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ISSUE 33 | MARCH/APRIL 2016


VegWorld Magazine

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CONTENTS VegWorld Magazine - March/April 2016

THE FUN SIDE OF VEGGIE LIVING 8 Vegan Hot Sheet 16 Events Calendar 18 VegWorldly Wanderings 23 Infograph of the Month

The genius team behind America’s new meat free butcher shop. See page 9.

FAMILY AND LIFESTYLE 25 That Moment When 27 Vegan 101 30 Healthy Family 34 True Beauty Love. lust, libido and the science you need to know to keep the juices flowing on page 63.

FEATURES 39 Beer’s Dark Secrets 42 Michael Greger, M.D., Critical Thinker 51 Meet Veestro’s Monica Klausner

NUTRITION AND THRIVING 55 Food as Medicine 57 SOS Free Living with Chef AJ 60 The Power of Motion 63 Well Woman Way What non-vegan suprises can be found lurking in beer? What to look for and how to avoid them on page 39.

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CONTENTS VegWorld Magazine - March/April 2016

FRESH FINDS 67 Loves & Wants 70 Between The Pages 72 Movie Reviews 74 Prowling Europe’s Restaurants

JUICE GURU 82 How to make a Lucrative Income as a Juicing Coach

RECIPES FOR FOODIES 83 Double Chocolate Cherry Truffles 84 Southwest Roasted Asparagus and Corn 86 Coconut Caramel Corn

Steve and Julie Prussack have a new book out and a new business opportunity for juice fans. See page 82 for details.

REGULAR FEATURES 5 Credits 6 Editor’s Note 87 Love, Lori

Fresh sparagus is one of the first green miracles of spring. Enjoy a delicious rendition by Mark Reinfield on page 84.

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CREDITS VegWorld staff

Publisher Edward N. Smith III Editor-in-Chief Amanda C. Smith Graphic design Lise-Mari Coetzee Associate editor Lori Fryd Associate editor Robin D. Everson

Contributors

Tess Challis

Chef A.J.

Linda Carney MD

Andrea Denton

Steve Prussack

Robin D. Everson

Lori Fryd

Michael Greger, MD

Sharon McRae

Karen Ranzi

Lani Muelrath

Mark Reinfeld VegWorld Magazine

Hannah Sentenac

John Pierre

Robin Tierney Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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EDITOR´S NOTE T

he month of March has almost passed us by and many of you are probably wondering why this issue is so late. There are a number of reasons, but chief among them is that preparations for the Marshall, Texas HealthFest have taken a substantial amount of our time.

om A message fr the Editor of zine, a g a M ld r o W g Ve h Amanda Smit

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his event has grown far beyond our wildest expectations. When we started with the idea of bringing the top plant-based experts in the world to our little Texas town, we never dreamed that it would evolve into what is has become today. It is a lot of work and every year we say maybe next year we will take a break from it, but we never do, because the incredible feedback that we get makes it all worth it. The HealthFest truly changes lives.

N

o endeavor we have ever been a part of has made such a difference to so many people. That is why we continue on and that is why we have no plans to stop. That is also why we acquired VegWorld Magazine. With it, we hope to create positive change in the lives of many, just as Dr. Michael Greger has done. We are proud to have Dr. Greger as our keynote speaker for this year’s HealthFest. He is also the subject of our feature story in this month’s issue of VegWorld. Right now, Dr. Greger’s book, How Not To Die, is a fixture on various bestseller lists - and it should be. It’s a book that can change lives from a man who is changing the world.

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lease forgive us for the late arrival of this issue. We hope that, like Spring itself, you will find that it has been worth waiting for! Enjoy and, as always, we welcome your feedback. Please don’t hesitate to contact us using the links below.

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hank you for joining us on this remarkable journey of education and wellness. It is our hope that we will continue to learn and grow together toward a better future for all of us and for generations of people still to come.

Amanda Smith Editor-in-Chief VegWorld Magazine

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FINALLY

A magazine that does for compassion what GQ does for fashion. compassionateman.com tap here for Apple VegWorld Magazine

tap here for Android Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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Vegan Hot Sheet Latest Vegan & Plant Based Buzz VEGAN GOOGLE SEARCHES CLIMB 32% FROM 2014 TO 2015

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eganism is growing in popularity, and Google holds the proof. According to the Internet giant, search interest in the term “vegan” increased 32 percent in the U.S. from 2014 to 2015.

A lot of big stories came out of the plant-based world in 2015 — from pop singer Beyonce’s vegan announcement to Ben & Jerry’s upcoming almond milk ice cream. As a term and a lifestyle, “vegan” is more mainstream than ever. As far as vegan Google searches as a genre, the search engine’s team also provided the following (revealing) info to Latest Vegan News about 2015 trends:

Top questions on “vegan”: What is a vegan?

How to go vegan?

What do vegans eat?

Is bread vegan?

What is vegan leather?

What can vegans eat?

Is honey vegan?

Is peanut butter vegan?

What is a vegan diet?

What is the difference between vegan and vegetarian?

Considering that there are 1.17 billion Google users worldwide (ONE SEVENTH of the earth’s population), there’s a lot of insight to be gleaned from vegan Google searches. Conclusion drawn from last year’s data: veganism has hit the big time.

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VEGAN HOT SHEET

FIRST-EVER

VEGAN BUTCHER SHOP

OPENS IN MINNEAPOLIS

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ove over Boar’s Head and Oscar Meyer — there’s a new meat-maker in town, and they’re not hurting any animals in the process. The Herbivorous Butcher, the world’s first-ever vegan butcher shop, is now open in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Founded by brother-sister duo Aubry and Kale Walch, the shop saw lines outside the door and down the sidewalk for its grand opening weekend. The Walches created a wildly successful Kickstarter fundraising campaign in 2014 with the idea, and raised more than $61,000 to make it happen. On the menu are items like Italian sausage, smoky house BBQ ribs, pepperoni, deli bologna, and much more. The shop will also be selling items online including a vegan starter kit, and a vegan jerky sampler. The shop is open at 507 1st Ave NE in Minneapolis, Minnesota, so those in the area can stock up on compassionate cuisine.

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET

FREE PROGRAM HELPS PEOPLE GO VEGAN BY MATCHING THEM WITH MENTORS

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now someone who needs a leg up to make veganism happen? Most of us do: that wellintentioned co-worker who can’t keep away from the local burger joint or fast food restaurant; that curious aunt who’s always asking about your diet; that college roommate who lives on ramen. Helping people go vegan is what Vegan Outreach’s Vegan Mentor Program is about. Basically, a prospective vegan can sign up and almost immediately be matched with a mentor via email. This person will help with anything and everything — from grocery store shopping to answering common questions. The program is 100% free, and as far as mentees, it’s open to anyone looking to live a more veg-friendly lifestyle. To become a mentor, there are a couple of criteria. “Being vegan is one of the implied criteria,” Jack Norris, executive director of Vegan Outreach, told Latest

Vegan News. “Beyond that, it’s mostly a matter of hooking people up with others who are compatible. We tend to weed out people who push a restricted version of a vegan diet–we don’t want mentors telling our mentees they should avoid all processed or cooked foods. We also emphasize that the mentorship is not for giving or receiving medical advice.” While the program originally launched in 2014, it’s undergone some improvements and revisions since then. Now, any mentee who signs up will be matched to a mentor within 24 hours. As far as the program’s size: “The sky’s the limit! We currently have 700 mentees and 300 active mentors. We’d love to have thousands rather than hundreds,” says Norris. Visit veganoutreach.org/vegan-mentorship-program for more info or to sign up.

FORMER BURGER KING CHAIR

ON VEG FOOD: ‘THE

CONSUMER HAS BEEN AHEAD OF THE MARKETPLACE’

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rian Swette’s career was as corporate as it comes. From Procter & Gamble to PepsiCo to eBay to Burger King, he did executive-level stints at some of the world’s biggest and most powerful organizations. Now, Swette is president of Sweet Earth Foods, a veg food company based out of Moss Landing,

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET California. The brand, which he and his wife, Kel-

think about how big a distributed system is -- every

ly, launched in 2011, makes vegan and vegetarian

part of a supply chain from crops being grown to

products like Benevolent Bacon, Chipotle-Style Sei-

how you dispose of food at a restaurant and every-

tan, and a Get Cultured! probiotic breakfast burrito.

thing in between. The systems don’t adapt as quickly.”

With the recent news about McDonald’s CEO taking a spot on the board of Beyond Meat, it’s easy to say

Overall, Swette feels that the industry needs to catch

Swette started the trend. Rather than just join an-

up with the consumer. Considering that Sweet Earth

other company, however, he started his own.

doubled its sales in 2015 (and is looking to double again in 2016), the company is meeting consumer

From his unique experience at the highest levels of

demand.

the consumer goods industry, he was able to understand the problems with industrialized food produc-

“There’s so much resistance to change. I would say

tion.

that the consumer has been ahead of the marketplace. It is so clear that the market has been chang-

“I came to understand how much the making of and

ing. We’ve been going through a food revolution for

everything about food was so primary to the health

15 years but it’s getting to critical mass.”

of the planet,” he explains. “It was like a big epiphany that land, water, energy -- you name it -- were all

Considering the rise of non-dairy products, meat

linked to our agricultural processes which were a

substitutes, and vegan and vegetarian fast food,

result of what we ate. I understood that this was not

the numbers back Swette’s assertions. People want

a good thing that we’re doing.”

healthier, more sustainable options.

Swette understands the historical context that led to

Sweet Earth’s innovations will continue in the years

today’s system. “I’m not one of these people that’s

to come, Swette says.

holier than thou. In the ‘70s when I was growing up we were afraid people were going to starve -- that

“We’re going to continue to make our products ac-

there would be mass starvation,” he says. “Unfortu-

cessible on a national level. We’re going to try to

nately we course corrected a little too well and we

make them more affordable; if you can make the

created this industrial food that’s not so hot. It’s just

plant-based proteins less than the animal proteins,

really, really wrong.”

that’s an advantage.”

He’s quick to say that he worked with some won-

With Sweet Earth products now in approximately

derful people in his years with major corporations.

10,000 retail locations (including reasonably priced

It’s the system and the culture -- more than the peo-

chains like Walmart, Target, Albertson’s, and Kroger),

ple -- that are the problem, he says.

the company is on its way.

“Culture doesn’t move that quickly, food habits don’t

“We’re an enabler for people to make better choices.

change that quickly. And food systems, when you

Our mission is to make this a part of everyone’s life.”

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET

PORTLAND, OREGON

IS TOP CITY FOR VEGAN SEARCHES

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or the most part, bigger cities tend to be friendlier places for plant-based eaters — but just because a city is large in stature doesn’t mean it dominates the vegan scene. In 2015, the United States city that searched “vegan” the most is on the smaller side.

According to Google, Portland, Oregon tops its list for 2015, and the progressive metropolis is followed by Seattle, Wash., and Los Angeles, Calif. Check out the full list below:

Top cities searching for “vegan”:

Top states searching for “vegan”:

• Portland, OR

• California

• Seattle, WA

• Washington

• Los Angeles, CA

• Hawaii

• San Francisco, CA

• Maine

• San Diego, CA

• Nevada

• Honolulu, HI

• District of Columbia

• Austin, TX

• New York

• Boston, MA

• New Hampshire

• Fresno, CA

• Massachusetts

• Denver, CO

• Colorado

Looking at this info, it’s clear that California and Oregon are where it’s at for vegans. Who’s up for a holiday?

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET

RESEARCH SUGGESTS 36%

OF AMERICANS OPEN TO PLANT-BASED EATING

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eganism is on the rise. While most people have seen anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon—more products in the supermarket, more coverage in the media—the research supports it. Not only are more people open to eating less meat and more plants, but it looks like perceptions about the vegan lifestyle are changing … for the better. Last year, the Nutrition Business Journal released its 2015 Special Diets Report. It outlined many of the different dietary segments in the U.S. and yielded some interesting statistics about veganism and its increasing relevance in the marketplace. Eric Pierce, Director of Strategy & Insights, NEXT Trend, helped create the report, and he believes there’s been a definite shift in the perception of a vegan lifestyle.

Clearly, people are starting to hear about the health factors involved. While Pierce and his team don’t have comparative data from 10 years ago, he thinks these numbers demonstrate a shift. He attributes this change partly to the widespread availability of information. Netflix streaming of documentaries, people like Michael Pollan talking about eating more plants, Beyonce and her 22 days of veganism—these are powerful cultural factors. Additionally, the number of vegans or vegan friendly people in the population may be far greater than is generally assumed.

“I think, what I see from doing some brief consumer surveys, is generally a changing in the perception or the stereotype of vegans,” Pierce told Latest Vegan News. For example, when Pierce and his team asked general U.S. market consumers what they associate with a vegan diet, 35 percent said healthy/health food. Following that, 23 percent said animal welfare, 13 percent said cleaner ingredients, 12 percent said weight loss, 11 percent said environmental responsibility and 8 percent said social responsibility. This flies in the face of the traditional stereotype that saw vegans solely as aggressive animal activists. VegWorld Magazine

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET “If you ask consumers to self-define their dietary preferences, I’ve actually found among the general population of U.S. consumers about six percent will say they’re vegan and about seven percent will say they’re vegetarian,” Pierce explains. “What’s really exciting is that there’s this bucket of flexitarians or lessitarians or pescetarians or just consumers who wouldn’t identify with any of those terms who would say ‘I’m choosing to eat less meat,’ and what I’ve found in again, a brief survey, is that about 26 percent of the U.S. population has said they’ve consciously chosen to eat less meat in the last 12 months.” These answers came in response to the question, “Which of the following diets, if any, do you adhere to?” Add those numbers up, and you get between 36 and 39 percent of the population that’s interested in reducing (if not eliminating) its meat and dairy consumption. Similar numbers apply to dairy, with around 36% of consumers in 2014 saying they prefer milk alternatives to regular milk (and non-dairy milk sales have skyrocketed). That means that more than one-third of the population is interested in plant-based eating—numbers that large represent a significant segment for retail-

VegWorld Magazine

ers. “36 percent of consumers are looking for dietary changes that help them consume less meat—or none of it, depending on the point of view,” he explains. “What I see there is major opportunity, and in some ways an underdeveloped market, possibly.” Hear that, companies? People want their plants.

Some other key highlights from the report include: • If a company does opt to make vegan/vegetarian consumers its niche, it should target the products and marketing efforts toward millennials. Unlike baby boomers, who have all but given up on eschewing meat, 9 percent of the 30-something crowd is vegetarian. • A consensus is forming among industry observers and insiders that for vegan products to be adopted by more consumers, “plant based” is far preferable to “vegan” as a label term. • The vegan product category is expected to grow at an average rate of 13.4 percent thorough 2020. A major driver of that growth will be products developed not just for vegans specifically but for other specialty diets that overlap with vegan—extending even into the meat-heavy paleo realm.

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VEGWORLD HOT SHEET

VEGAN HALF

AND HALF ALTERNATIVE HITS STORES

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here’s no shortage of dairy-free coffee creamers on the market, but most are heavy on the sugar and some rely on artificial flavors. For consumers looking for a cleaner addition to their morning joe, Califia Farms’ new vegan half and half has arrived.

Dubbed Better Half, the new creamer is made with coconut and almond cream — no dairy, soy, GMOs, gluten, trans-fat, carrageenan or excess sugar. The vegan half and half comes in original and unsweetened (20 and 15 calories per serving, respectively), and is initially available only through Whole Foods. After the test period ends in summer 2016, it’ll be available at other retailers nationwide. “Our mission is to treat your coffee kindly, and with Better Half, folks can enjoy this delicious coconut and almond creamer, minus the excess sugars, artificial chemicals, and ‘bad-for-you’ hydrogenated oils found in traditional Half & Half products,” says Califia’s Kaitlin Barton. “Plus, in tune with the evolving health-conscious American palette that prefers less sugar, we wanted to provide an innovative option with an unsweetened version containing 0 grams of sugar. All in all, Better Half represents the ultimate upgrade in a category that has steadily ignored the needs of today’s consumers.” The company also reformulated its line of Almondmilk Creamers, which also includes unsweetened options. So when will you be able to find Better Half in coffee shops? “Our foodservice sales team is currently introducing this product to coffee shops, restaurants, and universities, as well as our Barista Blend and other vegan Creamer products – we’re revolutionizing the coffee experience one drink at a time.”

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VEGWORLD EVENTS CALENDAR

VEGWORLD EVENTS CALENDAR Looking for the most exciting, fun, inspiring, and informative vegan events worldwide? Here they are! If you have an event coming up, let us know by sending the details to editor@vegworldmag.com HealthFest 2016 April 1 - 3, 2016 Marshall, TX Texas VegFest Apr 2, 2016 Austin, TX Veggie World - Festival Apr 2 – 3, 2016 Paris, France

Las Vegas VegFest April 9, 2016 Los Vegas, Nevada New York City Green Festival April 15 – 17, 2016 New York, NY Berkeley Vegan Earth Day April 17, 2016 Berkeley, California

Nashville VegFest April 9, 2016 Nashville, Tennessee

Red and Green VegFest Albuquerque 2016 April 23, 2016 Albuquerque, New Mexico

Seattle VegFest April 9 & 10, 2016 Seattle, WA

VegMichigan April 24, 2016 Novi, Michigan

VegWorld Magazine

New Forest Vegan Fair April 30, 2016 Lyndhurst, Hampshire, England New York City Vegetarian Food Festival May 7 & 8, 2016 New York City Cleveland VegFest May 7th, 2016 Cleveland, Ohio Veggie Fest Hamilton May 14, 2016 Hamilton, ON, Canada VegFest UK Bristol May 22 & 22, 2016 Bristol, England

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VEGWORLDLY WANDERINGS

Downtown Skyline_Photo Credit - Dr Bill Carson

AHOY, MATEY! TAMPA’S A HOT SPOT FOR

PIRATES, MANATEES AND VEG FOODIES Story (and some photos) by Robin Tierney

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he sunrises and sunsets rock, but my favorite Florida sights are manatees. These large gentle mammals, also called sea cows, are herbivores who feed on aquatic plants. The average adult is approximately 10 feet long and 1,200 pounds. They reside in shallow rivers, bays, springs, estuaries, coastal waters -- and, when temperatures drop, in power companies’ discharge canals. Between early November and mid-April, large numbers of manatees frequent the canal at Tampa Electric’s Big Bend power station, which takes saltwater from Tampa Bay. When the bay dips below 68 de-

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VEGWORLDLY WANDERINGS grees, manatees take refuge in places like this. After TECO’s Manatee Viewing Center opened in 1986, the canal became a state and federally designated manatee sanctuary.

walk, a 2.4-mile path linking downtown attractions such as: • Cotanchobee Fort Brooke Park. Playground, bay views and the setting for spring International Dragon Boat races and Tampa Veg Fest, presented by Florida Voices for Animals. The 7th annual Veg Fest is November 12, 2016. • Other green spaces such as Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park, Kiley Gardens and Water Works Park. • Tampa Bay History Center, Tampa Museum of Art, Glazer Children’s Museum and other fabulous cultural centers. • Paddling, electric boats and water-bikes as well as Coast Bike Share stations. • Bronze busts portray historic figures such as Henry B. Plant, whose trains and steamers made Tampa Bay a huge commercial hub. Colorful new trolley car sculptures salute local organizations.

The free-admission center, a few miles south of downtown off the Tamiami Trail, features boardwalks and a ½-mile Tidal Walk perfect for viewing the manatees in a channel bounded by native habitat and the power plant. The education center is full of great displays and activities for all ages. A butterfly garden attracts Monarchs and a nature walk leads to a 50-foot-tall observation tower. My timing was fortunate: spinner sharks, who coexist peaceably with manatees, performed corkscrew air-jumps, and a team of marine biologists and Save The Manatee volunteers released four rescuedand-rehabbed young manatees into the canal.

Why walk the plank now that Riverwalk’s open? Tampa’s great places to walk draw travelers from across America and overseas. The newest is River-

VegWorld Magazine

Veg fare galore “The vegan scene is vibrant and exciting with everything from its legendary 10-year-old ThanksVegan potluck that attracts 250 people to multiple meetups each weekend from protests to dinners at vegan restaurants,” says author, athlete and activist Ellen Jaffe Jones, who has placed in 94 races “wearing vegan running shirts to show the world we get plenty o’ protein.” Tasty vegan dishes are easy to find. Here’s a sampling based on sources including HappyCow.net and Creative Loafing, the free local weekly, which devoted a January issue to vegan dining.

Vegan eateries: • Just 4 U Vegan Kitchen and Market - Jamaicanstyle comfort food, mac ‘n cheese and mango shakes and warm spirit.

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VEGWORLDLY WANDERINGS house by river, serves daily vegan specials, plantbased okra fries with robust house-made ketchup and avocado soup topped with charred corn. Terrific house-brewed lagers use traditional German methods, meaning no animal-derived ingredients. Mise en Place, helmed by Modern American culinary innovator Maryann Ferenc, offers several plant-based dishes that sing with flavor, including delectable Cauliflower Three Ways.

• New Leaf Elementals - baked treats, good coffee and zen-like atmosphere. • Natural Detox Nutrition Shoppe - salads, sandwiches, hot dishes, smoothies. • Loving Hut - Asian dishes to a BLT with plantbased bacon. • Consciousness-Blossoms - soul-warming dining in Palm Harbor. • Rawk Star Cafe - raw vegan marketplace in Oldsmar.

Vegan food trucks: • Old Earth - organic gluten-free raw vegan dishes like zucchini walnut flatbread.

And wait, there’s more: fresh Asian rolls at Bamboozle; Indian at Dosa Hut, Udipi Cafe and Jai Ho; black bean and portobello tacos at Bartaco; vegan burgers, shakes and light sweet potato “air-fries” at Evos; pies and breadsticks at Gourmet Pizza Company; organic bean burritos at Jem’s Natural Living; spring rolls, pumpkin soups and avocado wraps at Kaleisia Tea Lounge; vegan BLTs at Cafe Hey; Ethiopian at Queen of Sheba, Vietnamese at Trang Viet Cuisine; and coffee/bakery treats at Mojo Books & Records. Just beyond Tampa, there’s Lotus Vegetarian Restaurant in Pinellas Park, Kara Lynn in Clearwater and Mangia Gourmet in Gulfport. Plant-based bites appear at bars like the Independent, Fodder & Shine and new Ichicoro. In this craft beer bastion, many brews are vegan-friendly, including Tocobaga Red Ale and other releases from Cigar City Brewing. For all-fruit refreshment, look for Big Crush Slush around town.

• Ray’s Vegan Soul - pumpkin chili, roasted jerk sweet potatoes, peach brandy cobbler and more. • Vegg’d Out Vegan Kitchen - try the Nattiez Pattiez hot pocket. Other vegan-friendly spots abound. Fine dining choices include new Ulele and Mise en Place, which kick-started the Tampa farm-to-table scene three decades ago. Ulele based in a historic pump

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VEGWORLDLY WANDERINGS

Ahoy, maties - the pirates come ashore. This place is a treasure chest of piratethemed venues, cruises -- and Gasparilla. Named for Jose Gaspar, who terrorized Florida’s Gulf coast in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, this free January extravaganza unleashes fun for all ages, day and night. During the Gasparilla Invasion, hundreds of costumed swashbucklers invade Tampa Bay aboard the massive pirate ship “Jose Gasparilla.” With so many spectacles, Tampa will hold you captive.

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VEGWORLDLY WANDERINGS

More info: http://www.VisitTampaBay.com http://www.thetampariverwalk.com http://www.tampabayvegfest.org http://www.floridavoicesforanimals.org

Watch manatees on these webcams: http://www.tampaelectric.com/company/mvc http://www.savethemanatee.org/savethemanateecam.html

Gasparilla Music Festival March 12-13. http://gasparillamusic.com

Aloft Tampa Downtown: new, central lodging on the waterfront by parkland http://www.alofttampadowntown.com

About the Author Robin is an award-winning writer who seeks out vegan fare on world travels. Reach her at travelveg@live.com

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INFOGRAPHIC OF THE MONTH

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feeding families / saving animals A Well-Fed World is a Washington, DC-based hunger relief and animal protection organization chipping away at two of the world’s most immense and unnecessary forms of suffering... the suffering of people hungry from lack of food and the suffering of animals used and abused for food.

Don’t like Heifer International? Sign-up for our monthly e-newsletter for information about our Plants-4-Hunger gift-giving campaign, and give the gift of vegan food to people in need without harming animals.

care@AWFW.org

www.AWFW.org

Ashraya Initiative for Children

Poplar Spring Sanctuary by Mark Peters

~how beautiful is a world that is healthy, well-fed and kind all at the same time~ VegWorld Magazine

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THAT MOMENT WHEN

That Moment When features the awkward, enlightening or inspiring moments that all vegans experience in life. Share yours with us here

M

y best friend and former teacher in graduate school died suddenly last night. He was 73. I had given him an exercise bike, and he rode it for ten minutes every two hours, every day. He grew his own vegetables, restored his city home, built a seaside house using materials from dismantled Victorian houses. He built an outdoor bake oven, played piano, and was a fine English professor. He was more vigorous on his last day than I have been any day of my life. Vincent, did not look old and he DID NOT DIE OF OLD AGE last night. Vincent died of a disease, coronary artery disease. It is a disease whose symptoms are quite obvious; a disease that struck him down suddenly, amidst friends, taking him from us in an instant. People have told me it was the best way for a person to go. And maybe that is true. But it was not the best WHEN to go. Vincent had at least 15 more vigorous years before the ravages of age would set in. His mother had lived to be more than a hundred. He could have lived that long too. About two years ago he told me that physicians had warned that his cholesterol was high and that he also had high blood pressure. He asked me what he could do.

VegWorld Magazine

I started my answer with an explanation of how arterial damage is created and how it leads to heart attacks and strokes, but he very quickly became anxious and told me he could not listen to any of this. Because of this, I jumped ahead and explained the diet to him, but he thought it too extreme, and therefore totally out of the question (he liked very specific “rich” foods – cheese, pate, and ox tail for example, and he felt that life was not life without them). At this point, there was little I could do besides recommend Omega 3 and beets. I told him I would send him some videos (which I had already done several years before). I also added that, any time he changed his mind, I would discuss anything in the videos and even give him some meals to get him started. I advised him to do 10 minutes every two hours on the exercise bike rather than one hour session each day. About three months ago, Vincent came back from extended travel and his skin was greyish. This is a well-known indicator of chronic heart disease. I saw it immediately, but I didn’t say anything. If I had, it would have filled him with anxiety, but I don’t think he would have gone to the doctor. And if he had told the doctor, “My friend thinks I have heart disease because of what I am eating…” well you can imagine what the consequence of that would be.

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THAT MOMENT WHEN

The upshot of the story is I feared what was coming when he said he would not change his diet and I knew what was coming when he could not listen to a description of arterial wall failure. That was actually when I said goodbye to him. Vincent was a very intelligent man, quite possibly the brightest person I have ever known. But we all use our intelligence to bring together our assumptions and our deepest beliefs. He was also a free adult. And as a free adult, I had to respect his determination to live his life on his own dietary terms. The reality is that I could not pour water into a cup that was already filled. And so, the best that I could do, at that moment when I learned that he died was to recall that he chose death on his own terms. This is the closest I can come to freeing myself of a sense of responsibility for what has happened.

VegWorld Magazine

Vincent was the most important person in my life, and I just wanted to say that it was not old age that killed him; it was a disease that many people in our society contract and that the diet you and I follow fights. In cases like his we can see why we have made this choice. He was the best person I have ever known, certainly better than I. He won’t be replaced for me or for anyone else who knew him. His loss is a direct and total loss in this world – a loss that is made all the worse and totally unnecessary in that he had many, many years of vibrant productive living to do (a well published writer, he was writing another book, and he was always building things in his home). All that creativity and goodness -- that remarkable gift to the world that he was -- is gone from all of us, not because of the passage of a full-time of living, but because of a diet that is the great hubris of our time.

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VEGAN 101

WHAT TO DO WHEN SIDE DISHES GET PROMOTED by Andrea Denton

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hen you switch to a plant-based diet, there are plenty of challenges; seriously, it’s like learning to cook all over again. How do you prepare kale? What is nutritional yeast? How do you make cheese out of cashews? Those are really compelling questions, but today we’re talking meal planning. When it comes to transitioning, you have to rethink your plate and what you consider a meal. The beauty of this is that what you previously considered a side dish gets a huge promotion. I think the promotion, like most, is long overdue—veggies, beans and carbs do stellar work and they’ve long been taken for granted!

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But how do you deal with this new organizational structure? There are a lot of ways to look at your meals when it comes to replacing what was once the centerpiece. Before you resort to having salads for every meal because you don’t know else to make, try these strategies. 1. Meat Replacements—Every day there are more and more vegan products on the market and they have come a long way. Products like Gardein, Beyond Meat and Boca are making some pretty tasty products. No, they’re not exactly like meat, but for someone wanting to

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VEGAN 101

make a smoother transition, they can be a great help. Use them how you would have used meat. 2. Replace the protein—Most people are very nervous when they start a plant-based diet, concerned that they’re going to quickly become protein-deficient. It’s not likely at all to happen, but if it makes you feel better, center your meal around a food high in protein, such as beans, lentils, quinoa or tofu. Mushrooms are also a great centerpiece. By adding veggies to any of these ingredients, you will have a great meal. 3. Re-make traditional meals—think about your favorite meals that you grew up with and there is bound to be a way to veganize it. Spaghetti Bolognese can be made with red lentils or minced mushrooms. Sloppy joes are terrific made out of green lentils (my daughter likes them more than she ever liked sloppy joes made with meat). Buffalo wings? Try buffalo cauliflower. Macaroni and cheese, Garlic Alfredo

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or General Tso’s chicken….there are so many vegan recipes out there that will surprise you with their deliciousness. Pinterest is your new best friend. 4. Embrace the sides—Who made the rule that said a potato or zucchini is a side dish? Break the rules! Buck the norm! Promote your side dish to main course and enjoy. Top a potato with black beans, corn, onion and avocado and eat up. Shred zucchini and make it into a crab cake flavored with Old Bay Seasoning. There are no reasons these can’t be meals. 5. Embrace One-Pot Meals—What’s better than not having to worry about cross-contamination between meat and veggies? Having fewer dishes! It’s perfectly normal to have one pot dishes several times a week. Sometimes, I don’t even have a plan. I just make up rice or pasta and just start throwing stuff in that looks good. It’s fun! Try it!

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VEGAN 101

6. Go international—So many other cultures eat a largely plant-based diet that it’s easy to try these recipes without even having to change anything. I like to come up with themes each day to help with my meal planning. Mexican Monday or Thai Thursday… strategies like this can help in making a meal plan really fall into place. Start exploring Thai, Indian or African cusine today!

It will take some extra learning and some exploring on the Internet, but you’ve got this! Embrace the new hierarchy and take your taste buds with you on this new adventure.

While it can be hard to go your whole life thinking about a meal being a certain way, with some creativity and imagination, you can be eating better than you were ever were when you had to plan whether you would be having chicken, beef or pork. Instead of thinking about what you can’t make, think of all the ways you can prepare food.

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FAMILY

OBESITY UNDERSTOOD by Karen Ranzi, M.A.

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ccording to the Harvard School of Public Health, Childhood obesity has been called ‘one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century,’ and with good reason. Obesity can harm nearly every system in a child’s body – heart and lungs, muscles and bones, kidneys and digestive tract, as well as the hormones that control blood sugar and puberty – and can also take a heavy social and emotional toll. What’s worse, youth who are overweight or obese have VegWorld Magazine

substantially higher odds of remaining overweight or obese into adulthood, increasing their risk of disease and disability later in life.” As Western fast foods, including factory-farmed animal foods and processed foods, are replacing traditional foods in developing countries, obesity rates continue to soar worldwide. Inhabitants of many nations are experiencing unprecedented rates of debilitating chronic diseases that are inex-

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tricably linked to obesity, thanks to current commercial Western eating policies and choices. According to FRAC, Food Research and Action Center, “Obesity rates have more than doubled in adults and children since the 1970’s (National Center for Health Statistics, 2009).” Whereas many weight loss diets don’t work in the long run, improved nutrition through a raw vegan lifestyle offers lifelong health benefits, including healthy weight. Life in our foods communicates with life in us, but, unfortunately, this vital aspect is lost once foods are heated and processed. White, highly refined foods can often be addictive – those who eat them may endlessly eat more, hoping to find that satisfying spark of life that is no longer there. It was destroyed in these foods, ironically, to give them a longer shelf life. Children will not be obese when their parents uphold a strong conviction about the benefits of fresh raw vegan foods. These parents will teach the health-promoting aspects of fresh fruits, leafy greens, sprouts, and vegetables to their children. When foods are whole, ripe, fresh and organic, they contain vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients that satisfy us. We’ll benefit from the essential fiber that keeps us feeling full, but this will never be an incapacitating full feeling such as that following a standard holiday dinner. Remember that unpleasant full feeling after big cooked holiday meals? But now, after fresh raw vegan meals, there’s no longer

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the sensation of having an overstuffed stomach. Now, feeling full simply means satisfied - energetic. Animal foods are devoid of fiber, but the essential fiber, contained in all fresh vegan foods, has powerful cleansing benefits. When food is refined, processed, denatured in packages, its nutritive characteristics are greatly diminished. The eater will not feel satisfied, and the feeling of craving something else will linger. In an attempt to obtain essential nutrients, the craving for more will persist, but refined foods will always lack what the body needs – overeating of nutritionally empty foods ensues and becomes habitual. Such “empty” eating habits result in vitamin / mineral deficiencies and obesity. In addition to being unaesthetic, obesity lays the groundwork for myriad diseases. Whenever there is excess body fat, there is an accumulation of toxins in the fat cells that must be diluted in water. The fat cells thus become bloated, heavy, and all bodily functions become more difficult, resulting in diseases based solely on eating disorders; in reality, the disorder is nothing more than eating empty foods that have been destroyed by heat, chemicals, and many processing techniques before arriving on the plate. Paradoxically, the obesity victim is really starving for nutrients found only in fresh vegan foods. Commercial interests selling acrylamide, a carcinogenic plastic resulting from high temperatures

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in contact with foods that are fried, baked or roasted, further facilitate excess fat gain. A study done at the University of Stockholm, Sweden in 2002 demonstrated the toxic effects of high cooking temperatures. For example, potatoes, when cooked at high temperatures in boiling oil, get coated with the potent cancer-causing plastic compound called acrylamide, especially prevalent in French fries or chips. Acrylamide, easily recognized by the golden brown surface on foods, combined with the polyunsaturated oils used in cooking with canola, soybean, safflower, corn and other seed and nut oils, produce toxic amounts of free radicals, causing aging, inflammation, fat gain and cancer. In her article, “Turning Up the Heat on Acrylamide,” in the FDA Consumer Magazine (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), January – February 2003, Linda Bren explains: “Acrylamide was not found in uncooked or boiled food – studies indicate that it appears to form during certain high-temperature (greater than 250 degrees Fahrenheit) cooking processes, such as frying and baking, and that levels of acrylamide increase with heating time. Acrylamide is classified as a potential human carcinogen, as well as a genotoxicant, a substance that can mutate and damage genetic material.” Animal foods contain cholesterol, which with time builds up to clog blood vessels. Leafy greens, vegetables, sprouts and fruit are 100% cholesterolfree. Since our livers make all the cholesterol we need, there is no dietary requirement for cholesterol. Animal fat is solid at body temperature, whereas fruit and vegetable fat is liquid. Unfortunately, obese children are clogging their arteries, laying the foundation for future diseases that are unknown in countries where people remain, fortunately, too poor to eat animals and their byproducts. The milk of the different species varies in protein and fat content according to how fast the infant VegWorld Magazine

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of that species grows. The bovine calf grows 4 times faster than the human baby, which explains why cow milk is 20 percent protein and human mother’s milk is only 5 to 6 percent protein….a true indication that cow milk is meant for calves, not for humans. Cow milk is meant to grow a calf into a 1000-pound plus animal. Is that what we should be doing to humans?

Refined sugars, especially high fructose corn syrup and aspartame absorbed by means of guzzling sodas, whether diet or regular, cause an inflammatory response, preventing weight loss.

Even vegan children become obese when white foods are eaten: white flour, refined sugar, salt, white potatoes, starchy, sugary refined cereals, white rice, crackers, breads, rolls, cookies, cakes, etc. Baking and frying require high temperatures. Not only are the heated oils and shortening toxic to the point of becoming carcinogenic, the resultant acrylamide (a deadly golden brown plastic), albeit crunchy to taste, becomes yet another toxin that gets stored in the fat cells and must be diluted with water and held in solution – hence obesity.

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-preventionsource/obesity-trends/global-obesity-trends-inchildren/

When the precepts of fresh plant nutrition are fully lived, obesity will no longer be an epidemic; it will be impossible.

http://www.ninds.nih.gov Bren, Linda. “Turning Up the Heat on Acrylamide.” FDA Consumer Magazine, January – February 2003. Ranzi, Karen. Creating Healthy Children. Ramsey, NJ: SHC Publishing, 2010.

About the Author Award-winning author, international lecturer, raw food coach and chef, Karen Ranzi is the author of Creating Healthy Children: Through Attachment Parenting and Raw Foods and Raw Vegan Recipe Fun for Families. Karen can be reached at www.SuperHealthyChildren.com

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TRUE BEAUTY

TRUE BEAUTY

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his month, I’m sharing some new products from one of my favorite safe cosmetic lines, Rejuva Minerals. I also tried out a few personal care product lines that were new to me, and I was pleasantly surprised. Both EO Products and Acure Organics offer safe products that are not tested on animals, but not all of the products in the line are vegan. The vegan products that I tried were very impressive, and they piqued my interest enough to look for additional suitable products in the line. I was also very excited to find DeVita Natural Skincare and Color Cosmetics, because not only are they cruelty-free, they are also 100% vegan.

Rejuva Minerals I’ve been using Rejuva Minerals concealer and foundation for years, ever since I read that they were vegan and got a very good safety rating on the EWG Skin Deep Cosmetic Database (http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/). It was initially a gamble to select my shades online, but their descriptions and helpful chat service really helped and I found my perfect matches. These foundations apply easily using a wide head brush (a “Buki brush) and are easy to blend, offering buildable coverage. The best thing about them is how light they feel on the skin, like you’re wearing nothing! They also photograph well, which is an added bonus. I was skeptical initially about wearing a powder foundation, fearful that it would settle in fine lines and highlight dryness in my skin… but these formulas do neither and I’ve been very satisfied with them since I’ve been wearing them. I recently introduced my 17-year old twin daughters to them, and they’re loving them too! I decided to give some of the other products in the line a try this month. http://www.rejuvaminerals.com/store/

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TRUE BEAUTY

Rejuva Minerals Bronzer/Contour Powder I never really used a bronzer, though I applied one frequently to my clients when I worked as a makeup artist. I always assumed it would look too phony on my lighter skin tone…but I was pleasantly surprised. The “Light” shade gives me just the right amount of warmth for that healthy, sun-kissed glow, which is most welcome in the midst of the coldest, darkest time of year. I apply using the Buki Brush and follow the helpful video tutorial on the site, which advises applying in a “W” pattern from temples to the apples of the cheeks and crossing the bridge of the nose. I apply blush on top on the apples and blend for a pretty pop of color…all very natural! This is one of those items I just know is going to be a staple in my makeup case.

Rejuva Minerals Water Resistant Mega Lash Lengthening and Thickening Mascara This vegan formula is water resistant, which means it’s not waterproof and drying to lashes, but it will hold up to onion tears (and I tested it). It’s also resistant to flaking, clumping, and smudging… and those of us who wear mascara know how annoying that can be. The formula is also soy-free, gluten-free, and non-GMO, and contains some organic ingredients. I loved the shorter brush applicator because I could get in close to my lashes without banging into the mirror. What’s great about this formula is that it really does thicken, in addition to lengthen. At this stage of my life, my lashes seem a bit thin and wimpy on their own, so formulas that are simply lengthening don’t seem to do it. But this mascara really built them up and made my eyes stand out, even with the first coat! It’s easy to remove using coconut oil and cleanser. Definitely a keeper.

Rejuva Minerals PUR Lips Lipstick in Red, Red Wine This new vegan formula and shade is absolutely gorgeous! It’s definitely a versatile color that I would say just about anyone could wear. On me, it’s more of a nighttime shade, as during the daytime, I tend to wear very neutral tones that are just a hint darker than my natural lip color. The formula is semi-matte but not at all drying, and very comfortable to wear. I haven’t tested it out for a full evening yet, but it seemed to stay in place for at least an average amount of time. It’s also free of soy and gluten, contains organic ingredients and no FD&C dyes. Definitely a keeper for those evenings out!

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DeVita Natural Skincare and Color Cosmetics This line offers skincare and mineral makeup products that are all natural, 100% vegan, and paraben-free. Their products are available in exclusive medical spas, physician’s offices, natural retail stores throughout the United States and Canada and in many different countries. They also are available online at www. absoluteminerals.com, www.devitaskincare.com and www.devitastyle.com.

DeVita Natural Skin Care Aloe Vera Moisture Cleanser I’m so impressed with how safe these skincare products are…I checked all of the ingredients on the EWG Skin Deep Database (http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/), and nothing was higher than a 1! This cleanser felt absolutely luxurious on my skin. It comes in a pump dispenser so it’s easy to control, and a small amount goes a long way…I used around a dime-sized amount for my whole face and neck. The instructions are to lather the product in moistened hands, then massage into face and neck to break up congestion and impurities. If you are wearing makeup, you may need to repeat the process. My skin felt so incredibly soft and smooth after washing, even before applying moisturizer! I’m sold and will definitely keep this one in my rotation.

DeVita Natural Skin Care Evening Rich Nutritional Moisturizer Although this is intended as a nighttime product, it’s also light enough to be worn during the day for those like me with mature skin. A small pea-sized amount was enough to massage into my face and neck, and it was absorbed very quickly, leaving my skin very smooth and soft. It contains ingredients like hyaluronic acid that work to condition skin and minimize fine lines, and is scented with a very pleasant blend of essential oils for a light fragrance that dissipates quickly. It works great under my mineral foundation; in fact, I want to try combining the mineral powder with a little of the moisturizer to make my own beauty balm next! Definitely keeping this in my skincare lineup for day and night.

EO Products I’ve recently discovered this line, and I’ve been very impressed with the products I’ve tried so far! The company prides itself on producing personal care items that all contain some organic ingredients, and all of the ingredients they use are non-GMO, gluten-free, cruelty-free, and synthetic fragrance-free. https://www.eoproducts.com/

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TRUE BEAUTY

EO® Certified Organic Body Serum 01 Revitalizing I’m really enjoying this as an alternative to the body butters I typically use. It has a pump dispenser so it’s easy to control how much product you use. It’s pleasantly scented with coconut flavor (derived from coconut extract) and orange peel oil. The scent doesn’t linger, so it’s unlikely to interfere with your fragrance of choice. It easily melts into skin without any oily residue. And skin feels smooth and well-hydrated hours after use…that says a lot in these frigid temperatures we’re experiencing on the East coast.

EO® Ageless Skin Care Organic Argan Face Oil I fell in love with this certified organic serum! It’s a blend of organic argan, jojoba, and avocado oils and vitamin E scented with a beautiful blend of essential oils and organic coconut flavor. Packaged in a glass bottle with dropper so it’s easy to control how much you apply. It melts easily into skin to feel just like that drink of water my complexion is craving during this dry, cold weather. And no oily residue on the pillow in the morning! It’s also a very versatile product that can be used on hair, cuticles, or in the bath. This will definitely be a staple in my skincare rotation.

Acure Organics Another line I’ve recently discovered is Acure Organics. This family owned and operated company creates products that are certified organic and free from gluten, parabens, sulfates, phthalates, synthetic fragrances, harmful preservatives and artificial colors and are never tested on animals. http://www.acureorganics.com/

Acure Organics Coconut Dry Oil Body Spray

This is a very light spray that can be used to soothe skin after shaving and add moisture without a heavy, greasy feel. It’s versatile, in that it can also be used on hair to add shine and tame frizzies…one quick spritz is all you need. The organic coconut flavor oil gives it a very pleasant, tropical scent that reminds me that warmer weather is right around the corner….well, almost. It melts into skin very easily and really hydrates skin and hair.

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TRUE BEAUTY

Acure Organics Pore Minimizing Facial Scrub This new product contains natural jojoba beads to gently exfoliate along with Moroccan red clay to help to draw out impurities from pores without taking moisture from skin. It contains argan stem cells to stimulate new cell growth and repair, improving skin texture and creating a more radiant complexion. Since my twin 17-year old daughters are experiencing issues with acne and clogged pores, I asked them to try this and let me know what they thought. They said the grainy, red paste felt “weird when you put it on,” but it was a gentle scrub and made their skin feel smoother after they rinsed it off. They both said they think their skin cleared up a bit after using it, which they did 3 times a week for a couple of weeks. And knowing it’s a safe product makes me a very reassured mom.

About the Author Sharon McRae is a Certified Health Coach and nutrition/cooking instructor for the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine’s (PCRM) Food for Life program. In her past life, she was a freelance makeup artist for a high-end cosmetics line, and she moved away from this work after learning about the prevalence of endocrine disrupters and animal-derived ingredients in the products. She strives to use and recommend personal care products that are as pure as the foods she includes in her diet in order to maintain optimal health. Learn more about Sharon here: http://eatwell-staywell.com/

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BEER’S DARK SECRETS

VEGANISM AND BEER:

THE MURKY TRUTH

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or some, throwing back an ice cold brew on a hot summer’s day is one of life’s simple pleasures. But, if you are vegan and you

care about not consuming anything made with animal products, you’re going to have a little bit of work to do to make sure you find a brew that is 100% animal free. This is because ingredient transparency has never been a big priority for the alcohol industry. In order to protect the secrecy of their recipes, most European brewers, distillers and vintners prefer to not disclose their ingredients. Dating as far back to the temperance movement in the United States, the ambiguity of alcohol labels

A confusing array of guidelines followed. Different regulations for beer, wine and spirits are enforced – and all of these have different qualifiers (based on percentages of alcohol, carbohydrate levels and a myriad of other, often conflicting, criteria). In fact, the only consistent labeling rule from the TTB seems to be that a complete listing of ingredients is not required. Consumers who want to avoid consumption of animal products must learn to rely on other resources. With an understanding of certain labeling and advertising language practices - and a few good internet resources - it is always possible to find a good vegan brew.

has been a long-established trend. In 1935, when Congress legalized the manufacture and transportation of alcohol, an effort was still made to make sure that spirits were not seen as nutritious. The

Here are a few things to watch out for.

Flavoring Agents

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau was established to determine what would be required

Some flavoring agents are going to be fairly obvi-

on labels for beer and wine.

ous, since most brewers will advertise them. For

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BEER’S DARK SECRETS

example, honey, which is both an allergen and a

than isinglass. Guinness, which has used isinglass

source of flavor, will often be included in the name

in its brewery for the past century, has announced

of the beer or featured somewhere on the label.

that they will be switching to animal free clarifiers

However, some brewers will use honey during the

by the end of 2016.

toasting process, and will not always advertise this. As a general rule, avoid British beers that advertise Lactose is often used to give darker beers, especial-

brewing in the traditional way. Bass and New Castle

ly stouts, a richer texture and flavor. Look for words

are two big breweries that still use animal product

like cream, sweet, milk, or chocolate as indica-

in their manufacturing process. German and Bel-

tors of the presence of lactose in beer. Of course,

gian beers are largely vegan. German beers follow

there are exceptions to every rule. Sometimes the

the Reinheitsgebot, the German beer purity laws,

word “chocolate” is simply an indicator of the tast-

which exclude the use of any ingredi-

ing notes of a beer, or the presence of pure cacao.

ents beyond water, grain, hops and

This is the case for Brooklyn Brewery’s Black Choc-

yeast.

olate Stout. Similarly, Sixpoint Brewery’s C.R.E.A.M Ale contains no lactose at all.

Manufacturing Animal by-products are sometimes used in the manufacture of beer. Isinglass, a collagen harvested from the swim bladders of fish, can be used in a process called fining. Yeast particles bond to the isinglass and sink to the bottom of the vat, leaving a clear, clean beer. Gelatin, which is derived from the skin, connective tissue and bone of cattle and Casein, a milk protein, can both be used in place of isinglass in this process. Charcoal, which is usually made at least partially from animal bone, can be used in the final filtration process. Glyceryl Monostearate, a substance derived from animal fats, is sometimes used to control the level of foam in a particular brew. Alternately, Albumin, a protein taken from animal blood, can be used to increase the foam potential of a beer. Most new craft breweries have adopted animal-free brewing practices. Even big brewers, like Sierra Nevada, use Irish moss as a filtering agent, rather

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The Bottom Line: With a little bit of persistence and a little bit of education, nothing needs to get between a vegan and a cold one. When in doubt, consult a bartender or visit Barnivore.com, a massive community-compiled database of which beer, wine and spirits are vegan-friendly.

About the Author Anna Konya is an industry professional and mixologist. She has a B.A. in English from Loyola University, New Orleans. When she isn’t working on her book of new cocktail recipes, she spends her time behind the bar at Bar Rosso in Stamford, Connecticut.

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

MICHAEL GREGER, M.D.,

CRITICAL THINKER by Robin D. Everson

T

here is often a moment in one’s life that greatly influences the path they will follow. For some, it is the death of a family member or friend. In the case of Michael Greger, witnessing his grandmother healed from end-stage heart disease set him on the course of redefining the way the world views medicine. Michael Greger was born in Miami, grew up in Wyoming, and finally landed in the Washington, DC area. His father was a postal worker and his mother a homemaker who also taught Biblical Hebrew at the local community college. Later, she became a home health nurse, which continued young Michael’s exposure to the world of medicine. When Michael was just a kid his grandmother, Frances Greger, was diagnosed with end-stage heart disease. By

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

age 65, she was confined to a wheelchair. She had undergone numerous bypass surgeries and had become so scarred that further surgery was not possible. On October 16, 1977, 60 Minutes aired a story entitled “The Heart You Save.” The segment featured Dr. Nathan Pritikin and Pritikin’s Longevity Research Institute in Santa Barbara, California. Frances Greger’s doctors had done all they could for her. She seized upon this report, seeing it as a last-ditch chance to save her life. She made the arduous cross-country trip from Florida to California, was wheeled into the facility—and was immediately put on a plant-based diet. Within a few short weeks, her new healthy diet was doing its magic. She underwent a miraculous recovery and within 3 weeks was walking 10 miles-a-day. Grandma Greger went on to live another 31 years, enjoying her six grandchildren grow up, and

inspiring young Michael to become a doctor. She lived to the age of 96, long enough to see her grandson Michael graduate from medical school. Frances Greger was one of Nathan Pritikin’s earliest success stories and she is featured in Pritikin’s biography. “At the time, I didn’t realize the significance. That’s what was supposed to happen when you were sick: you go to the doctor and ‘poof’ you get better. But back then it was heresy to even suggest heart disease could be reversed,” said Greger, reflecting on his grandmother’s (and Pritikin’s) pioneering experience. In the years to come, Michael would never forget how plant-based nutrition had saved his grandmother’s life. He would go on to follow his grandmother’s courageous example, often stepping outside established rules and conventions, creating opportunities and pursuing his dreams.

Innovator and Critical Thinker Young Michael did all the things you would expect a kid to do—Boy Scouts, Little League. But, he hated school. “I did not like illegitimate authority,” remembers Greger. “Why should I raise my hand if I have to go to the bathroom? Who are you to tell me that I can’t go to the bathroom? That was ridiculous to me . . . I’ve been like that my whole life. ‘Because I said so,’ was never enough justification. I’m a critical thinker,” recalls Greger. Even as a child, one could see that Greger would grow up to always question everything. Young Michael’s “discussions” with his teachers were more inquisitive than rebellious. “They [the teachers] were not born with this knowledge. I wanted to know the primary source to make sure it was credible. It isn’t that it should be taken as fact without question. Who says 2 + 2 = 4? Prove it! Let’s see the research! School wasn’t about critical thinking. It was about memorizing things from a book. It didn’t teach us how to deal with the problems of

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

the world. That’s what I wanted to learn about,” said Greger. In high school, Greger was in many advanced placement classes. Always studious, he wasn’t too thrilled to go to prom because he had “important work to do” but his date insisted and he finally relented. Because of Greger’s diligence in high school, he was able to skip the first year of introductory college-required courses. As an undergrad at Cornell University, he worked as a Teaching Assistant in biology. Greger was a biophysics major and performed independent research in the world-renowned lab of biophysicist Dr. Watt W. Webb. Greger continued to pave his own unique path, creating opportunities for himself in fields that fascinated him. He was interested in the effects of electromagnetic fields, such as telephone lines, on biological systems and leukemia rates. “While I was

in high school, I contacted the leader in the field, Andrew A. Marino, PhD, and told him that I wanted to work in his lab. My persistence eventually paid off. He invited me down to his lab in Louisiana. He took me out to dinner and served me deep-fried alligator,” said Greger. Marino was impressed with Greger’s depth of knowledge and invited him to do research over his first undergrad summer. He would go on to write a glowing recommendation for Greger, which helped get him into medical school.

Jumping Into The Deep End Greger was accepted to Tufts University where he started out in an MD/PhD program, which called for doing two years of medical school, going on to attain a PhD, and then returning to medical school. Ever the individualist, he soon had his own ideas about what he wanted his future to look like. “I didn’t want to spend another four years tootling away in some lab. I wanted to go out and start helping people, so I dropped the PhD. I originally wanted to be a medical researcher and have a clinical practice. I was going to do research and try to cure cancer. But then I realized, I don’t need to because we already have the cure for most of our leading diseases. We don’t have to spend a penny more on research to prevent 80 percent of premature death and disability in this country. How can we spend money on research when we have the cure to our leading killer?”

“If people actually ate and lived healthily, my chosen profession would be in a lab somewhere doing biological research along with my clinical practice.” VegWorld Magazine

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

With that insight, Greger came one step closer to discovering his true calling as one of the leading proponents of lifestyle change to address chronic degenerative illnesses.

Going On The Road “I was in clinical practice but soon realized how few people I could reach in a day. I decided that I

“We don’t have to spend a penny more on research to prevent 80 percent of premature death and disability in this country.” VegWorld Magazine

needed to take (the science on the power of nutrition) on the road. I wanted to change the practice of medicine and speak at every medical school every two years to influence a whole new generation of doctors. At the time, I think there were 127 medical schools and I visited 126 of them. I did that for a couple of years and realized that too many people were dying now to wait for the profession to change, so why not just try to reach people directly, which is why I started the Latest in Clinical Nutrition DVD series—which is now up to Volume 30—and then the website, NutritionFacts.org. But, life on the road was unsustainable. In his typically resourceful way, Michael devised a plan to spread the plant-based message his way, ‘I’ll just record the DVDs and then if someone wants me to come speak, I will send them the DVD,’ he thought. Philanthropist Jesse Rasch saw one of my earlier volumes and offered the seed funding to put the Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

Nutrition Facts: NutritionFacts.org is a strictly non-commercial, science-based public service provided by Dr. Greger, providing free updates on the latest in nutrition research via bite-sized videos. The website boasts more than a thousand videos on nearly every aspect of healthy eating, with new videos and articles uploaded every day. NutritionFacts.org relies on individual donors to keep the site alive. Dr. Greger offers it as a public service and does not make a penny from NutritionFacts.org or his books. (He has a day job.)

DVDs online so more people could see them. So, in 2011, NutritionFacts.org was born.”

Getting Off The Road While on tour presenting at medical schools, Greger wrote about bovine spongiform encephalopathy, also known as Mad Cow Disease. The disease is a progressive neurological disorder that damages the central nervous system in cattle. After seeing some of Greger’s research, the Humane Society of the United States offered him a position as their public health director. This was perfect timing since Greger was tired of being on the road. Working with HSUS, Greger distinguished himself as an innovative thinker and tireless advocate for public health. His work garnered national attention when he exposed many egregious practices that were taking place in the meat industry. “[Through undercover video] we were able to show one of the main suppliers to the school lunch program dragging downed cows into the meat supply,” said Greger, who testified before

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a Congressional inquiry. The undercover video and campaign triggered the largest meat recall in history. A strict no-downer law was passed under President Obama’s administration. The connection between animal diseases and human health became more prevalent. This also prompted Greger to write the book Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching. Greger continues to do largely infectious disease and community health work for HSUS as their public health director while devoting nights and weekends to his passion for nutrition and chronic disease work.

Sprouting and Cultivating As for his own lifestyle, Greger didn’t change his diet until Dr. Dean Ornish published his findings on reversing heart disease in the summer of 1990. Greger knew about the power of whole foods, plant-based nutrition from his grandmother, but considered it to be more of a therapeutic diet. But after immersing himself in Dr. Ornish’s work he realized that the same diet could be used to prevent disease as well.

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“I wanted to get to the juicy stuff. This is where you unlearn all the stuff that was taught in those introductory courses. For example, in biology, you learn the central dogma is DNA to RNA to protein. That is how we learned it a half-century ago. It gives you the basics and then you learn that’s not really true. You go on to learn that it’s way more complicated. That is what I wanted to learn—the latest and greatest in science. Bypass all the failed theories. I didn’t want to memorize stuff. I wanted to understand stuff. I wanted to challenge myself and the professors appreciated that.” Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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MICHAEL GREGER, M.D., CRITICAL THINKER

Today, when he has control over his diet, he strives to eat an SOS-free (no added salt, oil, or sugar) whole foods, plant-based diet. Greger currently has four published books: Heart Failure Heart Failure: Diary of a Third Year Medical Student, Carbophobia: The Scary Truth about America’s Low-Carb Craze, Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching, and his newest book, How Not To Die, which became an instant New York Times best seller. He also has more than a thousand videos on his NutritionFacts.org website.

Helping Oprah Out: While still in medical school Greger was contacted to help Oprah Winfrey with her infamous meat defamation trial. On an episode of The Oprah Winfrey Show, Howard Lyman revealed that cattle were being ground up and fed back to cows. Upon hearing this stunning revelation,Oprah said, “I’ll never eat another burger again.” This spontaneous remark prompted a cattle rancher in Amarillo to sue Winfrey and Lyman, citing food libel laws, because his cattle futures on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange plummeted after that show. Charles “Chip” Babcock, a premier Houston litigator, contacted Greger as one of the experts on Mad Cow Disease. Winfrey won on First Amendment grounds, and prevailed on all subsequent appeals.

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Concerning Greger’s book tour, he said, “It is a very intimate experience. It is great to have that oneon-one moment with someone. That is something that I missed when I gave up my clinical practice to do research, writing and public speaking. But, with the book, people tell me a little bit about their story, their family, what they are going through and I am often signing books for their sick relatives – it is deep, heavy stuff. It is emotionally draining, but that is my favorite part of this whole tour. I cherish it.” How Not To Die is being translated into 21 languages and appears destined to become an international best seller. Dr. Greger is planning a sequel that will be about weight loss. The tentative title of his next book will be “How Not To Diet.” You can look for that to be published in a few years.

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IMAGINE

THE DAY WHEN ALL ANIMALS ARE FREE TO BE.

Working together, it’s within reach. For over a decade, Mercy For Animals has been campaigning diligently to prevent cruelty to farmed animals and promote compassionate food choices and policies. Through education, undercover investigations, corporate outreach, and legal advocacy, we are changing the course of history for animals -- inspiring both compassion and change. VegWorld Magazine

Join us. MercyForAnimals.org

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VEESTRO

MEET THE VEGAN VIRTUOSOS BEHIND VEESTRO,

THE MEAL DELIVERY SERVICE by Robin Tierney

V

eestro is an inspired fresh vegan meal delivery service founded by the sister-brother team of Monica Klausner and Mark Fachler. Our food and travel specialist Robin Tierney interviewed Ms. Klausner about their burgeoning plant based business. Robin: How would you sum up the Veestro concept? Monica: Veestro delivers 100% plant based, organic, gourmet meals straight to people’s doors everywhere within the U.S. With Veestro, there’s no more chopping, cooking or cleaning! Just heat and eat!

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Robin: Tell me about your background. Monica: I’m co-founder and CMO of Veestro. We have an exceptional chef who grew up in Bolivia as a vegetarian and has been a vegan chef for over 30 years. Mark used to be an investment banker, and I worked in sales and marketing for 20 years Robin: Where did you grow up and where do you live now? Monica: Mark, my brother, and I grew up in Costa Rica. I live in Encino, California now. Robin: Can you tell me about your chef?

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Monica: Chef Jose [who likes to stay out of the limelight] is an integral part of our team. He comes up with the recipes and is always on top of the latest developments in nutritional benefits.

doors to deliver the Christmas goodies and spend time with the families. Robin: How did you find your calling and tackle the path of becoming a disrupter?

Robin: Who impressed you food-wise? Monica: Our chef impresses me on a daily basis, because he can take three ingredients and make them into the most delicious, clean meal you’ve ever had! Robin: Who impressed you ethically and how? Monica: My mom has always impressed me and inspired me ethically. She has owned her own business since I was small and runs it with such integrity that her employees have been with her for more than 20 years. My mom always taught us to be kind and generous with everyone. My favorite example is that every year, my mom would take a big portion of her business’ profits and take my siblings and I to the store where we would purchase toys, clothes and books and we would drive to a very poor village a couple of hours away where we would knock on everyone’s

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Monica: That was Mark’s idea. He wanted to eat healthy, but as a busy professional, he never had time. So after looking for alternatives, he came up with the concept. When he told me about it, I was on board 100%. Robin: How would you describe your activism? Monica: We are passionate about people’s health, and Veestro is our way to bring better health through a delicious and attractive medium – food – to people all over the U.S. We want people to enjoy eating more plants and less animals without feeling overwhelmed, deprived or intimidated, and we know that ultimately, their health will be better, and the environment will be better. Robin: What do you want to be known as and remembered for? Monica: Both Mark and I want be remembered as

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innovators and disruptors, but most importantly, we want to know that what we did in our life made an impact in people’s health. Robin: Has anyone told you yet that you have helped them? Monica: I heard from a customer that we changed her life. She’s been a vegan on and off for a long time, and she “falls off the wagon” because she gets busy and lazy. Everytime she does, she gains weight and her energy levels drop. With Veestro, she doesn’t have to worry about falling off the wagon because she has a freezer stocked at all times. Robin: Where is Veestro in terms of its business goals? Monica: Veestro is in a very exciting place. We have been steadily growing and are ready to move to a much larger facility so we can accelerate our growth. This market is in its infancy and consumers are now ready to make some serious changes to their lifestyle. Veestro is here to make that transition easier and much more convenient.

Robin: Do you have any companion animals? Monica: I’m a big advocate for adopting rescued animals. We recently adopted the sweetest dog, Saki, and she is just an incredible addition to our family. Our kids know how important animals are, and they recently fundraised for a local dog rescue that needed to relocate. Robin: Your video tips for preparing and presenting Veestro meals are fun to watch. Have you “served” on camera before? Monica: Well, I am the oldest of four kids, so not only was I always “playing boss” but I have always loved performing. I was a ballerina dancer for 16 years until I was 19, and then I did some modeling in Costa Rica. When we created Veestro, we wanted to give people a more personal experience with our brand, and since posting the videos, we have seen our sales grow and our relationship with our customers improve. Food is very personal and emotional, and when people feel connected to our brand, they feel more connected to our food.

About the Author Robin is an award-winning writer who seeks out vegan fare on world travels. Reach her at travelveg@live.com

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MEDICINE

HOW TO COOK BROCCOLI by Dr. Michael Greger

W

hen I used to teach medical students at Tufts, I gave a lecture about this amazing new therapeutic called “iloccor-B.” I’d talk about all the new science, all the things it could do, its excellent safety profile. Just as they were all scrambling to buy stock in the company and prescribe it to all their patients, I’d do the big reveal. Apologizing for my “dyslexia,” I would admit that I’d got it backwards. All this time I had been talking about broccoli.  The main active ingredient in broccoli is thought to be sulforaphane, which may protect our brains, protect our eyesight, protect our bodies against free radicals, boost our detoxification enzymes, and help prevent and treat cancer.  In my videos The Best Detox and  Sometimes the Enzyme Myth is the Truth, I talked about how the formation of sulforaphane is like a chemical flare reaction, requiring the mixing of a precursor com-

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pound with an enzyme, which is destroyed by cooking. This may explain why we get dramatic suppression of cancer cell growth from raw broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, but hardly anything from boiled, microwaved or steamed (except for microwaved broccoli, which actually retains some cancer fighting abilities). But who wants to eat raw Brussels sprouts?  There is a strategy to get the benefits of raw in cooked form. In raw broccoli, the sulforaphane precursor, called glucoraphanin, mixes with the enzyme (myrosinase) when you chew or chop it. If given enough time—such as when sitting in your upper stomach waiting to get digested—sulforaphane is born. The precursor and sulforaphane are resistant to heat and therefore cooking, but the enzyme is destroyed. No enzyme = no sulforaphane. 

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That’s why I described the “hack and hold” technique—if we chop the broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, collards, or cauliflower first and then wait 40 minutes, we can cook them all we want. The sulforaphane is already made; the enzyme has already done its job, so we don’t need it anymore. 

frozen foods section, but the myrosinase is dead by the time you take it out of your freezer. It doesn’t matter how much you chop it, or how long you wait, no sulforaphane is going to be made. This may be why fresh kale suppresses cancer cell growth up to ten times more than frozen. 

When most people make broccoli soup, for example, they’re doing it wrong. Most people cook the broccoli first, then blend it. We now know it should be done the exact opposite way. Blend it first, wait, and then cook it. 

The frozen broccoli is still packed with the precursor—remember that’s heat resistant—and we could get lots of sulforaphane out of the frozen broccoli by adding some outside enzyme. Where do we get myrosinase enzyme from? Researchers just buy theirs from a chemical company. But we can just walk into any grocery store. 

What if we’re using frozen broccoli, though? In my video, Second Strategy to Cooking Broccoli, you can see the amount of sulforaphane in someone’s body after they eat broccoli soup made from fresh broccoli versus from frozen broccoli. The difference is dramatic. Commercially produced frozen broccoli lacks the ability to form sulforaphane because vegetables are blanched (flash-cooked) before they’re frozen for the very purpose of deactivating enzymes. This prolongs shelf life in the

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All cruciferous vegetables have this myrosinase. Mustard greens, a cruciferous vegetable, grow out of little mustard seeds, which we can buy ground up in the spice aisle as mustard powder. If we sprinkled some mustard powder on our cooked frozen broccoli, would it start churning out sulforaphane? We didn’t know…until now. 

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SOS FREE LIVING WITH CHEF AJ

SOS FREE LIVING WITH CHEF AJ

Q:

A:

My family has all kinds of tempting junk food in the house. If it isn’t vegan, I’m not bothered by it, but if it is, I simply can’t resist. What do I do? ~ Losing my Mind in Melbourne

Dear LMM,

So my first question is why do you allow there to be ANY junk food in your home, vegan or not? The mantra in the Ultimate Weight Loss Program is that “IF IT’S IN YOUR HOUSE, IT’S IN YOUR MOUTH”, and while you may be able to resist the non-vegan junk food, I believe that the constant exposure to these unhealthy foods just fuels your cravings for vegan junk. Since I don’t know the ages of your kids, I don’t know if the junk is there because they are old enough to buy it and are bringing it in or you are buying it for them. So while it my not be possible to prevent your family from eating crap, at the very least you don’t have to be their pusher. Teach them the importance of eating healthy and have plenty of hearty and delicious options available at all times. Perhaps you can explain to them how difficult it is for you to be around these foods and ask them to please eat all junk food outside of the home if they are going to consume them. At the very least, at least ask them to keep them out of your sight, in the basement, garage, a high shelf, in dark bags or even locked food safes. Better yet, why not constantly provide them with an array of healthy, delicious snacks like cut-up fruit and veggies with hummus? Most snacks that people indulge in are a combination of sugar and fat, fat and salt or sugar, fat and salt and you can create these tastes in a healthy manner by

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offering snack foods like baked chickpeas. Easy to make, you can season them any way you like and are a satisfying, crunchy snack that is also delicious on salads or in place of croutons on soup. You can easily make them baked tortilla chips and serve with salsa or guacamole. And everyone loves homemade “ice cream” which you can make in a jiffy in a Yonanas machine, a Champion juice or high powered blender out of frozen bananas. If you want an even more decadent snack, why not try my recipe for Outrageous Brownies? I have served these to even the most unhealthy eaters and they gobbled them up! No one will even know that they are vegan and made from healthful ingredients, let alone free of sugar and flour! Enjoy! And always remember, “IF IT’S IN YOUR HOUSE, IT’S IN YOUR MOUTH”, and you can’t eat something that isn’t there.

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SOS FREE LIVING WITH CHEF AJ

OUTRAGEOUS BROWNIES by Chef AJ

Ingredients: • 15 ounce can salt free Black Beans (rinsed and drained) or 1.5 cups of cooked beans • 1.5 cups date paste* • 3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk or other unstained plant milk • 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds • 1 Tablespoon alcohol-free Vanilla Extract

• ½ teaspoon baking soda • ½ cup cocoa or cacao powder • ¾ gluten free oats • 1 cup non-dairy vegan chocolate chips (optional) • ½ cup finely chopped unsalted pistachios (optional)

• 1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking powder

Preparation: Preheat oven to 350. Place beans and date paste and almond milk in a food processor fitted with the “S” blade and process until smooth. Add the flax seeds, extracts, baking powder and soda and cocoa powder and process again. Add oats and process very briefly, just until combined. Pour batter into an 9 x 9 square silicone baking pan. Sprinkle with nuts and or chocolate chips, if using, and gently press the toppings down with the palm of your hand. Bake for 30-35 minutes until middle does not jiggle and toothpick inserted comes out clean. Cool before cutting. I prefer to serve these chilled with a nice cold glass of homemade vanilla almond milk.

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DATE PASTE by Chef AJ

Ingredients: • One pound pitted dates • 8 ounces of water or nondairy milk

Preparation: Soak dates in liquid until softened. Process in a food processor fitted with the “S”blade until a smooth paste forms.  Keep any unused date paste in the refrigerator or freezer.

Chef’s Note: When using chocolate chips, I prefer to use the Sunspire brand grain sweetened ones. They are sweetened with barley malt, however, so they are not gluten free.  All of the gluten free chocolate chips contain refined sugar, usually as the first ingredients.

Chef AJ has been devoted to a plant-based diet for almost 40 years. Host of the television series Healthy Living with CHEF AJ which airs on Foody TV. With her comedy background, she has made appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Late Show with David Letterman and more. She is author of the popular book Unprocessed: How to Achieve Vibrant Health and Your Ideal Weight. Based in L.A., she teaches how to create meals to transform their health, how to deal with cravings and food addiction and addresses the emotional side of eating. She is the creator of the Ultimate Weight Loss Program, which has helped hundreds of people achieve the health and the body that they deserve. Chef AJ is also creator of Healthy Taste of LA and the YouTube cooking show The Chef and the Dietitian.

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POWER OF MOTION

EAT YOUR (SEA) VEGETABLES by John Pierre

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oms are famously known for encouraging their children to eat their vegetables. But what about their sea vegetables? Not so much−yet. But that may soon change once we start to recognize the benefits of sea vegetables and begin to gain from their immense goodness. I’ve been a fan of sea vegetables for years. Let me I’ll share some of the reasons that I think adding them to our diet can be so valuable. Let’s start with the basics. We all know that minerals play an important part in proper nutrition and vibrant health. Without minerals, other important nutrients such as vitamins and proteins may not function properly, which can result in a wide range of health issues. A big one is cognitive function. VegWorld Magazine

The World Health Organization, for example, reports that a deficiency in the mineral iodine is one of the leading causes of preventable brain damage.1 Iodine deficiency is one of the main reasons for impaired development in children, with disorders that can start before birth and jeopardize their very survival. The less visible, but perhaps far more pervasive, repercussions of iodine deficiency are impaired mental functioning and reduced intellectual capacity. And since iodine assists with the proper function of the thyroid gland, which has a significant influence on the metabolic processes of our body, a deficiency can include a number of symptoms such as depression, fatigue, goiter, and of course, Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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tion of processed foods. It’s no surprise that adulterated foods have very little to offer in the nutritional arena; with some merely boosting blood sugar levels to extreme highs for short spans of time before causing a crash. When people place them at the center of their diets (about 90% of modern diets now revolve around processed foods and animal products) they experience blood sugar roller-coaster rides all day long. That comes with a price, which includes mineral and nutrient deficiencies. cognitive issues. Sadly, iodine deficiencies are rarely Luckily, one of the best ways to combat mineral diagnosed, which means they’re often not on many deficiencies is found in our oceans. Coastal populations have enjoyed the taste and nutritional benefits health practitioners’ radars. of sea vegetables in their diets for centuries. These powerhouses of nutrients are some of the oldest Plants absorb the nutrients and minerals that are living species of vegetables on earth. offered to them directly from the soil. We, in turn, get our nutrients from plant matter. That means that When we compare sea vegetables (also called seamany of us get our minerals in micro amounts from weeds) to land vegetables, we find that they’re sigour diet, but getting enough of them, particularly nificantly more nutrient dense. One of the reasons iodine, can be a challenge for a number of reasons. is because they grow in the ocean, which is filled with energy-rich minerals. These minerals are abThe first has to do with our soil. The mineral consorbed by sea vegetables and converted into forms tent in our modern food supply has been severely that our body can easily assimilate. diminished from factors such as over-farming and weather erosion. Additionally, the recent disturbing Because sea vegetables rarely get the spotlight they trend of adding questionable agricultural chemideserve, many individuals are not aware that they’re cals to our soil has thrown off its natural balance. one of our highest sources of readily absorbable What we often end up with is soil that’s deficient amino acids (the building blocks of protein). They’re in certain minerals and overabundant in other elealso filled with carotenoids, iron, calcium, magnements, but that’s not by Nature’s grand design. If sium, chlorophyll, and the critical mineral iodine. the condition of our soil is our present and future health inheritance, what kind of nutritional legacy Just adding sea vegetables to your weekly diet can bring you closer to attaining superior health and are we creating for ourselves and future generawell-being. Incorporating sea vegetables into your tions? The truth is that soil deficiencies and imbalances become our deficiencies and imbalances; the weekly meals is fun, easy, and best of all, delicious. insufficient minerals in plant matter created by them Some of the most popular and readily available sea vegetables are nori, kelp, wakame, and dulse. They directly affect our wellbeing. are all rich in naturally occurring sodium which Another reason that many individuals don’t get suf- helps assist with the proper functioning of our nerves and muscles. They’re salty to the taste and ficient minerals has to do with the overconsump-

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are a great way to substitute salt in your diet. Center your diet around whole, unprocessed foods and work on incorporating sea vegetables into your meals several times per week to help counteract mineral deficiencies. Here are some suggestions of how to incorporate more sea vegetables in your diet throughout the week: • Many health stores carry ground seaweed in the spice or international foods section. Sprinkle the ground seaweed on salads, rice, steamed veggies, and soups. • Incorporate sheets of seaweed as a burrito wrapping. Fill the seaweed sheet with veggies, rice, spouts, and beans. • If you have a craving for salty chips, try seaweed sheets first. They’re crunchy, taste salty, are more nutritious, and have significantly lower fat than many oily processed chips. They will usually help the craving subside and you’ll get the vitamins and minerals that your body is really seeking. • Kelp noodles are one of the lowest calorie foods. They’re extremely filling and can be used in place of all grain noodles with high success. Kelp noodles look clear (almost see-through) and are similar to rice noodles. Use them is soups, casseroles, or salads. • Many dried sea vegetables will last in a dry cupboard for long periods of time, making them very convenient to have on hand and available at any time. They’re delicious and versatile in soups, stews, and salads.

• Substitute ground seaweed as you would salt in any recipe. You’ll get the added nutrition and similar salt taste. • Use kelp in moderation as it’s extremely high in iodine. 1. World Health Organization. Micronutrient deficiencies. Iodine deficiency disorders. http://www. who.int/nutrition/topics/idd/en/ (Accessed February 1, 2016)

About the Author John Pierre is an author, and a nutrition and fitness consultant who has devoted over 25 years to improving the lives of others through his expertise in the areas of nutrition, fitness, women’s empowerment, green living, and cognitive enhancement. A dedicated activist, John works with people of all ages promoting the benefits of a plant-based diet, stress reduction, physical fitness, and the importance of compassion in life. John is widely recognized in the area of geriatrics for enhancing cognitive function in our senior population. John has been lecturing for over 20 years at various venues that reach thousands of people. John’s books The Pillars of Health and Strong, Savvy, Safe are available at www.johnpierre.com

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WELL WOMAN WAY

LIBIDO IN BLOOM: PART I BY LINDA CARNEY MD

D

o you want a little more life in your libido? Sex drive is admittedly complex, particularly for women.1,2 Drug manufacturers were hoping that Addyi (flibanserin)-- commonly called “the pink Viagra”--would change that, but it seems that Mother Nature outsmarted Big Pharma in this case. The pathetically low sales of Addyi (less than 1000 prescriptions filled in its first two months on the market) revealed a stark contrast to the runaway success of Viagra’s first month of sales (more than 500,000 Viagra prescriptions filled) back in 1998. Need I mention Addyi’s possible side effect of causing potential fainting if mixed with a glass of wine, which conceivably might come into play during a romantic evening?3

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Sex researchers tell us that there are two types of normal, healthy sexual desire: spontaneous and responsive. Spontaneous desire happens when we mentally anticipate pleasure. Responsive desire comes in response to arousal--it’s like having fun once you get to the party. Most people experience both types of desire, but desire can shift as we go through different stages of life. About 85% of women report that responsive desire is their dominant style. Unfortunately for the manufacturers of Addyi (which was originally developed to treat depression), the pink pill only attempts to treat spontaneous desire in premenopausal women, thus purporting to “fix” something that scientific surveys tell us isn’t broken. Furthermore, the drug is very expen-

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sive and--according to the FDA’s analysis--only 10% of women report “at least minimal improvement.”4,5,6 Desire is only one aspect of libido. Our openness to intimacy is influenced by physical and emotional factors that can either override or enhance desire. A low-fat, oil-free, whole-foods, plant-based diet can have an amazing effect in both the realm of the physical factors and the emotional factors that affect sex, boosting our confidence and bolstering our desire. Which of the following six factors might we need to consider lest they cause our sex life to wither?   A negative body image can be a major obstacle. Feeling uncomfortable about the way we look makes us less willing to engage in intimate activity and less able to focus on the pleasure of the moment. Conversely, if we feel good about our bodies--our weight, our physical condition and our sexual attractiveness-- we are more likely to have satisfying sex lives.7,8  When we switch to a plant-fueled lifestyle, a new body can take shape.

VegWorld Magazine

On average, people adopting a plant-based diet for at least four weeks lose between 7.5 to 10 pounds, even without exercising or limiting portions.9,10 Beautiful skin flourishes. A plant-based diet gives skin a natural glow due to the increased intake of carotenoids.11,12 Acne clears up once animal-products and processed foods disappear from the diet.13,14 And skin ages more slowly when we eat fruits and vegetables.15,16 It’s also been my experience that as my patients change to a plant-based diet, the desire to exercise grows stronger. The combination of weight loss and better skin, plus improved stamina and muscle tone are reasons plant-eaters can feel more confident about their bodies and sexuality.   Although we joke about “onion breath,” worries about natural body odors can seriously inhibit intimacy. Breath, sweat, and body secretions are all potential concerns. There is good evidence that a diet of plant foods can improve the sensory experience with each of these personal scents. As part of digestion, bacteria break down sulfur-containing compounds which are found abundantly in red meat, poultry, dairy products, and other animalbased foods. Sulfur gas is a by-product which is released as bad breath.17,18 Eggs can also be a culprit in body odor because they are rich in choline, a nutrient which some individuals cannot metabolize well, giving a fish-like smell to their breath, sweat, saliva, and vaginal secretions.19 If we adopt a diet high in animal-derived foods--like a high-protein, low-carb diet--we can expect even more body odor. Followers of Atkins or paleo-style diets often complain of bad breath and body odor because the diet is known to cause the body to “leak” smelly ketones through the breath and sweat.20,21,22,23  One solution proposed by the advocates of these diets is to eat more greens since the chlorophyll in greens works as a personal deodorizer.24  Maybe that’s why the test subjects in a Czech Republic study smelled better on a plant-based diet. Researchers found that “red meat consumption has a

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negative impact on perceived body odor hedonicity,” but the body odor of the same subjects on a non-meat diet was judged to be “significantly more attractive, more pleasant, and less intense.”25 Apparently, plants can help with more than body odor. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that diet--particularly fruit--can improve our intimate flavors.26 A small, unscientific study suggested that eating pineapples noticeably sweetened the taste of the sexual secretions of both men and women.27 This seems plausible since we know that what we eat affects other bodily secretions and that fructose is a component of semen.   But even if we’re not distracted by physical concerns, emotional conditions can also crater our sex drive. Chronic stress, critical life events, and stressful relationships have been clinically shown to lower libido.28,29 Sixteen percent of women ages 18-64 report often feeling “very tired” or “exhausted.”30 Depression, which affects more women than men, is considered one of the most common mental disorders in the United States.31 A study done on 292 GEICO employees at 10 different sites demonstrates that a low-fat plant-based diet can

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actually relieve these emotional conditions that keep us from enjoying intimacy. After trying a plantbased diet to treat their overweight or Type II diabetes, employees discovered that their depression and anxiety decreased, their productivity increased and--as shown by the graph--their fatigue symptoms and general health greatly improved.32,33 Another study demonstrated that a vegan diet which emphasized fruits and vegetables improves mood and reduces stress and anxiety.34 And in only two weeks, still other test subjects who removed meat, fish, and poultry reported significant improvement in their overall mood.35 As our depression resolves, our anxiety calms. As our spirits lift and our energy goes up, we become more productive in our daily lives, freeing up more time and mental energy to devote to pleasurable pursuits.   Plants improve our looks, our scents, and our emotions, but can they help our hormones and our sexual responses? Next month, where we’ll take a deeper look at the role diet plays in the bedroom.

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1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC2811244/

18. http://www.nealhendrickson.com/mcdougall0201p2.htm

2. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/25/ magazine/25desire-t.html

19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC1741321/pdf/v075p00451.pdf

3. http://www.post-gazette.com/news/science/2016/01/10/Female-Viagra/stories/201601080236

20. http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/ low-carb-diets-can-cause-bad-breath

4. http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/ PressAnnouncements/ucm458734.htm 5. http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/laoe-0823-nagoski-pink-viagra-20150823-story.html 6. http://www.thedirtynormal.com/ blog/2014/06/16/i-drew-this-graph-aboutsexual-desire-and-i-think-it-might-changeyour-life/ 7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC2874628/ 8. http://www.jstor.org/ stable/3813371?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents 9. http://www.pcrm.org/health/medNews/review-shows-weight-loss-with-vegetarian-diet 10. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2 Fs11606-015-3390-7 11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC2780675/ 12. http://www.ehbonline.org/article/S10905138(10)00116-9/abstract 13. https://www.nestlenutrition-institute.org/resources/library/Free/workshop/BookNNIW67/ Documents/NNIW67_booklet_27.pdf 14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC3408989/ 15. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11293471 16. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayA bstract?fromPage=online&aid=7738408&fileId =S0007114509993461 17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17071291

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21. http://www.livestrong.com/article/360408foul-body-odor-from-going-on-the-atkinsdiet/ 22. http://www.livestrong.com/article/542205ketogenic-diet-body-odor/ 23. http://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/sideeffects#badbreath 24. http://thepaleodiet.com/bad-breath-bodyodor-paleo-fix-turn-stink/#.VpajWfkrLcs 25. http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/8/747.long 26. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/allabout-sex/200911/how-improve-the-tastesemen 27. http://porkandgin.com/ingredients/the-pineapple-sex-test/ 28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23841462 29. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6944562_Associations_Among_Everyday_Stress_Critical_Life_Events_and_Sexual_ Problems 30. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6214a5.htm?s_cid=mm6214a5_w 31. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/ prevalence/major-depression-among-adults. shtml 32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524383 33. 33http://www.pcrm.org/nbBlog/archive/201502 34. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25415255 35. https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-11-9

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Things We

o L ve ! N

RSO E V E . D ROBIN VES

LO

Fruit guys snacks The Fruit Guys new healthy snacks. There are six different varieties and all of them are vegan. Woo! Hoo! The 1 oz. (28g) snacks are packed 20 in a self-dispensing box. With varieties like Dried Cranberries, Just Almonds, Trail Blazer mix, Fruit & Nut Medley and Jumbo Rainbow Raisins (hand-picked select table grapes), these are perfect to have in an office break room or pop into a child or adult lunch bag, purse or briefcase. The Fruit Guys offer office and home delivery. Go to www.fruitguys.com/healthysnacks

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THINGS WE LOVE!

ON

ERS V E . D N ROBI ES

LOV

WTRMLN WTR A great way to stay hydrated - WTRMLN WTR is hand-made, cold-pressed watermelon water and lemon (nothing added) that provides a good source of hydration with performance enhancing nutrients, antioxidants, vitamins and natural energy-boosting goodness to benefit the body, brain and spirit. It is naturally packed with potassium and tastes like you are eating a watermelon. How cool is that?! You can find it at a store near you by clicking on the link. http://wtrmlnwtr.com/

CHEF AJ

LOVES

Potato Express

Crisp-Ease trays

Cooks a potato fast and keeps it warm for travel: http://www.asseenontv.com/potato-express/ detail.php?p=465618

These make the best and most crisp oil free French fries! You can find them on Amazon by clicking here.

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THINGS WE LOVE!

SON N H O J AMY VES LO The Prince of Peelers Want to peel the skin on a mango? A kiwi? The skin of a tomato? Peel potatoes faster? I donated all of my other peelers when this one came into my life. By the Messermeister company, this “Pro-Touch Serrated Swivel Peeler” sloughs off just a thin layer so you don’t lose all of the flesh inside your vegetable or fruit. And, the sharp blade peels with speed and ease! I can peel an entire bag of potatoes in about five minutes! This serrated peeler is made with a comfortable softgrip handle, so your hand won’t slip while peeling

soft, fleshy fruits. And, the blade is  “AISI420” (double) stainless steel, so it’s made to last. The scoopshaped tip provides a way to remove blemishes in potatoes, too. Also, it swivels, so you can get around odd shapes. Just make sure to rinse the blade well with soapy water right after use, and you will enjoy many years of use. After you add this helpful gadget to your kitchen, you’ll want to give this peeler as a gift to everyone you love! Purchase it at  Amazon.com  and other kitchen stores.

http://www.amazon.com/Messermeister-Touch-Serrated-Swivel-Peeler/dp/B00020H30S/ref=sr_1_4?s=k itchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1455114053&sr=1-4&keywords=messermeister+peeler

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BETWEEN THE PAGES

BETWEEN THE PAGES

COOKBOOK REVIEW: COOK THE PANTRY Review by Robin D. Everson

R

obin Robertson has done it AGAIN! With over 20 cookbooks on the market, the queen of vegan cookbooks has created a cookbook that makes you fall in love with cooking.    “Cook the Pantry” is a savior for your kitchen. The cookbook takes your favorite pantry and refrigerator items and turns them into beautiful, tasty dishes. Yes, there are great recipes for that left over spaghetti. I always cook too much spaghetti and Robertson’s Spaghetti Lo-Mein on page 130 takes care of that problem.     The book is listed as being “for the animals” and that sense of compassion can be felt in the nutritious recipes that make up the over 150 pages of “Cook the Pantry.” While fighting and supporting the health and rights of animals, there is no reason to let your health suffer. Robertson’s recipes see to your good health with balanced nutrition, variety and great taste.     

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Back to the book, Robertson gives you a wellthought-out pantry list complete with perishable and non-perishable items. This is perfect for the newbie plant-based eater, just starting out in life after college eater, single, married, married with kids eater or retired eater. The recipes are easy and a great way to get your children involved in preparing and cooking meals. (Hint: the pizza recipes will have them making you dinner.) Plus the list of equipment items (only seven) that everybody has in their kitchen makes preparing items from the cookbook even more enticing.     The things I really liked about the cookbook is that it has real world recipes for people who live busy lives. For those of us who want to prepare something quick and healthy without having to use 20 ingredients and some obscure, expensive spice that no one has ever heard of or spend the night chopping vegetables or stirring pots, this is the perfect book. Recipes that allow you to use the extra canned goods you picked up on sale and

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turn them into culinary works of art is what is going on here. Weeknight dinners can look like fancy well-to-do “Are we having company over tonight?” affairs.     There are so many recipes to love it was hard to pick my favorites but I did select a few.  The Quick Quinoa Pilaf on page 99 is a great stovetop onepot supper. My favorite (you can make this in your sleep) recipe is the Pantry Plus Gazpacho on page 28. This recipe calls for you to refrigerator for a few hours to chill before serving.  I made this recipe right before going to bed, put in the refrigerator and Viola! Gazpacho for breakfast! OK, fine you can have it for lunch. And for those that have a can pumpkin puree in their pantry left over from the holidays, there is the Curry-Spiced Pumpkin Bisque on page 24. Yum, yum!    “Cook the Pantry” by Robin Robertson is published by Vegan Heritage Press and is available through your local bookseller or through Amazon.com. 

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MOVIES

EATING YOU ALIVE B

ehold the trailer for the movie that everyone is talking about. With more and more films coming out that expose the truth about our food system and the inadequacy of the current medical paradigm, we expect multitudes of people to embrace a plant based diet and reap the benefits. This one looks like it’s going to make a huge impact. We can’t wait to see it ourselves!

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MOVIES

THE MARSHALL PLAN

V

egWorld publishers and founders of the annual HealthFest of Marshall, Texas,  Ed and Amanda Smith, are featured in

a just released full-length documentary film, The Marshall Plan. The film investigates the devastating health toll exacted by the Standard American Diet (SAD) and explores how and why switching over to a whole-food, plant-based diet can help

Neal Barnard, this revealing documentary presents personal success stories from the people of Marshall, Texas, themselves. The Marshall Plan is a quick-paced, eye-opening exposé which educates, convinces, and inspires, demonstrating that if health through lifestyle change can be dramatically restored even in residents of the so-called “stroke belt” of East, Texas, it can surely be achieved anywhere. 

to reverse cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and many other chronic degenerative illnesses. With guest appearances by Dr. Michael Klaper and Dr.

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Click below to view a trailer of this enlightening movie.

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RESTAURANT REVIEWS

THE GHOST WOLVES

DEVOUR EUROPE! VORACIOUS ROCK & ROLL BAND FROM AUSTIN, TEXAS PROWLS THEIR WAY THROUGH THE OLD WORLD IN SEARCH OF NEW VEGAN FLAVOURS VegWorld Magazine

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RESTAURANT REVIEWS

Last fall we toured through Europe and visited five countries including Italy, Germany, Switzerland, France and Belgium. Between our adventures on the road, our vehicle breaking down, and dealing with one crazy concert promoter, we had the chance to eat some amazing vegan food. For those who say one can’t be vegan because they travel so much, we are living proof that is not true! We feast our way across multiple continents on tour every year, and have a great time doing it. Here are some culinary highlights from our most recent adventure.

THINGS FIRST STARTED COOKING AT COOX

C

OOX is tucked into the corner of the Piazza Vittorio, a picturesque setting in one of the major cultural centers of northern Italy. We visited between lunch and dinner, late in the afternoon on a Friday, with the intention of sampling the menu and having some coffee to prepare ourselves for the night’s show. We found a very friendly staff behind the counter and ordered a smattering of dishes on small plates. We were seated at a table in a downstairs cavern, which felt very ancient and might have once been a Roman wine cellar. The decor was lovely, very modern and clean. When one of our party remarked about the lack of music, somehow, tunes magically came on for us! We were very pleasantly surprised by the food there. What at first appeared to be more of a newage vegan restaurant turned out to be a classic Italian kitchen, serving delicious meat-free versions of the kinds of food you might find at your Nonna’s house on a Sunday afternoon after church. Favorites included the Sfoglia’s, which are small

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filo-styled pastries topped with either zucchini and house made vegan cheese, or eggplant with basil and olive oil. The Porcini Panzerotti, a mini calzone filled with sautéed mushrooms and herbs was also a hit at the table. We were also delighted to taste some regional specialties - particularly the Pappa al Pomodoro, which is a thick Tuscan stew prepared with fresh tomatoes, bread, olive oil, garlic, and basil. The house made seitan cheeseburger, which, while delicious and full of grilled flavors, seemed a bit out of place on the menu. We finished our feast in the cavern downstairs and decided to venture upstairs for coffee and desert. It was at this point that an already delicious meal really kicked into overdrive and became something unforgettable. We were treated to two Italian specialties - cappuccinos, overflowing with nondairy milk foam and perfectly brewed espresso, and Tiramisu - possibly the only Vegan Tiramisu we’ve ever had which was indistinguishable from it’s nonvegan version, every bite full of spice, cream, and chocolatey-sweet heaven!

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COOX front entrance

COOX flawless Tiramisu VegWorld Magazine

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RESTAURANT REVIEWS

hefty portion of vegan cheddar, onions, tomatoes, and spicy sauce. It hit the spot -- and for a quick, cheap lunch (only 5 euros for the sandwich), we were quite satisfied. We also ordered a roasted vegetable plate, served hot, that featured seasonal roasted root vegetables, mixed with wild rice. It reminded me of something you might see on the hot bar at Whole Foods in the USA - quick, delicious, low in oil and salt - simple and tasty. Desert was apple pie, a fluffy take on the American staple, served with a lemon glaze. We of course, also finished with espresso, as the Italians would.

Located just steps from the Duomo Di Firenze, one of the most important and famous cathedrals in all of Italy, stands a small counter service restaurant called Panino Vegano. Its location in one of the main tourist centers of this ancient city proved to be very helpful to us on the day we visited. With our time in Florence running out quickly, we were attempting to make a mad dash to see the famous Cathedral before we rolled off to our next tour stop. The problem we were having was that we were, as usual, very hungry! Luckily, Panino Vegano fit the bill perfectly - location, price, quick counter service, and of course, everything on the menu being 100% cruelty-free.

The one complaint we had was that paper plates and plastic cups were used in the service. It would be nice to not have to throw things away after a seated meal at a restaurant. That aside, we were very happy with our visit to this little spot and would gladly stop by again!

Arriving at the restaurant, hard stone-arch entranceways gave way to a colorful, and very clean interior dining area, punctuated by the endless and beautiful smile of the woman behind the counter. Through some gesturing and halfItalian/English gibberish on our part, our lovely hostess rustled us up what would prove to be one delicious meal. We ordered several Panini sandwiches, the house specialty, to start. We sampled the lentil-patty and the chickpea-patty versions -- both topped with a

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Gelateria dei Neri - Florence, Italy

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While not a vegan establishment, this traditional gelateria deserves a stop-in. The almond based hazelnut gelato was the most deliciously creamy delight I had while in Europe. I had it scooped with dark chocolate and vanilla. It’s always nice to get the creamy options, and not just the fruity ones in a place like this. What a treat.

Cafe Rost - Mannheim, Germany This little cafe was a pleasant surprise. The show promoter took us here to have a meal with his friends before the show. The place was packed as a special event going on: A man was reciting 1970’s romance novels in German. Everyone there was giggling and blushing. We didn’t understand much of that, but we loved the food. The chef changes the menu daily and always uses the season’s best. The menu that evening was pumpkin soup, salad, focaccia bread, and an autumn tart. It was fabulously well done and we would love to return to try more of the chef’s specialties. Onnoz Noodles and More - Heidelberg, Germany Fast noodles on a chilly day in this picturesque town was just the ticket. We sat in the window and people watched while we enjoyed the change in cuisine. The sign outside caught our eye with the word vegan written on it. Not all of the offerings were vegetarian, but the vegan choices were clearly marked. We probably could have found classier food in Heidelberg, but we had a castle to climb up to and it was getting late.

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Green Republic - Erfurt, Germany A quick snack in the city center. They had veggie burgers and other sandwiches to choose from but we ordered the traditional German bratwurst with sauerkraut, mustard, and ketchup. It’s nice to have this all vegan restaurant in the middle of an old German town. It was quite unexpected and we were pleasantly surprised. Signor Verde - Cologne, Germany This was the last stop for us before heading to the airport in Frankfurt for our long flight back to Texas. We had been traveling all day across Germany to make it to the airport and were rather famished at that point. A friend in Cologne suggested we meet up at Signor Verde, an all vegan cafe right on the way, for a late lunch before we headed off. The cafe was located in a lovely pedestrian area and we found quick parking for our touring van on the main avenue nearby. The inside of the restaurant is arranged in a lovely art-deco style, with large wooden tables seating six to eight people, a gorgeous stained glass skylight and period-correct lamps. We started off with vegan cappuccinos and then quickly ordered food. We were just past the mark for ordering breakfast - 3 p.m. - but after eying the rest of the menu, which consisted of mostly veggie burgers in various forms, we convinced the waitress to put in an order for something none of us had ever had vegan style: a full English breakfast! We were quite delighted with what came out of the kitchen. Gigantic portions of British style Heinz beans in tomato sauce, delicious vegan bratwurst sausages, a smoky, peppery tofu scramble, tomato slices, and a small salad and plenty of toast to mop it all up with. We noshed for close to 45 minutes or more on all of this wonderful food and still didn’t finish! To-go boxes aren’t something you normally find in a German eatery - but we had to ask! Luckily, it kept very well and made for a perfect late night snack before we took off. Green Republic - Erfurt, Germany Out of all the European countries we visited, Germany seems to be light-years ahead in the vegan department. A few local friends cited the vibrant youth punk culture as a possible source of the country’s cruelty-free culinary enlightenment. In fact, one of the best meals of our entire trip was had at an all-vegan punk squat venue in Leipzig (see our other review: ZORO), and just about every common grocery store features a nice selection of vegan products.

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What isn’t so common, yet, is Veganz: an entirely vegan grocery store, the first we’ve ever heard of. They have several locations around Germany and are apparently working on coming to the USA this year. We went to their location in Hamburg, during the evening before our gig there. We were absolutely delighted with what we found inside. A clean, brightly lit store, with nary an ounce of flesh or a slice of dairy cheese to be found. Instead, the aisles are stocked with vegan delicacies, bulk staples, and hard to find bits and nibbles. Our favorite sections included the faux-meat aisle - we found the quality and selection of the substitutes to be seemingly much better than your typical Tofurky slices or Chik’n, with less ingredients and additives. The cheese section also had just about every known form of vegan cheese, neatly stocked and displayed. The one aisle that left us scratching our heads was actually the fresh produce, which seemed to be a bit lacking in variety and quantity, as is sometimes found at “health food stores” in the USA. Perhaps you are meant to do most of your dry and packaged goods shopping at Veganz and then go to a larger, more robust grocery for your produce needs. On our way out, we sampled a veggie-bacon-cheese burger and a pizza roll-up from the hot cafe, which both made delicious road snacks. Visiting an all-vegan grocery proved a true luxury - one is afforded the rare opportunity of simply enjoying the front side of food packaging, instead of the endless moments spent gazing at the ingredients list on the back. Here’s to Veganz making their USA debut in 2016! Zoro (Vegan Squat, Leipzig, Germany) The most memorable meal of our trip was not had in a restaurant or a cafe, nor a quick counter service deli or in our tour van screaming down the autobahn at 160 KPH. Our favorite vegan meal in all of Europe was had in the most unlikely of places - a punk squat venue called ZORO, in the ancient German city of Leipzig. A preface: the word “squat” has a bit of a different tone in Europe than in the USA, and we actually found ourselves playing the squat venues regularly. The laws regarding unoccupied buildings are quite different in Germany, although we never got a totally straight answer. It seems as if when a building is left to rot long enough by its owners, young people can take it over, somewhat legally, and have their way with it. Usually, VegWorld Magazine

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this means they install a music venue inside, selling beer, spirits, and most often, punk-rock or alternative music shows. ZORO is one of the oldest squat venues in all of Germany. It was founded just after the fall of communism, and the entire venue is actually a repurposed Soviet-era speaker factory. When we play shows in Europe, the promoter usually provides a meal before the gig and sometimes snacks afterwards in the green room. The quality of these meals really depends on the person cooking it and their comfort level with Vegan food. We’ve had everything served to us - from a pot of plain pasta dressed only in olive oil to an incredible six course multiple hour long sit-down meals where it tasted like they hired a Michelin-starred chef to cook for the night. Our night at ZORO falls into the latter category - unforgettable, top notch! We were so very delighted to find out upon arrival that the cooks were operating a 100% vegan kitchen every night of the week. And they must have heard we were from Texas, because we were treated to some of the finest vegan Tex-Mex meal we’ve ever had outside of our homeland. The menu featured seitan mole enchiladas, piled high with melted vegan cheese, sour cream and a rich, velvety sauce. Spanish style rice and home made refried beans on the side. A giant bowl of creamy smooth guacamole. Home made chorizo and potato empanadas, served with a spicy tomatillo green salsa. A fresh green salad with a house-made strawberry vinaigrette. Unlimited, oversized bottles of tasty German beer, and to top it all off a decadent chocolate raspberry cake. We were left completely flabbergasted with the quality of the meal. Our experiences with anything Mexican in Europe up to that point had been store bought chips & salsa, which tasted more like corn flakes and ketchup sauce! To have a taste of home in the middle of our month-long journey was a truly memorable thing. And we were so lucky to have a great gig to follow the meal. The crowd at ZORO was our exact demographic - the open-minded, beer-guzzling, crowd-surfing types, and they kept us playing well past our set time. We stayed up late hanging out after the show and made sure to raid the leftovers in the kitchen before bed. We would highly suggest going there to check out a show and have a drink. Since the kitchen operates mostly to feed the bands and staff, you won’t be able to buy food here necessarily...but if you befriend (or bribe) some of the musicians, they might invite you up for a bite after the gig! About the Authors: Carley and Jonny Wolf are both members of the Austin, Texas based band The Ghost Wolves. Their first record, “Man, Woman, Beast”, was released in 2014 on Plowboy Records. Besides playing music, Carley also has her own line of handmade clothing called Starwolf, and will be launching a new company, Texas Vegan Purses, in 2016. When they aren’t on the road, the couple enjoys spending time in the beautiful Texas hill country with their family. To keep up with the band, visit them at www.theghostwolves.com VegWorld Magazine

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JUICE GURU

JUICE GURU HOW TO MAKE A LUCRATIVE INCOME AS A JUICING COACH (WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK OR YEARS OF SCHOOL)

About the Authors

Steve Prussack is the co-author of “Juice Guru: Transform Your Life with One Juice a Day” (Robert Rose Publishing) and “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Juice Fasting” (Penguin Books). Steve is the CEO and founder of Juice Guru, a lifestyle brand dedicated to spreading the message about juicing and healthy living. He launched the world’s only accredited virtual School of Juice Therapy program, the “Juice Guru Certification Program” (December, 2014), recognized by the Complementary Medical Association. Steve produced the “Jay Kordich’s School of Juicing” with Jay and Linda Kordich in January, 2012. School of Juicing is an online coaching and mentoring program, teaching the fundamentals and health benefits of juicing (schoolofjuicing.com). Steve founded and co-produced the world’s largest online vegetarian summits, Veganpalooza: 2012 Vegetarian World Summit (veganpalooza.com) and Rawpalooza: 2012 Raw Food World Summit (rawpalooza.com). He also produced Evolvepalooza: 2013 Conscious Life World Summit (evolvepalooza.com).

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PLANT-BASED JOURNEY DOUBLE CHOCOLATE CHERRY TRUFFLES

PLANT-BASED JOURNEY DOUBLE

CHOCOLATE

CHERRY TRUFFLES by Lani Muelrath

YIELD: 24 TRUFFLES

My dear friend Colleen Holland, co-founder of VegNews magazine, created these truffles for a mutual friend’s birthday—and I’ve been a fan ever since. They taste like a walnut-fudge brownie, with hints of cherry and vanilla. I hope Colleen makes them for my next birthday . . . hey, a girl can dream!

Ingredients:

• 1/2 cup dried cherries

• 3 cups walnuts

• 1/4 cup cacao nibs

• 1/2 cup cacao powder

• Chopped walnuts, shredded coconut, or crushed cacao nibs, for dusting

• 1 teaspoon vanilla bean powder • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Steps:

• 1/4 teaspoon salt • 15 soft Medjool dates, pitted (about 1 1/2 cups)

1. Place the walnuts, cacao powder, vanilla powder, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor. Process until the nuts are finely chopped but not powdered. While the food processor is running, slowly add the dates one at a time until well combined. 2. Lightly pulse the food processor while adding the cherries and cacao nibs. The cherries should remain in pieces. 3. Roll the dough into 1-inch truffles and roll in the chopped walnuts, shredded coconut, or crushed cacao nibs. Store in the refrigerator or gift to a special person in your life!

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SOUTHWEST ROASTED ASPARAGUS AND CORN RECIPE

SOUTHWEST ROASTED ASPARAGUS AND CORN by Mark Reinfeld

Spring is on the here, meant to arrive later this month. Does anyone else think of asparagus when they think of spring? Find this recipe for Southwest Roasted Asparagus and Corn and a few other spring-green asparagus creations in our 30 Minute Vegan cookbook. This colorful dish works best with thin spears of asparagus. Thicker varieties will require more time. You can also grill the ingredients for an equally delightful experience.

Ingredients:

Preparation:

• 1 bunch Asparagus, chopped into 1-inch pieces

1. Preheat the over to 400 degrees F. Place the asparagus, corn, bell pepper, jalapeño, and olive oil in a bowl and mix well. Transfer to a baking sheet and roast until the asparagus is just tender, about 20 minutes, depending on the thickness of the asparagus.

• Kernels from 2 medium-size ears of corn, or 1 (10-ounce) bag frozen • 1 large red bell pepper, diced • 1 small jalapeño or other hot pepper, seeded and diced

2. Remove from the oven and place in a bowl with the remaining ingredients. Mix well and enjoy.

• 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro • 1 medium-size lime, juiced • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin • Sea salt • Black pepper

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SOUTHWEST ROASTED ASPARAGUS AND CORN RECIPE

About the Chef

Mark Reinfeld is the winner of Vegan.com’s Recipe of the Year Award for 2011 and has over 20 years experience preparing creative vegan and raw food cuisine. Mark was the Executive Chef for the North American Vegetarian Society’s 2012 Summerfest, one of the largest vegetarian conferences in the world. He is described by VegCooking.com as being “poised on the leading edge of contemporary vegan cooking”. Mark is the founding chef of the Blossoming Lotus Restaurant, winner of Honolulu Advertiser’s ‘Ilima Award for “Best Restaurant on Kaua’i”. Mark is also the recipient of a Platinum Carrot Award for living foods – a national award given by the Aspen Center of Integral Health to America’s top “innovative and trailblazing healthy chefs.”

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Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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HEALTHY COCONUT CARAMEL CORN

HEARTY COCONUT

CARAMEL CORN by Chef Tess Challis

SERVES 2; GF/SF/BLUE (ACCORDING TO THE HEALTH GUIDELINES IN MY BOOKS AND BE RADIANT PROGRAM)

Coconut Caramel: • 1/4 cup popcorn kernels • 1 tablespoon coconut oil • 2 tablespoons coconut sugar • 1 1/2 tablespoons EACH: brown rice syrup and agave nectar • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

Photo Credit: Michelle Donner

Years ago, I tried a version of coconut caramel corn, made without refined sugar. It was GOOD. Ever since, I’ve been determined to recreate it! I was pleasantly surprised with this recipe, because it was just as good - and even my daughter (who currently has attitude about coconut sugar) couldn’t get enough. It’s delish, has only natural sweeteners, and contains less fat than typical caramel corn. Hope you love it!!

Directions: 1. Pop the popcorn in an air popper. You might need to do this in two batches. Alternatively, you may pop it on the stove. Place the popcorn in a large bowl. 2. In a skillet set to medium heat, add the oil. Once it melts, add the remaining caramel ingredients and reduce heat to low. Gently boil for about two minutes. 3. Pour the caramel over the popcorn and stir - I use a heatproof rubber spatula to get all the caramel goodness out of the pan and then I stir the popcorn with it. 4. Allow to cool slightly and then serve. 

About the Author Tess Challis is an author, vegan chef, wellness coach, and cooking instructor. Tess began her holistic health journey in her late teens. After a lifetime of numerous health ailments (including severe acne, obesity, constant illnesses, anxiety, and depression), she found that a vegan diet along with an inner wellness regime made all the difference. In 1994, Tess began to work as a personal chef across the country. In 2008, she shifted her focus to writing, coaching, speaking, and teaching healthy plant-based cooking. Her books include Radiant Health, Inner Wealth, The Two-Week Wellness Solution (foreword by Dr. Neal Barnard), Radiance 4 Life (foreword by Robert Cheeke) and Get Waisted: 100 Addictively Delicious Plant-Based Entrees (co-authored by Dr. Mary Wendt). Tess’s greatest passion is helping others achieve radiant health and wellness - all while enjoying the most delicious foods on the planet! Tess resides in SW Colorado and Florida with her daughter, Alethea, Vegan Kid Chef.

VegWorld Magazine

Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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LOVE, LORI

LOVE, LORI

MONTHLY MUSINGS ON THE PLANT-BASED LIFESTYLE MONTHLY MUSINGS ON THE PLANT-BASED LIFESTYLE

IS FOOD LOVE?: by Lori Fryd

A

n infant learns through thousands of repetitions to associate food with love. The pain of their hunger is satisfied by a loving mother who provides them with nature’s most perfect food, all the while making eye contact, stroking, caressing and nurturing them.  Feeding is a time of extraordinary human bonding which gently and consistently coaxes the baby out of its little cocoon and lovingly encourages it to explore and interact with the wider world. 

my own body was. I believe that nursing my children was, indeed, an act of love, perhaps the most supreme and complete love I ever extended as a mother, because it was uncomplicated and truly perfect.  They needed me and I needed them and my own milk provided them with the purest form of sustenance there could ever be.  In the years that followed, motherhood became more complicated and challenging.  But, nursing was profound, elemental and deeply rewarding.

Nursing was one of the highlights of motherhood for me. I will never forget how complete and satisfying that act of providing nourishment through

So is food love? My answer is yes, it can be. But with one strict and unequivocal caveat:  It all depends upon the food. 

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LOVE, LORI

Just like nursing, providing the highest quality of natural and life-sustaining foods is, indeed, an expression of love. That means a whole food, plant-based diet. When I place a healthy, lifegiving meal in front of the people I care about most in the world – I’m saying I love you.

me those long-ago feelings of my days of nursing - feelings of joy, of pride, of accomplishment and satisfaction - those serene and soothing days, when I provided for my children the very best food there was for them at the time. Because I loved them.

No matter how exciting and delicious a Standard American Diet meal might be, no matter that you remembered that this was your loved ones’ favorite and made it especially for them, no matter how many happy, loving emotional associations they may have with the meaty, cheesy, buttery meals of their past – if it is food that injures their bodies and ultimately leads them towards illness and suffering – then, no, that food is not love. And we do no one any favors by presenting them with harmful foods under the guise of love. Plant-based eating, on the other hand, stirs my maternal instincts once again. It awakens within

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Time has passed. But, I can still offer up to my family the most perfect foods there are for them right now. I can still nurture and sustain and truly nourish them. Plant-based nutrition is Earth’s version of mother’s milk. With the help of a whole-food, plant-based diet, I can still use food to say I love you to my children.

As much now as I did back then.

Love, Lori Issue 33 - March/April 2016 |

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VegWorld Magazine

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