Page 1


NOW VOYAGER!

The world’s most beautiful cruises

CITY LIGHTS ALLURING APARTMENTS AND TOW N HOUSES

Trophy life

Interior Design Awards &ArtStart now open

Arrive in

Style

THE NEW AUSTRALIANA DESIGN

STARS

EXPORTING ANTIPODEAN S P I R I T

+ 90

pages of showstopping homes

FROM HERE TO HOLLYWOOD


Iconic Jasper II Experience the multi award-winning Jasper, an icon of Australian design. The ultimate expression of flexibility and long-lasting personal comfort. Built around a superior steel frame that’s backed by a 25-year warranty, Jasper can be effortlessly reconfigured into multiple configurations, even a heavenly guest bed for two.

kingliving.com 1300 546 438 AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND SINGAPORE MALAYSIA SHANGHAI CANADA


l


Delight Create timelessly sophisticated spaces with Delight, a collection of Italian porcelain dedicated to the beauty of classic marble. Available in traditional tiles and large-scale SRUFHODLQSDQHOVWRVXLWEHQFKWRSVIJRRUVZDOOVDQGPRUH Shown: “Invisible Lightâ€? - 1200mmx2600x6mm. Visit Signorino.com.au now to explore Delight and more.


KITCHEN PERFECTION EXPERIENCE TRUE DESIGN FREEDOM WITH INTEGRATED COLUMN REFRIGERATION

ямБsherpaykel.com


parisi.com.au


ACQUERELLO Basins by Valdama Acquerello collection, designed by Prospero Rasulo for Valdama, revolves around a new basin with soft lines, shaped by the light, with no hard shadows. Light slides over the surfaces in a uid and natural way. Acquerello interacts with other design elements, to create harmonious combinations of shapes and colours within the home, just like in a painting. These colourful beauties come with cover plates, with the option to mix and match colours. Available in Australia exclusively through PARISI, Acquerello basins and cover plates are available in 9 matt colours and 2 gloss colours.

Gloss White

Matt White

Velato

Nuvola

Basento Tempesta Oceano

Laguna

Zolfo

Matt Black

Gloss Black


WHERE LUXURY meets DISCOVERY With lands of pristine beauty and breathtaking wildlife, travelling to Antarctica is a long held dream for many. Plan your adventure to the final frontiers of this southern continent, go further and dream bigger. From our passionate Discovery Team members, to the two on-board helicopters and submarine and a wealth of world-class features, Scenic Eclipse is the new benchmark in ultra-luxury cruising.

We invite you on board Scenic Eclipse, The World’s First Discovery Yachts™. EARLYBIRD FARES OUT NOW

Dive deep below

Soar above and beyond


Intimate and luxurious, with every feature you could wish for, Scenic Eclipse has been designed with the guest in mind. Delighting both the keen explorer and elegant traveller, the World’s First Discovery YachtsTM will surpass all of your expectations. Anthony Laver, Group General Manager, Sales and Marketing, Scenic Luxury Cruises & Tours Scenic Whisky Bar

ANTARCTICA IN DEPTH

ANTARCTICA, SOUTH GEORGIA & FALKLAND ISLANDS UP TO

Buenos Argentina Aires

$4,000

Ushuaia

Beagle Channel

1

Argentina

Drake Passage

11

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)

South Georgia

Ushuaia Elephant Island

South Shetland Islands

18

Drake Passage

South Orkney Islands Port Lockroy

PER COUPLE AIR CREDIT*

Buenos Aires

1

South Shetland Islands

Antarctic Peninsula Weddell Sea

Lemaire Channel

Antarctic Circle

Antarctic Peninsula

Departing 9 Nov 2020 Buenos Aires > Buenos Aires (101S)

Departing 20 Nov 2020 and 8 Dec 2020 Buenos Aires > Buenos Aires (201S)

Includes Earlybird Savings from $4,510* per couple

Includes Earlybird Savings from $6,950* per couple

113 days from $18,025*pp including charter flights Buenos Aires - Ushuaia return

20 days from $29,565*pp including charter flights Buenos Aires - Ushuaia return

Truly All-Inclusive Luxury Only 200 guests Spacious all-verandah suites Butler service 1:1 staff-to-guest ratio Up to 10 dining experiences, from casual to fine dining All meals and premium branded beverages† Specialist Polar Discovery Team Immersive Scenic Discovery excursions# Indulgent 550m2 Senses Spa, gym, yoga and Pilates studio‡ Internal flights, airport transfers and tipping

Order a copy of our new brochure collection now CALL 1300 947 488 | Visit sceniceclipse.com or visit your nearest Scenic agent *Conditions apply. Offers are valid for new bookings only on selected departures. Offers are valid until the 28/02/2020 or until sold out. These terms and conditions are additional to the terms and conditions contained in Scenic Eclipse Worldwide Discovery Voyages 2020/2022 brochure and on scenic.com.au/terms. All bookings are subject to Scenic’ s full terms and conditions. Prices are in Australian Dollars. Advertised prices includes Early Payment Discount and guests must book and pay in full by 28/02/2020 for the discount to apply. Antarctica in Depth price based on Category DD. Antarctica, South Georgia and Falkland Islands price based on 20 November 2020 departure category DA as at 02/12/2019. Conditions for Air Credit: Flights must be booked with Scenic. Air Credit offer is valid for new bookings only, maximum of 1 air credit per person per booking. Single occupancy suites receive half the per stateroom air credit amount specified. Air credit offer can be combined with Earlybird Fare as marked on selected itineraries, Scenic Club Members, Welcome Home, Vouchers and with Members Introduce a Friend vouchers. Offers cannot be combined with Future Travel Credit, expo offers, Scenic Club Member offers published in Magazine and other mailings. Offers are non-transferable and cannot be altered or exchanged for cash, or other goods or services. Any unused portion of the offer will be forfeited. Voucher can only be used once. Once a booking is made including the voucher code, the voucher expires and cannot be reinstated or re-issued. All drinks are included except for a very small number of rare, fine and vintage wines, champagnes and spirits. ‡Additional cost for Spa treatments. #Helicopter and submarine excursions are available at additional cost. Must be booked and paid on board. Excursions are strictly limited and subject to availability, weight restrictions, medical approval and weather & ice conditions. For full conditions visit scenic. com.au/terms. Scenic ABN 85 002 715 602


25

148

F E B RUA RY/ M A RC H

2020

25

CHISELLED LINES

SPY A nude palette takes the reins in

this assemblage of wares with artisan qualities.

32 35

I N T E R I O R D E S I G N AWA R D S Enter now.

EMMA TULLOCH OF EMMA TULLOCH ARCHITECTS COLL ABORATED WITH MIRIAM FANNING OF MIM DESIGN ON THIS REMARKABLE THREE-STOREY FAMILY HOME IN MELBOURNE.

R I G H T N O W Don Cameron presents

a tableau of covetable pieces.

36

CONTENTS

A RT Eye-opening artworks appearing at

galleries around the country.

38

A RT STA RT Enter our painting prize for the chance to win a share of $17,500.

40

A RC H I T EC T U R E Karen McCartney in

conversation with architect Sou Fujimoto.

42

A RC H I T EC T U R E N E W S The top

six constructions from around the globe.

44

C R E AT I V E S PAC E Unlock the expertly curated world of The Vault Sydney.

47

B E LL E LOV E S Designer Romaine Alwill curates a collection of sleek side tables.

51

LUXE FILES A nomadic family tree fosters a love of travel and creativity for Bethan Gray.

52

B U S I N E SS O F D E S I G N The new identity

of Australiana now being exported to the world.

56

W O M AN Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom inspires a jungle style where ‘anything goes’.

58

M A N Crack the whip in luxuriant looks that

P HOTO G R A P H Y A L A N A L A N DS B E R RY ( S PY, TOP M I D D L E ), P E T E R C L A R K E ( HOM E , TOP R IG H T ), S E A N F E N N E S S Y ( S M A RT S PAC E , B OT TOM L E F T )

are likely to make others green with envy.

65

ST Y L E E T I Q U E T TE Navigating life's major milestones: births, deaths and marriages.

67 69

L I B R A RY The newest pages to pore over. S M A RT SPAC E S Tour 10 homes where city life and impeccable style go hand in hand.

70 117 118

HOM ES SY D N E Y The Obamas’ post-White House home was the spark that

inspired this American beauty on the eastern side of the city.

126

A M A L F I C OA ST Azure seas and an iconic landmark form the dreamy

backdrop to this Melbourne family’s northern hemisphere escape.

134

M E L B O U R N E For Shareen Joel, the devil is in the detail of the

revamped 1800s villa she refurbished and inhabits with her family.

142 148 154

LO S A N G E L E S This Hollywood home received the star treatment. M E L B O U R N E Considered curves make a monumental style statement. PA R I S Design duo Humbert & Poyet transformed a 17th-century

space from hôtel particulier to glamorous, contemporary residence.

15


166

T H E YAC H T S ON A JOURNEY FROM VALLETTA TO ATHENS WITH SEADREAM YACHT CLUB PRIVATE CRUISE LINE, ENJOY TWO DAYS ROMANCED BY THE BUSTLE OF HYDRA IN GREECE.

163

FOOD & TRAVEL CRUISING SPECIAL

164

T H E O CE A N L I N E RS Immersive experiences

from the coast of Europe to Hong Kong and Tokyo.

166

T H E YAC H T S Cruise the seas in complete luxury

aboard impressive superyachts akin to floating resorts.

170

T H E E X P E D I T I O N S H I PS Luxe trips that take

in Antarctica and Galápagos appeal to the adventurer.

172

T H E R I V E R C RU I S ER Soak in the sights, history and culture of the mighty Yangtze River region.

Grill then Chill. Extend your evening hours with Stoke’s collection of outdoor fireplaces. There’s one for every home. stokefires.com

18

Masthead and Privacy Notice; Contributor and the Belle Hot List

21 23 181 186

Editor’s Letter Inbox On The Town The Office ... Michelle Macarounas

OUR COVE R American Appeal, p118. Photography Pablo Veiga.

Subscribe to BELLE and receive a pair of Turkish towels, valued at $78. Details p114.

P HOTO G R A P H Y A L A M Y ( H Y DR A , TO P R IG H T )

R EGULARS


E D I TO R I A L

Editor Creative director Deputy editor Senior copy editor Designer /art production Contributing editors

Gavin Kirk Cathryn Zhang Harry Roberts Janice Hogg Matus Kundrat Steve Cordony (Style director-at-large), Emma Elizabeth, Karen McCartney (Architecture), Lucy Montgomery (Interior design editor), Judy Pascoe (Library), Melissa Penfold, Carli Philips (Melbourne), Georgina Safe, Jean Wright (Design)

60 SECONDS WITH ANDRE A BL ACK E D I T O R I A L O F F I C E GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028 Tel (02) 9282 8456, email: belle@bauer-media.com.au

CON T R I B UTO R S Francis Amiand, Brigid Arnott, Andrea Black, Katrina Breen, Sharyn Cairns, Phillip Castleton, Peter Clarke, Lisa Cohen, Lindyl Crabb, Eszter+David, Sean Fennessy, Felix Forest, Paloma Garay, James Geer, Virginia Gen, Deborah Grant, Maree Homer, Alana Landsberry, Shannon McGrath, Karine Monié, Tamarah Pienaar, Matilda Ringrose, Prue Ruscoe, Anson Smart, Kristina Soljo, Pablo Veiga, Dave Wheeler

A D V E RT I S I N G

Homes commercial manager Brand manager Advertising production manager Director of sales, NSW Director of sales, Vic, SA, WA Victoria head of direct sales Queensland head of sales Creative director Production planner Advertising production

Rhonda Maunder, (02) 9282 8687 Kimberly Anderson, (02) 9282 6103 Kate Orsborn, (02) 9282 8364 Karen Holmes, (02) 9282 8733 Jaclyn Clements, (03) 9823 6341 Will Jamison, (03) 9823 6301 Judy Taylor, (07) 3101 6636 Clare Catt, (02) 8116 9341 Sally Jeffries, (02) 8116 9385 Dominic Roy, (02) 9282 8691

M A R K E T I N G , R E S E A R C H & C I R C U L AT I O N

Marketing director Senior marketing manager Assistant brand manager Circulation manager Research analyst Group subscriptions and e-commerce Subscriptions campaign manager

Louise Cankett Jillian Hogan Sarah Webster Nicole Pearson Alison Gillerman Sean McLintock Jesvin Vincent, (02) 9263 9865

For this issue of Belle, Andrea embarked on seven of the world’s most spectacular sea voyages for our luxe Cruising Special, see p163. “Luxury cruise lines have realised we want an experience that caters to our own interests both on shore and at sea,” says Andrea. “We don’t want to be led on group tours to tick off ‘bucket-list’ sites.” What have been your favourite career experiences? Visiting Le Corbusier’s ‘vertical garden city’ Unité d’Habitation in Marseille, France, was incredible, as was touring Cambodian architect Vann Molyvann’s buildings in Phnom Penh with a local architect. I am a big music fan, too, so a private visit to Elvis Presley’s mid-century Beverly Hills home, now used by The Future Perfect as gallery space, was a highlight. Your enduring creative influences? Music. When I travel I seek out vintage vinyl record stores and bring home a local release from way back. Best cities for records? New Orleans and Stockholm. Where is home for you? Sydney’s inner west. It has great music venues, breweries, Vietnamese restaurants and incredible Portuguese food at the Marrickville Hardcourt Tennis Club. What would be your ultimate travel escape in 2020? The Amalfi Coast in June for a friend’s birthday. We’ll catch the local bus to Sorrento for a tour and lunch at Parco Dei Principi, the Gio Ponti-designed hotel. What is inspiring you? Leila Jeffreys’ bird photography, Tim Ross’s design and architecture talks and books, and pretty much any record that Daptone Records put out. T H E B E L L E F E B RUA RY/ M A RC H H OT L I ST

Electrolux 681L French door fridge in dark stainless steel, $3295, (left). harveynorman. com.au

B A U E R M E DI A

Chief executive officer Executive general manager Associate publisher, Homes Commercial director Australia General manager media solutions Research director publishing Business manager

Brendon Hill Sarah-Belle Murphy Shane Sutton Paul Gardiner Jane Waterhouse Catherine Ross Georgina Bromfield

SUBSCRIPTION SALES & ENQUIRIES Visit: magshop.com.au. Email: magshop@magshop.com.au. Tel: 136 116. Mail: Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000. S Y N D I C AT I O N E N Q U I R I E S syndication@bauer-media.com.au Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ACN 053 273 546) part of the Bauer Media Group, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, tel (02) 9282 8000, fax (02) 9267 8037. The trademark Belle is the property of Bauer Consumer Media Limited and is used under licence. © 2020. All rights reserved. Printed by Ovato Warwick Farm, 8 Priddle St, Warwick Farm NSW 2170. ISSN 0310-1452. Contributors’ manuscripts should be typewritten, and all text, photographs and illustrations must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope stamped to the appropriate value. Bauer Media does not accept responsibility for damage to, or loss of, material submitted for publication. Material contained in Belle is protected under the Commonwealth Copyright Act, 1968. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Belle is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media.com.au/privacy/. It also sets out how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

‘Herringbone Weave’ seagrass floor covering, $55/sqm, (above). ‘Århus’ organic hand soap in glass bottle, $49/500ml, (right).

interfloors.com.au

worksmelbourne.com/shop

Breville ‘3X Bluicer Pro’, from $599, (right). harveynorman. com.au

‘Le Château 150’ cooker in Lafayette Blue and Polished Chrome, POA, (above). lacornue.com


EDITOR’S LET TER

P HOTO G R AP H Y KR I ST I N A SO L J O ( POR T R A I T) , S H A N NO N M C G R AT H ( TOP R IG H T, H EC K E R G U T H R I E P ROJ ECT )

H

ABOVE, THE SMART INNER-CITY SPACE DESIGNED BY HECKER GUTHRIE, P76. BELOW LEFT, EXPERIENCE THE SPECTACULAR SIGHTS OF CHINA’S YANGTZE RIVER REGION WITH ABERCROMBIE & KENT, P172.

ey Siri, play I’m So Excited by The Pointer Sisters.” Welcome to 2020. No matter how it rolls off your tongue – twenty-twenty or two-thousand-and-twenty – it feels rather surreal having arrived in this decade. It’s a time that, pre-Y2K dramas, I dreamed was so far away it would feel like an eternity between then and now. Suddenly being here, though, it’s a little different to what I’d imagined: mostly because I don’t have a flying car in the garage, and Rosie the robot isn’t at home preparing dirty martinis at the end of each working day (if only Siri had arms and legs!). Nonetheless, there are so many things to be excited about right now, and in this agenda-setting issue of Belle. First on the list, we have that new year buzz under our seats. We’ve torn the month of December off the wall calendar – retro, I know – and with the new year comes a rush of renewed energy, charged with resolutions, good intentions and a brighter vision for the future. With this in mind, we are thrilled to present to you our latest edit of what we call Smart Spaces from design stars around the country (p69). Here, you’ll find a line-up of 10 inner-city pads that deliver clever ideas, savvy solutions, sophisticated metropolitan palettes and all-round outstanding design brilliance to inspire and delight you. Our suite of six showstopping homes is also something to bookmark and revisit again and again. From the cover-star American beauty by Alexandra Kidd Design in Sydney’s east which was inspired by the Obamas’ post-White House address (p118) to an Australian family’s Amalfi Coast getaway where the dazzling Mediterranean Sea all but laps the doorstep (p126), each page abounds with bliss. But the excitement certainly doesn’t fizzle out there. Whether you’re a liner-loving luxurian, seafaring sailor or seeking an action-packed ocean odyssey, writer Andrea Black tantalises you with the world’s most beautiful cruises (p163), selected to satisfy the junkies and first-timers alike. So ahoy, there. And bon voyage! Also this issue, we present Australiana 2.0 (p52). Having matured from the faraway island known for shrimps on barbies and clip-on koalas, meet the local design heroes who are presenting to the world a contemporary Australian design language, peppered with the heart and soul of our irresistible lifestyle. It’s new design for the new decade, and it’s a wonderful place to be. “Hey Siri, play Janet Jackson’s Design of a Decade ...”

Gavin Kirk, Editor @GAVINJAMESKIRK

Follow us

#BELLEMAGA ZINE

FACEBO OK BELLEMAGA ZINE AU

INSTAGR AM @BELLEMAGA ZINE AU

EMAIL BELLE@BAUER-MEDIA.COM.AU

Belle is also available to buy as a digital magazine for iPhone and iPad, through Magshop, which is a free app to download from the App Store and from Google Play.


Leo Collection

SYDNEY 02 9906 3686

BRISBANE 07 3252 8488 sales@cotswoldfurniture.com.au - www.cotswoldfurniture.com.au

MITTAGONG 02 4872 2585


3

1 TOWER OF POWER The ‘New York’ 20-box stand is part of the Luxe collection of stylish storage devices from Sagitine. The brass-finished frame supports 20 art decoinspired curved boxes with leather pulls. sagitine.com

4 FINE FEAST Chef Josh Niland from Sydney’s fish-centric Saint Peter restaurant has devised a limited-time menu, paired with Dom Pérignon’s Vintage 2008 and Vintage 2002 Pléntitude 2. saintpeter.com.au

3 WATCH OUT In a tribute to the year of production of the model that inspired it, the understated Longines ‘Heritage Military’ timepiece is numbered and limited to 1938 pieces. longines.com.au

1 11 CHUNKY MONKEY Plumped-up cushions on a refined frame provide the contrast that gives the indoor-outdoor ‘Fatty’ armchair from Kun Design its durability, comfort and its name. domo.com.au; kundesign.com

INBOX

4

2 METAL AS ANYTHING The ‘Organo’ cabinet pulls by British luxury hardware outfit Joseph Giles are akin to jewels for your joinery, each created using traditional casting methods. englishtapware.com.au

2

5 GLOWING REVIEW Taking its shape, and its name, from the unique voronoi arrangements seen among forest canopies, the Voronoi collection of sculptural globes is now at Euroluce. euroluce.com.au

New year solutions Resolve to treat yourself to something special in 2020.

11

Edited by GAVIN KIRK

6

5

6 GLAMOUR FROM THE GARDEN Magnolia is the enchanting scent at the heart of Loewe’s latest fragrance, supported by notes of musk, sandalwood and red fruits. loewe.com

10 DOG DAYS Designed to complement the existing Radan outdoor collection, the team at Coco Republic has created the ‘Charlie’ dog bed in a bid to please your pooch – and your aesthetic. cocorepublic.com.au

10

9 KING OF THE C A ST LE Fresh from the masterminds at King Living, Design.Online is the new destination for affordable, quality, quick-to-assemble furniture, delivered to your door in a flash. Expect to put together the threeseat ‘SmartSofa’ in under 10 minutes – no tools required. au.design.online

9

8 JOURNAL ENTRY Globetrotting photographer and ambassador of Australian life and style, Kara Rosenlund presents a few of her favourite things in Weekends: surf, shacks, seafood, summer and North Stradbroke Island. kararosenlund.com

8

7 7 GOING GREY The ‘Tao’ dining table by Monica Armani for Tribù was a winner at the recent Archiproducts Design Awards. Partnered with the ‘Tosca’ armchair, they make an unbeatable indoor-outdoor solution. coshliving.com.au

23


Available from

gregorycroxfordliving.com.au info@gregorycroxfordliving.com.au 0403 656 110


Photography ALANA L ANDSBERRY Editing/styling STEVE CORDONY

ST Y L I ST A S S I STA N T S J ACOB OLS E N , LU C I G R A N T. H A N DW R I T I N G BY L E S L E Y W O R K M A N

Artisanal traits, polished silhouettes and tactile encounters elevate collections of new neutrals.

This page, from left Møbel Copenhagen ‘Font Bold’ lounge sofa, from $5059, from Fred International. The Rug Company ‘Brink Ivory’ rug by Kelly Wearstler, $3400/sqm, from The Green Room. Mud Studio beaded stool in Ivory, $1950, from MCM House. Shallow maple wood bowl, $45, from Chee Soon & Fitzgerald. Vintage papier-mâché mirror, $1500, from Studio ALM. Vintage Japanese bamboo wall vase, $160, from Planet. Floral by Grandiflora. Artwork by Tania Mason, $440, from The DEA Store. French ceramic sculpture, $8500/set of six, from Tamsin Johnson. Tempest Sheer roller blind in ‘Frost’, POA, from Luxaflex. Carl Hansen & Søn ‘CH36’ chair, $1182, from Cult. Articolo ‘Fizi’ table lamp, POA, from Est Lighting. Caroline Blackburn large vase, POA, from Spence & Lyda. Background painted in Porter’s Paints ‘Popcorn’.

25


SPY

Trends

These pages, from left Artwork by Kyle Murrell, $590, from The DEA Store. ‘Vilda 3’ dining chair, from $1850, from Great Dane. On table ‘Emporio linen‘ (used as tablecloth), POA, from Westbury Textiles. Wingnut & Co breakfast bowl, $40, from In Bed. Large resin temple plate, $110, from Dinosaur Designs. Opus Lab cheese knife, $65, from The DEA Store. ‘Ivy’ incense holder, $80, from Jardan. Opus Lab maple wood vase, $120, from The DEA Store. Tempest Sheer roller blind in ‘Frost’, POA, from Luxaflex. Tumbler, POA, from Jardan. Wineglass, POA, from The DEA Store. Ceramic speckle vase, $150, from In Bed. Pierre + Charlotte tree light, $790, from MCM House. Wingnut & Co body brush, $35, and salad plate, $38.50, both from In Bed. Natalie Rosin sculpture, POA, from Curatorial+Co. Timber candelabra, $320, from In Bed.

25


The strength of rock, the ethereality of paper and the possibility of scissors unite in a harmonious fusion of modern elements. This page, clockwise from top left Vipp mortar and pestle, $691, from Cult. Katarina Wells pitcher, $280, from Curatorial+Co. Brass scissors, $116, from Planet. 1960s French rattan mirror, $1200, from Tamsin Johnson. Opus Lab carved wooden mushroom-shaped salt cellar, $300, from The DEA Store. Vipp wood cutlery, $100/set of five, from Cult. Visser solid brass chopsticks and holder, $45, solid brass fork, POA, and dinner plate, POA, all from The DEA Store. Napkin, $45, from Ondene. Whiskey glass, $115, and timber sushi platter, $165, both from The DEA Store. Likestone ‘Koishi’ vase, $119, from Ginkgo Leaf. Lizzo Mantra fabric (as tablecloth), POA, from Westbury Textiles. Floral from Grandiflora.


Window fashions as individual as you If you’re looking for the perfect blend of style and substance, it’s time to discover PolySatin® Shutters from Luxaflex Window Fashions. Proudly made in Australia, they bring elegance to any interior with the soft, matte lustre of freshly painted wood and the durability of our advanced Polyresin compound allowing them to be unaffected by sun or water. For a tailor made solution to suit your lifestyle, visit your local Luxaflex showroom 01/2020

and discover the Luxaflex difference for yourself.

luxaflex.com.au | 13 58 92 |


Trends

SPY

This page, from left French ceramic sculpture, $8500/set of six, from Tamsin Johnson. ‘Gusoku 1’ by Nousaku brass candleholder, $279, from Ginkgo Leaf. Simone Karras raku vessel, POA, from Jardan. Small metal pebble vase, $155, from Dinosaur Designs. Timber tongs, POA, from The DEA Store. 1882 Ltd medium bowl, $250, from Neil Bradford. Floral from Grandiflora. Helsinki linen (used as tablecloth), POA, from Westbury Textiles.

From the earth’s raw materials, precious objets and one-of-a-kind artistry are born at the skilled hands of the sculptor.

29


DOMO showrooms in Sandringham, Hawthorn, Paddington, Willoughby, North Adelaide, Brisbane & Gold Coast. Contempo Studio, Claremont.


Trends

SPY

This page, clockwise from top left Artwork by Kyle Murrell, $590, from The DEA Store. Carl Hansen & Søn ‘CH36’ chair, $1182, and ‘CH23’ chair, $1364, both from Cult. Møbel Copenhagen ‘Font’ dining chair, from $2255, from Fred International. Taro table, from $6780, from Great Dane. Helsinki linen (used as curtain), POA, from Westbury Textiles. On table, clockwise from left Oak stepped container, $129, from Ginkgo Leaf. Paola Paronetto clay bottle, POA, from Fanuli. New Volumes ‘Artemis’ candleholder, $436, from Cult. Oak tape dispenser, $129, from Ginkgo Leaf. ‘Blossi’ table lamp, $1695, from Great Dane. Humble Matter ‘TTM’ vessel, $1150, from Curatorial+Co. Keshiki potted plant, $59, from Ginkgo Leaf. Alpren glazed mug, $48, from Planet. Dinesen timber flooring, POA, from Precision Flooring. Brass scissors, $116, from Planet. On floor, from left ‘Drip’ vase by Alessandro Di Sarno, $300, from Neil Bradford. Katarina Wells vase, $240, from Curatorial+Co. Brush, $45, from The DEA Store. Stoneware vase, $590, from Planet. Papier-mâché vessel, POA, from Water Tiger. Background painted in Porter’s Paints ‘Popcorn’.

31


Call for ENTRIES » In association with COCO REPUBLIC, Australia’s leading furniture and design brand, Belle is delighted to announce that entries are open for the 2020 INTERIOR DESIGN AWARDS » Now in its tenth year, this prestigious awards program is committed to supporting the creativity and innovation of the local industry by celebrating and rewarding excellence in Australian interior design and decoration by individuals, partnerships and design practices at residential, hospitality and commercial levels. 2 02 0 AWA R D S CAT EG OR I E S » BEST RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR » BEST RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR – READERS’ CHOICE

» BEST RESIDENTIAL KITCHEN DESIGN » BEST RESIDENTIAL BATHROOM DESIGN » BEST HOSPITALITY INTERIOR

» BEST COMMERCIAL INTERIOR » BEST WORK WITH COLOUR » EMERGING DESIGN STAR » HALL OF FAME » BELLE/COCO REPUBLIC INTERIOR DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

S P O N S O R E D BY

S U P P O RT I N G S P O N S O R S

E N T R I E S C LO SE M A RCH 16 FOR AN ENTRY KIT AND FURTHER DETAILS, PLEASE EMAIL BELLEAWARDS@BAUER-MEDIA.COM.AU


FURNITURE & HOMEWARES | INTERIOR DESIGN | PROPERTY STYLING | DESIGN SCHOOL WWW.COCOREPUBLIC.COM.AU


mckimm - Project #338 Photography - Dave Kulesza Artwork - Jasmine Mansbridge Bea Lambos & VV Interior Spaces

1238 High St Armadale VIC 14 Dissik St Cheltenham VIC 3-7 Danks St Waterloo NSW www.studiogallerygroup.com


P HOTO G R A P H Y TOM ROS S

RIGHT N OW

REFINED RECLINER Interior designer Fiona Lynch called on collector, gallerist and filmmaker Don Cameron to devise a noirish visual narrative for the third iteration of Work Shop, the experimental design gallery that adjoins her Collingwood studio. Playing up the chemistry between objects to dramatic effect, Don’s mise-en-scène comprises art and design pieces from his own eclectic inventory, including a reclining figure (pictured) by French ceramicist Roger Capron, which remixes Picasso’s harlequin with a nod to Henry Moore and is now attractively lit by a trio of vintage Scarpa pendants. Shop the collection until March. fionalynch.com.au

35


RIGHT NOW

Art S Y D N E Y

M E L B O U R N E

ON THE HORIZON

NEED FOR ROOTS

OPERATING IN THE ROMANTIC TRADITION OF LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY, AMANDA WILLIAMS EMBRACES THE MATERIAL POSSIBILITIES OF HER MEDIUM AND THE UNPREDICTABLE ‘AFTERLIFE’ OF HER EPIC SWEEPS (BELOW) – CAPTURED ON EXPIRED ILFORD FILM AND HAND-PRINTED ON MURAL-SIZED, FIBRE-BASED PAPER – AS THE CHEMICAL PROCESS AFFECTS SUBTLE MUTATIONS. FEBRUARY 1-29. THECOMMERCIALGALLERY.COM

Expressed across varied media, including rusted, sandblasted water tank panels (left), Robert Fielding’s ‘Routes/Roots’ explores questions around the ownership of cultural knowledge and institutionalisation of sacred objects. The series draws on research into colonial looting as well as the ancestry of the Mimili artist himself, who is of Western Arrernte, Yankunytjatjara, Pakistani and Afghan descent, with ties to the 19th-century cameleers who navigated central Australia. February 22-May 17. lindenarts.org SY D N E Y

C U M U L AT I V E I M PA C T Sarah Cottier Gallery’s first 2020 show assembles artists who were represented in landmark public programs during the preceding year – including Julie Fragar and Koji Ryui, commissioned for the ‘The National 2019’ by Carriageworks and AGNSW respectively – and Elizabeth Pulie, whose weavings (right) formed part of ‘Bauhaus Now!’ at Buxton Contemporary. February 1-29. sarahcottiergallery.com

Made you look What’s turning heads and opening eyes at galleries.

C A N B E R R A

FRENEMIES ‘Matisse & Picasso’ follows the fraught yet fruitful relationship of the two modern masters via more than 200 examples of their work, positing the pair’s enduring artistic rivalry and turbulent friendship as fuel for their radical creativity. “Nobody ever looked at Matisse’s work as thoroughly as I did. And he at mine,” said Picasso, whose pieces – including Reading [La Lecture] (left) – can now be seen at the NGA in a compelling conversation with that of his peer. Until April 13. nga.gov.au

A D E L A I D E

STITCHE S IN TIME Sewn together with the discombobulating logic of the digital realm and its flattening of dissonant ideas and images, Paul Yore’s phantasmagorias are by turns comical and disquieting in their intensely layered scramble of chauvinist slogans, trash iconography and homoeroticism. Does My Ideology Look Big in This? (above) forms part of the artist’s series, ‘Crown of Thorns’. February 6-March 7. hugomichellgallery.com

S Y D N E Y

COAST TO COAST Titled after the Solomon Islands expression meaning ‘one ocean, one people’, ‘Wansolwara: One Salt Water’ is a series of programs at UNSW Galleries and 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art that pools work from 20 Pacific region artists and reflects the diverse practices – contemporary and customary – held within the shared waterscape. Described by curator Léuli Eshraghi as an “archipelago of Indigenous moving image works”, ‘O le ua na fua mai Manu‘a’ at UNSW includes Gutingarra Yunupingu’s digital self-portrait (left), in which the Arnhem Land filmmaker exhibits Yolngu sign language. January 17-April 18. 4a.com.au; artdesign.unsw.edu.au

36

A L L A RT W OR K S CO U RT E SY OF T H E A RT I ST S A N D G A L L E R I E S . A RT I ST A M A N D A W I L L I A M S AC K NOW L E D G E S T H E W O LG A LU A N D NG A R I G O P EOP L E W HO A R E T H E T R A DI T ION A L CU STOD I A N S OF T H E L A N D ON W H IC H H E R P HOTO G R A P H ( P I CT U R E D, TOP L E F T ) WAS TA K E N . W E PAY O U R R E S P ECT S TO T H E I R E L DE R S PA ST A N D P R E S E N T.

Edited by HARRY ROBERTS


Welcome to the Midas touch

Renaissance Gold | Shop www.wedgwood.com.au


wo n be

$1 7,5 00

to

2017 – winner H E N RY CU RC H O D

2018 – runner-up

2015 – third place

J O S H UA C H A R A D I A

S A L LY A N D E R S O N

2019 – runner-up O LY M P I A A NTO N I A D I S

2019 – third place A RC H I E TA IT

2019 – winner B E N JA M I N TH RO S BY

2015 – winner

DA N I M C K E N Z I E

2015 – runner-up H E N RY CU RC H O D

2018 – winner ANGUS HAM R A

2017 – third place 2018 – third place 2017 – runner-up

A N N A M AY H E N RY

A LE S S A N D R A J O S E P H

Join these art stars!

Enter your painting in the fifth Belle ArtStart program and you could join our line-up of past winners plus receive a share of $17,500 prize money. Awards will be announced, and works exhibited, at the Art Gallery of New South Wales on March 13. Entries close February 21.

P H OTO G R A P H Y J O N AT H A N C A M í ( 2 0 1 5 ) , A L A N A L A N DS B E R RY ( 2 0 1 7 ) , K R I ST I N A S O L J O ( 2 0 1 8 , 2 0 1 9 )

P H O E B E H A LP I N

38 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND TO REQUEST AN ENTRY KIT, EMAIL BELLEARTSTART@BAUER-MEDIA.COM.AU. A ONE-OFF ENTRY FEE OF $50 PER ENTRANT APPLIES.


TV when it’s on. Art when it’s off.

Inspiration has truly come home. Switch it on, and The Frame seamlessly presents your favourite entertainment with superb QLED picture quality. Turn it off, and instantly transform your living space into a personalised art gallery with Art Mode. Choose from over 1000 pieces of art and photography on the Samsung Art Store.* Learn more at Samsung.com/au/theframe *Supplied with 20 artworks. Additional artworks available for purchase or via subscription. Subscription and other fees are subject to change. Internet connection and Samsung Account are required.


RIGHT NOW

Architecture

TREE CHANGER The structure of plant forms is the inspiration for this architect’s cultivation of beautiful, organic and highly innovative buildings. Portrait PHILLIP C A STLETON Edited by K AREN McCARTNEY

SOU FUJIMOTO WAS PHOTOGRAPHED EXCLUSIVELY FOR BELLE IN THE FORECOURT OF THE MUSEUM OF SYDNEY WITH THE INSTALLATION EDGE OF THE TREES, BY ARTISTS JANET LAURENCE AND FIONA FOLEY.


This page, clockwise from above

P H OTO G R A P H Y I WA N B A A N ( N A HO U S E , S E R P E N T I N E PAV I L I ON ). R E N DE R S R S I ST U DIO ( L’A RB R E B L A NC , M I L L E A RB R E S ) , CO U RT E SY OF T H E COL L ECT I V E A N D A RT E FACTORY L A B ( T H E COL L ECT I V E )

Render of the Mille Arbres scheme. House NA, Tokyo, is based on the concept of living in a tree. The Serpentine Gallery commission. Red brick building for co-living developer The Collective in New York. Two views of L’Arbre Blanc with signature projecting balconies.

W H E N I T COM E S T O T H E WO R K of Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto, I was an early adopter. In 2013, I saw his house design for Solo Projects in Spain based on the concept of a ‘geometric forest’ with untreated timbers forming an open latticework structure. That same year, I was one of thousands of visitors to his Serpentine Pavilion in London’s Kensington Gardens. His appointment marked a shift in the commissioning of the globally significant pavilion to one that embraced a new generation of architects. Julia Peyton-Jones, then director of the Serpentine Gallery, recalls the sense of risk in choosing someone without the “easy acclaim outside the profession”, as part of the funding was predicated on the subsequent sale of the pavilion. It is with a note of pride that she reports it was the most visited exhibition of design anywhere in the world that year. It is easy to understand why. The cloud-like form Fujimoto designed and had simply constructed in a gridded, white-steel framework took on an ethereal quality. Dense in parts and transparent in others, it looked digital while revealing its natural surrounds and that of the adjacent gallery. The concept was always, according to the architect, “that geometry and constructed forms could meld into the natural and the human”. This was something he had explored for a young couple in a more domestic setting in the renowned NA House (2011) in Tokyo. The block of land was tiny at six by nine metres but the introduction of a series of 21 platforms, located at various heights, brings an expansiveness. Originally challengingly open to the street (there are now curtains) Fujimoto’s idea was that the floor plates could accommodate various activities, with “fragments of life floating around you, a bag, some books”, allowing the owners to become “nomads in their own home”. The analogy of the tree is never far away. Even when the structure is gridded rather than organic, the concept is that of nature. With the NA House, for example, he references the sense of living in the branches of a tree. “To hear one’s voice from across and above, hopping over to another branch, a discussion taking place across branches by members from separate branches. These are some of the moments of richness encountered through such spatially dense living,” says Fujimoto. Selected as one of the keynote speakers for the second year of Dr Gene Sherman’s SCCI (Sherman Centre for Cultural Ideas) Architecture Hub in Sydney in October 2019, Fujimoto chose to expand on these very themes in a talk titled, ‘Between Architecture and Nature’. “It is about making human life actively connected

with the life of the building and with the life of the natural elements associated with it,” he says. “The care of architecture and the care of greenery is part of human life.” An example of this philosophy delivered on a large and uncompromising scale is the recently completed apartment building in Montpellier, southern France. “From the beginning there was a desire for a landmark project and we came up with a unique building that is like a pinecone or a head of broccoli,” Fujimoto explains. Poetically named L’Arbre Blanc (White Tree) the 17-storey building is defined by its balconies projecting from the living room, the largest of which extends to five by eight metres. In some instances there are external stairways which connect two balconies belonging to the same apartment. “I knew that it needed to be special, to represent the city, the climate and the traditions in this part of the world to live outside and so the exterior spaces become the backdrop to life,” says Fujimoto. In what must be considered something of an architectural coup Sou Fujimoto Architects, along with their L’Arbre Blanc collaborators, Paris practice Oxo Architectes founded by Manal Rachdi, have won a Reinvent Paris commission with their Mille Arbres (Thousand Trees) scheme. The site, which is at present a carpark and bus station, will be replaced by “a floating village in the middle of a forest in Paris”, as the proposal stated. White and ethereal with heavy planting, as the name suggests, the ninestorey building will house 127 apartments, a 250-room hotel, restaurants, a children’s centre and a new bus station. Whether it is a contemporary vertical village in Paris or the master planning of the heritage Tsuda College outside Tokyo, Fujimoto says he searches for the same sense of clarity: “With the college we are reorganising history and rethinking the needs for education. Everything has an existing context and our strategy is to create a wonderful link to the new and a clear path to the future.” sou-fujimoto.net

41


RIGHT NOW

Architecture News I R E L A N D

WINNING FORM PRESENTED BY THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS, THE RIBA HOUSE OF THE YEAR IS ONE THE MOST PRESTIGIOUS ANNUAL AWARDS FOR ARCHITECTURE. BELFAST-BASED ARCHITECTS MCGONIGLE MCGRATH TOOK OUT THE 2019 TITLE WITH THEIR WINNING PROJECT, LESSANS HOUSE, THE REWORKING OF A FORMER FARMSTEAD IN NORTHERN IRELAND’S COUNTY DOWN. IT IS ONE OF A REFINED AND THOUGHTFUL BODY OF WORK IN BOTH HERITAGE AND NEW PROJECTS ALIKE. MCGONIGLEMCGRATH.COM

LO N D O N

M A S T E R LY A I R At the new Airbnb office in London’s Clerkenwell, fluted Douglas fir panels form the covered walkway or ‘stoa’ in the unusually titled The Stoa and The Fora (above). Collaborating with the company’s environment team, Threefold Architects combined inspiration from a 15th-century painting by Antonello da Messina with staff research into the ideal usage of space. threefoldarchitects.com

LIFT OFF

M E L B O U R N E

HERITAGE REBOOT ENGAGED TO DESIGN A HOUSE (RIGHT) SET IN A HERITAGE PRECINCT OF ASCOT VALE, WOLVERIDGE ARCHITECTS TOOK THEIR CUES FROM INTERWAR BUILDING TYPES, MANIPULATING THE KEY ASPECTS IN A CONTEMPORARY MANNER TO CREATE A FRESH DIALOGUE WITH THE SURROUNDS. WOLVERIDGE.COM.AU

V I C TO R I A

A RC H E D R E S P O N S E Arcade (below) is a monumental installation consisting of five steel plates placed in a zigzag on the side of a dyke between the village of Bazel and the polder (reclaimed land) in Belgium. The aim of creators Arnout Van Vaerenbergh and Pieterjan Gijs was to design a portico of classic arched shapes that suggested an existing artefact rather than a new one. gijsvanvaerenbergh.com

42

B E LG I U M

S U SS E X

FARM LIFE The recently completed Nithurst Farm in the UK’s Sussex countryside is a house that, in the words of architect Adam Richards, “feels both ancient and contemporary – its weighty and tactile materials speak to those of the surrounding farm buildings, whilst the abstraction of its stepped form is suggestive of minimalist sculpture”. adamrichards.co.uk

P H OTO G R A P H S BY E A R L C A RT E R ( S E A N G ODS E L L ) , A I DA N MCG R AT H ( I R E L A N D ), M AT T H I J S VA N DE R B U RGT ( A RC A DE ) , D ON A L M U R P H Y ( T H E STOA & T H E FOR A ) & D E R E K SWA LW E L L ( W O LV E R I D G E A RC H I T ECT S )

House in the Hills (below) in Barrabool, Victoria, by Sean Godsell Architects, won the 2019 AIA National Award for Residential Architecture for Houses (New). The jury citation notes its presentation as an “abstract intervention in the landscape”, with a “hovering parasol inspired by steel-framed haysheds”. Beneath are two pavilions with warm plywood interiors, surrounding a courtyard, creating a modest house in a vast landscape. seangodsell.com


Vogue traders Jeremy Bowker and Phoebe Nicol of vintage emporium The Vault Sydney keep their eyes peeled for conversation starters and wares with a storied past. Photography KRISTINA SOL JO


Creative Space

W

RIGHT NOW

HAT WERE YOUR E ARLY CRE ATIVE INFLUENCES?

Phoebe Nicol: I had creative freedom and was aware of design from a very early age. My mother is an interior designer so decorating is in my blood. She allowed me to furnish and decorate my own bedroom. I remember the pure excitement of such freedom and banging furniture together at all hours. Jeremy Bowker: Before moving to Australia I never imagined I would end up an antiques dealer. The late Martyn Cook is the person I owe for what I am now. He provided a great framework for me in understanding art and antiques. He was an incredible mentor and one of Australia’s most respected dealers. WHAT INFORMS YOUR APPROACH TO COLLECTING? PN: We’re a good team. I’m an emotional buyer and fall head over heels. Jeremy is more considered; he likes to know the provenance of a piece and its integrity. HOW WOULD YOU DE SCRIBE YOUR APPROACH TO INTERIOR DE SIGN?

PN: I respect tradition but have a desire for modernity. A home needs to have soul. My basic checklist is style, comfort and quality. IS THERE A COMMON ETHOS THAT RUNS THROUGH YOUR WORK? PN: It’s about curation, the juxtaposition of ideas, styles and materials; crosspollinating the past with the present; keeping the eye interested. People want pieces that create conversation. JB: We aspire to build a collection of interesting and eclectic pieces, and we aim to be approachable. WHAT APPEALED TO YOU ABOUT YOUR SPACE? PN: We quickly saw past the hideous purple walls and grey carpet. The vast space and high ceilings really appealed – and the rent was cheap! YOUR FAVOURITE PIECES ON THE FLOOR? PN: The 19th-century green and gilt columns (pictured opposite) I had to beg the dealer to sell to me. JB: The Italian Charles X painted dresser. It’s a fun and unusual piece. ARE THERE ANY PIECES YOU WOULD LOVE TO SOURCE? PN: My eyes are peeled for an Italian neoclassical painted bookcase. JB: I’d love the François Xavier Lalanne ‘Hippopotamus Bar’ – something to aspire to! IS THERE AN ERA OR STYLE THAT RESONATES WITH YOU? PN: The symmetry and elegance of Georgian architecture. JB: The Directoire period with its elegant lines; it’s a little more humble than Louis XVI. WHICH DESIGNERS, ARTISTS AND ARCHITECTS DO YOU ADMIRE? PN: Both our contemporaries and the icons of our profession, including Sister Parish, Mies van der Rohe and Joseph Dirand. I have always adored Axel Vervoordt. JB: Carlton Hobbs, a New York antique dealer, is particularly inspirational. He offers museum-quality pieces that are often whimsical or unusual with a sound academic footing. WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO? PN: The complete renovation of a terrace on Queen Street. We’re also getting married in May – that’s a project in itself! JB: We are looking forward to returning to France and, with hope, Italy. thevaultsydney.com

This page, clockwise from top left Italian Louis XVI period mirror and marble console. Viola marble-topped console in Louis XVI-style with giltwood gaming chair by James Mont. French gilt and marbleised bookcase with white and Sienna marble urn. Large French faux tortoiseshell octagonal mirror above an art deco oak table. Opposite page Jeremy Bowker and Phoebe Nicol in The Vault showroom with green and gilt columns and armchair with ball detail, both 19th century. Flemish verdure tapestry and Spanish console table, both 18th century.

45


Model: 30942-84

AN ORIGINAL PIECE OF ICONIC DESIGN Crafted from solid brass, knurled to a fine pitch and finished in Faucet Strommen’s organic Antique Brass Light, this new basin mixer features sophisticated and minimalist design to create an iconic piece in modern bathrooms. This model is part of a new comprehensive range covering bathroom and kitchen and is available in a raft of beautiful finishes. Designed and built by hand in Australia, this mixer uses a progressive valve for simple turn-only action.

Celebrating 20 years 1999-2019

Ph: (03) 5450 4236 www.faucetstrommen.com.au

Hand built in Australia


Belle Loves 1_CURVE APPE AL

5_PLAY IT COOL

The hand-blown glass and solid brass ClassiCon ‘Bell’ side table, $4950, embodies a most elegant silhouette. anibou.com.au

India Mahdavi’s ‘Lolita’ side table, $5400, brings life to living spaces with its insouciant mix of material and shape. studioalm.com

2_PRECIOUS METAL

6_SMOOTH OPERATOR

Finished in megawatt polished brass, this Atelier de Troupe ‘Os’ side table, $1800, strikes gold in any space. spenceandlyda.com.au

Unlike the cactus it was inspired by, the Moooi ‘Elements 002’ side table, $1785, is a real smoothie. spacefurniture.com.au

3_ARCH SUPPORT

7_INTO THE FOLD

One day a table, the next a pouf, B&B Italia’s curved ‘Colosso’ side table, $2060, adapts to every occasion. spacefurniture.com.au

Designed in 1954, Artek’s origami-esque ‘Trienna’ table, $1695, is a timeless piece. anibou.com.au

4_TAKE A LEAF

Designer India Mahdavi takes a refined approach to rattan furniture with the glass top ‘Stromboli’ side table, $9000. studioalm.com

RIGHT NOW

I N T E R I O R A R C H I T E C T Romaine Alwill of Alwill Architecture + Interiors (pictured) likens side tables to little jewels that “can help sculpt the language of your space” through colour, reflectivity and texture. “I use them to create a pop of richness or colour. I love combinations of materials that can be put together such as metals and stone and timber. They are an opportunity to have fun with colour and shape, and break up the boxiness of sofas and coffee tables.” Of course, she adds, they need not be confined to the living room. “Don’t hold back with your side tables. You can use them in other areas.” alwill.com.au

In good company For Romaine Alwill, the best sofa-side companions are only an arm’s reach away.

2

4 1 3

5

7

6

Words LINDYL CR ABB Photography DAVE WHEELER

47


RIGHT NOW

Belle Loves

8_ PL ANT BASED

De La Espada’s ‘Zhuzi’ tables (front and back left), $2535, are an abstract interpretation of bamboo, while the ‘Lianou’ stools, $1905, symbolise the lotus root. spenceandlyda.com.au 9 9_ SCALE BACK

India Mahdavi imaginatively arranges rattan beneath glass to create her aptly titled ‘Fish’ table, POA. studioalm.com

10

11 10_ SET IN STONE

Crafted from Palladiana, the Baxter ‘Matera’ small table, $5225, is beautifully detailed yet strong and stoic in form. criteriacollection.com.au

8

11_ BAL ANCING ACT

12

[ Mindful design ] With its stripped-back timber shell and removable cork compartment, the De La Espada for Studioilse ‘Companions’ table (right), $2810, encourages a less-is-more approach to storage.

The adjustable conical top of MMairo’s ‘Totem’ onyx side table, $11,400, points towards heaven – or earth. theinvisiblecollection.com 13_ MODERN HISTORY

Oeuffice’s ‘Ionik’ stool, POA, resurrects the geometric forms of classical architecture for a modern era. criteriacollection.com.au

16_ H ATS OFF

16

14_ STONE ROSES

13

Elaborately veined pink onyx is employed to exquisite effect in the Baxter ‘Tebe’ small table, $6545. criteriacollection.com.au

14

15_ FLORAL ARR ANGEMENT

15

48

The ‘Blackwebwood’ side table, $40,975, by Fabrice Ausset takes inspiration from nature’s state of equilibrium. theinvisiblecollection.com 12_PR ACTICAL MAGIC

spenceandlyda.com.au

Thierry Lemaire’s handsome walnut and brass ‘Hellmet’ side table, from $4675, has a sense of humour – after all, its namesake is the similarly shaped York helmet. theinvisiblecollection.com

Three petals of eye-catching lacquered wood interlock in the statement ‘Flower’ table, POA, by India Mahdavi. studioalm.com

9


Frame Living System & Glenaire Swivel Chairs by Kett

Tao Table & Tosca Armchairs by Tribu

Grand Weave Sofa & Deco Rugs by Gloster

Luxury furniture from leading designer brands. Exclusive to

Melbourne | Sydney | Brisbane | Perth www.coshliving.com.au


Oblik by Marsha Golemac for Artedomus. Photography by Tomas Friml. Full product listing at artedomus.com.


Luxe File

RIGHT NOW

3 5 4

1 2

6

I S T H E R E A N A R T I S T W H O H A S B E E N A N E N D U R I N G I N F LU E N C E ?

French architect and designer Charlotte Perriand [12]. D O YO U CO LLEC T A N Y TH IN G? Seashells. I recently put my passion into practice collaborating with Nature Squared on a furniture collection, Exploring Eden [8], made using waste shells. FAVOURITE WATCH? Rado invited me to design a watch and, inspired by the cool, confident women I know, my design True Thinline ‘Studs’ [5] is about a contemporary, more nuanced femininity. FR AG R A N CE O F CH O I CE? When I travel, I take frankincense and rose oils, a combination that instantly grounds and calms me. B O O KS – W H AT A R E YO U R E A D IN G N OW? I keep a beautiful book on my nightstand called Seashells of Eastern Arabia [10] by Donald Bosch that feeds my imagination when I am not out collecting real shells. Lethal White, the fourth novel in the Cormoran Strike series, written by JK Rowling under her pseudonym, Robert Galbraith. M US I C – W H AT’S O N ROTATI O N AT O FFI CE A N D H O M E? ‘Pang!’ [9], from Super Furry Animals front man Gruff Rhys. Welsh musician and producer Cate Le Bon. Singer-songwriter Aldous Harding. B E S T D O WN T I M E (I F YO U E V ER H AV E A N Y) PU R S U IT ? I love yoga – I met my husband Massimo on a yoga retreat. I also love travelling and spending time in nature – both provide inspiration for my work.

Poet in motion An inherent passion for travelling the globe informs the life and creative language of designer Bethan Gray.

8

8

D O YO U ENTERTAIN AT H O ME AND/O R WHAT IS YO UR RE STAUR ANT O F CHO ICE? Mazi in Notting Hill is a favourite for the Bethan Gray

team for its Greek warmth and hospitality. Massimo is a fantastic cook and we love to entertain friends and family at home. W H AT I S YO U R PR EFER R ED TI PPLE? My father is Scottish, so I’m partial to a single malt. Last year, I created an immersive experience at The Glenlivet distillery to celebrate the launch of Vintage 1967, the third addition to The Winchester Collection of limited-edition 50-year-old single malts [2] – the tasting was a real treat! F I L M S T H AT H AV E I N S P I R E D YO U? Cinema Paradiso [7], which is really the story of leaving everything you know behind to follow your dreams with the full support of your loved ones. SH O PS YO U FR EQ UENT? Egg in London’s Belgravia, the city’s bestkept secret. Liberty – I could lose myself there for days.

7 9

10

TR AV EL – FAVO U R ITE R EG U L A R H AU NT A N D W H ER E I S O N YO U R

My maternal family descends from a nomadic clan that migrated across Arabia and Persia for centuries – perhaps where my passion for travel comes from. The fort at Nizwa [1] in Oman and the traditional dhow boats were both key inspirations in my Shamsian collection [11]. Wales, to catch up with friends and family.

A RT W O R K S CO U RT E SY OF G A L L E R I E S A N D A RT I ST S

M US T-S EE LI S T ?

11

LI S T A FE W O B J EC T S O F D E S I R E YO U WO U LD B U Y R I G HT N OW

A piece by Charlotte Perriand – perhaps a vintage bookcase [4]. A work by Petra Börner, a London-based Swedish artist whose drawings are full of movement [13]. A Carolina Bucci ‘Florentine’ cuff [6]. A piece of Genevieve Bennett’s sculpted leather work [3]. W H AT PROJ EC T S A R E YO U LO O KIN G FO RWA R D TO? Collaborating with one of the UK’s most celebrated leather craftsmen and handpainting my dhow pattern onto a leather hide. bethangray.com

13

12

51


The new Australiana Marked by their fresh approach and celebration of points of difference, local design businesses are winning global applause for sophisticated, sleekly packaged and fashion-forward products and services. Words GEORGINA SAFE


Business of Design

K E N D O N E H A S N O T WAV E R E D from his mission since he began creating his vibrant and exuberant artworks 40 years ago. “In all my paintings – with very few exceptions – I try to celebrate the optimism and natural beauty of Australia,” says Ken. But while the inspiration has remained consistent since he held his first solo show in Sydney in 1980, global reaction to his art and design has waxed and waned. From widespread acclaim in the early 80s and near-insatiable demand for his colourful T-shirts celebrating Sydney’s Opera House and Harbour Bridge throughout the decade, he found himself in the creative wilderness in the 90s as ‘Australiana’, with all its clip-on koalas and shrimps on barbies, went out of fashion. “The 80s was an incredible burst of national pride and optimism, but you get to a stage if anything is very popular that the appetite eventually dissipates and people want something new,” says Ken. Today he is again at the forefront of a renaissance in Australian design, as part of a host of Antipodean artists, artisans and creatives making it big overseas. From the realms of fashion and homewares to furniture and hospitality, our makers are marketing a sophisticated and desirable Australian lifestyle to the world, with well-designed objects of style that are about as far from those lowbrow shrimps on the barbie as you could get. “I got a call this morning from a collector in Virginia who wants to buy six of my most expensive paintings,” says Ken, who has just launched four books with Thames & Hudson with another on the way, has an exhibition touring regional Australia and an exciting commission for the Antarctic base. “Our design is back in fashion, and thanks to technology reducing global barriers and a whole new generation discovering what we do, things have come full circle,” says Ken. In art and fashion Australian design is defined by colour, optimism and a celebration of native flora and fauna championed by the likes of Sydney brands Zimmermann, Romance Was Born and Dion Lee. They are following in the well-dressed footsteps of their forebears and mentors Jenny Kee and Linda Jackson, whose vivid garments, inspired by – and showcasing – indigenous plants and animals, are currently the subject of a major retrospective at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney until March 22. “Australiana was once taken in a negative context, but I like to think of it now as

RIGHT NOW

exotica because I feel like Australians are becoming a lot more curious about their culture,” says Romance Was Born’s Luke Sales who co-founded the label with Anna Plunkett. “We have so many awesome actresses and artists on the world stage, and there is really an allure to Australiana now, which is good for us, because we embrace it.” From budgies and the Sydney Harbour Bridge to waratahs, wattle and the Snugglepot and Cuddlepie books by May Gibbs, RWB designers Luke and Anna mine the national identity with a bowerbird-like instinct for unique motifs then translate them into collections that are as colourful and creative as our country. “There is a mental and physical space in Australia that evokes freedom and creativity,” says Anna. “We try to capture that with bright colours and an appreciation of nature.” In the realm of furniture and interiors, Australian design is also inspired by nature but typified by raw materials, clean lines, a natural palette and a reverence for light and space. “For much of our work, the inspiration has been born from observations of the Australian landscape and the light and colours that are prevalent in nature,” says Akin Atelier founding director Kelvin Ho, whose “spatial communications” practice works on retail, hospitality, residential and commercial projects around the world. Those observations infuse recent and current projects including the Qantas first and business class lounges in Singapore (in partnership with Caon Studio), the Saturdays NYC flagship store expansion in New York’s SoHo and Ormond Group’s new hotel MoMo’s in Kuala Lumpur. “There is definitely a regional influence on how we approach our work that is

P HOTO G R A P H Y S E A N F E N N E S SY ( R A E S , A RT E D O M U S ), LU C A S DAW SO N ( A J E )

“There is a mental and physical space in Australia that evokes freedom and creativity.”

This page, clockwise from top left Mining the landscape: the interiors palette of luxury retreat Raes on Wategos speaks to contemporary Australian style. ‘Block’ marble sconce by Studio Henry Wilson. ‘Bacchus’ table for Artedomus New Volumes by Tom Skeehan. Aje Resort 2020 references outback sign posts and iconic wattle. Zimmermann RTW Spring 2020. Pearl earrings by Albus Lumen. Opposite page Sydney Night 3/4 Moon by Ken Done.

53


RIGHT NOW

Business of Design

This page, from top Camilla and Marc store in Melbourne, designed by Akin Atelier. Camilla and Marc Resort 2019. Born in Sydney’s Darlinghurst in 1993, Bills restaurants now deliver legendary cuisine globally, including in Japan. A spread from tailor P. Johnson’s lookbook. A table in David Caon’s new Bloc modular furniture range. Caon Studio and Akin Atelier collaborated on the Singapore Qantas lounge interiors. King Living’s ‘Zaza’ sofa.

54

directly related to our lifestyle being outdoors and surrounded by nature,” says Kelvin. “It’s lovely that international clients now feel comfortable to engage a designer outside of their country, and the reason they approach us is to provide a point of difference.” The Australian point of difference proved key for King Living when it opened its Singapore showroom in 2015. “All the advice we were given was keep Australia on the ‘down-low’ and make it appear we were European,” says King Living global head of products David Hardwick. “We decided to take out a full-page newspaper advertisement saying ‘we are Australia’s most awarded furniture company’ and also to run a design event. Both of those really took off and totally changed our approach to entering new markets with the decision to actively promote that we are Australian.” When King Living opened its most recent showroom in Vancouver, Canada last year, the Australian allure paid off in spades, David explains. “It really took us by surprise because we did no marketing but people just flooded in, all talking about the fact we are Australian and what that means when it comes to a superior product. That bodes really well for future international expansion, which is where our eyes will be focused over the next five years.” The international focus for many local designers is Salone del Mobile and the concurrent Milan Design Week, where the likes of Henry Wilson, David Caon and Charles Wilson present their wares with a growing focus on the ‘Australianess’ of their products. “Australia has had a strong presence in Milan and we do talk about the fact we are Australian,” says Charles. Emma Elizabeth is the curator and stylist responsible for bringing the next generation of Australians into the international spotlight, with what Charles describes as “a curated selection of Australian design presented in a highly art directed and beautifully selected context”. But showing in Milan, or anywhere on the other side of the world for that matter, comes with considerable challenges for designers from Down Under. “If you’re based in Warsaw or Berlin, you can just put your product on a truck and drive to Salon del Mobile but for us it costs thousands of dollars in shipping, flights and accommodation to be able to show there,” says Charles. Savvy use of technology is allowing designers to subvert the tyranny of distance – along with late-night conference calls, red-eye flights and other creative solutions, says David of Caon Studio. “The time difference is huge to the bigger markets such as the US and Europe and people still like to meet face to face so it makes sense for us to look at establishing a satellite presence in another city.” While the industrial designer is considering Europe, the US and Asia as options in which to set up another office, he says he would not relocate overseas because being based in a smaller market comes with opportunities, such as creating his own modular furniture range, Bloc, and a collection of modular shelving he has launched with Studio Henry Wilson. Both are created in Australia, from conception to manufacturing. “It’s a more niche industry here so you have to be quite self-reliant to get your work out there,” adds David. “You see studios in Europe that don’t do any of their own manufacturing. Here, we don’t have that luxury so you put it into production under your own steam and your own coin. Being in Australia makes you a more rounded designer because you have to take the global view: deciding what products to make, why you think they are necessary, manufacturing them, then likely also selling, marketing and branding them. You are a turnkey solution in yourself and have to be always on and always operating. I don’t know if that makes things a little more pure and crafted.” Call it the new Australiana, but in 2020 that means Australian design is entering a fresh decade of global opportunity and accolades with plenty more to come. “There is a local design identity growing with certain traits that are exclusive to us,” says King Living’s David. “It’s exciting because it means the designers coming through now have a real chance to put their mark on what the national identity is.”


inspired by nature, crafted by hand


RIGHT NOW

Woman Kate Capshaw in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984).

7

3 6

4

2

1

8

5

Jungle look

9

Go wild in fecund finery that packs a tropical punch.

18

Edited by HARRY ROBERTS

17

14

16

10

15

13 12 11

1 ‘The Treatment Lotion’, $190/150ml, from La Mer. 2 & 3 Marni floral print top, $1361, and skirt, $1831, both from Matchesfashion.com. 4 Gucci earrings, $655, from Net-A-Porter. 5 Jacquemus mules, $965, from Moda Operandi. 6 ‘Coastal Cypress & Sea Fennel’ EDP, approx. $211/100ml, from Molton Brown. 7 Moroso ‘Morning Glory’ side table, $1375, from Hub. 8 ‘Nalgona Dining Chair 01’ by Chris Wolston, POA, from The Future Perfect. 9 Noir Kei Ninomiya S20. 10 David Yurman watch, $3227, from 1stdibs. 11 Leather bag, $11,540, from Bottega Veneta. 12 Gold-plated silver ring, $700, from Bottega Veneta. 13 Anya Hindmarch ‘Chewing Gum’ candle, $75, from Matchesfashion.com. 14 Linda Farrow sunglasses, $873, from Matchesfashion.com. 15 Leather sandals, $1700, from Bottega Veneta. 16 Marni leather bag, $597, from Matchesfashion.com. 17 Completedworks cuff, $690, from Matchesfashion.com. 18 Loewe sweater, $785, from Matchesfashion.com.

56


RIGHT NOW

Man

4 3 8 7

2

6 1

9

5

Harrison Ford in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984).

Doom’s day Anything goes in the quest for a special treasure. Edited by HARRY ROB ERTS 15 12

14

10

13

11

1 Isabel Marant ‘Lekson’ leather slides, $840, from Matchesfashion.com. 2 Luis Morais lapis lazuli, turquoise and 14-karat gold bracelet, approx. $442, from Mr Porter. 3 Mr Leight ‘Rei S’ sunglasses, approx. $892, from Mr Porter. 4 Wacko Maria shirt, approx. $1045, from Mr Porter. 5 Resin mineral cufflinks in Malachite, $145, from Dinosaur Designs. 6 Clive Christian ‘1872 Masculine’ EDP, $399/50ml, from Agence de Parfum. 7 Curtis Jere brass sculpture, $3488, from 1stdibs. 8 Dior Homme Pre-Fall 2020. 9 Montblanc ‘1858 Automatic Chronograph’ limited-edition watch, $7266, from 1stdibs. 10 Moroso ‘Shadowy’ armchair by Tord Boontje, $4725, from Hub. 11 Nick Fouquet ‘Monte Carlo’ felt hat, $2015, from Matchesfashion.com. 12 La Chance ‘Borghese’ table by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance, $3630, from Living Edge. 13 Bag, $2350, from Hermès. 14 Overose ‘Valkiria’ candle, $75, from Matchesfashion.com. 15 Off-White shirt, approx. $838, from Mr Porter.

58


A soft fabric headboard set within a dark timber frame evokes serenity and creates the tranquil bedroom setting you’ve always dreamed of. Curved edges and light, bespoke upholstery define the Maxis extended bed frame. Expertly crafted in Australia using premium-quality Warwick fabric, the Maxis can be customised to suit you. Choose from an array of stains and fabrics to create a bedroom you’re sure to love.

Matter of balance Complement a gentle colour palette with dark timber furniture to bring a sense of sophistication to the bedroom. Pictured here is the Maxis bedside table and Lotus tallboy. There’s a variety of bespoke furniture options available at Snooze, and you can customise a stain to suit your bedroom décor.

Natural choice Style your bed with nurturing, organic tones such as rose and mustard. Here, the Linen House ‘Haze’ quilt cover set in Maple is teamed with the ‘Cleopatra’ Euro pillowcase. Accessorise the space with an assortment of throws and cushions to take your bedroom’s comfort to the next level.

Visit Snooze in-store or online to find out more about the Maxis extended bed frame and accompanying furniture ranges.


Refined practicality Furniture in a deep-toned timber stain is the perfect choice for a retro-style bedroom. The Maxis tallboy is a great spot to display your favourite personal belongings.

Expertly crafted in Australia, the Lotus bed frame, exclusive to Snooze, is the essence of modern design with a retro twist. It features a simple, rounded headboard and base in Warwick ‘Chambray Storm’ fabric and a Chocolate timber stain. The Lotus is customisable in a range of fabric styles and timber stains, so you can create a bed that speaks to your personality and style.

Circular accents Accent your bedroom space with the circular form of the Lotus bedside table, which pairs beautifully with the Lotus bed frame and the Mayfield ‘Chet’ lamp.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to find out more about the Lotus bed frame and accompanying furniture ranges.


B E L L E P R O M O T IO N

Retro fit Come home to a modern take on a retro bedroom, where curved, expressive bedroom furniture is teamed with geometric patterns and playful ’70s hues.

Playful shades Add a bold, refreshing jolt of mustard and teal to freshen your bedroom for summer. Featured here is the Linen House ‘Nimes’ linen quilt cover set in Chai, ‘Pani’ cushion and ‘Belmore’ throw in Teal. Complete the look with striking geometric cushions.

“Indoor plants are firmly back in vogue. Showcase your plants in vintage vessels and rattan pots to beautify your bedroom and tie the modern-retro look together.” S A M A M O R E , S T Y L I S T FO R S N O O Z E


B E L L E P R O M O T IO N

Child’s play Create a bedroom that’s fresh and fun with beautifully designed furniture, delicious colours and accessories that are sure to get the tick of approval from the littlest Snoozers in your family.

Sweet treat Make your child’s bed frame pop with linen featuring delicious motifs in gelato tones. Shown here is the Logan & Mason Kids ‘Sprinkles Gelato’ reversible quilt-cover set. Keep accessories sunny and fun with a cheery yellow cushion.

Timeless timber A practical Bingo timber bedside table coordinates beautifully with its matching bed and ensures you’ve created a space that will be easy to adapt as your little one grows. The Mayfield ‘Pia’ desk lamp provides the perfect accent here.

“Soft furnishings and bedding in gorgeous colours and patterns add fun to your child’s bedroom. They can also be very easily modified as their tastes change.” S A M A M O R E , S T Y L I S T FO R S N O O Z E


B E L L E P R OM O T ION

Keep it tidy Bring order to your child’s bedroom with a chest of drawers to fill with clothes or their favourite toys. Decorate it with wooden trinkets, colourful wall hangings or fun, decorative pompoms to make it distinctly theirs. Featured here is the Bingo chest of drawers.

Play away, then fall into bed at the end of the day: the Bingo bed frame, exclusive to Snooze, is a bedroom piece your child will adore. The storage compartments beneath the bed look fantastic and means kids have no excuse not to tidy away their toys! Featuring a lighttoned timber bed frame and white finish, this bed is versatile enough to last your child right through to adulthood. Sustainably crafted in Australia, the Bingo bed works beautifully with all styles of bed linen. It’s customisable in an array of upholstery and painted finishes, and available with a trundle base – so you’re prepared for the next sleepover.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to learn more about the Bingo bed frame and the new kids’ furniture range.


B E L L E P R O M O T ION

The personal touch For bedroom furniture that reflects your own distinctive style, look to the customisable Lotus collection at Snooze. Lotus bedside table and bed frame featuring Warwick ‘Chambray Storm’ fabric.

Lotus tallboy

Lotus chest of drawers

Style notes 1. Bring the outdoors in with pot plants, foliage and natural materials. They will bring an instant sense of summer to your space. 2. Colour your bed with fresh, juicy hues. The cheerier and more tropical, the better. 3. Complete your bedroom summer styling with artwork and decor with retro accents.

Visit Snooze in-store and online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Lotus bedroom furniture collection.

PRODUCED BY STORY

Design your perfect space with the Lotus furniture collection at Snooze. Crafted in Australia, you can choose from various bedside, tallboy and chest furniture options to keep your bedroom neat and free from clutter. Each of these pieces are available in array of stains, sizes and shelving styles (for added storage). For added decorative detailing, opt for the Lotus chest in a Chocolate stain. The Lotus bed frame is the essence of contemporary style with a retro twist and can be customised in various stains and fabrics that suit your personal style.


Style Etiquette

RIGHT NOW

2

3

6 4 7

5 8 1

Major milestones Melissa Penfold delivers witty wisdoms and style savvy to help navigate births, deaths and marriages.

P O RT R A I T K R I S T I N A S O L J O

B I R T HS | Even in this digital age, neither mother nor newborn wants to be photographed at that moment. Also, allow new parents to release the first images of their baby, which is a key, modern-parenting moment. OVER-SHARING Parents, less is very much more. We don’t need to see every waking moment of your child’s life. LOOK, B U T DO N’T TOUCH Some people are just not comfortable coddling a newborn. You can politely decline by simply saying ‘I’m fine, thank you’, with a smile. D E AT HS | It’s amazing how often funerals are done wrong. We know people have an excuse. Someone they love has died, they’re upset and have to make thousands of decisions during the worst days of their life. Funerals are social occasions, however – get them wrong and everyone will feel uncomfortable. Whether the death has filled you with despair or lifted a weight from your shoulders, you need to be a loyal, stoic, self-effacing and generous host and give those who have made an effort to attend a decent and, yes, enjoyable experience. And it’s not a chance to show off or social climb. This is also no time to stir up old feuds with estranged inlaws, former wives and hypocritical hangers-on. No matter how distraught or exhausted you are, invite people back to the house or a place that has some connection to reminisce and recuperate.

Start by telephoning people about what’s happened, and putting a death notice in the paper. Keep the wording simple and informative. T H E S E R V I C E As for words, music and flowers, they should be appropriate to the departed’s life and tastes. Hold back from overly personalised touches like a huge floral coffin in the shape of a guitar, or the tones of You Picked A Fine Time To Leave Me Lucille on the PA system. If they would have hated muted organ music as much as the rest of us, then choose something different. Make sure the minister knows something about the deceased so their words are meaningful. A good eulogy should make those present laugh, smile and cry. Include anecdotes and mention the departed’s best attributes as well as idiosyncrasies. If the task is beyond you, ask the best public speaker in your inner circle. F O O D Go for generous and comforting. Nothing beats chicken sandwiches and cake, served with tea and Champagne. Have whisky on hand – it’s a good stiffener. MAR R IAGES | Expect to see an increase in dramatic wedding arrivals and departures. Also, at receptions, there’ll be a growing number of brides making speeches. TH E B I G D AY Don’t make social media a priority. Be clear about whether you’re happy for guests to take and upload photos. Make the most of the day and be present. ARR ANGEMENTS

9

10

1 Valentino RTW Spring 2020 2 Georg Jensen ‘Bernadotte’ stainless-steel thermo jug, $275, georgjensen.com.au 3 Tiffany & Co ‘1837’ sterling-silver baby cup, $880, tiffany.com.au 4 Paperless Post ‘Double Loop Frame I’ invitation in Gold, 2 coins, paperlesspost.com 5 Baccarat Croisé Bagues vermeil rings in Clair and Rouge, $820 each, palmerandpenn.com.au 6 Baccarat ‘Wine Therapy’ coffret of six crystal glasses, $2299, palmerandpenn.com.au 7 Aerin shagreen ice bucket in Dove, $999, palmerandpenn.com.au 8 Baccarat ‘Rouge 540’ perfume bottle, $5000, palmerandpenn.com.au 9 Aerin porcelain bisque peony, $149, palmerandpenn.com.au 10 Georg Jensen ‘Alfredo The Twist’ four-piece baby cutlery set, $105, georgjensen.com.au

65


Library

RIGHT NOW

PALM BE ACH Its storied history and culture is celebrated in Aerin Lauder’s paean to Florida’s Palm Beach, and to read about it is to seriously want a slice of it. Not much has changed since a glamorous coterie of the likes of Cecil Beaton, Slim Aarons, Douglas Fairbanks and the Lauders swanned from tennis and golf to drinks and dinner parties, but the years have only served to make it more alluring, its charm captured in the pages of this beautiful volume. Aerin Lauder, Assouline, $155

BIBLIO STYLE If books such as these are taking over your life, here is a definitive guide for storing and displaying them. The featured homes all boast extensive libraries and the author extols the virtues of warmth and personality that books bestow. Whether first editions, rare collections or sumptuous illustrated tomes, in serried ranks on shelves or stacked in unlikely spots, books speak of their owner’s interests and passions and create a design language all their own. Nina Freudenberger, Hardie Grant, $50

Shelf centred Upscale the bookcase with these brilliant new tomes.

THE HOUSE OF GLAM It’s easy to be seduced by this title – and subtitle, Lush Interiors & Design Extravaganza. If you feel your interiors are a little beige or minimal here’s inspiration aplenty to ramp things up. Chapter heads such as Hollywood Glamour Reborn and Not Short on Glitz, as well as profiles of designers whose bold take is beyond exhilarating, mean this is not a book for the faint-hearted. Gestalten eds., Gestalten, $115

Edited by JUDY PAS COE

T R AVE L H O M E This book feeds wanderlust as well as a design addiction and features a bevy of international creatives, from Nate Berkus to Malene Birger, their reflections on travel and the influence it has had on their decorating style. Whether they souvenir textiles, tchotchkes, art, books, furniture or simple cards or coasters, all have responded to the excitement of unfamiliar places and brought home a taste of it to flavour their interiors. Caitlin Flemming & Julie Goebel, Abrams, $55

THAM MA DA While this may not be a title that would instantly conjure Italian powerhouse architect and designer Paola Navone, the Thai word for ‘everyday’ encapsulates her ethos of turning the ordinary into something extraordinary. ‘The Adventurous Interiors’ of the subtitle are lavishly illustrated in her thrilling projects, ranging from private residences in Italy and France to hotels in Miami and Phuket. Spencer Bailey, Pointed Leaf Press, $180

ROOMS WITH A HISTORY As the son of celebrated English interior decorator David Hicks, and a designer himself, Ashley Hicks is well equipped to author this book. Displaying an eclectic combination of rooms from both then and now, including his own remodel of his parents’ former London apartment, this volume is also peppered with fascinating insights into the relationship between the father and son decorators, making it far more than just a glossy picture book. Ashley Hicks, Rizzoli, $110

67


In our Nature

Pool + Garden 02 9818 3377 goodmanors.com.au


S PACES S TYLE DIRECTION

P H OTO G R A P H Y F E L I X FOR E ST

The skilful and considered touch required for tending bonsai is reflected equally in the curation of objets with an artwork by Kerry Armstrong in this Surry Hills apartment. For more see Light and Palmy, p110.

Selected for their adjacency to inner-city action, these 10 beautiful apartments and townhouses present compact design ideas without compromising on luxury. Adelaide Bragg & Associates Alexandra Kidd Design Coco Republic Hare + Klein Hecker Guthrie Imogen Naylor Phoebe Nicol Steve Cordony Susanna de Vienne Tamsin Johnson 69


S M A RT S PAC E S

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Tamsin Johnson

M O D S Q UA D [ South Yarra ]

These pages, from left Parquetry floors by Kustom Timber and a custom Palladiana stone tile fireplace bring natural sophistication to the living space. sculptural as it is functional. The Curtis Jere pendant light is a 1stdibs find, the brass and marble floor lamp is a 1930s French design and the Murano animated. The side table and vase are from Edward Clark Antiques. A custom-designed bench upholstered in Ralph Lauren Home fabric anchors a pair

70


Photography SEAN FENNESSY

The rug is a custom Tamsin Johnson design, the coffee table is by Gaetano Pesce and the 1960s cane sofa and armchairs were sourced locally. Lighting is as glass sconces are from Italy. The colour of the tiles is echoed in the artwork by Lane Cormick from Daine Singer, while the Gio Ponti coat rack appears almost of Bill Henson artworks in this cafe-style setting. The 1930s cane table, 1920s Italian chairs and Daum vases are naturally illuminated by skylights above.


This page The benchtops, splashback and rangehood in Fantasia stone from Signorino create a striking, architectural impact in the kitchen. Stevens + Waters Building completed the joinery, which is matched with 1950s Italian metal sconces. The stools are custom made, the tapware is Brodware, the cooker is Smeg and the overhead lights are from Euroluce.

G I V I N G T H I S T I R E D mid-century home in Melbourne a polished revamp proved to be an incredibly rewarding project for interior designer Tamsin Johnson. What was the brief? This is actually my sister’s house so she didn’t have a choice but to use me! That said, she gave me complete creative freedom and the builders are friends so it was a really lovely team. She’s my best friend so I needed no briefing. The house is one of the only mid-century buildings on a leafy South Yarra street so I wanted to embrace that. We wanted to turn the home into a family retreat, something durable, easygoing but beautiful and true to its time. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? The house was a mid-century house in a not-soattractive yellow. We bagged the brick and painted it white, installing a pebbled entry with mature cactuses. We replaced very small highlight windows with floorto-ceiling, square-framed windows in white steel to bring the light in. The ground floor was separated by a very large internal courtyard full of plants with a

water feature. We filled that in to make an open-plan dining room and bar, and tiered the floor plan into three different levels: a beautiful sunken lounge and a raised kitchen f lowing onto a courtyard with oversized palms, planter boxes and a round marbletiled swimming pool. How would you describe the interior? A fresh mid-centur y family home in predominantly neutral tones with pops of colour in the art and the vibrant green Fantasia marble in the kitchen. Were any devices employed to maximise the sense of space? The window seat with the beach ball-striped cushions is the perfect extension from the living room. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? Our parents are antique dealers so my sister had a lot of amazing pieces collected over time. The lighting was bought in Italy and France and the custom Palladiana tiles were designed by my old boss, Don McQualter from Studio McQualter. We clad the fireplace in them, which created a dramatic scale, and flanked the roaring open fire with Murano wall sconces. tamsinjohnson.com


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left The dining space hosts a 19th-century Spanish table and 1930s cane chairs. Along the wall is a wrought-iron and glass console, colourful Oscar Perry artworks and a Venetian mirror. These staccato pops of colour continue in the bedroom in the form of a Ken Done artwork and a 1950s metal lamp. The bedhead is custom made, as are the Dedar fabric cushions. The bathroom’s Palladiana tiles and Moroccan marble basin are reminiscent of archaeological finds. Beside the Murano glass sconce is a recessed mirror. Tapware and towel rail by Astra Walker. The same tiles adorn a larger basin with brushed aluminium joinery and a 1950s French sconce.

73


S M A RT S PAC E S

“ W E WA N T E D T O T U R N T H E H O M E I N T O A FA M I LY R E T R E AT, SOMETHING DUR ABLE, E A S YG O I N G B U T B E AU T I F U L .”

This page, clockwise from left Outside a window, the home’s fresh white facade extends into a planter box for a cactus garden. This sun-lit alfresco shower is paved with French sandstone and fitted out with Astra Walker tapware, a Gio Ponti mirror and a Moroccan marble basin. A Pierre Jeanneret chair takes pride of place beside a 19th-century Italian marble-topped table, a vivid Tom Ramsay artwork and terracotta vases sourced from Puglia.

74


TOPS ON TOP Cindy Crawford on New Silestone Eternal Noir

A product designed by Cosentino® Find inspiration at cosentino.com | Follow Us F T ô Et. Noir Coming Soon

Adelaide

|

Auckland

VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS IN | Brisbane | Melbourne

|

Perth

|

Sydney


I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Hecker Guthrie

OPEN BORDERS [ Darlinghurst ]

Photography SHANNON McGRATH

This page In lieu of solid walls, ‘floating’ joinery in pale timber with glazed expanses delineates zones and gently frames sightlines, resulting in an airy ambience that’s further enhanced by the muted palette and subtle references to both Japanese and Scandinavian design. Looking from the living area through to the study: Ligne Roset ‘Linden’ occasional table from Domo, ‘Undercut’ planter from Anchor Ceramics, artwork by Ayumi Ohashi from Tokyo’s Claska Gallery and assorted objects from Provider Store. A floral arrangement by Doctor Cooper Studio rests atop a custom plinth by Hecker Guthrie.

76


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from above In the kitchen, suspended shelves display the owner’s collection of ceramics above a Brodware ‘City Stick’ mixer in Brushed Stainless Steel. The opening affords internal views to a suite of artworks by Ayumi Ohashi from Claska Gallery. Eschewing unsightly joins, the kitchen cabinets are akin to freestanding furniture, set apart from a wall clad in Inax tiles from Artedomus. In the study, Poliform ‘Guest’ chair by Rodolfo Dordoni with an ‘Undercut’ planter from Anchor Ceramics on the desk and, on the shelves above, assorted objects from Provider Store and an artwork by Ayumi Ohashi from Claska Gallery. In the living area, Gervasoni ‘Ghost’ sofa, dining table by Mr and Mrs White and Expormim ‘Fontal’ chairs from Ke-Zu, all beneath a ‘55A’ pendant light by Isamu Noguchi. Artworks by Lottie Consalvo from Dominik Mersch Gallery.


S M A RT S PAC E S

THE DESIGN-SAVVY owner of an already stylish apartment in Sydney’s Darlinghurst called on Hecker Guthrie to further unlock the space’s potential, says Hamish Guthrie. What was the brief? With a sophisticated eye for design and a passion for architecture, our client asked that we reimagine her apartment, set within the iconic Republic II building, to align it with her design principles and lifestyle. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? The location of existing services dictated planning to a degree. Our challenge was to maximise the space, without imposing too dramatically on the existing architectural language. Describe the completed interior? The light-f illed apart ment is sophisticated and contemporary. The focus centres around social living at its core, with an overarching pull towards the outdoor element of this apartment. To enhance the visual and physical connectivity between zones, we created a series of timber and glass screens to help frame the living spaces, referencing the client’s passion for Japanese and Scandinavian

design, objects and artwork. In replacing key walls with glazed partitions, we created an expanded sense of space and light in a functional and considered way. Directional lighting creates subtle illumination to focus sightlines and imbue a gallery aesthetic. The owner’s carefully selected furniture and objects cohesively tie the spaces together. Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? The finely crafted timber and glass partitions link the living areas and create opportunities for light, connection and life to come together. What informed the selection of art, furniture and fittings? Using a minimal palette with white as a base, the client’s art, objects and furniture infuse personality into every facet of the space. Was the owner happy with the execution? Ultimately a place of sanctuary for the owner, the apartment allows for a place of work and a place to entertain. The way she has embraced the ideas and taken further ownership of her environment and run with it is everything we aspire to achieve as designers. heckerguthrie.com

This page, clockwise from above A ‘Maruni’ chair by Sanaa perches below a large artwork by Michael Bennett from Gallery9. The clean lines of the ‘Finley’ bed from Jardan, which has a leather headboard and solid American oak base, is complemented with softly crushed pure linen bedding from In Bed. Pianca ‘Dedalo’ occasional table from Domo and Akari ‘1A’ table lamp by Isamu Noguchi. The Plant Society deployed generous planters filled with Japanese maple to enrich the balcony’s leafy outlook.

78


Inspired by Elegance, innovated through passion. Silestone by Cosentino Eternal Noir is one of the new colours launched from Silestone by Cosentino’s Eternal range. It provides an asymmetrical design inspired by THEćPUREćELEGANCEćOFćNATURALćSTONEć)TSćBLACKćȺNISHćEMANATESćDISTINCTIONć and simplicity and its intense, dramatic white and orange veining appeals to a whole spectrum of aesthetic tastes. Eternal Noir is a colour that has the power to captivate and inspire interior design choices based on dark colours. Silestone by Cosentino is a low porous mineral surface, which is highly RESISTANTćTOćSTAINSćCAUSEDćBYćEVERYDAYćPRODUCTSćSUCHćASćCOȹEE ćLEMONć juice, vinegar or wine, guaranteeing very easy daily cleaning and maintenance. 4HEćLOWćLEVELćOFćȻUIDćABSORPTIONćFACILITATESćCLEANINGćANDćMAKESćITć long-lasting. Maintenance is very simple; therefore, giving you peace of mind. The high impact resistance of Silestone by Cosentino, exceeds that of other materials used for similar applications (granite, solid surfaces, etc.), this means that it can withstand extremely heavy objects with absolute CONȺDENCEć

For more inspiration check out Cosentino.com Cosentino_Aust


S M A RT S PAC E S

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Alexandra Kidd Design

V E LV E T C RU S H [ Potts Point ]

80


Photography BRIGID ARNOTT Styling MEGAN MORTON

These pages, from left The owners found the grand mirror at a flea market in Paris and its reflection expands the intimate living room and draws in the leafy street view. The ‘Eloise’ single-tier chandelier from Arteriors features scalloped, cloudy glass panels suspended from an antique brass framework. The commode was sourced from Miguel Mireilles Antiques in Malvern, Victoria. The custom cushions by Alexandra Kidd Design were made in textiles from South Pacific Fabrics and bring shine and colour to the sofa and armchair. Framed by Simply Linen curtains, the private terrace off the master ensuite offers vistas over the inner-city neighbourhood and is set with Knoll outdoor chairs by Harry Bertoia from De De Ce. The ensuite is tiled in Pietra grey limestone.


A N I N N E R- C I T Y T E R R A C E house in Sydney’s Potts Point received an elegant makeover from Alexandra Kidd which rethinks and refines the vertical connections of the five-storey home. What was the brief? To create a more functional home and improve the interior flow. The location of almost every room was moved. What was once a sunroom is now a delightful dining space; the kitchen moved down a level to be more accessible for easy, everyday living; the palatial master suite now consumes a whole floor, complete with two private terraces and separate walk-in robes. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? This terrace is split over five levels and we had to think in terms of vertical space. Instead of connecting rooms left and right, we set out to improve the connections upwards and downwards. Describe the completed interior? Classic. It is a timeless space that will look as chic and tailored in 15 years’ time. What are some of your favourite elements? Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? A favourite element is the perforated metal balcony with spiral staircase. It is

an extension of the dining area where the sun floods in through the new steel windows. There are many beautiful bespoke details and clever uses of space. The kitchen epitomises these elements as the heart of the home, with the living area on one side and dining on the other. The narrow, central island encourages gatherings and is the perfect proportion for an intimate dinner party or a lively cocktail party. What informed the selection of art, furniture and fittings? The owners moved to the area for the vibe and desired a sophisticated home. For the fixed elements, we used a minimal palette of crisp black and white. Layers of luxurious yet organic materials, such as the island bench in Champagne-coloured stainless steel, Calacatta marble, near-black oak f looring and pure linen drapes, were added throughout. We injected colour and vibrancy via the furnishings, using ochre and earthy tones in unexpected textures. The master bedroom features suede wallpaper with gilt flecks, and the lounge is adorned with crushed-velvet cushions in delicious tones of topaz and crimson. alexandrakidd.com


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top In the panelled dining room, the table and chairs were made to order by Stylecraft. Curtains from Simply Linen. In the ensuite, a luxurious slab of Arabescato Orobico marble clads the vanity. Basins from Candana with tapware from Brodware. Wall sconces by Porta Romana. The perforated metal balcony with spiral staircase, made by Enzie, serves as an extension of the dining space, says Alexandra. “It is also practical, having direct access from the carport to the kitchen level. Now the lower level can operate entirely as a self-contained unit – the perfect guest house.” The vibrant crimson velvet cushions in the bedroom were custom-made. Vintage leather wall covering by Élitis. Bedding from Ondene and Simply Linen. Opposite page The kitchen surfaces are in a glamorous mix of Calacatta marble from Nefiko Marble and Rimex stainless steel in Champagne. Positioned over the Gaggenau cooktop are two pendant extractor fans by Elica from Winning Appliances. A marble sculpture by Carol Crawford from Curatorial+Co and a Murano vase sit on the island bench. The dark oak floor was laid by Precision Flooring. Tapware by Gessi.

83


C O NTEM P O R ARY Y O K AT O W A L L T A P S E T WITH KNURLED LEVERS

ARCHITEC TUR AL FIX TURES

AUSTR ALIAN MADE FIX TURES 20 Y E A R S WA R R A N T Y 15 PVD FINISHES Y O K AT O H A N D L E O P T I O N S :

+61 1300 800 300 @ B RO DWA R E B RO DWA R E.CO M


S M A RT S PAC E S

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Phoebe Nicol

W H I T E H E AT [ Paddington ]

Photography DAVE WHEELER

This page Curves soften the living room’s pure white scheme, from the Anna Charlesworth plaster pendant light to the sofa with a custom slip cover and the hypnotic Ryan Hoffmann artwork from Liverpool Street Gallery on the wall. The cast glass sculptures are from The Vault Sydney. Horn pyramid box from 1stdibs.

85


86


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from above Displayed on the travertine coffee table from The Vault Sydney is a vase from Curatorial+Co, a glass sculpture from The Vault Sydney and a pyramid-shaped horn box from 1stdibs. On the custom-made console, which was designed to fit the narrow entry, the rose-filled Murano vase is from The Vault Sydney and the hand-forged candlesticks were made by a local blacksmith. A geometric mirror from Jardan adds sparkle. Brass sconces sourced from 1stdibs light up the dining room. On the custom-made table is a Simone K+arras ceramic vase. The white ‘Dots’ ceramic bowl is by Kelly Wearstler. Opposite page Phoebe designed the Roman blinds and pelmets in the home office and had the round wool rug and asymmetric steel mirror custom made. The neon pendant light is a particularly special piece – it featured at homeowner Georgie’s own wedding. The invitations on the open shelves are by ATR and many of the ceramics are by Rachel Saunders.


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left In the bedroom, Porter’s Paints ‘Jeep’ on the walls contrasts beautifully with the white trims and furnishings. The Italian neoclassical painted and parcel-gilt chair is from The Vault Sydney. The scalloped bedhead and cushions are custom made and the plaster sconce is from 1stdibs. The powder room is painted in Resene ‘Duck Egg Blue’. On the wall is a Gubi brass mirror; on the sink is a Rachel Saunders vase.

I N T E R I O R A RC H IT E C T Phoebe Nicol took a bespoke and functional approach to reconfigure the layout in this terrace in Sydney’s Paddington that doubles as a business headquarters. What was the brief? I was recommended by a friend to Georgie Karloci, the woman behind After The Rock (ATR) and we clicked instantly. She was amazing to work with. The response to the brief for this project was greatly influenced by the fact that Georgie is a successful creative who runs her business from home, so a high degree of functionality has been incorporated within the beautiful aesthetic of the finished spaces. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Like most Paddington terraces, the spaces were narrow. We had to reconfigure the dining and living area to make t hem more liveable, adding joiner y a nd customising f urniture to maximise space. Initially the spaces felt dark and uninspiring so we introduced a light materials palette to give them energy. We were very deliberate in our furniture placement so as not to overcrowd the

88

space. How would you describe the interior? The home combines playfulness with sophistication, and artistry with purpose. In order to achieve this, many bespoke pieces – including lighting, mirrors and furniture – were designed and crafted by skilled artisans. What are some of your favourite elements? I love every element of this home. Every room oozes its own very special character. The master bedroom is a private sanctuary with the walls rendered in a stucco wax finish that gives a lustrous dimension to the darkly evocative space and offers a complete contrast to the brighter living and working areas of the home. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? We made sure to acquire ‘forever’ pieces such as art that creates a conversation and well-made and designed furniture of quality. The furnishings a nd f u r n it u re repre sent a n i ntent iona l juxtaposition of ideas, styles and materials. Was the owner happy with the execution? She was delighted with what we created together. There is a lot of love in this home. phoebenicol.com


Picture this on your floor! Introducing Scribbles, crafted in Melbourne using two different yarns. The first is a chunky heathered wool, with a random thinner highlight yarn ducking and weaving its way in and around each loop. The result is undisputed luxury perfect for all domestic installations. Walk through our entire collection at prestigecarpets.com.au. (03) 9794 9044. Prestige Carpets‌ bringing your home to life.


S M A RT S PAC E S

These pages Texture comes to the fore of the living space, from the elaborately carved coffee table and chess set to the sofas upholstered in hemp weave fabric from Tigger Hall Design and carpets from Don Currie. Layers of cushions, including a design in Holland & Sherry’s ‘Gretta’ linen dobby fabric from Milgate, add volume without overwhelming the finer details. Above the fireplace is a painting of an owl by Elisabeth Frink; in front are ceramic tortoiseshell stools from Bragg & Co. The table lamp is also Bragg & Co. “Our clients have an extensive collection of artefacts and accessories from a lifetime of collecting so we were blessed to work with such wonderful pieces,” says Adelaide.


Photography LISA COHEN

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Adelaide Bragg & Associates

E A RT H LY T R E A S U R E S [ South Yarra ]

91


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from above A Bragg & Co. lamp and an Orient House basket are elegantly assembled among natural artefacts. In the bedroom, the owner’s dresser and table elevate a bust and a Bragg & Co. lamp, above which is a Charles Lamb painting. Other works by unknown artists. Rose Tarlow ‘Duncan’ fabric in Smoking Hay from Tigger Hall Design adorns the armchair which is layered with a rust cushion from Brownlow Interior Design and a cushion in neutral Colefax and Fowler fabric from Domus Textiles. The fireplace is a Richard Ellis design. On the dining room wall is a Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri artwork; its rich tones echo the Altamira ‘Roma’ dining chair fabric. The Suzanne Tucker ‘Serengeti’ zebra print ottoman upholstery makes a debonair statement.

92


This page, clockwise from left Natural surfaces evoke a sense of serenity in the bathroom. Silver Vein marble tiles sweep the floor, the walls are painted in Dulux ‘Berkshire White’ and Stone Italiana ‘Jaipur Vanilla’ quartz clads the benchtop. The basins are Apaiser; the Greek roundel is by Classicast. Warm, earthy textiles swathe the bedroom. Kerry Joyce ‘Taza’ and ‘Fleur de Lys’ fabrics were chosen for the bedhead and curtains respectively; the solid cushion is from Brownlow Interior Design and the printed cushion fabric by Fortuny. Créations Métaphores lampshade fabric from Boyac. The ottoman is covered in the owner’s vintage fabric.

W O R K I N G W I T H I N the parameters of a penthouse apartment and the clients’ beloved collection of art, furniture and travel artefacts presented interior designer Adelaide Bragg with a challenge to conjure a space that celebrates these elements in perfect harmony. What was the brief? On a tree-lined street close to Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens, this airy apartment was designed by one of the city’s best-known architects, Wayne Gillespie. It is typical of his style – structurally strong with a pleasing floor plan and scale. We worked with our clients to update the interiors but retain the strong foundation of the layout. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Working with the clients’ existing pieces took me on a journey a little different to my usual style and I enjoyed the challenge. More masculine, less pretty, but with my signature layering, the schemes are very tonal, earthy and textural to complement and balance all their lovely accessories and pieces. Describe the completed interior? This project is a successful example of working collaboratively with clients who have a good existing collection. Eclectic

and layered, the interiors successfully marry the clients’ pieces, displayed to best advantage, with a polished and elegant scheme coming together in a sophisticated whole that still reflects the inhabitants. What informed the selection of art, furniture and fittings? The artefacts and art were a major consideration in selecting the overall palette. The earthy, tonal layering used throughout forms a perfect foil for the stronger colours found in some of the artworks. The wonderful painting by Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri provides important elements of colour, dramatically reflected in the linen of the dining chairs. Occasional strong pops of colour are also seen in a cushion, a lamp base or a rug, resulting in an overall pleasing balance. I love the salon hang in the study that lends an air of quiet intimacy and marries an eclectic array of smaller artworks. Were the owners happy with the execution? They were delighted that the apartment perfectly reflects them and celebrates their collections. Their gatherings are centred on the family room and courtyard, and it truly is a warm and happy home. adelaidebragg.com.au

93


S M A RT S PAC E S Photography

ALANA LANDS B ERRY

A RC H I T EC T

Koichi Takada I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Imogen Naylor

N AT U R A L C U R L S [ Bondi Beach ]

94


This page, clockwise from top In the living area, an Eilersen ‘Flap’ sofa from Spence & Lyda and Gervasoni ‘Gray 07’ armchairs by Paola Navone from Anibou surround a coffee table forming a stage for the Nude #1 stainless-steel sculpture from Korban/Flaubert. In the light-filled hallway, Ligne Roset ‘Toa’ armchair from Domo, White Tiger artwork by Eugene Tan from Aquabumps, daybed from Orient House and Turkish pot from Water Tiger. A Rubn Lighting ‘Long John’ pendant light from Fred International hangs above the kitchen island bench with Viccarbe ‘Last Minute’ bar stools from Hub tucked below. Opposite page Dining table with black ‘Kiki’ chairs from MCM House beneath a Pinch ‘Anders’ pendant light from Spence & Lyda. Baskets from Orient House under the staircase.


S M A RT S PAC E S

”DE ANA AND J O RDAN LOVED THE IDEA OF U S I N G N AT U R A L ELEMENTS TO C R E AT E A TR ANQUIL E N V I R O N M E N T.”

B L E S S E D W I T H V I E WS of Bondi Beach, this penthouse was given a chic, breezy overlay by stylist and interior designer Imogen Naylor. What was the brief? Homeowners Deana and Jordan were referred to me by my friend Steve Cordony. The brief was to create an interior with a contemporary coastal European look and feel. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Although the curved walls with gull windows in the bedrooms were lovely to the eye, they were tricky to furnish. We ended up with motorised blinds in the spare bedroom and flowing linen curtains to complement the lines in the main bedroom. Being opposite the beach and on the top floor, the alfresco spaces really take a hit from the elements, especially from the salt air, afternoon sun and strong winds. Furniture and decorative pieces had to be weighted and planting needed to be resilient. How would you describe the interior? Relaxed coastal elegance: pared-back light, neutral tones and textural elements in muted colours and subtle patterns sit with injections of vintage, antique and global treasures. Were any devices used to maximise the

sense of space? We converted the doors in the main bedroom to double steel doors. It added an immediate feeling of luxury and really opened up the space to allow in more natural light. For the office, The Fiddleback Gallery did an incredible job creating a desk from a slab of camphor laurel, hand-finished in highquality Danish oil, which brought a sense of nature inside. A bespoke bar in the kitchen with brass and stone accents was another element that lifted the profile of the space, along with the commissioned art works by Chris Warnes and Tracey Deep. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? Deana and Jordan loved the idea of using natural elements to create a tranquil environment. Each piece was carefully selected and thoughtfully sourced, premium quality and incorporating luxurious fabrics while still maintaining a level of practicality. Were the owners happy with the execution? They love their home, taking inspiration from their travels, continuously updating their spaces and being able to relax and entertain in their beautiful and meaningful surrounds. imogennaylor.com

This page, clockwise from top left ‘Raphael’ concrete outdoor dining table from Papaya matched with chairs from Stylecraft. On the upper terrace, Gloster ‘Vista’ armchairs from Cosh Living enjoy sweeping views over Bondi Beach. In the master bedroom, Iosis Paris velvet cushions from Francalia sit on a ‘Nook’ bed from Jardan with a pair of Ligne Roset ‘Ruché’ ottomans from Domo. On the bedside table, L’Objet ‘Cenote’ vase from Becker Minty and ‘Lumi’ table lamp from Articolo. ‘Beoplay A9’ speaker from Bang & Olufsen. Antique Turkish rug from Behruz.

96


S M A RT S PAC E S

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Coco Republic

STA R Q UA L I T Y [ Huntleys Point ] Photography MAREE HOMER

This page The dazzling ‘Luxor’ cabinet by Palecek conceals the television in the formal lounge room. Timothy Oulton ‘Viscount William’ sofa upholstered in Graphite linen with Oly ‘Michael’ chairs, ‘Diego’ side table and ‘Pipa’ cocktail tables, all from Coco Republic, on an ‘Ombre’ rug by Tappeti. On the side table, ‘Callisto’ pink onyx box from Coco Republic. On cocktail tables, ‘Artemis’ round marble tray, ‘Callisto’ pink onyx tray and ‘Amber Rose’ candle, all from Coco Republic. ‘Narsi’ floor lamp from Arteriors. Delicate Seaweed VI artwork from Coco Republic. Timothy Oulton ‘Night Rod’ pendant light in Bronze from Coco Republic. Walls painted in Resene ‘Sea Fog’ with ‘Alabaster’ trim. Opposite page, clockwise from top left In the foyer, ‘Barrett’ winged occasional chair from Max Sparrow, ‘Saturnus’ fixed chandelier and ‘Philomena’ lamp, both from Arteriors, and ‘Andre’ mirror and Oly ‘Jackson’ buffet, both from Coco Republic. On the buffet, ‘The Orbit’ tray and ‘Athena’ small marble box, both from Coco Republic. ‘Nordic’ rug in Driftwood from Bayliss. In the dining room, Timothy Oulton ‘Boston’ table with ‘St James’ chairs in Mink Velvet on a ‘Steele’ rug in Ice, all from Coco Republic. ‘Dallas’ chandelier and ‘Millicent’ centrepiece, both from Arteriors. The kitchen bench is topped with ‘Borghini Naturale’ from the Smartstone Milan collection with joinery in Resene ‘Triple Sea Fog’ and finished with Brompton solid-pewter hardware. ‘Markson’ bar stools and ‘Fortuna’ jugs, all from Coco Republic. ‘Marek’ vases from Arteriors.


“THE INTERIOR C E L E B R AT E S T H E H E R I TA G E ARCHITEC TUR AL ELEMENTS, WHILE BEING BOTH C O N T E M P O R A RY A N D S O P H I S T I C AT E D.”

99


S M A RT S PACE S

FO R T H I S FA M I LY- F R I E N D LY scheme, the aim was to include a bit of wow factor in every room, explains Coco Republic senior interior designer Lily Cumberland. What was the brief? Spaces needed to be low maintenance and functional for a family with very young children. The home’s heritage features were also played up and sophisticated looks included throughout. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Working out the function of each room was the main challenge. The kitchen and lounge were originally in the same room, but the walls in this area were taken up with large windows or doors so there was no space on which to place a TV. We ended up converting the former lounge room space into a dining room, introducing a TV hidden in a cabinet into the formal lounge, so it could also double as a living room. Describe the completed interior? It is understated and plays on light and dark

but includes hits of colour throughout. The interior celebrates the heritage architectural elements, while being both contemporary and sophisticated. What are some of your favourite elements? The mix of textures and colours on the soft furnishings. Pops of pink feature throughout, including on the splashback in the main ensuite. Walls were painted a light grey to maximise the sense of openness and create flow between the rooms that had felt dark and poky. What informed the selection of furniture, fittings and finishes? The owners appreciated interesting pieces and were not afraid of mixing styles and finishes. We invested in dramatic lighting (the chandeliers are out of reach of the kids). How do the owners use the space? It’s a great house for entertaining, with the kitchen and dining area opening onto the outdoor lounge and pool. I was lucky to have such trusting clients who were so much fun to work with. cocorepublic.com.au

This page, from top ‘Haskell’ chandelier and ‘Wilson’ floor lamp, both from Arteriors, with an Oly ‘Blaire’ floor mirror in White Shell from Coco Republic, Taj ‘Honeycomb’ dresser from GlobeWest, Delicate Seaweed IV artwork by Designer Boys from Coco Republic, and ‘Maxwell’ occasional chairs from Max Sparrow on a ‘Nepali’ rug from Boyd Blue. In the bathroom, Inax ‘Yohen Border’ tiles from Artedomus with vanity clad in Dogal marble. ‘Icon’ tapware from Astra Walker.

100


A masterpiece in innovative freshness technology 6 Temperature Zones: A Food & Wine Storage Centre Designed Just for You

Quality, Design and Innovation

SBSes 8486

home.liebherr.com.au


Photography PRUE RUSCOE Styling ALEXANDRA GORDON

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Susanna de Vienne

FA B R I C O F L I F E [ Woollahra ]


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from top left Exhibited salon style at the bottom of the stairs and continuing along the front hallway is a series of paintings by Susanna’s grandfather, Sir Charles Lloyd Jones. Beneath a painting by Ray Crooke, a 19th-century console showcases bronze figures from the family of Susanna’s late husband, paired with ottomans upholstered in Colony Fabrics ‘Iguana’ fabric from Boyac. The South-East Asian head was purchased at auction, the red side table found at a flea market in Paris and the ‘Leila’ sofa from Jardan is upholstered in ‘Touch Me’ cotton velvet from Antoine d’Albiousse. A Ray Crooke artwork hangs beside the staircase. Opposite page Flanked by bronze sculptures from a Paris antiques dealer, the fireplace hearth was finished in tiles sourced by design consultant Wende Reid of Form and Colour to match the original front hallway. Artwork by Ray Crooke.

103


S M A RT S PAC E S

THE PRINCIPAL OF TEXTILES, wallpaper and lighting emporium Boyac, Susanna de Vienne, sought to inject her Sydney terrace with verve and colour without losing its heritage charm. What was the brief? The starting point was to maintain the original qualities of the terrace as one in a heritage group of four in Queen Street and to make a contemporary living space. We also wanted to display our furniture and artworks and make them work within a classic terrace design. The kitchen and dining area are an important part of my daily life and we were able to incorporate this idea at the back of the house opening onto the north-facing garden. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? Working within the original space and adapting to a more modern lifestyle proved challenging. We fitted two bathrooms into the existing layout and added storage without impacting classic features, cornices and ceiling roses. How would you describe the interior? Classic and comfortable as well as versatile. It works well in both summer and winter – there is a cosy fireplace for winter months while the

house is open to the garden during summer. Were any devices used to maximise the sense of space? Having been in the design industry for more than 30 years, I loved being able to use wall coverings and textiles to add a further dimension to the space, both in colour and texture. The bi-fold doors and open-plan kitchen/dining area create a sense of space in a relatively narrow zone. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? The furniture and artworks are elements we already owned. The paint colour was inspired by my grandfather Charles Lloyd Jones’ paintings, which hang in the main living room, and the bedroom with blush-pink grasscloth wallpaper and printed curtains. The pieces of furniture, large Watteau painting and Du Passage bronzes are from my late husband Count Patrick de Vienne’s collection. What do you enjoy about living here? Living in the heart of Woollahra with so much at my doorstep. We love being able to enjoy the total calm and green of our back garden like a secret sanctuary of our own. boyac.com.au

This page, clockwise from top left In the main bedroom is an 18th-century painting by Watteau and curtains by No Chintz in Normandy fabric with navy trim from Boyac. The rear courtyard is a leafy sanctuary with an appealing profusion of palms and bougainvillea. The powder room is clad in Colony wallpaper from Boyac. Opposite page, clockwise from top left Design consultant Wende Reid of Form and Colour restored a pair of Chinese cabinets to fit the formal sitting room, which also features a painting by Patrick Hockey, a tortoise shell from Tahiti purchased by Susanna on her honeymoon 40 years ago, coffee table from a flea market in Paris and Empire-style chairs in de Le Cuona paisley fabric. A red shelving unit designed by Chris Connell displaying collected curios pops against the walls. In the second bedroom, curtains by No Chintz in Fermoie fabric from Boyac. In the bathroom, the Iksel ‘Edo Wisteria’ wallpaper from Boyac creates a sublime backdrop to the bath from ACS Designer Bathrooms in Woollahra.

105


S M A RT S PAC E S

Photography ANSON SMART

I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Hare + Klein

SUCCULENT SCENE [ Darling Point ]

This page Ringed by Carl Hansen & Søn ‘CH88’ chairs by Hans J Wegner from Cult, the Molteni&C ‘Asterias’ dining table by Patricia Urquiola from Hub is characterised by a sculptural base that was inspired by a species of Mexican cactus. An ‘Oval Boi’ pendant light by David Weeks Studio dazzles above.

107


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, from above Wrapped in curtains made of Design of the Times ‘Seppala’ linen from James Dunlop Textiles, the living zone features ‘Santa Monica’ swivel armchairs from Poliform and a custom sofa by Hare + Klein upholstered in Threads ‘Andes’ fabric from Elliott Clarke. Molteni&C ‘Trevi’ coffee tables from Hub and ‘Oko’ side table by Christophe Delcourt from Ondene, all on a ‘Landscape’ rug by Hare + Klein from Designer Rugs. ‘Beovision Harmony’ television from Bang & Olufsen, ‘Applique’ wall light by Serge Mouille from Cult and artwork by Conchita Carambano from Graphis. B&B Italia ‘Erica’ armchairs from Space drink in Sydney Harbour views.

L AYE R I N G S O F T- E D G E D appointments in enveloping shades wit h moments of sculptural f lair, this 120sqm harbourside bolthole is a neat encapsulation of Meryl Hare’s elegant MO. What was the brief? To focus the interior towards the view and create a sophisticated but relaxed Sydney ambience. The owners live overseas so we felt it was important to create a strong sense of their identity, so that when they visited Sydney, they would feel instantly at home. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? One of the conundrums in settling on a floor plan for the living area was to focus on the generous harbour view but also accommodate a large television. After discussion with our clients, we acquired a Bang & Olufsen television and located it in front of a window, allowing the main seating to soak up the view without compromising the aesthetics. The lack of floor space required a minimal approach to the design, which is deceptively simple but meticulously detailed. Describe the completed interior? It’s a balance between a sophisticated palette with crisp, contrasting

108

design details and a warmth that’s created by layer on layer of texture, colour and form, with paintings and sculptures that enrich the spaces. Were there any devices used to maximise the sense of space? We designed a joinery box that wraps around to the kitchen and ‘hugs’ a Joshua Yeldham artwork that is both graphic and calming, reflecting the aura of the space with the sculptural dining area in the background. The furniture placement was designed to maximise the sense of space, particularly in the living room where we angled the sofa to take in the view, without closing off the entry to this area. Similarly the round table doesn’t define the dining space too clearly, making it a fluid layout. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? Our selection of finishes reflected the brief, which was substantiated with inspirational imagery, giving us a good starting point. The f urniture selection reflected our clients’ sophisticated taste as well as their desire for comfort. Their aesthetic is closely aligned to our own, so we found curating the furniture, furnishings and art very rewarding. hareklein.com.au


This page, clockwise from top left David Weeks Studio ‘Oval Boi’ pendant light, Molteni&C ‘Asterias’ dining table by Patricia Urquiola from Hub and Carl Hansen & Søn ‘CH88’ chairs by Hans J Wegner from Cult. In the bedroom, a painting by Colin Pennock from Arthouse Gallery hangs in the space above the low joinery, which was designed to accommodate shoes. Totem sculptures by Ruth Levine. In the bathroom the Agape ‘In-Out’ basin from Artedomus is fitted with Vola tapware and a back-lit mirror from Boffi with accessories by Oliver Thom from Candana. Moving from the entry foyer into the living spaces, steel and glass doors create a sense of arrival while the handsome timber joinery conceals a bar and frames an artwork by Joshua Yeldham from Arthouse Gallery.


I N T E R I O R

D E S I G N E R

Steve Cordony

L I G H T A N D PA L M Y [ Surry Hills ]

Photography FELIX FOREST


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, from left Dining chairs from The Vault Sydney surround a pedestal table from MCM House that was selected to make the space feel more expansive. A Leila Jeffreys artwork hangs below the vintage pendant light from a flea market in Paris. The study is clad in ‘Beverly Hills Martinique Banana Leaf’ wallpaper from Designer Wallcoverings. Maxalto ottomans from Space, bar trolley from Bowerhouse, carafe and vase from Waterford, and lamp from Jason Mowen. Opposite page Looking through to the bedroom, covered in Ralph Lauren ‘Chevron Moderne’ wallpaper from Radford Furnishings, a Gebrüder Thonet Vienna ‘Lehnstuhl’ armchair by Nigel Coates from Space sits beside a Rubn ‘Lektor’ floor lamp from Fred International on a rug from Cadrys. A Flos ‘Taccia’ table lamp from Euroluce sits on a console from Conley & Co with an artwork by Kerry Armstrong above and a vintage trunk from Palmer & Penn below.

B E LL E S T Y L E D I R E C T O R-AT- L A RG E Steve Cordony imbued his former apartment in Sydney’s Surry Hills with a mood of relaxed elegance and globetrotting electicism. What was the brief? My partner Michael and I decided to do a ‘soft’ cosmetic renovation on this art-deco apartment in Surry Hills to make it more layered and textural. The double-height doors and sash windows, which lead out to the large terrace, informed the interior as we wanted to make the transition between the rooms seamless and for the spaces to complement each other. What were the challenges of the space and how did you resolve them? The house is quite long and narrow, so manipulating the layout of furniture to make the space seem more expansive was tricky. The use of a circular dining table, full-height mirrored wall cladding and a crisp white background allowed the interiors to feel open, airy and generous. How would you describe the completed interior? The interior is a dichotomy between traditional European detailing and classic American styling, with Italian mid-century accents. What are some

favourite elements? One of my favourite pieces is the brass chandelier we found at the SaintOuen flea-market in Paris that was handmade by a local craftsman based on a vintage design from the 1960s. Also, the original ‘Beverly Hills Martinique Banana Leaf’ wallpaper from Designer Wallcoverings was something I had always loved and wanted to use for a while, so creating the study based around this was one of my favourite elements. What informed the selection of furniture, art, fittings and finishes? The art-deco heritage of the building definitely informed the interiors but I also wanted to give a contemporary spin to the space. The fittings and finishes were kept neutral so we could add textural layers, such as the contemporary artworks from Leila Jeffreys and Kerr y A rmstrong and t he wallpapers from Designer Wallcoverings and Phillip Jeffries. What did you enjoy about living here? The abundance of natural light was the biggest drawcard plus the almost invisible line between indoors and out made it feel as if we were living on top of the city. stevecordony.com

”THE ALMOST INVISIBLE LINE BET WEEN INDOORS AND OUT MADE IT FEEL AS IF WE WERE LIVING ON TOP OF T H E C I T Y.”

111


S M A RT S PAC E S

This page, clockwise from above Positioned against a mirrored wall beneath an artwork from LuMu Interiors, a Maxalto sofa from Space faces a vintage Louis Vuitton trunk (similar available from Palmer & Penn) and a pair of 1950s Italian armchairs from Jason Mowen, all on a rug from Cadrys. Floor lamp from Conley & Co, Cire Trudon ‘La Promeneuse’ fragrance diffuser from Libertine Parfumerie, ceramic sculpture from Planet, and side table from James Salmond with crystal vase from Waterford. On the terrace is a table from MCM House with chairs from Parterre and cushions in a Christopher Farr Cloth outdoor fabric from Ascraft. Pendant light sourced in Bali and planters from Martin Kellock Pots & Planters. A portrait by James King from Becker Minty and a photograph by Nick Leary from MCM House are exhibited against Ralph Lauren wallpaper from Radford Furnishings. The bed is dressed in a quilt from Analu, an Hermès ‘Avalon’ blanket and custom cushions in a houndstooth from South Pacific Fabrics. Brass side table and vintage Wedgwood vase, both from Becker Minty, with a lamp sourced from India.

112


Home is where aspirations are born. It’s where your personal style and best memories come together in a perfect display of comfort, warmth and safety. Your home is your space. It should perfectly balance your individuality with practical living solutions that allow you to live your best life. Privium Homes offers a diverse range of modern oor plans and facades to customise, curate and co-design a space that meets your standards. Backed by 23 years of award-winning experience, we have built over 6,500 homes across Australia for individuals, couples and families of all shapes, sizes and backgrounds. We take an interactive, innovative and empowering approach to help you build your dream.

Be inspired by how unique your home can be Visit priviumhomes.com.au or call 1300 002 268


SUBSCRIBE & RECEIVE

A PAIR OF TURKISH TOWELS THE SUMMER HOLIDAY EDITION

50KI+TCHEN& BATHROOM pages of breathtaking des ign

8ho0me+grown interiors from coast to coast pages of

B O N D I RE D UX THE NEW B E A C H S H A C K

B UD D I N G RO M A NCE

Spring fabrics in full bloom

P F RO M

50+

DESIGN MOMENTS

ON

Our painting prize is back Going troppo! A garden in the dunes

Steve Cordony’s fabulous festive style

IS AND L

ND

ART S TART 2020

AR

O

g architect Australia’s greatest livin

Serving

Cheers to

curves

tipples&

tableware ESCAPE ROUTES

Tokyo drifting Aspen’s sunny side

The new wave of interior s cutting a fine figure ROM ANC ING THE STON E GRA PHIC MAR BLE MEET S TACT ILE THRE ADS

Sand

castles

all-blue views Blissful abodes with

2020 INTERIOR DESIGN AWARDS ENTER NOW

EDIT

O C T O B E R 2 01 9

LUXE COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

N WITH IN CONVERSAT IO

to bookmark

WE SPY COOL AND COLL ECTE D CURI OS

California

LOVE

Living large in LOS ANGELES, SYDNEY, FLORENCE and PUGLIA

The LONG & the SHOR T

HAUL

POR TUG AL BEC KON S, HON G KON AND A NSW FAR M STAY AWA ITS ART FAN ATICGS DEL IGH TS

YOUR SUBSCRIPTION INCLUDES » A BONUS PAIR OF TURKISH TOWELS VALUED AT $78 » 8 ISSUES FOR $74.99 RECURRING » SAVE 18% OFF THE RETAIL PRICE » FREE DELIVERY EVERY ISSUE

Already a subscriber? SIMPLY EXTEND YOUR SUBSCRIPTION WITH THIS OFFER TO RECEIVE YOUR BONUS GIFT.

HURRY! OFFER ENDS FEBRUARY 23, 2020

MAGSHOP.COM.AU/BELLE202 For Terms and Conditions, visit www.magshop.com.au/belle202. Savings are based on retail cover price of $11.50. Please see contents page for location of our Privacy Notice. If you do not want your information provided to any organisation not associated with this offer, please indicate this clearly at time of order or notify the Promoter in writing. Offer valid from 06/01/2020 to 23/02/2020 to Australian residents only. The offer includes a


Subscribe to Belle this month and you’ll receive two bonus Tommy towels in navy. Soft, lightweight and quick-drying, the all-natural, 100 per cent premium Turkish cotton towels make for the perfect beach or travel companion. tommytowels.com

VALUED AT

$78

136 116 AND QUOTE M202BEL bonus pair of Tommy towels valued at $78. Offer valid while stocks last. One gift set per subscription. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of free gift. Free gift is sent to purchaser of the subscription. Automatic renewal: After the first 8 issues, the subscription will automatically renew and be billed as $74.99 every 8 issues (yearly). Subscription renews unless cancelled.


HOMES

P HOTO G R A P H Y J A M E S G E E R

Each presenting an authentic expression of the concept of home, these six abodes invite you to cross the threshold and take a tour.

For an Australian family, the dazzling Mediterranean Sea is at their doorstep on the Amalfi Coast, where centuries-old walls now house a newly renovated slice of paradise. For more see Sun Catcher, p126.

117


American appeal With its grand facade, refined appointments and classic detailing this reinvigorated home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs boasts unimpeachable design credentials. Words JUDY PASCOE Photography PAB LO VEIGA Styling M EGA N M O RTO N


Sydney

HOME

This page The exterior of the house presents a fresh facade painted in Dulux ‘Vintage Linen’ with timber doors and windows in Dulux ‘Blackwood Bay’. Quoizel ‘Byron’ wall sconces in Imperial Bronze from LightCo. Bold foliage and textures by landscape designers Sticks & Stones create lush layers of green, with architectural plants in pots providing a structural element. Opposite page The client loved the original panelling in the formal areas of the home so designer Alexandra Kidd replicated it in the entry, giving extra gravitas to the dramatic stair with timber treads tinted in a rich chocolate hue. Oly ‘Phillippe’ table from Coco Republic. Visual Comfort & Co. ‘Ziyi’ chandelier in Antique Brass from Laura Kincade. Arteriors ‘Hampton’ wall sconces in Antique Brass from Boyd Blue.

119


HOME

Sydney

t’s amazing what a difference one feature can make to a house. In this case it was two columns in the kitchen that the owners had lived with and found awkward for more than 15 years. So, when they embarked on an upgrade of their expansive Georgian-style home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs under the guidance of Alexandra Kidd of Alexandra Kidd Design, the columns were first to go. “When they renovated previously they had made some compromises that impacted the floor plan,” says Alexandra. “The two columns were structural posts that divided the kitchen from the family room, and removing them became the starting point for reimagining the space, opening it up and making it work harder.” With their children grown and living in various locations around the world, the owners felt it was the perfect time to address the imperfections in the home and create a comfortable and luxurious base for their new family dynamic. Inveterate travellers, they had fallen in love with the gracious, generously scaled mansions located on the US East Coast. A reference to the Obamas’ post-White House residence, which had featured in a magazine, was the inspiration for the aesthetic. They wanted Alexandra to capture that feeling of relaxed living, timeless elegance and classic detailing. The house was generous in size but the family was not utilising most of the living area, confining themselves to the kitchen and family room. The connection between spaces was poor with small door openings that didn’t facilitate flow. “The house was big but felt small due to small-scale joinery, low head heights and openings,” says Alexandra. A thorough internal gutting was called for, and everything was made bigger to create a sense of space – full-height joinery, furniture on a grand scale and larger room openings – while bulky timber doors were replaced by slimline steel in keeping with the lighter, more contemporary feel. “We opened up most rooms to the exterior,” says Alexandra, “which made a huge difference. As soon as I walked into the original home I had an overwhelming desire to open the doors and let in air and light.” To enhance the connection between indoors and out, she added terraces that flow onto the level lawn or overlook the »

I

120


A reference to the Obamas’ post-White House residence, which had featured in a magazine, was the inspiration for the aesthetic. This page Kitchen joinery painted in Dulux ‘Deep Aqua’ speaks to the clients’ love of colour and the Baker ‘Dressmaker’s’ chandeliers in bronze from Studio Cavit add a decorative flourish. Calacatta Gold marble benchtop from Nefiko Marble. Brushed stainless-steel rangehood from Astor Metal Finishes. Perrin & Rowe tapware from The English Tapware Company. Opposite page, from top A cool neutral palette in the family room with ‘Manhattan’ sofas from Fanuli upholstered in Mokum ‘Sahel’ in Pebble. Bolier ‘Domicile Arch’ coffee table from Studio Cavit. ‘Swanson’ tiered spot table from Max Sparrow. Arteriors ‘Norman’ floor lamp from Boyd Blue on a custom Persian ‘Cumulus’ knot rug from The Rug Establishment. Cushions are in a mix of fabrics, including Jim Thompson ‘Himma Gardens’ from Milgate and Rubelli ‘Victoria’ from South Pacific Fabrics. Alexandra repurposed many of the client’s existing pieces such as the side table and the armchair, which was reupholstered in Pierre Frey ‘Tournelle’ embroidered silk from Milgate. Porta Romana ‘Tapering Harral’ floor lamps. ‘Highgate’ console from Max Sparrow. Curtains made by Simple Studio in Zimmer+Rohde ‘Luce’ from Unique Fabrics. Élitis ‘Vintage Leather’ wallpaper.


HOME

122

Sydney


This page, clockwise from above In the vestibule of the master bedroom, de Gournay ‘Askew’ wallpaper from Milgate provides a romantic touch, coupled with the Milling Road ‘20th Century’ bench from Studio Cavit upholstered in Brochier ‘Leonida’ from South Pacific Fabrics. ‘Monaco’ gold-leaf cigar table from Regency Distribution. Behind the Hickory Chair ‘Candler’ bed from Laura Kincade is a wall upholstered in Phillip Jeffries ‘Manila Hemp’ from The Textile Company. Baker ‘Oval’ night table from Studio Cavit. Porta Romana ‘Crystal Strata’ column lamp, with shade from South Pacific Fabrics. Custom ‘Elegance’ rug from The Rug Establishment. On the outdoor terrace, ‘Klismos’ chairs and ‘Foucault’s Orb’ outdoor chandelier, all from RH. The powder room opens to the garden. Carrara marble benchtop from Nefiko Marble on a ‘Woodstock’ timber veneer vanity from Briggs Veneers. Armani Casa ‘Refined Structures Versailles’ wallpaper from South Pacific Fabrics. ‘Silver Casa’ stone tiles from SNB Stone. Porta Romana ‘Olivier’ wall light, with shade from South Pacific Fabrics. Custom mirror by Alexandra Kidd Design. Blind in Zimmer+Rohde ‘Lilo’ from Unique Fabrics. Opposite page In the formal dining room a Baker ‘Larchmont’ table is attended by Baker ‘Atelier’ chairs, all from Studio Cavit. ‘Windy’ rug in Winter Moss from Robyn Cosgrove. ‘Hyères’ ceiling lamps from Regency Distribution. Custom mirrored panelling by Alexandra Kidd Design.


HOME

Sydney

These pages The property enjoys a serene outlook onto lush landscaping by Sticks & Stones. Strategic placement of plants to complement the existing mature trees and climbers, which include wisteria, bougainvillea and star jasmine, created privacy and depth in the garden. The exterior is painted in Dulux ‘Vintage Linen’ with mouldings in Dulux ‘Vivid White’ and timber doors and windows in Dulux ‘Blackwood Bay’. Steel windows and balustrades are in Dulux ‘Duralloy Black Matt 19319’. Outdoor furniture is ‘Klismos’ from RH. The path leads to the swimming pool.

124


SPEED READ » Wanting to upgrade their expansive Sydney eastern suburbs home, the owners called on Alexandra Kidd of Alexandra Kidd Design to reimagine the property. » Despite the home being large, it felt small, due to disconnected rooms, low entryways and small-scale joinery. » Rejigging the layout to open up the rooms to each other and to the outdoors through new slimline steel doors and windows was the masterstroke, admitting sunlight, air and views into the formerly stuffy interior. » A fresh, airy palette underlined the sense of space, with pops of colour and pattern included to honour the owners’ love of vibrant hues.

« lush landscaping from upstairs, and opened up the kitchen to the front of the block allowing afternoon sun to stream in. Even the laundry had a glamorous update. No longer a dark space hidden at the back of the house, it connects to the family room and links with the garden. “We created a large terrace off the family room and kitchen so the owners could enjoy sun-drenched breakfasts there. The construction of the terrace allowed for a covered loggia on the lower level that now serves as an outdoor room, creating shade and a cool retreat on hot days,” says Alexandra. This lower, previously unused level is now a guest wing with a games area and cinema. “We spent time getting to know our clients and their requirements, how they live and what would genuinely improve their lives,” she says. “Our response to this allows every room of the house – in fact, the whole site – to be utilised.” The changes have clearly resonated with the owners. “Marrying the inside with the outside has brought a whole new dimension to our home and a new way of living for us. We’re rarely without a glimpse of the beautiful outdoors,” they say. “We love the sitting area under the pergola and have our morning coffee there most weekends.” Throughout the house Alexandra has created an ambience of quiet luxury and sophistication, interwoven with contemporary details. She used mirrors to bounce light around, reflect the view, bring the outdoors in and play with the sense of space, especially in the formal dining room where walls are panelled with handmade antique bronze mirror. “And, more simply,” she says, “we lightened the palette significantly so everything feels bigger and brighter.” From the exterior which is washed in Dulux ‘Vintage Linen’ to the inside walls painted in Dulux ‘Ghosting Half’, the backdrop is fresh and light, but Alexandra honoured the owners’ love of colour with a splash of vibrant aqua in the kitchen joinery, reupholstering furniture in rich hues and adding accent wallpapers by de Gournay, Élitis and Phillip Jeffries in the bedrooms for drama and contrast. “The architecture remains the hero with interest coming from luxe textures and beautiful fibres,” she says. Much of the clients’ original furniture was repurposed and reupholstered which fosters a sense of permanence. A measure of the renovation’s success is that having been back in the house for 14 months, the owner says, “We are usually frequent travellers, but we have not wanted to leave our new home for even one night away!” # alexandrakidd.com; sticksandstonesld.com.au


Sun catcher Exalted by an iconic coastal rock formation at its doorstep, this Mediterranean villa is an Australian family’s idyllic summer escape. Words LINDYL CR ABB Photography JAMES GEER


Amalfi Coast

HOME

This page Outside the guest suite on the lower level, the table and chairs from Fermob provide a front-row view of the Faraglioni rock formation. The villa’s south-facing orientation welcomes all-day sunshine and protection from the Mediterranean wind. Opposite page A desk custombuilt by local joiners makes the most of a window in one of the three bedrooms. This nook is decorated with a woven raffia vase and lobster from Eco Capri. Hans Wegner ‘CH36’ chair.

127


This page Tactile, handcrafted furnishings warmly embrace the living room’s pared-back architectural details. The white sofas and round African wall baskets are from The Conran Shop and the handwoven ceiling pendant and floor lamp are from Mona Market. The Jøtul castiron stove provides respite from the cold winters. Opposite page, from top In keeping with the owner’s wishes, the living space now flows into the kitchen. A De La Espada bench marks the threshold. Tableware by Amalfi Coast artisans takes pride of place along the wooden shelves and limestone counters installed by local joiners. While meals are typically an alfresco affair, there is a Stix dining table with oak legs and Carrara marble top in the kitchen. The chairs are by Hans Wegner and the artwork above is from a series by Australian artist Mark Schaller.


Amalfi Coast

HOME

radled by chivalrous limestone cliffs and a forest of pine trees, this sea-facing abode appears to have been painted en plein air into the Amalfi Coast. “It took our breath away,” says owner Uschi Schwartz recalling the first time she and husband Danny laid eyes on the property while having lunch at a restaurant below. The Melbourne-based couple had been looking for a summer holiday home in the northern hemisphere and the sight of this stone villa with private access to the sea and paradisal views of the famous Faraglioni rock formations rising from the water was serendipitous to say the least. However, on closer inspection, Uschi says, “we saw a villa in steep decline. It was tired and needed an entire refit, and the garden was a total mess.” The land had once belonged to a palazzo that was subdivided and sold off, and the villa itself had been a stone cistern until 1974 when it was turned into a private residence. The layout was typically Italian in that “it was carved up into many small rooms and the kitchen was cut off from the main dining area”, says Uschi. But although it couldn’t have been further from their vision of informal, inviting living spaces, she says, “this was exactly what we were looking for, something we could renovate in our style”. Naturally, the brief was inspired by the sun-kissed landscape and involved “opening up the small internal spaces and giving it a fresh Mediterranean feel”, Uschi says. The couple, who have a toddler son, also wanted to introduce design elements synonymous with their Australian lifestyle – lots of windows, open-plan interiors and alfresco entertaining areas. The renovations were quite a crosscultural experience. They engaged a builder from Australia to collaborate with a local tradesman and hired a team of craftsmen who “still bring local produce when they come to visit”. Now, two years later, you’d swear this holiday home had been plucked from a Slim Aarons photo. While the centuries-old external walls remain, inside is a breezy three-bedroom, three-bathroom family getaway with a basement converted into a separate suite for guests. The uncontrived interiors personify their environment: »

C

129


» the purity of the air, the warmth of the sun and the simplicity of daily life on the Amalfi Coast. “The mood reflects a Mediterranean summer,” says Uschi. “The colour scheme was intended to be natural and calm and not deflect from the intensely beautiful outdoor surroundings. We wanted to keep the furniture clean, fresh and natural to blend in.” With an abundance of local creative talent at her doorstep, Uschi incorporated regional art and ceramics into her preferred repertoire of homewares from European retailers. In the living room, Tunisian handwoven lamps from Mona Market in Paris, round wall baskets from The Conran Shop and a Gan rug designed by Patricia Urquiola harmonise with raffia sea creatures from Eco Capri, a store helmed by the grandson of legendary Capri artist Letizia Cerio. In the adjoining kitchen, handpainted dinnerware by Capri artisans Eureka di Pollicino creates an authentic sense of place displayed upon the locally-sourced limestone benchtops and richly-grained Austrian oak shelves. Underfoot, Italian terracotta tiles by Patricia Urquiola and Austrian oak floorboards impart an earthiness throughout the whitewashed scheme. These textural materials also create a natural, almost seamless physical transition as the family step off the beach and into their villa. Newly installed windows dissolve the boundary between the indoors and outdoors even further. “We opened up the views so we could see the Faraglioni,” says Uschi, “even from the shower!” Ironically, she says it’s the picturesque topography that demands the most work. “We did major landscaping and in doing so brought in many plant species that are local to the area.” Among them, hibiscus, oleander, bird of paradise, banana and citrus trees, yucca, and an assortment of ferns and succulents which trail down the terraced garden, from the tiled balconies to the outdoor lounge area and stone swimming pool. And there’s still more to do – the couple have plans to add flat grassed areas, playground equipment, a bocce court and fruit trees. While the property requires year-round upkeep, it’s well worth the effort. After all, Uschi says, “we spend most of our day in the garden. We make spaghetti vongole, throw on our bathers and stuff a basket with wine, bread and watermelon. We have lunch literally next to the sea, where we rinse off after our meal. We love the natural simplicity of the local life.” #

130


AmalďŹ Coast

This page The owners had the saltwater pool put in one year ago. Surrounded by flourishing native flora and facing the open sea, it’s a luxurious spot to cool off. However, having an in-ground pool was not permitted on the property, so they had to build the concrete and stone structure into a terrace wall. Opposite page, clockwise from top A private staircase on the property winds down the escarpment from the house to the beach. In summer, which is peak tourist season, the sea swells with boats. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are enjoyed on this terrace where the family can watch the activity on the water. The red outdoor dining set is from Fermob. A woven pendant and linen sheets from Merci in Paris add tactile sensuality to the minimally decorated bedroom.

HOME


HOME

Amalfi Coast

These pages, clockwise from left Umbrellas from a local store provide shade to the sun-drenched entertaining area with an outdoor lounge set and ‘Balad’ lamps from Fermob and rugs designed by Patricia Urquiola. It’s the perfect set-up for serving aperitivo at sunset. A bamboo pergola with a dining table and chairs from Fermob and a hammock brought back from Florence maximise the property’s close proximity to the water. This sandy spot is ideal for picnics and the little blue cabin is used to store the family’s beach gear. Looking up at the rugged coastline from the sea, the villa’s stone facade and red umbrellas can be seen on the right.

132


SPEED READ » In 2017 owners Uschi and Danny Schwartz, who have a young son, Benji, bought this 3000sqm property located on Italy’s Amalfi Coast. » Based in Melbourne, the couple wanted a European holiday house where they could escape their home city’s cold winters. » The villa’s stone facade was centuries-old and the interiors had been renovated in the 1980s. » Inspired by the light-filled, open-plan style of Australian homes, the owners embarked on a three-month redesign which involved gutting the villa, turning the basement into a separate apartment and landscaping the terraced gardens. » Builders from Australia and the local area worked together to realise the project. The owners engaged local trades and a building surveyor to organise the necessary permits. » A neutral colour palette and textural, natural materials capture the simplicity of Mediterranean style. » Homewares handmade locally are effortlessly incorporated into the decorating scheme, as are timeless pieces from stores across Europe.


character role A sleek modern addition has revived this 1800s villa, while witty pieces, wonky elements and a vintage stash add soul.

Words C ARLI PHILIPS Photography LISA COHEN Styling BECK SI MON


Melbourne

HOME

These pages, from left On the staircase landing there is a shelf to display books and artworks such as the Blue Armchair painting by Clara Adolphs, white ceramic vase from Puglia and Changeling sculpture by Mark Howson. In the open-plan living area, a pair of Cassina ‘LC3’ chairs by Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand face the B&B Italia ‘Diesis’ coffee table and ‘Charles’ sofa, both by Antonio Citterio, and De La Espada ‘Laurel’ side table by Neri & Hu. An Edra ‘Favela’ chair by Fernando and Humberto Campana sits close to the doors. ‘702 La Barca’ dining table by Piero De Martini and Cassina ‘Cab’ chairs by Mario Bellini.

135


HOME

Melbourne

These pages, from left ‘702 La Barca’ dining table by Piero De Martini and Cassina ‘Cab’ chairs by Mario Bellini. A secret, electronically operated hatch in the wide pine floorboards opens up and leads down to a small underground bar for entertaining friends. The interior module box provides most of the home’s storage. Above the kitchen bench is Still Life with Pears (1967), an artwork by Harley Cameron Griffiths. Shelves in the kitchen display a mix of vintage French and Italian crockery, a Wedgwood tea set, a vintage ceramic fruit bowl, and pieces from Alessi and Iittala. On the desk below, a black sculpture by Peter Cole sits beside vintage ceramics.

136


t was dark with no light and had nana carpets everywhere – just granny, granny, granny,” recalls architectural, industrial and interior designer Shareen Joel of her Melbourne home before she renovated it. So great is the transformation that this description seems an improbability, but the designer had complete conviction from the start. She stumbled across the open for inspection in passing so ducked in and saw the house’s potential right from the get-go. Her husband, Dean, did a drive-by but was entirely unconvinced. “He said it looked like a simple cottage and that I had rocks in my head! But I knew he would be pleasantly surprised so that night I sketched up a plan. I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it. We bid on the day and the first time he saw it was after the auction. He just trusted me.” Peacefully planted on a green, leafy street, this classic 1800s Victorian-Italianate villa with a bay window also has a raised tiled verandah, detailed filigree facade and low-pitched roof hidden by a graphic parapet. The family had moved from a large art deco property nearby and, for this house, Shareen sought to channel a refined yet effortless European aesthetic. She left the chimney as pale pink, and dusted off the antique French windows and doors she had kept in storage for years. “Everyone told me to strip everything and replace the cornices because they were cracked, and to fix the wonky door because it was on an angle, but I refused,” says Shareen. “I decided to just be happy with the imperfections so kept them – and thank God I did. I didn’t want new and boring and soulless.” The small, compact home had a lean-to kitchen and was disproportionate to the size of the landscaping, the latter a mess of ponds, rambling walkways and precarious rocks. However, the generous garden space provided the opportunity for a significant extension. The floor plan was basic, comprising a  lounge, two bedrooms and a bathroom to the left of the central spine. »

I


HOME

Melbourne

“THIS HOUSE IS N OT R E A L LY A B O U T THE THINGS AND TH E FIN ISH ES. IT’S ABOUT THE LIGHT A N D T H E S PA C E S .” « Towards the back, dark and gloomy dining, kitchen, laundry and family rooms were ordered one after the other. Shareen set about reorganising. One bedroom remained in position but with a renovated ensuite while the second became an office, which is hung salon-style with artwork. The original front lounge was converted into a bedroom for her teenage son with two stand-alone mirrored wardrobes. The separate wet areas were joined, pushed out and a European laundry with retractable doors installed. At the end of the existing hallway a cosy new family room has been created, tucked in between two sets of vintage panelled double doors. Behind, Shareen blew out a huge open-plan dining, living and sitting room built in double brick. Clever joinery and a central box-like module provides most of the storage, designed with specific compartments concealing everything from the refrigerator to dinnerware and shelves for luggage. Renowned in her family for keeping everything in its original box, Shareen decided that now was the time to unpack the wedding gifts she had out of sight since getting married more than 20 years ago. Many are now on display, including Alessi classics which, she says, “have made me smile all over again with their distinct humour”. In the kitchen, shelves are lined with a white-on-white showcase of ceramics. Adding subtle spunk to conservative pieces such as Italian dinnerware are witty, oversized country-style roosters and 3D ceramic fruit bowls overflowing with faux grapes. Two massive, floor-to-ceiling panes of glass welcome floods of light, warming up the timber and calm neutrals in the rear, and highlighting the beautifully composed communal zone. A cellar (formerly below the patio) is now under the dining table and accessible via an electronic switch that raises the floorboards to reveal a secret hatch. Designed as a mini underground wine bar for friends, the space has been lined in red travertine tiles and outfitted in Boffi’s ‘Brompton’ black shelving system with concealed LED lighting for atmosphere. The concrete walls, slab ceiling and staircase have been left raw and exposed. At the juncture between the old building and the addition is a glossy, polished-plaster stairwell, its rustic surface enhanced by the new skylight. Upstairs, the couple’s simple yet sophisticated bedroom and bathroom is minimalist, with detail and colour coming instead by way of nature through long rectangular picture windows encircling the room that slide open to reveal sweet flower boxes. With the refreshing breeze and panoramic frame, it’s akin to feeling the bed is floating on a balcony. “This house is not really about the things and the finishes,” says Shareen. “It’s about the light and the spaces.” # shareenjoel.com


This page Designed as Shareen’s office, this room is being used as her son’s study during his last year of school. Beneath a Gubi ‘Semi’ pendant light, Knoll ‘Tulip’ table by Eero Saarinen with Cassina ‘Superleggera’ chair by Gio Ponti and ‘Cab’ chair by Mario Bellini. Cappellini ‘Fronzoni ’64 Sedie’ chair by A.G. Fronzoni. Artworks include Origami #3 by Robert Owen from Arc One Gallery (bottom left), Tranquilly Mist 1 by Alesandro Ljubicic from Scott Livesey Galleries (bottom right) and Weird Fish by Michael Muir from Sophie Gannon Gallery (top left). Opposite page, from top Of her love for the French doors in the hallway, Shareen says, “I have collected and kept them in storage for years. I was waiting for the perfect house to put them in. I built the house around these doors.” B&B Italia ‘Charles’ sofa and De La Espada ‘Laurel’ side table. Cassina ‘Cab’ chairs and ‘702 La Barca’ table. In the kitchen, Cassina ‘LC9’ stool by Charlotte Perriand and artwork by Harley Cameron Griffiths.

139


HOME

Melbourne

SPEED READ » Designer Shareen Joel happened on an open house in a leafy Melbourne street. » Spotting the potential of this classic 1800s Victorian-Italianate villa with tiled verandah and filigree features to be her own new home she snapped it up. » The original villa was reorganised as bedrooms, bathrooms and a study, then an expansive open-plan living area and communal zone was built at the rear with floorto-ceiling glazing that welcomes in light and warmth. » Shareen set about infusing the house with a “European aesthetic” using a palette of tranquil neutral tones and timber, dusting off and installing vintage French doors and windows she had saved for years, and unwrapping 20-year-old boxed wedding gifts that are now on display.

140


This page Formerly a rambling mess of ponds, rocks and uneven paths, the rear garden has been landscaped. Shareen does the planting and has learnt to become a green thumb. Vintage picnic chair. Opposite page, from top Beneath one of several new skylights installed throughout the house, the stairwell is lined in polished plaster. In the master bedroom, Zanotta ‘360 Servomuto’ side table by Achille Castiglioni, Louis Poulsen ‘AJ’ floor lamp by Arne Jacobsen and white chair from Luke Furniture.


IN NER

GLOW

Thoughtfully curated with contemporary and vintage pieces, this abode eschews LA’s megawatt glamour for time-honoured design. Words LINDYL CR ABB Photography ESZTER+DAVID


Los Angeles Sydney

HOME

This page Designer Jase Sullivan and his client chose Portola Paints ‘Angel’s Landing’ for the panelled dining room walls, which creates a sensual backdrop for the B&B Italia ‘Tobi-Ishi’ table from Diva, the Pierre Jeanneret chairs and Natalie Page ceramic pendant lights. A brass pot from The Window nurtures a towering triangle ficus plant. Opposite page The undulating lines of a Noguchi lamp from Rewire, a Bruno Mathsson chair from Sumner Furniture and Holland & Sherry sheer linen curtain fabric create a moment of repose downstairs. The artwork is from Pat McGann Gallery and the rug is from Jamal’s in LA. Both pieces are vintage.

143


HOME

Los Angeles

P

erched above Sunset Boulevard in the cloistered Bird Streets, this property was a perfect fit for Australian interior designer Jase Sullivan’s clients. The family were looking for a house in Los Angeles and, having worked with Jase before, engaged his expertise on their future home. Somewhat of a local, he went one better and helped them find it. The close rapport between Jase and the home’s new owners, a couple with two young children, evolved into a collaborative alchemy which underpinned the brief. “The trick to designing this house,” Jase says, “was to find really cool, rare vintage pieces that were in keeping with the mother’s style – she’s quite fashionable – but still keep it young, fresh and not too serious for the kids.” Fortuitously, many of the key ingredients were already there, not least Jase’s discerning eye for collectable vintage furnishings. Set over three storeys with a cinema and cellar on the basement floor, the house was near new. The property’s exclusive location met the couple’s desire for privacy and the family-friendly layout embraced their alfresco lifestyle – a climatic drawcard in sunny California. Take, for example, “the way the pocket doors in the living room slide back completely, allowing the indoors to flow onto the private front yard and back pool area”, he says. “It’s perfect. The parents can watch the kids play outside from the living room.” And yet, the immaculate, modern interiors lacked nuance and felt incongruous with the traditional East Coast-style architecture. “I wasn’t a fan of the slick kitchen, lighting and fireplace,” says Jase, who suggests the original marble fireplace might have felt more at home in a mausoleum. A year-long redesign ensued with work scheduled while the family was away. To remedy those audacious elements and restore harmony, the interiors underwent a textural overhaul befitting the exterior’s traditional DNA. Now, a two-storey white shiplap wall in the living area echoes the oak floorboards, panelled dining room and external cladding while Jase, who will “jump at any chance to introduce texture”, replaced the glossy stone surfaces with hand-painted brick walls. He also designed the hand-finished Shaker-style kitchen joinery that can be repainted with ease should the owners have the inclination to change up the colour scheme, and that fireplace now boasts a wide, light brick facade anchored by custom timber shelves. “Rather than work from an office, I try to work from the house as much as I can to really get a feel for it,” says Jase of his design process. In this case he stayed at the property for several weeks, observing the home throughout the day and making acquaintance with its quirks, such as the sun bouncing off the white exterior wall cladding and amplifying the light inside. To counteract this, he “introduced olive trees outside the living space to minimise the reflection and sheer linen curtains to diffuse the light and soften the rooms”. The same assiduous approach applied to sourcing the mouthwatering mix of contemporary and antique furniture from across North America and Europe. Jase also frequented his favourite LA vintage stores, including Lief gallery, ma+39 and Galerie Half where he tracked down a Peter Bonde artwork , the original Pierre Jeanneret dining chairs, the Fritz Hansen sheepskin armchair and the 1940s Formica breakfast table. Covetable as they are, these mid-century pieces form a concordant dialogue with the tactile architecture. “New houses lack history and sometimes energy,” he says. “So introducing vintage pieces I truly believe gives a home soul.” »

144


This page The horizontal shiplap walls and hand-painted brick fireplace were designed to create a warm, informal mood in the open living area. A de Sede sofa and Formica worktop table with swing chairs facilitate casual seating arrangements, while the Peter Bonde artwork cleverly conceals a television behind it. Siglo Moderno ‘Growlights’ form a leafy canopy above. Opposite page, from top An original Juergen Teller photograph of Kate Moss takes pride of place in the upstairs landing. Sourced from ma+39, a pair of ‘Camaleonda’ chairs by Mario Bellini for B&B Italia make the most of this space. The floor lamp is a 1960s Swedish design by Uno and Östen Kristiansson. Vintage side table and rug. Kitchen cabinets custom designed by Jase. He selected unlacquered brass accessories, including Waterworks tapware and Renaissance Design Studio handles. Above the Fisher & Paykel oven is a ‘LUread F’ wall sconce from Lumfardo.


HOME

Los Angeles

SPEED READ » Interior designer Jase Sullivan collaborated with his clients, a family of four, on this year-long project. » Located in the Bird Streets of Los Angeles, the three-level home had recently been rebuilt but the sleek, modern interiors were at odds with the traditional East Coast-style architecture. » While the existing layout remains, most light fixtures and living room surfaces were replaced and a new Shaker-style kitchen was built. » Jase designed several elements including the kitchen and master bedroom furniture. » He also sourced the iconic mid-century and contemporary furnishings from stores across LA and European vintage retailers. » French oak floorboards laid the foundation for the neutral scheme punctuated by key pieces of bright furniture and art.

« And soul it has in spades. Snaking around the living area, a de Sede ‘DS-600’ sofa found on 1stdibs and imported from Munich can be manoeuvred to accommodate intimate pastimes such as TVwatching as well as evenings spent entertaining. Vintage Persian rugs invite shades of aged gold, blue and ruby into the principally neutral palette and link the separate spaces. According to Jase, one rug in particular adorned the floor of a Lake Como waterfront villa for more than 100 years. “If it could talk, imagine the stories it would tell.” The couple’s own memories are woven throughout their home, too. An original Kate Moss print by Juergen Teller is of particular sentimental significance. “My client is a huge fan of the supermodel and her husband was the highest bidder for it at a charity auction.” The use of colour in the dining space tells another story. “When I designed my client’s previous home, she and I painted a built-in cabinet together. We decided we’d do a room together in this house and chose a beautiful nude colour for the dining room,” Jase says. “The two kids wanted to join in so they received their very first painting lesson.” A black B&B Italia ‘Tobi-Ishi’ dining table punctuates this sophisticated blush scheme. It’s one of a few black-toned contemporary

146

pieces including the Bronson credenza in the living room and a large pendant in the master bedroom – the only light fixture to have survived the redesign – which were incorporated to subtly create visual continuity between the upper and lower levels. Craftsmanship is celebrated in its myriad forms alongside patinated materials such as leather that can withstand “two very active children who believe this house to be a Formula One racetrack”. Handmade ceramic pendant lights by Natalie Page were chosen for the dining room and the living room’s wooden shelves are curated with ornaments and accessories from The Window antiques store in LA and the Rose Bowl Flea Market in Pasadena. On a larger scale, Jase’s custom-designed furniture yields beautifully to the master bedroom’s vast dimensions. When the hunt for vintage burl bedside tables in just the right size proved futile, he sourced the highly figured wood and had them made. Not only is the balance between enduring design, material integrity and utilitarian function a testament to family life, but assurance that should the owners move, every piece will continue to feel right at home. # jasesullivan.com.au


This page Verdant lawns and a swimming pool in the backyard add to the property’s family-friendly appeal. The vintage iron table and chairs are from JF Chen and the teak dining table is from Leif. Atop it are cane wine bottles from Rose Bowl Flea Market. Opposite page Jase custom designed the master bed and base as well as the burl bedside tables. Mid-century designs make an appearance here, too. He sourced the 1960s green velvet armchairs from Hollywood at Home and the Hans-Agne Jakobsson table lamps from Rewire. Ochre-hued Matteo bed linens and a vintage rug from Jamal’s resonate with the home’s warm neutral scheme.


Chiselled lines The clean-cut angles of this sleek Melbourne home are softened by the cleverly placed, curvaceous contours.

Words CARLI PHILIP S Photography PETER CL ARKE


Melbourne

HOME

This page Alongside a large commissioned work by Colin Pennock from Arthouse Gallery, a Matter Made ‘Avoa’ chair in solid brass by Pedro Paulo Venzon from Criteria gleams in the hallway leading to the casual dining area. Lowe Furniture ‘Atticus’ dining table from Hub surrounded by Verpan ‘Series 430’ dining chairs from Space. Opposite page The monolithic entryway makes an impressive welcoming statement. ‘Tiga’ sconces by Inlite.

149


I

t has elements of strong and rigorous bravado combined with the subtlety and softness of smooth curves,” explains Emma Tulloch of Emma Tulloch Architects who designed this contemporary ‘forever’ family home in Melbourne in collaboration with interior design studio Mim Design. This aesthetic description is also well suited to the homeowner’s appreciation and love of luxury cars, a collection now stored in a newly designed aggregate basement. Mim Design principal Miriam Fanning says her clients, the director of McLaren Developments and his wife, were fastidious when it came to the minutiae. “They are passionate about attention to detail. As designers, we needed to be really spot-on too. For us, this project was specified to the nth degree. It was to a level not usually found in a house [and] it had to be executed perfectly.” While cleancut and monolithic when it came to the architecture, the close-up interior touchpoints of this house are exceptionally sophisticated, with a nod to intricate industrial design. Aged brass is used extensively on specified fixtures throughout. Handles, in particular, have been given special treatment with some folded on a soft radius while others are knurled Buster + Punch hardware. “In homage to the client’s love of fine automobiles, [we] found equilibrium between the refined finesse of precision detailing and durable materials,” says Miriam. The home’s overwhelming, box-like structural geometries are moderated by sweeping curves that gently bend around corners. The most dramatic are at the oversized entryway and silo-like, polishedplaster curved staircase with its steel ribbon balustrade. In the cellar, black-stained oak veneer joinery follows the radial form of the room and in the kitchen, two solid blocks of stone have been carved with round edges. While powerfully heavy, a natural palette creates a softened sense of “intimacy and calm”, says Emma. To the left of the ground floor, off the lobby, is a powder room in moody Nero Marquina marble. To the right, a north-facing study overlooks »

150


Melbourne This page The pendant light in the kitchen was conceived by Mim Design and sourced through Ambience. Living Divani ‘Hinge’ stools from Space are pulled up at the curved island bench, which is made from two solid slabs of stone. Opposite page, from top Under the ‘Otto’ one-arm pendant light by David Weeks from Criteria, the formal dining room features a B&B Italia ‘Oskar’ table by Vincent Van Duysen from Space with ‘La Pipe’ chairs by Friends & Founders from Fred International. The table holds a mix of glass objects by Anna Torfs from Space, Tom Dixon from De De Ce, and Philip Low from Hub. In the formal lounge, a pair of Inheritance Collection armchairs by Stephen Kenn face the Baxter ‘Chester Moon’ sofa by Paola Navone, all from Criteria. A ‘Mondrian’ coffee table by Jean-Marie Massaud from Poliform radiates in glossy orange beside the fireplace.

“ W H I L E P O W E R F U L LY H E AV Y, A N AT U R A L PA L E T T E C R E AT E S A S O F T E N E D S E N S E O F ‘ I N T I M A C Y A N D C A L M ’.”

HOME


HOME

Melbourne

« a garden designed by Jack Merlo. Off the hallway, fluted glass doors open to a large lounge and formal dining room outfitted in a B&B Italia ‘Oskar’ table and Friends & Founders ‘La Pipe’ chairs. The cosy, casual den opposite features floor-to-ceiling views of the garden and pool, brightening the grey and neutral space. The corridor path pauses at a black portal, transitioning from narrow floor tiles into a larger format, marking the intersection between the formal and casual areas. From here, the expansive rear balloons out with an open-plan kitchen, dining and casual living area. A glass walkway links to the ‘west wing’, a large secondary zone with a pavilion lounge, ensuite and bedroom that opens onto a terrace and basketball court. The self-contained, apartment-style accommodation was designed with guests in mind. When it came to furnishings, trust played a major role, explains Miriam. “For us, it was about making sure each piece worked with one another and didn’t look like a display house. We prioritised using varied product from all over the world. It’s not from one distributor or manufacturer. We wanted to create different layers and levels of interest.” This meant using a rich palette of materials expressed in furniture such as Poliform’s glossy tangerine ‘Mondrian’ coffee table and Baxter’s ‘Chester Moon’ sofa in quilted button-back blue suede. Level one is dedicated to the sleeping quarters. Two children’s bedrooms stem off the main axis that has built-in banquette seating with storage. At the top of the stairs, double doors open into a generous 75sqm master wing with an ensuite and extensive walk-in robe made in soft quarter-cut oak veneer. Lined in a vibrant teal felt, accessory drawers have been meticulously compartmentalised while bespoke robes and shelving illuminate an array of bags and shoes. A custom brass joinery unit with shelving for the owner to display his collections is located in the eight-car garage. A golf simulator, cinema room and gym add to the fun, but when the carparks are empty it makes for a “fabulous party space”, says Miriam. # emmatulloch.com.au; mimdesign.com.au; jackmerlo.com

152


SPEED READ » Emma Tulloch of Emma Tulloch Architects and Miriam Fanning of interior design studio Mim Design collaborated on creating a spectacular contemporary family home in Melbourne. » The three-level home’s box-like structure has been softened with curves in places such as on the polished plaster staircase at the entry and the rounded edges on the monumental marble kitchen island. » Furnishings are a mix of contemporary statement pieces and the finer details include top-quality fittings such as bespoke handles that add their polish to the interior scheme. » In the basement, a golf simulator, cinema room and gym are housed alongside an eight-vehicle garage.

This page “The curved fillets unify the edges such that you want to keep looking to the next corner. They also soften the house which, despite its scale and generosity, creates an intimacy and calmness,” says architect Emma Tulloch. GandiaBlasco ‘DNA’ sofa from Hub and Tribù ‘Illum’ table and chairs from Cosh Living. Large pots from Martin Kellock Pots & Planters. Opposite page, clockwise from top left Chinese Whispers II (2015) by Danelle Bergstrom from Arthouse Gallery hangs in the master bedroom. Custom bed by Grazia&Co. Porada ‘Ziggy Night’ table. ‘Silhouette’ wall sconce by Ross Gardam. In the master bathroom, proportion was a key consideration. The natural stone is overscaled but balanced by a wall of smaller, pleated tiles. ‘Shy’ sconce by Bec Brittain from Criteria. The downstairs study overlooks the garden. A pair of Verpan ‘Series 430’ stools from Space sit under the custom desk with leather inlay from Zuster. ‘Ora’ desk lamp by Ross Gardam.


FLUENTLY

FRENCH

This glamorous yet family-focused apartment epitomises the style of designers Humbert & Poyet with both classic and contemporary references. Words K ARINE MONIÉ Photography FR ANCIS AMIAND


Paris

HOME

This page Creating a conversation place in the living room is the curvaceous ‘Grand Théodore’ sofa upholstered in Christian Fischbacher ‘VIP’ blue velvet plush alongside the ‘Gabrielle’ coffee table, a pair of Théodore armchairs upholstered in a linen and wool blend bouclé fabric, timber shelving and marble fireplace, all by Humbert & Poyet. 1960s sconce by Gino Sarfatti and ceramics by Georges Jouve. Photograph by Robert Mapplethorpe. The parquet floors were newly laid. Opposite page Speckled terrazzo captures the tones of the apartment’s white, black and grey palette. Brass railing by Humbert & Poyet. Subway Drawings (1989) artwork by Keith Haring.

155


I

n Paris’s third arrondissement, the charming neighbourhood of Le Marais is where designers Emil Humbert and Christophe Poyet – the duo behind design studio Humbert & Poyet – brought back the luxury of a bygone era for an apartment nestled in what was originally a 17th-century hôtel particulier and which had later served as a jewellery atelier in the 19th century. Spread over two floors, the 250sqm apartment retains historic elements but has now been designed for a contemporary lifestyle. “The master planning was done in accordance with the classical codes of a private residence,” say the designers. The spaces are organised in an enfilade. Mouldings and modernised double doors adorned with wood and gleaming brass were reintroduced to both honour the past and reinterpret it in a contemporary way. Respecting tradition, the first floor is home to the public spaces that are dedicated to hosting and entertaining friends and family, while the private upper level houses the bedrooms and bathrooms. “We approach each space by looking at its form and function,” they add. “The frame of the design is created and the stage is set with attention to finishes, materials and furniture to create harmony.” Adorned with vintage pendant lighting, the entrance foyer is an invitation to discover the elegant duplex where Humbert & Poyet designed much of the furniture and fittings, down to the brass handles. “Our goal is to translate a complex atmosphere into a threedimensional space,” say the pair. “We communicate constantly throughout a project. Our symbiosis forms the foundation of all we do and ensures the space that we’ve imagined works.” With its new terrazzo floor and stairs, the hallway features Subway Drawings, an artwork by Keith Haring, as well as Le Corbusier chairs, a Jean Prouvé chest, and Georges Jouve and »

156


Paris

HOME

This page A David Ostrowski artwork hangs above a pair of stools by Eero Saarinen in the living room. Floor lamps by Gino Sarfatti. ‘Grand Théodore’ sofa and ‘Gabrielle’ coffee table, both by Humbert & Poyet. Opposite page, clockwise from top left Mid-century Dutch pendant light. Brass door hardware and pendant light in brass and opaline above the stairs, both by Humbert & Poyet. An artwork by Bertrand Lavier delivers a smack of colour to the mostly monochromatic interiors. Vintage table lamp, ceramics by Georges Jouve and Valentine Schlegel from Thomas Fritsch – Artrium gallery, ‘Ava’ floor lamp by Humbert & Poyet and Cassina chaise by Le Corbusier.


HOME

Paris

This page Adding drama to the kitchen is the ‘Asterios’ suspension light in bronze and frosted glass by Humbert & Poyet which hangs above custom cabinets in a painted finish by Farrow & Ball with brass trim and benchtops in Arabescato marble. Opposite page, clockwise from left ‘Tractor’ stools by BassamFellows at the island bench provide a casual dining place. Reflected in a mirrored finish in the formal dining room, Cassina ‘Superleggera’ chairs by Gio Ponti surround an ‘Appolline’ table by Humbert & Poyet with a wall sculpture made in timber and metal by Berlin-based artist Katja Strunz. Sling chairs by Le Corbusier, console by Jean Prouvé, ceramics by Georges Jouve and Olivier Gagnère, ‘Lolita’ lamp by Humbert & Poyet and green console table with brass radiator cover.

158


« Olivier Gagnère ceramics. Throughout the duplex apartment, architectural elements added in the 18th century, art-deco details and Italian references from the 1950s create a delicate atmosphere. In the cosy living room, which includes a Gino Sarfatti sconce, a painting by Bertrand Lavier, ceramics by Valentine Schlegel and Georges Jouve from Thomas Fritsch – Artrium gallery, an Eric Schmitt vase, a photograph by Robert Mapplethorpe and a Le Corbusier recliner, several pieces were designed by Humbert & Poyet including the marble fireplace. The ‘Ava’ floor lamp, the blue velvet sofa and the white armchairs are by the designers for The Invisible Collection and echo their ethos of “luxury meant for everyday living”. “We have designed statement pieces that evoke a sense of sophistication through an understated elegance,” say the duo. The white background and mostly neutral colour palette – that also includes black and greys – highlight the furniture and art in the high-ceilinged apartment, which is bathed in natural light. “We enjoy creating compositions, like a stage for a playwright,” say the designers. “For this project, we were particularly inspired by the modernist, art deco and Memphis movements, paired with classicism. These periods are reflected through the choices of furniture, hues and finishes. All of this creates strong and refined spaces, which are statements in themselves.” In the formal dining room, ‘Superleggera’ chairs by Gio Ponti surround a brass table and pendant light by Humbert & Poyet. On the wall, a lamp by Angelo Lelli and a painting by Günther Förg from Almine Rech Gallery complement the design. Functional and chic, the kitchen mixes Arabescato marble with green cabinets, black BassamFellows ‘Tractor’ stools and the ‘Asterios’ pendant light in bronze and frosted glass by Humbert & Poyet. »


« “The materials were selected for their character and their sense of harmony,” say the designers. “Marble brings richness, wood conveys warmth and terrazzo adds a modern twist. We also enjoy working with brass as it highlights the other materials.” Playing with scale and proportions, and using geometric shapes, touches of bold colours and metallic accents, Humbert & Poyet fully expressed their firm’s creativity through this project. An impressive terrazzo staircase, with a pendant light by the French designers, leads to the bedrooms situated on the upper level. In the master bedroom, a triptych by Aaron Young dresses up the wall where the Flexform bed sits, anchored by two pendant lights by Franco Albini from Magic Circus Éditions. On the other side of the space, a Serge Mouille sconce and a Pierre Paulin chair combine with the Humbert & Poyet chest and the Paul Stanley painting. Playing with mirror effects, the brass wardrobe – also designed by the French duo – looks glamorous. “The main source of inspiration was the function of the space,” say the designers. “We wanted to design a timeless and elegant family home, suitable for entertaining, and with art and design as part of the lifestyle.” With a work calendar teeming with design projects around the world, Humbert & Poyet has now switched its focus onto an upcoming high-end, ultra-luxury 19-storey residential building in Monte Carlo, two hotels in South Korea and new Beefbar restaurants. # humbertpoyet.com

This page, from top Console in brass and hand-brushed lacquer beneath a mirror and sconces, all by Humbert & Poyet, topped with a sculptural object by Kelly Wearstler. Flexform bed with bedside tables by Humbert & Poyet and pendant lights by Magic Circus Éditions above. Triptych artwork by Aaron Young. Armchair by Pierre Paulin, sconce by Serge Mouille, sideboard by Humbert & Poyet, painting by Paul Stanley and 1950s ceramics by André Aleth Masson from Thomas Fritsch – Artrium gallery. Opposite page Mirrors with brass trim by Humbert & Poyet reflect a dazzling scene in the bathroom with generous slabs of Arabescato marble and timber drawers finished in hand-brushed lacquer.

160


Paris

HOME

SPEED READ » Designers Emil Humbert and Christophe Poyet restored the timeless glamour of a duplex apartment in Paris, originally built in the 17th-century as a hôtel particulier and later serving as a jewellery atelier, updating it for modern family life. » The first floor holds living, dining and kitchen spaces, and is dedicated to hosting family and friends, while the private upper level holds bedrooms and bathrooms. » A neutral palette of white, black and grey is complemented by swathes of rich blues and greens, and the imaginative use of marble, terrazzo and brass accents. » Furniture and finishes centre around the mix of art and design, including a work by Keith Haring, and iconic modernist pieces by the ilk of Gio Ponti, Serge Mouille and Le Corbusier. » Humbert & Poyet contributed custom touches, including brass handles, a pendant lamp and the shimmering brass wardrobe.


LUXURY POLAR EXPEDITION CRUISES Arctic | Antarctic | Northwest Passage “Glittering white, shining blue, raven black... the land looks like a fairytale. Pinnacle after pinnacle, peak after peak – crevassed, wild as any land on our globe, it lies, unseen and untrodden. It is a wonderful feeling to travel along it.” – Roald Amundsen Whether exploring the High Arctic and the legendary Northwest Passage, or plying the Southern Seas on a voyage to Antarctica, a luxury expedition cruise with A&K immerses you in the exotic and the unspoiled. Unlike other cruises, every A&K voyage promises a fresh and unscripted adventure thanks to an expertly-crafted itinerary, award-winning Expedition Team, on-board education and enrichment programmes, and an incredible expedition vessel. Talk to your travel agent or call Abercrombie & Kent on 1300 851 800. www.abercrombiekent.com.au

Book now and save up to up to $15,940* per couple on some of our most popular Arctic and Antarctic cruises. Solo travellers can also take advantage of 50% off the single supplement on select departures. Visit abercrombiekent.com.au for details.

*Terms and conditions apply. Please see our website for up-to-date prices and terms and conditions.


FOOD T R AV E L C

RU

ISING

SPECIAL

Choose your adventure: these seven journeys by river and sea are destined to impress liner-loving luxurians, smooth sailors and intrepid explorers.

P H OTO G R A P H Y A L A M Y ( T H R E E G ORG E S )

Edited by ANDRE A BL ACK

RIPPLE EFFECTS Set your spirit adrift with a luxe journey through the middle reaches of the picturesque Yangtze River, China’s historic trade artery and the longest river in Asia. See The River Cruise, p172.

163


RU

ISING

SPECIAL

The

OCEAN l i n ers

This page, clockwise from left

Set your sights on blue horizons from Western Europe to Hong Kong and Tokyo on board vessels akin to boutique hotels where luxury abounds. THE JOURNEY

Lisbon, the largest city in Portugal, is where the Captain’s Choice tour begins. A cobbled city street and tram. Traditional azulejo tiles on an Oporto facade. The lighthouse at Foz do Douro, a great place for a walk in good weather. Get your art fix at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, a superstructure designed by Frank Gehry.

Charming Coastlines of Western Europe with Captain’s Choice.

heads to Bordeaux for two days, then it’s off to Belle Île, Nantes, St-Malo and Honfleur before docking at London’s Tower Bridge.

THE VESSEL

THE EXCURSIONS

Cruise line Silversea recently refurbished, 254-guest Silver Cloud is now a dual-purpose luxury ocean liner and expedition ship for polar waters. The ship has large suites, some of the most spacious in luxury cruising, many with a private teak verandah and all include the services of a butler. The two-bedroom, 77sqm Owner’s Suite features a marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, powder room and second bathroom. The large veranda features patio furniture and f loor-to-ceiling glass doors. Expect personalised stationery, a walk-in robe and a bar stocked with your preferences.

A tour of the Guggenheim in Bilbao is a highlight. The titanium building by Frank Gehry houses work by modern masters such as Mark Rothko and Jeff Koons. In Bordeaux, guests can tour La Cité du Vin wine museum and enjoy a tasting. A visit to the museum in Nantes honouring Jules Verne is another high point. London is journey’s end with dinner at Quaglino’s and a stay at Corinthia London.

THE PORTS The 18-day voyage skirts coastlines across the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel and visits the cobblestoned paths of historic cities in Portugal, Spain, France and the UK. The journey begins in Portuguese capital Lisbon, then heads to Oporto, famed for its wine and beautiful azulejo tiles. Spanish beach city La Coruña then Bilbao are next. The vessel

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Of the five gourmet dining venues, the elegant menu of regionally inspired dishes with wines to match at La Dame is a top pick. At The Grill, guests can cook their food at their table. Dolce Vita offers complimentary after-dinner drinks or sample an impressive selection of cigars and cognac at Connoisseur’s Corner. Zagara Beauty Spa offers an array of massages or body wraps, plus saunas and steam rooms. Aerobics, yoga, Pilates and personal training are available at the fitness centre. Prefer to loll? Pull up a chaise lounge on the pool deck. captainschoice.com.au

2

3

TO PACK 4 Bottega Veneta ‘BV Twist’ calf-skin bag in Rust (1). The Row ‘Beriko’ sleeveless roll-neck cashmere sweater in Camel (2).

Loewe round sunglasses wth calf-skin application in Brown/Khaki Green (3). Hot Milk novel by Deborah Levy (4).

Byredo ‘Gypsy Water’ 7.5ml perfumed oil roll-on (5). Rothko book by Jacob BaalTeshuva (6). 5

1

6

P HOTO G R A P H Y G E T T Y, A L A M Y

C


THE JOURNEY Hong Kong to Tokyo with Regent Seven Seas Cruises (RSSC).

THE VESSEL

3 4

2

TO PACK 1 Hay ‘Mono’ notebook in Mint (1). Hay ‘No. 2’ pencil in Green & Silver (2). Tatcha ‘Luminous Dewy Skin’ masks (3). Bao Bao by Issey Miyake ‘Lucent’ gloss square pouch in Green (4). The Memory Police book by Yoko Ogawa (5). Prada appliquéd shell visor in Black (6). Miu Miu oversized silk-organza shirt in Baby Pink (7). Yi Yi film by Edward Yang (8).

8

7 6

5

Expect some of the finest in Park Avenuestyle design on the 700-guest Seven Seas Voyager. In the all-balcony suites, a soothing colour palette and rich textures include marble appointments in the bathroom. If staying in a Penthouse Suite or higher category, guests have access to a free butler service. The two-bedroom Master Suite is 113sqm and features a crystal chandelier and two private balconies. Expect unlimited valet laundry service, priority check-in on embarkation day, an in-suite caviar service plus a complimentary cocktail party for eight.

THE PORTS From Hong Kong, the ship sails to Keelung near Taipei before cruising to Japan. First stop is Ishigaki in the Sakishima Islands followed by Okinawa. Next up are Kagoshima and Miyazaki before two glorious days in Osaka, with the option to travel to Kyoto. From Osaka the ship heads to Shimizu for unparalleled views of Mount Fuji’s dramatic peak before the journey ends in Tokyo.

This page, clockwise from top left Your cruise departs from Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour. The trip to Japan includes two days in Osaka seeing its historic castle and more. Sengan-en garden and stately home in Kagoshima, owned by the Shimadzu family. Volcanic playground Kume Island, part of the Okinawa Prefecture. Miyazaki on Kyushu Island.

THE EXCURSIONS In Taiwan, guests can tour the extraordinary art collection at the National Palace Museum. In Japan’s Miyazaki visitors can hike through winding Inohae Gorge, an area of natural beauty and picturesque waterfalls. In Tokyo, browse for traditional merchandise such as folk art and Buddhist scrolls at Nakamise or hit the designer stores in the Ginza district.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES The RSSC Enrichment Series sees esteemed guest lecturers impart their knowledge in the Constellation Theater, where a five-piece orchestra can also perform. The outdoors awaits with an expansive deck with a heated pool, two whirlpools and table tennis. Visit the impressive fitness centre, run around the track or sample the treatments at Serene Spa & Wellness. After dinner at steakhouse Prime 7, Italian at Sette Mari at La Veranda or French fare at Chartreuse sit back in a leather armchair at the Connoisseur Club where you can order a rare vintage cognac or port and choose a cigar. rssc.com

165


The

YAC H TS

This page, clockwise from top left

Clock up knots aboard impressive superyachts that deliver you to the doorsteps of glamorous destinations.

Coastal homes along the first stop, Key West in Florida. The Dominican Republic’s Samaná Peninsula is known for its beautiful beaches. Timber townhouses in pastel-hued Key West. Swimming at El Limón waterfall in Samaná. A Signature Suite on Evrima is designed to feel akin to a typical room in a Ritz-Carlton resort.

THE JOURNEY Fort Lauderdale, US, to San Juan in Puerto Rico with the Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection.

THE VESSEL

1 2

TO PACK Evian by Virgil Abloh silicone -sleeve water bottle (1). Max Mara ‘Bimba’ swimsuit in Blue (2). Kevin Murphy ‘Motion Lotion’ curlenhancing lotion (3). Aerin ‘Enzo’ travel playingcard set (4). Loewe small logo-debossed raffia basket bag (5). A House For Mr Biswas book by V.S. Naipaul (6).

6

THE PORTS

3 4

5

Evrima sets sail from Fort Lauderdale in Florida. First stop on this eight-night voyage is laidback Key West, southernmost city in the continental US, before heading to the glorious beaches and amazing marine life of Turks and Caicos Islands and the Dominican Republic. The yacht sails on via La Romana

and Ponce, then docks in the colourful, 16thcentury city of San Juan in Puerto Rico.

THE EXCURSIONS There’s an array of shore excursions on offer. In the Dominican Republic, guests can ride horseback across the forested mountains of the Samaná Peninsula to the waterfall of El Limón, and have a swim in the pool at its base. Continue the adventure in San Juan, where you can hike El Yunque to experience Puerto Rico’s natural beauty and then have a surf lesson at one of the area’s best breaks.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Designed by Sven Elverfeld of Aqua, the three Michelin-star restaurant at The RitzCarlton Wolfsburg, menus reflect the cultural traditions of each port visited. Elsewhere on board, you can indulge in a spa treatment or gym workout, read a book in the beautiful Living Room and later watch the sunset in the Observation Lounge. ritzcarlton.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y A L A M Y, G E T T Y

One of the newly launched Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection, Evrima accommodates 298 guests. The superyacht is designed to fuse the residential feel of Ritz-Carlton resorts with the innovative design quality of the world’s most stylish yacht interiors. Guests can expect the kind of luxurious experience found in a Ritz-Carlton hotel. The vessel measures 190m long and features 149 allbalcony suites. The ultra-luxe 102sqm Owner’s Suites have a spacious terrace with a private spa pool overlooking the ocean. Down near sea level is an open-air marina platform offering direct access to the water.


C

RU

SPECIAL

ISING

THE JOURNEY Valletta, Malta, to Athens, Greece, with the SeaDream Yacht Club private cruise line.

THE VESSEL SeaDream II is designed with all the attributes of a classic yacht. Think polished teak, brass detailing and white and blue stripes. It’s like your own private villa at sea. Best is the Owner’s Suite: at 42sqm it has a separate bedroom and bathroom (with tub and massage shower) and a living and dining room area with guest bathroom. Guests can expect Bulgari amenities and Belgian bed linen. In a nod to owner Atle Brynestad’s Norwegian heritage, there are original artworks and glass pieces by well-known Scandinavian artists throughout the yacht.

THE PORTS The 10-day, 112-guest cruise begins in Malta, travels to Sicily and Otranto, then docks in Ksamil in Albania. It’s onwards to Greece, including two days in Hydra, then Spetses and Nafplion, before disembarking in Athens. SeaDream II offers water sports, so when in port guests can choose to frolic in the sea or be led by crew on cycles or hikes to discover more of each destination.

THE EXCURSIONS In Sicily, guests can choose to hike Mt Etna or take part in a feast at the Godfather Villa. On the isle of Spetses, you’ll enjoy views of the whitewashed buildings and seaside cafes by taking a traditional horse-drawn carriage ride along the seashore. The seaport town of Nafplion is not only one of the most beautiful towns in the area of Argolis (in the eastern Peloponnese), it’s also renowned for great wine. The SeaDream adventure offers a wine-tasting adventure here.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Dinner can be enjoyed in the main Dining Salon or under the stars at the Topside Restaurant. After dinner, guests usually gather for drinks at Top of the Yacht Bar or in the Piano Bar. You can even sleep under the stars on Deck 6, where there are beds made up and pyjamas provided. Onboard, there’s also a small swimming pool, hot tub, fitness centre, daily yoga, tai chi classes and more. seadream.com

This page, clockwise from top The SeaDream Yacht Club tour spends two days in bustling Hydra, Greece. Looking across to Mount Etna in Sicily. Cute Popeye Village in Malta, which began life as a film set from the 1980 musical Popeye and is now a theme-park village complete with boat rides and eateries. Bushland towards the base of Mount Etna.

1

TO PACK The Leopard book by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa (1). Gucci watersnaketrimmed embroidered raffia hat (2).

Nadia Shelbaya ‘216 Perle Savage’ pearl and gold hoop earrings (3). Fendi ‘Mon Trésor’ canvas and leather bucket bag (4).

2

3

Stromboli film by Roberto Rossellini (5). Giorgio Armani ‘Crema Nera’ reviving volcanic black gel mask (6).

4

5 6

167


LUXURY EXPEDITION CRUISES Antarctic | Arctic | Greece | Italy | Japan | Kimberley | Baltic SeaNEW An ultra-refined portfolio of luxury polar expeditions and immersive cultural cruises. Every voyage an all-inclusive, unscripted adventure on a state-of-the-art expedition vessel, with award-winning on-board programmes, and out-of-this-world shore excursions. 2020–21 voyages on sale now with early booking discounts on most departures. The best suites and staterooms selling fast. Just released: Antarctica & The Solar Eclipse voyage November 2021 (see below). Other 2021–22 voyages also open for registration of interest.

Talk to your travel agent or call Abercrombie & Kent on 1300 851 800. www.abercrombiekent.com.au

ANTARCTICA & THE SOLAR ECLIPSE NOV 28, 2021

CLASSIC ANTARCTICA DEC 7, 2020; JAN 3, 2021

15 days from $29,685 pp twin

15 days from $20,125 pp twin

ANTARCTICA, SOUTH GEORGIA & THE FALKLAND ISLANDS DEC 17, 2020; JAN 13, 2021 18 days from $25,825 pp twin

ARCTIC CRUISE ADVENTURE: IN SEARCH OF THE POLAR BEAR JUL 31, 2020

NEW! ULTIMATE ICELAND &

GREENLAND CRUISE AUG 13, 2020 15 days from $24,160 pp twin

15 days from $23,895 pp twin

THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE: FROM GREENLAND TO THE BERING SEA AUG 24, 2020

WONDERS OF JAPAN CRUISE JUN 13, 2020 14 days from $23,905 pp twin

24 days from $47,750 pp twin

KIMBERLEY CRUISE: AUSTRALIA’S LAST FRONTIER JUN 25, 2020

NEW! CRUISING THE BALTIC

SEA: COPENHAGEN TO ST PETERSBURG JUL 16, 2020

ITALY CRUISE: HIDDEN TREASURES FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE AUG 22, 2020

15 days from $21,005 pp twin

13 days from $20,280 pp twin

13 days from $18,835 pp twin

CRUISING THE GREEK ISLES SEP 23, 2020 10 days from $16,660 pp twin

The prices shown here include early booking discounts on certain departures. Those discounts are subject to availability and may be withdrawn or reduced at any time. Please see our website for all voyages, up-to-date prices and terms and conditions.


The

EXPEDITION ships

2

TO PACK

Once-in-a-lifetime journeys to lands where the natural world reigns are destined to evolve your explorative and adventure-seeking spirit. THE JOURNEY Antarctica in Depth with Scenic Luxury Cruises & Tours.

1

5

Burberry silk-lined lambskin gloves in Brown (1). Yeti ‘Rambler’ half gallon jug in Stainless Steel (2). Fendi ‘T-Rex’ shearling-lined rubberised-leather boots (3). Globe-Trotter ‘St. Moritz’ vanity case in Navy/Red/ Polished Chrome (4). Moncler cropped houndstooth down jacket (5). 3 4

THE VESSEL

This page, clockwise from top left The Scenic Eclipse sails along the Antarctic Peninsula, offering spectacular views of wildlife and land and seascapes. Helicopter trips offer unique views of ice formations. Guests can take guided trips on land. The yoga room.

The 114-suite (all with verandahs and views) luxury Scenic Eclipse is a game-changer at sea. The ship has been designed with a rating of Ice Class 1A Super, the highest of any luxury vessel, to operate in tricky ice conditions. Scenic Eclipse packs its own submarine and helicopters to discover the polar regions from every angle. From the generous 32sqm Verandah Suites to the tennis court-sized 245sqm two-bedroom Penthouse Suite all feature elegant furnishings, a separate sleep zone and lounge area, and butler service. With a near 1:1 staff-to-guest ratio, attention to detail is paramount. Expect fine toiletries, Egyptian cotton linen and a pillow menu.

THE PORTS The 12-day, 200-person trip flies out from Buenos Aires, Argentina, joining the Scenic Eclipse at Ushuaia. From here, the vessel sails through Drake Passage to the Antarctic Peninsula where six days and nights will be spent gazing at f loating ice towers and incredible wildlife. Wake up to spectacular scenery and ice-filled channels you can explore via Zodiac, helicopter and submarine. Constantly changing weather, landscapes and colours are a photographer’s dream. The trip returns to Buenos Aires via Ushuaia.

170

THE EXCURSIONS Scenic’s experienced Discovery Team leaders use their expertise to design the voyage from day to day, making the most of the 18–20 daylight hours. It might be a Zodiac trip around formations, a kayak around icebergs, or a snowshoe on the ice to view penguins. If weather allows, guests can see it all from above by helicopter – or below. Scenic Eclipse’s submarine Scenic Neptune can seat six chairs mounted on a 280-degree swivelling platform, diving an incredible 300 metres. Every excursion yields a new discovery.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Unlike other expedition ships, there’s a large range of dining options onboard with 10 restaurants, and eight bars and lounges. A popular after-dinner spot is The Whisky Bar, stocked with 110 varieties to enjoy, including single malts such as a 25-year-old Glendullan, or a blend such as Ireland’s Jameson Select Reserve Black Barrel. Looking for a wellness opportunity? Book in for a treatment in the spacious Spa Sanctuary or learn the ancient art of Nordic bathing, dipping in and out of temperature-controlled plunge pools. There’s also a gym and a yoga and Pilates studio. scenic.com.au


C

This page, clockwise from left The Celebrity Flora was custom-built for the Galápagos Islands. Blue-footed boobies breed on Santa Cruz Island. Bartolome Island is a landmark on the Galápagos journey. Pools along the rocky shoreline host flamingo colonies. The area is an important sea lion refuge. Colourful saltbush covers the rocky shoreline.

THE JOURNEY Galápagos seven-night Outer Loop with Celebrity Cruises.

THE VESSEL Francesca Bucci of New York’s BG Studio International was tasked with executing the interior design concept for the 100-guest Celebrity Flora. Highlighting sustainability, regional materials are used throughout. Think natural textures and colours that reflect the area, as well as art inspired by the f lora and fauna of the Galápagos. The standout suites include t he ultra-lu xe Penthouse, the largest sailing the Galápagos Islands, with a verandah that blurs the boundary between inside and out at the touch of a button and which features an outward-facing spa pool and shower.

THE PORTS Celebrity Flora visits 12 ports, sailing from Baltra Island where guests can get up close to the unique wildlife. Highlights include Gardner Bay, home to a major colony of sea lions and a nesting site for sea turtles. There’s also a visit to Floreana, the first capital of the Galápagos, where Charles Darwin met the islands’ Governor. Its small lagoon is often home to flamingos, stilts, and white-cheeked pintail ducks. At Moreno Point, guests will have the chance to see marine iguanas, sea turtles, stingrays, sharks, penguins and the flightless cormorant.

P HOTO G R A P H Y G E T T Y, A L A M Y

1

THE EXCURSIONS For experiences off the ship, guests have the use of snorkelling equipment, wetsuits and excursions led by Galápagos National Park certified naturalists. At South Plaza, a small uplifted island just off the northeast coast of Santa Cruz, naturalists lead guests along the low-lying rocky shoreline covered in scrub, colourful saltbush and giant prickly pear cactus. Here, a subspecies of land iguana is found in abundance and can be spotted grazing on the cactus.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Glamping is offered on the top deck with two inviting, luxurious cabanas, one fitted with a double bed for sleeping, and the other set up for dining. A naturalist will be available to highlight the constellations and stars. Cocktails, wine and campfire-inspired cuisine will be curated for the evening. Wake up to a spectacular sunrise with a full breakfast at your bedside. Guests can also enjoy menus crafted by a Michelin-starred chef, unlimited beverages, wi-fi and room service. celebritycruises.com

2 3

TO PACK

5

Maison Francis Kurkdjian ‘Aqua Universalis’ scented hair mist (1). Stella McCartney cat-eye

dégradé bio-acetate sunglasses in Brown/ Pink (2). Dermalogica ‘Pure Light’ SPF 50 moisturiser (3).

Loewe ‘Postal’ small frog-appliqué leather bag (4). Fendi twill hair band in Brown (5). 4

RU

ISING

SPECIAL


The

RIVER cruiser

The breathtaking escarpment carved by the mighty Yangtze River – the lifeblood of local transportation for more than 2000 years – now forms the backdrop to grand journeys. 172


C

RU

ISING

SPECIAL

This page, clockwise from top left The Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer offers a deluxe experience afloat. Aerial view of the spectacular Three Gorges region. One of the onshore excursions visits giant pandas in a purpose-built nature reserve. Opposite page The peaceful, centuries-old ambience of the fabled Three Gorges region of the Yangtze.

THE JOURNEY Across China: Tibet and the Yangtze with Abercrombie & Kent. The land-based part of the journey, which is limited to 18 guests, starts off with three days in Beijing before heading to Xian for two nights. Then it’s a bullet train ride to Chengdu in the Sichuan province for two nights, followed by Lhasa in the Tibet Autonomous Region. The cruising portion of the trip follows, with the journey finally ending in Shanghai.

P H OTO G R A P H Y A L A M Y, G E T T Y

THE VESSEL A portion of this 17-day luxury small group journey includes three nights sailing on China’s ‘golden river’, the Yangtze, aboard the Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The vessel can accommodate 124 and offers one crew member for each guest – the highest ratio on the river. This makes for an intimate experience with an ambience more like that of an exclusive club than a cruise ship. Designer Premchit Chitrabamrung of Bangkok-based ZenGeo was the mastermind behind the interior fit-out in clean-lined contemporary Chinese style with a soothing colour palette. Taking inspiration from the surrounds, the ‘silver-leaf’ wallpaper designs feature a mudan, or peony, native to the Yangtze area. A rtworks, furniture and cushions were sourced from local markets. There are 38 deluxe cabins and 20 fully serviced luxury suites, all with private balconies and full-height picture windows. Four Celestial and Imperial Suites, top of the line at 110sqm, feature four-poster beds, private sun decks and separate sitting rooms.

THE PORTS For the cruise section of the journey, the vessel departs from Chongqing and travels

downstream to Yichang. Along the way, in the city of Fuling, guests visit the White Crane Ridge Underwater Museum to see centuries-old rock carvings of fish and hydrological inscriptions. Further down the Yangtze, after the vessel navigates the Qutang and Wu gorges, the Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer anchors at Badong, where guests transfer to ‘pea pod’ boats poled by Tujia boatmen and explore a scenic gorge and village.

THE EXCURSIONS As well as a journey to a quieter area of the Great Wall of China, bespoke offerings on this itinerary include a tour with an on-site specialist to view the Terracotta Warriors in Xian. In Chengdu on Day 7, there’s a visit to the Panda Breeding and Research Centre to observe giant pandas roaming in their specially designed habitat. On Days 8 and 9 in Tibet, guests visit the Dalai Lama’s former summer residence at Norbulingka, 4 2

TO PACK

1

Farewell My Concubine film by Kaige Chen (1). Gucci ‘Rhyton’ apple-print leather trainers (2).

Gucci ‘Crystal’ single hair barrette in Pink Resin (3). Salt by Hendrix jade face roller (4). Hermès ‘Garde-Robe

3 Pop’ scarf 90 in Rouge Vif/Noir/Crème (5). Bottega Veneta ‘Arco 29’ small leather bag in Dark Green (6).

5

6

173


RU

ISING

SPECIAL

These pages, clockwise from top left The Potala in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, was the winter palace of the Dalai Lamas from the 17th century. Shanghai is the final port of call where guests can take the opportunity to explore the city. A Jade Suite aboard the luxury Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The famous Terracotta Warriors. The Yangtze River’s Wu Gorge.

then venture to the towering walls of the aweinspiring Potala Palace, the former winter residence of the Dalai Lama. Days 11 to 14 are onboard the river cruiser. Winding up the trip with a f light to the modern metropolis of Shanghai, on the last two days of the journey guests can take the opportunity to see the city’s rising art district on a tour of the West Bund Art Center and check out the Shanghai Museum on a private visit with its curator.

ONBOARD ACTIVITIES Expect to sample f ine cuisine aboard t he Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The Dynasty Dining Room features an east-meets-west menu, with the highlight a traditional Chinese banquet for the farewell dinner. As guests travel along the tranquil waters, they can choose from an array of spa treatments in one of the six treatment rooms or try out the fitness centre. Onboard activities include traditional performances and lectures, morning tai chi sessions, masterclasses in Chinese medicine, as well as lessons in such skills as the ancient art of Chinese calligraphy or dumpling making. abercrombiekent.com.au

174

P H OTO G R A P H Y A L A M Y, G E T T Y

C


PIONEERS OF THE EXTRAORDINARY Handcrafted Private & Small Group Journeys | Luxury Expedition Cruises Born on safari in East Africa in 1962, Abercrombie & Kent has been reinventing luxury travel for more than half a century. Now with 56 offices and more than 2,500 travel experts on the ground around the world, we take the world’s most discerning travellers to the ends of the earth on unforgettable adventures. This is luxury travel redefined – exquisite, creative, courageous and enriching journeys – taking travellers out of their comfort zones, in comfort, to more than 100 countries and all seven continents. See the world in a new light and find yourself somewhere amazing on an A&K private or small group journey or expedition cruise.

Call Abercrombie & Kent on 1300 851 800. www.abercrombiekent.com.au


FROM DENMARK. Miami sofa by Anders Nørgaard displays gentle curves and pillow- like forms. Designed with open and close- ended configurations, modules can be arranged to fit accordingly to your home. The sofa combines visual pleasure and comfort with its elegant expression. Customise with 100+ fabric and leathers to suit your space and style. Shown here with the Philadelphia coffee table, Demand floor lamp and Loom rug. Explore Scandinavian designs for every room. BoConcept offers a coordinated one-stop solution for living, dining, bedroom and outdoors. Ask about our interior design service and let us help you co-create your dream home. View or order a copy of the 2020 catalogue online.

Crows Nest Flagship Store - 575 PaciďŹ c Hwy Tel. (02) 9437 0066 Moore Park - Shop GA03 Moore Park Supa Centa Tel. (02) 9697 2886 www.boconcept.com.au

|

Open 7 days

TO THE WORLD.


M E L B O U R N E

CLOCK THIS

LOUNGE

All-day diner Marameo offers sun, spritzes and salumi in a stylish palette of milky marble, blond timber, tan leather and bottlegreen detailing by Chris Connell Design. marameo.com.au

A QUICK BITE

with M A X S H A R R A D { Partner and head chef at Nido } Favourite food experience? A spectacular meal in a stunning setting at Luke Burgess’s Rocky Tops Farm in Hobart on my honeymoon. First food memory? Mum has a picture of me in the kitchen as a baby and I’ve got a tub of yoghurt in my lap which is smeared all over me and the cabinetry! Favourite restaurant? We’re spoiled for choice with award-winning restaurants in South Australia but my wife Laura (Nido chef Laura Cassai) and I love going to The Summertown Aristologist in the Adelaide Hills for Sunday lunch. Recent projects? Refining and evolving our menu at Nido. What are you looking forward to in 2020? More great achievements for Nido bar and pasta. nidobarpasta.com.au

H O U S T O N

SAUCY SEVENTIES INSPIRED BY ITALIAN IMMIGRANT COOKING, THERE’S A 1970S VIBE AT ROSALIE ITALIAN SOUL (RIGHT) WITH FLORAL ARMCHAIRS AND A FAMILY-STYLE DINING TABLE FOR SHARING BIG BAKED PASTAS AND RED-SAUCE DISHES. ROSALIEITALIANSOUL.COM

Venues that please the palate. TWEETIE PIE Eat, boogie and drink at the multi-level, New Orleans-inspired Canary Club (right). Designed by Emily Frantz in a citrus, mint and pomegranate palette, the menu channels Cajun fare. canaryclubnyc.com

PA R I S

FA I R T R A D E A former afro wig shop, L’Avant-Poste (above) is a light-filled, country-style restaurant in Paris that champions a short supply chain, sustainability and seasonal produce sourced from farmers. lavantposteparis.fr

P HOTO G R A P H Y K R I STOF F E R PAU LS E N ( M A R A M EO ), J U L I E SOE F E R ( ROS A L I E )

On the pass M A N H AT TA N

MULTI TASKER Belgian fashion designer and moody minimalist Ann Demeulemeester has translated her aesthetic into Serax tableware (above). serax.com

TALKING POINTS

H O N G

KO N G

S I LV E R S E RV I C E C O O K’ S B I B L E

J UST L A N D E D

BURIED TREASURE

The famed Italian recipe book has been re-issued. au.phaidon.com

Discover Mexican homewares curated for Australian tastes. cactacea.com.au

Chivas presents a unique selection of rare malts. chivasbrothers.com

Asia’s first Tiffany’s Blue Box cafe has been designed in the jeweller’s signature robin’s egg blue. Located in the Tsim Sha Tsui store, everything is served on the brand’s dinnerware. international.tiffany.com

<< S W E E T B U N C H HAND-CAST GLASS FRUIT CREATED BY DEVYN ORMSBY IN AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND, COME IN A RAINBOW OF DELICIOUSLY JUICY COLOURS, INCLUDING PALE COBALT, LIME, PINK AND YELLOW. DEVONMADEGLASS.COM

Edited by C ARLI PHILIPS

177


the taste of summer

SYD THE ROCKS | MANLY | DOUBLE BAY MELB FLINDERS LN | HAMER HALL BRIS EAGLE ST PIER GOOD FOOD GUIDE AWARDS 1 CHEF HAT • WORLD OF FINE WINE WORLD’S BEST SAKE LIST RESTAURANT & BAR DESIGN AWARDS WINNER • GOURMET TRAVELLER WINE AWARDS 3 GLASSES

sakerestaurant.com.au


PA S S P O RT

V E N I C E

OPPOSITES ATTRACT N E W

YO R K

Dorothée Meilichzon has blended terrazzo, Gothic windows and dramatic marble with playful berry, limoncello and peach hues at Hotel Il Palazzo Experimental on Venice’s Grand Canal. palazzoexperimental.com

RETRO ACTIVE A S H O RT STAY

with BETTY WONG

P HOTO G R A P H Y K A R E L B A L A S ( HOT E L I I PA L A Z ZO ), R E A D MC K E N DR E E ( WA L K E R HOT E L ), C H R I ST I A N HOR A N ( FO U R S E A S O N S )

{ Divisional vice president inflight services and design, Singapore Airlines } Favourite hotel? I like to try different places [but] I especially love exploring Japan and the ryokans. My favourite is in beautiful Takayama and I first visited about four years ago and was impressed with the food, quality of service and the people who made me feel so special. Destination highlights? Our family holidays have a theme which helps us decide on the destination. Experiencing food and shopping is one of my favourites. I make a list of restaurants and pre-book. If I want to relax, I find a resort. Travel must-have? A long black cardigan: it can be worn to dress up more casual clothing. Favourite design piece collected abroad? We purchased a painting, now hanging in our living room, from an unknown artist in Bali years ago who has become really well known. Your ultimate destination in 2020? I’ve always wanted to see the northern lights and hope to make it a reality! singaporeair.com

Housed in a former button factory, the new Walker hotel (right) is kitted out in modernist furniture from Pierre Jeanneret and Osvaldo Borsani. Take time out from Tribeca with a drink in the library. walkerhotels.com

FREE WHEELER Italian craftsmanship meets cutting-edge design on the Aviteur carry-on (right) in hand-stitched, woven leather. aviteur.com L O S

A N G E L E S

MEGA MIX California renaissance revival meets Mexican colours, boho textiles and emerging artists in Kelly Wearstler’s avant-garde interiors for Proper Hotel in Downtown LA. properhotel.com

Departing ways

Pack it all in and take off in high style. SY D N E Y

UNDER THE BRIDGE LOCATED IN AN HISTORIC WHARF ON SYDNEY HARBOUR, A STONE’S THROW FROM THE BRIDGE, NEWLY REFURBISHED PIER ONE HOTEL (LEFT) INVITES GUESTS TO LUXURIATE IN STYLE. PIERONESYDNEY HARBOUR.COM.AU C O STA

PA L M A S

TALKING POINTS

E A SY BREEZY On Baja’s beachfront, the Four Seasons Costa Palmas is ultra luxe while still embracing a deep connection to the laidback local culture. Plunge into your private pool post-18 holes of golf. fourseasons.com

S E A H AI R

TA K E A H I K E

O C E A N F RO N T

Simply spray on to conjure beachy waves for summer days. mecca.com.au

Marc Newson kicked in design nous for the new ‘Yard Boot 365’. rmwilliams.com.au

Dry off after holiday dips with Tekla’s beach towels. teklafabrics.com

<< FRENCH SPRITZ COMBINE 30ML ST-GERMAIN LIQUEUR, 60ML SPARKLING ROSÉ, 60ML SODA WATER AND 10ML FRESH LEMON JUICE OVER ICE IN A COLLINS GLASS. STIR GENTLY, GARNISH WITH A LEMON TWIST. STGERMAIN.FR Edited by C ARLI PHILIPS

179


Discover a world of folklore and fantasy

Exclusive to Sydney Art Gallery of New South Wales Until 8 March artgallery.nsw.gov.au

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi Picture of the earth spider monster mentally tormenting Sakata Kintoki and others during the night guard in the chambers of Minamoto no Yorimitsu in the fall of 976 1886 (detail). Minneapolis Institute of Art. The Mary Griggs Burke Endowment Fund established by the Mary Livingston Griggs and Mary Griggs Burke Foundation, gifts of various donors, by exchange, and gift of Edmond Freis in memory of his parents, Rose and Leon Freis Photo: Minneapolis Institute of Art


ON THE TOWN 1, 8 Guests mingled in the new Armadillo & Co. showroom designed by David Goss 2 James Watts, Miffy Coady 3 Jodie Fried, Sally Pottharst 4 Michelle McEwen, Belle editor Gavin Kirk, Tanya Buchanan, Owen Lynch 5 Brendan Guy 6 Jess Stephens, Mary Andrew, Caroline Edwards 7 Jodie Fried, Lisa Cooper, Phillippa Carnemolla 9 James McGregor 10 Annie Bowen 11 Alix Helps 12 Andrew Kirk, David Goss, Hamish Collins

2

5

1

6

3 7

4

A R M A D I L LO & C O. A N N I V E R S A RY Armadillo & Co. showroom, Surry Hills, NSW 8

9

10

11

Design of the times We were floored by rugs, seduced by scents and illuminated by international designers.

12

W HO WOU L D H AVE T HOUG H T a rug party – or two – could be such a hoot? Australian label Armadillo & Co. celebrated its tenth anniversary and launched the new David Goss-designed Sydney showroom with an event that saw guests kick off their shoes for an evening of barefoot luxury. Greg Natale debuted his new rug range, in partnership with Designer Rugs, at a packed-out party at Sydney’s Chin Chin. Ecoya welcomed the summer season with a sunset soiree, Dylan Farrell showed his furniture and lighting collection, now available at Est Lighting, while our friends at Parisi and VBO hosted evening celebrations with designers Prospero Rasulo and Mario Nanni respectively.

D E S I G N E R RU G S X G R E G N ATA L E

14

13

13 Greg Natale, Gavin Kirk 14 Designer Rugs’ Yosi Tal, Eli Tal and Rami Tal 15 The large gathering included friends and industry colleagues 16 ‘Dunand’ rug 17 ‘Després’ rug 18 ‘Erté’ rug on display among pieces from Cult and Ke-Zu

P H OTO G R A P H Y E S T E B A N L A T E S S A 9 A R M A D I L LO & C O . )

Chin Chin, Surry Hills, NSW

16 15

17

18

181


ON THE TOWN

20

28

21

27 19 29 22 23 30

25

24 31

26

E C O YA S O I R E E Vaucluse Yacht Club, NSW

32

D Y L A N FA R R E L L D E S I G N O N D I S P L AY

33 35

Est Lighting, Surry Hills, NSW

MARIO NANNI VISIT

34

VBO showroom, Chippendale, NSW

39 38 36

PA R I S I PA RT Y Parisi showroom, Silverwater, NSW

182

40 P H OTO G R A P H Y F ION A SU S A N TO ( V B O, E ST L IG H T I NG )

37

19, 26 Guests imbibed cocktails among festive vignettes 20 Claire Barnes 21 Daniel Kurlapski, Sara De Clercq 22 Renae Ayris 23 Tahnee Atkinson 24 Belinda Liana 25 Lissa Dragomir 27, 30 Dylan Farrell Design pieces on show 28 Gavin Kirk, Dylan Farrell, Nicolette Farrell, Cathryn Zhang, Harry Roberts 29 Jase Shepherd, Vicki Robertson 31 Michelle Patterson, Scott Koopman 32 Simon Cormack, Georgia Hawkins 33 Parisi showroom 34 Franco Parisi, Natasha Rivett 35 Jennifer Mapletop, Leanne Russo 36 Prospero Rasulo 37 Gianmarco Baccini, Len Nucifora, Francesco Piazza 38 Steven Isherwood, Michel Goupy, John Bechini 39 Mario Nanni of Viabizzuno 40 The crowd enjoyed a presentation from Mario Nanni


B E L L E P R OM O T I O N

B E L L E P R O M O T IO N

BUYERS’ MARKET When it comes to updating your home and lifestyle, only the best will do – so here’s a round-up of the latest and greatest products out there

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 AGA AUSTRALIA The Aga ‘TC3’ packs in three renowned cast-iron ovens known for retaining their moisture, plus providing roasting, simmering and baking functions. Easily programmable with both oven and hot plate heat distribution. RRP $23,198. agaaustralia.com.au 2 BO CONCEPT Indivi’s openend design creates a dynamic and welcoming atmosphere. Its elegantly defined silhouette makes it a timeless classic, and easily integrated for areas of open-plan living. RRP $6989. boconcept.com 3 CULT The Ocean Collection is a reimagined table-and-chair collection made from ocean waste and recycled plastic. Combining innovative solutions to prevent ocean pollution with one of the 20th century’s most renowned designers, Nanna Ditzel, this 1955 design is characterised by its light structure and is made and tested for outdoor use. From RRP $410. cultdesign.com.au 4 DOMUS Defined by its rectangular frame, the ‘Sherwood’ lantern takes its inspiration from nature with the distinctive sculpted leaves and randomly pitted metalwork. In white or brass. POA. domustextiles.com.au 5 FAUCET STROMMEN The Caspian Hampton residences showcase the Pegasi ‘M’ sink mixer curve with pull-out hose for increased performance at the sink. Antique brass finish for added beauty. RRP $1140. faucetstrommen.com.au 6 GREGORY CROXFORD Belgrave collection by Armac Martin is an elegant design, upholding classic imperial tones yet soft in detail. Pictured in a beautiful hand-polished burnished brass finish. RRP $230. gregorycroxfordliving.com.au 7 HARVEY NORMAN The Samsung 825L ‘Family Hub French Door’ refrigerator in black steel finish, isn’t just smarter than your average fridge, it could be the smartest internet connected device in the house. RRP $7499. hn.com.au 8 HARVEY NORMAN The ‘Rodeo’ outdoor dining chair has aluminium legs for stability, a plush foam cushion makes for extra comfort and a rope back ensures support, making this chair ideal for reading in the sun. RRP $199. hn.com.au 9 JOANNE GREEN Create your perfect outdoor sanctuary with Joanne Green Landscape & Interior. Blending style with function, constructed with quality and seamlessly completed, they design and build beautiful spaces for you to live in. joannegreen.com.au


LUXE Edit H O M ES, I N T ER I O R S, D E S I G N & A RT

Dee Jackson

A stage for life Private Residence in Armadale featuring Sesame ďŹ&#x201A;oors

Photo: Lillie Thompson

Designed by Thomas Robinson Architects

Australian artist, Dee Jackson, creates beautiful watercolour portraits. Commissions welcome.

Dee Jackson T: 02 9416 2265 | M: 0439 986 452 E: deejackson@deejackson.com.au www.deejackson.com.au

Ercol Marino Chair and Footstool in Cognac leather.

madebystorey.co

TO ADVERTISE CALL 02 9282 8369

@madebystorey

For retail and trade enquiries contact the Australian distributor of ercol at temperaturedesign.com.au (61) 3 9419 1447 @temperaturedesign


LUXE Edit H O M ES, I NTER I O R S, D E S I G N & A RT

HEGI DE SIGN STRIVES TO INFUSE STYLISHNESS INTO EVERY PIECE BECAUSE MINIMALISM IS HARD TO FIND.

More than just a side table, Dakota is a tech integrated designer piece.

W W W. H E G I D E S I G N H O U S E .CO M

ANNETTE GOLDENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S detailed and meticulous paintings are highly sought after by discerning corporate and private collectors. Inspired by nature and mythology, her practice draws on classical themes re-envisioned into a contemporary iconography. To view more of her original works and prints, see www.annettegoldenart.com, or contact her directly on info@annettegoldenart.com

Exclusive BELLE magazine offer Save $100 by using discount code BELLE at checkout at www.chapmantradingco.com.au Offer ends 28/02/20. Not available with any other offer

WWW.CHAPMANTRADINGCO.COM.AU TRADE ENQUIRIES WELCOME SUPPORT@CHAPMANTRADINGCO.COM.AU

ENTER THE WORLD OF RICHARD MISHAAN The acclaimed New York designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exclusive aesthetic now available from

Rich fusion of East and West in the lacquered, handpainted and gilded Han Decorative Chest. SELECTIONS FROM THE RICHARD MISHAAN COLLECTION IN STORE MID-FEBRUARY %*,#!).,$$.'$0!)#,%!2    -!'$-'!/,!&%)"!#$"*(2+$)*)#!1.*!./,#!1!(.* +(

www.laurakincade.com www.homestolove.com.au/directory


THE OFFICE

H O W WO U LD YO U D E S CR I B E YO U R S T U D I O?

Our studio is an ever-evolving creative platform. It is constantly adapted to showcase our collaborations. I love that this allows my creative world to be visualised instantly and often. W H AT I N I T I A L LY A P P E A L E D T O YO U AB OUT THE SPACE? The greatest appeal was, and continues to be, the sense of community in and around the courtyard that we share with Woollahra locals. More like a small piazza, the space oozes st yle and is reminiscent of our trips to Milan. WH AT ARE YO U R D E S K E S S EN T I A L S? I love to layer my desk space: it must be full of creative pieces, aesthetic beauty, a little glamour and references to architectural and design icons to inspire me. My desk is also laden with the latest perfumes, bespoke designer candles

and, of course, a vase with fresh roses, gardenias or other intensely beautiful smelling flowers. W H AT I S U N I Q U E A B O U T YOUR SPACE? It’s unique in layers of thought. I find it interesting to see how people feel when they are in the space, how they are received, how they work and how they enjoy it. I grew up always changing spaces around – adding, collecting, adapting. I think what we do with our projects is give our clients the freedom of design – real design is like giving a golden key to unlock the doors to a world of understanding how to live with  a better sense of your space. It’s not just pretty objects. It’s about how spatial creativity, together with well thought-out textures, tones and object placements, can lead not only to a better layout in your home, but to

a complete change in mental wellness and response to life. I F YO U R S T U D I O W E R E LO C AT ED A N Y W H ER E EL S E , W H ER E WO U LD

Athens or Istanbul. Both cities have such a unique sense of style and understanding of design. W H AT PROJ EC TS A R E YO U L O O K I N G F O R WA R D T O? We’re opening an office in Singapore by mid-year and have three new residential projects that will show the studio in a different light. We’re also working on the creation of the new Olsen Gallery, which is exciting for me, and designing yachts for Longreef Yachts which I f ind challenging and inspiring. We’ve only ever worked on a decorative level; now we will get to dive deeper into more of an architectural style. infinitedesignstudio.com.au T H AT B E ?

THE BBQ, 2010-2017, BY JOHN OLSEN (RIGHT). ON THE TABLE ARE THREE PIECES BY YASUHISA KOHYAMA, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: SLICE OF EARTH MITTAGONG V, 2004, WIND IN MITTAGONG IV, 2004, AND HOMURA, 2014.

Michelle Macarounas

Future thinking The interior designer is reaching for new boundaries from her Sydney studio. Photography KRISTINA SOLJO

186


Profile for Verano22

Jukjhyk  

Jukjhyk  

Profile for verano22
Advertisement