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VOL. 53 NO 4. SUMMER 2018 $25.00 (inc GST)

wa

grower WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

vegetablesWA launches new website This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by vegetablesWA together with: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA

Welcome Stonefruit WA

Water updates for the State


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inside Your vegetablesWA magazine

14

49

18 3

Local agrifood research bursary

41

In the business

85

vegetablesWA CEO’s Report

4

IEO Update

42

In the orchard

86

vegetablesWA President’s Report

5

Myalup-Wellington water project

46

In the packing shed

89

Committee of Management

6

In the market

90

New Committee Members

7

Industry Summit and Grower Tour

8

STONEFRUIT WA

91

YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA’s new website YOUR PRODUCTION

10 11

Area Freedom status for CLso

12

Soilborne diseases

14

Redbacks in broccoli

16

Metering deadline

18

Queensland fruit fly eradicated

20

Managing weeds

22

Permits 119

$500M to boost water infrastructure 48 Myalup water security

50

Automated plant counts

52

Gascoyne Food Council Update

54

Gascoyne Food’s artist-in-residence 56 Recognised Biosecurity Groups WA POTATOES

58 61

President’s Report

62

Recipes reap rewards for schools

64

Industry Development Strategy

65

POMEWEST

67

Executive Manager’s Report

68

25

Promoting BRAVO™ apples

70

Maturity testing equipment

26

BRAVO™ Season Review 2018

72

More sustainable crops

28

Perth Hills Festival

73

29

Integrated management

74

Striving for good quality apples

76

Buy West Eat Best’s 10th Anniversary 30

Following fruit quality

78

Financial Review and Benchmarking 34

Aussie Apples at Perth Royal Show

80

TOOL TIME

YOUR INDUSTRY

HortConnectWA 36 Biosecurity Blitz 2018 event

38

2018 Reg Miller Award Winner

40

WA CITRUS

81

From the Chair

82

In the industry

83

Chairman’s report

92

Summerfruit Australia Update

93

Season launch

93

YOUR BUSINESS

95

How to manage your cash flow

96

The Seasonal Worker Programme

98

Navigating your QA audit: Part 2

100

Single Touch Payroll

102

RIC Loans

104

YOUR MARKET

107

Asian veg spreads its roots

108

Export success in 2018

110

Export Facilitators Project Update 113 Western Australian Tradeshows

114

Boost for citrus exports

116

WA Industry & Export Awards

117

WHAT’S ON

124

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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VOL. 53 NO 4. SUMMER 2018

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WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948


YOUR CONTACTS

contacts vegetablesWA

Management Committee

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

President

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au

Maurice Grubisa m: 0413 050 182 Metro North

Operations Manager Rebecca Blackman t: (08) 9486 7515 e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au COVER IMAGE: Moore Veggies who grow capsicums and chillies in Carnarvon.

Photo: © Gascoyne Food Council & Anton Blume – Hi Way Plantation

Published by vegetablesWA This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • vegetablesWA • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA

© 2018 All articles and other material published in this magazine is vegetablesWA copyright (unless otherwise stated) and may not be reproduced in part or full without the written permission of the authors and publisher. DISCLAIMER: vegetablesWA make no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in WA Grower. Reliance on any information provided by vegetablesWA is entirely at your own risk. vegetablesWA is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from any vegetablesWA or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of WA Grower, or from reliance on information contained in the material or that vegetablesWA provide to you by any other means.

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Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au Industry Extension Officer Sam Grubiša m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au Benchmark Lead Bryn Edwards m: 0417 409 821 e: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Market Development Manager Claire McClelland m: 0477 477 044 e: claire.mcclelland@vegetableswa.com.au Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Finance & Administration Officer Christina Ford t: (08) 9486 7515 e: christina.ford@vegetableswa.com.au Export Development Project Lead Manus Stockdale m: 0448 897 652 e: manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au Life Members A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, S. Calameri, A. Harris*, A. Ingrilli, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P) and J. Turley. * Deceased

Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Carnarvon

Vice President Committee

Peter Dobra m: 0408 616 515 Gingin Lauren East m: 0419 047 371 Manjimup Paul Glavocich m: 0413 922 287 Gingin Peter Ivankovich m: 0428 919 211 Myalup Anthony Lieu m: 0401 558 886 Metro North Duc Nguyen t: (08) 9941 8376 Carnarvon Paul Shain m: 0419 041 045 Carnarvon

Agricultural Produce Commission APC Manager Ingrid Behr t: (08) 9368 3127 e: APCManager@dpird.wa.gov.au

Advertising For information on WA Grower advertising rates and sizing please go to: www.vegetableswa.com.au/wa-growersmagazine and click on the download media kit link.


your

industry associations

Your industry associations

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

CEO’s Report A

If you have a group of five or more and would like to organise the course, please contact our office and we can set it up. Sam and Truyen also travelled to Tasmania for the VegNET annual meeting in mid September.

BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

key priority for vegetablesWA in the last quarter has been meeting with industry and growers to provide feedback about the State Government’s proposed water licence fees. vegetablesWA is strongly opposed to any cost recovery for water licence permits, and we’ve attended meetings held by the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation to express this view. We will continue to oppose these unfair fees as we move beyond the consultation phase. We’ve also been busy working on solutions to industry labour problems. To best present our view vegetablesWA has recently become a member of the National Farmers Federation Horticulture Council. The federal government has made some changes to the Working Holiday and Seasonal Labour visas as result, but we will continue working to bring in an Ag Visa with worker protections and labour hire licensing. We’re working on a new and exciting water use and fertiliser efficiency project with the Smart Farms Grant, headed up by Perth NRM. The project will be using trials with vegetable growers in Wanneroo and Gingin. If you are interested please contact Sam Grubisa. Truyen has helped 14 Vietnamese growers obtain their chemical certification to finalise their Freshcare training.

They had a great tour of the Harvest Moon farm and the owners shared some very valuable industry insight, which Truyen and Sam will be happy to share with growers. Export Development Project Lead Manus Stockdale held the APC VPC funded Export Readiness workshop at Crown on October 26th. This workshop was well attend by growers who are interested in finding out what they might need to do to take the step to export. Claire recently travelled to Hong Kong for Asia Fruit Logistica and Dubai for World of Perishables and provided WA vegetable growers great opportunities to meet with exporters and trade contacts. Bryn has been all over the state with Planfarm facilitating workshops from Albany all the way up to Geraldton. They’ve been sharing findings from the State’s first Industry Benchmarking report released in August and giving growers tips on creating and maintaining a sustainable business.

Export Readiness workshop held during October.

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And of course we also recently hosted our annual Industry Summit, which becomes a bigger and better event every year. This year we had a range of events including a grower tour, cocktail function, HortConnectWA brunch, and Industry Summit. There were educational talks on soil health and water use, and interesting panel discussions about food innovation and ag tech. Bec and Christina did a great job in pulling off such a successful event. MORE INFORMATION John Shannon, phone 0488 111 526 or john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

President’s Report T

BY DAN KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

he Harvest season is coming to a close for 2018 in the Gascoyne Region. Reflecting back on this season some growers have had a win (not by much) and some haven’t, its just the nature of the beast in this industry. Looking back on prices across most vegetable lines the price has been as per previous season, however, I’m hearing the quality hasn’t i.e. tomatoes resulting in a poor return. Viruses have had a minimum impact this season across the board, growers are being more vigilant with their on-farm hygiene to ensure they don't become a host for the harmful pests. Some rockmelon growers have had issues with viruses in their early patches and some haven’t, you can do all the right things and still be affected. There has been talk of area-wide management of pests in the Gascoyne Region which could possibly be attached to the on-going Eradication of Fruit

Dr Doris Bleasing speaking on water use efficiency and soil health at the Summit.

Fly Project. If this were to happen it would be a great tool for the grower to use, it could provide an early warning system to the whole region. Not only would you be aware of the potential hazard coming, but identify which pest is on its way allowing the grower time to prepare, minimise the potential damage on farm and be in control. I would like to see this eventually in all growing regions. Perth and the southern growing regions are beginning their season and wish them all the best. Water is still an issue and potential extra water licence fees to be added to the growers ever growing costs. If you would like more information on this matter or want to voice your opinion, please contact vegetablesWA to keep you updated. vegetablesWA hosted the Industry Summit on the 26th of October at Crown Perth, it was pleasing to see a very good turn out and great to see some growers there for the first time. I encourage growers to attend this summit in the future (yes, I know you are all busy BUT) the information provided in these summits are for the growers to gain more knowledge. Dr Doris Bleasing was a guest speaker on water use efficiency and soil health. It was very interesting for me because my brother Rob and I have implemented the practises for about five years and have seen great results, hearing her speak reassured

me that I was on the right track. I would like to thank all the guest speakers for making themselves available and presenting great information.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Vice President Maurice Grubisa and the rest of the Committee of Management for their continual support through out of this year. To John Shannon, Rebecca Blackman and the rest of the vegetablesWA staff for their great work in 2018 and supporting the vegetable levy paying growers in Western Australia. Most of all I would like to thank all the vegetable levy paying growers for your commitment to this industry, you are the driving force through good times and bad. I would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a very prosperous 2019. Stay safe over the holidays. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

Committee of Management

D

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

uring September, vegetablesWA hosted our Annual General Meeting and this year Mr Dan Kuzmicich from Carnarvon, was voted as President for an additional year.

The Committee of Management has had new members voted in with two resignations. The Committee is made up of the following growers: • Mr Dan Kuzmicich — President Carnarvon • Mr Maurice Grubisa — Vice President Wanneroo • Mr Peter Dobra — Gingin • Mr Duc Nguyen — Carnarvon • Mr Peter Ivankovich — Myalup

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

This AGM also saw the resignation of Bao Nguyen from Geraldton, Bao has been on the committee for three years and we wish him well for the future.

• Mr Paul Shain — Carnarvon

MORE INFORMATION

• Ms Lauren East — Manjimup

If you wish to contact the Committee Members please visit the website for their details www.vegetableswa.com.au/about/ or contact the office on (08) 9486 7515.

• Mr Paul Glavocich — Gingin • Mr Anthony Lieu — Carabooda Ms Maureen Dobra stood down from the Committee this year, after

6

stepping down from the President role a few years ago. Maureen has worked tirelessly for the WA vegetable growing community during her time on the committee. We are very appreciative of the effort that Maureen has gone to over the years.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

New Committee Members

BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

Peter Dobra

Paul Glavocich

Anthony Lieu

R&D Manager The Loose Leaf Lettuce Company, Gingin Enterprises Year round: spinach, baby leaf lettuce, rocket, mizuna, tatsoi, chard, radicchio, baby cos and baby kale

Owner Glavocich Produce, Gingin Enterprises Summer crops: zucchini, silverbeet and kale; winter crops: sweet potato, parsnip and garlic

Manager Landsdale Strawberry Farm Pty Ltd, Carabooda Enterprises Summer crops: capsicum, eggplant, gourmet Roma and grape tomato; winter crop: strawberries

PETER is a third generation grower, with both his paternal and maternal grandparents involved in the industry. His grandparents grew everything from potatoes to lettuce. As a young boy, gourmet veg such as radish, turnips, Dutch carrots, bunched spinach and gourmet lettuce were the family’s crops of choice. The Loose Leaf Lettuce Company started as a side venture for Peter’s sisters, until the delights of travel lured them from the farm, leaving Peter’s parents and brother to take on the ever-growing client list. As the R&D Manager, Peter is always looking to increase efficiency and quality. However, as a family run, primary industry business, his daily duties are never set in stone — so adaptability is key.

WHEN you are of Croatian descent in WA, you’re likely either be a grower or are related to one. Paul hits the mark on the former as a second generation grower, with his baby son Ben the future third generation of this dynasty. Paul’s father began the family business on a property in Wattleup in 1986, growing carrots and onions where he is still producing. A few years ago, Paul decided to take the leap and buy a property of his own in Gingin; to grow the business and create a life with his wife, for the next generation of Glavocichs’.

WITH the launch of HortConnectWA and its ambition to connect and support the new generation of Horticulture professionals; the addition of our youngest member Anthony, to the vegetablesWA Committee of Management, is a dividend that will certainly pay off. As a second generation grower Anthony is set to take over from his father, who established their successful business in 2003 on a farm in Landsdale. Working to ensure the farms efficiency and sustainability for his family future, means Anthony brings a level of enthusiasm to brighten the sometimes harsh reality of farm life.

Peter’s nomination and acceptance to the vegetablesWA Committee of Management brings a unique view to the board. Having spent 13 years focusing on improving his own farm processes, he would now like to assist the wider industry. With a varied background and involvement on the farm, Peter can offer a valuable perspective on process, procedure and production. His belief is that having growers from all regions with diverse backgrounds, allows the Committee to have a wider industry perspective, with a greater pool of knowledge.

With childhood weekends and holidays spent helping on the farm, Paul was destined to be a grower. He has completed an apprenticeship in horticulture, providing him with a solid foundation on which to develop his skills and build on knowledge he has gained in field. A stint as a truck driver added to the essential matrix of abilities required for life on the farm. All former avenues of employment have lead Paul back to the farm, where he now stands as the owner of his own business. Having progressed his family business from a small- to medium-scale operation, Paul has learnt many lessons from trial and error and sees his position on the vegetablesWA Committee of Management as a way to share those experiences. As well as having a voice in the decisions of the wider industry, Paul’s enthusiasm to contribute ideas and concerns from a younger, newer generations perspective will be a benefit to the organisation and those involved in horticulture.

A university degree and working in ventures outside of horticulture allow Anthony to view not only his own farm, but the wider industry with fresh eyes. Seeing his father transition from hardworking farm employee to thriving business owner has taught Anthony the merits of hard work. Through trial and error, the farm has grown in size and reputation, with Anthony now wanting to develop the knowledge he has learnt from his father and use it to encourage and educate others. Supporting the next generation of growers by sharing experiences and circulating information, reinforces the value that ‘new blood’ will bring to the industry as a whole. MORE INFORMATION Contact the office on (08) 9486 7515.

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Vegetable

Industry Summit

O

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

n Thursday 25th October, vegetablesWA two day Grower Tour & Industry Summit commenced, we had a number of events planned over the two days to provide growers with R&D information to think about utilising in their businesses.

Grower Group Tour

& Grower Tour

Grower Tour The grower tour, sponsored by Rural Bank & Bendigo Bank, commenced with almost 50 people heading to Center West Exports to view the packing facility and hear from experts Doris Blaesing, RMCG on soil health and Julie O’Halloran, Department of Agriculture QLD and her team on precision agriculture. Francis Tedesco and his team were very open with showing everyone around the packing facility and explaining how

it all worked. It was eye opening to see the mechanisation and human power working together, from everything starting with grading all the way through to the palletising machine. After the tour of the facility we heard from Doris Blaesing, RMCG who has run soil trials on the Center West property for custom made compost and the focus was on disease suppression; cavity spot and maintaining organic carbon and structure in intensively cropped, sandy soils. Following Doris we heard from the Precision Ag project team, Julie O’Halloran & Celia van Sprung from Department of Agriculture QLD and Angelica Suarez; University of New England.

They all provided insights to the current project running on the property which has included ground truthing satellite images of crop variations and the yield monitor which is running on the harvester. At the conclusion of the tour we ended the night with a cocktail function for the growers attending the Export Workshop the following day and the Grower Tour, this was a great way for everyone to get to know each other.

HortConnectWA Brunch The Friday commenced with the HortConnectWA Brunch which was the first major event for the newly formed group. HortConnectWA aims to bring together like-minded young horticulture professionals to engage in social and professional networking. You can read more about the event on page 36.

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Cocktail Reception Industry Summit

Industry Summit Following the brunch the vegetablesWA Industry Summit commenced with a stellar line up and the afternoon kicked off with MC, Di Darmody running the event. With over 115 people in attendance the room was packed with growers and industry eager to hear from the days speakers. We started with a hot topic in WA at the moment, water. We heard from speakers regarding water use efficiency and its impact on soil health and water licence cost recovery fees. Following this we took a detour into a more technical look at precision agriculture and how you can utilise the technology. After a short break for everyone to stretch their legs we started on the innovation train with presentations about food innovation and utilising waste products. Moving straight onto ag tech and how to robotize your packing area.

The very successful event would not have been possible without our speakers so we would like to thank each of you for attending and providing insights into your area of expertise and passing them onto the growers. The afternoon sessions completed with a networking function where growers, stakeholders and speakers got to engage one on one.

We would like to thank our funders Hort Innovation, Agriculture Produce Commission — Vegetable Producers Committee and sponsors Rural Bank & Bendigo Bank Gingin along with all of the growers and stakeholders who attended. We have set the date for our events for next year so please keep the 17th and 18th October 2019 free to join in.

MORE INFORMATION Contact Rebecca Blackman: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

V

egetablesWA has been working on updating and modernising our website for a number of months. The key driver behind spending time to re-visit the website was to enable growers to be able to find information and resources easier and be able to download them on multiple platforms. We have had an exciting few months with launching the Monthly Wrap Video, now the new website and the vegetablesWA Podcast will be next off the block early next year.

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LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

With all of the new tools we hope it will enable you as the grower to be able to contact, engage and get the information you need easily to run your business. Some key features of the website are: • Resources in easy downloadable formats • Access to videos • The latest news • A new event calendar — linking through to Eventbrite If a resource you need isn’t on the website please get in contact so we can make it as useful as possible. Make sure you head to the website www. vegetableswa.com.au to check it out!

MORE INFORMATION Contact Rebecca Blackman: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR PRODUCTION

your

production Your production WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Maintaining Area Freedom status for CLso

T

he Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is continuing work to regain market access for Western Australian potatoes following the detection of tomato potato psyllid (TPP) in February 2017.

Access for seed and ware potatoes has recently been regained for New South Wales, Victoria, and Queensland. Potato tubers must be free of leaves, stem material or other green material, and Queensland requires potatoes to be brushed or washed. People wishing to export to these states are encouraged to contact Quarantine WA (QWA) on qa@agric.wa.gov.au or (08) 9334 1800. Extensive surveillance and testing of more than 10,000 psyllids for the associated bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) was completed over three growing seasons across 2017 and 2018. This was done under a nationally cost shared response, and this testing confirmed that CLso is not present in Australia.

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WA met the national surveillance requirements in the ‘Transition to Management’ phase to demonstrate absence of CLso in WA, and Western Australia has issued an Area Freedom Certificate for CLso to all other states. WA is continuing to work with South Australia as they review their interstate movement restrictions related to CLso. Ongoing surveillance in WA will be required to maintain area freedom for CLso.

DPIRD is leading surveillance efforts required to rebuild and maintain trade.

33EXTENSIVE surveillance and testing of more than 10,000 psyllids for the associated bacteria CLso was completed over three growing seasons.

Whilst it was determined that TPP is not eradicable from WA, there is significant benefit in knowing if CLso is present or absent in the state. DPIRD is leading surveillance efforts required to rebuild and maintain trade for the estimated $4–$5m of seed and ware potatoes lost when TPP was detected in WA. In addition, in the event of detection of CLso, WA growers will have early warning to plan and prepare to minimise any negative impacts.


© J. E. M uny ane za, US

Surveillance is spread over 13 modified local government areas that include the shires of Gingin, Chittering, Wanneroo, Swan, Armadale, Kalamunda, Mundaring, Cockburn, Kwinana, Mandurah, Rockingham, South Perth, Canning, Victoria Park, Belmont, Gosnells, Mosman Park, Cottesloe, Nedlands, Claremont, Subiaco, Cambridge, Perth, Peppermint Grove, Vincent, Fremantle, East Fremantle, Melville, Stirling, Bayswater, Bassendean and Joondalup.

(US)

YOUR PRODUCTION

© Plant Health & Environment Laboratory, Ministry for Primary Industries, Auckland, NZ

Two rounds of surveillance, one in spring and the other in autumn, are required each year to collect the data to issue the Area Freedom Certificate to allow trade with other states, and to provide confidence to trading partners that Australia is free of CLso.

ss ac Pa nnow , Ko S R -A DA

This spring, over 200 DPIRD staff along with local government employees have done a great job in trapping TPP to provide the Psyllids needed to test for CLso in the urban and peri-urban areas. However, we still urgently need industry support — especially in Wanneroo, Swan and Mundaring where our TPP trapping numbers were low and have struggled to capture TPP required that help maintain Area Freedom’ status. Whilst the vegetable and nursery industries management of the psyllid has been good and either none, or low numbers were detected in crops, psyllids are still attracted to the large areas of host crops on commercial properties. In light of this, DPIRD is seeking several growers of capsicum, tomatoes, chillies and eggplants to set traps on the borders of their properties to trap incoming psyllids attracted to these crops.

33TOP: Symptoms of zebra chip (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum) on potatoes. INSET: Symptoms of zebra chip (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum) on fried chips. 33ABOVE: Growers should regularly check for signs of TPP in host crops.

Given that TPP has already been determined to be not technically feasible to eradicate, DPIRD would like to make it clear that if CLso is found in the TPP population outside a protected or secure facility, it is unlikely in most cases that DPIRD would impose movement restrictions within the state, or place properties under quarantine.

This surveillance is important to maintain the freedom WA has worked hard to achieve and resulted in some states again accepting WA potatoes.

With this in mind, we are seeking producers, both vegetable and nursery, that may be able to assist in Wanneroo, Swan and Mundaring, to adopt traps to capture TPP to ensure the data requirements to maintain area freedom are achieved.

Email don.telfer@agric.wa.gov.au or rohan.prince@dpird.wa.gov.au if you can help.

MORE INFORMATION Please respond to Don Telfer (manager of CLso surveillance) or Rohan Prince (Director of Horticulture) if you are able to help.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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YOUR PRODUCTION

t h g i l l a c i t c a r p a Shedding on challenging

Recap on the farm walk as part of the Soilborne Disease Master Class in Virginia, SA

T

BY CARL LARSEN RMCG

he Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) projects work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice. This edition provides an update from the Virginia demonstration site in South Australia, as well as a number of resources that provide practical tips and tools on managing soilborne diseases in a range of vegetable crops.

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In September, growers and industry service providers descended on Adelaide for the fourth Soil Wealth ICP Soilborne Disease Master Class. The Master Class provided and discussed the core principles and cutting-edge knowledge for managing soilborne disease in different vegetable production systems.

As part of the Master Class, participants visited our demonstration site in Virginia, SA hosted by Braham Produce. Braham Produce grow capsicums in soil under greenhouse systems. The key messages from the field visit were: • Use soil fumigation strategically in a monoculture, actively manage soil biology via compost and biological products and be strict about hygiene and biosecurity

• Monitor all inputs and their effects via soil, plant and water testing for nutrients and diseases, and adjust management according to results — it pays • Keep on top of new technology by working with suppliers and researchers through on-farm trials. You can find out more about the demonstration site on the project website, www.soilwealth.com.au.

Clubroot management in brassica vegetables: fact sheet Clubroot is one of the most potentially devastating soil borne diseases affecting brassica vegetables (e.g. cabbages, cauliflower, broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts) in Australia. Once plants are infected there are no effective control measures. A practical fact sheet has been developed that assists with identifying clubroot, clubroot management strategies including integrated approaches, as well as evaluating clubroot risk.


YOUR PRODUCTION JULY 2018

Yellowing and wilting cucumbers

OOT CLUBRGE MENT MANA ICA IN BRASSBLES VEGETA

INTRODUCTION

8

EMENT OT MANAG CLUBRO S GIE STRATE agement 1. Crop

and soil dments

affected by Fusarium wilt.

Fusarium is a genus of common soil-borne fungi. Most live as saprophytes on decaying plant matter while a few are also important plant pathogens. These plant pathogenic Fusarium fungi are necrotrophs (they feed

May 201

man

ing ive in reduc ing nam is effect as a seedl ide fluazi d either 4,5 . The fungic when applie planting infection at trans clubroot drench 1 or as a soil drench to ptibility choice d be vary in susce Brassica choice shoul vegetables cultivar and Brassica ) rios. • (see below risk scena in highclubroot considered be used should carefully cultivars strategy resistance gement ars Clubroot rated mana • ant cultiv Banana-shaped of an integ of resist Fusarium spores. as part planting repeated resistance. however a loss of in may result

Soil Amen added lime – 7.5 with pH of 7.0 Lime g a soil oot. Maintainin ct of clubr • e the impa are often can reduc Quicklime) ct cts (e.g. um produ lime produ . the optim Reactive however • en soil types raise pH, vary betwe products is used to red will us subtil Biocontrol le for soil. nt requi s (eg. Bacill rates suitab and amou ntrol agent as a soil advice on ing to er d bioco applied transplant Seek furth ulatum) Formulate oot prior to • adium caten can reduce clubr one week 6. and Gliocl at least 1. planting Apply • ure is low at trans toxicity drench se press avoid phyto when disea infection g soluble nt addin 7 manageme over watering. er than Calcium nt irrigation incidence. pH is great to preve Soil and clubroot When soil increasing irrigation reduce • (e.g. ge can mide ture Mana salts cyani • calcium ve soil struc to improve calcium soil to impro m) ations of g calciu beneficial 3 soil applic Take steps • or addin nce . m, pH and Repeated logging. matter • ot incide organic se soil calciu ise water e clubro can increa and minim help reduc drainage which all providing microbes, fit of also the bene nitrate which nitrate has form of Calcium • e in the acidifying en sourc oot, unlike a nitrog st clubr ct again 4 . helps prote fertilisers economical ammonium ive and 3 is an effect cts . in rows m produ Banding for calciu • method application nt developme ion and Boron soil in its the infect d to the Boron inhib • can be applie e fertiliser. oot and m nitrat of clubr with calciu sodium lation or acid formu d as boric advice on further be applie bor. Seek It can also • Granu e.g. crop. tetraborate le for your are suitab rates that disease s established control Fungicide control. will not protectant Fungicides provide • they may however

MANAGING FUSARIUM DISEASES IN VEGETABLE CROPS on dead plant tissue) – which implies they produce enzymes or toxins that kill plant cells as they invade.

Fusarium pathogens of vegetables produce characteristic banana-shape d spores (macroconidia ), as well as other smaller, jellybean-shaped ones (called microconidia) and small resting bodies (chlamydospores and sclerotia). These chlamydospor es and sclerotia can survive in soils for several years.

Wilt diseases

While there are many different pathogenic Fusarium species, some of the most damaging diseases are caused by strains of one species complex, Fusarium oxysporum. They cause vascular wilt diseases by entering the roots and colonising the water-conduct ing tissue (xylem) and then spreading up into stems where they secrete enzymes and toxins that destroy the surrounding tissue. This causes older leaves to yellow and plants eventually wilt and die.

1

Access all the resources at

soilwealth.com.au 2

Managing fusarium diseases in vegetable crops: fact sheet Fusarium is a genus of common soilborne fungi. Most live as saprophytes on decaying plant matter while a few are also important plant pathogens.

While there are many different pathogenic Fusarium species, some of the most damaging diseases are caused by strains of one species complex, Fusarium oxysporum. They cause vascular wilt diseases by entering the roots and colonising the water-conducting tissue (xylem). This causes older leaves to yellow and plants eventually wilt and die.

33AS part of the Master Class, participants visited our demonstration site in Virginia, SA hosted by Braham Produce.

Soilborne disease video series: practical tips and tools

• Bottom rot in lettuce

A series of six videos providing practical guidance on the identification, causes and management of soilborne diseases have been produced and are now available on the project website.

• Summer root rot in parsley

These short videos feature plant pathologist and expert Dr Len Tesoriero, and cover: • Basel plate rot in leeks • Big vein in lettuce

• Club root in brassicas

MORE INFORMATION You can access all the resources in this article, as well as news and events from around the country, at www.soilwealth.com.au. For more information, please contact project leaders Dr Gordon Rogers on (02) 8627 1040 or email gordon@ahr.com.au and Dr AnneMaree Boland on (03) 9882 2670 or email anne-mareeb@rmcg.com.au.

• Black rot in brassicas

The team have written a useful fact sheet on fusarium wilt diseases, factors that favour fusarium diseases, and management strategies.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: VG16078

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YOUR PRODUCTION

What’s a redback doing in my broccoli? BY DR JENNY EKMAN APPLIED HORTICULTURE RESEARCH

W

hile hard to measure, it seems some consumers are making the connection between fewer pesticides during vegetable production and the occasional unwanted hitchhiker afterwards.

Major outbreaks appear to coincide with hot, dry summers. 3 COMPLAINTS about redbacks in broccoli have come from all states in Australia, so this is a common problem.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018


YOUR PRODUCTION

However, there is one creature for which no explanation or justification will be accepted. The issue of redback spiders in broccoli first crawled into the headlines in 2016. Since then there have been numerous complaints. Unfortunately these are often via social media, resulting in negative press that can go around Australia and, indeed, the world. Redback spiders (Latrodectus hasseltii) have also occasionally been found hiding inside bunches of table grapes. They are very difficult to spot, at least until the grapes are eaten. The spiders are also occasionally found in pumpkin fields, on cotton, and grains. Complaints about redbacks in broccoli have come from all states in Australia, so this is a common problem. ‘Redback season’ extends from January to June, with most finds during April – May. This is not surprising, as the end of summer is when populations are maximised. Despite their fearsome reputation, redbacks are generally timid. The spiders are nocturnal ground dwellers, which really just want a quiet life protected from wind, rain and extremes of temperature. Sheds, pump-houses, electrical boxes and, of course, outdoor toilets are perfect; broccoli crops are not their natural habitat. Major outbreaks of redbacks appear to coincide with hot, dry summers — as forecast this year. At 25–30°C a tiny spiderling can mature into an adult female in only 6–8 weeks. Although males mature even faster, they are inconspicuous at only 1/50th the size of their sisters, and have a far less venomous bite. Each egg sac produces an average of around 110 spiderlings, so a single one can cause a significant infestation. However, unlike other spiders, there is little evidence redback spiderlings disperse on the wind. Instead, they walk. As a result roads, watercourses and open areas all act as natural barriers to dispersal.

Population spread mainly occurs through hitchhiking on equipment, machinery and vehicles. This means that if spiders have entered a crop, they have likely done so with human assistance. The key prey of redbacks includes beetles, millipedes and other ground dwelling insects. These are not usually regarded as pests, so may not be controlled in crops. It seems possible that the shift to integrated pest management (IPM) has increased survival of both spiders and their prey. However, it is not yet clear if redback spiders are actually present in broccoli crops, or infest broccoli after harvest. If spiders are present on harvesting bins, it is possible they may climb up into the heads during cold storage. Social media photos of redbacks in broccoli heads appear to support this theory, as no webbing is visible on the heads themselves. Once inside the broccoli head, redback spiders can easily survive the conditions in the supply chain. They can tolerate temperatures below zero and above 45°C, and live for months without food.

Detergents are deadly to redback spiders, so washing bins and materials before use provides extra protection. Hygiene is particularly important if broccoli follows a crop such as pumpkins, where redbacks can potentially flourish. No chemicals are registered for controlling redback spiders on broccoli crops. However, there are a number of products which can be used to kill spiders on equipment and machinery and to disinfest harbourages. These contain active ingredients such as bifenthrin (e.g. Terminate 80 SC), chlorpyrifos (e.g. Chlorban 500 EC) and α-cypermethrin (e.g. Fendona). MORE INFORMATION For more information, an eight page guide on managing redbacks in broccoli crops is available from the vegetablesWA office, or contact Dr Jenny Ekman 0407 384 285.

The best way to reduce the risk of redbacks contaminating broccoli is by thoroughly cleaning the equipment used to grow and harvest the crop. WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR PRODUCTION

New year’s deadline for metering of licenses between 50–500ML

A

ll water licensees across Western Australia with an annual licensed entitlement between 50–500ML per year will need to be ready to measure and submit their water use from 31 December 2018 onwards.

3 Ensure the meter and installation complies with the Rights in Water and Irrigation (Approved meters) Order 2009.

New meters need to be registered online with your water licence.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

3 METERING helps keep the resource sustainable and protects reliability of entitlements.


YOUR PRODUCTION

This means licensees need to have approved meters installed or an approved alternative measurement arrangement in place by the end of the year if they are to be compliant with the Rights in Water and Irrigation Regulations 2000. Department of Water and Environmental Regulation Executive Director Regional Delivery Paul Brown said if licensees in this volume category haven’t already prepared for the new regulations coming into force, they need to be working now to ensure that they have an approved meter correctly installed at each draw point by the end of the year. “Under the new regulations it is the responsibility of licensees to ensure the meter is maintained, in good working order and operating within a range of plus or minus 5% of the quantity of water that actually passes through it, when tested in field conditions,” Mr Brown said. “Unless you are exempt or have an approved alternative measurement approach, you need to have your meters up and running by 31 December to start recording your water use.” The new regulations require licensees to register details of the meter installation including date of installation, size, type, serial number and location. “Licensees need to be guided by the Rights in Water and Irrigation (Approved meters) Order 2009 in buying and installing a meter, which is available from our website or by contacting the department,” Mr Brown said. “If you are having problems meeting the deadline for meter installation, it is important that you contact the relevant Department of Water and Environmental Regulation regional office and advise them of this so they can assist you with compliance.” Under the new regulations, water users need to record monthly meter readings and then submit them to the department annually. “Unless otherwise approved, all meter readings must be submitted via the department’s Water Online metering portal, by entering meter installation details against your water licence,” Mr Brown said. He said the department was busy responding to requests for approvals for alternative measurement, typically

applied to surface water use associated with dams. “Alternative forms of measurement approved for surface water may include but not be limited to dam surveys, installation of staff gauges, or monitoring of water levels. “The department has been working with surface water licensees since letters reminding users of the new regulations coming into force were sent out. “Alternative measurement arrangements still involve a requirement to submit agreed information related to water use. There may still be a requirement for meters to be used where, for instance, two users take water from a single dam.” Mr Brown said under special circumstances, exemptions from measurement were available, but these were generally only granted in the rare circumstances where there is limited benefit to managing the resource.

The new metering regulations override any pre-existing metering licence conditions. Failure to comply with the new regulations is an offence and can result in an infringement of $400, or if the matter goes to court as a prosecution, a penalty of $2000 and daily penalty of $200 under prosecution. "We have always worked with licensed users to help them bring their water use in line with entitlements before we prosecute, and we will be doing the same with the metering regulations,” Mr Brown said.

“The aim is for both the user and the department to have a more accurate Metering picture of actual water requirements use so we can work for water users together to keep the taking between resource sustainable 10–50ML begins and ensure reliability 31 December of entitlements.

As demand for water has grown and resources in many areas are close to or fully allocated, pressure on resources has increased, particularly in the south west of the State where reduced rainfall as a result of climate change is a major risk to security of entitlements. Management of water resources now requires more accurate information, which includes direct measurement of licensed water use. The department first announced the plans for a staged introduction of mandatory metering in 2016 through the release of the Measuring the take of water policy. “We let water users know then that measurement would be coming in staged over several years starting in 2018,” Mr Brown said.

2019.

He also reminded licensees that incorrect installation of a meter so that it does not accurately measure water, or tampering with meters, is also a prosecutable offence.

“Under the Rights in Water and Irrigation Regulations 2000 it is an offence to damage a meter, or install or alter a meter or any associated fittings, so that the meter does not accurately measure the quantity of water being taken. “The department has prosecuted water users for tampering with State-owned meters in the past, and considers it a serious offence consistent with deliberate theft of water. “We are happy to work with licensees through any issues they have as metering rolls out across the State.”

Following the enactment of the Rights in Water and Irrigation Amendment Regulations 2018 in February this year, metering of licenses of 500ML per year or more started on 31 March.

MORE INFORMATION

Metering requirements will kick in for water users taking between 10–50ML per year from the Gnangara mound on 31 December 2019, and then to all other water users of 10ML per year or more across Western Australia by the end of 2020.

To register your meter and begin submitting meter readings go to https://online.water. wa.gov.au/.

More information including fact sheets and frequently asked questions can be found at www.water.wa.gov.au/licensing under Metering and Measurement.

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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Queensland fruit f ly

eradication success

D

epartment of Primary Industries and Regional Development efforts have once again protected our horticultural industries from the devastating impact of Queensland fruit fly (Qfly).

Following the detection of a number of male Qfly in May this year in the Perth suburb of Como, an outbreak was instigated. Following a dedicated and extensive response program, eradication was declared at the beginning of November, and local growers have been able to reclaim area freedom.

A Quarantine Area was established within a 1.5km radius of the detection points, and a 15km Suspension Zone was established. This suspended Qfly area freedom and prevented fruit from within that area from being sold without treatment. Qfly area freedom for the remainder of Western Australia remained in place throughout the response. The Quarantine Area restrictions introduced in May 2018, encompassing Como, South Perth, Karawara, Bentley and Kensington, have now been lifted, meaning that local people can now share their home-grown fruit and vegetables with people outside of the area.

There have been no further Qfly detections in the quarantine area since May 2018.

There have been no further Qfly detections in the quarantine area since May 2018.

Department plant biosecurity manager Darryl Hardie said the eradication campaign led by the department involved a concerted effort involving support from industry, local government, businesses, community gardens and groups, markets and local residents.

Under the Australian Fruit Fly Code of Practice, the department response to the outbreak was immediate, involving the placement of supplementary traps within 200m of each detection point (Outbreak Zone), and commencing weekly baiting and surveillance of all host trees and plants within this area.

“During the baiting program, significant effort went into making direct contact with all residents within the Outbreak Zone to seek access to their properties to check for host plants/ trees, and if needed to carry out ongoing bait spraying and surveillance,” Dr Hardie said.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

“Contact was made with 94% (1182 properties), and more than 3500 baitings on 608 properties were carried out throughout the campaign. “The willingness of residents to accommodate weekly visits from department officers played a critical role in successful eradication.” Also critical to successful eradication was the participation of the community at large in complying with Quarantine Area restrictions on the movement and disposal of home-grown fruit and vegetables. While baiting of properties close to the detections finished in August, the Quarantine Area period was extended until 2 November to take into account the winter months, when flies can become dormant. Dr Hardie said this provided additional assurance that all efforts were being taken to achieve eradication. “The department appreciates that ongoing compliance with the Quarantine Area restrictions over such a long period was difficult, but this was a key factor in achieving this great outcome,” he said. “The department and WA’s horticultural growers would like to acknowledge and thank everyone who cooperated and assisted with the outbreak.”


YOUR PRODUCTION

Pests or plant damage of concern can be reported via the MyPestGuideTM Reporter.

3 DEPARTMENT of Primary Industries and Regional Development contractor Rodney Phillips and City of South Perth waste supervisor Daniel Roepen.

Western Australia is again free of Qfly and this is the sixth time since the 1980s that the department has successfully eradicated this species. “Thanks to the department’s permanent fruit fly trapping system of 1900 traps across the Perth metropolitan area, all new outbreaks have been detected early — allowing the department to act quickly. This early warning system helps WA to prove area freedom from Qfly,” Dr Hardie said. 3 PENHROS College Year 2 students looking at Queensland fruit fly quarantine information with Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development officer Jemma Thomas.

“If Qfly was to become established in WA, the impact on horticultural industries would be dramatic and devastating, and additionally would make it difficult to grow backyard fruit and vegetables.”

3 DEPARTMENT of Primary Industries and Regional Development officers David Budd (right) and contractor Rodney Phillips discuss Queensland fruit fly surveillance and trapping with Como resident Helen Buckley.

The department is reminding everyone to be aware of the risk of new pests and diseases becoming established in WA, and to keep a look out for unusual pests or plant damage. Early detection of serious threats enables the department to act quickly and ensure there is no spread of the pest. MORE INFORMATION Pests or plant damage of concern can be reported via the MyPestGuideTM Reporter app or online — both are available from mypestguide.agric.wa.gov.au. Anyone with further questions about the eradication program should contact our Pest and Disease Information Service on (08) 9368 3080.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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Managing weeds through winter cover cropping: results from year 1 of Myalup trial BY MICHAEL COLEMAN, PAUL KRISTIANSEN, CHRIS FYFE AND BRIAN SINDEL UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND (UNE)

A

Hort Innovationfunded trial site in Myalup has illustrated the ways in which different cover crop types can suppress weed germination and growth. UNE’s first winter cover crop trial to understand the impact of different types on weeds in Western Australian vegetable production was completed in July. Working with Ivankovich Farms (Myalup), the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and David Grays, this research is part of the Hort Innovation-funded project VG15070 A strategic approach to weed management for the Australian vegetable industry.

The goals of this project and the cover crop trial were discussed in more detail in the Winter, 2018, edition of the WA Grower magazine. Here, we summarise some of the preliminary results and provide further information on next steps.

Soil samples were also collected at planting to provide baseline data on the weed seed bank.

Six cover crop types were planted in this replicated trial, and grown for 90 days before incorporation. The types were:

• biomass and ground cover percentage data for each cover crop;

• Field peas (Pisum sativum; 90kg/ha) • Cereal rye (Secale cereale; 180kg/ha) • Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum; 22kg/ha) • Caliente (Brassica juncea; 12 kg/ha) • BQ Mulch (25% Brassica nigra, 75% Brassica abyssinica or Brassica carinata; 10 kg/ha) • A biofumigant mix provided by David Grays (comprising Brassica juncea and Eruca sativa; 13 kg/ha) All cover crops were monitored at 14, 28, and 42 days after sowing (DAS) to measure the growth and canopy cover of each, and the number and species of weeds present within each cover crop.

The team from David Grays provided support during end of cover crop monitoring by collecting cover crop and weed biomass samples.

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Final monitoring of the cover crops was carried out 90 DAS. This included collecting:

• biomass and density (number of plants per square metre) of weeds within each cover crop; and • soil sample collection to provide data on the weed seed bank within each cover crop at the end of the first year of the trial. Some of the main weed species observed within the cover crop plots included fat hen (Chenopodium album), milk thistle (Sonchus oleraceus), pigweed (Portulaca oleracea) and wireweed (Polygonum aviculare). These are amongst the most common weeds of the vegetable industry across much of Australia.


YOUR PRODUCTION

A management guide for fat hen is available for download from our website, and guides for milk thistle and pigweed are in preparation.

TABLE 1 Weed density and weed biomass, Myalup, April-July 2018 Cover crop

Weed density (plants/m2)

Weed biomass (grams/m2)

13.5

17.7

Field peas

Figure 1 illustrates the percentage of ground cover observed in all the cover crops. Table 1 provides summary weed density and biomass data collected during final monitoring of the trial. The weed seed bank study is ongoing, and results from this study will be made available through the project Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ iwmvegetables).

7.8

0.4

Italian ryegrass

Cereal rye

10.5

3.1

Caliente

15.5

2.7

BQ Mulch

18.5

2.6

Biofumigant mix

14.5

2.5

As Figure 1 illustrates, cereal rye covered the ground considerably faster in the first 14 and 28 DAS compared with the other cover crops in the trial. Figure 1 also illustrates that at 90 DAS, all cover crop types showed a similar ground cover percentage, with some types exceeding the cereal rye data by this stage.

Table 1 shows that this rapid ground cover establishment correlated with a considerably reduced weed burden in the cereal rye plots at the end of the trial, both in terms of the number of weeds per square metre and the weed biomass.

33THESE aerial views show the site at 14 DAS (top) and 28 DAS (bottom). The cereal rye plots are marked in red, and showed a visibly greater rate of establishment than the other cover crops trialled.

This suggests that the weeds within the cereal rye were not only less frequent but also considerably smaller than they were within all other cover crops trialled. This in turn shows that early ground cover establishment is important for cover crops to suppress weeds.

In contrast to the cereal rye plots, Figure 1 also shows that in the field pea plots, ground cover percentage lagged considerably behind the other cover crops for much of the trial. Table 1 shows that at the end of the trial, the number of weeds was similar to that found in the three biofumigants (Caliente, BQ Mulch and the biofumigant mix), however the weed biomass in

100

Ground cover (%)

80 60 40 20 0

0

20 Field peas Italian ryegrass BQ mulch

40 60 Time (days after sowing)

80

Cereal rye Caliente Biofumigant TriMixÂ

100

the field peas was considerably higher than all other cover crop types, showing that relative lack of ground cover had allowed larger weed plants to establish by the conclusion of the trial. The other cover crop types in the trial (Italian ryegrass and the three biofumigants) all exhibited similar ground cover percentages throughout the trial, though the biofumigant mix plots had the highest percentage of ground cover after 90 days (Figure 1). Weed density was relatively low within the Italian ryegrass plots, however weed biomass was slightly higher than all plots other than field peas. All three biofumigant types performed similarly with regards to weed suppression, both in terms of weed density and weed biomass (Table 1). Farmers may choose to plant a cover crop for a range of reasons other than weed management, including to preserve the soil, conserve soil moisture, and increase soil carbon. These factors will often influence which cover crop is selected. This project contributes to that decision making process by demonstrating which cover crops may help to reduce the weed burden.

FIGURE 1 Cover crop ground cover percentages, 14 to 90 days after sowing, Myalup, April-July 2018 WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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In addition to the Myalup trial, the project team are monitoring cover crop trial sites around Australia to evaluate the impact on weeds of a range of winter and summer cover crop options. The UNE team is very grateful to Peter and Anthony Ivankovich for their generous support of this project, Ian Guthridge and Graham Blincow from the DPIRD Manjimup office for completing the cover crop sowing activity, Grant Swan, John Cross and Bruce Shaw (David Grays) for their assistance with crop establishment and monitoring during and at the end of the trial, and Dave Stewart (Elders), Doris Blaesing (RMCG) and John Duff (Qld Department of Agriculture and Fisheries) for their advice. 33THE cereal rye (foreground left) and Italian ryegrass (foreground right) plots showed a considerable difference in crop height at 90 DAS, though ground cover percentage was similar by this stage.

An identical trial is planned for Ivankovich Farms during autumn and winter 2019, to provide two growing seasons of comparative data. In the meantime, Peter and Anthony are growing cash crops on the site.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

MORE INFORMATION For more information and updates on this project, please visit www.une.edu.au/ iwmvegetables and www.facebook.com/ iwmvegetables


TOOL TIME

TOOL

TIME

your

production WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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TOOL TIME

Maturity testing equipment

in apples

Firmness

SUSIE MURPHY WHITE 1 AND STEELE JACOB 2 1 POMEWEST 2 DPIRD

T

here are three tools required to test apple maturity; penetrometer, refractometer and iodine solution they measure Firmness, Brix and Starch.

These maturity parameters are used to determine the maturity of fruit and to predict when fruit will be at optimum maturity. By testing fruit before harvest it will ensure that all apple eaters experience a great apple every time they bite into an apple. 33ELECTRONIC penetrometers used to test fruit firmness.

Flesh firmness is measured using a penetrometer. Electronic and mechanical types of penetrometers are available from a number of manufacturers. Electronic penetrometers are available and may have a built in sensor to determine if operator action is within an acceptable range of time or speed. To avoid operator differences it is recommended that mechanical penetrometers be mounted on a rack and pinion drill stand. The accuracy of the result is reliant on the consistency of the operator and the equipment used. The 11.1mm penetrometer tip is used for assessment of apples and Asian pears and 7.9mm for European pears. Flesh firmness is expressed as the number of kilograms force (Kg-f) needed to push a metal probe of specific diameter a known distance into the flesh of the fruit and the higher the number registered the firmer the fruit is considered. Low numbers indicate that fruit may be soft or have poor texture.

There are three tools to measure apple maturity; penetrometers, refractometers and iodine solution.

Total Soluble Solids (Brixº) The compounds that form the total soluble solids (TSS) content in apples are sugars (fructose, sucrose and glucose), acids, vitamin C, amino acids and pectins. In most ripe fruit sugar forms the main component of total soluble solids. Soluble solids help determine fruit maturity and as sugars contribute to the nutritional and sensory qualities of fruit, it is used as a marketing tool.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

The most economical method of determining soluble solids levels is by using a hand held or pocket refractometer. This measures the refractive index of the juice and gives readings in either % Sucrose or % Brix.

Typical ranges are 10.5–12.0 at the beginning of harvest, to 12.0–16.0 at the end, depending on variety and season. There are two types: Hand-held refractometers, which have a prism with a lid for holding the juice sample or digital refractometers, which have a well for holding the juice sample.

Starch Index Pattern This measurement relies on the simple fact that starch will stain blue/black in the presence of iodine and potassium iodide, but is only suitable for fruit assessed within 48 hours of harvest. It is the pattern that is of particular interest when determining SPI, rather than the darkness or intensity of blue/black colour, and is scored compared to the appropriate reference chart. Conversely the clear yellow/white pattern indicates regions of nil or low starch levels, where starch hydrolysis or conversion to simple sugars has occurred. Little starch staining (higher SPI) at harvest means shorter storage life, and often increases in storage disorder incidence, such as senescent breakdown. Insufficient hydrolysis may mean less than optimal eating and post storage quality, with lack of flavour, high and/or low sugar levels and increased risk of superficial scald for some varieties. NOTE: The Iodine solution must be kept in a dark bottle out of direct sunlight.


TOOL TIME

Measuring maturity 1

Using a potato peeler or knife, remove a  small section of skin from both sides of the apple. Using a Penetrometer with an 11mm tip, push into the fruit as far as the indicator line (1cm) to record Fruit Pressure and record the pressure.

2

With a small dish or directly onto the  refractometer, collect the juice that drips out as you insert the penetrometer to measure the sugar (%TSS) of each apple.

3

Place the top half of each apple into a  container of 1–2cm deep Iodine Solution and leave for about 2 minutes. Or spray each apple half with Iodine Solution using a small spray bottle. Take each half out of Iodine Solution and place down on paper towel for a few seconds to dry.

4

1 2

Leave to dry and starch to stain for at least  10 minutes before scoring using the 1-6 Starch Pattern Index.

3

4

33STARCH Pattern Index 1-6.

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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TOOL TIME

More sustainable crops

S

Funded by Hort Innovation and the Cotton Research Development Corporation, the project is being delivered by the University of Queensland (UQ) in partnership with Nufarm, and involves trials of the non-toxic, biodegradable product BioClay on farms in Queensland and other locations across the country.

Hort Innovation research and development general manager David Moore said the new work followed more than four years of research into developing the product, and the trials presented an exciting step toward the commercialisation of BioClay. “The Australian vegetable industry is among Australia’s largest horticultural industries with an estimated annual gross production value of $3.7 billion, and exports to Asia and the Middle East valued at over $270 million,” he said.

“Pest and disease management is increasingly challenging for both the fruit and vegetable and cotton industries, who are facing climate change, pesticide resistance and chemical use limitations. WA Grower SUMMER 2018

33 SMART spray: BioClay is a non-toxic crop spray.

“The high-tech BioClay spray responds to these challenges by priming the plant’s own defences, helping the plant to naturally attack specific crop pests and pathogens.” UQ research arm, the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, is leading the trials, and while the project is not due for completion until 2021, agricultural biotechnologist and research leader, Professor Neena Mitter, said early signs were promising.

BioClay offers sustainable crop protection and residue free food produce.

“Globally, an estimated 40% of food grown is lost to crop pests and pathogens.

28

Photos: © University of Queensland

cientists are investigating whether a clay-based ‘vaccine’ for plants could safeguard the nation’s $5.5 billion-combined cotton and vegetable industries against pest infestation and crippling crop losses.

“Through large-scale trials, we know that BioClay works, and the work we have done to date provides a great foundation for pest and disease management across vegetable and cotton crops,” she said.

“BioClay offers sustainable crop protection and residue free food produce — which consumers demand. “There is no genetic modification of the plants, and the process does not involve chemicals that might affect untargeted insects. “BioClay is the first step towards revolutionising how we manage pest control organically for increased sustainability and resilience of crops

33 PROFESSOR Neena Mitter (centre) and QAAFI researchers test the non-toxic, pathogen-free BioClay spray on cabbages.

and industry at large. This is an exciting project that has the potential to ultimately reshape industry approaches to pesticides.” MORE INFORMATION Contact Hort Innovation: www.horticulture.com.au

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the research and development levy, the Cotton Research and Development Corporation (CRDC) and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the growerowned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for the Australian horticulture sector.


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your

industry Your industry WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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The essential value

fo being West Australian 90%

of respondents are more

© Craig Kinder

likely to consider buying a product with the BWEB logo.

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1

Restaurant events at Houghton Kitchen, and Must; state-wide promotional celebrations at Farmer Jacks, IGA, Coles and Woolworths; a dedicated category for local produce at The Good Food Guide Awards and support from Gold Plate Awards acknowledge the shifting consumer sentiment that demands support for local.

The program has grown from strength to strength according to Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Director of Food, Deborah Pett. “The success of the Buy West Eat Best program is testament to the work and dedication of those involved and demonstrates that food provenance is still at the forefront of WA consumers’ interest,” Ms Pett said. Ms Pett highlighted that recent independent market research demonstrated strong Buy West Eat Best brand awareness, with 71% of survey respondents recognising the brand, and 90% of respondents more likely to consider buying a product with the logo.

3 Liam O'Connel (Executive Director, DPIRD), Anna Gare, Sarah Gordon (Buy West Eat Best), Chris Taylor (Frasers Restaurant), Nic Giblett (Newton Orchards), Danny Trandos (Trandos Hydroponics) and Melissa Worthington (Buy West Eat Best Program Manager).

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“When retailers applied the Buy West Eat Best logo to a shelf sticker in store, research showed a sales increase of 10%, with one-in-four consumers actively looking for the logo when grocery shopping,” she said. “It must be acknowledged that the non-competitive involvement from all major retailers has changed the way consumers see this program. Buy West Eat Best is now an essential value of being a West Australian.” Leading Australian demographer and social researcher, Mark McCrindle who visited Perth for the 10th Anniversary, noted that in conducting the Woolworths Trolley Trends Report and other notable reports for the food industry: amidst innovation and pursuit for the next trend, there is a counter trend, where it’s part of a broader thing that Australians are also looking for, something that’s wholesome. “Australians are on the hunt for value, when they discuss value it is broader than just price. Its value in terms of what they value, so it is about sustainable supply chain, it is about nutrition and the quality of the food. They want real food, not just empty food. “That’s where source of the food comes in. There is a premium that they place on local. There is a trust factor and indeed a premium that they place around certain regions and an expectation of a certain quality,” he said.

3

© Western Australian Agriculture Authority, 2018

B

uy West Eat Best is wrapping up a month of 10th Anniversary celebrations that have acknowledged the simple act of collaboration.

4

Award winners

1 Jim Trandos (Trandos Farms) being presented a 10 year award from Honourable Alannah MacTiernan MLC, Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food. 2 Andrew Bogdanich (Bogdanich Farms) being presented a 10 year award from Honourable Alannah MacTiernan MLC, Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food. 3 Luce Monte (M&G Monte & Sons) being presented a 10 year award from Hon. Darren West MLC. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food. 4 Jim Trandos (Trandos Hydroponic Growers) being presented a 10 year award from Hon. Darren West MLC. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food.

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© Craig Kinder

YOUR INDUSTRY

3 The Buy West Eat Best program has provided a strong platform for collaboration and cooperation across the food supply chain.

“So that’s where there are great opportunities for foods from WA.” Ryan’s Quality Meats manager Danny Weir said it was important for WA consumers to support WA businesses. “I believe it is a good campaign and anything that helps WA grow is a brilliant initiative,” he said. “It is just a chance for us to look after our own and support the industry and helps out our local farmers, our local truckies, our local brickies — the whole lot and it all stems through.”

Buy West Eat Best is a people’s choice brand, which has evolved into a multifaceted food and beverage industry program.

71%

of respondents recognised the BWEB brand.

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The label started following a petition of over 50,000 to The West Australian newspaper in 2005 driven by consumers wanting to know more about where their food comes from. The criteria and compliance requirements behind the distinctive trademarked green bite mark logo ensures credibility and assurance across industry that the licensee’s product is grown, farmed or fished in Western Australia and processed and packaged right here in WA.

Today, Buy West Eat Best has excellent relationships with all major Western Australian retailers, many chefs, food producers, food councils, development commissions, industry and consumers. It has proven success assisting small, medium and large businesses to secure distribution, sales and achieve profile within the domestic marketplace. The Buy West Eat Best program has provided a strong platform for collaboration and cooperation across the food supply chain, which has improved members opportunities in quite a competitive domestic marketplace. The strength of the Buy West Eat Best program is within its ability to work with and alongside all levels of industry to deliver thought leadership and commercial outcomes through the delivery of a meaningful collaborative and co-operative program of activity (at times through partnerships with projects/programs) to boost profile and assist industry to grow. MORE INFORMATION Visit: www.buywesteatbest.org.au


YIELD

ZEPPLIN AND WINGMAN A high yielding combination.

POLLINATION Zepplin, a large red-fleshed seedless watermelon, when paired with short-vine pollinator Wingman, will together yield excellent results.

seminis.com.au


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Vegetable business financial review and benchmarking Year 2 now on!

G

BY BRYN EDWARDS BENCHMARK LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

et in soon before the window for this year’s participation closes!

The second year of intake into the Benchmarking project has now begun and I thought I’d take the time to recap some of the key aspects of the service so that you the grower can benefits from this opportunity.

What’s it about? vegetablesWA has partnered with renowned WA based farm management and agricultural benchmark specialists, Planfarm, to provide an independent Financial Review and Benchmarking service to all vegetable producing business owners in Western Australia.

• As a participant, you receive a detailed Financial Review and Benchmarking report focused purely on your business. • As a participant, you also receive a 90-minute 1 to 1 Business Consultation session to support you to turn insights into tangible action to drive greater profitability in your business. • You develop a new confidence to control your business from a solid understanding of the key drivers and focus areas that steer a profitable business — not just a vegetable business but any business. • You access Australia’s first and only comparative set of vegetable industry benchmark averages — including the averages of the Top 25% vegetable growers so you know definitively what solid profitability actually looks like!

FREE

The first of its type in Australia and now in its second year, the purpose of this service is to support you, the business owner, to make the best possible decisions for the future of your business. The service provides you with specific information about the key areas within your business that you can control and act upon to improve profitability and the security of your longer-term future.

What’s in it for me? • T  his service is completely secure, confidential, independent and free of charge to you as a West Australian vegetable growing business owner.

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• You possess the exact detailed information to improve your business appearance to financial institutions and in turn access better finance conditions.

Also Your participation will provide a more detailed and evidenced based view of the WA vegetable industry which will allow vegetablesWA to advocate from a stronger position to shape state and federal government policy on key hot topic areas that include water reform, labour conditions and land use.

Who sees my data when it comes to benchmark comparisons? ABSOLUTELY NO ONE! Confidentiality and anonymity of all participants is of paramount importance to the development of this key information asset for the WA vegetable industry.

Only project staff directly employed on this service work with your data. No individual business data is shared with anyone else. Overall industry averages are obviously shared as part of the comparison but even this is only shared with participating growers not those who have chosen to sit on the sidelines and do nothing. What is more, all the benchmarking comparisons are calculated on a per hectare ratio basis. This is so we can compare all businesses, irrespective of scale, size, vegetable production and growing conditions. This way your confidentiality is maintained and all growers — regardless of size or scale — can be meaningfully compared.

How do I get involved and what’s the time commitment? The process for participation has been specifically designed to be as straightforward as possible for you the grower so that it requires as little of your time as possible and doesn’t take you away from what needs to get done on your farm. Our goal is to lead you through a process that provides maximum business value for minimal time and effort on your part. Yes, we ask you to gather up copies of key documents and provide information required to generate your report, but there’s no time consuming or painful computer data entry for you — we do all that! We enter your information into the analysis model that will crunch your data and produce your report, making the first half of the process a light touch for you. The rest is focused on understanding the findings of the analysis and planning your route to increased profitability.


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Feedback from year 1 1 Schedule your Data Gather and Verification Session — let us know when you’re available and let’s get started.

This process is repeated with all the other participating growers during the 1st October to 1st March participation window.

2 Gather up your documents and information — we provide you with a check list and template, so it’s all made super clear. Once you’ve shared it with us we can get cracking on the data entry.

After this window we will calculate all the Industry averages as well as the averages of the Top 25% profitable performers.

Key point of note — the more proactive you are in this stage of gathering all the necessary information, the quicker the rest of the process will flow!

3 Data Gather and Verification Session — we ask you to clarify and verify your data with us so that everyone is super sure we’ve got everything down correctly before we generate your Financial Review Report for your business. 4 Learn from your Financial Review Report — this is where the magic starts to happen and the valuable key insights flow. You will receive the Financial Review Section of your overall report straightaway.

Once this analysis has been completed we will generate the Benchmarking section of your Overall report. 5 Learn from your Benchmark Report — this completes the magic and provides the full range of insight into your business. 6 Schedule Your 90-minute 1 to 1 Business Consultation session — as a benchmarking participant will also receive a 90-minute 1 to 1 Business Consultation session with an experienced Farm Consultant that is focused on cementing your understanding of your results so that you can convert learnings into tangible action towards improving profitability.

Having worked with the super proactive growers in the first year of this service, we’ve listened to their feedback.

All growers remarked how valuable and insightful this process is to truly understand how to drive greater levels of performance and profitability in their business. Many stated how it cuts through any false assumption that’s floating around in assumptions and goes straight to the heart of business and its structure and management — it’s all laid bare for you to see the reality of your situation so you can take precise action towards clearer and specific outcomes.

Key points of note The participation window for getting on board and receiving your Financial Review and Benchmarking Report and 90-minute 1 to 1 Business Consultation session runs between 1st October to 1st March 2019. After 1st March 2019 we will no longer be taking on board any further growers until the next round commences in 1st October 2019. MORE INFORMATION Contact Bryn Edwards at: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au

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HortConnectWA

F

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

riday 25th October HortConnectWA held it’s first major event, a brunch. HortConnectWA aims to bring together likeminded young horticulture professionals to engage in social and professional networking.

The brunch was a sell out event and was attended by growers and industry from all of horticulture. The event was opened and Claire McClelland, Ambassador, explained what HortConnectWA was about and why it was formed, we would like to encourage all growers from all industries to join and make the connections which can last a lifetime. Followed by Emma Germano from I Love Farms, who gave an inspiring speech about how you can work within a family business, the struggles which come with this and how to take part in an entire industry.

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Save the date 18th October 2019!

After a brief hiatus due to a rogue fire alarm, Mitchell East from Willarra Gold took to the microphone to provide an overview on Growing Leaders and what young vegetable growers can gain from this valuable program. We would like to thank the growers and stakeholders who attended. We have set the date for our events for next year so please keep the 18th October 2019 free to join in.

33THE brunch included talks by Emma Germano (I Love Farms) and Mitchell East (Willarra Gold). MORE INFORMATION For more information contact, Rebecca Blackman, office@horticulture.com


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Biosecurity Blitz 2018 event n o ti c u d o r p od o f i r g a g supportin

T

he State’s annual pest and disease surveillance event, the Biosecurity Blitz 2018, has attracted strong support from the WA community in helping to monitor their surroundings for interesting insects, other creepy crawlies, obnoxious weeds and aquatic pests.

This is the fourth year of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s initiative to enlist the community and industry to monitor for pests that could threaten Western Australia’s valuable agriculture and fisheries industries. The Biosecurity Blitz encourages people to use one of the department’s reporting apps to make reports of as many interesting or damaging pests (animals, insects, diseases, weeds and aquatic pests) as possible over a month. Department development officer Laura Fagan said the event ran from 19 October – 16 November, attracting its strongest response yet from the community. 33DPIRD officer Rick Bryant and his twin sons Otis (left) and Henry (7) on the hunt for interesting insects, pests and weeds as part of Biosecurity Blitz 2018 over the next four weeks. 33RIGHT: Brown marmorated stink bug. © Kristie Graham, USDA ARS, Bugwood.org

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“In the first two weeks we received 971 Biosecurity Blitz reports,” Ms Fagan said. “As part of the Biosecurity Blitz, department scientists, with special expertise in taxonomy, examined all reports made to the department through its reporting apps, to identify the organism and determine whether they were pests, weeds or diseases which could pose a risk to agriculture or fisheries.” This year’s efforts focused on a number of new activities, including surveying for Brown marmorated stink bug, which was detected in February 2018 at a premise in Jandakot, Western Australia. While this damaging horticultural pest was removed, continued surveillance is essential to ensure it has not become established. Department development officer Laura Fagan encourages everyone to keep an eye out for Brown marmorated stink bug and to report similar-looking stink bugs immediately using the MyPestGuide™ Reporter app. “This species looks similar to many native Australian stink bugs but is larger and has distinguishing black and white checked markings on its lower back,” Ms Fagan said.


YOUR INDUSTRY

MyPestGuide™ Reporter is a general tool for everyone to make terrestrial reports.

“They are mottled brown in colour, shaped like a shield and emit a signature foul odour when disturbed. “Any reports of stink bug sightings are valuable, as the observations helps us demonstrate the absence of Brown marmorated stink bug.” Even though the Biosecurity Blitz is over for this year, anyone can still make reports using the department’s free apps. MyPestGuide™ Reporter is a general tool for everyone to make terrestrial reports,

33DEPARTMENT of Primary Industries and Regional Development officers Laura Fagan and Rosalie McCauley with Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan (centre), look over reporting technology as part of Biosecurity Blitz.

PestFax Reporter is for broadacre agronomists to use in the field and WA PestWatch is designed for sending in aquatic reports. Those without a smart phone can also make reports via the department’s MyPestGuide™ community and WA PestWatch webpages.

“To make a report, simply take a photograph of the pest and use the MyPestGuide™ Reporter app or the MyPestGuide™ community website to send it to the department,” Ms Fagan said. “One of the department’s diagnostic experts will assess each report and send back a response about what the specimen is and whether it is a rare and endangered species or a biosecurity risk.” The public plays a crucial role in the early detection of exotic pests, such as Brown marmorated stink bug, and every one of us are essential to achieve a successful eradication program in Australia. The Biosecurity Blitz 2018 reports support the department’s ongoing surveillance efforts to demonstrate freedom from many of the world’s worst pests and diseases, which underpins access to essential trade markets. MORE INFORMATION For more information about Biosecurity Blitz go to agric.wa.gov.au/biosecurity-blitz

33DPIRD department officer Laura Fagan with reporting technology as part of Biosecurity Blitz.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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2018 Reg Miller Award winner:

L

n o d y L s Lewi

ewis Lydon — considered one of the Australian onion industry’s biggest supporters — has been awarded the 2018 Reg Miller Award at the Onions Australia annual conference in Ulverstone.

January 2019 marks Lewis’ 30th anniversary in the vegetable seed industry as a plant breeder focused primarily on allium crops. Born and raised in Brisbane, he studied a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at the University of Queensland and upon graduating, he headed for the chilly climes of Narromine, New South Wales. There he joined Arthur Yates and Co — before it became known as Yates Vegetable Seeds — as an assistant onion plant breeder, and it wasn’t long before he took on the role of plant breeder responsible for the onion plant breeding programme. In this role, he was responsible for the breeding and product development of a range of Yates hybrid onions in domestic and export markets in South Africa, South America and America. During this time the first of Yates hybrids, including Gladiator and Destiny was released, and Lewis was also involved with tomato and cabbage seed breeding, releasing a very successful hybrid that was marketed in the Middle East. In October 2003, the commercial vegetable seeds division of Yates was sold to Enza Zaden, and lucky for Enza Zaden, that came with a highly respected onion breeding manager named Lewis Lydon. Lewis has worked for them ever since, and today is responsible for the company’s International Onion Breeding Program for Australia, New Zealand, America and Europe — essentially

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breeding for all major international onion seed markets. In more recent times, Lewis was elected to the Onions Australia Executive in 2015 and remains part of the group today. Those who have worked alongside Lewis describe him as a professional that growers are instantly enthralled with and enamoured by, always keen to share his passion and knowledge of the onion sector. Long-time colleague and mentor Dr Richard Jones — also a previous Reg Miller Award recipient — says he has fond memories of his time working with Lewis and watching him develop into a star of the commercial breeding sector.

“Working with Lewis was an adventure because he had such marvellous, big ideas of what could be achieved,” Richard said. “He had endless suggestions on how best to achieve these goals, and he’s always animated when shown an onion or a new trial or meets new growers — he truly loves what he does. “His recall of information always astounded me too, especially his knowledge of geography in the Narromine and Dubbo areas. It makes him a fierce debater — he’s always ready to argue the benefits or otherwise of his favourite crop with anyone, anywhere. “Those that socialise with Lewis know he’s a lot of fun off the onion paddock too. There’s an urban myth that one of

332018 Reg Miller Award winner Lewis Lydon receives his award from Onions Australia Chair Peter Shadbolt in Ulverstone, Tasmania.

the many talents he possesses is the ability to stand on his head and drink any beverage supplied to him! “Beyond the professional and social accolades however, he is above all a very kind and caring person who is generous with his time and knowledge. He truly loves life and is a devoted father to his daughters.”

The history of the Reg Miller Award The Reg Miller Award is the Onion Industry’s highest honour. Open to anyone passionate about the industry, the award recognises people who have made outstanding contributions to the Australian Onion Industry. The award is named in honour of Reg Miller, a South Australian who helped found Onions Australia. He worked on the family farm for some 20 years, served with the Australian Infantry in Darwin during WWII and throughout his life did committee work with grower associations, including Onions Australia.


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Bursary Lewis Lydon is in good company

… past recipients: • 2016 Andrew Moon • 2015 Dean Metcalf • 2014 Brian Bonde • 2012 Richard Jones • 2011 Peter Ivankovich • 2010 Steve Rathjen • 2009 Trevor Wicks • 2008 Ken Jackson • 2007 Don Fawkner • 2006 Tony Rumsey • 2003 Reg Ruge • 2002 Timothy Shadbolt • 2000 Tim Groom

MORE INFORMATION Nominations for the Reg Miller Award are open all year round, and close of the 1st of August each year. The award is not presented every year; only when suitable nominations are received.

to encourage local agrifood research

T

he McGowan Government has announced a fellowship award through Buy West Eat Best, to support one of Western Australia’s brightest agriculture and food minds.

At an industry gathering to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Stateof-origin food labelling program, Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan announced the bursary in honour of the founding Minister, the late Hon. Kim Chance. The Buy West Eat Best Kim Chance Fellowship Award will provide financial assistance of $10,000 to a PhD candidate, through The University of Western Australia’s Institute of Agriculture.

Buy West Eat Best was launched in 2008 in response to overwhelming consumer demand to know where their food was sourced from. Membership of the program now stands at more than 170 members across the State including major retailers, small growers, artisan producers, large scale processors, restaurants, chefs and food service providers. The fellowship will support a PhD candidate with the specific purpose of advancing agriculture in Western Australia. "For 10 years, the Buy West Eat Best program has helped grocery shoppers choose Western Australian

produce, and given food and beverage businesses support to differentiate their product as truly local. “The program enables Western Australian consumers to clearly identify food and beverage products which have been grown, farmed, fished and produced right here in Western Australia. “Kim played an instrumental role in not only establishing the Buy West Eat Best program, but championing the core value messages that remain in place today. “As a Western Australian farmer and politician and as a former Minister for Agriculture; Forestry and Fisheries, this award has been established in recognition of the great value Kim placed on the State’s agriculture industry. “It also recognises his tremendous efforts to support and promote farming and regional communities; he was a fabulous ambassador for industry and commanded respect across town and country.” MORE INFORMATION More information is available at: www.scholarships.uwa.edu.au

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IEO Update

Vegetable

Industry Summit

BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

& Grower Tour 25–26 OCTOBER 2018

Grower Group Tour Thursday 25 October 8.30am-4.00pm

Center West Exports/Sun City Farms, Woodridge

Grower Group Tour The day started with snacks and a goodie bag (sponsored by Rural Bank and Bendigo Bank) as we all jumped on the bus, headed for Centre West in Woodridge. We were greeted upon arrival by Francis Tedesco, who would be one of our guides on the tour of the packing shed. The process begins when a tipper truck drops the carrots into a huge tank, where they are bubbled through multiple wash steps before heading to the grading area on a conveyer. Now the packing shed doesn’t just put some carrots in a bag and BAM... you’re done. There are different grades, different weights and different cartons; all of which are separated out through a mix of mechanical and man power. Watching the grader was mesmerising. Man and

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machine working seamlessly together, resulting in a sudden drop of perfectly calibrated weight into the awaiting premade carton. One of my “fun” jobs when I worked on the farm was making the crates/ cartons. Believe me when I say, seeing the carton maker that also lines the carton almost made me cry. It pulls the flat carton from its bundle, squares it off as it slides along on a conveyer, folds the base and then…whoosh…the liner is in and it’s off to be packed. Then we have the palletiser. Another moment of bright-eyed bewilderment occurred as our group stood and watched this machine pick up four cartons, then with perfect precision place them on the pallet in alternating directions. While many would look at

this machinery as a cost cutter and labour saver, through my eyes it was a machine that ended hours of aching shoulders. After being packed and stacked the carrots moved on to the pallet wrapper which, unlike me when I used to do it, didn’t get dizzy spinning around to secure its cargo in place. After the pack shed tour we congregated outside for a session of project updates. First up was Dr Doris Blaesing with all things soil health. The Soils Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection project (VG15010) has been working with Francis and the team at Centre West, focused on a soil improvement plan with custom composts to address soil borne disease, soil structure and loss of organic matter.


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Next, we heard from Julie O’Halloran and Celia van Sprang from DAF Qld and Dr Luz Angelica Suarez from UNE, about the progress of the Precision Ag project (VG16009). The team, including DAF Qld, UNE and WA’s own Allan McKay, had just finished a second stint of field sampling for the yield prediction and monitoring sections of the project. This type of research is becoming increasingly valuable as we know, “What gets measured, gets managed”.

With yield prediction and monitoring we are able to assess the suitability of the land we plant, the vigour of the crops and the pack out wastage, all of which have an impact on your business. With our heads full of information and our bellies full from the mouth-watering burger bar, we headed back to Crown. However, for our Growers the day was not yet over. A coffee and a sit down was followed by a delightful evening of networking at La Vie with the Growers from the bus. Conversations about “farm life”, some delicious canapes and more than a few laughs was a great way to bring “bus tour day” to an end.

Industry Summit Friday 26 October 2.00pm-6.00pm

Botanical Room 2 & 3 Crown Perth

Industry Summit At Fridays Industry Summit we were fortunate to have Di Darmody as our MC. With 17 years of experience as a journalist and presenter we were in good hands. The Summit was opened by vegetablesWA CEO John Shannon, followed by a VegNET Project review and update by vegetablesWA Operations Manager Rebecca Blackman.

The first three presenters focused on water. Dr Doris Blaesing and Neil Lantzke spoke on the topic of Water Use Efficiency and how important it is to ensure we are making smart choices when it comes to crop, climate and soil conditions. John Shannon covered, in part, the Government Water Licencing Fees and how vegetablesWA is on the front foot when it comes to advocating for our Growers and this precious resource. A Q&A panel was followed by Julie O’Halloran and Dr Luz Angelica Suarez speaking about yield prediction within the Precision Ag project. 33ANDREW Bogdanich, Peter and Radmilla Ivankovich, Rafal Pysz and Jorge Lopes.

Following afternoon tea, we were given some great insights about food innovation and technology. Dr Hazel MacTavish-West, who has recently completed a Churchill Fellowship European study tour, opened our eyes to the trends and opportunities available to vegetables producers interested in product development. Hazel was followed by CSIRO Senior Research Scientist, Dr Danyang Ying who presented some of the most recent research outcomes in the area of creating value from waste. This research focuses on reducing food loss and adding value to horticultural by-products, providing Growers with an alternative pathway for unsellable produce. Closing out the Summit were Rafal Pysz and Carlo Sportiello with their session on Ag Tech. As the industry changes, so does technology and the advances that we have seen in the Ag Tech space point to Grower/user benefits. Peter Ivankovich provided the end user grower experience, after having a robotic palletising system installed at his Myalup property. The new age of technological advancement in the horticulture arena is an exciting prospect indeed.

33FRANCIS Tedesco and the Sun City team.

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1

1 4

1 Rebecca Blackman, Manus Stockdale, Sam Grubisa and Joel Dinsdale. 2 Angelica Suraz, Julie O'Halloran, Allan McKay, Rohan Prince, Celia van Sprung, Neil Lantzke and Rhiannon Robinson. 3 Rohan Prince discussing water during the Q&A Panel at the Industry Summit. 4 John Shannon and Dan Kuzmicich.

2

As vegetablesWA’s premier industry event drew to a close at TWR with networking, cross horticulture conversations and some amazing food (the mini sliders…am I right?); the exhausted team here at vegetablesWA shut the door on our most successful event to date. Much appreciation to the Growers who attended and the wider stakeholders for your support. With the weather warming up and the summer crop silly season kicking into gear, I would like to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a prosperous 2019. I look forward to visiting you on farm in the new year! MORE INFORMATION Contact Sam on 0427 373 037 or email sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018


Membership information and benefits What is HortConnectWA? HortConnectWA aims to bring like-minded young horticulture professionals together to engage in social and professional networking. An initiative of vegetablesWA, WA Potatoes, WA Citrus, Pomewest and Stonefruit WA the HortConnectWA group will collaborate, share information and offer professional development across the West Australian horticulture industry.

Partnership with WA Farmers and AgConnectWA HortConnectWA’s purpose is to connect young horticulture professionals in Western Australia. To maximise the benefits of this network, HortConnectWA is aligned with WA Farmers AgConnectWA initiative. This will provide members of HortConnectWA access to some social events hosted by AgConnectWA to enhance cross industry collaboration.

Membership model and benefits Direct membership fee of $65/year One year membership July 2018 to June 2019 Membership benefits include: WA Grower magazine subscription (annual) Reduced rates for social and industry events Access to regional workshops (free with registration) Annual Christmas Party

Interested and want to know more? You can check us out on Facebook or Twitter but for a more personal touch, you can get in touch with the team at vegetablesWA on (08) 9486 7515 or email office@hortconnectwa.com

Events & Activities • • • • •

Regional Workshops and Sundowners Annual Industry Summit Conferences Annual End of Year celebration AgConnectWA events including Heart of WA and annual Cocktail Party

HortConnectWA 702–704 Murray St, West Perth, WA, 6005 P: +61 8 9486 7515 E: office@hortconnectwa.com HortConnectWA HortConnectWA


YOUR INDUSTRY

Myalup-Wellington water project

$190 million

I

rrigated agriculture production in the Collie River, Harvey and Waroona districts in south-west Western Australia is set to expand thanks to a transformational water infrastructure initiative. Led by Collie Water, the $396 million project aims to reduce salinity in the Wellington Dam, WA's second largest reservoir. Deputy Prime Minister, Leader of The Nationals and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack said the Australian Government is committed to constructing the water infrastructure of 21st century. “The Myalup-Wellington project is a significant economic development project which offers an innovative, long-term solution to the salinity problems in the Wellington Dam,” Mr McCormack said. “The Project is expected to increase supply of potable water into the Harris Dam by 10 gigalitres per year. It'll boost WA's gross state product by more than

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

has been committed to the project. $570 million each year and support up to 830 jobs throughout the construction and operation phases.” Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources David Littleproud said the Liberal and Nationals Government is committing $190 million to the project. “Saline water will be pumped from the Collie River East Branch to reduce salt flows into the Wellington Dam. A private desalination facility will be built near Collie to produce potable water to be delivered to the Harris Dam,” Mr Littleproud said. “The Burekup Weir will be improved to provide increased head pressure, while existing open irrigation channels below the weir will be replaced with a closed pipe network to extend pressurised water supply and increase the area under irrigation. “The project is also working to deliver new irrigation water to Myalup to support expansion of the region’s existing highly productive irrigated agricultural industry.” WA Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan said access to fit-for-purpose water is vital for the region’s agricultural growth.

“The Myalup-Wellington Project will help secure the future of the region in a drying climate, creating opportunities for expanded horticulture and agriculture,” Ms MacTiernan said. “This is a long-term project — staged over the next five to seven years. “Work is underway to increase the area of timber plantations in the upper Wellington Dam catchment to assist in the management of catchment salinity.

“Collie Water is progressing design plans and has commenced its tender process for the construction of the desalination plant.” WA Water Minister Dave Kelly said the environmental benefits of the project are significant. “This project will enable great utilisation of the significant water resource in the Wellington Dam,” Mr Kelly said. “It will also deliver greater certainty in water supplies for those in the region.” The project is jointly funded with the Australian Government investing $190 million, the Western Australian Government $37 million and Collie Water and private investors $169 million.


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YOUR INDUSTRY

Watershed moment:

A

t s o o b o t M 0 0 5 $ more than e r u t c u r t s a r f in r e t wa

more than half a billion dollar increase to the National Water Infrastructure Development Fund will bolster the delivery of transformational water projects for regional communities. Making this historic announcement in November in Gladstone, Acting Prime Minister and Nationals’ Leader Michael McCormack said the Liberal and Nationals’ Government has today revealed the Fund’s increase of more than $500 million will be used to work with State and Territory Governments to identify and co-fund the construction of new water infrastructure projects across regional Australia. “We aren’t afraid to back dams. We want to build more of them,” Mr McCormack said. “If we want to create jobs and grow regional Australia then we need to add water. “This announcement will turbocharge the construction of water infrastructure in regional Australia because our agricultural industries expect it and our communities deserve it. “This is yet another investment the Liberal and Nationals’ Government is making in regional communities to ensure water security and help create jobs and opportunities in the regions.” Mr McCormack said water is the lifeblood of regional communities and this historic injection of funds will be a game changer for many communities.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

“This funding pipeline represents the single biggest commitment to investment for building water infrastructure across the nation,” Mr McCormack said. “Access to secure and affordable water is critical to the lives of many Australians in regional areas and investment in water infrastructure is vital to keep Australia thriving, especially during tough times of extended drought.

Agriculture and Water Resources Minister David Littleproud said water means wealth and jobs in the regions. “As a former rural bank manager, I know the value of a megalitre of water to a rural community,” he said. “We’re proud to be delivering water and wealth to rural communities.”

“Having the right water infrastructure in the right place will provide greater opportunities for new and expanded high value irrigated agriculture.

The Fund’s expansion to more than $1 billion, as well as the existing $2 billion National Water Infrastructure Loan Facility program, means more than $3 billion is now available from the Federal Government to support State and Territory Governments and their project partners, to build new water infrastructure and provide greater social and economic opportunity for Australians.

“This is not just about storing water in times when it is dry, it is also about protecting communities through flood mitigation in times when it is incredibly wet.”

“We Liberals and Nationals have invested in water infrastructure the likes of which have never been seen in places across the nation,” Mr McCormack said.

“If we want to create jobs and grow regional Australia then we need to add water.”


YOUR INDUSTRY

“From Myalup in regional Western Australia to Queensland’s Rookwood Weir, we believe in dams and water security and are investing to make it a reality for regional Australians.

“This announcement is exciting for regional Australians, who understand full well the importance of water storage and underlines that as a government we don’t just talk about it we got on and do it.” The expanded funding includes:

• $1 million to co-fund the completion of the regulatory approval processes, including the final business case, design and Environmental Impact Statement, required for the Southern Forest Irrigation Scheme to progress to construction (WA)

MORE INFORMATION Further information on the National Water Infrastructure Development Fund is available at https://infrastructure.gov.au/ infrastructure/water-infrastructure/nwidevelopment-fund/.

• $250,000 to co-fund the establishment of management arrangements, finalisation of the design and completion of the regulatory and statutory approval processes needed for the Coldstream Recycled Water Pipeline to progress to construction (Victoria).

• $2 million for a feasibility study to assess options to build new water infrastructure to increase water supply and security in the North and South Burnett regions (Queensland)

We believe in dams and water security and are investing to make it a reality for regional Australians.

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Moves underway for Myalup water security Improve water security for agricultural growth.

3 LAKE Preston a RAMSAR wetland.

BY DEPARTMENT OF WATER & ENVIRONMENT

T

he State Government has started consulting stakeholders on the introduction of a standalone groundwater management plan for Myalup, to improve water security for agricultural growth and sustainable environments with climate change.

The Department of Water and Environmental Regulation (DWER) has begun work to develop the Myalup groundwater allocation plan, building on advanced research through the Water for Food investigations supporting the Myalup-Wellington project in collaboration with the Department of Primary Industries

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

and Regional Development (DPIRD) — including airborne electromagnetic survey, land and water quality investigations, drilling and aquifer testing, and development of an updated groundwater model. Focused on providing certainty to industry on the availability of groundwater in the 2550ha Myalup Irrigated Agriculture Precinct — worth more than $120 million in gross annual agricultural production — the new plan will also support high-value, groundwater-dependent ecosystems such as the internationally significant Lake Preston and Lake Clifton. DWER acting Executive Director of Science and Planning, Kerry Laszig, said the latest research had shown distinct hydrogeology and land use around Myalup — which is currently part of the 2009 South West Groundwater Areas Allocation Plan — supporting a Myalup groundwater

allocation plan with a localised approach to groundwater use and management rules. Expected to be released for public comment in 2020, the Myalup groundwater allocation planning work will involve the first review of groundwater allocation limits in nearly a decade. Ms Laszig said the next steps would include DWER working with stakeholders on the results from the new groundwater model being developed to assess water balances in the Myalup area. “The department will be working with growers who — after four decades of declining rainfall in the South West — understand well that if we are to continue to take water from the ground sustainably, we must plan for climate change,” said Ms Laszig.


YOUR INDUSTRY

Lake Clifton

PRESTON BEACH

YARLOOP

Myalup Irrigated Agricultural Precinct Lake Preston PERTH

MYALUP

HARVEY MYALUP

Kemerton Strategic Industrial Area New Myalup groundwater allocation plan

N 0

5

10

Kilometres

“Reviewing groundwater allocation limits through new planning for Myalup is an opportunity to further safeguard water security for a horticultural area that is significant to the region and the State.

Leschenault Estuary

3 IRRIGATED agriculture in the area is almost entirely reliant on the shallow superficial aquifer, pumped individually by producers for on-farm sprinklers.

Irrigated agriculture in the area is almost entirely reliant on the shallow superficial aquifer, pumped individually by producers for on-farm sprinklers. Production is concentrated in the South West Groundwater Areas Allocation Plan subareas of Myalup and Lake Preston South — both already fully allocated. With some localised groundwater salinity and reduced recharge of groundwater resources from declining rainfall, the production of high-yield fruit and vegetables in Myalup has reached a limit. MORE INFORMATION Contact Department of Water & Environment https://dwer.wa.gov.au/

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Automated plant counts

from UAV imagery

BY JULIE O’HALLORAN AND CELIA VAN SPRANG QUEENSLAND DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FISHERIES

U

se of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV’s) or drones is increasing across the vegetable industry. The Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries is working with vegetable growers to assess different applications of UAV technology.

overlapping digital photos as it flies over the crop which are then stitched together into an orthomosaic (1 large image of the field comprised of the smaller overlapping photographs) and analysed using these algorithms to give a plant count over a given area.

Accuracy of automated counts

Commercial plant counts

Comparison of manual and automated plant counts in these small plots demonstrated that the commercial algorithms generated highly accurate plant counts (see Table 1).

In Figure 1 plant count analysis was applied over a given area in a commercial broccoli field. The red area highlighted outlines the area to be counted. Automated plant count analysis indicated that there were 48,817 plants in this 1.13ha area.

To confirm accuracy of the commercial algorithm, DAF QLD established replicated small plots (5m x 2 beds). Plants in these plots were counted both manually and using automated counts (see Figure 2).

Recent demonstrations have shown that automated plant counts for crops such as broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, where individual plants represent a unit of produce, can be easily achieved.

Accurate automated plant counts can provide an estimate of yield for hand harvested vegetable crops currently without yield monitoring capability. Comparison of these automated counts with packout data could provide field recovery data and an indication of field losses, which is generally not measured. Automated plant counts are undertaken using commercial algorithms. These can be accessed through various webbased platforms. The UAV captures

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

FIGURE 1 Example of output from the Agremo™ online platform for automated plant counts of broccoli in Victoria. Area of automated counts is highlighted in red. Note the five small validation plots within the large red area * Note: subscription charges apply to Agremo™ analyses for areas greater than 10 acres per individual analysis.


YOUR INDUSTRY

The aim of the project is to support the vegetable industry with the adoption of precision agriculture technologies. This project is working with growers across Australia to implement the following precision agriculture technologies and assess their potential in vegetable systems including: • EM38 soil mapping • Crop sensing imagery for various applications • Strategic soil and plant sampling • Yield prediction from remote sensing imagery FIGURE 2 Small plot to monitor accuracy of automated plant counts in broccoli

• Yield monitors and

TABLE 1 Comparison of manual and automated plant counts from small plots in lettuce, broccoli and cauliflower Lettuce

Broccoli

Cauliflower

Automated

Manual

Automated

Manual

Automated

Manual

92

93

72

72

55

55

1 2

88

89

71

71

56

56

3

91

92

76

75

51

51

• Variable rate applications The project has a number of collaborators across Australia including the University of New England (UNE), Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA), Harvest Moon, Primary Industries and Regions SA, Vegetables WA and the Society of Precision Agriculture Australia (SPAA).

4

98

98

72

72

52

52

5

86

86

73

73

54

54

MORE INFORMATION

6

85

85

NA

NA

NA

NA

For more information on this project, please contact:

Accuracy

99%

Limitations Automated counts by commercial algorithms are generally based on differences between green (plant) and brown (soil) pixels. For accurate counts individual plants can’t be touching and fields must have low weed density.

99%

100%

This project This work is part of the national Hort Innovation funded project ‘Adoption of precision systems technologies in vegetable production (VG16009), led by the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

• Julie O’Halloran on 0409 054 263 or julie.o’halloran@daf.qld.gov.au • Celia van Sprang on 0459 862 266 or celia.vansprang@daf.qld.gov.au

33THE aim of the project is to support the vegetable industry with the adoption of precision agriculture technologies.

UAV technology in the vegetable industry.

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Gascoyne Food Council Update

B

BY GEORGIA THOMAS FRESH CREATIVE

usy times are continuing for the Gascoyne Food Council following the end of the Gascoyne Food Festival in September. Working closely with the horticulture, seafood and pastoral industry, the organisation has pushed ahead with a number of initiatives, including a photographic project, media and communications projects and a major effort at the Perth Royal Show. Additionally, the council has been a major supporter of the State Governments’ Buy West Eat Best program as it celebrates its 10th Anniversary during October.

Perth Royal Show For the first time the Shire of Carnarvon and the council joined forces to shine a spotlight on the Gascoyne region and the newly anointed Top Tourism Town of Carnarvon during the Perth Royal Show.

The collaboration was a great success with the Shire declaring the event one of the most successful consumer shows it has delivered. Warm weather brought the crowds and gave the Gascoyne team the opportunity to engage with a huge number of visitors across the eight day event, handing out over 30,000 food samples and over 2500 Carnarvon and Coral Bay Destination Guides. Plus selling some amazing Gascoyne treats, including preserves, chocolate coated bananas, Sweeter Banana bread and awardwinning Gelatino Banana Gelato. Food samples included Harvey Beef slow cooked butterflied beef, Sweeter Banana bread and fresh bananas, hand crafted preserves, along with a huge range of Carnarvon produce including capsicums, tomatoes, corn, onions, paw paw, black sapote, beans, pumpkins, zucchini and paprika.

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Fresh from Carnarvon

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

The team handed out over 30,000 food samples during the show.

Much of the produce donated by growers thanks to the support of the Carnarvon Growers Association. Visitor Centre Coordinator Stephanie Leca stated that the collaboration with the Gascoyne Food Council was timely off the back of the recent announcement of Carnarvon as the Top Tourism Town for 2018. “We believe collaborating shows unity in our region. Food tourism is the fastest growing driver of tourism in the world and linking closely with the Gascoyne Food Council is successfully placing Carnarvon as a highlighted tourism destination,” said Stephanie.


YOUR INDUSTRY

Buy West Eat Best Anniversary Month The Must Winebar held a gastronomical showcase — Taste of Must — Gascoyne Edition — on October 2nd to kick off the month-long celebrations for the 10th Anniversary of Buy West Eat Best. Chef Russell Blaikie created a delicious menu highlighting some of beautiful ingredients from the region, including Shark Bay prawns, tomatoes, beef ribs, zucchini, strawberries, stonefruit, pumpkin and much more. While the restaurant was a full capacity, the Gascoyne Food Council also hosted a VIP table of media and stakeholders to share the amazing dishes.

33CHEF Russell Blaikie (Must Winebar), Morena Perdec (WA Potatoes) and Christoffer Persson (Sweeter Banana) celebrating Buy West Eat Best month.

Guests included Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food; Alannah MacTiernan, Farmer Jack’s Fred Fairthorne and Buy West Eat Best Program Manager Melissa Worthington.

The Gascoyne Food Council has also supported the Buy West Eat Best 10th Anniversary event on the 25th October with produce for a mouth watering display.

Taste of Must – Gascoyne Edition – October 2 2018

Photography Project The Gascoyne Food Council’s photography project is continuing to add to the impressive library of images that have already been curated by photographer Anton Blume.

The highly valuable library has already proven to be a huge bonus for ongoing media and communications initiatives. Moving forward Anton will be capturing more of the horticulture industry as well as featuring the goat and seafood industry’s as well.

MORE INFORMATION • Carnarvon Visitor Centre: www.carnarvon.org.au • Shire of Carnarvon: carnarvon.wa.gov.au • Gascoyne Food Council: www.gascoynefood.com.au

@gascoynefoodcouncil @gascoynefood

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Love of the land shines through

During this residency I have the opportunity to meet some passionate primary producers in the Gascoyne and I am fortunate to be welcomed into their inspiring workplaces across the horticulture, pastoral and fishing industries. It provides me with a continuous source of discovery and intrigue which inspires new and exciting work. Insights into these environments also make me realise that there are important stories to be shared and this is also an important element to my work.

3 Gascoyne Food Council Chairman Michael Nixon, Minister Alannah MacTiernan, Artist Sue Helmot and Councillor Kristan Pinner.

S

BY GEORGIA THOMAS FRESH CREATIVE

ue Helmot is Carnarvon-based artist whose paintings embody a love of the Gascoyne landscape and a desire to capture its beauty. A keen interest in the Gascoyne’s diverse food production industry and an aspiration to record aspects of its story through art inspired Sue to seek out a residency with the Gascoyne Food Council in 2018. As artist-in-residence for Gascoyne Food, Sue has been visiting plantations, pastoral stations and fishing harbours throughout the region to gather inspiration for her paintings. In August, Sue’s first exhibition during the Gascoyne Food Festival From the Source — A Landscape of Food was a major success. The event brought the local community together in support of Sue’s work and the immortalisation of their life on the land. The exhibition took visitors on a visual journey of life in the region… from Mount Augustus where during rainfall events

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

water is shed and then begins to flow downstream in the Gascoyne River to the rangelands that are grazed by livestock. The water then reaches Carnarvon where it replenishes the aquifers and is converted into fruit and vegetables on the Gascoyne Delta. Finally the river then discharges into Shark Bay triggering the spawning of a variety of seafood. “Partnering with the Gascoyne Food Council as their Artist in Residence is an incredibly rewarding experience. My work is motivated by a keen interest in the Gascoyne foodscape and a desire to capture aspects of it through painting before it is lost.

I see this work as forging a valuable connection between art and food production with the aim of creating a fresh perspective and engaging new audiences. I am excited to be embarking on a new series of oil paintings focusing on seasonal aspects of food production in the Gascoyne, which will form the basis of my 2019 exhibition,” said Sue. Sue is also using her eye for detail to assist photographer Anton Blume for the Gascoyne Food Council’s Photo Project in the region. MORE INFORMATION Website: https://suehelmot.com.au @suehelmotart @sue.helmot


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Custom Granulation – Because we manufacture our products in WA, we can make custom mixes to suit your individual requirements. Minimum quantities do apply.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Recognised Biosecurity Groups

A vision for community approaches to pest management

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018


YOUR INDUSTRY

A

number of biosecurity groups became recognised in 2018, bringing the total number to 14, operating across much of Western Australia. Recognised Biosecurity Groups (RBG) are not-for-profit organisations managed by volunteers and regional representatives that have been formally recognised under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007. They are a unique concept, supported by the WA Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) to empower communities to lead and coordinate control of widespread and established declared pests that are affecting their community the most.

RBG activities are funded by declared pest rates collected from landholders in their areas. These are then doubled by the State Government, which matches dollar-for-dollar all rates collected. DPIRD Acting Invasive Species Director Victoria Aitken said RBGs fostered a bottom-up approach by providing opportunities for landholders to identify which declared pests are a problem, to help develop strategies and the budget required, and to participate in on-ground management activities.

“Local people are best placed to know about local pest problems. By involving everyone in decision-making about activities and expenditure, communities are encouraged to take ownership of pest management,” Ms Aitken said. Problem pests differ from region to region. Therefore, each RBG has their own list of priority pests, ranging from Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly), rabbits or weeds such as cotton bush and parkinsonia, through to animals like wild dogs that have significant impacts on agricultural lands and livestock. RBGs can be established for the benefit of any agriculture industry, including horticulture. Additionally, RBG activities differ, with some focusing on education, training and coordinated activities, and others more involved in on-ground

control. Each RBG carries out a range of activities, as there is no single approach to effective pest management. Ms Aitken said while RBGs are expected to be increasingly self-sustaining, DPIRD will continue supporting RBGs with matching funds, and providing advice and guidance in areas such as engagement, operational planning, administration and governance.

Helping landholders to meet their legal obligations Ms Aitken said an important role for RBGs was to increase awareness that landholders have an obligation under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 to control declared pests on their own land.

RBGs are not-forprofit organisations managed by volunteers and regional representatives.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

3 EACH RBG has their own list of priority pests, ranging from Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly), rabbits or weeds such as cotton bush.

FIGURE 1 Recognised Biosecurity Groups in Western Australia Source: DPIRD

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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“A priority for RBGs is to increase motivation for individual landholders and other stakeholders to become involved in pest management by providing them with the ability to carry out control activities. “Skills development is achieved through information sessions, communication materials such as newsletters and websites, training workshops, technical demonstrations and advice — including passing on information about new technologies and best practice control.” Ms Aitken said motivation to become involved in pest management also came from knowing there is a shared responsibility. “Pests know no borders, and it is important for effective management that it takes place across all tenures — both public and private — and is coordinated and collaborative. All stakeholders need to be involved — landholders, government, industry and other organisations.” At the community-level, coordinated activities could include community

baiting or weed control days, or joint rabbit and fox control activities. RBGs can also collaborate with government, industry and other RBGs to carry out pest control over large regional areas, where declared pests such as wild dogs need to be controlled on a large-scale. Ms Aitken stressed that while the activities carried out by RBGs and their partners support landholder efforts, they complement rather than replace them. In recent years the RBG concept has been extended to our agricultural regions. Previously, there were only five RBGs, which had operated in the WA’s pastoral regions for many years. “In the agricultural regions, participation in decisions about declared pest management is new, and still evolving. The goal of RBGs is to maximise the involvement of their communities,” Ms Aitken said. “DPIRD is assisting RBGs to improve their skills in this area, as the success of a RBG depends on effective

engagement, to make sure their activities reflect the pest management needs of communities in their area.” Engagement may include open invitations to planning workshops and Annual General Meetings, surveys, feedback channels through websites and social media forums, and hosting displays at events where community members can discuss pest problems one on one with RBG staff.

Engagement forms the basis of operational plans, which help determine the declared pest rate required in each RBG area. In 2018–19, 12 RBGs have had a rate raised — five of these rating for the first time. RBGs operate across a number of different local government areas — currently totaling 60. MORE INFORMATION Go to www.agric.wa.gov.au/bam/ recognised-biosecurity-groups

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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WA POTATOES

potato

update WA Grower SUMMER 2018

61


WA POTATOES

contacts Potato Growers Association Vaughan Carter President

Busselton

m: 0417 092 505

Daniel Omodei Vice President

Pemberton

m: 0427 761 121

Mia Rose Treasurer

Myalup

m: 0409 112 245

Committee Colin Ayres

Albany

m: 0428 451 014

Garry Bendotti

Pemberton

m: 0427 569 903

Roy Humfrey

Gingin/Dandaragan m: 0427 148 832

Christian de Haan Manjimup

S

Terms 2016–19 m: 0428 827 126 e: glenjr@bigpond.com

Dominic Della Vedova 2016–19 Sam Calameri

2016–19

Terry Ackley

2016–19

Mathew Cocciolone

2017–20

Mia Rose

2017–20

Fee for Service charge 2018–19 Processing potatoes — local and export

$6.00/t

Seed potatoes — local and export

$150/ha

Ware (fresh) potatoes — local

$8.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — export

$6.00/t

Projects Approved 2018–19 Part funding for PGA

$285,500

Delivery of Registered Seed Potato Certification Schemes & Virus Testing

$96,000

Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid (PSTVd) surveillance of the Seed Scheme

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

BY VAUGHAN CARTER PRESIDENT, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

ince my last report the Potato Growers Association have had our AGM and I am happy to welcome Christian de Haan to the CoM . Christian will represent the Manjimup area and I encourage growers to get in touch with Christian with any issues that arise within the industry. All other positions on the PGA remain the same.

Potato Producers Committee Glen Ryan Chairperson

President’s Report

m: 0429 436 361

Agriculture Produce Commission Member

Potato Growers Association

A sincere big thank you to our outgoing member Don Terrigno. Don has represented the industry with the same passion as he has for farming in general. Don approached his position on the PGA with great integrity and always pushed for the best outcome for his local members. A big thank you Don from all PGA members. Another outcome from our annual AGM was the special resolution to change the constitution. The wording regarding the motion moved at the AGM reads “That the Constitution of the Potato Growers Association of Western Australia (Inc) in the form presented to the AGM and initiated by the Chairman be adopted as the constitution of the Association in substitution for and to the exclusion of the Associations existing Constitution”. It has been a fairly long process to change the constitution, so the above statement is rewarding to read, and another box ticked that was required after the deregulation of the industry.

Water reform has been a hot topic and down in the Busselton region there have been a few meetings held. Water holders concerns were bought to the attention of Vasse MLA Libby Mettam and former politician Barry House who now represents the wine industry. Another meeting was held by the Department of Water in Margaret River. The general consensus from those who attended was that any moves to adopt a licensing fee be rejected and a submission be tabled to acknowledge licence holders are absolutely opposed to any change.

The PGA has formed a submission on behalf of all its members. This submission was notified by email to all members. On the domestic front, supply is currently short which has seen a increase in price. I have taken some time to speak with numerous growers who are all terribly relieved to see a bit of reward for the investment dollar. I can only hope that the margins


WA POTATOES

Potato Growers Association

Executive Officer’s Report SIMON MOLTONI EXECUTIVE OFFICER, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

Trade resumed with NSW and Victoria. remain reasonable for some time to inject some confidence back in the industry. In the last few months growers received an email notifying them that NSW had resumed trade with WA. This is great news and now Victoria has done the same. We now wait on SA to follow suit which will be a big shot in the arm for our seed growing industry and our industry as a whole. Our CEO Simon Moltoni has been in continual contact with SA regulation bodies to help with the slow response in allowing trade back into their state ... soon we hope! My sincere thanks to our CoM who over the last year have worked extremely hard which has seen some really significant achievements and benchmarks resolved. To our EO Simon and finance and administration Manager Morena well done on all your hard work! MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com

S

pring has arrived bringing with it some good news for our industry. Tightening of supply through the winter months has seen improved returns to growers after two years of depressed prices. Warmer growing conditions are also much appreciated after the significant frosts that hit our winter production areas. Market access to the east coast is rapidly improving as at the time of printing NSW and Victoria have opened their borders to WA potatoes. We expect SA and Queensland to follow suit in the very near future. This will enable our seed industry to recover lost ground and potentially provide a relief valve for the fresh market growers. In TPP related news we have a proposed study tour to New Zealand in February 2019 for interested seed growers. This tour has been proposed by Victorian Seed Potatoes and is very well supported by NZ govt and industry bodies. Ausveg is helping co-ordinate the tour. More information will be available as details are finalised. Places will be limited, and participants will need to pay their way. I recently attended a biosecurity workshop in Melbourne with participants from Plant Health Australia, DoAWR, Ausveg, and state plant health representatives along with industry bodies. This was an educational experience that certainly

improved my understanding of how the different agencies etc need to work together to achieve acceptable outcomes. The purpose of the workshop was to provide feedback for the development of the Framework to Achieve Area Freedom. I feel it was important to have industry involved as we provide a practical perspective on the balance between biosecurity protocols and trade. Thank you to those growers who lodged submissions with DWER regarding the proposed water license fee changes. This is a critical issue for our members which will be contested through the entire process.

PGA have been working collaboratively with other agricultural organisations to this point and intend to continue to do so as this is a wider issue that is just the thin end of the wedge. In R+D news PGA, with the support of WASPP, have teamed with Murdoch University in applying for a Regional Export Development grant to build a pilot Aeroponic minituber production facility. This is an exciting opportunity that can in the long term increase the capacity and reliability of the WA potato industry particularly in the export market. We are also seeking funding for a project to identify the natural predators of TPP in WA to increase our knowledge of how this significant pest will behave in our environment. This will ultimately help develop effective management strategies for growers. Thank you to Morena, Georgia, Vaughan and the COM for their ongoing commitment to our industry. MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon Moltoni on 0447 141 752 or email simon.moltoni@vegetableswa.com.au

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WA POTATOES

Recipes reap rewards for schools Seed for Schools Potato Recipe Competition

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o wrap up the 2018 Seed for Schools program the WA Potatoes team offered classes an opportunity to submit a recipe to go in the running for a great prize. Classes were encouraged to harvest their potatoes and make a simple, fun and healthy recipe and send it in with photos. The top reward of a Sustainability Visit was provided by Bunnings and included a tailored package with fresh mulch, plants and hand-on assistance to freshen up the gardens at the selected school. The judges had a very hard time selecting the top entry as each recipe was fantastic. As such, all of the submissions will be used to create a recipe booklet for the 2019 Seed for Schools program and will also be shared on the website in due course. The WA Potatoes team also decided to send all the schools that entered a certificate and cookbook as an extra thank you for their hard work. Congratulations must go to the overall winner for this incredibly innovative recipe. We can’t wait to try it for ourselves. Well done Beldon Education Support Centre!

Potato and rhubarb dumplings with rhubarb compote Ingredients

Method

POTATO DUMPLING

1. Run a potato peeler down a strip of rhubarb and cut so you have 2cm long strips, place the strips into a dehydrator for approximately 8 to 10 hours.

·· 500g Desiree potatoes (peeled) ·· 50g semolina ·· 100g plain flour ·· 50g melted butter ·· 1 egg yolk ·· 150g panko breadcrumbs ·· 60g butter ·· 75g caster sugar ·· 1 teaspoon cinnamon RHUBARB COMPOTE ·· 400g rhubarb cut into 1cm sticks ·· 200g raw caster sugar ·· 1 tablespoon orange zest ·· ½ lemon (juice) ·· 1 vanilla pod ·· 50g rhubarb ·· Micro herbs and flowers to decorate

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2. Place 400g of rhubarb in a saucepan sprinkle with sugar and add the lemon juice and orange zest. Strip the vanilla seeds from the pod and add. 3. Simmer over low heat until just tender, but still holding its shape. Set aside to cool then place in fridge until needed. 4. Simmer potatoes in a large saucepan until tender. Drain well then while still warm pass through a potato ricer into a bowl. Add melted butter, semolina, flour and egg yolk, mix to make a smooth dough. If sticky add a bit more flour. Set aside.


WA POTATOES

WA Potatoes

Industry Development Strategy 2018–23 Vision

A profitable and sustainable Western Australian potato industry with a clear direction for the future.

Mission 5. Heat 60g butter in a large frying pan over medium heat until foaming, add sugar , cinnamon and breadcrumbs, stir until crumbs are golden brown, set aside. 6. Take about 2 tablespoons of dough and gently roll into a ball, using your thumb make an indentation in the middle, add a piece of the rhubarb compote (no liquid) and close the dough around the rhubarb compote, sealing any patches where filling seeps through, place on a tray and re-peat with remaining dough and compote. 7. Blanch dumplings very gentle in a large saucepan of barely simmering water until they float approximately 15 mins. Remove with a slotted spoon, place on a paper towel briefly to drain. Roll in crumbs to evenly coat.

Congratulations Beldon Education Support Centre!

8. Place some compote in a serving spoon top with dumpling and decorate with dehydrated rhubarb micro herbs and flowers.

To make the WA potato industry a competitive supplier of quality potatoes to local and overseas markets through adoption of world class production, biosecurity, supply chain, marketing and management systems.

Objective

R&D

Increase average farm profit by 5% per annum, in real terms, over the next five years.

Research and development will continue to be conducted by the Potatoes Research WA at Murdoch University, which includes variety development and a new industry linkage program. The PGAWA will also investigate mechanisms to facilitate the adoption of new technologies and systems.

There have been some dramatic changes to the WA potato industry over the past 12–18 months. Deregulation, disease incursion and closing down of processing facilities have impacted all facets of the industry and created an opportunity for transformation. The Potato Growers Association of WA (PGAWA), with the assistance of Strickland Park consultants and the Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development (DPIRD), has reviewed it’s position, functions and industry realities to create a new Industry Development Strategy for the future. The plan sets out the strategic imperatives for industry and identifies plans for their implementation. Core activities identified in the plan include:

Marketing The PGAWA will continue the program of generic marketing of potatoes formally managed by the PMC. This includes maintaining programs such as Seed for Schools, Perth Royal Show promotion, media and communications activities and retail outreach.

Capacity Building The PGAWA will continue to develop capacity to take on the functions previously managed at the PMC. This will include development of a Communications Plan and the ongoing training and up-skilling of the staff in the office.

Export Development The PGAWA is creating an Export Development Plan to create opportunities for chip stock and seed potatoes in priority markets. This includes ensuring the continuance of the Certified Seed Potato Scheme and ongoing work towards gaining market access in identified markets. The Industry Development Strategy is currently being finalised and will be made available to all industry members by the end of the year. MORE INFORMATION Morena Perdec P: (08) 9481 0834 E: morena@wapotatoes.com.au

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WA POTATOES

Introducing Christian de Haan The Potato Growers Association’s newest Committee of Management member

PERTH

MANJIMUP

Farmer Christian de Haan Location Manjimup Enterprises Beef & potatoes

M

anjimup local Christian de Haan is a third generation farmer whose family has been involved in farming since the 1950s.

The farm produces about half seed potatoes for export and half fresh potatoes, including Royal Blue, Rodeo, Nadine and Orchestra which are the main varieties grown on the farm. The farm is home to Christian’s parents and sister, as well as his partner and young daughter. Like most farmers, Christian loves when things are going right and wishes that consumers new more about the amount of work that goes into growing good quality produce.

Christian has been on the property since graduating from ag school in 1999 and with his background and work ethic is an ideal addition to the PGAWA Committee of Management (COM). “Great-Opa was a potato breeder in Holland and Opa and Oma migrated to WA in 1950s. Opa initially worked for the Department of Agriculture and eventually purchased our farm out on Muir Highway where we have been growing potatoes ever since,” said Christian. “I’ve also been very fortunate with Uncle‘s Bob and Bruno Pessotto with their generous help over the years.” The property in Manjimup boasts a classic mix of beef and potatoes, which probably explains Christian’s preference for simple Royal Blue wedges with herbs — the perfect accompaniment to steak.

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Royal Blue wedges with herbs — the perfect accompaniment to steak.

“We have been implementing programs to improve soil health, such as green manure crops and hope to expand exports for fresh, processing and seed potatoes,” says Christian. The PGAWA welcomes Christian to the COM and looks forward to working together to see the good work that has been achieved since deregulation continue.


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pome

update Pomewest

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POMEWEST

contacts Pomewest Committee and Officers

From the Pomewest

Harvey Giblett, Chair

e: newtonbros@wn.com.au

Mario Casotti

e: mario@casottigroup.com

Wayne Ghilarducci

e: strathspey@modnet.com.au

Jason Jarvis

e: twinpack@bigpond.com

Sam Licciardello

e: sam@orchard1sixty.com.au

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Susie Murphy White, Project Manager e: susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au

Executive Manager

33ANABP 01A blossom at La Valle Orchard in Perth Hills.

Nardia Stacy, Executive Manager e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au Natalie Gallagher, Executive Assistant e: natalie.gallagher@dpird.wa.gov.au

APC–Pomewest FFS Income 2018–19 Project General Account Budget Biosecurity Account Budget

$ 450,000

APC-Pomewest major projects 2018–19 Project

$

New Technology Project (Susie Murphy White)

88,860

Innovative Orchardist Group Project

28,000

Markers, Markets and Validated Nutritional Qualities of Australian Apples

20,000

Market Access Projects

116,280

Annual Meetings and Communications

14,500

Medfly Surveillance Trapping Network (Ashmere Consulting)

60,000

Codling Moth (DPIRD)

36,000

Maturity Standards Legislation and Compliance

80,000

Industry Sponsorships and Association Memberships

4,800

Promotion & Publicity Local Project (Fresh Finesse)

37,500

Natural Mite control/Baseline fungicide resistance — Apple Scab

17,680

Administration APC Administration

185,000 45,000

APC fee for service charge POME FRUIT effective from 1 January 2015

68

Type of fruit

$/kg

Fresh fruit — apples, pears, Nashi, other

0.015

Processing fruit

0.005

Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit

0.002

Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

0.001

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

60,000

A

celebration of productivity — from bud burst to full blossom and much buzzing activity in the orchard makes a picture perfect postcard at this time of the year. We have had very mild spring weather with plenty of rain. Some regions have reported some sporadic, dare we say it — hail incidents, fortunately this has been before fruit set. Growers are set to bask in the oncoming sunshine of summer and work to establishing the trees for the upcoming 2019 season.

Whilst last season started slowly in retail, the recent re-adjustment of prices has renewed a sense of optimism for our producers for the upcoming months. September — October was a busy couple of months for events, starting with our Industry Summit in Bunbury which spoke to around 25 WA growers and other industry stakeholders.

Pome Summit 14 September 2018

33POME Summit — featuring New Leaf Orchard Juices.

Mark Scott, Deputy Chair of Pomewest, welcomed the attendees and opened the program. The first speakers were guests from the Eastern States including the APAL team headed by CEO Phil Turnbull and HIAL’s Apple and Pears Relationship Manager Sam Turner and Marketing Manager Olivia Grey. These speakers represented the national industry bodies. They were followed by Rohan Prince, acting WA DPIRD Director of Irrigated Agriculture. The focus of most of these presentations followed a familiar


POMEWEST

This edition…

Future Orchards, IPDM program & Innovative Orchardist Bus Trip

tune — collaboration and unearthing opportunities to position the future growth of the pome business, whilst focusing on export. Olivia’s presentation looked at the outcome of the HIAL marketing spend of Levy funded promotional activities and recorded results. Good discussion resulted, our growers were able to express their views on several points covered. It was a good opportunity to have an understanding from all perspectives. We were also very fortunate to add to the program some innovative value adding featuring local businesses — Newleaf Orchards and Custard Cider Co who presented their stories and opportunities for value adding products. Juice and Cider samples were enjoyed by the group throughout the breaks on the day.

The technical program featured Harvista presented by Hannah James of Agrofresh and Brevis from Bevan Addison of ADAMA Agricultural Solutions.

The Spring Future Orchards walk was held at Bluemoon Orchard in Mullalyup on the 28 September, focused on fruit quality. The take home message from the day was no surprise — good quality will sell more apples. More on this story on page 76. Following along the theme of fruit quality — Susie Murphy White organised a bus load of growers to visit Market City and Woolworths Delivery Centre in November where they were able to see firsthand quality testing requirements of exported fruit and the biosecurity facilities used to treat imported fruit — please see more on this also in this edition.

Feedback is always appreciated and taken well into consideration for future events. Please let me, Susie or Natalie know if you can contribute to any ideas for the programming of the next summit. Links to some of the presentations and websites will be made available on the Pomewest website.

In addition, Pomewest made its usual industry donation to the Perth Hills Festival and there is also a report on this event in this edition. We invited Georgia Thomas from Fresh Creative to write a story about Social Media using the BRAVO™ branded apple as a case write up, which we hope you will find interesting.

Good quality

will sell more apples!

As part of the Hort Innovation Australia funded project AP16007: An Integrated Pest, Disease and Weed Management (IPDM) program for the Australian Apple and Pear Industry we have an update on the workshops which were run in late August, see page 74. Promotions

APAL visit In October, I was fortunate to meet up with the whole APAL team and my fellow state representatives for an overview and update session led by Phil Turnbull. This was particularly useful to cement a national voice and to support a national based outlook for the industry and its future. I applaud APAL for this opportunity, I really enjoyed the energy and enthusiasm of the group and support this and future occasions to build on these relationships and outcomes. Water We have been in discussion with vegetablesWA and other industry bodies regarding the proposed changes to the water licensing fees and Pomewest will be part a joint horticulture response paper as we believe a united voice approach across industries will be most effective we will advise you of the outcome of the submission in due course.

Both were well received by the group and if more information is required by any of our members on these applications, please let me know. A networking BBQ and drinks followed where growers and guest speakers were able to continue valuable discussions. It was very much appreciated that APAL, HIAL and our other guests were able to contribute to the success of the day.

sold over 3,000 apple slinkys. We were happy to be able to feature samples of local WA made apple juices again supported by New Leaf Orchards. Another successful show this year.

33NARDIA Stacy, Aussie Apple volunteer and Natalie Gallager at the Perth Royal Show.

Pomewest, again was also involved in supporting the Perth Royal Show from 22–29 September, made possible by funding supplied by Hort Innovation again this year supporting the Aussie Apple message. Our stand supported the WA regional display for local produce and many people were drawn to our stand which featured WA grown BRAVO™ branded apple, Pink Lady™ and Granny Smith apples. This year we sampled 13,000 apple slices and

Merry Xmas and Happy New Year To conclude we, at Pomewest, both Committee and staff, wish you and your families a safe and an enjoyable festive season. However, it won’t be long before the next harvest is knocking at the door — when we all do it again in 2019. MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@fruitwest.org.au

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Promoting â„¢ BRAVO apples in a digital world

e h t a i d e m w e N a r o f t i f t perfec e l p p a new 70

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s the third commercial season for BRAVO™ apples comes to an end it is an ideal time to review the impact of its ongoing digital marketing campaign. Despite greater volumes being available the season has concluded even earlier than previous years, with demand continuing to grow for the apple Like No Other™. Part of the success is due to effective and consistent brand messaging across all media platforms. Through the partnership between Fruitwest Co-operative Ltd and WA Farm Direct, the digital media strategy for BRAVO™ has resulted in the creation of a website, Facebook and Instagram accounts. Considering that worldwide over 50% of the population use the internet (that is around 4 billion people using the internet for an average of six hours a day)*, digital media has never been more important as a tool for marketers.

The BRAVO™ digital strategy has been running over the 2017 and 2018 seasons and has achieved some excellent results in this short time. • 911 Facebook followers and 1075 Instagram followers • Around 20,000 people see BRAVO™ content on social media each month • Nearly 2000 people a month are engaging with BRAVO™ content on social media each month • The website attracts around 2000 visitors per month • BRAVO™ social media achieves 5–10 times more engagement than similar branded apple social accounts on Instagram and Facebook • 50% followers from WA, 40% followers from the rest of Australia and 10% from overseas In 2017 and 2018 the BRAVO™ team created consumer photo competitions to engage loyal fans and create a stream of new content. The competitions resulted in hundreds of entries and some amazing photos which were a great boost for reach of the brand.

Winner!

Consumer photo competition

Around 20,000 people see Bravo™ content on social media each month

In 2018 the digital strategy also evolved to include influencers and ambassadors.

Athlete Sam Kerr currently being the main ambassador for BRAVO™ with over 60,000 Instagram followers and 14,000 Facebook followers. As well as being a highly recognised sports star with a healthy lifestyle that suits the ethos of the BRAVO™ apple. Social influencer Amy Zempilas was also engaged in 2018 to post about BRAVO™ to her media following. Her lunchbox image including sliced BRAVO™ apples resulted in reach of over 15,000 people and over 700 comments… many asking about the apple and where to buy it! Moving into 2019, the BRAVO™ team has some exciting plans to further develop its collaboration with Sam Kerr and to continue to grow its audience in Australia and internationally. MORE INFORMATION Keep up-to-date with the BRAVO™ activities:

Bravo Apples bravoapples www.bravoapples.com.au. *Digital in 2018 in Oceania report by Hootsuite (www.slideshare.net/wearesocial/digital-in-2018-inoceania-part-1-west)

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T

BRAVO™ Season Review

8 1 0 2

33BEN Darbyshire and horticultural adviser Marcel Veens (Qld).

33ROB Green (SA), Steele Jacob(DPIRD) and John Vickers (SA)

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he 2018 BRAVO™ branded apple season review has held on Wednesday 31 October – 1 November at the Manjimup Horticulture Research Institute where the ANABP 01A variety was bred. The event hosted approximately 27 growers and 14 industry stakeholders with two South Australian growers present. The program commenced with a welcome by Fruit West Co-operative Chair Ben Darbyshire who outlined the purpose of the review which was to share knowledge and information about ANABP 01A growing practices, systems to maximise BRAVO™ pack-outs, marketing activities for 2018 and future planning to successfully introduce the brand to the world. The initial presentation was delivered by Steele Jacob of Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development who talked about drawing consumers back to the apple category of retail store. Steele’s view is that we must develop and promote varieties not only for a definable appearance — but this all must be backed up by taste and texture. This, he believes, is the key to determining the next purchase — quality is still the way to consumer’s hearts. He also believes that the BRAVO™ branded apple is set to deliver this ideal — given the value chain works together to achieve this goal. There are a lot of new apples in the global market, as was seen at the recent Asia Fruit Logistica held in Hong Kong, so we need to make sure that BRAVO’s distinctive appearance and quality attributes are clearly recognisable valued across the globe. The next presentation was from a distinguished panel comprised of consultants (including Steele Jacob and Marcel Veens) and pioneer growers and


POMEWEST

Perth Hills Festival

BRAVO™

branded apple season review.

13 October 2018

T

33ORCHARD Tours, MHRI, Fontanini Farm and Newton Orchards.

packers (Terry Martella, Dave Stewart and Adam Buckley) that discussed pruning, thinning, nutrient supplements, sunscreens, harvest maturity testing, post-harvest treatment and packing. A robust discussion ensued with views and experiences shared — which was excellent. The participants were advised that outcomes from learnings and trials throughout the last two seasons will be compiled into a Good Practise Guide as part of the Grower Group Research and Development (GGRD) project funded by DPIRD. The plan is to publish the Guide early in 2019.

Marketer Jenny Mercer of WA Farm Direct, the exclusive Licenced Marketer of ANABP 01A fruit, presented an overview of the social media exposure of the BRAVO™ brand in 2018. This led into a marketing report of the season just gone, marketing plans (including export) for next year, and value adding for out of spec fruit. The report covered the extensive Consumer Profiling, Brand Awareness & Development and Value Adding activities and quality control outcomes of the GGRD project. Dr Catherine Bondonno of Edith Cowan University delivered an update on the BRAVO™ clinical trials with promising results expected which would deliver

valuable marketing outcomes for upcoming seasons based on the health benefits derived from the BRAVO apple’s high flavonoids. These trials also form part of the GGRD project outcomes. Catherine’s Presentation is available on the Fruitwest website: www.fruitwest.com.au The first day ended with a networking forum for participants to reflect on the day’s proceedings and discuss further, personal experiences with the ANABP 01A variety. On Thursday 1 November the 2018 Season Review concluded with a tour of the Australian National Apple Breeding Program hosted by Steele Jacob and John Sutton of DPIRD and tours of four year-old trees courtesy of Fontanini Farm and Newton Orchards. Marcel Veens provided growers with an insight into growing practices and trial results known so far for the ANABP 01A variety — whilst viewing the trees. Growers attending the orchard visits benefited greatly by the ‘hands on’ approach and the discussions in the field. Big thanks to the Fontanini’s and Newton Orchards for making their orchards available to visit.

BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

he Pomewest sponsorship of the “I Love WA Fruit Kids Corner” assisted the Hills Orchard Improvement Group (HOIG) to promote the “Crunch and Sip” campaign. This has been running for a number of years. This activity encourages parents and children to sample different types of fresh fruit by creating their own fruit kebabs on the day.

In addition, take away bags of fresh locally grown fruit were also freely given out to children. To walk out with their own bag of fruit makes a very happy future apple eater. It’s great for us to know that apples continue to be a crowd pleaser, and that fruit sourced at this event is readily available on the metropolitan doorstep. HOIG is committed to support this festival in the name of promoting local growers and their produce to WA consumers.

MORE INFORMATION Website: www.bravoapples.com.au Website: www.fruitwest.com.au Fruit West Co-operative Ltd: Nardia Stacy, Executive Officer, (08) 9368 3869.

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Integrated pest, disease

and weed ent managem

33WEEVIL leaf scalloping

33GARDEN weevil adults

BY ALISON MATHEWS 1 , STEWART LEARMONTH 1 AND SUSIE MURPHY WHITE 2 1 DPIRD MANJIMUP 2 POMEWEST MANJIMUP

A

s part of the Hort Innovation Australia funded project AP16007: An Integrated Pest, Disease and Weed Management (IPDM) program for the Australian Apple and Pear Industry workshops were run in late August to inform growers across Australia on the management strategies and monitoring techniques used in IPDM.

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The workshops identified grower collaborators willing to participate in individual orchard case studies commencing during the 2018–19 season. Twenty-six growers and pest scouts attended the Western Australia workshops over the two days. Entomologist David Williams from Agriculture Victoria led the groups through IPDM strategies and the development of their own IPDM plans for this season. The groups were able to hear about trapping methodology and pest thresholds from guest speaker Chris Adams from Michigan State University. Officers from the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and Pomewest were on hand to answer any specific local queries. David said ‘while there was a high level of awareness of IPDM and the tools required for growers to use IPDM effectively were available,

grower and advisor confidence in IPDM could be improved by developing a better understanding of, and gaining experience with, the integration process’. Thanks to those who completed the online survey prior to the workshops. The majority of respondents from WA indicated that they were using IPDM in their orchards. This result was reflected around the country also with over 75% of respondents using IPDM and even more doing regular monitoring in their orchards. Across Australia, the majority of respondents said they could identify all pests in their orchards, but only one third could identify all beneficial insects and less than half said they could identify all diseases. When asked what was required for them to reduce their reliance on pesticides over 80% said more information and over 70% said support to make decisions could be improved.


POMEWEST

Out of the survey and discussions at the workshops the most mentioned pests of concern in WA were med fly, weevils, woolly aphids, mites and thrips and for diseases powdery mildew, apple scab and alternaria.

maintain and hopefully improve returns. It is all about deciding on the acceptable damage levels, which vary between orchards, and identifying when the cost of preventing loss will be higher than the value of potential loss.

The survey results provide the project team with information on the level of IPDM experience, engagement with IPDM practices, pest priorities and barriers limiting uptake of IPDM for growers, pest management scouts and advisors. This will enable a better targeted response to region specific information and better training

An example of an IPDM strategy used in WA is the woolly aphid wasp. The wasp parasitises the aphids by laying their eggs into them. Instead of the aphid developing as normal a ‘mummy’ forms, from which a wasp emerges. If you have aphid mummies in your orchard they can be collected in autumn, stored in the fridge or cool

33WOOLLY aphid wasp parasite and aphid mummies.

guidelines for growers and advisors when the second round of workshops is undertaken in 2019. The survey responses will also help to make the revised IPDM manual more relevant to the needs of the industry. Growers, scouts and consultants will be able to get regular and timely IPDM information from experts across Australia throughout the life of the project on the Extension Aus web page, which is expected to go live in November 2018. Check out www. extensionAUS.com.au in the coming months and throughout the season as more information is added.

For pests that may or may not be a problem in spring, regular monitoring will indicate whether action is required. room and then released into the orchard the coming season in late spring when woolly aphids colonise tree canopies. To collect the mummies simply prune wood with parasitised aphids. For pests that may or may not be a problem in spring, regular monitoring will indicate whether action is required. History of the orchard, especially

33ADULT apple dimpling bug.

damage the previous season, will indicate what pests are likely to occur and therefore need regular monitoring. For example, pests such as apple dimpling bug and garden and apple weevil vary in abundance each season. If these pests are present above the action threshold, monitoring will dictate the best time to intervene. Knowing what monitoring technique to use is important. For weevils monitor weekly using corrugated cardboard bands or check for scalloped leaves near the crown of trees from late October to December. For apple dimpling big, tapping blossoms into an ice cream container works well — if low numbers are found, monitoring frequency should be increased to twice a week. As the project rolls out, resources and news on pest presence will be available to orchardists to assist with their pest and disease management following IPDM principles. MORE INFORMATION Local contacts for the project are Alison Mathews, DPIRD, (08) 9777 0122, alison.mathews@dpird.wa.gov.au, and Susie Murphy White, Pomewest, (08) 9777 151, susan.murphy-white@agric.wa.gov.au.

33MANJIMUP woolly aphid.

IPDM is a systematic approach to pest and disease management. It incorporates identification and monitoring of pests and their natural enemies, and diseases, and techniques such as cultural practices and selective chemicals that allow natural enemies to keep pest populations under control. The IPDM decisions reduce crop damage while helping to reduce environmental impact and at least WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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Striving for

s e l p p a y t i l a good qu

T

BY SUSIE MURPHY WHITE PROJECT MANAGER, POMEWEST

he WA Spring Future Orchard Walk was at Blue Moon Orchard in Mullalyup on 28 September and it was all about fruit quality. Ensuring quality and consistency of any product is crucial to ensuring consumer satisfaction and future purchasing decisions.

The morning started with guest speaker Brad Fankhauser from Fankhauser Apples Drouin Victoria speaking about striving for fruit quality. Their orchard strives to produce premium fruit that they pack and market themselves. Brad highlighted the fact that they spend time in the orchard assessing maturity, fruit and tree growth, water availability, pest and disease levels to ensure that premium fruit is grown.

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This orchard walk was a little different to previous as it saw the group undertake some taste testing of Pink Lady™ apples. An eating quality trial had been set-up across Australia with all regions picking the Pink Lady™ apples at three timings (seven days before first pick, at first pick and after second pick) and stored until the September orchard walks.

The WA apple samples were from an orchard in Manjimup and Donnybrook, and had been air cooled stored. Each of these apples were rated for texture, juiciness, sweetness, flavour and the chance of purchasing again. The responses to the apple samples varied across the group with different people showing different responses to the early, mid and late maturing fruit.

33THE eating quality trial rated texture, juiciness, sweetness, flavour and the chance of purchasing again.


POMEWEST

The group was asked to describe their favourite apple in one word from what was tasted

crispiness crispiness crisp refreshing refreshing crispsweet overall sweet overall

flavour flavour sweetness sweetness juice

juice

crunch

crunch

texture texture taste taste balance balance crunchiness crunchiness

Growers were then asked what was wrong with the worst apple using one word

mealy mealy soft soft floury floury texture texture

dry dry bland bland

poorpoor pressure pressure

From the results on the day it looked like the early pick on block B was what most people would return to purchase (see Figure 1).

Apple growers can take steps to ensure more consistent and good eating quality of apples are available to consumers through good orchard and post-harvest management practices. While no two seasons are the same growers can rely on set practices and measurements to ensure optimum harvest time to achieve best post-

harvest quality. Since harvest maturity is most important this demonstration trial looked at the effect various harvest regimes may have on the final quality and eating experience of the product. Thank you to Tony Giumelli from Blue Moon Orchard for hosting the day and thank you to our growers who donated fruit to the eating quality trial, it was greatly appreciated. MORE INFORMATION

1 - Poor 2 - Below average 3 - Average 4 - Above average 5 - Excellent

60 40

5 - Excellent

20 0

3 - Average 1 - Poor Blk A Blk A Blk A Blk B Blk B Blk B Early/mat Mid/mat Late/mat Early/mat Mid/mat Late/mat

Contact Susie Murphy White (Pomewest), phone (08) 9777 0151 or email Susie at susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Future OrchardsÂŽ is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Apple and Pear Fund. It is funded by Hort Innovation using the apple and pear levy and funds from the Australian Government, and is delivered by APAL and AgFirst.

FIGURE 1 Rate the chance of purchasing the apple again WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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POMEWEST

Following fruit quality

t e k r a m to y a w e all th

33TASTING champagne ciders at Carmel Cider, Lisa, Susie, Claire and Elizabeth.

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POMEWEST

BY POMEWEST INNOVATIVE ORCHARDIST GROUP

F

ollowing this year’s theme of fruit quality in the Future Orchards program. Pomewest ran a two day bus tour to Market City and the Woolworths Delivery Centre. The group consisted of growers from the South West and Perth Hills who were also joined by other industry representatives from the HortConnectWA network.

33ABOVE: At the Naked Apple for cider tasting and dinner.

Over the two days we visited TQAS where we saw the application of quality standards for international export and local standards. Chris Hall showed us how fruit is tested for maturity before it is exported around the world. The group then headed up to the hills to do some cider tasting of champagne ciders at Carmel Cider then onto Naked Apple Cider House for another cider tasting followed by a great meal, all looking at the aspects of value adding to apple products. Next morning we made an early morning visit to Market City with John Mercer from WA Farm Direct who showed us the biosecurity treatment of imported fruit followed by a tour of the market facilities with time to talk to market agents.

It was then onto the Woolworths Delivery Centre where we saw the daily process of distribution of the fruit sent up to market. Again quality testing was in place as new produce was received. It was a great tour enjoyed by all with some good learnings on how the market system works along with how we can ensure apples remain in great condition all the way through the supply chain. Thank you to John and Jenny Mercer and team from WA Farm Direct who hosted us over the two days. MORE INFORMATION More Information Susie Murphy White Pomewest (08) 9777 0151 susan.murphywhite@dpird.wa.gov.au This project is funded through Pomewest Innovative Orchardists Group Project funded from APC Fee for Service grower contribution

33TOURING the Woolworths delivery centre.

33WA Farm Direct Market City produce bays.

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Aussie Apples at Perth Royal Show 1200

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

A

BY NOELENE SWAIN FRESH FINESSE

pples were once again involved at the IGA Perth Royal Show within the Walk through WA display in the Centenary Pavilion.

This pavilion provided an excellent access to an audience focused on discovering the offerings of regional WA and the fresh food produced in these regions. The apple stand was located amongst other regional displays with a large four by six metre stand well positioned in the pavilion. With excellent background signage of apple varieties, supply maps and general orchard lifestyle images, this location proved ideal for engagement with individuals, families and children interested in discovering more about local food. The apple offer included samples of the new BRAVO™ apples and the opportunity to explain the story behind this new premium variety. An estimated 13,000 people sampled the BRAVO™ over the eight day show. Armed with Apple

No. apples distrubuted

1000 800 600 400 200 0

Sat

Sun

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Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

FIGURE 1 Apples distributed by year Source: Fresh Finesse

Slinky machines, the apple team also managed to swirl and twirl their way through over 2000 BRAVO™ apples and over 1,250 Pink Lady™ and Granny Smith apples whilst chatting to show goers about the importance of eating locally produced fruit. Two clear groups emerged whilst canvassing consumer reactions to the new BRAVO™ apple during the show. It became clear that people are all truly impressed with the variety, but fell into a split between those previously aware of the apple and those who’d not heard of it. Those who were introduced to the BRAVO™ at last year’s show were very quick to espouse their love of the new apple and their strong commitment to purchasing the apple since discovering it in 2017. Such strongly positive responses provide excellent encouragement that demand for the BRAVO™ will continue to grow as a result of this year's sampling at the show. Sale of a small stock of Apple Slinky machines appealed to those keen to continue the apple ‘magic’ at home. Such a simple tool provides a key easy mechanism for kids (of all ages!) to enjoy apples fresh or to prepare apples for cooking. These machines have a strong following in Primary Schools and school canteens. Even young adults drooled affectionately over the apples as they recalled their primary school memories.

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Mon

BRAVO™ apples were also supplied to the IGA Kids Cooking stage for inclusion in their sessions which provided further opportunity to share the apple industry story. Media interest also achieved good coverage through social media. Thanks are extended to the volunteers who assisted with manning the stand during the show. This is an excellent forum for the general public to engage directly with growers, and for growers to gain a first hand understanding of what the public think of the produce they buy. The combination of youth and experience from Lyster Orchards was extremely well received as was the display of innovation in value adding to create sparkling apple juices by New Leaf Juices.

Further thanks to Horticulture Innovation Australia, Fruit West Cooperative and WA Farm Direct for the support to underwrite this major promotional activity for WA. The good spring weather this year provided strong attendance early in the show however a damp day and preoccupation with the West Coast playing in the AFL Grand Final limited the final day. Never the less, the show provided an excellent opportunity to engage with a large and diverse public. We would recommend continued involvement in this location in 2019.


WA CITRUS

citrus

update WA Citrus

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contacts Producer Committee Members Richard Eckersley, Chair

From the Chair

e: chair@wacitrus.com.au

Shane Kay Mary Ann O’Connor Andrew Sorgiovanni Daniel Ying Cliff Winfield

Manjimup

Rocco & Concetta Zampogna Lower Chittering Doug & Heather Buist

Harvey

WA Citrus Office

Building 16, 3 Baron-Hay Court, SOUTH PERTH WA 6151 Bronwyn Walsh, Industry Development Manager e: industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au m: 0400 873 875 Kate Cox, Administrative Services e: admin@wacitrus.com.au m: 0439 899 600 Helen Newman, Biosecurity Officer e: biosecurity@wacitrus.com.au

what’s on... 2018 Industry End of Year Social Event WHEN 1 December 2018 WHERE Novotel Vines, Swan Valley

2019 Pre-Forum tour WHEN 4–5 March 2019 WHERE Mildura, Adelaide

Citrus Australia Tech Forum WHEN 6–7 March 2019 WHERE Adelaide

HortConnections WHEN 24–26 June 2019 WHERE Melbourne Please note dates and location of industry events are subject to confirmation based on availability of speakers, venues and attendance.

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BY RICHARD ECKERSLEY CHAIR, WA CITRUS

his year was a busy one with three groups of visitors to WA forming the basis of our industry days. Also a big thanks to Roland Hessels from Moora Citrus also hosted an industry day in July on spray application and new products.

There has also been a bunch of local, interstate and international events that Bronwyn and individual businesses have attended. Some of the information from these are described in this edition. Regular feedback from industry events is to visit more orchards. Some businesses have been very generous, opening their gates repeatedly to industry visits and we would like to thank them. It would be nice to visit a few new sites offering the opportunity for everyone to learn in 2019. This year has seen a continuing increase in fruit on the domestic

market, including Afourer mandarins, as larger volumes are produced nationally. It was good to see exports continuing in 2018. Damien Guthrey attended the annual Citrus Australia meeting in Mildura as part of his role as chair of the regional advisory committee for Citrus Australia. He provided our top five priorities for WA. These were recommended by WA Citrus, based on industry day feedback and discussion over the year.

Congratulations to new WA Citrus committee members voted in at the AGM in October. For a relatively small industry we are fortunate to have such commitment. Also, Kate Cox, Helen Newman and Bronwyn Walsh have been assets to the WA citrus industry this year, especially with the additional work associated with the citrus canker response. Their efforts see our industry well supported and represented. Lastly a very warm welcome to new members of WA Citrus. It is always good to hear from WA growers. MORE INFORMATION Contact Richard on 0417 911 534 or email chair@wacitrus.com.au

Interstate visitors look at northern orchards.


WA CITRUS

In the industry Life Membership presented to Bruce Wharton

WA Citrus Bruce Wharton was presented with our inaugural WA Citrus Life Membership Award for services to the Western Australian citrus industry in December. Growers and colleagues thanked Bruce for his commitment to the industry particularly in representation on Committees. Bruce has been in the horticulture business for well over 20 years. He moved into horticulture after 29 years in the electronic engineering profession within the aviation industry. After a sea change involving a move to Bindoon, Bruce and his wife Jenny began to grow primarily citrus with dry harvest currants and a range of stone fruit as additional crops. His commitment is demonstrated in membership of WA Fruit Growers Association, then the WA Citrus Improvement Group, Fruit West committee, the APC Citrus Sub-Committee and most recently WA Citrus. This longevity and his attention to governance helped guide new Committee members and most recently the constitution of WA Citrus. Bruce’s commitment to the industry leadership team is recognised with this Life Membership.

33NEW WA Citrus Committee members.

WA Citrus AGM and welcome to members The Annual General Meeting for WA Citrus was held on Friday 19th October in Bunbury. Richard Eckersley, Chair, presented activities for the year and Kate Cox presented the financial report. Changes to the Constitution were approved regarding eligibility for Life Membership and clarification of the term of office for Committee members. The five nominations for Producer positions were elected unopposed. There are three Non-Producer and Affiliate positions still vacant, these will be nominated by the Committee.

Welcome to new WA Citrus members: Producer Members

Non-Producer Members

1. Chris & Diane Robinson, Kununurra

1. Mark Coulson, Dardanup Citrus

2. Neil Yates, Capel

3. Gail Stubber, Redgum Ridge

3. Kim and Dennis Tucker, Capel 4. Kevin Petersen, Herne Hill 5. Debra and Raymond Chamberlain, Kununurra 6. Cliff Winfield

2. Julian Sharp, Pemberton

Affiliate Members 1. Mark Bahen, Bahen & Co Chocolate 2. Brent Burns, Landsave Organics

MORE INFORMATION If you aren’t a member yet, becoming a member is free if you already pay fee for service. You can join at: www.wacitrus.com.au.

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33CITRUS Australia WARAC members.

News from the APC Citrus SubCommittee BY MICK MANN CHAIR APC CITRUS SUBCOMMITTEE

Agreements for two grants to provide services to WA citrus fee for service payers are now in place for 2018–19.

33BEN Cant, Chair of Board of Citrus Australia meeting with WA citrus growers.

The first is to provide leadership, communication and promotion services to the WA citrus industry and the second is for a contribution to an R&D project aimed at developing new market-focussed products for WA citrus fruit in export markets.

WA Regional Advisory Committee BY DAMIEN GUTHREY CHAIR WARAC, CITRUS AUSTRALIA

The WA citrus industry welcomed Citrus Australia at their Regional Forum as part of the industry day held in October this year. Nathan Hancock gave an overview of Citrus Australia activities. He was joined by new Chair, Ben Cant the new national biosecurity officer Jeff Milne, and stakeholder engagement manager Stephen Cooke.

33CITRUS Australia visited the Control Centre in WA. Please note a correction to the article in the Spring edition of WA Grower: Daniel Ying is a Committee member of WARAC, not Joseph Ling.

Citrus Australia visits WA.

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The last grant is waiting final sign-off with DPIRD to fund the Industry Development Manager project for improving business, market and industry. A call for applications for 2019–20 to deliver services using citrus fee for service will go out over summer. This is an annual process that allows for the allocation of citrus fee for service funding to provide services to the industry. The APC Citrus Sub-Committee review the applications for their fit with the industry strategy, value for money, fit within state and national RD&E activity, relevance to industry, the quality of the proposal and its fit with the functions of the Producers Committee.


WA CITRUS

In the business

H

Benchmarking - free service

BY BRONWYN WALSH WA CITRUS

igh labour costs and access-to and retention-of skilled workers is consistently raised as an issue by growers. Labour and water licensing Growers will have seen emails circulated seeking feedback on improving access to labour for agriculture and the discussion paper on cost recovery for the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation. Ongoing discussion and announcements by Scott Morrison in relation to changes will also impact this area. For water a submission from WA horticulture industries to the Discussion paper on cost recovery for the Department of Water and Environment Regulation, including citrus growers, was submitted as the first stage of the consultation process in November. Responses were collated by vegetablesWA.

Tools for businesses: Economics and managing staff Steven Falivene (NSW DPI) demonstrated an economic calculator available on the NSW DPI website at the industry day in October. He ran through a scenario of pruning navels and using drape-netting or overhead netting on Afourer mandarins.

Bronwyn Walsh then presented (on behalf of Charles Thompson, RMCG) the general findings of a benchmarking activity of citrus businesses in WA. Last year participants looked at orchard production and performance of different varieties. This free service will be available again in 2019 thank you to our state government funded Grower Group Grant R&D project. Participating businesses will receive individual reports and will have the chance to be part of the closed group discussion. All data will be kept confidential and reported anonymously. Charles has done benchmarking with citrus growers across Australia, as well as other fruit growers, for many years and will be visiting growers to collect data in early February.

If you would like to discuss or join the benchmarking program, please contact Bronwyn as soon as possible on 0400 873 875 or industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au. Also at the WA industry day, Carlo Scamuffo from Electrical Consultancy WA presented options for cost effective energy options for energy procurement. He spoke about understanding your consumption, managing peak demand, the role of LEDs and solar and ways to reduce energy costs. Before investing in new products or practices growers often do a trial run.

Farm trials

Andrew Van Burgel from DPIRD gave an outline of how to get the most out of on-farm trials. Information gathered from the trial helps growers gain confidence in the proposed change which sometimes involves considerable investment.His key message for success was replication:

1

Do not apply treatments over the whole crop — always keep an untreated section (control) so that you can evaluate the real impact of the treatment applied.

2

Instead of treating just one row, do two at least and separate them with a good buffer. The more replicate treatments and controls you do, the more accurate your information will be. If you expect a dramatic result from the treatment applied less ‘replicates’ are needed.

3

It’s better to do more replicates than to pick more fruit from each replicate.

A well designed trial will provide better information for decision making and will help you avoid unnecessary expense.

Lastly, Steven Falivene is developing a video for demonstrating workplace practices that will ensure safety and quality fruit. This looks like it will be a great tool for inducting staff. Topics included are the induction process of on-farm practices, clothing and equipment, picking citrus including mandarins, ladder use, bathroom use and snakes. WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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Factors that can affect fruit size: irrigation, nutrition, pruning, soil/root health and crop load.

In the orchard BY BRONWYN WALSH WA CITRUS

T

he launch of the 10th Citrus International Symposium in South Africa this year was almost like a rock concert, complete with laser light show. Over 600 delegates were present at the event over three days.

33GROWERS and presenters travel to Bunbury as part of the WA Industry day.

The South African citrus industry consists of over 64,000 hectares. It supports Citrus Research International (CRI) which has five programs: 1. Research; 2. Extension; 3. Biosecurity; 4. Citrus Improvement Scheme; and 5. Administration. Many of the presentations from the Symposium were by CRI researchers. The program included 11 sessions of presentations and posters. Bronwyn Walsh, Citrus Industry Development Manager, attended the event and has a copy of abstracts and some of the presentations. Another opportunity to attend an industry event was in October in WA. Growers met in Harvey to visit orchards and a packshed and then travelled together to Bunbury for presentations from local and interstate experts.

Improving fruit size and quality Fruit size management is one of the price determinants for citrus growers. Steven Falivene from NSW DPI outlined some of the factors that affect fruit size including irrigation, nutrition, pruning, soil/root health and crop load. He recommended monitoring and recording fruit size and crop load annually in December and February. Conducting soil tests and an annual leaf test. Steven is happy to conduct before the nutrition workshop for growers.

Tahir Khursid, from NSW DPI is investigating the practice of deficit irrigation to manage brix and flavour in navels and Afourer mandarins. He is using a trial block of established navel trees with a range of varieties on different rootstocks and a commercial planting of Afourers. In the first year he investigated ‘when to stress’, ‘how long to stress’ and ‘when to finish stress’. Trees were stressed between February and May. Results to date show that Brix levels can be raised however fruit size reduction needs to be addressed. Another question is the impact of summer rainfall during the stress period. Planning for the second year of trials has begun. Variation of internal quality of Imperial mandarins within a tree was investigated by Curtin University as part of Grower Group R&D project. A report on the findings is due in November. An albedo breakdown review was also conducted with the report due in November.

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Soil health At the Citrus Symposium in South Africa several talks were on soil health. Topics included: • Identification of soilborne biotic factors potentially associated with citrus replant disease. Replant disease occurs when new orchards are established on sites where citrus has been cultivated before. • Effect of phosphonate applications, for phytophthora brown rot control on mandarin external fruit quality. Phytotoxic damage was documented at harvest if foliar applications were done at colour break or full colour stage of fruit development. Skirt pruning is an alternative to mitigate phytophthora brown rot on Nardicott mandarin fruit. • Treatments for nurseries to eliminate Phytophthora spp. for chlorine and mefenoxam sensitivity . • Citrus tree nutrition: paradoxes to be managed and unravelled. First, second and thirdly understanding fertilising program. • Nitrogen and potassium release from organic soil amendments over time. Increasing use of compost and concerns over effect of delayed N release. Incubation studies

and field trials were conducted to determine the release rates of specific nutrients from different composts (vermicompost, cattle manure, citrus waste compost, wood based compost) and its effect on fruit quality.

Pest and disease management At the Citrus Symposium in South Africa several talks were on pests and diseases. Insect presentations focused on management of False codling moth (FCM) and oriental fruit fly, pests in South African citrus orchards. Biology and alternatives to traditional pesticides, such as mating disruption, baculoviruses, short cold treatments after fumigation with carbon dioxide, and entomopathogenic fungal isolates were the focus. The disease management section included citrus black spot (CBS) and fruit and foliar diseases. Opened by Australian pathologist Andrew Miles, it included: • Five presentations on citrus black spot. • Spray programs for the control of fruit and foliar diseases of citrus in South Africa. • Tree-row-volume-based sprays of pesticides for citrus protection.

• Evaluation of reduced volume agrochemical applications in the South African citrus industry.

Managing crop physiology Presentations and posters from the Citrus Symposium included: • Benefits of reducing the size of navel-end opening in Navel oranges. Foliar application of the plant growth regulator and synthetic auxin, 2,4-D during flowering time reduces the size of the navel and the navel end opening. Foliar application at full bloom significantly increased the percentage of fruit with fully closed navel ends. This confirms previous research and is consistent across varieties, regions and seasons. Treatments resulted in lower percentages of fruit infested with mealybug and alternaria black core rot (ABCR). A combination of 2,4 D and tebuconazole applied at full bloom was most successful in reducing ABCR infection and therefore provides a novel control method for black core in navel sweet orange fruit. • Alternate bearing in mandarins — the roles of carbohydrates and mineral nutrients. • Manipulating flowering time to produce lemon fruit out of season.

Citrus gall wasp in WA BY HELEN NEWMAN WA CITRUS BIOSECURITY OFFICER

September-October this year was a ‘hive’ of gall wasp activity in WA. It focused on increasing community and nursery-industry awareness and action, with the aim of keeping the gall wasp away from citrus production areas. A media statement released through DPIRD in late September kicked things off. This along with very targeted information was emailed to media outlets, Local Governments, wholesale and retail nurseries, Bunnings, and the nursery industry association. As a result, there was high-visibility coverage on ABC news (TV), ABC and 6PR radio, community newspapers, as well as website content and Facebook

feeds on Local Government, news, and community sites which generated thousands of shares, likes and views. Another very effective vehicle for action was a flyer that was mailed directly to 132,000 residents in known infested suburbs in early October. The flyer showed people what citrus gall wasp looks like and how to manage infested trees. Residents were asked not to move infested plants and to treat infested prunings before disposal. This mail out generated more than 450 gall wasp reports on DPIRD’s MyPestGuide™ reporting app. During this activity we discovered an issue around chemical registration for gall wasp control in nurseries (production and retail). Movement of infested nursery stock could be a

major mode of gall wasp dispersal to new locations. There has been no ‘official’ work on controlling gall wasp in nursery stock and there are no nursery-applicable label rates registered for the recommended chemical controls. This makes it difficult when making recommendations on control. With most of the industry based around the metropolitan area, and the recent role of households in the citrus canker response, the WA citrus industry is interested in ways to engage the community to prevent movement of pests into and within WA. MORE INFORMATION For the latest information on gall wasp management in orchard situations visit the NSW DPI website www.dpi.nsw.gov. au/agriculture/horticulture/citrus under insects, diseases and disorders.

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its members. The itinerary includes visiting orchards and packsheds from 4th and 5th. WA Citrus are investigating group bookings for airfares and accommodation. If you haven’t already put in an Expression of Interest, please contact Kate Cox at admin@wacitrus. com.au or on 0439 899 600.

Citrus Canker Update Regular updates from DPIRD have kept WA growers informed of progress of the Citrus Canker response. 33GROWERS visited trial site using bee exclusion netting as part of the WA industry day.

Citrus production under nets Interest in citrus production under nets continues in Australia and around the world. It has been the subject of site visits in Australia as well as research. In WA, growers visited a drape net trial in Harvey as part of the industry day. The net is being used for bee exclusion to reduce seediness in Afourer mandarins, a trial from our State government funded project. In their annual report Citrus Research International says “It should therefore be noted that the use of shade netting is still in an early stage of development as a technology in citriculture. Some of the positive impacts such as improved yield and reduction in superficial scarring should be weighed over a longer term if a possible reduction on rind condition is found which reduces the postharvest potential of the fruit. At this stage shade netting under certain conditions does seem to improve the cropping efficiency of citrus trees.” One of the key reasons for attending the Symposium was to hear presentations from the session ‘Citrus production under nets’. The session included the following studies in Nardicott mandarins: • The use of gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitors in citrus production. • The impact of 20% white shade netting on the microclimate and citrus tree physiology. The study showed that reducing light levels by 18–20% caused significant physiological change in the tree as well as the fruit.

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• Effect of permanent shade netting on late mandarin tree phenology and productivity. • The influence of 20% white shade nets on fruit development and quality. • The effect of a low-density, white shade net on tree performance, production and fruit quality. • The influence of drape nets on insect pests, spray deposition and certain horticultural aspects. • The effect of orchard nets on the management of key citrus pets. • Foliar uptake of urea and micronutrients in mandarins grown under shade net in different climatic regions — summer versus winter rainfall. Monitored flower intensity. In the winter rainfall area the differences between treatment groups were minimal and there was a large variation between replicates. • Monitoring insect pest populations and damage under nets in the Western Cape.

Registrations are now open for the Citrus Australia Technical Forum

Nathan Hancock, CEO Citrus Australia also presented an Update at the Industry Day, joined by Nerida Donovan, NSW DPI, and Bronwyn Walsh who have also both been intensively involved with the Response.

In November, the national citrus canker response activated its fourth Response Plan. For WA this means a downsizing of the Control Centre as activities move to surveillance to collect evidence of freedom from citrus canker. A critical period is the wet season this summer when conditions are favourable for disease expression. The Restricted Area in Kununurra needs to remain free of citrus hosts to meet the ‘fallow period’ requirements.

HLB & disease management: Graft transmissible disease Huanglongbing (HLB) remains a global concern as well as other exotics. These were featured in the following presentations at the Citrus Symposium: • HLB border effect on properties under strict disease management. • Preparing for citrus. Huanglongbing (HLB)

The highly anticipated bi-annual Citrus Australia Technical Forum will be held in Adelaide from 6 to 7 March 2019. This is the only national event for the citrus industry for the year with more than 400 representatives from the production sector of the citrus industry expected to attend. To register go to www. citrusaustralia.com.au/events/list.

• Progress of the survey, detection and eradication program for the control of HLB in southern California, 20122018 and implications for South Africa; HLB in southern Africa, preparing for the storm.

Citrus Australia and EE Muir & Sons are sponsoring a pre-Forum field trip travelling from Mildura to Adelaide for

• Response to the first case of citrus leprosis-N in South Africa.

• Citrus tristeza virus — faster processing method for sequencing virus and viroid detection.


WA CITRUS

In the packing shed 33GROWERS visited new packshed at Harvey Citrus as part of the WA Industry day.

BY BRONWYN WALSH WA CITRUS

WA citrus packers will meet in December to review the year and identify issues. At the VegeSummit, an end-of-line robotic arm for packing, that has been installed in a vegetable shed, was presented by a local WA business. Case studies of citrus businesses that have received grants for equipment in their packsheds such as pattern-packer and blemish sorter are also being published. At the Citrus Research Symposium presentations and posters on postharvest were:

Postharvest and cold chain:

Postharvest disease management:

• Towards integral optimization of cooling processes and packaging in the citrus cold chain.

• Chemometric analysis of phytochemical changes in the find of five citrus varieties, with reference to CBS susceptibility.

• Ambient loading — increasing citrus cold chain efficiency; partial precooking improves cooling efficacy in ambient loaded citrus. • Postharvest wax treatments reduce the incidence of chilling injury in lemon fruit. • Effect of pre and postharvest factors on total phenolics in order to mitigate chilling and non-chilling disorder of ‘Benny’ Valencia fruit. • Identification of the citrus sour rot pathogen in South Africa orchards and packhouses. • Logistics strategies aligned to export growth projections.

• Encapsulation of spearmint oil for application in citrus postharvest disease management. • Comparisons of chlorine and peracetic acid for sanitisation of fungicide drench solutions and the effects on green mould and sour rot control on citrus. • Citrus sour rot management by propiconazole drench application in South Africa. • Baseline sensitivity of G citri-aurantii to the demethylating inhibitor propiconazole.

• Postharvest detection of FCM in citrus fruit by volatile emissions. WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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In the market BY BRONWYN WALSH WA CITRUS

Developing export markets for WA fruit As part of a Grower Group Grant project we are investigating new markets and products for WA citrus fruit. An analysis of export markets for WA mandarins and market visit have provided information to assist with planning for future seasons. The report will be discussed at the exporters workshop in December.

Export volumes from South Africa reached 1.9 Million tonnes in 2017, 80% of production is exported. This highlights the importance of gaining, retaining and optimising market access to the South African industry. Australia by comparison exports about 30% of its citrus grown.

Lemon market challenges and opportunities

The challenge for export market access is that fruit that requires degreening and must meet a cold treatment protocol that carries high risks of chilling injury. Markets that need cold treatment for fruit fly disinfestation, such as China, need temperatures to be below 3ºC. This challenge is of concern, given the increase in plantings, which means extra production will be hitting the market soon, as well as increasing competition from other southernhemisphere production regions. Another challenge particular to lemons is that customers don’t buy volumes when they are special, a common mechanism used to move large volumes of fruit. Michael identified export as an opportunity, however it would need suitable protocols that do not cause chilling injury. New varieties, food service and promotion were also other opportunities. Michael presented this information at the Industry Day in October.

Plantings of lemons in Australia had increased by

28%

Michael McMahon, from Nutrano, highlighted that the level of plantings of lemons in Australia had increased by 28% between 2014 and 2017. Queensland has the largest area and is more than double the size of southern growing regions in NSW and South Australia. The area planted in WA has also doubled in the last three years. The largest increase in plantings has been of seedless lemon varieties. For lemons/limes only 4% of production is exported.

Citriculture: Preharvest, cultivars and cultivar display Fundamental to market performance is delivering varieties that meet consumer’s preferences.

Graeme Sanderson gave an update on variety evaluations at the WA Industry Day in October. For some varieties of new valencias, Navels and red flesh Navels in the program, 2018 was the first year of fruit. He also reported on mandarins and new additions in 2018 and 2019. At the Symposium the session on ‘Citriculture: pre-harvest, cultivars and cultivar display’ included: • The South African mandarin story. • The performance 14 valencia selections on four rootstocks.

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33MICHAEL McMahon talks about lemon orchard management at the Industry day in October.

• The performance of Star Ruby & Nelruby grapefruit on eight rootstocks. • Defining seedlessness — Tango. • Alternate bearing in mandarins, the role of phytohormones. • Effect of various pruning strategies on fruit production of young and old late mandarin trees. The CRI Annual Report (2017–18) reported that South African budwood sales increased from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 from Citrus Foundation Block and certified nurseries. This was on top of a 32.8% increase since 2015–16 and 6% more than in 2016–17. The largest increase was in Limpopo (34.8%), followed by Western Cape (29.7%) and Easter Cape (20.2%). Other provinces were less than 10%. Mandarin was the most popular citrus (43.6%), followed by valencia (18.3%), lemon (14.8%), navel (11.1%), clementine (6.4%) and grapefruit (4.7%). The top 30 varieties comprised 91% of total number of buds supplied. ARC Nardicott was the most popular cultivar, followed by Eureka, Midknight, Leanri, Orr 4 and Nules. ARC Nardicott LS supply levels have increased over three years from 29,160 to 1,080,328 and Leanri increased from 3,000 to 811,659 from 2014–15 to 2017–18.


STONEFRUIT

stonefruit

update

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STONEFRUIT

contacts Stonefruit Sub-Committee

Chairman’s report

Danny DiMarco, Chair e: dimarconson@gmail.com Anthony Fullam

e: afullam@wn.com.au

Bruno Delsimone

e: bdelsimone@mercermooney.com.au

Anthony Caccetta

e: antc83@hotmail.com

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Shay Crouch, Value Chain Facilitator

e: shay.crouch@perthnrm.com p: (08) 9374 3306

APC fee for service charge Stone fruit effective from 1 November 2009 Type of fruit

$/kg

All fresh stone fruit (apricots, cherries, loquats, nectarines, peaches and plums)

0.015

Processing fruit

0.006

what’s on... 2018 Season Launch WHEN 4 December 2018, 6:30am – 9:00am WHERE Yagan Square and Murray Street Mall

2019 APC Stonefruit Sub-Committee AGM WHEN April 2018, TBC

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BY DANNY DI MARCO CHAIRMAN, STONEFRUIT

t’s the start of another challenging but exciting stone fruit season and we’re hoping for better returns on our produce prices compared to last year. The committee has been active on promotion and export options for this season and beyond, joining forces with the Buy West Eat Best program and increasing our commitment with Perth NRM and the work of our Value Chain Facilitator, Shay Crouch. Shay has a key focus on the promotion of our produce to consumers and engage communication across the entire supply chain. With many growers already picking the early varieties, early reports from growers statewide is talk of lighter plum and pluot crops and average nectarine and peach crops.

We are currently conducting a grower survey which I cannot stress enough the importance of getting growers to complete. By completing the survey and providing your feedback, the committee will be able to better ensure that your fee for service money is being used for the benefit of the growers. This will help establish priority outcomes for the industry as we move forward with establishing strategic plans for the seasons to come.

Our aim is to improve the sustainability of the local industry for producers by creating consistency in the market and improving eating habits of the consumer. On behalf of the committee we would like to thank you for all your support as growers and wish you all the best for this upcoming season. Personally, I’d like to thank Wilma Byl, Shay Crouch and all committee members for your support over the last six months. ● MORE INFORMATION Contact Danny on 0435 270 055 or email dimarconson@gmail.com.


STONEFRUIT

Summerfruit Australia U pdate

$454,000

S

BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT

grant secured

ummerfruit Australia Ltd, the official body for the Australian stone fruit industry has secured a $454,000 grant to unite the industry to work towards increasing exports to China. The Victorian Government’s Food Sources Growth Grant will last for three years and be used to “identify the most suitable varieties for the Chinese market, packing to premium specification with quality inspections”, explains Victorian Minister for Agriculture and regional Development Jaala Pulford.

Access to the Chinese markets for Australian nectarines has been approved since 2016 with peaches, apricots and plums opening in 2017.

The 2017–18 season saw nearly 5,000 tonnes of Australian stone fruit land in China with Hong Kong taking 3,308 tonnes. These quantities are set to increase as Summerfruit Export Development Alliance (SEDA) Chairman Ian McAlister indicated that this new project aims to position Australian Summerfruits as the premium counter seasonal fruit for Chinese consumers. There is potential here for WA growers to make the most of this initiative to increase the demand for Australian stone fruits and having access to these markets will also result in a less congested domestic market. Summerfruit Australia are also looking for a WA grower representative, if this could be you please contact John Moore at Summerfruit Australia or Shay Crouch on (08) 9374 3306. ●

W

ith the start of the stonefruit season well upon us what better way to celebrate than free tastings of local fresh fruit. The season launch will take place on Tuesday, December 4 between 7am and 9am in Perth’s Yagan Square and Murray Street Mall. The launch will showcase these wonderful fruits and provide a healthy treat to those on their way to work.

The launch compliments the Buy West Eat Best, Taste of WA: South West event being held on Sunday December 2 in Yagan Square where Chef Don Hancey will use local stone fruit in his cooking demonstrations. These events raise the profile of West Australian stonefruit as we head into the peak season and get customers excited to be eating stone fruits. Follow on activities such as in-store demonstrations, social media campaigns and point of sale material will continue throughout summer. ● MORE INFORMATION Contact Shay on (08) 9374 3306 or shay.crouch@perthnrm.com

MORE INFORMATION More information at Summerfruit.com.au

33EXPORTED Australian White Flesh Nectarines in the 2017–18 season.

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STONEFRUIT

Stone fruit growers attending the Future Orchards Walk in Balingup.

Orchard Walk

As a part of the Future Orchards walks many Perth Hills growers made the trip down to Balingup to join growers from the South West for talks about management of crop load to improve consistency and higher quality fruit. Though the focus was on Pome fruit there were many take home messages for producing stone fruits. It was a great opportunity to see different trellis systems where trees could be trained accordingly for ease of management and increased time efficiencies. ●

BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT

Festivals and events

Other activities

I have been fortunate enough to be working in this role for over 12 months now and have had the opportunity to meet with many growers and hear their stories to better understand and how we can all work together to create a more sustainable Stonefruit industry here in WA. Here is a summary of some of the activities we are currently working on.

Grower survey As Danny mentioned, we are running a grower survey to establish a better understanding of the needs of the stone fruit growers and identifying priority areas as we move forward in a more strategic direction. The survey covers a range of topics from orchard management to future outlooks on the industry. The committee is looking to update the strategic plan for the industry and the feedback provided in the survey will highlight key areas within the strategic plan. The survey is confidential and takes less than 20 minutes, grower cooperation in completing the survey is greatly appreciated. Please contact me if you wish to discuss further.

Hort Connect Hort Connect is a great initiative which aims to connect the younger horticultural community to socialise and feel supported but also to improve cross industry networking and future proof the industry. Hort Connect also provides opportunities for professional development, learn new skills and form

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new innovative ideas. We encourage those who are looking to feel more connected or learn of new opportunities to get involved.

Social media With over 60% of Australians using Facebook and 33% using Instagram we have been utilising these social media platforms to drive consumer awareness and promotion of our local WA stone fruit. With over 700 followers the We Love WA Stonefruit Facebook page, has been publishing posts about when fruit is in season, recipe ideas, grower activities, connecting with stonefruit growers and promoting grower led initiatives such as orchard tours. Facebook is the easiest and fastest way to connect with thousands of consumers or potential consumers of our great stone fruits. Instagram is a platform which is focussed on sensational images, with the blossom and the fruits being so photogenic it is an opportunity we can not miss out on. Customers are wanting to learn how their food is being produced and showcasing images straight from the orchards is a great way to connect both growers and the broader public.

Find us at: We Love WA Stonefruit #WAStonefruit

In the months leading up to the season opening there have been several events which we have attended to promote the upcoming season. The Canning Show was held on the first weekend of November and brought many people through the gates, many of which were interested in the upcoming season. In early October the Perth Hills Festival was held in Karragullen where festival goers were able to purchase an array of fruit trees and have valuable conversations with the orchardists who have organised the event for the last 35 years.

Finally, I would like to thank the entire stonefruit community for their cooperation in working together to improve the industry. I am continually looking at improving communication and value for growers and always happy to chat with you about ways we can do this. ● MORE INFORMATION Contact Shay Crouch on (08) 9374 3306 or shay.crouch@perthnrm.com


YOUR BUSINESS

your

business Your business WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR BUSINESS

r u o y e g a n a m o t How

cash flow

BY SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

O

ne of the most important indicators for a successful business is cash flow. When it comes to managing business finances, cash is king (fundamental) and key to the survival of your business. However, this is one area of business that is often neglected. With properly planned cash flow you can maintain enough working capital to operate through the quiet periods. Managing a business is not just about profit and loss, it’s also about managing your business spending and being prepared for likely eventualities for which you may need funding. Your cash flow may be the difference between your business success and failure. You can be profitable but may be forced to close your doors because you don’t have enough money to pay your rent or

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electricity costs. Cash is the lifeblood of your business and you must keep your finger on the pulse at all times as there are many areas of your business that impact your cash flow and many decisions that are impacted by it. Your cash flow helps you decide the payment terms you can offer your customers, whether you can afford to buy plant and equipment, your staffing levels — essentially, it impacts all your future spending decisions and the direction your business is likely to take going forward. As we head towards the New Year, use the time to learn how to better manage your cash flow and enter 2019 with a cash flow plan that will help you achieve your business goals. Here are a few handy tips to get you started.

Plan and monitor your cash flow A good cash flow forecast will help you to monitor when you have money coming in, and going out of your business. It can help you identify when you have extra cash available or are likely to experience shortages, and also

provides warning signs to avoid future financial problems. Having a strong grasp on the financial forecast of your business will help you make decisions throughout the year if there are any shortages or surpluses in cash.

Visit smallbusiness.wa.gov.au to download a free cash flow forecast template from the Small Business Development Corporation (SBDC).

Know which levers to pull to get more cash in or to reduce cash out If you need more cash consider revising your pricing, increasing your volume of sales and managing your debtors. Alternatively reduce the cash going out of your business by revising outgoing expenses, inventory and staffing levels to determine whether you can make some savings. You may also consider refinancing your loans and selling any underutilised assets.


YOUR BUSINESS

Increase your sales

Monitor stock levels

Consider an advertising campaign to increase sales and grow your customer base. It’s important to note that putting effort into new marketing techniques doesn’t necessarily require a lot of money. For example using the internet and social media can be a cost effective technique to advertise and promote your products.

Practice good stock control — modify the quantity and timing of your stock purchases to coincide with higher cash flow periods. Do regular inventory reviews and hold only as much stock as you require to run your business efficiently — remember excess stock can tie up and increase storage and insurance costs.

Tighten terms of credit

Reduce your outgoings

Late payments can spell disaster for many small businesses. There are important measures business owners can put in place to avoid problems with late or non-payments of debts. Having minimal exposure to debtors is good financial practice for any business, and documented systems and processes will help keep track of cash flow and control finances. Given your customers could be a risk to your cash flow, it pays to do due diligence on debtors and assess them before you start work.

Effective cash flow management also means keeping outgoing payments to a minimum. Look for opportunities to save money by streamlining business practices and reducing operating costs, for example:

In today’s economy, requesting payment from customers on short payment terms is a wise move. To avoid late payments, issue invoices promptly with clearly defined terms and conditions for payment. In Australia, payment terms are considered part of a sales contract and operate under contract law, therefore failure to comply with agreed payment terms is a breach of contract. If your business provides a product or service that requires substantial cash or effort before you can deliver, consider asking for a deposit or milestone payment. Make it as easy as possible for customers to pay you by offering them additional payment options such as having your bank account number on your invoices, credit card options, and accepting additional payment systems (ie. EFTPOS and PayPal). Receiving payments faster will boost your cash flow – you may consider offering an incentive such as discount to encourage customers to pay early. If debtors are frequently late, negotiate a way to recover your money and evaluate if you should continue doing business with them.

• minimise energy costs by installing energy efficient products or by undertaking some business activities outside of peak electricity usage periods; • identify areas where you can reduce wastage or improve production efficiencies; •

• •

financials. Expanding your knowledge and business financial skills can help improve how you manage your cash flow and business finances. Consider attending a workshop to improve your business knowledge and get advice from an experienced accountant or SBDC business adviser.

Learn more about managing your finances by attending the SBDC’s ‘Understanding Business Financials’ workshop by visiting smallbusiness.wa.gov.au or phone 13 12 49 to speak to one of their experienced business advisers.

Use technology to help you If you’re not confident with numbers, hire a professional accountant and use quality accounting software. This way, you’ll always know your cash position and it’ll help you to forecast your cash flow for planning purposes.

Many business owners are moving towards cloud-based solutions review your insurances, phone and to improve their productivity and internet service contracts when they efficiencies. These accounting systems become due for renewal to ensure can make it simpler for business you’re getting the best deal; owners to get real-time visibility of their negotiate your lease with your cash and reduce the time it takes landlord; to proactively manage and forecast cash flow. Make the negotiate with suppliers most of these tools, but be for better buying Enter 2019 with a mindful that technology opportunities; and cash flow plan that will also comes with its risks, help you achieve your rather than advertising so consider implementing business goals. across the entire good cybersecurity metropolitan area, limit practices by: your exposure to areas • u sing strong passwords; located close to your base as servicing customers in your local • securing your devices and networks; area will help reduce travel time and • backing-up your data regularly; fuel costs. • educating your employees; and

Build a cash reserve

Access to cash can make or break your business. Creating a cash reserve will give you the confidence and finances you need to grow your business and help you prepare for any unexpected expenses. It also provides you with an opportunity to take advantage of strategic investments or any opportunities to reduce costs.

Improve your financial skills and get expert advice

• keeping up-to-date with the latest online threats and attacks. MORE INFORMATION The Small Business Development Corporation provides free confidential business advice and guidance to small business owners throughout Western Australia. To speak to one of their experienced business advisers call 13 12 49, or visit smallbusiness.wa.gov.au

Many business owners, particularly in the early stages of running a business, struggle to understand their business WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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YOUR BUSINESS

The horticulture industry and the Seasonal Worker Programme

A

ustralian employers in the agriculture sector, including the horticulture industry, unable to find enough local Australian workers to meet their seasonal labour needs can access the Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP).

The SWP provides employers with access to seasonal workers from Pacific island countries and Timor–Leste for up to six months, and up to nine months for workers recruited Kiribati, Nauru or Tuvalu. Seasonal workers can return in following seasons, providing employers with access to a reliable, returning workforce.

What work can seasonal workers undertake in the horticulture industry? Seasonal workers can undertake a range of low and unskilled work in the horticulture industry, including: • sowing • planting • raising • harvesting • picking • packing • clearing • fencing • trenching • draining or otherwise preparing or treating land for the sowing, raising, harvesting or treating of horticultural crops

Since the commencement of the programme on 1 July 2012, the horticulture industry has proven that a low-skilled labour mobility programme could not only contribute to economic development in the region, but also provide strong benefits to Australian industry including greater labour certainty and increased efficiency.

Seasonal workers can return providing employers with access to a reliable workforce.

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Employment arrangements Seasonal workers recruited under the programme earn Australian wages and are subject to Australian employment conditions. In addition to this, employers have a few additional responsibilities — such as contributing to each seasonal worker’s airfare to Australia and helping to organise accommodation. For a list of responsibilities, refer to the factsheet on ‘Approved Employers’.

How to access seasonal workers Employers in the horticulture industry with unmet demand for labour can either: • contact an approved employer who can manage the recruitment of seasonal workers for you and take care of all the administrative arrangements during the seasonal workers’ stay; or • apply to become an approved employer.


YOUR BUSINESS

Frequent questions about the programme.

Seasonal Worker Programme Approved employers Who can employ seasonal workers?

Approved employer responsibilities

Only organisations approved by the Australian Government can recruit seasonal workers under the Seasonal Worker Programme. These organisations are referred to as ‘approved employers’.

• Testing the labour market, and trying to recruit local workers before seeking access to seasonal workers

How does an organisation apply to become an approved employer? Organisations may be interested in becoming an approved employer of seasonal workers to recruit and place workers with their own business (e.g. an orange grower), or they may wish to recruit seasonal workers to place with another business in a labour hire arrangement. All organisations interested in becoming an approved employer should complete an application form on the Seasonal Worker Programme website www. jobs.gov.au/seasonal-workerprogramme. This form is then assessed by the Department of Jobs and Small Business. Approved employers enter into agreements with the Department of Jobs and Small Business and the Department of Home Affairs.

Who can apply to become an approved employer? Any organisation can apply to become an approved employer, including labour hire companies and employers in the agriculture sector nationwide, accommodation sector in selected locations and tourism industry in Northern Australia (pilot programme).

ALL organisations intere sted in becoming an approved em ployer should complete an application for m on the Seasonal Worker Program me website www.jobs.gov.au/seasonalworker-programme

• Employing seasonal workers in accordance with Australian workplace legislation • Providing briefings to seasonal workers on-arrival into Australia and before departing back home • Providing seasonal workers with a minimum average of 30 hours per week for up to six months or up to nine months for seasonal workers from the Microstates of Kiribati, Nauru and Tuvalu • Paying for the full cost of each seasonal workers’ return international airfare and domestic transfer arrangements up front, and recouping from the combined cost any amount over $500 from seasonal workers’ pay over time • Organising and providing access to council approved accommodation and transport to and from work for each seasonal worker (at the seasonal workers’ expense) • Reporting to the Australian Government • Providing pastoral care for workers, including opportunities for recreation and religious observance, a 24 hour contact number, and assisting workers to access services in the local community.

MORE INFORMATION More information can be found at: • Website: www.jobs.gov.au/seasonalworker-programme and www. homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa-1/403• Email: seasonalworker@jobs.gov.au • Phone: (02) 6240 5234 • Twitter: @SWPAustralia • Facebook: www.facebook.com/ SWPAus

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YOUR BUSINESS

Navigating your QA audit:

Part 2 BY JOEL DINSDALE QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR, VEGETABLESWA

I

n the previous edition of the WA Grower, we discussed the ways to successfully prepare for your QA audit. Let’s assume that you’ve now been to audit. Following that audit, the auditor should have communicated one of two options: 1. Your business meets the QA audit standards; or 2. Your business does not yet meet the QA audit standards.

If you’re reading this and have selected Option 1 — congratulations! However, many businesses will need to select Option 2 following an audit. So, what does this mean for your business? In QA lingo this means that you have a nonconformance (NCR) or corrective action (CAR) required. Don’t panic, there’s no need to throw the QA baby out with the wash water — improvements can and should be made to demonstrate compliance to the system to achieve (re) certification. So how do you go about improving the standards of the business?

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Here’s a few steps you can follow post audit to resolve NCRs and CARs:

1

You will need to find out which elements of your system do not meet requirements — this means communicating with your auditor. For those that speak English as their second language, Vegetable Industry Extension Officer, Truyen Vo is available to provide Vietnamese translation. Your auditor will almost always indicate what needs to be improved to become compliant. The auditor should also indicate the timeline for NCR closure. Businesses should be mindful of these deadlines as non-compliance may have consequences. In Freshcare FSQ4, Major CARs must be closed out within 14 days of audit, while minor CARs can be closed out in 28 days, or at the next audit. Failure to close out the CARs will mean that certification will not be granted until a successful audit has next been completed.

2

You will need to get a list of the CARs/ NCRs so that you understand what needs to be rectified. Following your audit, auditors should provide an audit report. This report is usually emailed to the business contact provided at audit within 24–48 hours of the audit being completed. In Freshcare FSQ4, the auditor will raise any NCRs against the code elements outlined in the Code of Practice. This means that you can check the compliance criteria for that code element and it will outline how and what is required by whom to become compliant.

3

Using the compliance criteria, you will then need to create an action plan in order to close out the NCR within the timeline. In the case of Freshcare, this can be done easily using the M4 — Corrective Action Record form located in your Freshcare FSQ4 manual. You will need to identify the cause of the problem and outline a short- and long-term strategy to ensure the problem(s) do no reoccur. This should be forwarded onto the auditor as they will require documentation as evidence of improvement/closure of the NCR.


YOUR BUSINESS

Helping to ensure that we are producing safe food for all.

Once you have understood where changes need to be made, you can then execute them to meet the standards. NCR’s are raised by auditors to maintain the integrity of the system and the standards.

3 NCR’s are raised by auditors to maintain the integrity of the system and the standards.

4

For vegetable growers in WA, QA advice and training can be provided by contacting Quality Assurance Coordinator, Joel Dinsdale for assistance.

Closing out the NCR — this is where you action the your plan to enact changes in your food safety system. At this point, you should be looking to capture any and all evidence to demonstrate an understanding and level of improvement. Examples of evidence include; photos, videos, meeting minutes, training documents, invoices, completed records, analysis results etc.

5

If at this point, you are still having trouble meeting the auditor’s requirements; then you may wish to seek additional assistance. This may mean contacting a QA consultant or a system trainer as you may have gaps in understanding that are inhibiting you from demonstrating compliance. For details please refer to your program’s website.

It is in everyone’s best interest that NCR’s are raised and closed out in order to maintain safe food systems. Look at an NCR/CAR as a chance to improve the systems within your business — after all it will help to ensure that we are producing safe food for all. MORE INFORMATION Contact Joel Dinsdale at: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au

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YOUR BUSINESS

Small employers, let’s talk about Single Touch Payroll

T

BY JOHN SHEPHERD ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER, AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE

he way employers report tax and superannuation information to the ATO has changed with the introduction of Single Touch Payroll (STP).

John Shepherd, Assistant Commissioner ATO, explains what this reporting change means for small employers and how they can take the next step and streamline their payroll reporting. STP is a reporting change that allows employers to send information such as their employees’ salaries and wages, pay as you go withholding and super information to the ATO from their payroll solution each time they pay their employees. Under law, employers with 20 or more employees started reporting through STP from 1 July 2018, however it’s not yet mandatory for small employers to do so. That said, employers with online

or cloud-based accounting software can follow the lead of the nearly 45,000 Australian employers successfully reporting with STP, including around 16,000 small employers who have voluntarily adopted STP reporting. Small businesses are a critical part the Australian economy, making up over 97% of all 2.2 million Australian businesses*, and we want to ensure they are aware of STP reporting and how they can transition as easily as possible. The ATO will not force smaller employers to purchase payroll software and there will be a number of other ways to report through STP, including low cost and simple alternate STP reporting solutions. We have asked software developers about their interest in building low-cost STP solutions at $10 or less per month — including simple payroll software, mobile phone apps and portals. We will publish a register of the products that we expect to be developed on our website by 30 November 2018. However, any smaller employer who does use payroll software should talk to their software provider about when their software will be available, so they can start reporting when they are ready.

We recognise this is a big change for employers, so we are focused on educating and supporting tax professionals and employers to make the transition easier. Payroll data is different to traditional tax data, so we will be taking a low touch approach to compliance until the new system settles in. STP is also good news for employees. Once employers transition to STP reporting, employees will be able to view their year-to-date tax and super information online via myGov and the ATO will be able to see whether employers are correctly reporting super.

Over time we expect to give employees a view of what their tax position could be at the end of the year. For example, an employee might have inadvertently claimed the tax-free threshold for two separate jobs, which means they could get a tax bill rather than an expected refund when they lodge their return. The ATO could alert them of this early in the year in time for them to consider changing their rate of withholding with their employer, which is a service that we couldn’t provide under the old system of once per year payment summaries. MORE INFORMATION Visit www.ato.gov.au/stp for information, resources, news and detailed guidelines. * Based on 2017 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Data

45,000 Australian employers successfully report with STP.

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Government of Western Australia Department of Commerce

WORK SAFELY IN THE HEAT

Avoid heat illness • Be aware of symptoms of heat illness • Use barriers or reflective screens alongside heat sources • Take breaks in shaded/cool places

• Acclimatise to hot environments • Share the workload

• Use natural ventilation, fans, blowers or chillers

• Drink water regularly

• Maintain a healthy lifestyle

• Use shade protection, a hat and sunscreen

• Keep an eye on your workmates

• Wear light clothing


YOUR BUSINESS

Regional Investment Corporation Loans

d n a u o y p l e h y e h Could t your business? BY CHRIS PUCKRIDGE RURAL FINANCIAL COUNSELLOR RFCS WA

E

arlier this year the Commonwealth Government established the Regional Investment Corporation to assist farmers with drought recovery and preparedness and to help build producer’s export capacity and competitiveness. But what does that mean for you? In a nutshell, the RIC loans are an alternative funding option, with two types of loans available to primary producers: Drought Loans and Farm Investment Loans. The Drought Loans are all about preparing and recovering from drought and are focused on water infrastructure and general drought recovery.

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Although these may suit some producers in WA, in most cases the Farm Investment Loans will be more relevant to WA producers at this time.

The Farm Investment Loans are designed for people planning to access markets interstate or outside of Australia, which is relevant to many of our fruit and vegetable growers.

Who is eligible? There is a range of eligibility criteria, which can be reviewed on the RIC website, but importantly a grower must have a business plan, be financially viable and keep at least 50% of their existing debt with a commercial lender. One of the key qualifiers is that you must have suffered a significant financial impact in recent years and the cause of the significant financial impact must be substantially outside the control of the farm business. For example, it may be because of drought or natural disaster, pest or disease outbreak, unexpected market closure or other significant events that are outside the control of the farm business. The Farm Investment Loans can improve your cashflow through refinancing existing debt and they can be used to fund operating expenses or capital improvements to your business.

3 One of the key qualifiers is that you must have suffered a significant financial impact substantially outside the control of the farm business, such as a drought.

The maximum loan available is $2 million and the current interest rate is 3.58% (variable and reviewed six monthly). The term of the loans are 10 years with the first five years interest only and the second five years requiring principal and interest. The remaining debt at the end of the 10 year period must be transferred to a commercial lender and there are no ongoing fees or charges.

Business planning might be the key? To qualify for a loan you need to have a business plan, which states what you are doing now and what you want to do in the future. This is where we come in. The RFCS has a very good business planning framework that we can adapt for your business. Our framework is based on the Harvard Business Planning Model and this has been used successfully across many industries all over the world to analyse and clarify what a business can do.


YOUR BUSINESS

In particular it can identify your areas of strength and areas where you need to focus your energy.

It might sound complicated, but it’s actually a very simple way to get a bank to understand what you are doing and what you want to do in the future.

The maximum loan available is $2 million and the current interest rate is 3.58%.

It’s a very practical way to build your banks confidence in your plans and it’s something that the RFCS can help you work through.

Sound interesting? By calling the Rural Financial Counselling Service of Western Australia on 1800 612 004 we can run through what your business options might be and help point you in the right direction. MORE INFORMATION More information on the RIC loans is available at www.ric.gov.au or 1800 875 675.

Regain Focus, Create Solutions Rural Financial Counselling Service

+61 8 9303 9638 info@paliz.com.au paliz.com.au

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YOUR MARKET

Keen on greens: Asian veg spreads its roots

B

ok Choy, Gai Lan, Yau Choy, and Choy Sum. These Asian vegetables are becoming increasingly commonplace in Australian households due to evolving consumer demographics and a growing awareness of their health benefits. Asian greens are the second-fastest growing vegetable category with dollar sales up by 7.5% in the year ending 08/09/2018 compared to the prior year, just behind fresh salad (8.4%) and ahead of eggplant (7%). Off the back of changing Australian appetites and as a point of differentiation, Rick Butler, Chief Executive Officer of Butler Market Gardens, made the decision to grow leafy Asian vegetables in 1993. Although volume sales were initially low, the farm had faith it would grow. Nielsen Homescan data shows that 35% of Australian households have purchased leafy Asian vegetables in the year

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ending 08/09/2018; and it’s not just ethnic households who have been munching on them. Ethnic households currently make up more than a third (36%) of leafy Asian vegetable dollar sales (see Figure 1); in comparison to just 16% of total vegetable dollar sales. While ethnic households represent a strong customer base for this category nonethnic households have grown their spend (7.6%) on leafy Asian vegetables at a similar rate to ethnic households (7.3%) on a year on year basis. This highlights the growing mainstream appeal of leafy Asian vegetables. Rick Butler believes that further education and customer awareness has the potential to boost sales.

%

BY TAMMY TAN SENIOR CLIENT SERVICE EXECUTIVE

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

States of play Victoria is a key state for leafy Asian vegetable demand. It accounts for 32.3% of dollar sales (see Figure 2) and contributed 55% of the value growth in the past year. Growth in Victoria is spurred fairly evenly by both ethnic and non-ethnic households. This trend links to Australian Bureau of Statistics' Migration Summary, by state and territory, whereby 45% of the net migration in 2016–17 was in Victoria. These findings emphasise the opportunity that changing demographics and an increasingly multicultural population represents for Australian growers.

Non-ethnic Ethnic

16% 36%

84%

64%

Total vegetables

Leafy Asian vegetables

FIGURE 1 Dollar sales distribution by ethnicity Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 08/09/2018


%

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100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

7.5% 10.1%

8.2% 11.3%

15.7%

20.4% 25.1%

32.3%

32.7%

32.9%

Total vegetables

Leafy Asian vegetables

New South Wales Victoria Queensland Western Australia South Australia (incl. Northern Territory)

•  Major supermarkets currently under-trade in leafy Asian vegetables. To reach their fairshare, on-shelf strategies such as multi-buys and promotions could encourage new shoppers to try and existing shoppers to buy more.

FIGURE 2 Dollar distribution by state Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 08/09/2018

MORE INFORMATION

Retail rumble Looking across retail channels, there is also a distinct difference in the way ethnic households shop for leafy Asian vegetables. Specialist supermarkets are popular with these households — possibly because these outlets cater better to their overall cultural food requirements.

The popularity of Asian vegetables highlights that major supermarkets also have an opportunity to grow their fair share of the category (see Figure 3).

%

Rick Butler suggests that different growth strategies should be applied for the different channels: high volume and low margins for non-supermarkets to attract ethnic households in-store; while major supermarkets should focus on high quality and different tasting hybrid-varieties to appeal to mainly non-Asian households. Nielsen data shows that the price per kilogram for major supermarkets is double that of non-supermarkets. 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

14.5% 9.6%

Tapping into the Asian greens opportunity Asian vegetables are loaded with healthy nutrients and unique flavours, yet they still have a way to go before they are a staple vegetable across mainstream Australia. For the savvy grower, there is a spectrum of opportunity associated with these leafy greens. • N  on-ethnic households made up 64% of leafy Asian vegetables’ dollar sales and grew at 7.6%. Growth can be boosted further by appealing to these households with education and recipes that focus on how fast, fresh, healthy and versatile these vegetables are. •  Leafy Asian vegetable shoppers want more variety (with shoppers rating interest in new varieties at 6.9/10 compared to an average of 5.3/10). Growers should look to produce a wider variety of Asian leafy greens to stimulate consumption opportunities and new interest in the category.

21.5%

Major supermarkets Other supermarkets Non-supermarkets

These data and insights were produced independently by Nielsen and shared through the Harvest to Home platform, supported through the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund. For more insights visit www.harvesttohome.net.au. Source: •  Nielsen Homescan, 52 weeks ending 08/09/2018 •  www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/ ProductsbyCatalogue/66CDB63F615CF0 A2CA257C4400190026?OpenDocument •  Attitudinal reports prepared by Nielsen for Hort Innovation, survey sample n=300, fieldwork from 21/06/2018 to 28/06/2018 for the Australian market. Copyright © 2018 Horticulture Innovation Australia. NOTE: Ethnic households defined by nonEnglish speaking households Non-ethnic households defined by English speaking households

Ethnic households currently make up more than a third (36%) of leafy Asian vegetable dollar sales.

22.7%

75.8%

55.8%

Total vegetables

Leafy Asian vegetables

FIGURE 3 Retailer dollar share of trade Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 08/09/2018

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Export success in 2018

s r e w ro g le b ta e g e v A W & how 9 1 0 2 in d e v l o v in t e g n ca

2

018 has been a strong year of growth for the fresh vegetable export industry, both in export volume and value as well as industry capability and culture. The 2017–18 Financial year saw a 9% growth in volume to 208K tonnes, and a 3% growth in value to $262 million. Eighty-five percent of the industry’s export volume was comprised of carrots, potatoes and onions, with carrots remaining the industry’s number one traded commodity, in both value and volume demonstrating steady year on year growth (see Figure 1).

The performance in the past year puts the fresh vegetable industry on target to reach the Vegetable Industry Export Strategy 2020 export growth of 40% to $315 million by 2020. For growers interested in pursuing export, there are a number of levy funded initiatives available to help continue the growers’ export success.

Export Facilitators Project & Export Readiness Managed by vegetablesWA and funded by Hort Innovation, this national project engages export facilitators on the ground in Western Australia, Queensland and Tasmania.

Asparagus, whilst only contributing 2% to export volume, is the second largest exported vegetable commodity by value (11%), at over $28M in 2017–18.

This project is designed to assist growers in better understanding the export process and to help growers to become export ready.

The industry’s top three export markets by value were Singapore ($47M), UAE ($37M), and Japan ($30M) (see Figure 2), and by volume were UAE (40k tonne), Singapore (31k tonne), and Malaysia (20k tonne).

The Export Facilitators are able to assist growers with questions around market access, free trade agreements, freight and logistics and pricing and payment as well as a range of other key issues.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

As part of this project, the Export Facilitators is also strongly linked with AUSVEG and the Vegetable Industry Development Program (VG16061) which this year has delivered seven export readiness workshops across Australia. With a culture shift occurring in the industry and more growers looking to export, the export readiness program continues to be a key tool for growers in developing their export plans and expanding their knowledge on the export process.

Market access In 2018 AUSVEG covered off all market access priorities outlined in the Vegetable Industry Export Strategy 2020. The four market access applications submitted to the Hort Innovation Trade Assessments Panel for review late last year were all approved and now sit with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources ready for discussion upon realising negotiation priority. Continuing forward, AUSVEG will be looking for market improvement and access cases to ensure a growing market for Australian vegetables into the future.


exports (volume) 3%

2%

2%

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1%

1%

15%

18%

Australia's top three export markets by value were53% Singapore, UAE and Japan. Category percentage of vegetable exports (volume) 3%

2%

2%

Category percentage of vegetable exports (value)

1%

3% 4%

1%

15%

1%

1%

1%

4% 7%

18%

8%

11%

53%

A

B

11%

36%

FIGURE 1 Top commodity exports by volume (A) and value (B) by percentage for 2017

Category percentage of vegetable exports (value)

Source: TradeMap Data 2017

4%

1% 1% 3%Volume Volume

Other Other 4% 103,546t 103,546t 43% 43%

7%

11%

Value Value

UAE UAE 40,673t 40,673t 17% 17%

Other Other $78.2M $78.2M 32% 32%

Singapore Singapore 30,581t 30,581t 13% 13%

Korea South Korea South 20,857t 20,857t 8% 8%

8%

A

1%

MalaysiaMalaysia Japan Japan 20,338t 20,338t Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia 11,319t 11,319t 8% 8% 15,582t 15,582t 5% 5% 6% 6%

11%

36%

Singapore Singapore $47.2M $47.2M 20% 20%

UAE UAE $36.9M $36.9M 15% 15% Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia $13.8M $13.8M 6% 6%

B

Hong Kong Hong Kong $15.8M $15.8M MalaysiaMalaysia 7% 7% $19.8M $19.8M 8% 8%

Japan Japan $29.6M $29.6M 12% 12%

FIGURE 2 Top export markets by volume (A) and value (B) for 2017 Source: TradeMap Data 2017

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Market development Reverse Trade Mission June 2018 saw the successful delivery of the Australian vegetable industry Reverse Trade Mission (RTM). Forty international delegates from seven different countries visited the growing regions surrounding Brisbane, QLD, and Bundaberg. The markets represented included Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, and the UAE. The group visited seven vegetable production sites, one treatment facility, one research and development facility as well as participating in the first Taste Australia Fresh Produce Display, held at the W in Brisbane alongside the Hort Connections convention.

This event saw several Western Australian growers exhibiting exclusively for the delegates and provided the opportunity to have some quality one-on-one discussions. Once again, the mission was a success with new relationships built and orders being processed already. Outbound trade events

program enables growers to gain and further develop their understanding of the supply chain logistics and advance their market knowledge with the market insight and supply chain tour run in each market in addition to the tradeshow participation. 2018 saw the Taste Australia brand continue to develop and establish itself on the global stage. The unified position as seen an increase in quality visitors to the tradeshow stand and has provided a strong platform for Australian vegetables to further develop the positive image and build a strengthened position in the world market. Levy paying vegetable growers who are interested in participating in any of these activities are encouraged to contact Manus Stockdale at vegetablesWA. Manus is able to assist growers in better understanding the export process and assist with export readiness requirements. MORE INFORMATION Levy-payers that would like a copy of the Vegetable Industry Export Strategy 2020 contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 or manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au

This past year eight Western Australian vegetable growers have been involved in international trade events via the AUSVEG facilitated program. This

ORGANIC

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

a

b c

The Vegetable Industry Export Strategy 2020 has been developed as a tool to assist growers and the vegetable industry to: • IDENTIFY the best export market opportunities for different vegetable products, • COLLATE a wide range of useful data and export information — including current trade, future growth opportunities, freight times and tariff schedules — in one userfriendly source, and • IDENTIFY areas where the industry as a whole needs to develop to create a strong and sustainable export sector into the future.

Contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 for a copy of the Strategy.


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Export Facilitators Project Update BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

T

he Export Facilitator Project is all about helping vegetable growers to understand what is involved in export and assisting them to start selling their produce to overseas buyers. Over the last few months vegetablesWA has been working with an increasing number of growers across a wide range of export related activities. In September a record number of WA growers attended the Asia Fruit Logistica trade show in Hong Kong with AUSVEG. The five WA growers had the opportunity to display their produce and meet with fresh produce buyers from across Asia. The trade show was a great success with a lot of interest in Australia vegetables and good business leads generated for all the WA growers that attended. AUSVEG supports vegetable growers to attend several international tradeshows each year and growers should keep an eye out for nomination opportunities. West Australian Corn Growers were finalists in the WA Export Awards that were held in October. They were nominated for the Agribusiness Category as well as Emerging Exporter for their corn exports to Dubai, Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong. While Trados Farms didn’t win the award, they did receive a High Commendation from the judges in the agribusiness category in recognition of their export success and growth over the past three years. The Export Awards are a great way of profiling your companies export activities to potential customer in Australia and overseas.

33THE half-day session gave growers a great overview of the export process and highlighted the support and assistance that is available at both a local and national level.

In late October vegetablesWA in collaboration with AUSVEG held an Export Workshop before the Industry Summit at Crown Perth. Funding from the Agricultural Produce Commission allowed growers from as far away as Carnarvon and Scott River to attend and it was great to have 12 growers present. The growers that attended had a variety of export experience — some had never exported before and were considering their options and others currently export some of their produce through an agent and want to be more involved in the process and make export a bigger part of their business. Whatever the level of experience each grower said that they learnt something that they could apply to their business. The Export Workshop attendees learnt about the basic requirements and documentation for export from Dianne Tipping of the Export Council of Australia, followed by presentations from Tigers International Solutions about the role of freight forwarders in vegetable exports.

Jim Trandos shared insights from his export experience with the growers and Kiyoko Ozawa, AUSVEG International Trade Specialist presented on the Japanese market and export opportunities for vegetable growers. The half-day session gave growers a great overview of the export process and highlighted the support and assistance that is available at both a local and national level. vegetablesWA plans to host another export workshop in the first half of 2019. MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in finding out more about any of the activities, would like to get involved in the Export Facilitators Project or have any export related questions please get in contact with Manus Stockdale at manus.stockdale@vegetablewa.com.au or phone (08) 9486 7515.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

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Western Australian fruit and vegetables on display in BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

i a b u D & g Hong Kon

Vegetable growers were able to apply to attend and exhibit at Asia Fruit Logistica as fully funded delegates through AUSVEG’s Vegetable Industry Export Development Program. This year, five Western Australian vegetable growers attended and exhibited at the Australian Vegetables stand. As part of the program, 45 delegates attended Hort Innovation’s market insights tour to meet with the Galaxy Entertainment Group (GEG) in Macau. Hosted by the VP Food and Beverage Procurement as well as a number of GMs and Executive Chefs from the F&B team, the tour provided delegates with an insight into the opportunities for supply to food service in Macau and Hong Kong.

T

radeshows are an excellent opportunity for growers who are export ready to travel to market to both display and sell their product and learn more about their chosen target market. One of the largest perishable tradeshows annually, is Asia Fruit Logistica, Hong Kong. Asia Fruit Logistica was held from 5–7 September this year and was visited by more than 10,000 attendees from 76 different countries. This year’s tradeshow offered businesses the opportunity to exhibit as part of the Australian pavilion under the Taste Australia branding. Several Western Australian businesses exhibited at the tradeshow, with many more businesses attending independently.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

Preliminary outcomes from this show for Western Australian growers have been positive with discussions occurring between growers and customers from across Asia including Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan and Taiwan. Following on from Hong Kong, growers interested in markets in the Middle East attended and exhibited at World of Perishables in Dubai. This targeted tradeshow attracts dedicated fruit and vegetable buyers and featured exhibitors from 31 different countries. Delegates who attend through AUSVEG’s program participated in a market insights tour that visited the Dubai Central Markets, retail stores and Dubai based importer Kibsons new distribution centre. Representatives from Kibsons also provided the group with an overview of their operations, discussing their online shopping platform (launched last year) and the new opportunities for e-commerce in Dubai.


YOUR MARKET

33THE Dubai tradeshow attracts dedicated fruit and vegetable buyers and featured exhibitors from 31 different countries.

Growers were able to exhibit their fruit and vegetables under the Taste Australia brand.

Growers were able to exhibit their fruit and vegetables under the Taste Australia brand. Western Australian delegates were also strongly supported by both Pankaj Savara and Aziz Saba from the WA Trade Office — Middle East and Africa. Pankaj and Aziz both facilitated introductions between growers and importers from across the region including Dubai, Oman and Saudi Arabia.

MORE INFORMATION Vegetable growers who are interested in participating in one of these tradeshows are encouraged to contact Manus Stockdale at vegetablesWA. Manus is able to assist growers in better understanding the export process and assist with export readiness requirements.

33DELEGATES who attend through AUSVEG’s program participated in a market insights tour visiting the Dubai Central Markets, retail stores and importer Kibsons new distribution centre.

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

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WA company receives boost for citrus exports

I

mplementing innovative technologies to grow, pack and market consistently top quality fresh citrus to a range of world markets is proving to be a winning tactic for Dandaragan-based company AGRIFresh. Set up in 2004, the family-owned business has established 320 hectares of orchards across two properties. About 60% of total orchard area is planted to navel oranges and the remainder is made up of mandarins and mangoes. 33AGRIFRESH directors Joseph Ling, left, and Daniel Ying have received a State Government Export Competitiveness Grant to grow WA citrus exports.

AGRIFresh operates an on-site, enclosed 7600 square metre citrus packing facility that has doubled in capacity in the past 12 months, and further expansion is planned. This achievement of scale has seen AGRIFresh grow into one of Western Australia’s biggest citrus players in recent years and the company is on-track to meeting its targets of being a fully-integrated production, packing and marketing business supplying key export and domestic markets. Selling in container loads to premium customers in Asia and the Middle East, AGRIFresh is one of the few exporters of fresh citrus from this State. Director Daniel Ying said integral to success was a commitment to growing quality produce and using latest technologies to achieve efficiencies in the value chain, while minimising costs. He said during the peak winter and spring citrus harvesting months, the company ran two packing lines that processed up to 30 tonnes of fruit per hour from the family’s orchards and other local growers. “We are now introducing advanced robotic packing equipment that can fast-track this process,” he said. “This will lead to lower per unit costs, higher throughput capacity, longer citrus shelf life, better business margins for the industry and lift our ability to boost export sales.” AGRIFresh recently received a $194,000 Export Competitiveness Grant (ECG) to help install two Sunkist® Soft Touch® Pattern Packers that can uniformly pack

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WA Grower SUMMER 2018

more than 200 cartons of fruit per hour with one machine operator. The ECG program is an economic development initiative by the WA Government’s Agribusiness Innovation Fund (AIF), managed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD). It aims to assist WA agrifood companies develop and secure new markets by improving the export competitiveness of the State’s agricultural sector.

The ECGs are provided to drive product development, production and processing innovations, scale and capacity, job creation, regional development, local community growth and higher returns to the WA economy. Mr Ying said the state-of-the-art robotic technology to be installed by AGRIFresh would complement an existing packer the family purchased in 2016 from the USA and enable them to triple output to three container loads of citrus per day from next season. He said the robotic packing system handled higher volumes at faster speeds, but at low impact to the fruit by using low vacuum air and soft rubber suction. “The machine also automatically places cartons in position for packing and then moves these onto a conveyor, using a system like traffic lights to avoid collisions,” he said. Mr Ying said more efficient processing systems would underpin future export

© AGRIFresh

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YOUR MARKET

market development as AGRIFresh sought to open new opportunities in Japan, Thailand, the Philippines and Vietnam. “We are already selling into China, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Brunei and Middle East, where customers value the quality, sweetness and freshness of our citrus,” he said. “We want to continue to grow sales to these customers and secure more overseas markets as WA’s citrus plantings expand. We see the best opportunities for our produce are in export destinations, although domestic markets are also developing for quality fresh citrus products.” Mr Ying said one of the main challenges to exporting citrus from WA included securing access to freight when it was needed. “It takes 21 days for our citrus to get from the Fremantle port to China and we aim for a maximum 30 days from picking fruit to getting it on to a shelf overseas,” he said. “Shortening that time, by even three days, through a more efficient supply-chain would be beneficial.” Mr Ying said overseas customers demanded the highest grade fruit, but AGRIFresh was also developing different markets for other grades of citrus. The aim was to be able to sell every piece of fruit harvested from a tree. DPIRD AIF acting Director Mark Holland said AGRIFresh was a good example of an innovative and forwardthinking WA business committed to improving the productivity and competitiveness of the State’s horticultural and citrus sectors. “Its efforts to improve competitiveness helped it develop and expand export markets which will ultimately drive WA’s long-term agribusiness industry’s profitability, sustainability and economic growth,” he said. MORE INFORMATION For more information about the ECG program, see: www.agric.wa.gov.au/ export-competitiveness-grants Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

It’s official!

A

BY CLAIRE MCCLELLAND MARKET DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

nother 12 businesses have joined the prestigious list of Western Australia’s best at this year’s 30th Western Australian Industry & Export Awards. In the presence of peers from the international business community, winners of this year’s awards were announced at a gala ceremony on Thursday 18 October 2018.

On a night full of celebration, the dedication, ingenuity and business acumen of Western Australian businesses was celebrated and recognised across 14 state and national export award categories. AGRIFresh, a family owned and operated citrus and mangoes business, had the honour of being announced Western Australian Exporter of the Year and winner of the WA Agribusiness Award. In 2015, AGRIFresh commenced international trade with their flagship brand, ZESTIE™. Today, their WA grown citrus are distributed to leading international retailers and distributors, including in South East Asia and the Middle East.

3 AGRIFresh Joseph Ling accepting the awards.

Highly commended in the Agribusiness category was WA Corn Growers. WA Corn Growers export to retailers and distributors in South East Asia and the Middle East. Winners of national export award categories will now represent Western Australia at the 56th Australian Export Awards, which was held on 27 November 2018, in Canberra. MORE INFORMATION Visit www.exportawards.gov.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

117


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YOUR PRODUCTION Permits

Permits

Current Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PEER80060

Frontier-P Herbicide

Bulb onions

Nutgrass/purple nutsedge

Expiry date 31-Jul-21

PER10677

Propyzamide

Chicory & endive

Grass and broadleef weeds

30-Apr-23

PER10845

Barmac Zineb Fungicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Cercospora leaf spot & downy mildew

31-May-20

PER10875

Pirimor WG Aphicide (pirimicarb)

Celeriac

Aphids

30-Sep-20

PER10976

Bentazone

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER10988

Bladex 900 WG (cyanazine)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER11438

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Specified vegetables

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Jun-19

PER11440

Sumiclex 500 (procymidone)

Peppers

Sclerotinia rot

31-Jan-20

PER11441

Propachlor

Radish, swede, turnip

Grass and broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-19

PER11747

2,2-Dichloropropionic Acid

Carrot crops (for seed)

Promotion of bolting and grass weed control

30-Nov-19

PER11768

Chlorpyrifos

Pumpkin

African black beetle

31-Mar-21

PER11935

Triadimenol

Parsnips, radish, swede & turnip

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-22

PER11949

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Beetroot & radish

Various insects

31-Mar-20

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, silverbeet, endive, radicchio, chicory & processing peas

Downy mildew

31-Mar-20

PER11991

Legend Fungicide (quinoxyfen)

Silverbeet

Powdery mildew

31-Mar-21

PER12008

Propachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, rocket & brassica leafy veg

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

30-Nov-25

PER12047

Thiabendazole

Sweet potato

Field rots caused by scurf & root rot

30-Sep-21

PER12048

Prometryn

Parsnip & carrot

Weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12351

Confidor Guard Soil

Leafy lettuce, okra

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER12357

Linuron

Parsnips

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12378

Acephate

Tomatoes & sweet peppers

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-20

PER12384

S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Herbicide)

Rhubarb

Various weeds

31-Aug-20

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Peppers (capsicum & chilli), cucumber and lettuce

Botrytis rot

31-May-21

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Celery, cucumber, peppers & Cape gooseberry

Aphids

31-May-20

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Capsicum and lettuce (protected crops only)

Botrytis rots

30-Sep-22

PER12823

Trifluralin

Chillies, paprika and eggplant

Various broad leaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER12846

Abamectin

Lettuce (hydroponic), snow peas & sugar snap peas

Two-spotted mite

30-Sep-20

PER13031

Maldison

Capsicums and cucumbers

Fruit fly

30-Nov-18

PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Specified root vegetables, specified alliums & celeriac

Various insect pests

31-Mar-22

PER13114

Prometryn

Celeriac

Grass weeds listed on label

31-Mar-22

PER13116

Propiconazole

Sweet corn

Northern corn leaf blight

31-Mar-21

PER13152

MCPA 250 Selective Herbicide Rhubarb

Broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-21

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

31-Mar-22

PER13170

Dimethoate

Melons including watermelons (postharvest)

Various fruit fly species

30-Sep-20

PER13300

Abamectin

Rhubarb

Broad mite

31-Dec-21

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

119


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.)

120

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER13301

Alpha-cypermethrin

Lettuce

Red-legged earth mite & vegetable weevil

PER13305

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Carrots

Certain broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-20

PER13322

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Specified leafy vegetables

Potato moth

31-May-22

PER13323

Score Foliar Fungicide (difenoconazole)

Celeriac

Cercospora leaf spot & septoria leaf blight

31-Oct-20

PER13351

Pirimicarb

Eggplant

Aphids

31-Mar-19

PER13367

Linuron

Leeks & celeriac

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Apr-21

PER13441

Ambush Emulsifiable Concentrate Insecticide

Rhubarb

Green peach aphid, green looper, light brown apple moth and budworms

31-Mar-27

PER13444

Propiconazole

Radishes

Cercospora

31-May-22

PER13496

Linuron

Celery

Range of weeds

30-Apr-22

PER13626

Metolachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, green beans and navy beans

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-22

PER13653

Maldison

Leeks, spring onions and shallots

Onion thrips

28-Feb-23

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Celery, silverbeet & spinach

Late blight, septoria leaf blight & downy mildew

30-Sep-21

PER13695

Ecocarb Fungicide

Various vegetables

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-20

PER13696

Trifluralin

Parsnips

Winter grass

31-Mar-23

PER13698

Phosphorous

Lettuce (leaf+hydro), parsley, coriander fennel and bulb (allium) vegetables

Downy mildew

30-Sep-22

PER13716

Abrade Abrasive Barrier Insecticide

Tomatoes (protected)

Various insect pests

31-Jan-20

PER13717

Amistar Top (azoxystrobin + difenoconazole)

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13720

Pristine

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13721

Switch

Tomatoes (protected)

Grey mould (botrytis)

31-May-21

PER13724

Previcur

Tomatoes (protected)

Root rot

31-May-21

PER13726

Trifloxystrobin

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13902

Phorate

Sweet potatoes

Aphids, thrips, jassids and organophosphate susceptible twospotted mite and wireworm

31-Mar-23

PER14008

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Garlic

Downy mildew & purple blotch

31-Mar-23

PER14035

Diflufenican

Peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-23

PER14036

Bupirimate

Eggplant

Powdery mildew

28-Feb-23

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Brassica leafy vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, chicory, endive, radicchio, rocket, carrots and parsnip

Various fungal diseases

31-Mar-22

PER14046

Mancozeb

Cucumbers

Grey mould

31-Mar-23

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Spring onions, shallots & radish

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

31-Mar-23

PER14049

Permethrin (Ambush )

Celery

Helicoverpa and looper

31-Mar-23

PER14050

Flint 500 WG Fungicide

Cucumbers and capsicums (protected)

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-23

PER14051

Iprodione

Broccoli seed treatment

Rhizoctinia

31-Mar-23

PER14071

Pirmicarb

Sweet corn, spring onion, celery

Aphids

30-Jun-19

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Greenhouse & hydroponic capsicum, cucumber & lettuce

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Sep-23

PER14142

Ioxynil

Spring onions, shallots & Welsh onions

Broad leaf and grass weeds

31-Mar-19

PER14212

Imidacloprid

Rhubarb

Aphids

31-Dec-22

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Lettuce

Damping off

30-Sep-22

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

Expiry date 31-May-20


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER14326

Captan

Leafy lettuce, cucumber, capsicum & chilli

Grey mould

Expiry date

PER14337

Trifluralin

Swedes and turnips

Weeds

30-Jun-20

PER14351

DC-Tron Plus

Lettuce

Various bugs

31-Mar-21

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Peppers & celeriac

Sclerotinia rot

31-Mar-22

PER14385

Prometryn

Specified root & tuber vegetables

Grass and broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-19

PER14430

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 SC)

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14432

Pendimethalin

Brussels sprouts

Weeds

30-Jun-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Chicory, leeks, spring onions, shallots

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

30-Jun-19

30-Nov-21

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Snow peas

Downy mildew

30-Apr-22

PER14471

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Shallots & spring onions

Various pests

31-Mar-19

PER14479

Propiconazole

Various vegetable crops

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14493

Phos acid

Rhubarb

Downy mildew

31-Jan-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

Celery, silverbeet, spinach, chicory and endive

DM, cercospora & septoria

31-Aug-22

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Grey mould (botrytis)

30-Jun-19

PER14536

Abamectin

Sweet corn, chillies, paprika, spring onions and shallots

Two-spotted mite

31-Dec-23

PER14583

Chlorpyrifos

Various vegetable crops

Various insect pests

31-Mar-19

PER14584

Imidacloprid

Brassica leafy vegetables

Aphids, whitefly and thrips

31-Mar-19

PER14626

Copper as tribasic copper sulphate

Garlic

Downy mildew

30-Jun-19

PER14628

Ioxynil

Garlic

Broad leaf and grass weeds

31-Jul-20

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

Protected cropping — capsicum, cucumber, eggplant, herbs & lettuce

Fungus gnats (Sciaridae spp.)

30-Jun-19

PER14695

Ridomil Gold 25G (metalaxyl-M)

Parsnips

Pythium spp. and Phytophthora spp.

30-Jun-19

PER14696

Abamectin

Head lettuce

Two-spotted mite

31-Mar-19

PER14701

Pyriproxyfen

Beans

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER14703

Tramat 500 SC Selective Herbicide (ethofumesate)

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea only) & silverbeet

Various weeds

31-Jul-19

PER14722

Abamectin

Capsicum, cucumber, eggplant, zucchini, tomato, sweet corn, chilli, paprika, potato, snow pea and sugar snap pea crops

Tomato red spider mite

30-Sep-20

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Leeks, spring onions and shallots

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER14773

Basagran (bentazonesodium)

Onions

Broadleaf weeds

31-Jan-23

PER14816

Azoxystrobin

Carrot

Powdery mildew, sclerotinia rot (white mould), black rot

30-Jun-19

PER14839

Zineb

Eggplant, spinach & silverbeet

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

30-Sep-19

PER14840

Bupirimate

Cucurbits & peppers

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Chicory, endive, radicchio, silverbeet and spinach

Botrytis and alternaria

30-Sep-19

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Spring onions and shallots

Downy mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

Celery

Heliothis, lightbrown apple moth, lucerne leaf roller and vegetable weevil

30-Sep-19

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

121


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.)

122

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER14858

Pendimethalin

Parsnip

Grasses and broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Sweet potato, brassica leafy vegetables, chicory radicchio & rocket

Aphids

30-Jun-19

PER14886

Pendimethalin

Garlic

Grass & broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-19

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Spring onions and shallots

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-19

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Beetroot

Alternaria leaf spot

30-Sep-19

PER14892

Pymetrozine (Chess Insecticide)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Aphid pests

31-May-22

PER14906

Triadimenol

Leek, chives, shallot, spring and Chinese onions

White rot (Sclerotium)

31-Oct-19

PER14907

Emamectin

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Brassica leafy vegetables, leafy lettuce & other leafy vegetables

Downy mildew & other diseases

31-Dec-22

PER7909

Scala 400 SC Fungicide

Cucumber

Botrytis rot

30-Sep-22

PER80099

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Fruiting vegetables, except cucurbits

Mediterrean fruit fly and Queeensland fruit fly

31-Mar-20

PER80138

Alpha-cypermethrin

Cucurbits

Cucumber fruit fly

31-Mar-20

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Protected tomatoes

Botrytis

30-Jun-20

PER80216

Torque Insecticide (fenbutatin oxide)

Tomatoes (protected)

Two-spotted mite

31-Mar-19

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Onions

Onion thrips

30-Nov-20

PER80538

Mancozeb

Parsley, chicory and brassica leafy vegetables (Brassica spp.)

Anthracnose and septoria

31-Mar-25

PER80558

Bifenazate

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Various mites

31-Aug-20

PER80717

Trichlorfon

Eggplant, Thai eggplant, pepino & Cape Fruit fly gooseberry

31-Oct-20

PER80891

Pyranica Miticide

Cucumbers

Two-spotted mite & European red mite

30-Sep-20

PER80910

Iprodione

Brussels sprouts & eggplant

Grey mould

31-Jul-20

PER80954

Methoxyfenozide

Snow peas and sugar peas

Native budworm, tomato grub and cluster caterpillar

30-Sep-20

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Cucumber, brassica vegetables, lettuce, beans, peppers, eggplant and peas

Specified whitefly and mite species

31-Mar-21

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Lettuce, chicory, endive, radicchio & spinach

Broadleaf weeds

31-May-20

PER81260

Imidacloprid

Beetroot

Aphids & thrips

30-Sep-20

PER81271

Various Actives

Leeks

Specified grass and broadleaf weeds

31-Oct-21

PER81408

Phosphorous acid

Capsicum

Phytophthora soil fungus

30-Sep-20

PER81702

Dominex Duo EC Insecticide

Cucumbers

Loopers

31-Mar-21

PER81713

Mainman 500WG Insecticide

Tomatoes

Silverleaf whitefly

31-Mar-21

PER81914

Emamectin

Celery & eggplant

Heliothis, light brown apple moth & cluster caterpillar

31-Oct-19

PER82055

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Garlic

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-21

PER82063

TEBUCONAZOLE

Garlic

Orange rust

31-Mar-21

PER82136

Difenconazole

Brassica vegetables

Ring spot

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Cucumber, peppers (sweet & chilli), zucchini, eggplant, sin qua, bitter melon, tomato & snake bean

Two-spotted mite

31-Mar-21

PER82359

Pirimor (pirimicarb)

Peppers — Chilli

Aphids

31-Mar-21

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

Expiry date


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER82374

Talstar

Various crops

Brown marmorated stink bug & yellow-spotted stink bugs

Expiry date 28-Feb-23

PER82456

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Field grown capsicum, chillies, paprika

Downy mildew

30-Sep-20

PER82459

Clethodiim

Brassica vegetables

Various grass weeds

30-Sep-21

PER82460

Paraamite selective miticide

Cucurbits, Asian cucurbits

Two-spotted mite and red spider mite

31-Jul-22

PER82461

Folicur 430 SC Fungicide

Beetroot, chicory, endive, radish, silverbeet

Scletotinia rot

31-Aug-20

PER82551

Diazinon

Leeks & cauliflower

Onion fly & onion seedling maggot

31-Mar-21

PER82556

Fluazifop

Various vegetables

Grass weeds

31-Jan-23

PER82745

Difenconazole

Silverbeet, spinach, chicory, endive

Fungal diseases

31-Aug-20

PER82811

S-Metolachlor

Beetroot

Blackberry nightshade

1-Feb-20

PER82904

Fenhexamid

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Grey mould and chocolate spot

30-Jun-22

PER82992

Avatar (indoxacarb)

Asparagus

Garden weevil

31-May-22

PER83203

Fipronil (REGENT 200 SC)

Celery & field lettuce

Western flower thrips, onion thrips

13-Mar-22

PER83277

Iprodione

Garlic

Botrytis

31-Jul-21

PER83765

Maxim XL

Spinach and silverbeet

Damping off

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Potato, sweet potato, tomato, capsicum, chilli, peppers, eggplant

Tomato potato psyllid

28-Feb-20

PER84249

Various

Potato

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Jul-20

PER84426

Various

Green beans, carrots, spinach and silverbeet

Sclerotinia, botrytis rot and black rot

31-Mar-19

PER84442

Pyrethrins

Vegetables

Tomato potato psylllid

31-May-19

PER84531

Methoxyfenozide

Sweet corn

Lepidopteran pests

31-Oct-20

PER84555

Vapormate (Ethyl Formate)

Fresh fruit & vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

30-Jun-19

PER84734

Verdict (haloxyfop)

Onions

Storksbill

31-Dec-21

PER84740

Fluazifop-P as butyl

Various root crops

Grass weeds including couch and Guinea grass

30-Apr-19

PER84743

Sulfloxaflor

Fruiting vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Oct-22

PER84757

spinetoram

Fruiting vegetables other than cucurbits & root and tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

30-Nov-20

PER84805

cyantraniliprole

Fruiting vegetables, root and tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Dec-22

PER84808

Ethofumesate (Tramat)

Onions

Broadleaf and grass weeds

28-Feb-23

PER84878

Switch Fungicide

Protected and field grown capsicum

Botrytis & sclerotinia

30-Nov-22

PER84955

Iprodione

Green beans, carrots, spinach & silverbeet

Sclerotinia, black rot & grey mould

28-Feb-23

PER85003

Ranman 400 SC Fungicide

Spinach and silverbeet

Pythium damping off

28-Feb-23

PER85011

Transform Insecticide

Nursery stock (non-food)

Aphid, mealybugs, mirids, scale, greenhouse whitefly

28-Feb-23

PER85307

Pirimicarb

Faba bean, broad bean and vetches

Bean aphid

31-Oct-19

PER8930

Phorate

Eggplant, peppers, shallots and spring onions

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

31-Jul-19

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

123


What's on

what’s on... Upcoming important events!

2019 Protecting Cropping Australia’s 15th biennial conference, trade show & farm tours Save the Date WHEN 7–10 July 2019 WHERE Star Casino, Gold Coast Queensland Connecting growers to valuable information and relevant technology. If you are interested in the Naming Rights for the event, please contact; Saskia PCA Company Secretary admin@protectedcroppingaustralia.com t: 0414 333 996 Jonathan Eccles 2019 Conference Chair jonathan@eccles.com.au t: 0407 242 757

Industry Summit and Grower Tour Save the Date WHEN 17–18 October 2019 WHERE TBC vegetablesWA will host its 5th Annual Grower Tour and Industry Summit in October 2019. In our 5th year we will continue to hold the Industry Summit and networking event at Crown however will move to the Crown Towers Ballroom. We will also host the HortConnectWA Brunch in the same location. The grower tour and export events will be held on Thursday 17th October. We ask all growers and stakeholders to save the date to allow you to attend our premier event. Rebecca Blackman Operations Manager, vegetablesWA e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au

From the vegetablesWA team Office will be closed from Friday 21 December 2018, returning Wednesday 2 January 2019

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

124

Website/Email

Address

Contact name

Contact no.

Agrimaster (p6)

www.agrimaster.com.au

Baileys (p57)

www.baileysfertiliser.com.au

Bon Electrics (p101)

www.bon-electrics.com.au

Lot 4 Bullsbrook Road, Bullsbrook WA 6084

Ben Bonomi

(08) 9571 1314

Dobmac Ag Machinery (OBC)

www.dobmac.com.au

36-38 Industrial Drive, Ulverstone TAS 7315

Mark Dobson

(03) 6425 5533

edp australia pty ltd (p60)

www.edp.com.au

31-37 OBrien Street, Mooroopna VIC 3269

Mick Schirmer

0437 252 122

1800 110 000

HM Clause (p37)

www.hmclause.com

PO Box 475, Bulleen, VIC 3105

Kevin Swan

0400 622 314

HortConnectWA (p45)

www.hortconnectwa.net

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth, WA 6005

Claire McClelland

(08) 9486 7515

Level 8, 1 Chifley Square, Sydney NSW 2000

Horticulture Innovation Australia (IBC)

www.horticulture.com.au

Madec (p24)

https://jobsearch.gov.au/harvest

Organic 2000 (Benara Nurseries) (p112)

www.organic2000.com.au

59 Safari Place, Carabooda, WA 6033

Paliz Agriculture (p105)

www.paliz.com.au

21/110 Inspiration Drive, Wangara WA 6065

R & E Engineering (p15)

www.reeng.com.au

(08) 6261 7171

R & E Engineering (p118)

www.reeng.com.au

(08) 6261 7171

Rivulis (p47)

www.rivulis.com.au

1800 558 009

Seminis (p33)

www.seminis.com.au

Signet (IFC)

signet.net.au

WA Crates (p106)

service@wacrates.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2018

(02) 8295 2300 1800 062 332 (08) 9407 5182 Hossein Darvish

Fiona Crate Yard, Market City

(08) 9303 9638

0411 427 220 (08) 9456 4092


Let’s talk about your industry

Sam Turner Relationship Manager Hort Innovation

Meet a vegetable fund Relationship Manager and see how he can support you. Sam is keen to chat with you. He is your link to the latest R&D developments and how these can help your business grow. It’s easy to request a phone call – just go to the ‘Contact Me’ form at horticulture.com.au/contact-me. Alternatively, you can call 02 8295 2300 or email membership@horticulture.com.au and let us know you would like Sam to call you.

horticulture.com.au


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Well Dried Onions

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Profile for vegetablesWA

WA Grower Summer 2018  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

WA Grower Summer 2018  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

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