to look at the weather reports to see how cold it is. Let’s say it is in the school range from increased travel to playing schools with larger enrollment single digits with the wind chill making it feel like it’s below zero. Layers work numbers. Playing schools with larger enrollment numbers often means wonders in this type of scenario. Yes, you are just walking from your car to playing teams that are tougher competition. When you are playing schools inside the school, but it’s better to dress warmly due to the fact that maybe twice as big you are, they often have a better talent pool to field a team you will be outside longer than you think. Instead of just that one shirt, from. That’s not to say that we are having troubles competing, the opposite add an under shirt, a regular shirt, or even a tank top under your original has actually occurred, in fact, we are competing very well this year. The shirt. Even with that one simple extra layer, you will stay even warmer than girls team has already come out to a 7-3 start on the heels of an “A” state before since your body temperature will stay; in other words you will be championship season. The girls are very competitive even after moving more insulated. Also, include a jacket with this; with a jacket and that extra up a division. They were handed their first loss of the season after playing layer you will definitely notice the difference in the temperature. If you are perennial girls power and state-runner up last year Mitchell. They proved a person that gets cold pretty quickly, then add a sweatshirt underneath they are out to challenge for a “AA” state championship after a close 55your jacket. I know for a fact this will help because when I moved to South 48 loss against Mitchell. The boys are now off to a 4-7 start to begin the Dakota, my body was not ready for the bitter cold, so I layered and sure year. It was rough in the early going for the boys team as they started the enough, I was much warmer. Girls, I know you have your styles that are season 0-3, but they then reeled off three straight to wins reach 3-3 before important to you - skirts, dresses, etc. Do try to wear sweatpants over them dropping their next two games and then bouncing back again with a win until you get into the school. Not only does it allow you to keep your look at home against Brookings. going year around, it even keeps you warm. For guys, I know some like to wear shorts, but like I told the girls, put on sweatpants because it allows you to still wear shorts while staying warm. When you know it’s going to be extremely cold out, layer up, put on your scarves, gloves, hats and you will CHAYDEN CARPENTER not have to worry about being cold. ver wondered what it’s like in the day of the life of a wrestler? Many people do not know how hard wrestling is, not only physically but mentally. When you lose, you have no one to blame except yourself, but you have an amazing team that is like a family supporting you every step of the way. I believe that’s what makes wrestling so unique and different from all of the other sports.

THE FEW, THE BRAVE, THE WRESTLERS

E T

he discipline that it takes to commit to wrestling is incredible. You have to be willing to come to practice everyday after school and work your butt off and push yourself out of your comfort zone to become better. You also have to be willing to sacrifice indulging yourself on food to make weight. Another thing that you have to sacrifice when being a wrestler is your free time; weekends to yourself are pretty non-existent in the life of a wrestler because there are usually meets once or twice a weekend. Not everybody is cut out to be a wrestler and that is why wrestlers take pride in what they do.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 9


NORTH MIDDLE SCHOOL 7TH GRADE CHARACTERS KELLY ANDREWS

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hange is happening at Harrisburg North Middle School! The middle of winter can be quite desolate, dull, and depressing at some schools, but not at HNMS! The transition from January to February marks a time of change. Winter decorations are coming down and are being replaced by pink and red hearts preparing for the festivities in February. However, decor is not the only thing changing over here; the students are undergoing changes themselves.

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n fact, the students are actually changing into different people— characters to be more specific. The 7th Grade English Language Arts teachers have collaborated to create a book talk project where our students are required to emulate a character from their free-read book. Our students will create a life-sized cutout of one character from their book, and they will decorate or dress the character as he/she/it is dressed in the book.

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or the presentation, the students will stand beside the model they created and assume the role of the character; the students will introduce the book, tell us about the role of the character, explain the greatest challenge(s) the character faces, and regale us with any other information they deem necessary for us to understand the book.

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lot of our students are bibliophiles and love to read in their free time, but for some of our students, reading is more like a punishment or torture. We have been encouraging our students to read every day outside of class and to step outside of their comfort zone to try new genres. This project has instilled a lot of excitement in our students because it’s a great way for them to try something new with reading.

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e have a lot of talented artists and thespians in 7th grade, and they have been bursting for more opportunities to display their strengths. Even some of the students who aren’t as outgoing or artistic are excited to step outside of their comfort zone to try something different. Our students have been working hard all year to speak comfortably in front of their peers, and we feel like this is a great opportunity for them to demonstrate their progress. Combining oral speaking skills with a book/character analysis is a great way for our students to be exposed to a vast array of genres and titles, which will hopefully inspire them to read more!

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f you find yourself looking for a little “change,” or for a great character to fall in love with, swing on over to the 7th grade wing to view the many different book characters who have inhabited our hallways! Can’t wait to see you, Kelly Andrews.

State Capitol building in Pierre.

HARRISBURG NORTH 8TH GRADERS HEADING TO PIERRE! TAMARA HUFFMAN

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he Harrisburg North Middle School 8th grade history classes have been studying a unit on the formation of our government and the Constitution. To supplement the unit, the 8th grade class has been given a wonderful opportunity to visit our State Capitol in Pierre. This field trip has been provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society and has been completely funded by a grant from Xcel Energy. In addition to a tour of the Capitol, students will participate in activities led by Smithsonian educators and view a session of our State Legislature.

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he State Capitol is unable to accommodate our large 8th grade class on one day so this field trip will take place on Tuesday, March 4, Wednesday, March 5, and Thursday, March 6, with students attending only one of the days.

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tudents attending the trip need to be in the Harrisburg North Middle School parking lot on their assigned day by 6:45 – 6:50 AM. The bus is leaving the parking lot promptly by 7AM. Lunch will be provided to the students while at the State Capitol. Students will arrive back at the North Middle School around 6 – 6:30 PM and they will be responsible for finding their own transportation home promptly by 6:30 PM.

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his is an amazing opportunity that many districts in our state do not have the privilege to partake. The 8th grade students and staff are very excited for this upcoming experience of our government in action!

Cultural Heritage Building in Pierre.

Exhibits at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 10


SOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL 6TH GRADE KELLI SEMMLER

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fter every quarter of homework, grades, projects, and tests, students at South Middle School are given the opportunity for reward! Students who receive a grade point average of 3.0 or above and those who have not had behavior infractions are allowed an afternoon of fun through our Tiger Stripes celebrations. Students who receive below a 3.0 can still attend the celebration if they receive a Tiger Stripes Nomination from a staff member for their citizenship, hard work, and/or positive attitude.

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r. Christopher Andre coordinates the program at the South Middle School. He and his team of Tiger Stripes Club members plan activities for this special event. The Tiger Stripes Club, consisting of 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students, meets after school to plan games, activities, and prizes to celebrate the success of the participating students.

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n the day of the celebration, during advisory, students who have earned their way into the celebration are given a Tiger Stripes pin to wear as a symbol of their accomplishment. For the last hour of the day, students go to the gym to take part in the festivities. Games vary, but can include lightning, dodge ball, minute-to-win-it games, and other fun competitions. This Tiger Stripes program is a great way to motivate South Middle School students play a game of musical chairs during a students to keep focused on their academics, behave appropriately, Tiger Stripes celebration. and always be working hard and trying their best. This is the fourth year of the Tiger Stripes program, and we look forward to recognizing our students’ accomplishments for many years to come.

ROBOTICS ON THE RISE CHRISTOPHER STEWART

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n an effort to entice students to seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) related fields, companies have sponsored global robotics competitions. These competitions draw students in with robots, and show students that STEM related fields can be exciting.

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his year sixteen students from Harrisburg's two middle schools formed three different robotics teams to compete in two different robotics competitions. These students will compete in a total of six regional and state tournaments using robots that were designed, built, and programmed to perform many complex tasks.

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wo teams, The Block Heads coached by Nate Hadrick, Steve Fox, and Kevin Van Engelenhoven, and Tiger Robotics Coached by Christopher Stewart, competed in the First Lego League. Over eighty elementary and middle school teams from around the state competed for one of forty spots at the State Tournament. The Block Heads earned one of the coveted golden tickets inviting them to the state tournament. They had an impressive showing and ended the day in eighth place for their robot's score on the robot run, the main event for First Lego League. These runs require the robot to run autonomously through an obstacle course scoring points by completing predetermined objectives. This year's theme was Nature's Fury. Many of the objectives dealt with natural disasters and providing needed supplies and shelter to characters on the board.

Blockhead robotics pauses for a quick picture during one of their many night practices, preparing for the state robotics tournament. Block head robotics is made up of Harrisburg students primarily from North and South Middle Schools.

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iger Robotics fielded a second team, coached by Christopher Stewart and Steve Fox for the VEX Robotics Competition. In this competition, middle schools and high schools from around the region design, build, and program VEX robots made from steel and aluminum parts to compete in a head-to-head competition with three other robots. In these competitions, robots score points in a short autonomous period followed by a longer period where students control robots using wireless controllers. Robots score points by moving objects around the field to different scoring areas. Tiger Robotics was the state champions in the VEX robotics competition at the very first VEX robotics competition last season and recently won the First Annual VEX Robotics Tournament held November 16th, 2013, at South Middle School in Harrisburg. They hope to defend their title in an upcoming tournament in Mitchell as well as the state tournament in Sioux Falls later this year.

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s robotics grows in Harrisburg, new coaches, mentors, sponsors and volunteers will be needed to help these programs grow. If you are interested in helping a current team or starting a new team contact Christopher Stewart, Tech Ed. Teacher for both Harrisburg middle schools for more information, or find the information you need at the websites listed below. http://www.usfirst.org/roboticsprograms/fll http://www.vexrobotics.com/ For information about upcoming tournaments check out Tiger Robotics web site. https://tigerroboticssd.shutterfly.com/

Tiger Robotics competes in the first annual VEX robotics competition, Harrisburg South Middle School, November 2013

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 11


8TH GRADE HAPPENINGS CARLA DIEDE

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he past few weeks have seen the 6th graders continue their work in Microsoft Word. We have started working on tabs and indenting. The students have picked up on this quickly. The 8th graders have begun working on spreadsheets. They have worked through several Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and a couple on Numbers. Numbers is developed by Apple and has proven to be a little more challenging because of its subtle differences to Excel. We will continue to work with spreadsheets for the next few weeks.

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n ELA the students are learning about real world issues. They are learning how to research topics. The students are then being asked to formulate opinions based on facts and present them to persuade. Communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills are what they are learning and that will take them into the 21st Century. They are enjoying learning about the issues and debating against their classmates.

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ongruent or similar, that is the question for 8th grade math students this month. They will be exploring relationships between congruent and similar polygons. When 8th grade math students explore geometry, Algebra students will begin looking into exponential relationships and radicals. From modeling investments to analyzing icebergs using exponents, students will gain an understanding of how polynomials are utilized in the real world. At the same time Geometry students will be using coordinate geometry to create transformation of polygons.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 12


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THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 13


ENDEAVOR ELEMENTARY KINDERGARTEN BRIAN PLAHN

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he Endeavor kindergarten students have been keeping busy through the month of January with many fun classroom activities. The month began with a unit on hibernation. We had a special hibernation day where students were invited to bring a stuffed animal, wear their pajamas, and read in our classroom caves.

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s a way to escape the cold weather we used our imaginations and took a trip to “Jamaica”. Everyone got out their shorts and shades and remembered the warmer days of summer. We worked on an ocean theme and did descriptive writing with fish and shells. We also sorted, graphed, and counted different ocean animals.

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e look forward to the 100th day of school where we will be spending the day counting to 100 in a variety of ways. Some activities will include: counting 100 steps in the school, bringing in collections of 100, reading for 100 seconds, drawing what we will look like at 100, and many more! The last Friday in January will be Sports Day where we will celebrate the Super Bowl and make our predictions as to who will win the big game.

RECESS RELIEF BRIAN PLAHN

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he Endeavor PTO came through in a big way and helped alleviate some of the winter blues for our students. With all of the cold SD temperatures, students have been spending a tremendous of time indoors. The PTO purchased over 100 games for the students. They were very excited about all of the new games and activities! The noise level dropped, students were socializing and everyone was engaged in an activity. It was wonderful! The games brought a smile and a much needed change of pace. Thanks PTO!!!

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he PTO meets once a month on Thursday at 6:30 pm in the Endeavor Library. There is always free child care and everyone is welcome to attend. The next meeting is on February 20th. We also have our Silent Auction and Pizza BINGO night on Friday, April 4th. Please come and support our amazing PTO!

ENDEAVOR PERFORMS AT THE SIOUX FALLS SKY FORCE BRIAN PLAHN

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n Friday, January 17th, the Endeavor Jambo Djembe and Expressions clubs performed at the Sioux Falls Sky Force game. The Jambo Djembe club sang the National Anthem while the Expressions club signed it. It was a special night at the game, as they were honoring Veterans. The students did a wonderful job and everyone was able to stay and enjoy the game. Parents and other supporters cheered the students on as they performed. Mr. Stockman, Jen Sevold and Lisa Norris led the groups.

Picture: The Endeavor Jambo Djembe and Expressions clubs waiting to perform.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 14


EXPLORER ELEMENTARY EXPLORER SPED CLASSROOMS CHRISTINA PAGE

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e are getting back into the swing of things after our nice Christmas break. The children were excited to jump back in.

n the Early Childhood Preschool Classroom, the students are working on many fine motor, gross motor, communication, and academic skills. They practice putting shoes on, dressing, and bathroom skills daily. Recently, they had a “Sturgis Rally” as they peddled around the lunchroom and parked in style in front of the library. As they learn their numbers, colors, shapes, and letters they get to scoot across the floor and place rings on the various skills. Motor planning is incorporated into each academic lesson.

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n the Exceptional Learning Classroom, one student has been working on learning to use switches to navigate cause and effect computer programs. Several students have been working on learning to orientate the building using canes, reading with magnifiers, closed caption circuit, and learning to read braille in textbooks and in their environments. Another student has been working on various devices to help with voice output when talking with other peers and teachers. All of the children have been working on social skills and how to interact with people in their environments.

Sturgis Rally.

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n the Resource Room, the students are working on letter and sound identification, phonetic awareness, oral reading fluency, and reading comprehension. Depending on the level of the students, they are working on antonyms, synonyms, and homonyms. In math they are working on basic number identification through learning their multiplication facts. Games and file folder activities are included in the lessons to help motivate students.

FREEDOM ELEMENTARY

TWITTER IN THE CLASSROOM TYLER MUTH & KATHLEEN PETERSEN

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tudents today are using technology and social media outside of school on a daily basis. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are a means for students to not only communicate their thoughts, ideas, and feelings to one another, but it also allows them to create and publish their work with ease.

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he classroom should be a place where students are able to use the same technology outside the classroom as well. At the elementary level, most students are just getting introduced to using social media, and knowing how to use them correctly and safely needs to be just as important as other daily social skills.

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n Mr. Muth’s 5th grade class at Freedom Elementary, we use Twitter and Instagram as a means of communicating to one another and parents, and also showcasing what is going on in the classroom. Students are able to tweet something they learned using our class Twitter account using a

fake Twitter handle. I also use it to communicate to parents with links to the weekly Tiger Tuesday page and our classroom blog as well. Instagram has been a great way to not only tweet pictures or what goes on in the classroom but also video now as well.

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n Mrs. Petersen’s 4th grade at Freedom Elementary, we use Twitter and Instagram as well in our daily and weekly activities. We use it to communicate with the parents, communicate with each other through questions, and to show our daily activities and projects. I post things the students have learned on Twitter with their fake Twitter handles, so they can show what they have learned and so parents can see too. Along with activities from our classroom we also share what is going on at Freedom Elementary from their Twitter account, so everyone can stay connect through some form of communication. Instagram and Twitter have become an almost daily thing in our classroom. The students enjoy seeing their work on our classroom Twitter, Instagram, and website.

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 15


JOURNEY ELEMENTARY CELLS AND MAGNIFICATION COME TO JOURNEY ELEMENTARY TONDA KIRTON

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-5 students who walk into school look around at their familiar surroundings. They see many items found within their day in usual fashion until they walk into the science lab. Thanks to the PTO and their generous donation of two teaching microscopes, fifteen student microscopes, and a couple hundred prepared slides, students are able to see up close the fibers and cells that make up things with which they are so familiar. “I didn’t know that a fly has hair on its leg! Gross!” called out an enthusiastic fifth grader. “What is this on my fingernail? It’s disgusting!,” exclaimed another.

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he microscopes were purchased with funds obtained through fund-raising programs organized and held throughout the year by a group of dedicated Journey parents. The two Boreal teaching microscopes have different capacities. One is able to project a high magnification of everyday items onto an Interwrite board and the other allows teachers to show cross-sections of cells. The two microscopes can be used in conjunction with each other to allow for a wide variety of learning. Both microscopes have the capacity to take still pictures or record a video of what students view.

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rooklyn DeVries, a senior at Harrisburg High School has been coming to Journey one time per month after school to lead a science club for eighteen students in grade five for his senior project. “My favorite thing about science club is being able to use the microscopes to see various organisms,” exclaimed fifth grader Olivia Hruby. “It is allowing me to learn how to use a microscope and that is good because I want to be a scientist someday. Who knows, maybe I will cure cancer!” Mr. DeVries has shown tremendous dedication to the advancement of science by allowing young minds to be excited each month about all science has to offer. Lesson preparations have included extracting DNA from a strawberry, learning the parts of a microscope and how to correctly use them within a lab setting, determining if solutions are an acid or base, and practicing the scientific method.

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PROOFREADERS

Special Thanks to:

Kaye Weber, Instructor Cade Berry Josh Burg LeAnn Bushar Abby Hatch Ethan Janis Evan Kelly Krystal Kvalheim Adam Larson Ellie McDowell

Creative Writing Class: Jordan Steen Aaliyah Sterkel Shelby Strand Tyler Thill Nate Trzaskoma Vivien Voigt Olivia Weigel Dani Wilson

iger Nation, your Harrisburg booster club for all

volleyball cour t, on a wrestling mat or jumping a hurdle.

extracurricular

High

Some life lessons are learned in a musical or dramatic per-

School, believes that education involves learning

formance or a debate competition. We can make an impact in

all of life’ s lessons. Many of these lessons are not

these life lessons!

activities

at

Harrisburg

learned in a classroom, but on a soccer field, on a

Have questions on how to join or get involved?

Contact

a

Tiger

Nation

Board Member or visit the website:

A few examples of what Tiger Nation has provided…

• Tent to keep our Cross Country & Track Athletes warm and dry • IPad and case for the Track and Cross Country coaches used to video athletes and keep stats • Choir robe bags and transporting boxes to keep the robes in good condition during travel • Assisted with expenses associated with the Fall Musical Play • Spike trainers & 4 block stands for our volleyball team • Green fees paid so our state boys golf team could play the course ahead of the state tourney • Basic equipment for fall school softball team • Tiger Vision crew T-shirts and a software upgrade

THE TIGER TIMES • FEBRUARY 2014 • PAGE 16

• Travel costs for a Wrestling team camp in Nebraska for two consecutive years

www.WeAreTigerNation.com Board Members:

• Funded the TIBBS position camp for all HS Girls basketball players for the past two years

President, Aaron Ellingsen

Vice President, Vicki Lanier

Funded the Boys Basketball team Jackrabbit Satellite Camp held at HHS

SDSU

• Funded boy & girl soccer players at a full camp, thanks to scholarship dollars offered • Impact Baseline Concussion testing software – still available to every Harrisburg Tiger athlete • Travel dollars to assist with the Debate and Oral Interp Teams to two National Tournaments • 100 Yards of turf on our state-of-the-art football field • 700 Seats in one of the finest high school auditoriums in the state

(605-360-1951) (605-351-2927) Treasurer, Lorna Severy (605-261-6722) Secretary, Deb Johnson (605-351-3632) Board Member, Steve Harris (605-321-3725) Board Member, Jeff Gross (605-321-9672) President Emeritus, Jeff Gould (605-201-5147)

Volume 37, issue 5, February 2014  
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