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Course Catalog 2019-20


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

ACADEMICS Vermont Academy’s Mission Statement challenges us to develop “confident and active learners.” Our goal is to provide an academic program that inspires each student to meet this challenge. The Head of School assumes the ultimate responsibility for the academic strength and integrity of the school. A confident and active learner:

Requirements

• pursues learning beyond limits set by the teacher, • sets an effective schedule for accomplishing tasks, • keeps track of and manages all tasks associated with learning, • gathers, processes, and communicates ideas and information effectively, • demonstrates self-discipline, • seeks opportunities to share talents and ideas with others, • portrays a willingness to take risks in pursuit of learning, • possesses an excitement and joy in learning itself, • demonstrates an awareness of ability and performs to that ability.

1. Students must satisfactorily complete at least 17 college preparatory course units to meet Vermont Academy’s diploma requirements. Most colleges will expect to see 20 or more units. The record is expected to include: SUBJECT: MINIMUM CREDIT: English 4 credits (Eng 9, Eng 10, Eng 11 and 1/3 credit each trimester in Grade 12; American Literature required) Mathematics 3 credits (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry.) History (US History required.)

3 credits

Science 3 credits (One biological science (B) and one physical science (P) required.) World Languages (2 years of one language.)

2 credits

Arts 1 credit (Music, Art, or Theater. Does not include 9th-Grade Arts. Electives 1 credit (Any credit from one of the departments above.)

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

2. Year-long courses receive 1/3 credit each trimester. If the student fails the first trimester, continuation of the course and granting credit are at the discretion of the teacher, the department chair, and the academic dean. 3. All students are expected to enroll in at least five courses each term. However, in some instances, the academic dean, the director of learning skills, and the director of college counseling may approve a minimum of four courses. The final decision rests with the academic dean. 4. In order to graduate from Vermont Academy, seniors must have earned appropriate course credits and have been matriculated and in attendance at the Academy for three trimesters in the senior year. Seniors must pass at least four courses each trimester during their senior year, one being English in addition to any other graduation requirements taken as a senior. A committee will review the standing of each senior prior to graduation to determine if a diploma should be awarded. A recommendation will then be made to the academic dean. 5. In extremely rare circumstances, a Vermont Academy student, having left in good standing before graduation, may petition to be granted a diploma.

Grading System Grading Criteria A = Consistently exceptional; mastery of skills, fully engaged in the course B = Secure understanding of skills and material; engaged in the course C = Struggles to master skills and material; inconsistently engaged in the course D = Substandard mastery of skills and material; not engaged in the course F = Does not meet minimum standards of the course Performance grades are reported as follows: 97-100 93-96 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 0-59

= = = = = = = = = = = = =

A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

6. Courses may be taken over the summer to make up a failed class or to accelerate a course of study. However, summer course credit will only be accepted if approval is given before the course is taken. Approval needs to be obtained from the chair of the given academic department and the academic dean.

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4.33 4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1.67 1.33 1.00 0.67 0.00


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

ENGLISH Year-Long Courses Grade 9 The Quest: no prerequisite. Grade 10 The Individual in Society: no prerequisite. Honors The Individual in Society – application and departmental approval necessary. Grade 11 American Literature: no prerequisite, graduation requirement. AP English Literature and Composition: application and departmental approval necessary. Grade 12 Honors World Literature: application and departmental approval necessary. International students: New students assigned after a placement test. Returning students placed by department recommendation. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL): no prerequisite. English for International Students (EIS): no prerequisite. American Studies for International Students (ASI): no prerequisite

Junior and Senior Trimester-Long Electives Note: Not every elective will be offered from the following list. Student interest will determine which electives are offered. No prerequisites.

HISTORY Year-Long Courses Grade 9 Foundations in History Foundations in History for International Students

Seniors must take one literature based course during a trimester of their senior Grade 10 year. Modern Comparative Cultures Modern Comparative Cultures for Fall Electives International Students Journalism Honors European History Note: Journalism is a one-trimester course and may be taken only once. Grade 11 Senior Writing Seminar United States History Note: is required unless a student is AP United States History enrolled in Grade 12 Honors World American Studies for International Literature Students Winter Electives Journalism Creative Writing Public Speaking and Debate Detective Fiction Madness & Monsters in Literature Survival Literature Spring Electives Journalism Public Speaking and Debate Writing and Reflection-Writing About Art, Art About Writing Science-Fiction and Fantasy Dark Realities Contemporary Short Story

Grade 12 Note: May include juniors who have satisfied the United States History requirements or want to double up in history. Year-Long Courses AP Psychology AP Comparative Government and Politics Economics AP Economics Fall Electives Contemporary Issues Sociology of Race Winter Electives Contemporary Issues Sociology of Gender

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

Spring Electives Contemporary Issues Sociology of Crime MATHEMATICS Year-Long Courses Algebra I Geometry Honors Geometry Algebra II Honors Algebra II Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry Statistics Pre-Calculus Honors Pre-Calculus AP Statistics AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC Advanced Topics in Mathematics SCIENCE Year-Long Courses except where indicated Physics courses Conceptual Physics Physics Honors Physics AP Physics Chemistry courses Chemistry Honors Chemistry AP Chemistry Biology courses Biology Honors Biology Kinesiology AP Biology

Environmental Science and Sustainability courses AP Environmental Science Geology and Ecology Engineering courses Robotics: Design and Engineering Robotics: Advanced Topics in Programming Robotics: Advanced Topics in Control System Design Robotics: Advanced Topics in Mechanical Systems Design Robotics: Advanced Topics in Electrical System Design Computer Science AP Computer Science Principles WORLD LANGUAGES Note: Some courses listed may not be offered depending on student interest and staffing. Language waiver possible with approval. Year-Long Courses Chinese 1 Chinese 2 Chinese 3 Chinese 4 Chinese 5 AP Chinese French 1 French 2 French 3 French 4 French 5 AP French Spanish 1 Spanish 2 Spanish 3 Spanish 4 Spanish 5 AP Spanish 5 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG

Russian 1 Latin 1 Latin 2 PERFORMING ARTS Note: All 9th Graders participate in 9th Grade Arts, rotating through visual, Musical, theatrical, writing, and science arts. Advanced Theater and Music are available by special arrangement. MUSIC COURSES Available Year-Long Advanced Music Music Lessons Ensembles Offerings Jazz Ensemble Vocal Ensemble Chamber Music Ensemble Note: Ensembles are year-long courses, with open enrollment at trimesters. Fall Electives Introduction to Electronic Music Winter Electives Music Appreciation Spring Electives Music Workshop THEATER COURSES Year Long Advanced Theater Fall Electives Introduction to Acting Winter Electives Form and Idea in Drama


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

VISUAL ARTS Year-Long Courses Pottery Filmmaking Digital Photography AP Studio Art (2D Design) Advanced Art by arrangement Fall Electives B & W Photography I Filmmaking: The Art of Television Digital Graphic Design Drawing 1 & 2 Winter Electives B & W Photography II Documentary Filmmaking Digital Graphic Design Introduction to 3D Spring Electives Painting I & II Comedy & Filmmaking Digital Graphic Design Pottery

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS We have two primary goals in English: To help our students become better writers and readers and to help them sharpen their critical thinking skills. At the same time, we want to convey to them the excitement, power, freedom, and versatility of language through their own experience with writing and exposure to a wide variety of literary works. Through literature and in their own writing, our students confront the ideas and issues that complete and enrich life. English courses at all levels are based on individualized and small-group instruction that challenge students to take responsibility for their own learning and to think conceptually. Regular writing and reading assignments, frequent classroom discussions, group workshops, individual student/teacher conferences and special projects are all part of the challenge. The English Department believes that critical thinking requires an open mind and a safe environment in which to use it. Therefore, we stress a comfortable setting for free exchange of ideas, and we encourage all members of classes to respect the natural variety of opinions and points of view that inevitably flow in class discussion. Year Long Courses Grade 9 The Quest In this year long course, students will explore archetypes and how they reoccur in the literature of different cultures throughout the ages. They will examine mythology, fairy tales, fables, novels, and films to investigate this idea throughout the course. By studying this premise, students will develop a firm understanding of how archetypes mirror the human experience. They will also solidify their knowledge of basic grammar, strengthen their reflective, analytical, and creative writing skills, and expand their vocabulary throughout the course of the year. Grade 10 The Individual in Society No prerequisites. This year long course focuses on how individuals function within the context of the family and in society at large. Students refine skills acquired in the 9th grade. They continue to work on the writing process, analytical writing, vocabulary, grammar, and reading skills. Readings may include: Night, Antigone, Fahrenheit 451, Othello, A Long Way Gone, short stories, and poetry. Honors The Individual in Society Students must complete an application process and receive departmental approval. This year long class for sophomores emphasizes developing writing and reading skills that will be expanded on in junior AP English. Titles may include, but are not limited to: A Doll’s House, Night, Fahrenheit 451, Othello, A Long Way Gone, short stories, and poetry.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

Grade 11 American Literature This is a graduation requirement. No prerequisites. This year long course concentrates on American writers from the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will read a selection of short stories, non-fiction, poetry, and novels covering a variety of literary styles and themes. Students will continue to refine their writing skills in research, analytical, and creative writing assignments. In conjunction with course material and in preparation for standardized tests, this course continues to emphasize vocabulary building and grammar. Texts will include The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, Fences, Orphan Train and The Glass Castle. No prerequisites. AP English Literature and Composition Students must complete an application process and receive departmental approval. This year long course for juniors will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement exam in English. Centered on American literature, the course is designed to introduce students to a variety of rhetorical styles and to increase students’ repertoire of literary works. Emphasis is placed upon written exercises through which students explore how authors work to convey their meanings, and through which students learn to articulate ideas concisely. Titles may include, but are not limited to: The Great Gatsby, Invisible Man, The Scarlett Letter, Beloved, Middlesex, short stories by Kurt Vonnegut, Ernest Hemingway, Joyce Carol Oates, Jhumpa Lahiri, Alice Walker, Tim O’Brien, Flannery O’Connor, and poetry from the 16th century to the present. One trimester will focus on British and World Literature in preparation for the AP exam, including: King Lear and The Handmaid’s Tale. Grade 12 Honors World Literature Students must complete an application process and receive departmental approval. Students must complete an application process and receive departmental approval. Focusing on world literature, this year long course is designed to introduce students to a variety of rhetorical styles and to increase students’ repertoire of literary works. Emphasis is placed upon written exercises through which students explore how authors work to convey their meanings, and through which students learn to articulate ideas concisely. Titles may include, but are not limited to: Cry, the Beloved Country; Heart of Darkness; Things Fall Apart; and one of Shakespeare’s plays. Students will also read short stories and poetry from the 17th century to the present. Senior Writing Seminar Required of all seniors and PG not enrolled in World Literature - Honors. All seniors must have a full year of English, including 1 literature elective. Seniors enrolled in Senior Writing Seminar can choose from the elecitves on page 9-12 for the winter and spring trimesters. Using essays and short stories as models, this course offers an intensive preparation for college level expository writing emphasizing the process approach. Students examine and practice the rules and principles that underpin good writing. Time will be set aside for work on the personal college essay. No prerequisites. 8 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

International Students For the classes below, returning students will be placed based on teacher recommendation, and new students will be assigned after a placement test. No prerequisites. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) No prerequisites. This is a year-long credit course which concentrates on teaching English as a secondary language. Students acquire listening and speaking skills and study grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing. New students will be placed in this course based on teacher recommendation or based on their performance on a placement test given during orientation. English for International Students (EIS) This course cannot be taken concurrently with ESOL. This course is designed as the final transition to mainstream English classes. This year long credit course is designed to give students an opportunity to practice the skills needed in mainstream English classes, such as analytical and personal writing, reading, and how to discuss literature. Students will be placed in this class based on teacher recommendation or based on their performance on a placement test given during orientation. Current ESOL students will usually be placed in EIS. American Studies for International Students American Studies for International Students is a combined history and English course that will fulfill the graduation requirements in United States History and American Literature at Vermont Academy. This course will have a greater emphasis on reading, writing, and speaking in English and offers opportunities to practice the skills necessary for college readiness. These skills include critically reading many types of source materials, engaging in the research process, and expressing ideas persuasively in both written and verbal form. In addition to skills development, this course will offer international students exposure to concepts and themes of American political, economic, social, and cultural history that are critical to taking full advantage of the study abroad experience. Note: Enrollment in this class will take precedence over all other course selections as a non-waivable graduation requirement, and it will count for a credit in both the History and English Departments. Students identified as having a language proficiency level that lends itself to enrollment in this course will be required to enroll in both the history and literature sections simultaneously. English Electives Open to Juniors and Seniors Senior Writing Seminar is required unless a student is enrolled in English 12 Honors World Literature Seniors must take one literature based course during a trimester of their senior year. Senior Writing Seminar Required for seniors unless enrolled in Honors Senior English Using essays and short stories as models, this course offers an intensive preparation for college level expository writing emphasizing the process approach. Students examine and practice the rules and principles that underpin good writing. Time will be set aside for work on the personal college essay. No prerequisites.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Fall Electives Journalism Journalism is a one trimester course which may be taken only once. This one trimester course will explore the history and tenets of American journalism and provide students with an opportunity to research and write articles and editorials for publication. The focus of the class will be producing a student run school newspaper the VA Voice. No prerequisites. Winter Writing Electives Creative Writing This course focuses on building and refining skills involved in fiction and poetry through the writing workshop model. Students are invited to experiment as they find their own unique voice and writing interests. We will read and discuss works in a variety of genres with the emphasis on writing as a way to both reflect upon and communicate one’s experiences. All students are required to contribute to the literary magazine PAW Print: Poetry, Art, Writing. Texts may include: Stephen King’s On Writing, Please excuse this Poem, The Penguin Anthology of 20th Century Poetry and New Sudden Fiction, supplemental handouts and students’ own work. No prerequisites. Public Speaking and Debate This trimester course is an introduction to the basic skills, techniques, and terminology involved in making oral presentations and speeches, not only in academic settings, but also for other occasions and situations. This course focuses on effective speech writing, preparation, and delivery skills using topics of student choice for speaking exercises and writing assignments. In addition, students will be introduced to and practice the research, argumentation, and rebuttal skills used in formal debate. No prerequisites Journalism This one trimester course will explore the history and tenets of American journalism and provide students with an opportunity to research and write articles and editorials for publication. The focus of the class will be producing a student run school newspaper the VA Voice. No prerequisites Winter Literature Electives Survival Literature This course looks at literature in which survival is a major element of the narrative. After an introductory unit that explores human connection to the wilderness & nature, as well as the role of extreme situations in building character, the course will be split into three units. The first unit will look at real life survival stories, the second will look at the survival genre in literature, both historical and current, and the third will look at survival as it works as part of fantasy literature. After the introductory unit, this course will work tutorial style, with members of the class pairing up and choosing their readings from a list for each unit. As part of each unit, each pair will read their chosen novel, find two literary essays, write 2 reading reflections, and complete a final project. Over the course of the term, students will complete three final projects—the first will be a personal narrative in response to their novel, the second will be an analytical essay, and the third will be a piece of creative writing or the equivalent in response to their source.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Detective Fiction While giving an historical overview of the genre, this course will introduce three main categories of detective fiction: the amateur detective, the private detective, and the police detective. Students will consider the conventions of the genre and what makes it so popular. Works by authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conon Doyle, Agatha Christie, Sue Grafton, Ed McBain, and Tony Hillerman will make up the reading for the course. Students will read critical essays and critical commentary by authors of detective fiction. Students will be asked to write reflectively and analytically about their reading. No prerequisite Madness & Monsters in Literature In many provocative literary works, characters are viewed as mad by those around them. This course will explore social norms and the reasons why characters are often deemed mad. We will also look at literary monsters and the societies that create them. Students will explore the responses to mad characters and monsters– ostracizing, imprisoning, and reforming – and the effect of those actions. Students will be expected to write regularly, most often in response to a section of the reading. As the course proceeds, essay topics will ask students to link texts together. Some reading could include Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Shelley’s Frankenstein, Stoker’s Dracula, Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis”, Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Swifts’ A Modest Proposal, Ionesco’s Rhinoceros by Eugene Ionesco, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. No prerequisites. Spring Writing and Speaking Electives Journalism This one trimester course will explore the history and tenets of American journalism and provide students with an opportunity to research and write articles and editorials for publication. The focus of the class will be producing a student run school newspaper the VA Voice. No prerequisites Writing and Reflection-Writing About Art, Art About Writing This course will be an interdisciplinary course that will spend equal time on creative/reflective writing and visual activities. We will be learning about literature and art through creative projects that emphasize making connections between the two. We will begin with a series of short projects, and will visit museum(s) and/or galleries and write about art. We will end with a self-directed project that incorporates both written and visual elements. While content for the final project will be chosen individually, possibilities include self-portraiture, work with fairy tales, illustration of favorite books/music, or creating a short graphic novel. Technical proficiency in art is not required, but will be an asset. There is a minimal course fee for art supplies (but no book purchases) for this class. No prerequisites Public Speaking and Debate This trimester course is an introduction to the basic skills, techniques, and terminology involved in making oral presentations and speeches, not only in academic settings, but also for other occasions and situations. This course focuses on effective speech writing, preparation, and delivery skills using topics of student choice for speaking exercises and writing assignments. In addition students will be introduced to and practice the research, argumentation, and rebuttal skills used in formal debate. No prerequisites

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Spring Literature Electives Science-Fiction and Fantasy Want to spend some time in an alternate reality? Sometimes an imagined world helps us to understand our own just a bit better. We will read selections by some of the big names in this genre such as Tolkien, Heinlein, and Card, and students will be responsible for selecting and presenting fantasy and science fiction short stories as well. Writing assignments will include analytical and reflective essays as well as creative writing based on the literature studied. No prerequisites. Dark Realities Texts and films often imagine dark realities meant to reflect contemporary society. These dark worlds, much like our own, are called dystopias. This course will explore the dystopian realities presented in various texts and films, including but not limited to Oryx and Crake (novel), Feed (novel), 1984 (film), Bladerunner (film), The Matrix (film), Minority Report (film), episodes of The Twilight Zone, and short stories by Phillip K Dick, Ray Bradbury, and EM Foster. Students will examine the ways in which these texts and films reflect our present society and identify various themes in dystopian narratives, including politics, the environment, corporations, technology, the apocalypse, violence and aliens. Students will be expected to write regularly, including critical reflection and analysis. Students will have the opportunity to complete one independent project in which they write a critical analysis of a dystopian film not otherwise covered in class. Open to juniors and seniors. No prerequisites. Contemporary Short Story This course is a study of short stories from the 19th and 20th centuries. The course examines a variety of authors, writing styles, and sub-genres within the larger genre of short story. The class studies both American and international authors of varying ethnicities and backgrounds. The class is largely discussion based but students will be expected to complete both analytical and creative writing assignments as well. They will also be quizzed on readings, and relevant class materials. No prerequisites.

HISTORY DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS The History Department offers a variety of courses that will leave students with a wide knowledge of history across time and geographical space after their four years at Vermont Academy. Beginning in the 9th-grade year, students gain a firm foundation in key historical themes and develop essential reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking skills. Subsequent courses in Modern Comparative Cultures, U.S. History, and senior-level electives build upon these skills and historical approaches throughout a student’s years at VA. In each course, there is an emphasis on historical research and writing. Across the history curriculum, we also place a high premium on learning history by doing history: students read primary sources to listen in on the voices of the past, evaluate those sources, and synthesize them into historical arguments. Students are also given ample opportunities to speak and engage with their peers in class through interactive classroom activities and presentations. Students are required to complete a minimum of three credits in social studies, including U.S. History, which is typically taken during the junior year. Students must take history in grades 9, 10, and 11, but may choose whether or not to take a history elective in their senior year. Designated honors/AP sections are available for grades 10 through 12. Students electing to take honors courses will need to achieve cumulative average benchmarks and secure the approval of their teacher and department head.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Grade 9 Year-Long Courses Foundations in History Foundations in History is a year-long course in which students learn not only basic study skills – note-taking, test-taking, and organizing – but also the essential skills of history: reading, writing, speaking, and thinking critically about the world. Students will spend the fall trimester exploring the development of early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, and India. During the winter, the course will examine the spread of civilization and the first major empires. Students will finish the year considering the artistic and intellectual achievements of the Classical Era. Topics will be organized thematically, with an emphasis on understanding the roles that geography, economics, power, and belief systems played in shaping the course of human history from the Agricultural Revolution through the decline of the Roman Empire. This approach will prepare students to consider how those same forces operate in the modern era. Foundations in History for International Students Grades 9 and 10. This year-long course is designed for students who are new to VA and whose first language is not English. The goal of the course is for students to develop their English communication and historical thinking skills through papers, projects, and presentations. As they develop these skills, students will learn about the development of early civilizations and their connections to the modern world. Topics will be organized thematically, with an emphasis on understanding the roles that geography, economics, power, and belief systems played in shaping the course of human history in ancient times and in the modern United States. Class participation will also be a major part of the course and each student’s evaluation. The course does not fulfill the American history requirement; students enrolled in this course will be expected to take United States history in their junior year. Instead, this course is meant to provide them with the foundation, in terms of both skills and familiarity with American culture, that they will need in order to succeed in mainstream history classes in the 11th and 12-grade years. Garde 10 Modern Comparative Cultures This course is an introduction to the cultures and events that have shaped our world from 1500 through the present. However, instead of a traditional survey course, this class will examine the process of nation building in the modern world by engaging in an in-depth study of eight regions of the world. We will begin the year with a discussion of an ascendant Europe’s political, economic and cultural dominance in the modern world through colonization in Africa, Brazil, and Iran. During the winter term, students will study the struggles that characterized the post-colonial world with explorations of revolutions in Russia, China, and Cuba. Finally, the spring term will include an investigation of the two global “hotspots,” including Afghanistan and Mexico, to help students understand modern conflicts have shaped the world in which they currently live. Students will be expected to arrive to class prepared, ready to participate in class in both discussions and in-class writings. Additionally, students will write response papers, formal essays, research papers and presentations.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Modern Comparative Cultures for International Students This course does not fulfill the United States History requirement. This course is designed for students who are either new or returning to VA, and whose first language is not English. Returning students who need one more year of focused English communication study will move into this course from the Foundations in History for International Students course before moving into US History their junior or senior year. This course does not fulfill the American history requirement. As is the case with Foundations in History for International Students, the goal of the course is for students to develop their English communication and historical thinking skills through papers, projects, and presentations. Students will improve their vocabulary, and reading, writing, and speaking skills while learning about the making of the modern world. The content of the course will focus on modern revolutions in France, Haiti, Russia, Germany, China, Iran, and Afghanistan. Structured, well-supported, and appropriately-cited essays will be the mainstay of students’ evaluation. Finally, class participation, especially in debates, will also be a major part of the course and each student’s evaluation. Honors European History Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and department chair approval; cumulative average of B+ in history courses. Offered to sophomores who have achieved a high level of success in freshman history, this year long course covers the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the French Revolution. Students examine the forces of change that shaped the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century. In particular, the course focuses on industrialization and its impact on the social, economic and political landscape of both Europe and the world. Topics will include the flowering of art, culture, and new ideas in Renaissance Italy; diversification of Christianity that accompanied the Protestant Reformation; expansion of Europeans’ worldview in the Age of Exploration; rise of secular and scientific ideas during the Enlightenment; and challenges to absolutist monarchy that characterized the French Revolution. Students will learn to assess and interpret both primary and secondary sources and will develop their writing skills. Debates, discussions, and research exercises will also help students hone critical thinking skills. Grade 11 United States History This course surveys American history from the mid-15th century to the present. We will study the major social, political, and economic transformations that have characterized the past five centuries in what is now the United States. Emphasis will be placed not only on learning the important people and places of the past, but also on developing critical reading and writing skills to better prepare the students for study in college. Assignments include response papers, projects, presentations, and several research assignments. AP United States History Prerequisites: Teacher Recommendation and Department Chair approval; All students in the course are required to take the AP exam at the end of the year. We’ll prepare for the AP exam as we study the history of the United States from its infancy as a nation to the present. Throughout the year, we will study the major social, cultural, political, and economic transformations that have characterized American history. In addition, students will hone their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, culminating in the AP exam in May. 14 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 American Studies for International Students American Studies for International Students is a combined history and English course that will fulfill the graduation requirements in United States History and American Literature at Vermont Academy. This course will have a greater emphasis on reading, writing, and speaking in English and offers opportunities to practice the skills necessary for college readiness. These skills include critically reading many types of source materials, engaging in the research process, and expressing ideas persuasively in both written and verbal form. In addition to skills development, this course will offer international students exposure to concepts and themes of American political, economic, social, and cultural history that are critical to taking full advantage of the study abroad experience. Note: Enrollment in this class will take precedence over all other course selections as a non-waivable graduation requirement, and it will count for a credit in both the History and English Departments. Students identified as having a language proficiency level that lends itself to enrollment in this course will be required to enroll in both the history and literature sections simultaneously. Grade 12 Electives Year-Long Courses AP Psychology Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and department chair approval; cumulative average of B+ in history courses and a B+ in Biology. Students must purchase the textbook before arriving in class and complete required summer readings. All students enrolled in the course will be required to take the AP exam at the end of the year. This course is meant to prepare students for the AP Psychology exam, introducing students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students will study psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major subfields within psychology. In addition, students will explore how psychologists use research methods and critical analysis to explore human behavior. In particular, students will learn about ethical considerations for and methods of psychological research and will learn how to plan for and conduct their own research. This is fast-paced course that will require a significant amount of memorization. AP Comparative Government and Politics Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and department chair approval; cumulative average of B+ in history courses. All students enrolled in the course will be required to take the AP exam at the end of the year. This is a year-long advanced placement course that is equivalent to an introductory college course in comparative government and politics. Comparative politics is a sub-discipline within the field of political science that helps students to better understand how government and politics work in different countries around the world. It draws from particular themes and concepts to compare, contrast, and analyze political systems, institutions, politics and policies in multiple counties. In this course, we will utilize a case-study approach to examine six countries and the European Union. The countries include the United Kingdom, Russia, China, Mexico, Iran, and Nigeria. Against these case studies, we will focus on the following key themes in comparative politics: sovereignty, authority, and power; political institutions; citizens, state and society; political and economic change; and public policy. Students will spend much of the spring trimester preparing for the required AP Exam.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Contemporary Issues Offered in Three Trimesters This class will study the people, events, and trends—social, economic, and political—that have changed the world over the past century. Students will examine the challenges we face as a global community and ways that individuals, NGOs, national governments, and the United Nations are working to address these challenges and move towards a more sustainable future. Some key topics to be discussed are: climate change, terrorism, refugees and migration, poverty, and cultural and religious conflict. Throughout the year, students will be asked to analyze various news sources and to stay informed with current events. Sociology Offered in Three Trimesters Sociology is the scientific study of society and human behavior. Sociology stresses the external factors on an individual to determine what influences people. Sociologists primarily focus on how people communicate with one another, their belief systems, group structure, and how all of these factors affect the society we live in. In this class, we will be examining how groups operate, how and why people make decisions, and what goes on behind the scenes of our society. Some of the topics we will be covering are: Culture, Crime and Deviance, The Family in Society, Race and Ethnicity, Gender Inequalities, The Media and its influence, and Collective Behavior and Social Movements. This course is offered as 3 trimester courses. Introduction to Economics This is a full-year course that introduces the fundamental concepts of both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. Students will begin the year by exploring the economic principles that apply to individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, acting within a market. This micro-level approach will explore concepts such as scarcity, opportunity cost, and the law of diminishing marginal returns, among others. These topics, along with thorough analysis of the role of government within these markets, will be discussed in order to develop a sense of the economy as it applies to individuals on a daily basis. In the second half of the course, many of these concepts will be revisited on a more aggregate, or Macroeconomic, level. Topics include the study of national income and price-level determination, as well as an exploration of broad economic indicators such as gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation. These topics will be explored and enriched by discussion of government regulation in the economy through investigation of current events as well as historical case studies. AP Economics Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation and department chair approval; cumulative average of B+ in history courses and B+ in math courses. All students enrolled in the course will be required to take the AP exam at the end of the year. This is a full-year course that introduces the fundamental concepts of both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. Students will begin the year by exploring the economic principles that apply to individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, acting within a market. This micro-level approach will explore concepts such as scarcity, opportunity cost, and the law of diminishing marginal returns, among others. These topics, along with thorough analysis of the role of government within these markets, will be discussed in order to develop a sense of the economy as it applies to individuals on a daily basis. In the second half of the course, many of these concepts will be revisited on a more aggregate, or Macroeconomic, level. Topics include the study of national income and price-level determination, as well as an exploration of broad economic indicators such as gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation. These topics will be explored and enriched by discussion of government regulation in the economy through investigation of current events as well as historical case studies. Students will be expected to take both the AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics exam at the conclusion of this course. 16 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

MATH DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS The Mathematics Department offers a range of courses designed to teach the mathematics required for admission to colleges and universities. The goal of the department is to provide our students with the ideas, skills, concepts, and attitudes that are essential for further study in mathematics and related fields and to foster an appreciation for the power and beauty of mathematics. The Mathematics Department recommends that all students take four years of mathematics. Successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II is required for a Vermont Academy diploma. All mathematics courses beyond Algebra I require that students have a TI-83+ or TI-84 graphing calculator. Year-Long Courses Algebra I Prerequisites: This course is open to all entering 9th graders and others by recommendation of the department. The focus of Algebra I is linear relationships. After solidifying pre-algebra concepts, students will explore linear relationships by visualizing and describing data; interpreting graphs and charts; creating scatterplots; interpreting, identifying, manipulating, and solving linear equations; developing the concept of a function; interpreting and solving linear systems; defining linear inequalities; investigating arithmetic sequences; and performing linear regressions. The concept of rate of change will be emphasized throughout Geometry Students hoping to take Algebra 2 and Geometry simultaneously must have earned at least a B+ in Algebra 1. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I or by recommendation of the department. Students learn to recognize and work with geometric concepts in various contexts. They develop an understanding of Euclidean plane and solid geometry through inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, and problem solving. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling to develop formulas and solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles, the properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons, circles, coordinate geometry, three-dimensional solids, geometric constructions, proportions, symmetry, the use of transformations, and an introduction to trigonometry. Throughout the course, students will make important connections between geometry concepts and those previously mastered in Algebra 1. Honors Geometry Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra I or by recommendation of the department. This course follows the description of the traditional course at a more rapid pace, in more depth, and with more connections made to algebra topics. A greater emphasis will be placed on developing ideas collaboratively through the problem solving process, oftentimes before any formal postulates or theorems are presented. Students will devise, present, and defend rigorous geometric proofs. Statistics Prerequisites: Successful completion Algebra II and with permission of the department. In statistics, students learn the art of distilling truth from data. Students will collect and analyze data from the surrounding community and pre-prepared scenarios, test hypotheses, and make appropriate conclusions. Students will learn how to properly display and discuss statistics and their implications.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Algebra II Students hoping to take Algebra 2 and Geometry simultaneously must have earned at least a B+ in Algebra 1. Prerequisites: successful completion of Algebra I. Algebra II strengthens understanding of linear relationships by incorporating technology and developing more advanced algebraic techniques. Linear functions are understood as a process of repeated addition in order to introduce exponential growth (and decay) as a process of repeated multiplication. Logarithms are introduced as the inverse of exponential expressions. The mechanics of exponents are emphasized. The common function families are explored with an emphasis on quadratics. Honors Algebra II Prerequisites: Students applying for the Honors section must have earned at least a B+ in Geometry and obtain the permission of the department. This course has all of the content of Algebra II and more. The goal of the course is to develop problem-solving skills with emphasis on creating connections between concepts and communicating mathematical ideas. Areas of study include a variety of functions and their applications, as well as inquiry into the process of mathematical reasoning. Students should expect homework assignments to include reading and learning new material independently prior to attending class. Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra II. This course develops students’ critical thinking and problem solving skills that they will apply for the rest of their lives. It makes a connection between the theory of mathematics taught in the classroom and real world situations, integrating real life problems from science, business, and other applications, while reinforcing and expanding on the student’s existing skills. The course completes the study of the elementary functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric) and includes topics from finite mathematics, including basic probability and statistics. This class is designed to review topics from previous courses, while introducing material that will be given emphasis in Pre-calculus. Pre-Calculus Prerequisites: Successful completion of Functions with a B average or higher, Honors Algebra II with a B- average or higher, or by recommendation of the department. This course is designed for the mathematics/science student preparing for AP or college-level Calculus and/ or advanced science classes. Students will explore algebraic and transcendental functions (with an emphasis on trigonometric functions) in terms of tables, formulas, graphs, and their application. Students will strengthen their ability to communicate mathematical ideas clearly and effectively, and will employ a variety of technologies to develop and demonstrate their ideas. Successful completion of this class will prepare students to take AP Calculus AB.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Honors Pre-Calculus Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Algebra II. This accelerated course is designed for students interested in pursuing a math related curriculum in college. Topics include functions, series, sequences, matrices, complex numbers, conic sections, polar and parametric equations, linear regression, vectors, applications of trigonometry, and an introduction to Calculus. Successful completion of this class will prepare students to take AP Calculus BC. AP Statistics Prerequisites: Successful completion Algebra II and with permission of the department. Students must be prepared to complete college level work. This course follows the Advanced Placement Statistics course requirements. In statistics, students learn the art of distilling truth from data. Students will collect and analyze data from the surrounding community and pre-prepared scenarios, test hypotheses, and make appropriate conclusions. Students will learn how to properly display and discuss statistics and their implications. AP Calculus (AB) Prerequisites: Successful completion Pre-calculus with permission of the department. Students must be prepared to complete college level work. This course follows the Advanced Placement Calculus AB course requirements. Students are introduced to the derivative and the integral with emphasis on their applications. AP Calculus (BC) Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP Calculus (AB) with permission of the department. Students must be prepared to complete college level work. This course follows the Advanced Placement Calculus BC course requirements. It covers the same material as AP Calculus AB, plus other topics listed in the Advanced Placement Calculus BC course requirements. Advanced Topics in Mathematics Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, and AP Statistics with the permission of the department. Students must be prepared to complete independent college level work. This course is occasionally offered as an independent exploration into further topics within Mathematics. It is currently incorporated under the umbrella of “Senior Seminar,� which is a student initiated and guided research format that requires department approval.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS All science courses require departmental approval to ensure appropriate placement. Waiver of prerequisites requires the approval of the Science Department Chair and Academic Dean. PHYSICS COURSES Conceptual Physics (P) Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra I or Geometry. Science is a way of knowing and understanding the universe that we live in. A conceptual understanding of physics provides the foundation for the study of chemistry and biology through learning about the interactions of matter and energy. Students in this inquiry-based class will learn science process skills such as experimental design, data collection, and scientific communication as they investigate the world on a human scale and at an atomic scale. Students will be evaluated using homework assignments, laboratory investigation procedure and technique, laboratory reports, and a complement of papers, quizzes, tests, participation, and final assessment. Physics: (P) Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. This introductory physics course is equivalent to conceptual physics but uses more mathematical reasoning and modeling. Honors Physics (P) Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Pre-calculus or higher. Honors Physics is a full year laboratory science focused on fundamental topics from mechanics. The program starts covering Linear Mechanics to include: fundamental concepts of one and two dimensional linear motion, the Newtonian Laws of Motion and Gravitation. Then the student progresses to Rotational Mechanics including: fundamental topics of rotational mechanics, work, mechanical energy and momentum, simple harmonic motion, wave mechanics and sound. Also, during the year, each student will research a topic of their choice, write a major paper concerning their research, and make a presentation of their findings to their peers during the final weeks of classes in May. It is recommended that the student demonstrate to the class an example of an experiment that supports the topic if at all possible.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

AP Physics (P) Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry; concurrent enrollment in Pre-calculus or higher. AP Physics is a laboratory science focused on fundamental topics from mechanics with an introduction into electrostatics and circuits and follows the AP Physics curriculum. Students in this class are required to take the AP Physics exam. Fall Trimester: Linear Mechanics: Fundamental concepts of one and two dimensional linear motion, the Newtonian Laws of Motion and Gravitation. Winter Trimester: Rotational Mechanics: Fundamental topics of rotational mechanics, work mechanical energy and momentum, simple harmonic motion, wave mechanics, and sound. Spring Trimester: Electrostatics and Circuits: Fundamental topics of the mechanics of electrostatics, electrical potential, current, and DC resistive circuits. During the year, each student will research a topic of their choice, write a major paper concerning their research, and make a presentation of their findings to their peers during the final weeks of classes in May. It is recommended that the student demonstrate to the class an example of an experiment that supports the topic if at all possible. CHEMISTRY COURSES Chemistry (P) Prerequisites: Completion of Conceptual Physics or higher; concurrent enrollment in Geometry or higher. Chemistry is a laboratory science course in which students investigate the composition of matter and the physical and chemical changes it undergoes. Students use science process skills to study the fundamental structure of atoms, the way atoms combine to form compounds, and the interactions between matter and energy. Students explore chemistry concepts through an inquiry-based approach. This course offers a solid understanding of the fundamentals concepts of chemistry. Students in this inquiry-based class will practice science process skills such as experimental design, data collection, and scientific communication as they investigate the world at the atomic scale. Students who plan on taking AP Chemistry should consider taking Honors Chemistry. Students who wish to take AP Chemistry with a Chemistry prerequisite will have to complete extra summer work to make sure they are ready for the AP level class. Honors Chemistry (P) Prerequisites: Completion of Conceptual Physics or higher; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Chemistry is the study of matter: the “stuff� that makes up the world in which we live. Students in Honors Chemistry will explore some big ideas in chemistry: atoms and elements; structure and properties of matter; and chemical reactions at a level that prepares students for AP Chemistry and college general chemistry. Chemical concepts are introduced in the lab and explored in depth during lecture, discussion, and problem-solving sessions. Students learn how to maintain a proper laboratory notebook as evidence of their investigations and communicate their findings in a variety of formats. Honors Chemistry includes some of the big ideas from AP Chemistry, most notably atomic structure and periodicity. One evening a week is scheduled for extra class time in fall and spring. This evening time takes precedence over other non-academic commitments. 21 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

AP Chemistry (P) Prerequisites: Completion of Honors Chemistry and Algebra II or higher. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course and further develops conceptual understanding of chemistry from Honors Chemistry. The big ideas in AP Chemistry include thermodynamics (relationship between matter and energy), kinetics (factors that affect reaction rates), and equilibrium (determining the balance of reactants and products in a chemical reaction). This course follows the AP curriculum guidelines to prepare students to take the AP exam in the spring. Students will develop the needed content background, laboratory exposure, and science process skill development to be prepared for entrance into science in college. One evening a week has a required double class period in the fall and spring. This evening time takes precedence over other non-academic commitments. BIOLOGY COURSES Biology Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry and Algebra 1 or higher. Biology is a full year lab course that will provide students with an understanding of the diversity of life on Earth and the interactions that occur between those living organisms. Much of our work will be tied to New England flora and fauna, utilizing the different ecosystems available to us on the Vermont Academy campus as our lab. Students will be exposed to learning in the four major areas of biology: cellular respiration, plant form and function, animal form and function, and the evolution of biological diversity. Honors Biology (B) Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Honors Biology is a lab course designed to introduce students to basic concepts of scientific study, research and experimentation, as well as provide a survey of major themes in biology. This course addresses the major themes of Biology through the lens of nutrition, medicine, health and fitness. The course will cover the units of chemistry, biochemistry, cells, genetics, evolution, and the human body systems. Class time will be utilized with a combination of discussions, lectures, group and individual work. The course will meet for one lab block approximately once per week, providing the opportunity for supplementary lab and field experimentation. The combination of these methods is designed to encourage observation, critical thinking, attention to detail, and understanding of the scientific method. Evaluation is based on participation and attendance, homework, tests and quizzes, lab performance and reports, and a final exam. Honors Biology includes some of the big ideas from AP Biology, most notably evolution, diversity, and the unity of life. Students who plan on taking AP Biology must take Honors Biology. If students have already had a different introductory biology course, they must complete a summer module to ensure they have the conceptual knowledge and practical skills to be successful in AP Biology.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20

Kinesiology (B) Prerequisites: Completion of Biology; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Kinesiology is the scientific study of human movement. This full year course is designed as an introduction to this area of study covering many of the fundamental concepts of anatomical structure and function and physiology that determine how we move and maintain stability during stationary and moving activities. The course is a discussion/ laboratory class that leads the student to understand and measure the healthy range of movement of some of the body segments during normal and sport related activity. Additionally, there will be discussions and activities about the recognition of the mechanics of injuries, how injuries impact the musculoskeletal system, prevention strategies, and interventions that improve conditions. Basic anatomy and muscle physiology, bone growth and maturity, and nutrition are included as topics of discussion as well. AP Biology (B) Prerequisites: Completion of Honors Biology and Algebra II or higher. Demonstrated mastery of reading and writing in English is advised. This lab course is designed to introduce students to content and laboratory procedures comparable to college-level biology. The course will cover the units of biochemistry, cells, genetics, DNA technology, evolution/classification and organ systems. Ecology and botany are covered independently by the students. Class time will be utilized with a combination of discussions, lectures, group and individual work. The combination of these methods is designed to encourage observation, critical thinking, attention to detail and process, and understanding the scientific method. Evaluation is based on participation and attendance, homework, tests and quizzes, lab performance and reports, projects, and a final exam. Students are required to take the AP Exam in order to have AP printed on their transcripts. Students taking the AP Exam are responsible for reviewing any topic that is not covered in class. One evening a week is scheduled for extra class time in fall and spring. This evening time takes precedence over other nonacademic commitments. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY COURSES Geology and Ecology (B) Fall trimester. Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry and Geometry or higher. Geology and Ecology is a full year, field-based science course that explores interactions between a diversity of organisms, their environment, and the geologic structures that frame the environment. Students will learn to identify and inventory many species of trees, flowers, insects, birds, amphibians and mammals that live with us in Southern Vermont. Concepts such as natural selection, co-evolution, population dynamics, geology, biodiversity and sustainable land management will be explored using real examples from our own fields, forests, rivers, ponds and other wetlands. Students will develop skills in species identification, biological drawing, natural history interpretation, mapping, wildlife tracking, nature photography, forest management and ecological landscape design. Students should be prepared to get their feet wet and their hands dirty!

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 AP Environmental Science (B) Prerequisites: Biology; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Major themes include: science as a process, our planet as an interconnected living system, human population and its influence on the Earth’s biodiversity, societal dependence on nonrenewable energy sources and the search for alternatives, and managing and sustaining common resources. Students will spend a considerable amount of time doing field work around Vermont and the Academy’s greater campus. An additional objective of this course is to prepare the student for the AP Environmental Science examination given each May. ENGINEERING COURSES Robotics: Design and Engineering: (T/E) Prerequisites: Completion of Conceptual Physics; concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. This year long engineering course covers a wide range of entry level electrical, mechanical, software design topics. The student will work with an experienced project leader and learn how to function as part of a team working together with common goals and timelines. Topics may include electrical and hardware design, Robot C programming software, the basics of troubleshooting hardware and software malfunctions. The student will maintain an engineering design notebook, create simple proof of principle experiments, collect, examine, and use electronic data to find patterns and quantify results. In addition, the student will plan long term projects, maintain a schedule, create and write technical documents based on the information gathered. In this way, the students are discovering physics of machines and engineering design using a hands-on STEM approach. Robotics: Advanced Topics in Programming (STEM) Prerequisites: Completion of Honors Physics or Robotics: Design and Engineering, completion of Algebra II or higher, or prior approval from the department. This year long laboratory physical science covers programming in greater detail. They will be the project leader for this area on the First Tech Challenge (FTC) team. The programming could be implemented in JAVA, HTML, CAD Scripts depending on the interest of the student. The course will examine all aspects of programming from creating algorithms, various loop constructs, implementing mathematical models in code as well as creating Android Phone applications that could be used to operate robotics systems both autonomously and remotely. The student will maintain an engineering design notebook, create simple proof of principle experiments, collect, examine, and use electronic data. In addition, the student will plan long term projects, maintain a schedule, create and write technical documents based on the information gathered. In this way, the students are discovering physics and engineering design using a hands-on STEM approach.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Robotics: Advanced Topics in Control System Design (T/E) Prerequisites: Completion of Robotics: Design and Engineering and Algebra II or higher. This year-long engineering course covers automated control system theories and its application in greater detail. They will be the project leader for this area on the First Tech Challenge (FTC) team. The control system will be implemented in JAVA through either Android Studio or App Inventor 2. The focus will be on implementing Proportional Controllers (P), Proportional Integral Controllers (PI) and Proportional Integral Differential (PID) in JAVA to stabilize robotics systems. The student will also maintain an engineering design notebook, create simple proof of principle experimentation, collect, examine, and use electronic data. In addition, the student will plan long term projects, maintain a schedule, create and write technical documents based on the information gathered. In this way, the students are discovering physics and engineering design using a hands-on STEM approach. Robotics: Advanced Topics in Mechanical Systems Design (T/E) Prerequisites: Completion of Robotics: Design and Engineering and Algebra II or higher. This year-long engineering course covers the Mechanical System Design and Simulation in much greater detail. They will be the project leader for this area on the First Tech Challenge (FTC) team. The mechanical design process will include using computer aided design (CAD) software to design and simulate mechanical systems in AutoDesk Fusion 360. Custom parts will also be fabricated using 3-D printing to prototype custom parts. The student will also maintain an engineering design notebook, create simple proof of principle experiments, collect, examine, and use electronic data. In addition, the student will plan long term projects, maintain a schedule, create and write technical documents based on the information gathered. In this way, the students are discovering physics and engineering design using a hands-on STEM approach. Robotics: Advanced Topics in Electrical System Design (T/E) Prerequisites: Completion of Robotics: Design and Engineering and Algebra II or higher. This year-long engineering course covers Electrical System Design in greater detail. They will be the project leader for this area on the First Tech Challenge (FTC) team. The student will focus on applying circuit design and analysis techniques to create custom sensors and other robotic electrical devices. The student will maintain an engineering design notebook, create simple proof of principle experiments, collect, examine, and use electronic data. In addition, the student plan long term projects, maintain a schedule, create and write technical documents based on the information gathered. In this way, the students are discovering physics and engineering design using a hands-on STEM approach. Robotics Winter Term Activity Vermont Academy competes in the annual First Tech Challenge (FTC) competition. This competition changes every year and the students run entire enterprise from creating a business plan and fundraising, to website design and maintenance, marketing, and includes mechanical design, electrical design, software design, systems design, fabrication and testing of their solution. The Advanced Topics in Robotics classes are the primary engineering arm of the process because the new season always begins in September. Anyone is welcome to learn through play in this activity/competition. To learn more about the FTC competition, go to www.firstinspires.org/robotics/ftc.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES AP Computer Science Principles (T) Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Geometry or higher. AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Students will complete two performance tasks during the course and a multiple choice AP Exam in the spring.

WORLD LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS The World Language Department prepares students to become culturally sensitive and communicatively competent in a second language. Through spoken languages it offers students an invaluable point of reference into their native language and global vision of the world. A five-year sequence is offered in French, Spanish, and Chinese; a two year sequence is offered in Latin; a beginning course and advanced course (when appropriate) are offered in Russian. The emphasis of the department is on the spoken word, and to that end, the classes are taught with an immersion approach and are constantly filled with music, film, media, and the latest available technology and tools to support this philosophy. Advanced classes are offered in levels 4, 5, and AP in French and Spanish. In Chinese and Russian advanced classes are offered in levels 4 and above. The following grades are required for advancement in each language: Level 1 moving to Level 2: C- or above Level 2 moving to Level 3: C+ or above Level 3 moving to Level 4: B- or above Level 4 moving to Level 5: B or above Level 4 or 5 moving to AP: B+ or above All World Language Courses are a Year Long Some courses listed may not be offered depending on student interest and staffing. French 1 This course introduces the language through all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The main goal is to develop the student’s confidence in using French as a means of communication. Participants are expected to work effectively in groups, as well as independently. The Espaces text and Supersite are used to promote interpretive communication presentational communication and interpersonal communication. The presentational focus for beginning students is to be able to communicate autobiographical information both in the written and spoken form. French 2 Intended for students who have acquired a basic knowledge in French, this course places an equal emphasis on written and oral skills. Participants are expected to work effectively in groups, as well as independently and to use only French in the classroom. The Espaces text and Supersite are used to promote interpretive communication presentational communication and interpersonal communication. The presentational focus for the students is to be able to communicate in dialogues using the present, preterit, imperfect tenses. 26 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 French 3 Conducted entirely in French, this course is for students who wish to continue to pursue French at the higher level. Emphasis is placed on all areas; speaking, listening, writing, and speaking, but special emphasis is placed on more spontaneous speech and the expression of more complex ideas in writing. Students will learn all verb tenses and moods and are asked to speak often and frequently in the target language, French. In this class students acquire new vocabulary and understand new grammatical structures in order to become more sophisticated speakers and writers as well as more confident language learners. The course focuses on interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational communication via the Espaces text and Supersite. The primary presentational communication goal is to begin to discuss and debate everyday topics as well as current events with classmates. French 4 Conducted entirely in French, this class stresses the effective communication of thought and ideas through debate and discussion of contemporary topics. The course also includes an in-depth study of the subjunctive mood, the study of culture, in particular Quebecois culture, through current events, literature and film from the francophone world as well as an intense focus on sophisticated presentational communication including cultural comparisons in oral and written forms. This class uses the Espaces text and Supersite but takes advantage of utilizing other authentic sources and begins to prepare the students for AP French in the spring trimester. The primary presentational communicational goal is a final oral cultural comparison. French 5 For advanced students who do not want to pursue the AP curriculum, students in this course are combined with the AP students and study the same material but are not required to take the AP exam. This course requires the approval of the department chair as well as B or higher in French 4. The class requires strong motivation and discipline as well as instructor and department chair approval. The course uses Thèmes, a book and website designed to prepare students for the AP exam. The students study six major themes including but not limited to personal identity, contemporary life, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology. It is conducted entirely in French and requires a high level of motivation and a strong interest in culture and debate. While the students are not expected to study for the AP exam, they are expected to work at a high level with rigorous effort. AP French The AP exam is required for all students at the end of the year. This course requires the approval of the department chair as well as B or higher in French 4. This course follows an AP syllabus that is approved by the College Board and prepares students for the AP exam. It requires strong motivation and discipline as well as instructor and department chair approval. The AP exam is required for all students at the end of the year. This course requires the approval of the department chair as well as B+ or higher in French 4. For advanced students who want to pursue the AP curriculum, students in this course use Thèmes, a book and website designed to prepare students for the AP exam. The students study six major themes including personal identity, contemporary life, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology, world challenges, and family and community. It is conducted entirely in French and requires a high level of motivation and a strong interest in culture, discussion, and debate. The students are expected to study for the AP exam and must work at every level and type of foreign language acquisition with rigorous effort.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Chinese 1 This beginner level Mandarin Chinese class is designed for learners who have limited or no prior knowledge in Chinese. The class focuses on the basic skills of language acquisition: listening, speaking, writing and reading. In particular, students will be linguistically immersed into the Chinese phonetic system (Hanyu Pinyin Romanization), simple grammatical structures, the simplified Chinese writing characters and daily conversation through drills, songs and Chinese social media. Teacher support and individual attention are given to every student. The teacher will assess each student’s learning style and language level and then work closely with individual student to achieve his/her learning goal. Upon successful completion of this course, students are able to: 1. Learn approximately 200 Chinese words 2. Self- introductions, greetings and family members 3. Count numbers from zero to one thousand 4. Write brief compositions about topics discussed in class 5. Narrate daily lives 6. Order food and drinks 7. Express time and date 8. Ask and answer where people live 9. Engage in simple conversations 10. Sing one Chinese song 11. Understand more in Chinese culture, history, philosophy and customs Chinese 2 This second year Chinese class builds on the fundamentals of Chinese acquired in the first year Chinese. Students continue to develop their proficiency in communication skills as they discuss everyday topics. The class will also engage students in the basic skills of language acquisition: listening, speaking, writing and reading. By the end of this year, students are able to: 1. Learn 250 Chinese words 2. Order Chinese food learn Chinese dining etiquette 3. Describe daily life and pastimes 4. Understand more in Chinese culture, history, philosophy and customs 5. Sing two Chinese songs 6. Go shopping and learn to bargain in the Chinese way

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Chinese 3 This third year Mandarin Chinese class builds on the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese acquired in the first and second year. Students continue to develop their proficiency in communication skills as they discuss everyday topics. The class will also engage students in interactive and integrated language practice that is intertwined with the 5 Cs of foreign language learning: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Highlights of Mandarin Chinese III include: 1. Be able to recognize and write 400 additional Chinese characters 2. Write 200-word essays 3. Conduct a 5-minute conversation with a native Chinese speaker 4. Academic topics include weather and season, health, sports, professions, vacation, holidays and celebrations, Chinese slang and social issues Chinese 4 This fourth year Mandarin Chinese class builds on the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese acquired in the first three years. Students continue to develop their proficiency in communication skills as they discuss everyday topics. The class will also engage students in interactive and integrated language practice that is intertwined with the 5 Cs of foreign language learning: communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. Highlights of Mandarin Chinese IV include: 1. Be able to recognize and write 400 additional Chinese characters 2. Write 300-word essays 3. Conduct a chit-chat conversation with a native Chinese speaker 4. Academic topics include seeing a doctor, dating, renting an apartment, travel and Chinese slangs and social issues 5. Read ten Chinese short stories (800 words each) 6. Practice some AP – Chinese workbook questions Chinese 5 This class is designated to prepare students for the AP – Mandarin Chinese exam. Students must have finished taking the Chinese IV class or have the instructor’s permission to take this class. This class will focus on developing and honing the students’ skills of interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills. Furthermore, the students will primarily work on listening and reading comprehension, essay writing, speaking, vocabulary and grammar review, as well as studying cultural in order to cover all of the contents of the AP exam.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Spanish 1 This course introduces the language through all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The main goal is to develop the student’s confidence in using Spanish as a means of communication. Participants are expected to work effectively in groups, as well as independently, and to maintain a self-corrected notebook for compositions. The Vistas text and Supersite are used to promote interpretive communication presentational communication and interpersonal communication. The presentational focus for beginning students is to be able to communicate autobiographical information in written and spoken formats. Spanish 2 Intended for students who have acquired a basic knowledge in Spanish, this course offers an equal emphasis on written and oral skills. Participants are expected to work effectively in groups, as well as independently, and to maintain a self-corrected notebook for compositions. Vistas text and Supersite are used to promote interpretive communication presentational communication and interpersonal communication. The presentational focus for the students is to be able to communicate in dialogues using the present, preterit, and imperfect tenses. Spanish 3 This course requires the approval of the department chair as well as B or higher in Spanish 2. Spanish 3 is a course for students that want to go above the minimum requirement of the World Language Department at Vermont Academy and therefore the students have to come with a strong motivation towards work and expanding their knowledge in Spanish. Students will amplify their ability to communicate in the present, preterit, and imperfect tenses and will learn to communicate using the present perfect, present subjunctive, future and conditional tenses. They will acquire vocabulary needed to identify places and objects in a city and give directions. They will know how to shop in outdoor markets and stores, and be able to convert currencies using larger numbers, if necessary. Third year students will also be able to describe rooms in a house and identify furnishings and appliances. They will be able to make a hotel reservation, rent an apartment, and navigate the Metro system in most Hispanic cities. Students at this level will also be able to describe things in nature and discuss environmental issues. This Level 3 course also emphasizes developing confidence in speaking through conversation practice. Students will use Spanish as the principal means of communication during class. In addition to oral conversations, dialogues and presentations, students are required to write essays in Spanish and present research on a variety of cultural topics. A stronger emphasis is placed on reading comprehension ability. Students will read a variety of authentic selections in Spanish and learn to derive meaning through inference and discussions. Spanish 4 Stressing the effective communication of thought and ideas through debate and discussion of political and literary topics, this course includes an in-depth study of the subjunctive mood, the study of culture through literature and film from Spain and Latin America as well as an intense focus on sophisticated presentational communication including cultural comparisons in oral and written forms. Conducted entirely in Spanish, this class also uses the Vistas text and Supersite and takes advantage of utilizing other authentic sources as well as beginning to prepare the students for AP – Spanish in the spring trimester. The primary presentational communicational goal is a final oral and written cultural comparison.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Spanish 5 For advanced students who do not want to pursue the AP curriculum, students in this course are combined with AP students and study the same material but are not required to take the AP exam. It requires strong motivation and discipline as well as instructor and department chair approval This course uses Temas, a book and website designed to prepare students for the AP exam. The students study six major themes including but not limited to personal identity, contemporary life, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology. It is conducted entirely in Spanish and requires a high level of motivation and a strong interest in culture and ideas. While the students are not expected to study for the AP exam, they are expected for work at every level and type of foreign language acquisition with rigorous effort. AP Spanish The AP exam is required for all students at the end of the year. This course requires the approval of the department chair as well as B or higher in Spanish 4. This course follows an AP syllabus that is approved by the College Board and prepares students for the AP exam. For advanced students who want to pursue the AP curriculum, students in this course use Temas, a book and website designed to prepare students for the AP exam. The students study six major themes including personal identity, contemporary life, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology, world challenges, and family and community. It is conducted entirely in Spanish and requires a high level of motivation and a strong interest in culture and ideas. The students are expected to study for the AP exam and must work at every level and type of foreign language acquisition with rigorous effort. Russian 1 This course introduces the language through all four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The main goal is to develop the student’s confidence in using Russian as a means of communication. Participants are expected to work effectively in groups, as well as independently, and to maintain a self-corrected notebook for compositions. Instructor is using many different approaches – songs, games, dialogues, and movies to enhance learning. The course will introduce a basic knowledge of Russian culture. Latin I This course is meant to introduce students with no previous experience with Latin to the Latin language. The text, Wheelock’s Latin, is a college text meant to cover the first year of Latin. It will be used as the basic text to cover Latin I and Latin II over a two year period at Vermont Academy. Although the course will not focus on speaking Latin, the correct pronunciation of Latin words will be discussed and studied to some extent. Reading Latin will be a focus of the class as will grammatical structure and vocabulary. Readings from the authentic works of the ancient authors will provide translation practice from Latin to English. Readings from modern stories will bring some fun to the translation process. The translation of short original essays will provide the practice for the correct English to Latin translation. The language learning process will be occasionally interrupted and enhanced with the study of Roman history.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Latin II This course is meant for the students who wish to continue their study of the Latin language having successfully completed a study of Latin verb conjugation through the Perfect Active and Passive system and fourth declension of nouns. As with Latin I, the text, Wheelock’s Latin, is a college text meant to cover the first year of Latin. The 7th Edition will continue to be used as the basic text to cover Latin II at Vermont Academy. As in Latin I, the course will not focus on speaking Latin, but the correct pronunciation of Latin words will be expected as each work will be read before it is translated. As in Latin I, grammatical structure and vocabulary will be a focus of the class. Readings from the authentic works of the ancient authors will provide translation practice from Latin to English. Readings from modern stories will bring some fun to the translation process. The translation of short original essays will provide the practice for the correct English to Latin translation. Again as in Latin I, the language learning process will be enhanced with the study of Roman history.

PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS Open enrollment for 10 – 12 grades in all theater and music electives. Music Ensembles and lessons are available beginning in grade 9. Vermont Academy. Performing Arts presents multiple theater productions throughout the school year, which rehearse in the evenings and during after-school hours. MUSIC COURSES Advanced Music - Year long course This full-year course allows students to pursue their individual performance, technical, or compositional goals, and to develop the skills and repertoire necessary to gain acceptance to college music programs. Available only to seniors with application and instructor permission. Introduction to Electronic Music - Fall elective Students enrolled in Introduction to Electronic Music course discover a broad scope of concepts related to electronic music, sound recording, and music technology. Students in this course will work through a diverse set of music and technology related activities, where they have the opportunity to learn about the audio sound systems on campus, learn how to record themselves or a student band, compose an original piece of music, repair a broken instrument or amp, or unlock the secrets of wireless transmission. This is an excellent course for a student interested in pursuing any field of music technology, electronics, or musical experimentation Music Appreciation - Winter elective Music Appreciation is a course designed to teach listening skills with the intention of providing historical and culturally relevant information about music throughout history. The course begins with an overview of the basic elements of music with a focus on active listening, and continues with units covering many musical styles and periods including music from antiquity through the 20th century, including contemporary pop, rock, and jazz music. Students will participate in ‘music sharing’ days where they will prepare and share information about their personal interests in music, as well as attend numerous live music events throughout the term. This course offers students the opportunity to share and explore music from all genres, with an emphasis on listening techniques, diverse musical exposure, and many cultural influences in music.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Music Workshop - Spring Elective Music Workshop is a course which allows students to pursue individual and small group self-designed musical goals. Topics include but are not limited to musical performance, music appreciation, music technology, and music composition. Students will research, practice, and share progress on their topics throughout the term, as well as participate in weekly large group musical activities. Included is a study of basic musical functions, instruments, rhythm, and compositional techniques. Available all trimesters Music Lessons Vermont Academy’s music lesson program offers students with an interest in performance a chance to study their instrument as part of their academic regiment. This popular aspect of the music offerings allows students to take a lesson once a week, during the academic day with a private teacher. Lesson students earn academic credit for their lessons, and earn the privilege of access to practice rooms, lockers, and listening resources. Lesson students benefit from the outstanding teaching and musicianship brought to Vermont Academy by our staff of adjunct lesson teachers. Jazz Ensemble Through ensemble rehearsal, this class will provide members with the knowledge of and ability to perform music from the jazz, funk, Latin, and contemporary literature. Two rehearsals per week make this ½ class an easy addition to a musician’s academic schedule. The group focuses on ensemble playing of music of all styles, as well as improvisational and instrumental technique. The ensemble presents upwards of 6 concerts each year to enthusiastic audiences. All instrumental students are welcome to enroll, with occasional limitations based on instrumentation. Vocal Ensemble Through ensemble rehearsal, this class will provide members with the knowledge of and ability to perform music from many genres, including jazz, classical, madrigal, musical theater, spiritual, and contemporary literature. Two rehearsals per week make this ½ class an easy addition to a musician’s academic schedule. The group also works on vocal techniques. The ensemble presents upwards of 6 concerts each year. In addition, students are also eligible for off campus festivals, such as the All-New England Choral Festival, Vermont All-State, and District Festivals. Chamber Music Ensemble Through ensemble rehearsal, this class will provide members with the knowledge of and ability to perform music from classical, film, popular culture, and contemporary literature. Two rehearsals per week make this ½ class an easy addition to a musician’s academic schedule. The ensemble presents upwards of 6 concerts each year. In addition, students are also eligible for off campus festivals including Vermont All-State and Regional District Festivals.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 THEATER COURSES Advanced Theater - Year long course This full-year course allows students to pursue their individual performance, technical, or compositional goals, and to develop the skills and repertoire necessary to gain acceptance to college theater programs. Available only to seniors with application and instructor permission. Introduction to Acting - Year long course This course is designed to provide students with an introductory understanding of acting. This understanding will come from knowledge and skills presented through in-class games, exercises, scene-study, rehearsal, discussion, reading and writing. Students will practice writing for the stage. Students will deepen their understanding of a collaborative and creative process. The culmination of all knowledge and skills gained from this course will be represented through a working rehearsal process of a final scene at the end of the semester. Form and Idea in Drama - Winter Elective Situated in a dramatic arts context but explored through varied artistic mediums Form and Idea in Drama is a single trimester course for 11th and 12th graders that examines the artistic Styles of Classicism, Romanticism, Expressionism, Realism, and Naturalism. The class will engage with lectures provided by the instructor, experience and analyze art associated with styles and create artwork of their own. To gain perspective on artistic styles lectures will discuss philosophical movements associated with each style. Students will observe, analyze and interpret Styles from paintings, poems, films, and modern dramatic literature. To gain a tactile and tangible understanding of Styles students will create simple sculptures inspired by elements of each Style. Students will engage in discussions identifying their personal artistic preferences and draw connections between those preferences and elements of Style.

VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS Year-Long Courses Advanced Art (includes Studio Art, Media Arts, Photography, and Pottery) Prerequisites: Open to seniors, with approval by the instructor and permission of the department chair. At least two visual arts courses completed with grades of B+ or better. This honors level class has a focus on portfolio development and gallery presentations. Students who plan to focus on the visual arts in college would benefit from this course. Students meet as a group one class each week for critiques and general assignments. During the course of the first trimester, projects are created that address Art History and can also be used in an application portfolio for college. In the second trimester students continue to develop their portfolios and more closely study an artist of their choice. The third semester allows for a more independent study according to the student’s goals, with the expectation of a year-end show. This class can be taken as an Advanced Pottery, Computer Arts or Photography course with the same expectations of the student in terms of trimester development. 9th-Grade Arts Program Required for all 9th graders. All 9th graders will rotate through Visual, Performing, and Theater Arts studios, one each trimester. In this way students will gain experience in a variety of arts classes and come to an understanding of how the arts function at Vermont Academy. 34 | VERMONTACADEMY.ORG


VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 AP Studio Art (2D Design) Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors. At least two visual arts courses completed with grades of B+ or better or by permission of the Department Chair. SUMMER WORK REQUIRED. This class is governed by the expectations of the College Board and culminates in the creation of an Advanced Placement Portfolio, which is submitted to the College Board in May. This class is designed for the technically advanced student who has a passion for making art. Students are able to submit work in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, digital work, and film photography. Pottery Students learn the basic hand-building techniques with which they are expected to produce a required number of pieces. When hand-building proficiency has been demonstrated, the students may choose to learn to use the wheel or work in sculpture. All work is done in stoneware—a high-fire clay of great durability and finished with cone 9 reduction glazes that are mixed in our studio. Motivated students are able to take more than one year of pottery, with the permission of the instructor additionally; students with some previous experience may be able to join the class in the winter or spring trimesters. Filmmaking Filmmaking is a yearlong course that combines Filmmaking I, II, and II. Students will spend the fall exploring the basics of filmmaking and Adobe Premiere. They will learn about composition, angles, and camera movements and how to shoot using a DSLR camera. Students will learn how to write a screenplay and shoot a short scene of dialogue. In the winter, students will learn about experimental and alternative forms of filmmaking. They will study stop-motion animation and create their own. The last film of the winter will be a creative combination of every skill the students have learned during the year. In the spring, students will be given weekly projects that will push them to be as creative as possible. The spring will conclude with a final film that will be written, shot, and edited entirely by the students. This class has no prerequisite. Digital Photography Digital Photography is a yearlong course that combines Digital Photo I, II, and III. Students will spend the fall exploring the basics of photography and Photoshop. They will learn how to use a DSLR and understand shooting in Manual. On Photoshop, they will learn how to complete basic edits and make graphic images. In the winter, we will move onto more challenging Photoshop techniques. In the spring, students will work to define their personal artistic style and create a portfolio that represents their best work. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in DSLR photography, Photoshop, and visual and digital literacy. This class has no prerequisite. Fall electives Art of Television Art of Television is a trimester course that will cover the history and production of television. Students will learn about the history of television and its evolution. Students will watch many episodes of various shows and discuss the various genres and influences. As a class, we will write a short screenplay for a pilot episode. Students will then work together to shoot and act in their own tv show. Students will learn how to use a DSLR to shoot video and Adobe Premiere to edit. This class has no prerequisite.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Digital Graphic Design This one trimester elective provides an overview of how to consider, understand and apply basic design theory using mainly Adobe Illustrator which will allow students an overview of the processes, historical context, and communication created through image-making and typography. In addition to basic lessons, students will work on “real life” assignments to get a sense of how design projects are created and implemented. Examples may include postcards, flyers, posters and web pages. B&W Photography I This class is designed for those new to traditional black-and-white silver gelatin photography. Students will learn the mechanics of operating a manual 35 mm SLR camera and the process of developing film and printing negatives in a darkroom. They will complete weekly shooting and writing assignments, with the goal of recognizing successful image making from technical, composition and content perspectives. Discussion of the process, exposure to work of significant photographers and discussion of student work provide tools for visual literacy and personal expression. During the first half of the trimester students will concentrate on developing competency with camera functions, photographing, developing film and printing photographs. In the second half of the trimester students will be encouraged to use those skills to explore their personal vision and creative process. Drawing I Students will explore a variety of drawing techniques and media. The focus will be on working towards improved observational drawing. Studio I is a basic class that is recommended for all students (except 9th graders — see Grade 9 Arts Program) who wish to take a general art class or for sophomores interested in pursuing an arts intensive path of study culminating in participation in Advanced Art. Basic techniques along with art historical studies and the Elements of Art and Principles of Design are stressed. Each student will make a Creativity Journal that emphasizes imagination and independence in the studio. Drawing II Prerequisites: Drawing I or teacher approval through portfolio submissions. Drawing and design projects are created using pencil, colored pencil, charcoal, and pastels. This class builds on the Studio I experience and allows further investigation of the history, techniques and ideas that inform the visual arts. Hands-on studio exploration and learning-through-looking at major artists are important aspects of the classes. Students are required to keep a sketchbook/journal throughout the trimester. Winter electives Introduction to 3D Students will create several different sculptures based on a range of modern sculptor’s work. Students will work with cardboard, wire, wood, and found objects. Documentary Photography (B&W) Documentary Photography explores the tradition of this genre while helping you to create your own Documentary Project. Students will learn about the camera, developing film, printing photographs.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2019 - 20 Documentary Filmmaking Documentary Filmmaking is a trimester course that will cover the art and production of documentary films. Students will learn how to use a DSLR to shoot video and Adobe Premiere to edit. Students will learn how to research story, shoot interviews, and edit a short documentary. Students will research the various genres of documentary filmmaking and will learn how to differentiate between them. This class has no prerequisite. Digital Graphic Design This one trimester elective provides an overview of how to consider, understand and apply basic design theory using mainly Adobe Illustrator which will allow students an overview of the processes, historical context, and communication created through image-making and typography. In addition to basic lessons, students will work on “real life” assignments to get a sense of how design projects are created and implemented. Examples may include postcards, flyers, posters and web pages. Spring electives Comedy & Filmmaking Comedy & Filmmaking is a trimester course that explores the bestselling combination of comedy and filmmaking. Students will explore the many genres of comedy within filmmaking and short video work. They will make their own parodies, mockumentaries, short sketches, dark comedies, and attempt to make their short viral video. Students will learn how to use a DSLR to shoot video and Adobe Premiere to edit. Students will also learn how to write a script for a short comedic sketch. This class has no prerequisite. Digital Graphic Design This one trimester elective provides an overview of how to consider, understand and apply basic design theory using mainly Adobe Illustrator which will allow students an overview of the processes, historical context, and communication created through image-making and typography. In addition to basic lessons, students will work on “real life” assignments to get a sense of how design projects are created and implemented. Examples may include postcards, flyers, posters and web pages. Painting I & II It is recommended that students have taken Drawing I before taking painting as the skills developed in that class will aid in better understanding of learning to work with paint. Students will work with acrylic, watercolor, and pastel to make paintings that are based on both observation and fantasy. Students will also learn several printmaking techniques such as: collograph, monoprint, and linocut. There will also be an introduction to a range of artists working in those mediums. Students who have a base in drawing will be more able to understand concepts and create work with better understanding. Students will spend more time developing their work by using sketchbooks and looking at great works of art. The elements of art and principles of design will continue to be strongly referenced as we work. Pottery Students learn the basic hand-building techniques with which they are expected to produce a required number of pieces. When hand-building proficiency has been demonstrated, the students may choose to learn to use the wheel or work in sculpture. All work is done in stoneware—a high-fire clay of great durability and finished with cone 9 reduction glazes that are mixed in our studio.

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VERMONT ACADEMY COURSE CATALOG | 2017 - 18

KEY DATES 2019-20 ACADEMIC YEAR Sun. Sept. 1 - Sat. Sept. 7

Jumpstart Orientation for International Students

Tues. Sept. 3 - Wed. Sept. 4

Proctor Leadership Training

Thurs. Sept. 5

Registration for preseason Athletes 9:00 - 11:00am

Sat. Sept. 7

Registration for all students 9:00 - 11:00 am

Mon. Sept 9

First day of Fall Trimester/Convocation

Fri. Sept. 27 - Sun. Sept. 29

Reunion Weekend

Thurs. Oct. 10 - Sat. Oct. 12

Family Weekend (Thurs. pm - Sat. pm)/VAPA Fundraiser

Sat. Oct. 12 - Tues. Oct 15

Fall Long Weekend (back in dorms by 8:00pm 10/15)

Wed. Oct 16 Classes Resume Thurs. Nov. 21

Last day of Fall Trimester

Fri. Nov. 22 - Mon. Dec. 2

Thanksgiving Break Starts at 11:00am (in dorms by 8pm on 12/2)

Tues.Dec. 3

Winter Trimester Classes begin at Vermont Academy

Fri. Dec. 20

Winter Vacation begins

2020 Mon. Jan. 6

Winter Vacation ends (back in dorm by 8:00pm)

Tues. Jan. 7 Classes Resume Sat. Feb. 1 - Tues. Feb. 4

Winter Long Weekend (back in dorm by 8:00pm on 2/4)

Wed. Feb. 5 Classes Resume Thurs. Feb. 13 - Sun. Feb. 16

Winter Carnival

Thurs. Mar. 5

Last Day of Winter Trimester

Fri. Mar. 6 - Wed. Mar. 25

Spring Break (back in dorm by 8:00pm on 3/25)

Thrus. Mar. 26

Spring Trimester Classes begin at Vermont Academy

Thurs. May. 7 - Tues. May. 12

Spring Arts Weekend (All Parents invited)

Fri. May 22

Last Day of Spring Trimester/Baccalaureate

Sat. May 23

Commencement (11:00am South Lawn, weather permitting)

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Profile for Vermont Academy

Course Catalog 2019-20  

Vermont Academy 2019-20 Course Catalog

Course Catalog 2019-20  

Vermont Academy 2019-20 Course Catalog