WA Grower Autumn 16

Page 1

$25.00 (inc GST)

WA Grower Agricultural Produce Commission

SINCE 1948 Vol. 51 No 1. Autumn 2016

APC-VPC APC-PPC

Young growers making their mark Lauren East Danny Trandos

WATER

What you need to know: • IrrigateWA App • Wellington Dam • Carnarvon • Gascoyne • Pilbra


FOR LEASE

Market Garden Land

Kw

ina

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Fre

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25 Lymon Road Stakehill

ap

• • • • • • • • •

. Dr

d or

n Lymo

Rd

o og

o dj Prior market garden property. an M Generous water license. Flexible size, 5 hectares to 15 hectares. Suitable for Market Garden, Turf Farm or Flowers. Easy access alongside the Kwinana Freeway and Forrest Highway. Fantastic signage opportunity on the freeway boundary. 35 minutes to Canning Vale Markets. Move to a more economical location. Flexible lease terms with rent free for set up period. This document is compiled from various sources and whilst the Shire of Murray has made every effort to ensure the accuracy and currency of the information, Council accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions. Includes layers based on information provided by and with the permission of the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate) (2013).

Is your land ready for development? Is suburbia creeping up on your market garden?

Date : 14/02/2016 Scale : 1:29982

Original Size

A4

P O BOX 21, PINJARRA 6208 Tel (08) 9531 7777 FAX(08) 9531 19 Email : mailbag@murray.wa.gov.au

Drawn by : Intramaps Public

Nick Di Lello M.B.A. M.Property Licensed Real Estate Agent & Business Broker 60706

Do you want to sell your land, buy a new garden and pocket the surplus? Unlock the equity in your land and prosper. Find out the development value of your property. Call Nick Di Lello at IQ Property & Projects for an obligation free and cost free meeting to inform yourself on the development potential of your land.

Property & Projects M: 0422 230 230 F: 08 9370 3703 E: nick.dilello@iinet.net.au


WA Grower 26

Vol. 51 No 1. Autumn 2016

72

50

YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

3

EnviroVeg manual launched in Vietnamese

52

From the Chief Executive Officer

4

Making hay

54

vegetablesWA President’s Report

6

Project Harvest Monthly Tracker Report

56

PGA President’s Report

7

Olakala — Trandos Hydroponics Growers

58

Simon Moltoni joins Potato Growers Association WA

7

Improving the efficiency of the carrot export industry

60

Hort Innovation levy payer workshop outcome

8

Fresh Potatoes campaign YOUR PRODUCTION

10 13

POMEWEST

61

Pomewest Executive Officer Report

62

The development of maturity standards

63

Non-bee insects just as important

14

Future Orchards Walk

64

Soil testing tips

16

The Surveillance Trapping Network Project

65

How can I control pests?

20

Being export ready for West Australian apples

66

Vegetable disease outbreak north of Perth

22

Black or white netting?

68

Spotlight on managing soil-borne disease

26

Improving productivity and eliminating stable fly

28

Backpacker Tax issues gather speed

72

New app helps vegetable growers optimise water use

32

What’s new for businesses in 2016?

74

Help for farm families

75

Safety tips

76

Cashflow and bookkeeping what you need to know

78

Taking the hard work out of growing your business

80

Permits TOOL TIME

110 33

The new European heavy duty floretting machine

34

Modular vacuum cooling

35

YOUR INDUSTRY

37

New technology will save growers water and money

38

Single supplier plan for Carnarvon water

39

Tapping into the Pilbara’s water resource data

40

Four contenders shortlisted in Wellington Dam EOI

41

David Grays’ leafy field day

42

Grower profile — Lauren East

44

Mirco still growing with focus on service and quality

46

Market City sold to industry

48

Potato industry deregulation update

49

Salmonella outbreak

50

NFF announces new initiatives

51

YOUR BUSINESS

71

YOUR MARKET

81

Getting ready for export

82

How to start exporting

84

Incoterms® explained

88

Export market development grants at a glance

90

What’s on the menu in 2016?

92

UN Comtrade

94

Australian dollar — where to in 2016?

96

YOUR SELF

97

12 of the best veggie/vegan cafes in Perth Mental health VIETNAMESE TRANSLATIONS

98 101 103

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

1


Produced by

vegetablesWA

Management Committees

Cover photo: Lauren East

Vegetable Growers Association

Contact details for Horticulture House vegetablesWA, Potato Growers Association, HorticultureWA 103 Outram Street West Perth 6005 t: (08) 9481 0834 f: (08) 9481 0024 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

President

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au Finance/Administrator/Communications Rebecca Blackman t: (08) 9481 0834 e: finance@vegetableswa.com.au Magazine Advertising Morena Tarbotton t: (08) 9481 0834 e: morena.tarbotton@vegetableswa.com.au

Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Vice President Ken Sue m: 0417 986 467

Busselton

Committee M. Dobra K. Edwards M. Grubisa P. Ivankovich T. Le A. Natoli D. Nguyen P. Shain H. Shapland P. Wauchope

m: 0417 174 110 m: 0427 724 243 m: 0413 050 182 m: 0428 919 211 m: 0408 910 761 t: (08) 9405 4817 t: (08) 9941 8376 m: 0419 041 045 t: (08) 9845 1064 m: 0400 717 600

Export Development Manager Dominic Jenkin m: 0427 373 037 e: dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au

Potato Growers Association

Vietnamese Field Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au

Treasurer

Life Members A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), S. Calameri, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, A. Harris* and A. Ingrilli. * deceased

Carnarvon

Gingin Manjimup Metro North Myalup Metro Metro North Carnarvon Carnarvon Albany Gingin

President Vaughan Carter m: 0417 092 505 Mia Rose m: 0409 112 245

Busselton

Myalup

Committee C. Ayres G. Bendotti R. Humfrey D. Omodei D. Terrigno

m: 0428 451 014 Albany m: 0427 569 903 Pemberton m: 0427 148 832 Gingin/Dandaragan m: 0427 761 121 Pemberton m: 0417 771 333 Manjimup

This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • APC- Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • vegetablesWA • Pomewest

Articles reflect the opinions of the authors and are not necessarily those of the publisher.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

YOUR

INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

From the

Chief Executive Officer BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

Horticulture industries in WA have received some good news over the Christmas and New Year period that the sale of the Canning Vale wholesale Market City site went to the industry bid, Perth Markets Ltd rather than property developer proponents.

Many growers are reporting declines in labour availability, which is backed up by government confirming that 417 visa holders are in decline. The proposed backpacker tax will only exacerbate this worrying trend.

This will ensure that there is a long-term future for this key piece of infrastructure and vegetable growers provided a significant amount of the capital raised. vegetablesWA was key in highlighting to government the risks of property developers taking control.

Also in the labour space, vegetablesWA are working to support Growcom and the Voice of Horticulture to mount an effective case in the Horticulture Award review, where the claims of unions are expected to be strong.

vegetablesWA is working with the National Farmers Federation, WAFF and a range of other state associations across agriculture, tourism and hospitality to seek needed changes to this proposal.

Rogue labour hire companies (also operating as sole traders and partnerships) continue to be a source of concern to the industry. We are seeking that the state government introduce specific laws to regulate the industry because growers simply don’t have the necessary powers to investigate the bona fides of these companies. Given that employment agents are already regulated by the Employment Agents Act 1976 there is already a WA precedent for specific laws in this area and the UK Gangmasters Licencing Act 2004 provides an example of an existing regime. If growers have particular concerns in this area please contact us so we can assist. Stable fly has unfortunately been an issue amongst the broader community North of Perth again this Summer; despite the tremendous gains that many growers have made in altering their management practices. In good news though, it appears that grower efforts in conjunction with advice funded by the Agricultural Produce Commission (APC) and Hort Innovation at Capel have largely controlled the pest this year. The APC Vegetable Producers Committee is represented on regulatory review panel which is looking at how incidences are reported and progressed. MORE INFORMATION Contact me on (08) 9481 0834 or email john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au

GOOD news — the Canning Vale wholesale Market City site went to the industry bid, Perth Markets Ltd rather than property developer proponents.

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

President’s Report BY DAMIR KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

I trust everyone has had a safe and enjoyable Christmas and New Year. Once again we in WA have had an eventful start to the New Year in regards to the fires in the South of the State. vegetablesWA is here to help, if there are any vegetable growers that have been effected by the fires please contact the office, (08) 9481 0834, to see what kind of assistance is available. Congratulations to The Chamber of Fruit and Vegetable Industries in Western Australia, on the successful bid and securing the Market site in Canning Vale. This now ends speculation and secures the market systems to stay in place which is very good news. I would like to mention to all vegetable growers in WA that hygiene practices are still an issue North and South of the state in some regions. Stable fly is still a problem around Gingin and Carabooda, we need to work closely together to solve this problem. In the North (Carnarvon) we need to be vigilant and work together by helping your neighbours to control insects and pests. By using pest control or spraying to minimise the risk of viruses spread this year. I would urge you to contact Truyen Vo, Field Extension Officer, 0457 457 559, to obtain any information you might need.

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

WE need to be vigilant and work together by controlling insects and pests and minimising the risk of viruses spreading.

Prices of certain produce lines have been significantly reduced in the local market due to an oversupply of produce. Growers in particular from Carnarvon have grown out of season to recoup losses during the normal growing season which impacts everyone. Price wise we need to get smarter in our processes and marketing. A rockmelon grower from Carnarvon identified the oversupply problem and sought out a new market in Singapore. With the help of Horticulture WA and the Export Development Manager, Dominic Jenkin, they were able to gain access and a market share as the produce was great quality and he has consistent supply. This has assisted their business and reduced supply to the local market. A job well done by all.

If any grower is seeking assistance with exporting horticulture produce contact Dominic Jenkin, 0427 373 037. Growers have had challenging times in recent years due to floods, cyclones and fires and we all need to work together through these hard times to make sure the vegetable industry services and moves forward, there is always help available. If you have any concerns please contact the team at vegetablesWA to see what assistance can be provided. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com vegetablesWA on (08) 9481 0834 or office@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

President’s Report BY VAUGHAN CARTER PRESIDENT, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

Dear Growers, as this is my first President’s report there are a few thank you’s and welcomes that need to be addressed. First and foremost the PGA Committee, staff and growers would like to acknowledge and thank our outgoing President, Dean Ryan. Dean’s contribution to our industry has been massive. The reason I say this is because of the unrest and unprecedented position our industry has found itself facing deregulation. Due to this, the work and time required by Dean and staff has been immense and his role and leadership has been fantastic. To Dean and his family the PGA Committee of Management wish you all the very best for the future. As Growers are aware over the past four months we have seen the ACIL Allen report prepared and presented to all zones. This report has gained the support of growers needed for the PGA to present it to Government as a fair and carefully considered proposal. The industry is determined to move forward from regulation with a positive and seamless transition. The outcome is still to be resolved but with support from the PGA and the PMC and the unwavering focus from growers, hopefully we will see a good result.

Danny Omodei has joined the PGA committee as a zone representative in Pemberton/Manjimup. We look forward to his input over the coming term. We also see the Executive Officer position change with Simon Moltoni taking the reins. Simon has already show a propensity for hard work and leadership in his short time and along with Morena we have what is needed in the current climate.

In conclusion a huge thank you must go to Ross Taylor. Ross took on the role of Executive Officer as a temporary position and his contribution has been invaluable. Ross has enormous respect for the people involved in our industry and his work during this challenging time has been unwavering. Ross, with the help of PGA committee and staff has seen us achieve an industry position that is united and on point, which is imperative to gain a positive outcome. MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com

Simon Moltoni joins PGA

BY MORENA TARBOTTON FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, PGA

Simon is not a newcomer to the potato industry. As a third generation grower in Pemberton, Simon has grown potatoes for the fresh, processing, export and seed markets, this gives him a solid understanding of grower issues from all sectors. Simon has significant experience in representing growers at regional, state and national levels including: • 92–95 Simplot Growers Committee • 05–11 Pemberton Potato Growers Zone Chairman • 09–11 PGAWA Vice President • 11–15 Western Potatoes Pty Ltd, Director • 12–15 WA Seed Potatoes Producers Vice President • 10–15 Member Industry Advisory Council (IAC) for Fresh Potatoes. Simon believes this experience, and the network of contacts developed during these years will help him settle into his new role. Simon says “On behalf of all growers I would like to thank Jim Turley for his tireless efforts over the last 16 years, this will be a hard act to follow. We wish him all the best during his well-deserved retirement. I would also like to thank Ross Taylor for his significant contribution as interim executive officer during these particularly challenging times. My new role represents the interest of all potato growers in Western Australia and I offer my dedication, commitment and enthusiasm to the Committee of Management and key industry partners alike. I look forward to working with you all.” MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon on 0447 141 752 or email simon.moltoni@vegetableswa.com.au.

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Hort Innovation

Become a member today

levy payer workshop outcome BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

vegetablesWA attended both of the Horticulture Innovation Australia workshops which were held in February. These workshops were held nationally to assist with the development of the company’s inaugural Strategic Plan, setting the strategy to 2018. The purpose of the workshops was to consult with horticulture levy payers to gain their input in shaping the company’s strategy and its implementation. Below is a brief indication of what was discussed.

Hort Innovation in general Discussion focused on Hort Innovation membership, and questions were raised around voting entitlements (at the Annual General Meeting) and how they are determined. The presenter acknowledged this feedback and the voting entitlements for members were explained.

Key takeouts for the Strategic Plan Company operations • Communication needs to be a mixed approach including digital and printed channels. • It also needs to be tailored and relevant with content customised for growers, including those with non-English speaking background. • Communication needs to have a focus on demonstrating how levies are invested for the benefit for growers — this includes R&D and marketing programs. • IRBs and grower associations need to be included in the communication approach, and without the duplication of content. Levy investment (Pool 1) • The advisory panels must show a fair and equal representation of growers. • The activities and outcomes of Hort Innovation’s advisory panels are to be more transparent, and the process must be transparent and well-reported. Strategic Co-investment (Pool 2) • Land, Soil, Water and Climate Management attracted the highest level of interest for attendees. Fruit fly, pest and disease management and leadership and people development also attracted strong support. • The Green Cities fund also attracted a high level of interest which was likely influenced by the presence of the turf industry at the workshop.

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www.horticulture. com.au/ membership

Hort Innovation have attempted to capture the broad sentiments, ideas and general comments from the meetings and this, along with the key take-outs are included in a summary document that is now available on our website along with the presentation.

We would also like to take the opportunity to remind you that paying a levy does not automatically make you a member of Hort Innovation. If you are not already a member and would like direct communication with Hort Innovation and updates about your levy investment, you may like to give this some consideration — no fee applies and it’s very easy to join online at www.horticulture. com.au/membership. MORE INFORMATION Should you have questions about membership, please contact Charlotte Dinnison at membership@horticulture.com.au. Smmary http://horticulture.com.au/ wp-content/uploads/2015/10/LPW-PerthOutcome.pdf Presentation http://horticulture.com.au/ wp-content/uploads/2016/02/HortInn-LPWPresentation.pdf Website www.horticulture.com.au


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Ask us how for your next growing season.

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Fresh Potatoes campaign

goes 100% local. 100% fresh. LAURA BERNHARDT FRESH POTATOES

Consumers are demanding to know if their food is safe and where their food comes from now more than ever. Food recalls, most recently salmonella lettuce and most famously frozen berries Hepatitis-A, highlight the risk and health implications of eating imported food.

The re-establishment of links to ‘real’ food is a trend on the rise and the new territory for the consumption campaign as it enters its final phase. The campaign will focus on the message 100% local, 100% fresh and celebrate that in WA, almost 100% of potatoes grown in WA are sold in WA. The strategy to achieve this is two fold; celebrate the retailers who are sourcing 100% local WA potatoes and drive consumer demand for 100% local WA potatoes.

Media activity will be primarily Seven West Group products such as thewest.com.au (Yahoo!7), TV news shows and use of Ambassador Rob Broadfield to voice of the campaign as well as: • Retailer POS created for the fresh potato category signposting their membership in the club. Standard POS required includes. • Retailer ‘Thank you’ adverts for supporting 100% local WA potatoes. • Paid news articles written for publication on prominent news sites through ‘Outbrain’ — a content promotion media group. • Paid articles written by three prominent WA Food Bloggers: http:// foodiecravings.com.au/, http:// breakfastconfidential.com.au and http://cooking101.com.au promoted for two months through their Facebook pages.

THE campaign will focus on the message 100% local, 100% fresh and celebrate that in WA, almost 100% of potatoes grown in WA are sold in WA.

• Don Hancey, ‘active’ Potatodors and Health Ambassadors will be refocused to endorse ‘Buy Local’ campaign. The marketing team are also looking beyond June 30 2015 on how this campaign can be extend, what the plan looks like and investment options. Watch this space for more details as the campaign comes to life. MORE INFORMATION For more information on the new campaign contact Paul Graham, Marketing Manager Fresh Potatoes paul@freshpotatoes.com.au or 0414 382 738.

• Weekly Facebook posts by Fresh Potatoes and one monthly consumer newsletter sent communicating our ‘Buy Local’ and ‘100% local club’ message. • Consumer competition. • Website updated to reflect new campaign message with new header banners and promotion of articles. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

WA volumes stabilise as national plummets

The data is based on till roll receipts of 1,000 households and provides a robust measure of actual market activity and volume of potatoes sold. The lastest results show since tracking actual volume of fresh potatoes sold at retail level remains stable in WA while national continues on a steep decline. Whilst there are a number of factors that could influence these figures it does clearly show a spike in December 2013 during which the category marketing campaign launched. From this point the trend line remains at a solid level with national, a contrast to National which does not investment in category marketing. Total tones sold is a function of weekly households purchasing potatoes, represented as a % of total households (penetration); and quantity (kilos) purchased per shopping trip. The December 15 quarter shows WA

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60 55 50 45 40

Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec 2012

2013

2014

2015

Source: Fresh Logic

2.00 1.80 1.60 1.40 1.20 1.00

Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec 2012

2013

2014

2015

FIGURE 2 Quantity purchased per trip (kilos) Source: Fresh Logic

WA

12,000

Nat

Linear (WA)

Linear (Nat)

120,000

11,000

110,000

10,000

100,000

9,000

90,000

8,000

80,000

7,000

70,000

6,000

Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec Mar Jun Sep Dec 2012

2013

2014

National

Independent market analyst Fresh Logic has been tracking consumer measures since 2012 to identify any changes in consumer behavior and consumption of fresh potatoes.

65

FIGURE 1 Weekly household penetration

Kilos

On October 1st 2013, the Potato Marketing Corporation (PMC) launched a campaign which stopped the declining fresh potato category in WA. The campaign was developed in response to a 20% drop in per capita consumption of fresh potatoes over the last decade and research that showed that those under the age of 40 were eating 30% less fresh potatoes than those over the age of 40.

WA

The last decade has seen a decline in consumption of fresh potatoes across Australia. This decline mirrors a trend which has been seen across the globe.

Number of households (%)

LAURA BERNHARDT FRESH POTATOES

60,000

2015

FIGURE 2 Total tonnes sold (retail) Source: Fresh Logic

household penetration up by 2% compared to national (49% v 47%) and quantity purchased per trip somewhat level with WA at 1.51kg and National 1.53kg. The final phase of the campaign will launch May 2016 with a Buy Local focus. The work and performance to date strongly positions the campaign to take advantage of the work to date as it evolves to meet the new needs of the industry.

MORE INFORMATION The next quarter of data will be available mid May 2016.


YOUR PRODUCTION

YOUR

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Non-bee insects just as important as bees for world’s crops BY SAM PROVOST ABC SCIENCE

Photos: bugwood.org

A wasp feeds on honeydew.

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Although bees are often lauded for their pollination prowess, other insects are just as important for the success of the world’s crops, according to a new study. The finding, reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggested that non-bee pollinators such as flies, wasps, beetles and butterflies could provide potential insurance against declines in bee numbers. An international team led by Dr Romina Rader of the University of New England set out to determine, for the first time, how nonbee insects contribute to pollination of crops. It is likely particular landscapes and habitats have more abundant non-bees that we haven’t really paid attention to. “The reason I started on this project was because I had looked at visitors within a few crops and noticed how abundant non-bees were in particular locations and particular times of day and under particular conditions and I wondered overall how much they contribute,” Dr Rader said. The team analysed data collected for 17 pollinator-dependent crops across five continents, ranging from vast monocultures to small diverse systems. A number of factors were measured including visitation rates, effectiveness, contribution to yield and relationship to habitat. The researchers found that non-bees performed 25–50% of the visits. While non-bees were less effective at depositing pollen, their visitation rates were much higher than bees, resulting in similar quality of pollination services.

Insects provide pollination insurance The study also elucidated the importance of non-bees to crops that are not attractive to bees such as custard apples, soursop and mangoes. Co-author Dr Saul Cunningham, of the CSIRO, said the study was important because it filled a gap in research that had been created through bias towards studying bees. "This study shows that while bees are usually the most efficient crop pollinators on a per visit basis, lots of other insects are involved, especially flies, wasps and beetles," he said.

“These other insects are sometimes so numerous that can have a greater total effect than the bees. This is especially true for certain crops that don't attract bees so well. “A good example that we all love at this time of year are mangoes, which benefit greatly from non-bee pollination.” The researchers also found non-insects responded differently than bees to the landscape structure.

IT is likely particular landscapes and habitats have more abundant non-bees that we haven’t really paid attention to. Insects like this hoverfly are important crop pollinators.

Dr Rader said that with current global declines in bee populations, other, hardier insects that do not rely heavily on vulnerable habitat structures could provide a kind of ‘pollination insurance’ in the face of environmental change. “The honeybee is assumed to be the dominant pollinator in many crops. While this is probably true in a lot of areas, it is likely particular landscapes and habitats have more abundant non-bees that we haven’t really paid attention to,” she said. “If we don’t know who they are, we will not know how to protect and conserve them and whether they are impacted by our management practices or not.” MORE INFORMATION You can read the original article here www.abc. net.au/news/2015-12-01/non-bee-insectsjust-as-important-as-bees-for-worldscrops/6988344

While bees rely on hives and other structures that can be affected by environmental change, pollinating insects almost always lived closer to the plants either in the grass or shrubs. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Soil testing tips:

Find out what your soil and plants need!

BY PETER CLIFTON PROJECT MANAGER, SOUTH WEST CATCHMENTS COUNCIL

Deb Archdeacon is an agronomist who has worked across a range of agricultural industries throughout the South West since 2004. Deb is passionate about helping farmers improve the long term condition and productivity of their soil. South West Catchments Council spoke with Deb to get some tips about soil testing.

Why should farmers soil test? Testing the properties of your soil gives you information on the availability of plant nutrients, and whether the chemistry and organic matter levels are suitable for soil biology and good soil structure.

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

SEEING if soil is glued to roots is one way to check for biological activity.

By comparing your test results to recommendations or benchmarks, you can manage inputs and amendments to achieve good growth without overusing fertilisers and without potentially reducing profits.

It also helps you set realistic targets if you are trying to build soil carbon, because the ability to store carbon is influenced by clay content. Standard tests come back with an estimate of soil texture, but asking for a particle size analysis will give you more reliable results. It’s not an expensive test and you only need to do it once.

Tests are not infallible but they will provide you with a good guide to achieving healthy soils and plants.

Can you test for soil biology?

How can farmers get the most out of soil testing? Finding out the chemical and physical requirements that maximise your crop productivity before you soil test is the best way to plan which parameters to measure. I think it’s also really important to know your soil texture. This will indicate how well your soil will hold onto any inputs that are later applied.

My aim is to promote a diverse soil biology with a diverse system, but I infer progress rather than test for biological deficiencies. For example, if the soil supports pathogens and disease it’s safe to say that the biology isn’t diverse. Alternatively, the biology is probably starting to crank up if less fertiliser is required, if the soil sticks to plant roots, or if weeds such as cape weed become less dominant. Improving parameters such as soil organic carbon and pH will often help the biology sort itself out.


YOUR PRODUCTION

What other tests are useful?

MONITORING CHANGE IN SOIL CARBON If you want to accurately monitor change in soil carbon, you need to set up a few monitoring points: 5x5m areas that you return to over the years. But make sure you pick a representative area and sample to depth. Note that this won’t give you a good estimate of average soil carbon but is useful for determining long-term trends. Refer to the source below for more detail. Source: www.grdc.com.au/GRDC-GuideManagingSoilOrganicMatter

AN example of soil glued to plant roots.

How do you choose a laboratory? One important consideration is finding out if the testing methods offered by the lab match the data available for your crop. For example, if the local crop data measured “Colwell” phosphorus (most WA data is Colwell P), ask for a Colwell P test with the PBI (phosphorus buffering index—a measure of how hard the soil hangs on to the phosphorus) to make easy comparisons. It’s almost impossible to compare different phosphorus tests.

Most laboratories don’t give advice on inputs for crops, and those that do can have very different points of view. It’s important to stay with a lab once you’re happy with it and not switch around because of the different testing methodologies. You need to compare apples with apples.

How do you collect representative soil samples? Soil properties can be quite different in valley flats compared to hillslopes. Properties can even change between the upper and lower parts of the hillslope. Its important to separate samples between these different soils, and having a dig around can help you identify differences so you can roughly map them out.

Photo: © Western Australian Agricultural Authority

INSET: Changes in soil colour with depth.

Other important tests to conduct are water quality (for irrigators) and plant tissue tests. Knowing the quality of irrigation water goes hand-in-hand with soil testing. Plant tissue/ sap tests are also a valuable crop monitoring strategy to identify issues with the crop itself (Note: Some agencies also recommend using tissue tests to accurately diagnose micronutrient status).

You should use an Australian Soil and Plant Analysis Council (ASPAC) accredited laboratory.

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YOUR PRODUCTION

LEFT: Demonstrating soil sampling with a pogo stick.

A dig stick can be a useful tool because part of the shaft is missing, allowing you to see the changes in the soil with depth.

Digging can also uncover physical and chemical constraints such as soil compaction, sodicity or acidity. Once you have a good feel for the changes in soil across your property, decide on the depth to which you want to sample. This will depend on the crop you are growing and whether you have found evidence of constraints at depth.

As you continue to soil sample over the years, use the same sampling points to increase your ability to detect change. You should also sample at the same time of year, generally before the growing season so any fertiliser applications don’t skew the results, and avoid sampling wet soils. MORE INFORMATION For further information contact the South West Catchments Council on Phone (08) 9724 2469 or email peter.clifton@swccnrm.org.au. This project is supported by the South West Catchments Council, through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

Then take one composite sample (made up of 15–25 subsample cores) for each depth within each of the mapped areas. It’s important that you sample in spots that are representative of the mapped area and not in animal camps, small depressions or other anomalies.

$1.45m negotiable

FOR SALE

GINGIN WEST Call Ray Conrad: 0410 560 546 or (08) 9227 5522 • Acreage 375 acres old farm land completely noxious weed free, no livestock for past 25 years • 100 acres fertilised for hay (grown and bailed) • 25 acres under reticulation from licenced bore, currently 79,510kl but has the capacity to be increased • Large machinery shed • Large workshop housing liquid fertiliser system feeding into retic • Large rainwater tank services comfortable 2 bedroom house • Solar panels feed into mains • Cattle loading ramp to holding paddocks • 15 minutes to Ledge Point

Ideal for vegetable growing!

18

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


GROWERS...

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Chlorothalonil 720

Chlorothalonil 720g/l

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Procymidone 500

Procymidone 500g/l

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Propiconazole 500

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Triadimenol 250

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Alpha Cyper 250

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4Farmers … ...For Farmers


YOUR PRODUCTION

How can I control pests? New resources for controlling high priority pests in vegetables BY KRISTEN STIRLING AND CARL LARSEN SENIOR CONSULTANTS, RMCG

The Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) extension team has put together easy-to-read fact sheets on control options, both chemical and non-chemical, for high priority pests in seven different vegetable crops. These fact sheets provide details on the currently registered and permitted pesticides in Australia for key diseases, insects and weeds for: 1. Brassica leafy 2. Brassica vegetables 3. Carrots 4. Celery 5. Cucumber

How can I control pe

6. Lettuce

Options for controlli

ng high priority pest

7. Peppers. 2016

ry 2016 2016 2016 Februa ry 2016 March March March Februa ts? ts? ts? ts? ? bles ts? tables troly ppeestssin peppers I controly ppeestssin lettuce I controly ppeestssin cucumbers I controly ppeestssin carrots I controly ppeestssin brassica vegectaontrol pestssintsbrassica leafy vege n o c I n ng high priorit n ng high priorit ow can ng high priorit n ng high priorit n ng high priorit I high priority pe a a a a n c c c c a c w w w w o o o o H ns for controlli H ns for controlli H ns for controlli H ns for controlli H ns for controlli Howfor controlling Optio

Optio

Optio

Optio

Optio

sts?

s in celery

February 2016

ry 2016

Februa

Options

Horticulture Innova tion Australia Ltd (HIA) and the vegeta Strategic Agrichemica ble industry review l Review Process ed pesticide requir (SARP) in 2014. This of major concern ements in celery via to the celery indust SAR process identifi a ry. Against these ed diseases, insect non-pesticide solutio threats, available pests and weeds ns, were evaluated registered or permi for overall suitability residues, withholding tted pesticides, along via a in terms of Integrated s period with rot , efficac fy car Pest Management ca lea y, trade, human safety eds nts in (IPM), resistance, and environmental in brassi insect uireme pests and we h ca The ssi req nts follow bra issues ing tables ide wit ect . uireme dis ect nts in eases, priorit pestic es, ins , s, along red or y pests, and ide req ntifilist es, ins ed the high uireme iewed diseas pestic sticide istance control methods, ide req ntified diseas red or le registe Pest s ide ustry rev bers ntified iewed M), res itted pe pestic impacting celery produ ed availab proces cucumetable ind process ide st ustry rev iewed Peind or perm nagement (IP cess ide le registe ratedble is SAR threats, ms of Integrat nts inthe veg andis SAR ction in Australia. istered ustry rev This SAR pro eats, availab of Integ Ma these 14. Th ues. uireme pests eta . ter ) in 20 ble ind 14. Ths, insect ide req (HIA) and thr ilable reg ed Pest Against ms the veg 14. ility in ental iss

via a lettuce eds nts in peppers uireme pests and we h nts in ide req ntified ect uireme ng wit ed pesticdiseases, ins ide req red or cess ide , ides, alo ry review pestic M), resistance ed ed pestic . This SAR pro ilable registe Peind edble st ust cess identifi or permitted ava (IP 14 ry review rat eta Integ pro ement indust (SARP) in 20 threats, ms ofthe veg red R . se nag ble iste SA eta s st the This le reg in ter al iss.ues Pest Ma A) and ent20 the veg view Proces 20sticide s, ava ues RP eta ry. Again suialia tability nm) in 14 eats, availab Integrated ry. 20 stic alia Ltdeases, RP) inpe Ltd (HI me in ter iro ust ironm A) and suitab So A) and Re RP Integrat . st these tability l ind the veg ed peAu eat env . s (SARP) in (HI d se indust ental isss (SA rall str str ed dis s (SA . . of thr ica thr(IP M), oven Au Ltd and s (SA se . overall pper ms of stralia and env ironm suialia Ltd (HI w Proces vegetable ces permitte for tio the ry. Again overall str tion ntifiw ry review ction in Australia richem env (HInA)inand al issues stralia ility in terms nmental issues stralia Proces AgaininstAu Pro st the safwety ted the pe ova safety ted for n in Au pping n vie fy ement ility in ter l Revie ca lea Ltdctio andica indust lua produ indust re Inn Innova, huma red or w Proces cess lide ctio vie iste nment Againnag for tion Aun safety em tab re eva tion Au a Strategic Ag concern to ns. du ble Re Rereg iro ry. n in were evalua ers human l sui stralia re cro ultu ultu R proem ova etable ust pp overall situatio and env l Revie ca vegetable evaluated ova ica produ ustry. st Maoverall suitab and enviro Aurot rich Inn ted the vegeta Hortic brassi ductio emica jor trade, uce pro ns, we tioncar Hortic cacAg y, trade fy veg ilablecar emica This SA n of pe for rot ind uce ind , huma gic Ag re ulture Inn for ulture rated Pe to the llies) via eds of ma Agrich ble pro e solutions, d, efficacy, lett ing lett field or protec ca lea and s, ava effigic rich to thepro rn eta Agrich to the brassi utions, we cropping 2014.ategicthr n safety n safety e solutio ductio luated acting the of Integeva re Innova d,ate Hortic y, traadeStrate luated Hortic nce to ms veg and chi icid impact rio ultu DISEAS coca ategic er alia Ltd (HIA) s (SARP) in Strthe rn ing were eva rn ter tected Str , huma se coeat rn E brassi sol and we non-pesticid olding perio efficac jorssi ds, imp re al issues.trade, huma alia. Hortictho ncein cums bles via s of mabra ing pe n-pest acting weent thods, only to eith conce st TYPE OF CONTROL riod, eta impactutions,fiel pests d or procacy, trade h me bles via a Str major conce n-pesticide ns, jor ds, jortability (capsi cacy, edacting ng with no es, withhold ds, imp withh utio matho ing pe veg ntrol me or ovation Austr view Proces ustry. Again of masui er in Austrcontrolveg ironm ng wit insect effi effi we of sol sol tho n eta es, no co n, of old e e imp d, d, OPTIONS eith alo env h me s es, alo me hh idu and ctio rall ctio s, rio rio idu to and ed icid pe ide , res est esticid ntrol ng wit , res ical Re Early blight/ re Inn sts, and diseas ber ind ted for ovenon-p produ es, wit peststhods,pesticides, controlnon-p produ ety and pests, or onlyhholding pe and we istance d pestic istance hholding cucumbehr priority pe d Currently registered , and co ides, alo nce, residu ntrol me llies, es, lettuce Horticultu gic Agrichem to the cucum lua man saf sts, and s or chi pests res wit wit priority itte sts co fy , stic hu h pe eva pe rm , es, M) lea pe ty permitte ent (IPM), res and re hig hig ing ty ista pe de residu d ate (IP rn ori we • Chlorothalonil (variou act um Cercospora the sts, residu head or ed. list the em h priori cacy, tra permitte ent (IPM), res via a Str major conce e solutions, high pri 11+3 – Management capsic ds, imp les list fungicides ority pe either s) – Group M5 – effecti tables the hig Manag cifi either of list the em riod, effi methoowing tab high priTOP) – Group owing only to les list leaf spot it is spe ve as preventative tables Manag only to weeds h non-pesticid hholding pe controlTh e foll list the ® The foll tions apply ing tab case, apply owing only tables (AMISTAR • Copper (variou sts, and follow is the op ns es, wit ng wit cified. e pe ing ol The foll ntrol options ty Th alo idu atio this spe ow – ntr s) – Group M1 – effecti d (Cercospora co ere . up 3 h priori tected situ co e, it is S nce, res The foll enoconazole eases – reduce ns. Wh ve as preventative ) – Gro ly Some the hig OPTION pro Australia resista the cas alia. up M1 situatio in + p 2025 uce on strdif les list fy lettuce, this is iority Dis apii) strobAu • Hydrogen perox ) – Gro ires Se rin ing tab oxy Where TROL head lett High Pr Azpic ide + peroxy acetic • oro M4 – lea complex 91, exp s ive OF CON +12 – e follow – m S up E chl 30 9 se Th + W ION niu M3 R1 ive TYP ea Gro up s + acid (PERATEC PLUS NS – S PE redne OPT se effect ammo ity Dis ) – Gro prope ups 4 rious) nce in – effect rious, OPTION registe (vaive ) – Group M ses nect Prior re copper ntly chloro – eff ity Disea EASE ) – Gro ITCH® • s IONS ole (va resista ea h up M1 S Metira rre TROL pta -di ssu (as ior DIS M1 se MZ OPT ION (SW naz m ble Dis Cu Ca L Hig Gro er Pr CON 1,3 (POLY pre il ea up – LD ssi h OPT uco RAM®) – Group M3 as on s s B – po GO us) S High iority CONTRO ) – Gro • TYPE OF seup L • Copp y under hig • Teb d fludiox 23red ery such fungicide iority Dis – effective as preven OPTION er (vario L iste Dis) –eaGro p 20 DOMIL® High Pr TYPE OF igants CONTRO dinil + d Powd Sereg red itycts • None – reduce High Pr efficac l fum CONTRO E tative effective ntly ires • Copp zeb (RI soire TYPE OF L Prior s registe pressu permitte • Cypro • Zineb (ZINEB®) up M1 h us red , exp Curre DISEAS E produ TYPE OF Higrio ategie CONTRO + manco red r hig rrently • hOnly mildew registe – DISEAS – Group M3 – effecti R1/4038 23) – Gro Currently s ides xyl-M PEuld IPM str DISEASE registe y unde TYPE OF w Cu up 11 17 – ysiphe us,mo ione (va E fungic Curren Sep 20tly permi Currently s ides ve rioey ide istered • Usenagement d effi • Metala (Er ) – GroNone y milde DISEAS regcac Currently s – Group tted er (vaGr fungic • Iprod D fungic expires uce E ntly • 40Difenconazole red Down up • gicide Jun 2019 e ma ne rre 2016) ei) –Cu tis rot options rial ective ide 4038, QL y ds DISEAS l • Copp fun Gro rov l spot ora acl try eff gic M3 – R1 cte e Ma d ica ires ) (SCOR ria hea a) and fungic imp her Bo osp PE fun Ba up ht E®, PER14812, expire ides Mar 2018 t– hem d , exp permitte us, ides ires • No hygien Bacte re – Gro (Peron tis cinpere and tig – Non-c d with wil red 47, exp fun R14816 resista permitte s Sep 2020) – Group 33 sarium rser (vario high pressu 24gic ft rotus, PEas omonas • None– nce issues (Botry and cro Fuus) yeapp expires domed Currently s n)iram (vario ociate registe r on (Xanth two • Co – Group ockso(varioom 3– crops ®, PER1 farinosa) Currently s e farm d . with 4837, up 9 ntly ORium be ass ide y unde mple •BioTh t (Fu as for 2017) M(TE LDsar stris pv. Rotate es, e.g nt rootst , PER1 ared ide permitte2017) – Gro upwil strobin(Pseud • Manag fungic phages d itte ns can rots Curre efficac (for exa Gromid campe ia) cterm s ires Jun – exa VUS® resista ns • fungic rum) ns nt varieti ncerns inia infepe ®)nh nia bacterio Sep • Azoxy nce co Currentlyires • Trifloxystrobin pathogeleroti micals id (RE onntly l optio gnosi fungicide fted ondto 84, exp tor l optio oxyspo PLUSFe spp., Erw a) ps rre igate se tolera Sc exp (FLINT®, PER14494, tor che ides d vesica hemica • Manyairflow ipropam le croCu rrect dia hemica PER141 65,gic resista s RATEC • nts gra vor activa • Invest • Choo ns Non-c permitte (PE ceptib Non-c – reduce rious, expires Jun 2019) odough co(Sclerotinia es or pla gicide effective • Mand rmitted carato PER125funive fence effective acidpe funns l optio allow gothr ieti, up M3 acid (va crops Currently s – Group 11 – wing sus rious, var ect rrently rum plant de yacetic to hemica nttio Rotate horous ns oid gro anil (va ista 20) – Gro ide ero conditio • Av only, eff Non-c for example Non-c t 20 eth + perox Cu s osp res scl gic y s • Utilise • hemic ns we rim Ph se ide ide fun Ma ns al options • Rotate • rox • Py ires tinia ting in up 7 fungic situatio strategie in rotatio l optio • Choo on only iques, gen pe crops Sclero harves ) – Gro 45, exp tected e IPM useful Sclerotinia pressi hemica 08 n techn Us oid IS® pro sup ps R1 tio n-c • Av • Hydro EL – – rot PE ge Noe • tiva , 11 e crominor) d (FONT red 4 + M3 (ZINEB® h pressure Currently registered nt dama p hygien timal cul • Rotat – Group • Iprodione (variou iopyra e registe Group• Zineb(Sclero hig AR®) Use op and cro imise pla rtinia ffectiv MZ) – fungicides s) – Group B – efficay • Penth ion (AMIST Currently s • Min ns • e farm nts y unde ective GOLD us) – ine uling l optio varies efficac strobin penetrat ide sclerotiorum) cted pla A 7 – eff • Manag 2 sched d ur (vario DOMIL® ery hemica spray fungic APVM oy infe supply • Azoxy 8 – – Group up 9 +1 QLDirrigation Powd zeb (RI • Sulph – not useNon-c water iew by e crops flow and • Destr up lid (various) ) – Gro tly permitted timise infect e airCurren + manco ective istered 19) – Grosca NSW and der rev (various) • Rotat ITCH® ease mildew + M3 –lid xyl-M 3 – effntly reg • s 4Bosca ary, dis improv nce in • Op ns 1B – un tree oil p 20 • Bo a (FILAN®, PER11127, the dis onil (SW nts to Group Curre resista l optio fungicides –rot if necess Group Group • Tea • Metala eades s ires Se us) fludiox sprtod (Leveillul ace pla ssible ide + up exp expires Jun 2018) rio MZ) – R®) – hemica t and, ive , S il Sp po ich red nia gic (va ly ma 40 – CU n-c ect Tes LD l ION din • wh oti es on fun B iste 48 , eff Ne • ) No GO OPT pro – Gro – Group 7 – effecti atsity antreg (NEMA dimenoScler PER1 gnior -pl • gCy ntly taurica MIL® nt varieti – Group pre rre ve guhs Pr 2017) iphos • Tria ODa®, a tini VMA L 11 – fun (RIDO hemic 7 Non-c resista us) –Cu rious) Au nam MR ol AP Hig lero e TRO up rio up (va Fe zeb s (NI ntr ne by Us (Sc ires e al r CON (va Gro • option • ion s ) – • Rotate crops • Co ) – Gro • No , exp gicide imate or, Sclerotini pene bliste review + manco TYPE OF er proite r 2014 red d • Iprod ELIS® a) fun R13695 under • Bupir xyl-M min iteblist did chloroWh ective registe ires Ma DE permitte – d (FONT canHA s M®) – rum) (various, PE d 11yra 3 – eff • Metala /bit.ly/wh • 1,3-di 23, exp bugo ET effective sclerotioon NEMATO ategie upiop Currently s (Al Currently s nth permitte – Gro – Group to http:/ red ium (M IPM str PER131 ide arb ate ly effective 2023•) Pe ide knot m sod Currently s registe rious, n refer • Use (various) nematic sium bic situations on fungic Rootrmatio ires Jun tions obin (va ide nazole • Metha Currently s • Potas oxystr todes fungic ical op 50, exp ther info tected Tebuco r Az y 40 fur ma ide pro • r hem • ste R1 – ne cac gic Fo bli PE M2 • tode Non-c g effi lister gyne d a) fun White • None INT®, varyin /whiteb tnema s (Meloido candid permitte iene d obin (FL only • None ategie /1601 2 1 p://bit.ly od hyg /root-kno (Albugo/022/1601 /1602 oxystr Currently s permitte .) /025/1602 d /026/160 e go /021 /020/160 IPM str ations spp er to htt • Trifl ctic nt ICP1 nt ICP1 nt ICP1 ps nt ICP1/024 nt ICP1 p://bit.ly ide permitte • Use Document ICP1 Currently s ted situ Docume Docume and pra Docume Docume e cro Docume ation ref er to htt fungic ns protec ide Currently s inform • Rotat e crops l optio ation ref ed nematic ns further ide inform hemica • Rotat identifi l optio • For fungic Non-c further tions hemica • None • For ical op Non-c ns n-chem l optio No ica hem Non-c

High Priority Disea

ses

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

20

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

ed by been fund ct has Australia This proje Innovation and ure table levy Horticult the vege ernment. using n Gov Limited Australia from the funds

This project has been funded by Horticulture Innovatio n Australia Limited using the vegetable levy and funds from the Australian Government.

Document ICP1/023

/1602


YOUR PRODUCTION

Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited (HIA) and the vegetable industry reviewed pesticide requirements via a Strategic Agrichemical Review Process (SARP) in 2014.

This SAR process identified diseases, insect pests and weeds of major concern to the main crops in the vegetable industry.

THE fact sheets provide details on the currently registered and permitted pesticides in Australia for key diseases, insects and weeds.

• For more information on the minor use permit system, contact the Minor Use Coordinator at AUSVEG on (03) 9882 0277.

Against these threats, available registered or permitted pesticides, along with non-pesticide solutions, were evaluated for overall suitability in terms of Integrated Pest Management (IPM), resistance, residues, withholding period, efficacy, trade, human safety and environmental issues.

• To stay up to date or for more information on the ICP project:

IPM compatibility of pesticides

• Online: www.integratedcropprotection. com.au, or register your interest at www.surveymonkey.com/s/ soilwealth_ICP_EoI

Growers using an IPM approach need to consider the IPM compatibility of any pesticide they apply. This means considering not only the efficacy of the product, but also its impact on the key beneficial insects and mites in each specific cropping system. Growers are encouraged to contact an IPM consultant for specific advice about the IPM compatibility of any pesticide listed in the fact sheets. The fact sheet series can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2120Q1e

Updates and further information These resources aim to improve management and decision-making by growers and advisors on-farm. The control methods are listed in simple look-up tables for each of the key diseases, insects and weeds.

• For information regarding ‘gaps’ on pest control options and the identification of suitable new or alternative pesticides to address these ‘gaps’ view the full commodity specific reports at: http://bit.ly/SARPS

• Pesticide registration and permit information changes regularly. To access the most up-to-date information, check the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority website at: http://apvma.gov.au, or InfoPest at: www.infopest.com.au

• Phone or email: Anne-Maree Boland, RMCG on 0427 679 042 or annemareeb@rmcg.com.au or Gordon Rogers, AHR on 0418 517 777 or gordon@ahr.com.au

• Social media: follow us on Twitter @ ProtectingCrops or our Community of Practice on Facebook at www.facebook. com/protectingcrops (remember that you do not need to join Facebook to view this site — just search the names and they will come up) • In person: at one of our many workshops, field days and events around the country, check the website above for details. MORE INFORMATION This project has been funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited using the vegetable levy and funds from the Australian Government.

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

21


YOUR PRODUCTION

Vegetable disease outbreak north of Perth Fusarium disease (Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. licopersici) that effects tomatoes was detected in tomato farms in Carabooda early in the 2015 season.

BY VO THE TRUYEN FIELD EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

The same problem along with the black dot disease (Colletotrichum coccodes) were again detected as the cause of severe losses in a number of tomato farms around Carabooda, Nowergup, and Gnangara in late 2015 through early 2016. This soil borne disease was also detected along with other dangerous transmissible diseases including tomato bacteria canker, tomato spot wilt virus (TSWV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV).

Identification of the existing problems A survey of soil and plant nutrition which is being funded by Perth Natural Resources Management (Perth NRM) has been undertaken in late 2015 and early 2016. This will help identify the diseases which are causing the most issues. This investigation of diseases is not designed to establish academic conclusions on the scale of the disease outbreak in the north of Perth, the nature of the disease development over years, or the link between the observed poor farm management practices to the disease occurrence in different farms.

The results of this investigation however are to confirm the facts that a list of plant diseases were detected using laboratory techniques. Also to confirm the losses caused by these diseases as reported by the involved growers where samples were taken and information was collected on their farms.

COMBINATION of dangerously transmissible diseases on a tomato plant in Carabooda including fusarium, bacteria canker and TSWV.

22

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

Results of the investigation has revealed that the soil borne diseases caused by Fusarium sp., Pythium sp. Collectrotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. continue to be the primary problem on tomato and cucumber plants. Fusarium disease which was detected as Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. licopersici. was the widest spread disease as it was detected in all 11 samples including tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini and parsley.


YOUR PRODUCTION

d

a

It was also detected that the Fusarium disease was associated with Pythium in a cucumber sample, while it was also found along with ZYMV in one of the zucchini samples. These soil borne diseases were also detected along with other dangerous transmissible diseases including tomato bacteria canker, TSWV and ZYMV. A dangerous combination of different diseases was found in a tomato sample in Carabooda including Fusarium, bacteria canker and TSWV. BELOW: A combination of different diseases including fusarium, bacteria canker and TSWV on tomatoes in a Carabooda orchard.

b

c ABOVE: Fusarium disease on: (a) cucumbers; (b) parsley; and (c) tomatoes. Pythium and fusarium on a tomato plant (d).

Poor pest and disease management practices On those tomato farms where severe losses occurred due to diseases, we observed the farm had poor hygiene practices in terms of farm site organising, quarantine and plant debris treatments. These along with the year-round presence of wild solanacean and other broad leaf plants within tomato rows, are considered key contributing factors. The farms as the possible hosts of the insect vectors and sources of inoculation should be considered as key contributing factors to the disease occurrence. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

23


YOUR PRODUCTION

Common poor practices observed in farms 1. Poor farm site organisation: This is definitely a contributing factor to the spread of soil borne and other diseases between sections in a farm and between farms in an area. The issues include: • No restriction of the movement of machinery, vehicles, equipment and people within sections in a farm and among farms • Absence of a standard delivery point for all deliveries and pickups • Absence of signs at the front gate requesting visitors/contractors to report their visits at a place. No footbath or boot covers provided when visitors and share-farmers proceed further into and around production areas.

• Gloves are provided to workers but it is often seen workers use a same pair of gloves throughout the day working at different plots and for different jobs. The workers do not change clothes when shifting from one farm to another • Disease infected plants remains in growing bed along with healthy plants • Tasks are carried out on different sections one after another regardless of the plant age. It is often seen that growers and their workers start from the point that they have left unfinished or where relocating machines and equipment is convenient

A disease infected plant remains on a growing bed.

• Crop residues, including those which had been known to harbour pests or diseases in the previous season.

PLANT residues of previous tomato crop remain on surface beside the new same tomato crop.

3. Absent of quarantine practice:

A vast growing tomato farm where there is no isolation barrier between sections.

• No quarantine check on the imported planting material into farm • In many cases growers see quarantine as not their work or the work of seedling factory or suppliers. A lot of purchase orders don’t describe how quarantine is organised.

2. Lack of proper hygiene maintenance: Without proper farm hygiene practices, pathogen and insect vectors can be introduced in, develop, and spread between sections in a farm and among farms. • Lack of proper hygiene maintenance to machinery, vehicles and clothing/ footwear. Absence of footbaths or boot covers for workers and visitors

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

A piece of used cloth is saved for the next use!

4. Unable to identify common pests on farm: Lack of knowledge on pest lifecycles as well as ways they attack crops and how diseases are transmitted from one to another.


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Recommendations to contain the situation These recommendations to contain the currently bad situation in the area are made based on the investigator’s own knowledge and experiences: • Chemical treatments provide very limited effect to control the diseases mentioned on page 22. ESTRICT movement of machinery, vehicles, R equipment and people both onto your property and within your fields.

Growers’ attempts of pests and disease control The most common attempt by participating growers to fight the previously mentioned diseases are chemical applications. This attempt is made when changes were found in the form, shape and colour of the plant and plant parts. Routine spays to prevent diseases were also undertaken using copper base chemicals.

In all cases participating growers always spray to control the diseases before calling professional consultants to ask for effective chemicals or other nonchemical avenues! Chemical application was undertaken in the form of either spraying or integrating in drip irrigation or both. None of the growers were happy with the outcomes of the chemical application. The severity of the disease could not be altered; the disease spread out could not be stopped. The average yield was reduced by approximately 50%. Product quality was significantly influenced, 100% loss has also been noted on one farm in Carabooda. MORE INFORMATION If you need further information please contact Truyen Vo on 0457 457 559 or Truyen.vo@ vegetableswa.com.au. This project has been funded by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA, APC-VPC and vegetablesWA.

• A change of the mind set should be undertaken towards acceptance to change the conventional practices which are of contributing factors to the occurrence and re-occurrence of the diseases. • Review the existing production and farm management practices to change any of the poor practices. • Preparing a plan for change to provide enough knowledge and resources for to make the changes within management and staff. • Consulting with professional consultants for knowledge and technological assistance. Easy points of contacts are local crop consultants or resellers, development officers and field extension officers of DAFWA and vegetablesWA. • Pairing changes with the list of ‘10 always right actions’ including: 1. Restrict movement of machinery, vehicles, equipment and people both onto your property and within your fields. 2. Organise a standard delivery point for all deliveries, preferably as close to your farm gate or main access road as possible. 3. Place a sign at your front gate requesting visitors to visit your office first. If they need to proceed further, supply them with a footbath or boot covers etc. 4. Keep machinery, vehicles and clothing/footwear clean. Provide footbaths or boot covers for

workers and visitors. There are many disinfectants available. Discuss the best choice for your situation with your local consultant or reseller. 5. Check any plant material used. Buy certified seed and ensure seedlings are pest, disease and virus free. Be aware of potential pest problems when purchasing mulch or soil amendments. Use soil-less potting mix when producing seedlings. 6. If crop consultants or resellers visit your property, ensure they take precautions (use footbaths or clean boots etc.) as they are likely to have visited several other properties recently. Ensure seasonal or casual staff who may have worked on other properties also take these precautions. 7. Begin all tasks at the youngest and work through to the oldest plantings as younger plantings are less likely to have pests present. 8. If harvesting contractors or preused harvest bins are used, ensure that all machinery and equipment used is thoroughly cleaned before it enters your fields. 9. Remove crop residues known to harbour pests or diseases as soon as practical. Place cover crops to reduce erosion hazards in fallowing fields. Choose cover crops that are not hosts for the pests that are likely to be present. 10. Learn as much as possible about the pests on your farm and surrounding properties, and any new pests in your region. Correct pest identification and a thorough knowledge of their lifecycle are very useful skills when planning a hygiene program for your farm.

Department of Agriculture and Food

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BY DR GORDON ROGERS APPLIED HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH

Spotlight on managing

soil-borne disease Soil-borne diseases are a major threat to vegetable produce in intensive cropping systems, costing Australia’s $4 billion vegetable industry around $120 million per annum, while management has become more difficult with fewer chemical control options, more intensive rotations and consumer demand for “perfect” produce.

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It is not surprising then, that growers and their advisers have identified soil-borne diseases as the main challenge for soil management and crop protection. A new three-year project, which will be guided by a panel of growers and industry specialists, aims to provide Australian vegetable growers with the tools, information and skills they need to manage the risk of crop losses due to soil-borne disease in the major vegetable growing regions in Australia.

Project leader Dr Gordon Rogers of Applied Horticultural Research, (AHR) said, “There are five soil-borne disease groups that continue to be a major problem for Australian vegetable growers: • Sclerotinia spp. (S. sclerotiorum and S. minor), • Fusarium spp. (F. oxysporum and F. solani), A disease-free product is easier to market, and one which brings a premium price to the grower. The difference is significant between healthy leeks grown in healthy soil following a biofumigant cover crop (left) and (right) a lessthan-optimum result — control crop of leeks where no cover crop was grown.


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• Water moulds (primarily Pythium spp.), • Nematodes and

• Best-practice demonstration sites with leading growers in ten Australian regions

• Rhizoctonia spp.

• Website and Facebook sites

“Through this project we are delivering a truly effective soil-borne disease management service to Australian growers, utilising the successful extension and delivery framework already developed under the Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection projects,” he said. The Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection projects led jointly by AHR and Dr Doris Blaesing from RMCG have created a new national framework for the delivery of soil and crop protection information to Australian vegetable growers. They have resulted in new resources and approaches to communicate information and skills to the vegetable industry, which were detailed in the Summer 15 WA Grower including:

• A soil-borne disease masterclass run in September, 2015 • Field days, regional workshops and interest groups • Videos, factsheets and social media deliver information and training to vegetable growers and agronomists • A network of 1500 growers, agronomists, resellers and chemical companies interested in soil-borne disease management.

The research component of the project will be led by Dr Len Tesoriero, Senior Plant Pathologist with NSW Department of Primary Industries; Kym White, an economist with RMCG, will concentrate on new tools for the economic risk assessment as needs are identified. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact AHR, Dr Gordon Rogers on 0418 517 777, (02) 8627 1040, or email gordon@ahr.com.au This project has been funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited using the vegetable industry levy and funds from the Australian Government.

The 25 growers and advisers who attended the recent soil-borne disease masterclass learnt about the core principles and heard cutting-edge advice on managing soil-borne disease in a variety of vegetable production systems.

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Improving productivity

and eliminating stable fly BY DR DAVID COOK AND DON TELFER DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

GROWERS gather around to see both the Celli Ares and Collari Stone buriers dealing with vegetable crop residues left after harvest.

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The headline, “Improve Productivity and Eliminate Stable Flies” proved to be a positive drawcard for vegetable growers to the recently held Stable fly Field Day at Bogdanich Farms, Gingin on Friday, 5 February.

Over twenty growers came to see two pieces of agricultural machinery in action that offer a radical change to how vegetable crop residues are dealt with after harvest. Don Telfer (Stable Fly Project Manager, DAFWA) and Dr David Cook (Entomologist, DAFWA) gave an overview of the research that continues into stable fly management from vegetable crop residues funded by HIA with support from many local government shires and vegetablesWA.

Dr Cook provided examples of the methods being used to determine stable fly development with changes in both the depth and timing of crop residue burial. The stone buriers or contravator rotary hoes on display were from Inlon Agrimec Group (Ourimbah NSW) (Gary Surman) and Lovegrove Turf Farms (Wattle Grove and Gingin) (Dick Lovegrove) with the Celli Ares and Collari Stone burier (respectively) used live on-site.

These machines are similar to conventional rotary hoes, however the blades work in the opposite direction and allow stones and large vegetable matter to be buried 30cm under clean soil. Both Gary Surman and Dick Lovegrove explained the key features of the machines and the different widths, tractor horsepower requirements, blade types, and other modifications to the machines that were possible. The machines were run through both a finished crop of cabbage, cauliflower and celery. The amount of vegetable matter left after harvest is greatest with cabbages and cauliflowers, and handling the large, reject cabbages in particular posed the highest challenge. Each machine was run through the residues, either after the residues were firstly broken up with a high speed mulcher, or as they were. Adult fly emergence traps will be placed over each area treated by the machines to measure how many adult stable flies actually emerge from the soil up to 3–4 weeks later. The expectation is that rapid burial of the residues will prevent stable flies from being able to access the residues as they decompose deep under the soil.

EACH of the stone burier machines being run through cauliflower crop residues left after harvest. TOP: Collari Stone burier BOTTOM: Celli Ares burier

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The whole premise behind this approach is one of improving the productivity of vegetable growing, whilst removing the residues before stable flies have a chance to lay eggs in the decomposing residues if left on the surface. The take home messages from the field day were: • Crop residues buried promptly after harvest will allow the land to be returned to crop within several days, saving on water wastage, and reducing capital costs • Producers will need less land under cultivation to produce the same crop outputs • Cultivation passes could be halved by use of the contravator or stone burier • Residues buried before decomposing stops stable flies from to lay eggs and should result in a dramatic reduction in stable fly development • Organic matter is retained on poor soils, and less insecticides are needed to control pests. MORE INFORMATION For more information on stable fly please visit the Department of Agriculture website at www.agric.wa.gov.au and search stable fly.

Department of Agriculture and Food

TOP: Growers assess the ground after a Celli and Collari machinery handles the vegetable crop residues left after harvest. ABOVE & RIGHT: Adult fly emergence cages placed over areas of crop residue placed underground using stone burier machinery; these will catch any stable flies that emerge from the soil.

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Department of Agriculture and Food

When harvesting is finished... you’re not finished!

Stop

For further information visit

vegetableswa.com.au Good Practice Guide agric.wa.gov.au search stable fly Supporting your success


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Download

Irrigate WA

New app helps vegetable growers

from the App store!

optimise water use BY LEON VAN WYK DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

In January 2016, a free app was announced which will simplify crop irrigation in Western Australia, saving growers time, effort and money. Developed by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA (DAFWA) as part of the Royalties for Regions-funded More Dollars per Drop Project, the Irrigate WA app draws on real-time data from the state’s 136 weather stations to help vegetable growers schedule their watering time, volume and duration. Agriculture and Food Minister Ken Baston announced growers could tailor the easyto-use app to individual irrigation block requirements to optimise water use and crop potential. Vegetable growers can use the app to determine their irrigation schedule and therefore irrigate their crops at the right time with the right amount of water on any given day.

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The app takes into account the production area, soil and crop type, irrigation system, plus daily rainfall and evaporation rates to determine the appropriate irrigation rates and schedule. It also provides a field diary for growers to track water meter readings and to record harvest details, which they can use to develop benchmarks for water use efficiency.

Regional Development Minister Terry Redman said the app would benefit irrigated agriculture growers and associated businesses throughout the State. Irrigate WA complements 150 State-wide More Dollars per Drop irrigation system health checks, undertaken by DAFWA. In a recent radio interview with WA Country Hour, project manager James Dee, noted that water use efficiency is not only about water conservation, but importantly considers the correct application of water to manage plant stress and maximise nutrient availability. Utilising the app to assist with correct irrigation scheduling can have a significant effect on the volume and quality of vegetable production.

THE Irrigate WA app complements 150 Statewide More Dollars per Drop irrigation system health checks, undertaken by DAFWA MORE INFORMATION A more advanced desktop version of the app and further information is available at www.agric.wa.gov.au/irrigated-crops/ irrigatewa. To access the app go to Google Play or download from the App Store at https:// itunes.apple.com/au/app/irrigate-wa/ id1052460284?mt=8 For more information contact James Dee, Project Officer, DAFWA Bunbury on (08) 9780 6285.

Department of Agriculture and Food


TOOL TIME

TOOL

TIME

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900–1400kg* florets per hour

Floreto

The new European heavy duty floretting machine Quick and clean de-coring of up to 70 heads of broccoli or cauliflower per minute.

• Adjustable capacity, up to 70 heads per minute*

The Floreto is an innovative product efficiently de-coring broccoli and cauliflower. It features a continuously running intake belt combined with a motional knife construction capable of higher capacity, more precision while ensuring increased lifespan of the knives.

• Optional: automatic knife diameter selection

Due to implementation of innovative solutions the machine is capable of seamlessly switching between floretting various vegetables by simply pushing of a button. The vegetable is manually fed into the machine with the core pointing upwards; after which it is de-cored applying vegetable specific procedures. The florets and waste material leave the machine separately ensuring the best possible end product.

Features • Suitable for a variety of broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce • Continual running intake belt and walking knife system • The florets and waste material leave the machine separately • Easy to operate • Size depth of cutting can be adjusted • Easy to switch between cauliflower, broccoli and lettuce

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~2000kg* florets per hour

• Made of stainless steel • Ability to reduce labour up to 70%

Automatic knife selection The latest innovation is the newly engineered automatic knife diameter selection for cauliflower. It applies sensor technology which determines the size of the heads. This optional kit allows to get more consistently sized florets when the size of cauliflower heads vary. Adding the automatic knife diameter selection makes the Floreto capable of correctly floretting varying crop sizes.

With this technology the Floreto automatically selects the optimum knife diameter to cut the outer florets, increasing the yield and quality of the florets. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Theo Sweere, Managing Director info@sweere.net or go to www.sweere.net * Depending on the size of the heads


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Improved product quality due to Modular vacuum cooling ColdMax-Weber has presented three innovations to the European public at the leading trade fair for asparagus and berry production. The innovations Modular vacuum cooling, Field vacuum cooling and Energy efficient large systems. The ‘Modular vacuum cooling’ system distinguishes itself because the vacuum chamber is separated from the technical components. This leads to higher flexibility and lower production costs, customers can up — or downgrade the cooling capacity whenever needed, save on precious refrigerant (and thus help the environment) by building extremely compact refrigeration systems.

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THE field vacuum cooling bring substantially higher yield, product quality and increased shipping and shelf life time.

For the end customer it will mean lower investment costs, higher flexibility and better re-sale value. The exact equipment that is necessary for the customer can be installed and expensive overcapacity can be avoided. The “Field vacuum cooling“ exists of two cooling chambers that can be placed on a trailer. It is set up as two small vacuum rooms with one central machine room. One side you fill with just harvested boxes, and when full, you start the cooling cycle. Then you fill up the other room. This way you can cool extremely quick, and only need small systems (with integrated GenSet) to get the temperature of your produce down. After cooling, you place the boxes on the trailer, and cover them with special insulated thermo covers with “cold capacity”, keeping your produce cool until they reach the packing house. For the customer this will bring substantially higher yield, product quality and shipping- and shelf-life time! According to Coldmax this way the quality of the products remain on a higher level. The “Energy efficient large systems“ is a concept that combines two cooling chambers with a vacuum cooling system. The chambers are alternately cooled and this increases the use of the cooling system and keeps the costs down.

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Many growers use big vacuum coolers in the packing house. A lot of the time, these customers are (un-)loading these rooms, and the cooling system is not working. Coldmax combine 2 vacuum rooms with one machine room (the “Dual Phase” concept), but in an intelligent way, so both rooms can partially “cool” at the same time.

Advantages: • Higher capacities • Lower power connections • Lower investments! MORE INFORMATION For more information go to: https://coldmax. eu/en/ or www.expo-se.de


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GWC hopes new technology will save growers water and money The head of the body which manages horticultural irrigation in Western Australia's Gascoyne region hopes new technology will save growers water and money. The Gascoyne Water Co-operative (GWC) recently started using a remote monitoring system to keep track of its 10 water bores north of the Gascoyne River. GWC chairman Rod Sweetman said the system should mean more efficient management of water resources in the often-dry region. “Until a couple of weeks ago, everything was manually run,” Mr Sweetman said. “You would read gauges and then set the number of pumps you wanted running. “Now with the telemetry system everything is programmed in. “The bores come online automatically and maximum pressure points automatically take them offline.” A traffic light system allows Mr Sweetman to monitor any disruption to bore pumping in real-time.

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“Green is for go. That means the bore is running healthily,” he said. “Yellow indicates the bore is on standby but is healthy, and red means something is wrong. It means wherever I am, I can monitor the bore field, and at the first sign of a problem I am sent an SMS.”

System helps track members’ usage As well as allowing the timely management of any disruptions to water service, Mr Sweetman said the system also would allow tracking of the water usage of the co-op’s 185 members. “There is a radio transmitting unit at each site, which is wired into the flow meter,” he said.

Our next task is to try to better regulate the water distribution in the system, so everybody gets a fair share of water when they need it most. Rod Sweetman, GWC chairman

“That unit sends data back, consumption volumes and flow rates. “That’s going to allow us to download the readings for each site at midnight on the last day of every month.”

MR Sweetman said the new system would allow tracking of the water usage of the co-op’s 185 members.

A more accurate reading of members’ usage also will allow for more equitable distribution of water, according to Mr Sweetman. “Members have varying sized (water flow) services — 50mm, 80mm, 100mm and 150mm,” he said. “Not everybody gets an equitable flow of water and quite often what growers get does not match their entitlements. “Our next task is to try to better regulate the water distribution in the system, so that everybody gets a fair share of water when they need it most.” These individual member usage readings are still being calibrated, but GWC hopes to have them in place by early next year. “We need a little bit of time to make sure that the figures at the site match the


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Single supplier plan for Carnarvon water The development of a single irrigation water supplier in Carnarvon will be pursued by the State Government in response to a report filed by the Carnarvon Ministerial Advisory Committee.

figures we have at GWC headquarters,” Mr Sweetman said. “The techs are saying we need to do two months of data gathering to be absolutely certain.”

Water prices to remain on hold for 2016 Mr Sweetman also has confirmed there will be no increase in water prices for Carnarvon growers in 2016. He said he would make the announcement at the GWC annual general meeting.

Water Minister Mia Davies has announced the State Government will pursue the development of a single irrigation water supplier in response to a report delivered by the Carnarvon Ministerial Advisory Committee (CMAC). “Having a single organisation responsible for the governance and management of Carnarvon’s irrigation water infrastructure will lead to a more efficient and sustainable horticulture industry,” she said. Bulk water delivery in Carnarvon is currently shared between Gascoyne Water, the Water Corporation and the Department of Agriculture and Food through the new four-gigalitre Gascoyne Food Bowl initiative borefield.

“There will be no increase in tariffs and charges for water (from the northern bore field) in the 2016 calendar year,” he said.

Ms Davies said the State Government would work with water co-operatives and growers to investigate the options and deliver a single entity.

“I’m also going to be bold enough to predict that the next move in rates will be down, not up.

WATER Minister Mia Davies.

“What I’m not bold enough to say yet is how low I think we can get the price to go.” Mr Sweetman said the price of irrigation water would be discussed in more detail at the co-operative's budget meetings in June. MORE INFORMATION Read the full article here www.abc.net. au/news/2015-11-16/new-tech-to-savegascoyne-dollars-and-drops/6945070

“In the meantime, I have asked the Water Corporation to continue to hold bulk water prices at the current rate while the options for a single entity are being investigated, ” she said. Carnarvon Growers’ Association President Bruce Munro said while he had not had the chance to fully analyse the State Government’s new water plans, he believed the current co-op structure was good enough. “I quite favour the system we have already and I actually said at the forum I believe the co-op structure is the way we should go forward,” he said. “I mentioned it because the structure is already working in the Ord, it’s working brilliantly in Harvey and over East it is working too. “There are a few issues we have got to sort out here and there, but I still think it’s probably the best way forward.”

The announcement comes in response to 17 recommendations CMAC made to Government to help improve Carnarvon’s longterm water security. Acting Agriculture and Food Minister Bill Marmion said the Government was committed to supporting a sustainable horticultural industry in Carnarvon, which was a vital contributor to the local economy and a major supplier of fresh produce to Perth. “Water security is central to the Government’s commitment to a sustainable irrigated horticultural industry in Carnarvon, and this report provides the options to work with industry to move forward and achieve this goal,” Mr Marmion said. MORE INFORMATION For more information on the recommendations or CMAC please see the link www.water.wa.gov.au/__data/assets/ pdf_file/0004/7762/109569.pdf

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Tapping into the Pilbara’s

water resource data BY VERITY TODD DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

For the past 12 months, Department of Agriculture and Food WA (DAFWA) hydrologist John Simons has been inundated with data to produce the first audit of water resources for irrigated agriculture development in the Pilbara. The pioneering research is part of the Royalties for Regions Pilbara Hinterland Agricultural Development Initiative (PHADI) DAFWA leads, which aims to unlock critical information about the potential of irrigated agricultural development in the Pilbara. Mr Simons said the audit is a component of the agricultural resource assessment of the region, and encompasses data on groundwater, mine dewater surplus, and surface water potentially available to support irrigated agriculture in the region. DEPARTMENT of Agriculture and Food WA hydrologist John Simons pictured with some of the 100 reports he has reviewed to produce the first audit of water resources for irrigated agricultural development in the Pilbara.

FIGURE 1 PHADI land and water resource assessment Source: DAFWA

“We’ve gone from a blank canvas to now having a much clearer picture of the location, quantity and quality of water resources in the Pilbara for irrigated agriculture, which previously didn’t exist.” “We kicked off the audit in September 2014 and since that time, I’ve reviewed more than 100 water resource reports and papers,” Mr Simons said. “Some of the water resource information is highly sensitive, particularly mine dewater volumes, so we had to work closely with our project collaborators to get access to some of the ‘restricted’ (commercial in confidence) reports,” John said. “The oldest report I’ve sited is from 1964, from the WA State Reference Collection.”

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“Specifically, we’ve looked at what volume of water is available in areas that have allocation limits; which mines have surplus dewater that isn’t already consumed for mining activities or environmental purposes; what other sources of water are potentially available including untapped, non-targeted aquifers, and surface water that could be captured and stored through Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems.” Close to 45 gigalitres per annum of water is currently licenced for irrigated agriculture in the Pilbara and this is proposed to double within the next two years, to more than 100GL/a. John says there is further potential for irrigated agricultural development using mine dewater surplus and surface water, through the use of MAR systems similar to the Ophthalmia dam near Newman. “The review continues as new reports are produced, such as water licence and environmental reports for new mines and mine expansions.”


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The audit results (excluding commercial in confidence data) will be compiled into a chapter of the PHADI prefeasibility report and made available on DAFWA’s website, as part of a suite of information products produced by the PHADI project. Mr Simons also coordinates the Agricultural Resource Assessment Technical Reference Group, which consists of representatives from DoW, DMP, Chamber of Minerals and Energy WA and the PHADI contractor Global Groundwater. Chaired by Richard George, the group provides a forum for leadership and coordination of data, information, and knowledge for the resource (land and water) assessment work in the project.

“A significant opportunity exists to develop irrigated agriculture in the Pilbara using mine dewatering surpluses and other in-situ water resources,” John said. “However, we need to better understand the region’s natural resource base and its ability to support sustainable irrigated agriculture, by bringing together the best-available knowledge and research through this reference group.” In addition to providing significant expertise, the reference members have linkages with broader networks that will add valuable input to the project. The PHADI project concludes in 2017. MORE INFORMATION For further information contact the Department of Agriculture and Food WA on www.agric.wa.gov.au or (08) 9368 3333.

Department of Agriculture and Food

Four contenders shortlisted in Wellington Dam EOI The State Government has announced a shortlist of four respondents from the Wellington Dam expression of interest (EOI) process. The shortlist includes a Western Australian-based joint venture led by Aqua Ferre; local irrigation co-operative Harvey Water; Israeli-based leader in desalination IDE Technologies; and Valoriza, a Spanish firm specialising in use of brackish water for agriculture.

“A total of 15 responses were received and evaluated against six principles — economic, technical, financial, organisation capability, project team capability and social and environmental merit,” Water Minister Mia Davies said. The Minister said all shortlisted respondents indicated that a level of government support would be needed; and the Government would work with the companies to define the level of support ahead of a possible request for proposal. “Possibilities for involvement by the Federal Government will also be discussed,” she said.

surface water storage in the SouthWest. Rising salinity has meant that the reservoir, with its 85 gigalitres of annual allocation, has been underutilised. Ms Davies said the companies were shortlisted by a technical advisory group that included representatives from the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination Australia, the CSIRO, Irrigation Australia, the Department of Agriculture and Food WA, vegetablesWA, South West Development Commission and Department of Water. Regional Development Minister Terry Redman said the Water for Food program, made possible by a $40 million Royalties for Regions investment, was focused on increasing economic growth in regional communities. “This is a significant investment by the State Government to increase the size of irrigation districts and create sustainable regional communities,” Mr Redman said. MORE INFORMATION For more information on the Water for Food project see the Department of Water’s website www.waterforfood.wa.gov.au/ projects/myalup-wellington or the brochure www.waterforfood.wa.gov.au/pdf/myalupwellington-flyer.pdf

Wellington Dam is the second largest reservoir in the State and the largest WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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David Grays’

leafy field day JOHN MCBRIDE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, SEED

David Grays recently held a leafy field day in partnership with The Loose Leaf Lettuce Company, Terranova and Seminis showcasing over 40 different varieties of spinach, rocket, speciality lettuce, cos lettuce, iceberg lettuce and leafy oriental vegies.

There were three replications of each variety and this required sowing over a five week period. The farm was well prepared and looked great on the day thanks to the team from Sativa, Terranova Seeds led by Danie and the David Gray horticulture crew.

Growers, processors and key stakeholders were able view and discuss the performance and suitability of these varieties with the seed company representatives and growers first hand.

This new material is certain to gain a following as it excels in the field and in the processing room. Their rocket selections continue to lead the range and the twin pack cos lettuce has generated a lot of interest since its launch and the seed is living up to expectation.

The event was held at Sativa Farms where Kevan and Jace Dobra worked hard to have all the varieties looking their best for the field day.

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Terranova Seeds had all their latest material on show and had several seedsman from interstate on hand to walk visitors through their varieties.

DAVID Grays’ recent field day showcased over 40 different varieties of spinach, rocket, speciality lettuce, cos lettuce, iceberg lettuce and leafy oriental vegies.


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Special guest, soil scientist Dr Doris Blaesing (AUSVEG researcher of the Year), gave a recount of her recent work on soil health; she demonstrated interpretation of soil analysis data and was on hand to discuss with individual growers the limiting factors in the soil samples that they had submitted beforehand. This was a very successful session with Doris demonstrating to growers how to get the best out of their soils.

A hot topic for debate was humus content in soil — or more to the point ‘the lack of’! Steve David from Organic Farming systems was able to give a review of a new to market peat based pellet — high in humic acid and Stoller nutritional additives were a fine compliment to have on display. Nigel Shaw was able to discuss the benefits of these products with growers first hand. The field day was well attended with a relaxed food and drink session to finish. Pedro Sippe (renowned agriculture photographer) was on hand with his drone to give us some great shots. Congratulations must go to Kevan and the Loose Leaf team for the effort they put in to ensure this event was so successful. MORE INFORMATION

Photos: Peter Sippe

For further information, please contact David Grays: John McBride, Business Development Manager — SEED on (08) 9331 0225, mobile 0400 934 706, or jmcbride@davidgray.com.au

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Grower profile Lauren East

PERTH

Name Lauren East General Manager G & T East Location Wilgarrup Size 600 acres Enterprises Broccoli

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Born and raised in Manjimup, farming is in Lauren’s blood. As the third generation on the family farm, she wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. The farm is just over 600 acres on the Wilgarup River, 10km north of Manjimup. Growing primarily broccoli and a sheep breeding program for wool and prime lambs, life is very busy. Lauren has been working on the family farm for over 10 years now, becoming a partner in 2014 and has dreams to take the business in new directions. Some of those dreams have become a reality with the family planting their first orchard of avocado trees and passionfruit vines last year. ‘I really love the broccoli, but we also wanted to diversify into a different market’.

Growing 22 hectares of broccoli this season, they supply mostly to a major supermarket and other independent grocery stores around Perth.

Completing the program in 2015, Lauren believes all young growers should give it a go. She says “I gained so much from the program that I apply to our business and in everyday life. It was a great opportunity to meet new people within the industry. I have expanded my own horizons to include a larger network of industry representatives all over the country.” Lauren realised how much more you can learn and gain directly from the knowledge and experiences of other people within the industry rather than by simply researching the internet. Lauren has found these programs motivating and extremely helpful. Undertaking these courses has enabled her to implement some of her ideas back into the business. With a five-year plan in mind for the farm, Lauren looks forward to the new challenges ahead. With the future harvest of avocados and passionfruit crops within the next two years, and the continued growing of broccoli and lambs.

LAUREN realised how much more you can learn and gain directly from the knowledge and experiences of other people within the industry rather than by simply researching the internet.

“Exciting times ahead for the next chapter on the farm, I’m very fortunate living in this beautiful Southern Forests region, doing what I love.” MORE INFORMATION Lauren East on l.east@bigpond.com or phone 0419 047 371.

Photos: April Pianta, Duck Duck Goose Photography

“We take a lot of pride in what we do to grow top quality produce.” Lauren manages the broccoli crew and runs the sheep breeding program. “We have a team of eight great seasonal workers for the four month harvest and packing season.” Utilising modern methods and the continued rotation of crops every four years, help protect against disease and care for the soil. “Dad has taught me not just to feed the plants, but to treat and take care of what’s underneath as well. Soil nutrition is of the upmost importance.” When broccoli season finishes, “bring on the rain because it’s time for seeding followed by lambing.” With still a few years to go before the production of the first avocados, Lauren has been furthering her skills in different courses and most recently undertook the Growing Leadership Training Program with Rural Training Initiatives. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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YOUR INDUSTRY

ADVERTORIAL

Mirco still growing

with focus on service and quality It’s been more than 50 years since brothers Vince and Peter Mirco opened their shop doors in Spearwood, WA, and though it’s seen many changes over the years, the business is still going strong today. What began as a fertiliser, chemical and delicatessen servicing Spearwood has grown into a thriving enterprise with four locations across the State, catering to the needs of market farmers, backyard gardeners and, more recently, pet owners. Mirco Bros is still very much a family affair, and that family extends beyond genetics to include a loyal customer base. As such, the loss of Peter last year impacted many, but Vince and the family are committed to continue the legacy the brothers worked so hard to build.

According to Johny Mirco, who manages the Neerabup store, one of the keys to success from the beginning has been a focus on customer service. “We’re very service-oriented and that’s something that has been a priority since Dad (Vince) and Uncle Peter started the business,” Johny said. “We pay attention to every little detail and while that may not seem like much, it can make a big difference.” There’s no denying that Mirco Bros has had to evolve over the years in order to survive, broadening its range of products as the industry has changed and catering to the gardening enthusiast as well as market gardeners. That product range now also includes a variety of products for pets. Mirco Bros has stores in Neerabup, Henderson, Manjimup (Manjimup Trading Co) and a machinery division in Bibra Lake.

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Johny said customers had come to expect a certain level of quality in the products stocked at the stores, which is why they stuck with brands they knew and trusted.

Johny said they also sold plenty of Haifa Multi-K, plain and enriched potassium nitrate products, and MAP, a fully water soluble fertiliser for Nutrigation and foliar feeding of all crops.

He said with such extensive experience in horticulture and gardening in WA, they had developed important relationships with a number of key suppliers over the years.

Other popular products include Haifa’s Mono Potassium Phosphate (MKP) and the calcium nitrate fertiliser range, Haifa Cal.

One of those suppliers is Haifa, which Johny said had a solid reputation with growers for providing superior fertiliser products. “We service a lot of market gardeners, with the main industries in this area being tomatoes, lettuce and strawberries” he said. “Farmers want products that are reliable and good quality, so that’s what we provide. “Over the years we’ve built up a great relationship with Haifa, which is why we stock a broad range of their products and they are very popular. “In particular, strawberry growers love the Poly-Feed range of soluble fertilisers.” MIRCO Bros Neerabup sales representatives Martyn Willacy (left) and Ben Joyce with manager Johny Mirco.

All Micro Bros staff have been trained to assist customers in selecting the products best suited to their needs. There are nine staff members working at Neerabup, but the team looks set to grow as the store increases its opening hours to include full weekend trading. MORE INFORMATION For further information head to one of our branches, there are three convenient locations. We welcome your enquiries. Mirco Bros, Henderson 800 Rockingham Road, HENDERSON, WA 6166 Phone: (08) 9410 2233 | Fax: (08) 9437 9043 Mirco Bros, Neerabup 2048 Wanneroo Road, NEERABUP, WA 6031 Phone: (08) 9407 4744 | Fax: (08) 9407 4755 Mirco Bros Machinery Division 26 Salpietro St, BIBRA LAKE, 6163 Phone: (08) 9434 6011 Machinery enquiries only: www.mircobrosmachinery.com


Noth’n feeds like Poly-Feed Soluble NPK fertilisers for complete plant nutrition World-renowned Poly-Feed fertilisers enable growers to feed crops according to their developing needs by Nutrigation or as foliar sprays, providing plants with optimal, balanced nutrition throughout the growth season. The wide choice of formulae meets the needs of vegetable crops, fruit trees and flowers at all growth environments. Suitable with water of varied quality, Poly-Feed products are: Fully water soluble and safe for use with all irrigation and spraying systems.

Haifa Australia

Comprise pure plant nutrients.

www.haifa-group.com

Free of chloride, sodium and other detrimental elements. Enriched with high levels of micronutrients.

Pioneering the Future

QUALITY HAIFA FERTILISERS AVAILABLE FROM

www.mircobros.com.au

HENDERSON 800 Rockingham Road Ph 9410 2233 E: mirco@mirco.com.au

NEERABUP 2048 Wanneroo Road Ph 9407 4522 E: mirco@mirco.com.au

MANJIMUP TRADING 9-11 Pritchard Street Ph 9771 1044 E: trading@manjimup. mirco.com.au

Rob Illiano 0447 030 367

Johny Mirco 0419 909 648

Marty Collins 0429 372 607


YOUR INDUSTRY

Market City

sold to industry BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

In a welcome result for the vegetable industry, the state government sold the Market City site at Canning Vale to the industry consortium Perth Markets Ltd (PML) for $135.5 million. A significant portion of this capital was invested by grower PML shareholders.

PML completed negotiations with the State Government in February to purchase the site at Canning Vale, which will therefore continue to operate as WA's primary trading centre for fruit and vegetables in the long term. Appointed as the preferred respondent in December 2015, PML undertook a competitive tender process against a strong field of bidders which included a range of property developers and the investment vehicle for Kerry Stokes. The Treasurer Mike Nahan said Perth Markets Ltd drew on its consortium’s industry experience to submit an outstanding proposal. “Perth Markets Ltd has demonstrated a strong commitment to the continuation of the market function. The consortium's experience in local and interstate markets will be a key to the ongoing success of Market City and WA's fruit and vegetable industry,” he said. Perth Markets Ltd will be required to operate under a range of control measures, including two key legislated requirements, both mandatory for a period of 20 years, which include: • To continue to operate the Central Trading Area exclusively as a wholesale fruit and vegetable market • To deliver additional warehouse storage for market-related purposes, as part of any future development plans. • Clauses within the contract will ensure Market City tenants are helped through the transition, with control measures around electricity pricing and the staged implementation of land tax.

THE site in Canning Vale will continue to operate as WA's primary trading centre for fruit and vegetables in the long term.

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Although this is a good result for the industry, there was no guarantee that it would end this way and the site could have been taken over by property developers.


YOUR INDUSTRY

vegetablesWA strongly made its view known that further protections were required for industry than those proposed by government as it’s the most important piece of infrastructure for our state market. It was also extremely disappointing that the Treasurer did zero consultation with our industry before the sale terms were announced.

We were very well supported in these concerns by the Labour Party and sections of the Nationals. I would like to make particular mention of upper house Nationals members Marty Aldridge (Agricultural Region), Jacqui Boydell (Mining and Pastoral) and Paul Brown (Agricultural) who moved and supported some amendments to the sale bill which would have provided some additional protections. Unfortunately these amendments weren’t successful because of the vote by the Liberal Party and two Nationals members, Dave Grills (Mining and Pastoral) and Colin Holt (South West). I understand that by splitting the Nationals this was the closest vote in the upper house on any piece of legislation this term of government. However, this would have been cold comfort indeed if any of the property developers had been successful and not had proper protections for industry to abide by. We hope that the Treasurer and Treasury do a better job of working with industry as they continue their program of asset sales. MORE INFORMATION Contact John Shannon, (08) 9481 0834 or john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au

Potato industry deregulation update BY MORENA TARBOTTON FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, PGA

The WA potato industry is now awaiting (at the time of writing) a response by the Barnett Government to the PGAWA Submission on deregulation that was handed to the Minister for Agriculture and Food in mid-December. The recommendation was for deregulation to be brought forward to late 2016 in return for a Grower Adjustment Package (GAP) to help growers transition to a fully deregulated market. “The GAP will be used as a stimulus and reinvestment mechanism,” said Simon Moltoni, the Executive Officer of the Potato Growers Association of WA “and it will allow growers to minimise the severe impact of deregulation”.

In the last quarter of 2015 retail prices of red and blue potatoes rose significantly (to around $4.00 per kg) whilst returns to growers plummeted. “This is a sign of things to come. It is therefore critical for the government to embrace our proposal that provides a cohesive and strategic approach to deregulation” said Mr Moltoni. Mr Moltoni said the WA potato industry had served WA consumers well for many years with the regulated system providing a wide-range of varieties whilst maintaining prices to consumers that were often less than those offered under a deregulated market on the east coast. “The current uncertainty being caused by government inaction is really damaging this highly valuable industry. It’s time to have the issue resolved”. MORE INFORMATION If you would like further information contact Simon Moltoni on (08) 9481 0834 or simon.moltoni@vegetableswa.com.au

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YOUR INDUSTRY

T C U D O PR

L L A C E R

Salmonella outbreak

in Victoria

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

During early February Tripod Farmers initiated a voluntary consumer recall of its prepackaged lettuce products on advice from the Victorian Health Department following detection of salmonella in 3 product samples.

Managing Director of Tripod Famers Pty Ltd, Mr Frank Ruffo, said the company was working closely with health authorities in the interests of public safety.

“The detections of salmonella were part of routine testing on product as part of the company’s standard food safety and quality program.

“We are shocked at the test results because we put public safety first and foremost and comply with all Australian health and safety standards.

“In the interests of public safety, we have recalled the entire production batches from which the positive samples were detected.

“We will be doing everything within our power to determine how this has happened,” Mr Ruffo said. Tripod Farmers is a family-owned business, founded in 1989, growing lettuce and leafy vegetables in Victorian farms, in Gippsland, Western Melbourne, and Mildura, with a processing facility in Bacchus Marsh. The company has a workforce of over 400 people. Tripod Farmers supplies pre-packaged leafy vegetable products to supermarkets and wholesale. “We have commenced a thorough investigation and will work with health authorities to ensure we get to the bottom of this,” Mr Ruffo said.

SALMONELLA infection usually results from ingestion of the bacteria from contaminated food, water or hands.

Tripod Farmers is expecting further test results in its search to determine and fix the cause of salmonella contamination. Tripod Farmers MD, Frank Ruffo, said the company was focused on the health and safety of consumers, establishing the cause of the problem, and fixing it.

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“We are continuing to work closely with health authorities to determine the cause and extent of the problem, and with our customers to manage an effective recall.

“The company apologises to everyone affected by the recall, and thanks the public for the way it is responding to the recall,” Mr Ruffo said. Tripod Farmers has suspended some of its farming and processing operations while the investigation is being carried out and until the problem has been fully identified and fixed. There are 144 cases of salmonella poisoning presently linked to contaminations of a range of pre-packaged salad products produced by Tripod Farmers. Nine of the 10 confirmed cases and 99 of the 134 probable cases are in Victoria. MORE INFORMATION For more information check the website www.tripodfarmers.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY

NFF announces new initiatives to revolutionise agriculture BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, announced in December three initiatives led by the National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) that promise to digitally transform Australian agriculture and help the industry seize the vast growth opportunities before it. The announcement includes: • a bold new online platform for Australian farmers; • the National Farmers’ Digital Agriculture Service; and • a new incubator for agricultural startups and technologies. The initiatives are underpinned by partnerships which include some of the biggest technology, communications and financial institutions from across Australia and around the world. The new measures will also allow Australian farms to maximise the benefits of improved connectivity offered by the National Broadband Network (NBN). NFF Chief Executive Officer, Simon Talbot, said the NFF’s vision, along with partners including Accenture, Crowe Horwath part of Findex, Prime Super, Commonwealth Bank, Vodafone and Coles, was two-fold.

“Through these initiatives we are seeking to facilitate disruption within the farm sector, and help farmers seize the benefits of faster connectivity,” Mr Talbot said. “Australian agriculture is entering a new growth phase and is likely to generate $1.2 trillion between now and 2030, while this year alone, agriculture is predicted to reap a record farm-gate return of $57.6 billion. “We need to reposition agriculture as an industry not of the past, but of the future with a flourishing culture of entrepreneurialism and innovation. “These three initiatives will help facilitate this shift, while bolstering prosperity across the sector.”

NFF’s new Online Platform aims to bring farmers, agribusiness professionals and consumers together in an engaging online platform designed to create value for farmers, agribusiness and consumers. It will deliver the most up-to-date food and agribusiness news, weather and market information; integrate best management practice; and provide member benefits, blogs, commentary, and the ability to magnify the industry’s voice using campaigns and live policy development. The Online Platform will go live in May 2016. NFF is collaborating with Accenture, its Official Strategy and Digital Partner, to develop and deliver new digital technologies and services, which will help Australia’s agriculture sector compete globally.

NFF’S new Online Platform is designed to create value for farmers, agribusiness and consumers.

In bringing Accenture’s global capabilities to the sector, NFF is committed to enabling Australian farmers to make better data-based operational decisions that seek to increase yield and boost revenue while reducing expenses — this Digital Agriculture Service (DAS) being a global first for a peak industry body. The NFF aims to launch a publicly available service for all farmers in July; as well as specific solutions for the Cotton, Horticulture and Beef farmers in late 2016, with other commodities to follow soon after. The new innovation hub for agricultural technologies, ‘Sprout’ will be a mechanism to identify, foster and promote the best new ideas in the food and agribusiness arena. The NFF and Crowe Horwath parent company, Findex, have assembled a highly skilled assessment panel, and are developing relationships with capital partners to provide agri-entrepreneurs with financial backing. “The agriculture sector has a proud history of innovation, often led by our farmers themselves,” Mr Talbot said. The first round of applications for incubation via Sprout will open in early 2016. MORE INFORMATION Go to www.nffdigital.org.au or Media release www.nff.org.au/read/5166/prime-ministerturnbull-announces-new-initiatives.html

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EnviroVeg manual launched in Vietnamese The Vietnamese version of the EnviroVeg manual was launched by the South Australian State Member for Taylor, Ms Leesa Vlahos MP, during January at the Vietnamese Farmers Association of South Australia (VFASA) event in Virginia, SA. The VFASA marked the Vietnamese New Year and commemorate 30 years of the association by hosting a free event for all members of the South Australian community.

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The EnviroVeg manual has long been a valuable resource for vegetable growers in Australia, with over 450 pages of resources and information on best practice and sustainable farming practices for members of the EnviroVeg Program. Interested growers can access hard copies of the translated manual by contacting AUSVEG on (08) 8221 5220 or emailinginfo@ausveg.com.au. For further information on the EnviroVeg Program, visit www.enviroveg.com. MORE INFORMATION Vietnamese growers who would like to discuss the manual can contact vegetableWA’s Field Extension Officer, Truyen Vo on 0457 457 559 or Truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au

The EnviroVeg Program is funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited using the National Vegetable Levy and funds from the Australian Government.


COME TO THE LARGEST EVENT IN AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURE! WHEN: 23 – 25 JUNE 2016 WHERE: RACV ROYAL PINES, GOLD COAST PRICE: EARLY BIRD MEMBER RATES FROM $565 HOW: WWW.REGISTRATION.HORTCONV.COM.AU

The National Horticulture Convention has fast become the premier event for the agriculture industry. With an expansive Trade Show and engaging speaker program, the National Horticulture Convention is not to be missed in 2016. With an increased number of commodities represented this year, the Convention will provide even more value to all in attendance. For more information visit www.hortconv.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY

Making hay first harvest marks milestone for irrigation project in eastern Pilbara Crops at the remote Woodie Woodie trial site have been harvested for the first time, as part of a pioneering project testing the use of surplus mine dewater to for irrigated agriculture.

Sorghum, Rhodes grass, lab lab and millet have been cut, baled and made into hay 10 weeks after planting.

The site was sown to sorghum, Rhodes grass and lucerne, as well as legumes including, Cavalcade and burgundy beans.

Led by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA (DAFWA) the trials are a component of the Pilbara Hinterland Agricultural Development Initiative (PHADI) funded by Royalties for Regions.

A 350 metre centre pivot irrigates the trials, using surplus mine dewater discharged from the Woodie Woodie manganese mine, 10 kilometres away.

The 38 hectare Woodie Woodie trial site is located on Warrawagine station, 190 kilometres east of Marble Bar.

The system’s ‘taps’ were officially turned on in September last year, after which plantings commenced. PHADI Project Manager Chris Schelfhout said the trials would be used to evaluate the agronomic and economic potential in the Pilbara’s extreme heat. “An initial analysis shows the hay is of average quality. However, this was to be expected given the fast growing environment of the Pilbara in summer,” Chris said.

36 bales Sweet Jumbo Sorghum, 12 bales Callide Rhodes Grass, and two bales Katambora Rhodes Grass are the result of the first harvest at the Woodie Woodie trial site in the eastern Pilbara.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

CUTTING the trial millet crop for the first time at the Woodie Woodie trial site on Warrawagine Station.

“Ultimately we hope to identify a suite of species that are suitable for cattle feeding systems or biofuel production that perform well in this environment,” he said.

“We’ve learnt a significant amount about matching crop nutrient to growth expectations, which we can apply before the next cut of the crops.”

“Market research will also explore the domestic and export opportunities for these and other irrigated crops.”

“We would expect to get another two cuts off the crop before the season ends in autumn.” “Further examination of yields and quality of all crops will be undertaken of subsequent harvests as the project progresses.” The hay has been fed to the Droughtmaster cattle on Warrawagine station, which is owned by the Mills family. Chris said he believed this was the first time a thorough, quantitative study of irrigated pastoral crops had been undertaken. “The aim is to capture information about crop production, as well as the nutritional composition and crop physiology during the calendar year,” he said. “That will provide information from which an economic analysis of stand-alone crop production and potential benefit in livestock feeding systems can be developed.”

At the time of publication, DAFWA was notified that mining operations at the Woodie Woodie manganese mine would be suspended and the mine put on care and maintenance from 2 February 2016. DAFWA is assessing the full impact of the closure on its Woodie Woodie trial sites of irrigated agricultural crops, which include sorghum, perennial grasses, lucerne and tropical legumes.

The PHADI team are working with project partners to investigate options to maintain access to water which will allow for the continuation of the project.

BALES of sorghum are dotted around one sector of the centre pivot. The sorghum was irrigated with surplus mine dewater and will be fed to the cattle on Warrawagine Station.

DAFWA and its project partners have had a close working relationship with mine owner and operator, Consolidated Minerals throughout the development and commissioning of the Woodie Woodie project. The change in mining operations highlights a key learning of the trial project and the importance of security of water supply for irrigated agriculture The Woodie Woodie and PHADI projects will conclude in 2017. MORE INFORMATION For further information contact the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA on www.agric.wa.gov.au or (08) 9368 3333.

Department of Agriculture and Food

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Project Harvest Monthly Tracker Report

i l o c Broc

i l l i h C

Broccoli grower action plan

Chilli grower action

Wave 30 fast facts — broccoli

Wave 30 fast facts — chilli

• C onsumer sentiment is in line with the Vegetable Average for all vegetables tracked thus far. There are high levels of endorsement for broccoli. • On average broccoli is purchased four times per month and consumed 10 occasions per month. Mainstream retailers are the main purchase locations. • Consumers typically purchase 800g of broccoli per occasion, relatively consistent with previous months. Broccoli is perceived to be good value for money, increasing this wave. Individual heads of broccoli are the preferred format. • National pricing analysis revealed an average of $3.69 per kg, which is substantially lower than July, 2015 prices. • Overall awareness of broccoli types remains low. Over half of consumers are unable to recall any variety. • The key motivations for purchasing broccoli are health and convenience. The main barriers to purchase are that broccoli is not available in their area and that they don’t want to waste any. • Broccoli is expected to remain fresh for a week. Expectations of freshness are stable and in line with previous waves.

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7.7

days broccoli is expected to remain fresh.

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

INSIGHT

1

Health is an increasing trigger to broccoli purchase. Short-term recommendation: Appeal to conscious improver consumers by clearly labelling the health benefits of broccoli at point of sale, including specific vitamin and nutrient benefits. This should encourage more frequent broccoli purchases. INSIGHT

2

There has been a lack of new product development globally, and only three product launches domestically in the last three months. Long-term recommendation: Snacking is a growing category in Australia — look to the United States for innovative broccoli snacking products, including chips and poppers.

• C hillies hold strong importance to consumers and are likely to be recommended to family and friends. There is strong future purchase intent for chillies. • Chillies are purchased four times a month and consumed on 10 occasions per month, which has declined this wave. Purchase is from mainstream and specialist retailers. • Consumers generally purchase 300g of chillies, with recalled last spend consistent at $4.00. Overall, chillies are perceived as fair value for money. • Pricing analysis revealed the average national price for long red chillies was $18.64 per kg, slightly higher than prices in July 2015. • There is a high level of recall for chilli varieties. Jalapeno and birds eye have the greatest awareness amongst consumers. • Main triggers for purchasing chillies are to use as an ingredient in dishes and taste. The key barriers to purchase are consuming enough for their needs and not wanting to waste any. • Chillies are expected to remain fresh for just over 10 days, and this freshness is met most of the time.


YOUR INDUSTRY

Project Harvest is monthly market research tracking consumer attitudes towards fresh vegetables over time. Below we look at wave 30, November 15. The full report is available here http://ausveg.com.au/email-resources/project-harvest/wave-30/Wave30-FullReport.pdf

$18.64

per kg was the average price for chillies in November, 2015.

plan

e c u t Let

14.7

times is the average consumption occasions for lettuce per month.

Lettuce grower action plan

INSIGHT

1

There has been a decline in consumption of chillies in past waves. However, consumers are open to experimenting with chillies when cooking a new recipe. Short-term recommendation: Inspire consumers with new recipe ideas that contain chilli at point of purchase. Clearly call out expected heat levels of dishes to avoid alienating less frequent users. INSIGHT

2

A considerable number of consumers grow their own chillies. Additionally, purchase of chilli plants is on the rise. Long-term recommendation: Further differentiate chilli varieties by creating cuisine-specific chillies, such as by encouraging consumers to use jalapenos for Mexican cooking and birds eye chillies for Thai. This will create the need for multiple varieties rather than a chilli plant for all cuisines.

Wave 30 fast facts — lettuce • L ettuce holds high levels of importance and satisfaction with consumers. Future purchase intent has remained stable. • Lettuce is purchased on average four times per month and consumed approximately 15 times per month. Purchase is primarily from mainstream retailers. • On average, consumers are purchasing 700g of lettuce, which is consistent with the previous wave. Recalled last spend was $2.70. Value for money is perceived as fair. • Price tracking revealed an average price of $2.22 per Iceberg lettuce head. This is lower than prices from July 2015. • There is a high level of awareness of lettuce types, especially Iceberg and Cos. • The main motivations for purchasing lettuce are health and complementing other food. Not wanting to waste any and short shelf life are the key barriers to purchase. • Lettuce is expected to stay fresh for a week. Expectations of freshness are met most of the time, consistent with previous waves.

INSIGHT

1

Knowing that lettuce is grown in Australia is highly important to consumers. Short-term recommendation: Ensure that all lettuce varieties have Australian provenance called out in-store and on-pack. Where possible, communicate locally grown lettuce (i.e. state provenance). INSIGHT

2

Fear of wastage remains a key barrier to purchase. Lettuce also has the highest level of wastage of all vegetables tracked. Long-term recommendation: Consumers want smaller portion sizes to help reduce their wastage. Ensure there are multiple sizes of pre-prepared lettuce formats that will appeal to couples, small families, and large families.

Project Harvest is funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited using the National Vegetable Levy and funds from the Australian Government.

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Olakala

Trandos Hydroponics Growers PERTH

Business Trandos Hydroponics Growers General Manager Danny Trandos Location Neerabup Greenhouses 5 Enterprises Tomatoes, and nursery/ seedlings capsicum, eggplant, cucumber, tomatoes & watermelon

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YOUR INDUSTRY

The Trandos family have a long history of growing vegetables, over 75 years in fact! It has always been a family business and 20 years ago they were growing hydroponic cucumbers and tomatoes. Now they focus on tomatoes and growing a range of seedlings. Mid-2015 they launched a new range called Olakala, where they have 100% of their produce being sold directly into Woolworths. The Olakala range; pronounced ola-kala, Greek for “all good”, is made up of the Hullabaloo range of premium quality exotic cherry and grape tomato varieties of Tommo, Sunblasts and Triple Treats. All in resealable packs (which can be resealed 22 times), they are the perfect snack for adults and kids alike. Truss tomatoes, are available in a number of varieties and, as they’re all glasshouse grown, are available all year round. Living Herbs including Living Coriander and Living Basil, provides fresh herbs that will continue to grow at home. The living coriander was the first to be sold in Woolworths in WA. With the new range taking four years of development from first seeing the produce in Canada and with collaboration from around the world it has been great to see their project come to life. The worldwide collaboration continues as the packaging comes from Milan and the machine for packing from the UK. Trandos Hydroponics Growers (THG) have exclusivity to two of the three Hullabaloo varieties with the breeder in Holland. The tomatoes take between 11–12 weeks from seeds being sown to full production. Danny says “once they are sown, we manually scout for insects, pests and diseases and we ensure we use our integrated pest management contacts to provide any beneficials (insects used to reduce harmful insects).” THG have a nursery where the seedlings are grown, they produce capsicum,

eggplant, cucumber, tomatoes and watermelon which are sent throughout Australia. The nursery is automated from the seedling being sown to the watering; the concrete ground floods and the water is then recycled, treated and reused, to the machine which moves the seedlings around. The climate and lighting are also automatically controlled with diffused glass being installed to ensure there are no shadows cast on the seedlings. Prior to being shipped, each seedling has followed a stringent series of processes to ensure that it performs to its best potential. What this means for growers is that the highest possible standards of quality and consistency have been applied to each seedling — making them the safest in Australia. THG employs world’s best bio-security practices to ensure that the greenhouse facility remains free of contaminants at all times.

DANNY Trandos in the greenhouse with the Sunblast tomato crop.

To ensure the facilities remain free from contaminants they have an in-house laboratory service. This is for plant diagnostics and through the ongoing testing of plants and irrigation water, they can provide a safeguard against contamination and disease. Environmental impacts are a driving factor in the business, they use wood chips and burn leftovers to power boilers for a heating source (carbon neutral), recycle water, integrated pest management to limit the use of synthetic chemical where possible and have installed a 100kW solar PV system. Where ever possible THG try to limit the impact on the environment, the new packaging uses 20% less plastic compared to conventional packaging plus it is 100% recyclable. Danny is the General Manager of THG and started working with the family business in 1997 as a crop worker, then moved to grower and now as General Manager. Danny says they employ a very dedicated team which includes both of his brothers, Steve and Jamie, along with their Production Manager Pietro, Laboratory Technician Elisa, Administration and Accounts team.

Danny said it is easy to do what he does as he loves it and every day is exciting. He gains a lot of enjoyment from producing a quality product and selling it. It provides him the opportunity to travel worldwide and to gain knowledge from innovation. With the exclusive relationship with the breeder in Holland it has spurred Danny into learning Dutch to allow communications to run smoother. In 2016 THG and the team are looking to further develop the Hullabaloo range and hopefully have some new tomato varieties on the market, in addition to developing a mini sweet pepper range. MORE INFORMATION You can contact Danny through their website www.thg.trandos.com.au, check out the Olakala range here www.olakala.com.au or connect with them through social media; Facebook www.facebook.com/thg.olakala

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Calling WA carrot growers!

Improving the efficiency of the carrot export industry A whole of chain approach scoping study BY PETER GARTRELL 1 AND RACHEL LANCASTER 2 1 ECONOMIST, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA 2

RESEARCH OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

This scoping study aims to identify issues in the Australian export carrot industry that are causing inefficiency in the industry and restricting growth. Export carrot growers across Australia are being interviewed to determine what they see as the key issues for the industry. The interview process has now commenced. Key topics highlighted by growers so far include: • Water access, costs and allocations. • Labour laws, including improved co-ordination between government departments and review of associated costs for visa workers.

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• Improvements that could be made to quarantine information, standards and protocols for export carrots. • Lack of up-to-date research into diseases such as cavity spot and harvest issues such as splitting. • Absence of substantial investment into breeding programs to develop superior genetics to improve carrot performance and improve crop tolerance to diseases. • Shortage of adequately researched, quick growing rotational options to improve the sustainability of the carrot production system and allow full land use. • Restrictive road transport laws.

The information gathered in the scoping study will be used to make informed decisions about research and industry support requirements, which may be funded using grower levies. MORE INFORMATION Export carrot growers who wish to contribute to this study are welcome to contact Peter Gartrell on email at peter.gartrell@agric.wa.gov.au or phone (08) 9780 6178 or Rachel Lancaster on email at rachel.lancaster@agric.wa.gov.au. This export carrot scoping study (project code VG13062) has been funded by DAFWA and Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited using the vegetable levy and funds from the Australian Government.

• Need for easily accessible information in a single location related to market access including quarantine requirements and current quotas and tariffs. • Use of robotics to improve post-harvest efficiency, particularly through the adaptation of existing technologies.

Department of Agriculture and Food


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Executive Officer Report ANABP 01 BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE OFFICER, POMEWEST

The pome harvest is underway with Galas now being harvested and pears in full swing. Reports of crops with sound yields with good quality, hampered only by mites in Manjimup and some bird damage in Kirup/Donnybrook, indicate a promising season for our members. Pomewest continue to work within our 2015–20 strategic plan supporting project activities that provide useful and relevant outcomes for the industry by: • Fostering a valuable and sustainable industry • Pursuing excellence in fruit quality • Providing leadership • Developing innovation and best practices • Grower communications

Queensland fruit fly Good news to report — at the time of writing this article the Department of Agriculture and Food WA (DAFWA) has not detected any new Qfly since November within the Outbreak Zone and Outbreak Area. The baiting program is still expected to conclude on or around 8 March 2016. Provided no further flies or larvae are found, the re-instatement of Qfly Area Freedom for the 15km suspension zone will be sought on or shortly after 8 March 2016. Identified as a priority for the pome industry, Pomewest has contributed $28,000 along with other horticulture industries to the DAFWA managed eradication. Pomewest will continue to update its members as news comes to hand.

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Pioneer growers of ANABP 01 (the dark skinned apple) are expecting a marketable crop with a pick date anticipated in April. This will be the first commercially grown marketable fruit available in Australia — a very exciting development. It will be wonderful achievement to see this new WA variety in store.

HIA workshops I attended the HIA workshop at the Perth Markets on Thursday 3 February with Paul Good of Newton Orchards to represent Pome in WA. We were given information on the new structure of HIA and we were able to re-establish our relationship. Working together is the key to secure communications and information for future funding opportunities for projects, and input with marketing plans alongside Apple and Pears Australia Ltd (APAL). This will be beneficial to our local marketing/promotions program for funding and resources. It is important for our members who contribute to the national levies to make sure WA has a piece of the action. If you are interested becoming a member of HIA please follow link http://horticulture.com.au/ membership-application-form/.

This edition We present articles on our Maturity Standards for identified WA Apple varieties and netting projects and the lowdown on the recent Future Orchard® walk in Karragullen. We also have a guest contribution from the Fruit West Co-operative Ltd with a story on ‘How to be ready for export’ which gives orchardist an account of how to be compliant for export opportunities. I hope that you are finding the subscription to the WA Grower magazine beneficial, I welcome any feedback or suggestions for future editions. Along with the Pomewest Committee I wish the State’s pome fruit growers all the best during the harvest period and a prosperous season ahead.

Pomewest Committee Members Harvey Giblett — Chair E: newtonbros@wn.com.au Mario Casotti E: mario@casottigroup.com John Gregorovich E: raelene.gregorovich@bigpond.com Terry Martella E: tjmart1@hotmail.com Mark Scott E: markpscott@bigpond.com Nardia Stacy — Executive Officer E: nardia@fruitwest.org.au

APC — Pomewest projects 2015–16 with funding allocation Project Commercialisation for WA (FW Co-operative)

$ $120,000

Maturity Standards for identified WA Apple varieties (Ashmere Consulting)

$82,000

Medfly Surveillance Trapping Network (Ashmere Consulting)

$52,750

Codling Moth (DAFWA)

$35,000

Markers, Markets and validated nutritional qualities of Australian Apples (UWA)

$25,000

Natural Mite control Project (shared with the Stone Fruit Subcommittee, Stewart Learmonth DAFWA)

$18,300

Promotion & Publicity Local Project (Fresh Finesse)

$16,000

Apple Looper Project (shared with the Wines of Western Australia, Stewart Learmonth DAFWA)

$4,870

APC Fee for Service — pome fruit effective from 1 January 2015 Type of fruit

$/kg

Fresh fruit, apples, pears, Nashi, other

$0.015

Processing fruit

$0.005

Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit

$0.002

Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

$0.001


POMEWEST

The development of maturity standards

for identified WA apple varieties project BY KIM JAMES ASHMERE CONSULTING

Consumer expectations are increasing in regards to eating quality and food safety. The Western Australian pome fruit industry has been funding quality program work over recent years to deliver improved quality to consumers and to build better business capability and profitability for members. This Pomewest research program aims to improve and strengthen the quality program and enable the Western Australian pome fruit industry to establish minimum maturity standards for three varieties of apples to commence in 2017. The Pomewest funded project aims to (i) analyse the first years data from the maturity standards testing of Gala, Granny Smith and Pink Lady™ apples in WA, (ii) to conduct second year confirmatory testing to set minimum industry domestic standards for Royal Gala, Granny Smith and Pink Lady™ apples under the WA Biosecurity and Management Act 2007 (BAM Act), and (iii) to conduct first year benchmark maturity testing of the new yet to be named Western Australian ANABP01 apple. The expected outcomes from the project are an improved program of development for the maturity standards for three apple varieties, Royal Gala, Granny Smith and Pink Lady™. The maturity data will be used as a basis for proposed legislated maturity standards to be included in the BAM Act similar to Western Australia table grapes and citrus standards. First year data on a benchmark harvest maturity standards, will be achieved for the new ANABP01 apple in market. The development of maturity standards for three apple varieties will benefit industry and ensure a legislated approach to allow the industry to deliver a consistent supply of high quality product to consumers.

Additional flow on benefits will include improved apple eating quality, increased demand for apples and improved producer and supply chain profitability. The project test properties cover three different growing regions including the Perth Hills (two properties) — Donnybrook (one property), Kirup (three properties) and Manjimup (two properties). The three test program includes; one test preharvest (two weeks pre-maturity), one test at harvest (maturity) and one test postharvest (two weeks post maturity). At each orchard, sampling consists of 24 pieces of fruit collected for testing from two production areas. Twelve trees on each property are selected and marked prior to collection. All test apple samples once collected are kept at a constant cold storage temperature prior to testing. The apples have been tested using approved techniques for assessment of maturity standards by Apple and Pear Australia Ltd (APAL) as well as the methodology used for the current Pomewest project to test the maturity standards for identified WA apple varieties. Near Infra-Red Difference of Absorbance (DA) meter readings have been used

TEST apples on the tree prior to collection.

to measure chlorophyll content; fruit pressure (kg) has been measured by using a FT 327 Penetrometer (11mm tip); and total soluble solids (°Brix) have been measured using a high precision digital sucrose refractometer with automatic temperature compensation. Fruits are scored on a Starch Index test (SI) Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA) and fruit acidity (Malic acid) is measured using a Hanna Instruments mini titrator for fruit juice analysis. The test apples are stored at a temperature of 3ºC and all tests are done at 20–22ºC. Data with diagnostic information is supplied to participating growers to assist management and project metadata is analysed and discussed at the end of each season in a report and presentation to industry. Photographs of the test apples have been taken including the external appearance and of the Starch Index test. MORE INFORMATION For further information please contact Nardia Stacy at Pomewest on (08) 9368 3869, mobile 0411 138 103 or email nardia@fruitwest.org.au

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Future Orchards Walk to boost harvest productivity Future Orchards® is a national program funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia Ltd (HIA) and managed by Apple and Pear Australia Ltd (APAL). The purpose of the orchard walk at Karragullen was to share tree crop and physiology research results from the Productivity, Irrigation, Pests and Soils (PIPS) project. Guest speaker Nigel Swarts from the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture spoke about nitrogen uptake and the distribution of nitrogen within the tree. FUTURE Orchards Craig Hornblow giving tips for young trees. BY NARDIA STACY AND SUSIE MURPHY WHITE POMEWEST

The first Future Orchards Orchard Walk for 2016 was held at Karragullen and it was well attended by orchardists from the Perth Hills and South West. ®

He said “Pre-harvest nitrogen supply should occur no earlier than four weeks after full bloom and uptake efficiency will be optimized through providing weekly applications”. “The distribution of nitrogen within the tree was strongly influenced by timing of the nitrogen application. A greater proportion of nitrogen was directed to the canopy from the pre-harvest nitrogen application whereas post-harvest nitrogen was directed to storage”. Craig Hornblow from AgFirst NZ spoke about orchard sustainability at harvest time. Combining the focus on market acceptable yields, productivity influencing costs and the people required to make it all happen.

Based on the outcomes of the program’s research from 2012 to 2014, Craig Hornblow from AgFirst NZ advised that it’s achievable to produce 100t/ha of high quality fruit in WA. Craig said “the consistency over the entire row length and across blocks was vital to achieving higher yields, and suggested the canopy should be full of low vigor, calm fruiting units, each in their own space.” The management of people was discussed with the key message to manage harvest labour availability, job satisfaction and compliance. “Good pickers need to be well looked after.” Future Orchards® provides apple and pear growers Australia-wide with practical, hands-on education and tools to help increase quality and productivity in their orchards and assist the industry in becoming internationally competitive. Karragullen Cool Store hosted presentations, which were followed by an orchard walk at Steven Ghilarducci’s Strathspey Orchard in Karragullen. MORE INFORMATION Orchard walk presentations are available on the APAL website at apal.org.au. They can be searched by topic and/or date. Future Orchards® tools and education information can be accessed here http://apal.org.au/researchdevelopment-extension/future-orchards/

FUTURE Orchards new plantings at Strathsprey Orchard, Karragullen.

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BY KIM JAMES ASHMERE CONSULTING

The Surveillance Trapping Network Project The Australian pome fruit industry remains relatively free of the serious pests and diseases that threaten world pome fruit production. Protection of existing markets and farm assets is important, and increasingly there is a need to implement surveillance programs, to control, and to have ‘evidence of absence’ for pests of quarantine concern. Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) is Western Australia’s biggest pest of quarantine concern. Since 1895 when it was introduced into Western Australia, Medfly has become established into key production areas, particularly in urban, peri-urban and rural areas where fruit is grown. High quality pest surveillance data is of key importance for retaining market access, both interstate and with international trading partners. Surveillance for specific pests is often carried out by state or territory departments of primary industries or independent parties. However, industrydriven surveillance is becoming an important tool in proving regional, area, or state freedom from pests of quarantine concern. The extent of surveillance that is necessary is highly specific to each importing country or state. Export approval can often depend on the major primary industries in that country, the importing country’s pest status and the level of assurance needed by that country to be confident about importing Australian produce.

Leading industry stakeholders are keen to protect existing markets and gain new export markets. To achieve this there is a need to demonstrate that orchard surveillance programs capture pest numbers throughout the season and they also have documented pre and postharvest control measures in place to prove Area of Low Pest Prevalence (ALPP) trading status.

A pro-active Medfly surveillance program is both a useful pest control tool and insurance policy to maintain and gain markets for the Western Australian pome fruit industry. The project objective is to take the required steps to implement an industry owned surveillance trapping network for Medfly that will collect and collate data to support a future acceptable trade protocol such as an ALPP to meet trading partner requirements. With reduced Medfly numbers, and specific control and management practice in place, the data set over a few years will be able to table evidence of low prevalence for fruit fly to define a case for ALPP (based on International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures — ISPM’s 14, 22 and 30). The Surveillance Trapping Network Project is funded by Pomewest to develop a Surveillance Trapping Network (STN) to monitor Medfly in key growing areas within the South West pome fruit production area of Western Australia. The project commenced in 2015 with Medfly traps located in 12 grower orchards and six town properties in the South West. The first year of the project has targeted Donnybrook,

Kirup, Manjimup and Pemberton with deployment of 168 Medfly traps that are checked and serviced each two to four weeks based on sound knowledge of the pest’s biology and ecology. The aim in the first year is to collect and collate Medfly baseline data from pome fruit properties in the area. The project will determine Medfly numbers in key production areas and ensure continuation of surveillance and monitoring of the five year Medfly trapping program in the South West. The Medfly surveillance trapping data collected will allow participating growers to define the extent of the problem and to allow development of appropriately targeted control and management measures to reduce fruit fly numbers. The STN traps and data collected is owned by Pomewest and will align with Biosecurity and Agricultural Management (BAM) Act of 2007. Data collected will be supplied to DAFWA on request if approved by the Pomewest Biosecurity Committee. Existing historical trap-catch data from the South West region will be used in the trapping data analysis and an initial proof of concept trial has been conducted in the first year on a fruit production property in Gingin to validate the efficiency of the Medfly lures used in the project. The lures in each trap are replaced each 12 weeks throughout the life of the project. MORE INFORMATION For further information please contact Nardia Stacy at Pomewest on (08) 9368 3869, mobile 0411 138 103 or email nardia@fruitwest.org.au.

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Being export ready for West Australian apples BY ANN LYSTER ORCHARDIST AND DIRECTOR OF THE FRUIT WEST CO-OPERATIVE LTD

Global G.A.P is the standard that is required by most markets in Europe and the UK. Whilst Asian markets are not as tough with QA systems this sector is increasingly moving in line with European standards and Global G.A.P seems to be the system of choice.

The West Australian apple industry has a long history of exporting, from the early days of Granny Smith exports to the United Kingdom and Asia, to the halcyon days of Pink Lady™. Growers made very good money and many tonnes of Pink Lady™ otherwise destined for the local market were directed to the UK. Without these exports from WA Pink Lady™ would never have been established as a premium apple in the world fruit trade. These exported apples took price pressure off the supply chain in our domestic market helping growers attain better prices at local level. Sadly, over the last number of years the export market has dried to a trickle for a number of reasons. The high AU dollar, quality/ MRL issues and not least the Global Financial Crisis have seen confidence challenged worldwide. Competition from low cost producers, such as South Africa, has also certainly impacted.

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GERALDINE Darbyshire from B & G Darbyshire Orchards, Katie Kammann from Newton Orchards and Ann Lyster from Lyster Orchards.

With the dollar closer to 70 cents, a rapid uptake of Quality Systems and the UK and Asia actively engaging with exporters in Australia we see a more positive situation. Since the inception of more controlled marketing of trademarked varieties and with the emergence of a new and exciting dark skinned apple there is enormous potential to re-launch an export industry here in West Australia.

It is now time to examine what is needed to be export ready. As growers there are thing we can control and those that are beyond our scope. European markets are very mature and tuned in to consumer requirements, in particular food safety. Growers in West Australia are familiar with QA Systems, the food safety issues and associated record keeping. However these HACCP based systems whilst well accepted in Australia are not recognised in other jurisdictions.

Of most importance for growers is to understand many supermarket chains have their own ‘in house’ standard for both growing and packing so it is wise to liaise with your Exporter to ascertain particular requirements. You may require both Global G.A.P and another certification. Examples are Tesco ‘Nurture’, Marks and Spencers ‘Field to Fork’ and packing houses need to achieve ‘British Retail Consortium Standard’.

As varieties these days are all commercialised under Trademarks it is important to make sure that the exporter has the necessary licenses required to trade your fruit in the destination country. Understanding the MRL and withholding periods is vital as there can be differences between what is acceptable in European Union the UK and Supermarket QA systems. Whilst this process can seem frustrating, if growers are aware of plant protection requirements right from bud burst, action plans can be followed. Exporters should supply growers and packers with ‘Minimum International Quality Specifications” which cover Brix, colour, firmness, major defects and minor defects. It is useful to be aware of these specs as ‘out of spec fruit’ causes problems for all involved. To avoid any quality/size problems growers must manage and select blocks specifically for export.


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While the gaining of another certificate to validate good orchard practice is very rewarding, the real reward needs to be the financial return at the end of the process. The companies all worked closely with Peter Richardson of Matrix and are pleased to report that the prices achieved in the UK were the best returns for Pink Lady™ in the 2015 fruit season. MORE INFORMATION If you would like more information contact Nardia Stacy, Pomewest on (08) 9368 3869 or email nardia@fruitwest.org.au

After the decisions have been made regarding markets and requirement it is up to growers to seek out and engage an auditing company well in advance of export date. As this process can on occasions be very protracted, the audit needs to be carried out well in advance of picking and packing.

Each QA system comes with lists of compliance criteria which growers need to acquaint themselves with, carrying out internal audits well in advance of third party audit so remedial actions can be taken. While the process of review takes time and on occasions some of the compliance criteria may seem frustrating, it can be viewed as an annual ‘health check’ of your growing practice just as with financial reviews carried out by banks and accountants. 2015 saw three companies export Pink Lady™ apples to Tesco in the UK. These companies were the first to apply for and receive the Tesco ‘Nurture’ certification. Tesco have a grading system of bronze, silver and gold. Newton Brothers, Darbyshire Orchard and Lyster Orchards were all proud to have attained Silver status.

POMEWEST Chair Harvey Giblett showcasing Pink Lady™ crops.

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Black or white netting?

Is there a difference? Or just a preference‌ BY SUSIE MURPHY WHITE 1 , ROHAN PRINCE 2 AND LISA STARKIE 2 1 POMEWEST 2 D EPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

Specifications on the black net state a 23% reduction of both shade and UV radiation while white net stated a 20% reduction.

Winter chill accumulation and fruit quality were also measured together with observations of flowering to determine the dates of bud break, occurrence of first flower and full bloom.

Winter chill

What is the difference between black and white net? Is there a difference or is it just your preference?

To test the effect of the netting, sensors were installed in each section to continuously measure mid canopy air temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and fruit surface temperature. A hand held meter was also used to measure photosynthetically active radiation during the season.

The demonstration established in November 2013 compared black net and white net to an area of non-netted (no net) trees within the same block in the orchard.

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2014 black net (55CP) 2015 black net (66 CP) 2014 white net (54 CP) 2015 white net (63 CP) 2014 no net (52 CP) 2015 no net (66 CP)

60 Chill portions

A netting demonstration site at Lyster’s Orchard, Manjimup, Western Australia was set up to demonstrate the benefits of netting under Western Australian conditions. Two sections of 16mm cross over quad netting were installed over an established Cripps Pink and Fuji orchard to assess their effect on protection from birds, sun and hail damage.

50 40 30 20 10 0 Mar

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Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

FIGURE 1 Chill accumulation under the black net, white net and no net in 2014 and 2015 Source: DAFWA

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Winter chill was calculated from 1st March through until 31st August 2014 and 2015 from hourly temperature readings (see Figure 1). There is no difference in chill accumulation under black net, white net or no net area. The nets do not reduce the amount of chill accumulated as there

Sep


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is minimal impact on the temperatures recorded under the black or white net or no net.

2014 black net 2015 black net 2014 white net 2015 white net 2014 no net 2015 no net

Flowering Bud break and flowering data was collected from 10 trees under black, white and no net rows. Observations were made three times a week from 30 August 2014 to 30 October 2014 (see Figure 2). Whole tree assessments were made to determine the dates of bud break, occurrence of first flower and full bloom and to monitor progression of flowering. There is minimal difference in flowering progression between the netted trees to the no net trees. All trees still came into full bloom at the same time in 2014.

245

250

255

260

265 270 275 280 285 290 DoY (Sep–Nov) Green tip — first flower — full bloom

295

300

FIGURE 2 Flowering progression of Cripps Pink apple trees under black, white and no net Source: DAFWA

Fruit growth rate Fruit diameter was measured six weeks after full bloom until the first pick. Little difference was measured in all sections during the majority of the season. In March, apples under the black net measured 3mm larger on average than fruit under white net or no net. However, at harvest time there was no significant difference in diameter of fruit grown under any of the treatments.

Minor variability in irrigation, tree management and nutrition are likely to have greater impact on fruit size than netting. Mid canopy air temperature There was minimal difference between the black and white net for mid canopy air temperature and humidity. Mean daily temperatures rarely varied more than 0.5 to 1 degree. The netting led to small increases in minimum temperatures and dampening of maximum temperatures. This action is similar to a cloud cover effect which reduces radiant heat loss overnight and reflects a portion of incoming daytime radiation reducing maximum temperatures.

Solar radiation and fruit surface temperature Not surprisingly the no net area received the highest solar radiation (see Figure 3). While not exactly the same as the specifications, the white net showed a 15% reduction and the black net 26% reduction during January and February 2015 and 2014. Specifications are only given as a guide to how the nets will perform and in this case the black net was close to specification and the white net slightly less.

It is reasonable to think that amount of solar radiation reaching the fruit surface should influence the fruit surface temperature (FST). FST was measured over the summer 2013–14 season (see Figure 4).

THERMOCOUPLES inserted into Cripps Pink apples to measure the fruit surface temperature.

Surprisingly, average FST was lower under the white net than the black, even though greater solar radiation was recorded under white net.

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Black net

35

White net

No net

30 MJm2/day

25 20 15 10 5 0 1/01/2014

15/01/2014

29/01/2014

12/02/2014

26/02/2014

12/03/2014

FIGURE 3 Solar radiation measured in the black net, white net and no net rows for summer 2014 Source: DAFWA

Air temp black net FST row 4 black net

Temperature ÂşC

60

Air temp white net FST row 10 white net

Air temp no net FST row 16 no net

50 40 30 20 10 0 4/2/2014

11/2/2014

18/2/2014

25/2/2014

4/3/2014

11/3/2014

Date FIGURE 4 Fruit surface temperature (FST) and air temperature measured in the black net, white net and no net rows for February till mid-March 2014 Source: DAFWA

Black net

0.80

White net

No net

0.70 Âľmol/m2/s

0.60 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00

8:30

9:30

10:30

11:30

12:30

13:30

14:30

15:30

Time FIGURE 5 Average fractional photosynthetic radiation interception (fPAR) measured at morning, noon and afternoon on 23 February 2015 in the black net, white net and no net rows Source: DAFWA

FST was significantly higher in the no net area particularly during extreme heat events in late summer and a higher percentage of sunburnt fruit was observed. There was no difference in sunburn between the black and white net areas, and both netted areas reduced sunburn significantly compared to the no net area.

Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) The effective area of shade was calculated by measuring PAR on a clear sky day in February 2014 and 2015 using a hand held ceptometer. Several measurements were taken throughout each section at morning, solar noon and afternoon to measure the extent and density of the shade created by the tree. While measurements reflected shade specification of the net, the reduction in PAR was also influenced by tree vigour. Figure 5 shows the black net had a greater reduction in shade compared with the white net and no net. Tree vigour was higher under the netted areas than outside the net.

During the monitoring of the demonstration site low bird pressure years were experienced with no damage occurring outside or under the nets. Netting has the capability of reducing bird damage and sunburn damage compared to the no net treatment. No major hail event was experienced, but anecdotally netting reduces damage caused by hail as seen in previous studies in Queensland. The netting had no impact on the fruit growth rate, and flowering was not affected and no significant differences were seen in winter chill between the no net, black net and white net. The impact of the reduced PAR under the nets and the increased vigour could explain the poor colour development of the fruit. MORE INFORMATION Contact Susie Murphy White Pomewest Project Manager, Susan.Murphy-White@agric.wa.gov.au

Department of Agriculture and Food

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YOUR BUSINESS

YOUR

BUSINESS

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YOUR BUSINESS

Backpacker tax

$0.325

Backpacker Tax

on every dollar earned!

issues gather speed BY DONNA MOGG GROWCOM

A recent report on the ABC’s 7.30 Report has highlighted the horticulture industry’s key concerns around the government’s proposals around the ‘Backpacker tax’. The proposal, which is to remove access to the tax free threshold for backpackers and require them to pay 32.5c on every dollar earned. This tax rate brings their net hourly rate (at Level 1) down to $14.59 per hour. The government maintains that this change will bring around $540m into the coffers, going some way at least to plugging the growing deficit hole. The government also maintains that these workers are ‘on holiday’ and that this somehow justifies taxing them to the hilt. No economic modelling was done to assess the proposal’s potential impacts or benefits, beyond the headline figure mentioned above.

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But industry representatives have highlighted that this policy will have a range of fairly serious impacts around the ongoing availability of high volume, shortterm labour that is so vital to our seasonal industry. The reduction in disposable income will have effects on their ability to travel, with some who will struggle to support themselves with accommodation, food and transport, let alone the capacity to see more of the country. Australia is a high cost of living country — and wages are set to accommodate that. Removing significant amounts of income from travellers via the taxation system will do little to enhance our reputation as a destination of choice for those young people. We are already hearing from backpacker groups that travellers are reconsidering their plans in light of these proposed changes. One survey has had over 5,000 responses which clearly demonstrate the intentions of travellers not to seek second visas or to move onto other countries (New Zealand, Canada, South America, Indonesia). The other important consideration is what occurs when you remove large amounts of discretionary spending from small regional and rural centres.

REMOVING significant amounts of income from travellers via the taxation system will do little to enhance our reputation as a destination of choice for those young people.

Many small businesses rely on these workers spending their hard earned cash locally including pubs, cafes and shops, as well as tourist attractions and activities. While industry agrees that it is not unreasonable to require these workers to pay tax, a reasonable and sensible level of taxation that does not function as a disincentive to this vitally important workforce is required. Major policy decisions such as this deserve a robust analysis of likely impacts, and consultation with affected industries to ensure the effects do not cause other problems, no matter how unintended. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Donna Mogg, Growcom on phone: (07) 3620 3844 or email dmogg@growcom.com.au.


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YOUR BUSINESS

What’s new

for businesses in 2016? BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

Small businesses have access to a range of tax concessions from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The ATO can provide full details of instant asset write-offs, Capital Gains Tax roll-overs, income tax discounts and Fringe Benefits Tax concessions. Below we have detailed some of the points however we recommend you speak with your Accountant/Financial Advisor or check with the ATO for further information, prior to making any purchases or changes to your business.

Primary producers who are small businesses are also eligible to claim the instant asset write-off until 30 June 2017.

Fringe benefits tax Fringe benefits tax gross up rate increase from 1 April 2015. From 1 April 2015 the Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) rate will rise from 47% to 49%. The rate will be in place for two years as part of the Temporary Budget Repair Levy. These changes will also result in a change of the gross up rates for Type 1 and Type 2 benefits. The new FBT rates, from 1 April 2015 will be as follows: • Type 1 gross up rate — 2.1463 (currently 2.0802) • Type 2 gross up rate — 1.9608 (currently 1.8868) Your FBT lodgement will be due in May 2016 and the period runs from 1st April 2015 to 31st March 2016.

Asset deductions

Fuel tax credits — business

Effective immediately you are able to depreciate any eligible asset costing less than $20,000 which you buy from 7.30pm on 12 May 2015 until 30 June 2017. This means you'll be able to deduct the assets in the financial year in which you first use or install the asset. There is no limit on the number of eligible assets costing less than $20,000 that you can immediately depreciate, however you need to buy them between 7.30pm on 12 May 2015 and 30 June 2017.

Fuel tax credits provide businesses with a credit for the fuel tax (excise or customs duty) that's included in the price of fuel used in:

Accelerated depreciation for primary producers From 12 May 2015, primary producers can immediately deduct the costs of: • Fencing, which were previously deducted over a period up to 30 years • Water facilities, previously deducted over three years. • They can also deduct the cost of fodder storage assets over three years, instead of over a period up to 50 years.

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• Machinery • Plant • Equipment • Heavy vehicles. The amount depends on when you acquire the fuel, what fuel you use and the activity you use it in. Fuel tax credits rates also change regularly so it's important to check the rates each time you do your business activity statement (BAS). Some fuels and activities are not eligible including fuel you use in light vehicles of 4.5 tonnes gross vehicle mass (GVM) or less, travelling on public roads. See the ATO website for the up-to-date information www.ato.gov.au/business/ fuel-schemes/fuel-tax-credits--business

Tax cuts for small business If your small business has a turnover of less than $2 million per year, these tax breaks apply to you. • 1.5% tax cut for companies If your business is a company, you’ll get a tax cut of 1.5 percentage points from 1 July 2015. Your new company tax rate will be 28.5%. • 5% tax discount for other businesses If your business is not a company, you’ll get a 5% tax discount from 1 July 2015. This means the amount of tax you need to pay on your business income will be reduced by 5%, capped at $1,000 each year. Visit the (ATO) website for more on the company tax cut www.ato.gov.au/General/ New-legislation/In-detail/Direct-taxes/ Income-tax-for-businesses/SmallBusiness---tax-cuts-for-small-business

Payroll tax Payroll tax — WA Threshold for the wages of employees is $66,666 per month or $800,000 per year, once this is exceeded you are required to pay payroll tax of 5.50% please note from 1 July 2017 the annual rate will increase to $850,000 per annum.


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Help for farm families supporting their children’s further education BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

Farm assets have been cut from the Youth Allowance asset test to boost regional education.

THERE is no limit on the number of eligible assets costing less than $20,000 that you can immediately depreciate, however you need to buy them between 7.30pm on 12 May 2015 and 30 June 2017.

Organisations who can assist you with your queries in relation to your business: • Australian Tax Office www.ato.gov.au • ASIC www.asic.gov.au • Legal Aid WA www.legalaid. wa.gov.au/Pages/Default.aspx • Office of State Revenue www.finance.wa.gov.au/cms/ State_Revenue.aspx • Rural Financial Counselling Service WA www.rfcswa.com.au

The Social Security Act 1991 and the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999 were amended late last year to remove the Family Assets Test and the Family Actual Means Test from the Youth Allowance parental means test arrangements. The welfare support changes were announced in last year’s federal budget and the associated legislation passed through federal parliament in November with support.

The Family Assets Test is based on how much money a family would receive from selling their primary assets, minus any debts or mortgages they owe. The legislative changes mean farming families no longer have farm assets counted towards the means test for their dependent children claiming Youth Allowance. With a financial commitment from the government of $262.7 million, this legislation brings extra support to farm families as their children move into young adulthood, particularly rural and regional families who children continue to study beyond Year 12.

They are designed to help farming families’ better support their children in further study.

Youth Allowance — what you need to know: Financial help for people aged 16 to 24 years who are studying full time, undertaking a full time Australian Apprenticeship, training, looking for work. • 16 to 21 years of age and looking for full time work or undertaking approved activities • 18 to 24 years of age and studying full time • 16 or 17 years of age and have completed year 12 or equivalent, or undertaking full time secondary study and need to live away from home in order to study, or are considered independent for Youth Allowance, or • 16 to 24 years of age and undertaking a full time Australian Apprenticeship. MORE INFORMATION For more information go to: www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/ services/centrelink/youth-allowance

• Small Business Development Corporation www.smallbusiness. wa.gov.au MORE INFORMATION For more information on these topics contact Rebecca Blackman on (08) 9481 0834 or finance@vegetableswa.com.au.

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Safety tips

for new and young workers and their employers BY WORKSAFE

To talk to workers about safety and health

What are the employers’ responsibilities for workplace health and safety?

As an employer, you are responsible for sharing information with workers about workplace safety and health matters, including:

New and young workers may be backpackers, contract or labour hire workers. As an employer, you must, as far as practicable, ensure the work environment and systems of work are safe and healthy, regardless of the type and terms of their employment. This includes preventing them from both physical hazards (such as slippery floors, heavy loads, faulty and unguarded machinery and chemicals) and ‘psychosocial’ workplace hazards (such as bullying, violence and fatigue).

You must consider the tasks you give to new and young workers given their skills, abilities and experience. To provide training and supervision As an employer, you must make sure workers have enough information, training and supervision to enable them to work safely. This training must: • Show workers how to do their job safely and how to recognise hazards on the job; • Provide and show workers how to safely use the necessary machinery and equipment; and • Provide and show workers how to safely wear and use any personal protective clothing and equipment (PPE), such as gloves, safety footwear and goggles. You should also: • Show workers how to report any safety concerns or hazards; • Help them to get to know the workplace layout, their immediate supervisor, safety and health representative (if there is one) and co-workers; and • Make it easy for new and young workers to ask questions — don’t assume they will ask.

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• Asking for their input when looking at any workplace hazards and ways to control them; • Discussing new machinery and equipment when it is introduced into their work area; • Holding discussions at team or toolbox meetings where safety and health concerns can be raised; and • Holding discussions with safety and health representatives (if any).

What are new and young workers’ responsibilities for workplace safety and health? To work safely Look after yourself and others by:

• Wearing personal protective clothing and equipment (PPE) as required; and • Reporting unsafe situations and injuries to your supervisor, employer and/or safety and health representative. To ask if you’re not sure Find out how to do things safely by: • Taking the induction and training seriously; • Knowing and following the safety and health requirement of your job; and • If you are not sure how to do something safely, asking for help or training before you start the task.

Work is important, but your life is more important. Some ways you could ask your supervisor for help are to ask questions like: • ‘I’m not sure how this works, could you spare a few minutes to show me again?’

• Following all reasonable instructions for doing the job; • Following workplace procedures; • Not putting yourself or your workmates at risk;

BEFORE you engage labour hire workers to carry out work, you need to provide details of any hazardous chemicals they will need to use.


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• ‘I think I’ve got the hang of this, but can you watch to make sure I’m doing everything right?’ • ‘I’m still a bit uncomfortable with this, would you mind explaining it/or showing it to me again?’ To report your concerns If you are concerned about your own or your co-workers’ safety and health: • Talk to your supervisor, employer and/ or safety and health representative (if there is one) straight away — this might about slippery floors, lifting heavy loads, faulty or unguarded machinery and equipment, chemicals, bullying, violence or fatigue; • Talk to one of your more experienced co-workers; • If you work through a group training organisation or labour hire agency, report your concerns to them, as well; • If you are a work experience or structured workplace learning student, you should also speak to your teacher or trainer about your concerns;

— any hazardous substances to be used; — any other safety and health risks associated with the work; — any control measures to minimise the risk of injury; and — organisational and OSH management arrangements.

Verify that the selected worker/s have any necessary qualifications, licences, skills and training to carry out the work safely; • Consult with the agent on any OSH matters;

• Where attempts to resolve a safety and health issue at work have not succeeded and you think there is a risk of imminent and serious injury or harm to health, you can contact WorkSafe and request an inspector attend the workplace; and/or

• Discuss with the agent the contents of site specific OSH induction and required information, instruction and training outlining duties, policies, procedures and safe work practices, including consultation methods;

• Where attempts to resolve a safety and health issue at work have not succeeded and there is no risk of imminent and serious injury, you can contact WorkSafe for advice. If you wish an inspector to attend the workplace, your request will be considered — you can request that WorkSafe does not release your name to your employer.

• Discuss with the agent any required equipment, including personal protective clothing and equipment (PPE), the standards PPE must meet and who provides the PPE;

Do you use labour hire workers in your workplace?

• Establish open communication and consultation methods with the agent and the worker in relation to OSH matters, including changes to the job; and

Before engaging labour hire workers — what can you do? Before you engage labour hire workers to carry out work, you should: • Provide the agent with detailed information about the nature of work to be carried out including details of: — any skills, knowledge, training and experience required to safely undertake the work required; — the tasks to be carried out; — the working environment; — any plant or equipment to be used; — any manual tasks to be carried out;

• Eliminate or, if that is not reasonably practicable, minimise risks to labour hire workers in the workplace in consultation with the agent;

PROVIDE and show workers how to safely wear and use any personal protective clothing and equipment.

• Treat labour hire workers as you would your own employees, with respect to the provision of a safe working environment and the provision of PPE; • Provide adequate supervision of labour hire workers to ensure that work is being performed safely; • Consult with the agent and worker regarding any changes which may affect OSH — you should not transfer a worker to a new task or a new location until you have consulted with the worker about this and have obtained approval of the agent to the proposed change(s); • Provide any further instruction, information and training necessary prior to transferring a labour hire worker to a new task or a new location; • Encourage labour hire workers to participate in the identification of hazards specific to their work; • Support and encourage labour hire workers to participate in workplace consultative arrangements; • Allow the agent access to the workplace and to relevant documents for the purpose of workplace safety assessments and to fulfill their OSH duties as an employer; and • Encourage workers to maintain contact with the agent throughout their placement.

• Establish persons of contact for OSH matters between you and the agent, as well as agreed means and frequency of communication.

MORE INFORMATION

During a labour hire worker’s placement — what is your role as a host?

For the full document see the WorkSafe website www.commerce.wa.gov.au/sites/default/files/ atoms/files/vegetable_growers.pdf

While labour hire workers are carrying out work, you should: • Provide the worker(s) with site specific OSH induction and information, instruction and training outlining duties, policies, procedures and safe work practices, including consultation methods;

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Cashflow & bookkeeping

what you need to know BY REBECCA BLACKMAN FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

As we speedily head to the end of the financial year for 2016 there are a few things you can do now to make your end easier and quicker. Start by getting your finances in order, if you are lodging your accounts annually we would suggest you start lodging your BAS quarterly, not only will this improve your cashflow it can provide important information about where your business is at financially. If you need to make any adjustments prior to the end of the financial year to improve your tax position you still have time to do so.

Cashflow A cashflow forecast usually covers a 12 month period and can highlight upcoming cash surpluses or shortages, and help you to make the right decisions. It can also assist with tax preparation, planning new equipment purchases or identifying if you need to increase your available funds or working capital through an overdraft or other credit facility. By including every case scenario in your cashflow forecast, you will see how your business will cope if it hits tough times, or does better than expected. Prior warning allows you to work out solutions to anticipated temporary cash shortfalls or arrange short-term investments for temporary cashflow surpluses. As a general rule as vegetables are GST free if you lodge your BAS on a quarterly basis you may be due a refund from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) for any GST you have paid out!

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Depending on your purchases for the quarter this could be quite significant and help with the cashflow of your business and allow you to make important purchases. If you are too busy growing your business and simply hand in a box of receipts to your accountant at the end of the financial year you could be missing out on thousands every quarter, to assist you with growing your business.

Bookkeeping If you are getting your finances done quarterly or annually by an accountant, you could consider hiring a bookkeeper to keep your accounts up-to-date on a quarterly basis and lodge your BAS return. A bookkeeper can cost between $50–75/ hour however if they are processing your accounts on a regular basis this may only be a few hours a quarter for your BAS to be lodged and money refunded to you.

In addition to the cashflow benefit you will also have an understanding of how your business is progressing on a regular basis so you can invest or make decisions based on facts. Once the bookkeeper has finalised your accounts for the quarter you can take this information to your Accountant and then have the discussion to look at tax saving measures for your business and your structure. We would suggest this should be done on an annual basis in April/May to ensure you have enough time to make any of the required changes or purchases to help you save on your tax bill. MORE INFORMATION If you are looking for a bookkeeper you can trust, contact vegetablesWA as we are offering this service. For more information speak to Rebecca Blackman on (08) 9481 0834 or finance@vegetableswa.com.au or check out our website www.vegetableswa.com.au/ members-services/#bookkeeping

Getting the right Bookkeeper If your Accountant is lodging your BAS for you and not providing you tax or company advice we would suggest again looking at a bookkeeper who is a registered BAS/Tax Agent and can complete the same tasks for significantly less money. It is important when you are looking at hiring a bookkeeper that you ensure the following: • They are registered with the Tax Practitioners Board, this is a simple search on their website www.tpb. gov.au/TPB/Finding_and_using_a_ practitioner/Search_the_register/ tpb/agent_register.aspx • Check what accounting packages they use and if there are any fees associated with it • Services they undertake i.e. BAS, Accounting, Payroll, FBT, Fuel Tax Credits.


ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A BOOKKEEPER WHO UNDERSTANDS YOUR INDUSTRY?

CONTACT VEGETABLESWA TO DISCUSS YOUR REQUIREMENTS TODAY.

We can provide: · Online access to your accounts at anytime from anywhere on any device · Real time collaboration with your bookkeeper — everyone is on the ‘same page’ · Reconciliation of bank accounts · Preparation and lodgement of Business Activity Statements · Preparation and lodgement of Superannuation · Preparation and lodgement of Payroll Tax · Preparation and review of financial statements · Liaison with your accountant as required · Posting of end-of-year adjustments as directed by your accountant

CONTACT REBECCA BLACKMAN P (08) 9481 0834 E FINANCE@VEGETABLESWA.COM.AU

Contact vegetablesWA to discuss your requirements today or go to www.vegetableswa.com.au/membersservices/#bookkeeping


YOUR BUSINESS

Taking the hard work out of your business

growing 65%

One of the most common challenges in growing a business is the recruitment and ongoing management of employees.

Recruiting a new apprentice or trainee can be a blessing or a curse depending on your ability to choose the right person for the job and handle the paperwork. If you’re new at recruiting and managing employees, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

65% of respondents are spending between 1 and 10 hours a week on compliancerelated tasks.

BY DIANE GRAHAM SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

In a recent State of Small Business survey conducted by the Small Business Development Corporation, 65% of respondents said they were spending between one and ten hours a week on compliance-related tasks. Around half of the respondents reported outsourcing some of this work — mainly because they felt they didn’t have the time or in-house expertise to complete the tasks. One of the most common challenges involved in growing a business is the recruitment and ongoing management of employees. Deciding on the right skills mix, recruiting the right people and handling the administration of wages, taxation, superannuation and workers compensation. The compliance burden involved in running a business that employs full-time, parttime and casual workers can be timeconsuming and costly but where possible, steps are being taken to lighten this load and make it easier for small businesses to grow, employ others and get on with doing what they do best.

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Apprenticeship and traineeship support

The Australian Fair Work Ombudsman has developed a Pay and Conditions Tool (PACT) that calculates base pay rates, shift allowances and penalty rates (including overtime), leave, termination notice and redundancy entitlements. It’s easy to access and is acknowledged as an official information source in the event of a wages dispute.

The PACT also includes information and referrals on awards, employment contracts, managing performance, workplace rights and protections, and unfair dismissals. Simplifying superannuation For superannuation, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has introduced SuperStream, a service that promises to save small business owners time and money while streamlining the process of collecting, processing and paying superannuation for employees. It takes a little time to set up initially but once the employees’ superannuation details have been entered, SuperStream can reduce the time spent on administration by up to 70%. SuperStream is mandatory for small businesses so be sure to register before 30 June 2016.

Organisations such as the Australian Apprenticeship Support Network (AASN) can help you attract and recruit a suitable apprentice or trainee and can provide ongoing support throughout the course of the employment. They can also relieve you of the administrative burden by visiting your workplace to complete the paperwork, induct your apprentice into their qualification, and process claims for government incentives if you’re eligible.

MORE INFORMATION For more information, or to find an AASN provider in your area, call 13 38 73.

More information • For more information on starting a business or growing your existing business contact the Small Business Development Corporation on 13 12 49 or www.smallbusiness.wa.gov.au • Australian Fair Work Ombudsman Pay and Conditions Tool available at: www.fairwork.gov.au/pay/taxand-superannuation#1728-1733 • Register with SuperStream at: www.ato.gov.au/Super/ SuperStream • To find an Australian Apprentice Support Network provider in your area call 13 38 73.


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STRENGTH in the domestic market will provide you with cash flow and the working capital you need to invest in developing your export markets.

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Getting ready for export ARTICLE PROVIDED BY AUSTRADE

It’s important to consider if your business is ready and to be sure that you understand exactly what exporting entails before you start. Exporting consumes time and money, and requires strong management commitment. In the initial stages management are usually diverted from existing domestic business but for many companies, this short-term stress will provide longer term rewards.

To achieve success, you need to have a plan and remain in control of your business, and not let the business control you. What does it take to be ready for international business? To have a successful international business, you need a product or service which is in demand in overseas markets, as well as the necessary commitment, resources, skills and information to support sustained exporting activities over the longer term. The following are key signs your business is well on its way to being export ready: • Significant management time and strong management commitment — Developing an international business is no different to starting and building your domestic business; in fact, you can expect it to consume more management time than developing business at home. — Exporting requires substantial commitment from management across the business, not just from the CEO or sales manager. • Strength in the domestic market — In most cases, solid domestic sales form the basis of a good exporting business.

— A successful domestic business gives overseas buyers confidence in you as a supplier and will ensure that your business processes are in place and well tested. — Importantly, strength in the domestic market will also provide you with cash flow and the working capital you need to invest in developing your export markets. • The resources to succeed — Exporters find they need strong financial resources to expand overseas to cover the costs of product modifications, travel and international marketing, to name just a few of the additional costs you might face. — You also need to have the right people in place to run the export side of your business, and that may mean additional staff. • Business and export planning — Many smaller companies don’t get around to formal business planning, but once you start exporting you are moving your business to a different level, so it is wise to consider putting these plans in place. — If you do not have an Export Plan, the information available in Austrade’s Export Strategy and Planning guide will take you through the key elements. • Export knowledge and skills

XPORTERS find they need strong financial E resources to expand overseas to cover the costs of product modifications, travel and international marketing,

MORE INFORMATION For further information please see the Austrade website www.austrade.gov.au or contact Domini Jenkin.

Checklist 4 Take a course in export basics. These are provided periodically by Australian Horticultural Exporters Association, Austrade, AUSVEG, Australian Institute of Export, Cargohound, Chamber of Commerce and Industry WA, Export Council Of Australia, and Food Innovation Australia, to name a few. 4 Get your objectives right and commitment will follow. 4 Make a list of your concerns and discuss them with advisers. 4 Talk to your banker and accountant about your export plans. 4 Develop a list of agencies that can help. 4 Talk to an Export Adviser who can work with you through the process. 4 Websites provide real insights into your competition.

— To export successfully you will need to learn about a wide range of issues such as how foreign markets operate, export documentation and foreign currency management. — Read Austrade’s Information about markets around the world and use the How to Export guides to help increase your export knowledge and skills. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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How to start

exporting ARTICLE PROVIDED BY LEARN.NAB

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Selling into export markets is more complicated than dealing with domestic customers. It requires an understanding of the various logistical issues involved, a new skill set and a medium to long-term commitment to make the effort worthwhile. However, the rewards and expanded revenue streams can be very gratifying.


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Research your market The first step to exporting is to locate a promising market. You may find export prospects in several markets, but be careful of spreading your resources too thinly. One trial market at a time is a sensible approach, so narrow down the possibilities to one country.

Research options Choose a research method that suits your business. To keep costs down, you can do some of the basic research from Australia or you can commission a specialist to do the research. Be clear about the data you require and set a realistic budget. Get help from Austrade, where you’ll find country and industry profiles to help you identify export opportunities. You can learn more about expanding your business internationally and check if your business qualifies for any export grants. Visiting trade exhibitions in your target market or joining a trade mission abroad can be good ways to build contacts. Search the internet and the events section of the Austrade website to find relevant events or contact your nearest Chamber of Commerce.

Learn from others You’re unlikely to be the first Australian exporter in the market, so shorten the learning curve by tapping into the experience of others. Most exporters will be willing to share their market insights, which can save you from pitfalls, and help you find suitable agents and distributors. Contact Austrade about export networking opportunities.

Confirm demand Once you’ve found a likely market, establish if there’s demand for your product or service. Try to drill down deeper by finding an overseas equivalent to the Australian Bureau of Statistics that provides trade figures. You need some idea of the strength of the economy and preferably growth areas in the target market that offer the best opportunities. The most convincing evidence of demand will be sales you’ve already secured (perhaps online) or enquiries and sales leads through emails or your website.

Consider trialling your product or service in the market to confirm demand before you invest.

Validate your product Can you sell your product or service just as it is, or will the product need modifications to make it acceptable to different cultures and regulations? Research issues such as packaging, labelling, colours and quality and safety standards in the target country. For example, children’s toys will need to meet safety standards and electrical equipment may need anything from voltage and plug changes to local certification. Other issues to research include quotas, duties and tariffs or taxes that may apply which will affect your pricing.

Understand the competition Examine the industry structure so you know who you’re competing against. Your competitors aren’t going to sit on their hands if you start taking market share. How will you combat this?

One important step is to protect your brand, logo and any other intellectual property. Review IP Australia for more information.

Validate pricing How does all this affect your pricing? Remember to include any necessary commissions for agents or sales people. Your research into competitors in the overseas market should include their pricing structures. Can you bring your product or service to the market at a competitive price? If your prices will be higher than average, do you offer a compelling point of difference to justify the premium?

Confirm capacity If you gain a sudden large order from an overseas buyer, does your business have the capacity to fulfil this order and sustain supplies for your Australian customers? Nothing can undermine your credibility more quickly than failure to meet an export deadline. It’s easy to forget your key suppliers, but you must confirm their capabilities too. Are they able to grow with you? Don’t take this for granted without checking. OTHER issues to research include quotas, duties and tariffs or taxes that may apply which will affect your pricing.

Calculate the costs Launching your product in an overseas market can be costlier than calculated. There’s no real substitute for travel to get a feel for the market and the local competition, so include a travel budget in your export planning. You may need to travel repeatedly to your market to gain a foothold. Budget for product or service changes, producing suitable marketing materials and translating your website into another language. Also calculate the cost of launching and supporting your export activity, including product development and marketing. Indirect costs include time spent researching foreign regulations, standards and cultural preferences, and training staff to handle documentation and legal obligations.

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Understand the logistics Select sales channels What’s the best way to sell your product in your targeted country? Some options include: • A sales agent will find buyers in return for a commission on sales. Find out how many other products the agent handles. Too many products could see your product lost among the others. Agents also tend to push products that offer the most commission. • A distributor will buy your products from you and on-sell them with a mark-up, so you’re likely to have less control over pricing. Check the track records of both agents and distributors and consider a trial period first. • A joint venture with a local business can give you access to established customers and markets. • Opening a branch office overseas is usually the most expensive option. Exporters often reserve this option for when other methods have established strong, sustainable sales and they need more control over issues such as aftersales service.

YOU will need to consider the best way to transport your produce and the climate of the countries it may pass through.

Transport options Identify the most suitable mode of transport for your goods and assess the cost. You might need to consider the climate of the countries the goods pass through or the best way to transport perishable or fragile goods. Freight forwarders offer a comprehensive goods transport service and may be able to save you costs by consolidating your goods with other consignments if you only need to ship a part-container load. A forwarder also assumes responsibility for documentation and bookings for air, rail, shipping and road transport.

Ask your business colleagues or your trade or industry association to recommend suitable businesses. Avoid the pitfalls The potential pitfalls include:

cash flow forecast that identifies all your anticipated likely costs before you commit to an export deal.

Export commitment Exporting usually requires a medium to long-term commitment to repay the effort and investment. Don’t imagine you can crack new markets quickly. There’s no real substitute for face-to-face negotiations. Get to know the local market and understand its needs. You might have to travel frequently or spend months negotiating a deal, so allocate sufficient business time and money to exporting.

Next steps List all of the potential issues you’ll face when exporting for the first time and then create solutions for each of these. • Browse the Austrade website and review the Federal Government’s section on exporting.

• Selling online is the lowest cost option, but may not work for your product or service type. You’ll also need to research internet trading regulations to stay on the right side of the law in your target market.

• Home market neglect. Be careful of neglecting existing customers in the excitement of developing an export market. You may need to delegate staff to cover some of your domestic market duties to ensure revenues don’t fall.

• Visit IP Australia and the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) website for information on protecting IP in foreign markets.

Service and backup

• Money risks. International trade transactions can be tricky. Pitfalls include currency volatility, the creditworthiness of your overseas customers and time lags between shipment and getting paid. Talk to your bank to help you manage your transactions and help protect you from the impact of currency, commodity and interest rate fluctuations.

Please note that this is a guide only and should neither replace competent advice, nor be taken, or relied upon as financial or professional advice. Seek professional advice before making any decision that could affect your business.

What will you need in the way of product or service warranties, spares, after-sales service or a help desk? What insurance cover do you need? Some markets like the USA are highly litigious, so you may need expert advice on product liability issues. Local facilitators It can be difficult finding your way around a foreign market, particularly if there are language issues. Austrade may be able to help you find interpreters and other facilitators such as agents who can deal with customs and shipping clearances in foreign ports.

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Once you’ve done your homework, put your findings and decisions in an export plan that fits within the framework of your existing business plan. This might help you get any funding you may need. It’s recommended you create an export

• Contact a Chamber of Commerce about export workshops you can attend.

MORE INFORMATION For further information please see http://businesstips.nab.com.au/category/ international-business/ or contact Dominic Jenkin. © National Australia Bank Limited ABN 12 004 044 937 AFSL and Australian Credit Licence 230686.


Two centuries of innovation. A lifetime of success. Caldo

F1

-

Fruit Numbers & Quality

+ + + + + +

Good against sunburn! Strong setting ability Thick walled, firm, smooth & blocky fruit Strong compact plant type covers fruit well Excellent shelf life Good resistance package

+ +

Resistances : HR: Tm:0,1 / PVY:0,1,2 / Xv:1,2,3 IR: CMV / Pc

Platynum

F1 - Unbeatable Uniformity

+ + + + +

Strong plant with unique disease package Uniform large fruit size of 18-22g Suitable for greenhouse & open field Brilliant dark red, firm, round fruit Very good fruit numbers

+ +

Resistances : HR: ToMV / Va:1 / Vd:1 / Fol:1,2,3 / C5 IR: TSWV:T0 / TYLCV / Ma / Mi / Mj

Lizarra

F1

Fruit Quality with Unique Disease Package

+ +

+

Strong plant with high yields Excellent fruit quality, firm & sweet, bright & glossy red colour Uniform size bottom to top, mini-plum fruit shape (18-20g) Suitable for greenhouse & open field

+ +

Resistances : HR: ToMV / Fol:1,2,3 IR: TSWV:T0, TYLCV / Ma / Mi / Mj

+

For more information, contact: Kevin Swan – Sales & Development Manager – Tel: 0400 622 314 – kevin.swan@hmclause.com Important: The descriptions, illustrations, photographs, advice, suggestions and vegetation cycles that may be presented herein are aimed at experienced professionals and are derived from observations made in defined conditions on various trials. They are offered in all good faith, for purely informational purposes, and shall not therefore, under any circumstances, be held to be exhaustive, be taken as any form of guarantee of harvest or performance, prejudge specific factors or circumstances (either current or future), and more generally, form any kind of contractual undertaking whatsoever. The user must first and foremost ensure that his exploitation conditions, local geographical conditions, his planned growing period, his soil, the means at his disposal (such as technical knowledge and experience and cultural techniques and operations), his resources (such as tests and control methods) and his equipment, and more generally his agronomical, climatic, sanitary, environmental and economic context are suitable for the crops, techniques and varieties that are presented herein. All the varieties illustrated in this publication were photographed in favourable conditions and no guarantee can be provided that results will be identical under different conditions. All reproductions, whether in part or in whole, of this publication (of the medium and/or the contents), in any form whatsoever, are strictly forbidden, unless specific prior permission is granted. Non contractual photographs - All rights reserved - © 2014 HM.CLAUSE

Clause Pacific - P.O. Box 475 - Bulleen - VIC 3105 - AUSTRALIA Tel: +61 (0)3 8850 5400 - Fax: +61 (0)3 8850 5444


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®

Incoterms explained Incoterms® are used to define where ownership, risk and the responsibilities of buyers (generally importers) and sellers (generally exporters) transfer throughout the shipping process.

Before goods are shipped, the seller and buyer need to decide: • Who will arrange for carriage? • Who will pay for carriage? • Who will bear risk of loss or damage to goods? • Who is to be responsible for what?

Sharing of tasks, costs and risks See Figure 1 to see where your ownership, risk and responsibilities begin and end: Ex Works (EXW) — The seller delivers when he/she places the goods at the disposal of the buyer at the seller's premises or another named place (e.g. factory, warehouse) not cleared for export and not loaded on any collecting vehicle. The named placed should be specifically stated as the goods travel at the buyer's risk and cost from this point. Free Carrier (FCA) — The seller delivers the goods, cleared for export, to the carrier nominated by the buyer at the named place. If delivery occurs at the seller's premises; the seller is responsible for loading. If delivery occurs at another place, the seller is not responsible for

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loading. If the buyer nominates a person other than the carrier to receive the goods, the seller is deemed to have fulfilled his/ her obligation to deliver the goods when they are delivered to that person. Carriage Paid To (CPT) — The seller delivers the goods to the carrier nominated by him/her and in addition must pay the cost of carriage necessary to bring the goods to the named destination. The buyer bears all risks and any other costs occurring after the goods have been delivered. If subsequent carriers are used, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier. The CPT term requires the seller to clear the goods for export but has no obligation to clear goods for import. Carriage and Insurance Paid To (CIP) — The seller delivers the goods to a carrier nominated by him/her and in addition must pay the cost of carriage and insurance necessary to bring the goods to the named destination. The buyer bears all risks and additional costs after the goods have been delivered. If subsequent carriers are used, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier.

MARINE Transit insurance will cover you door to door, whether this be from the farm to Canning Vale markets or from the farm to Singapore.

The seller contracts for minimum insurance cover and pays the premium. The CIP term requires the seller to clear the goods for export. Delivered At Terminal (DAT) — The seller delivers the goods. Once unloaded from the arriving means of transport, the goods are placed at the disposal of the buyer at a named terminal at the named port or place of destination. DAT requires the seller clear the goods for export but has no obligation to clear goods for import. If the parties wish the seller to clear the goods for import the DDP term should be used. Delivered At Place (DAP) — The seller delivers when the goods are placed at the disposal of the buyer on the arriving means of transport ready for unloading at the named place of destination. The seller bears all risks involved in bringing the goods to the named place.


YOUR MARKET

DESCRIPTION

EXW

EX WORKS

FCA

FREE CARRIER

CPT

CARRIAGE PAID TO

CIP

CARRIAGE AND INSURANCE PAID TO

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer Buyer

Seller Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer Buyer

Seller Buyer

Seller

DAT

DELIVERED AT TERMINAL

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

DELIVERED AT PLACE

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

DDP

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

DAP

DELIVERED DUTY PAID

FAS

FREE ALONGSIDE SHIP

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

FOB

FREE ON BOARD

CIF

Buyer

Seller

Buyer Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer Buyer

Seller

COST, INSURANCE AND FREIGHT Risks

Buyer

Seller

CFR

COST AND FREIGHT

Cost

Seller Seller

Buyer

Seller

Buyer

Seller Insurance

All modes of transport

Sea and inland waterways

FIGURE 1 Sharing of tasks, costs and risks Source: Cargohound, www.cargohound.com

AP requires the seller clear the goods for export but has no obligation to clear goods for import. If the parties wish the seller to clear the goods for import the DDP term should be used. Delivered Duty Paid (DDP) — The seller delivers the goods, cleared for import, but not unloaded, at the named place of destination. The seller has to bear all costs and risks involved in bringing the goods thereto. DDP represents the maximum obligation of the seller.

Free Alongside Ship (FAS) — The seller delivers when the goods are placed alongside the vessel nominated by the buyer at the named port of shipment. The buyer bears all costs and risks of loss of, or damage to the goods from that moment. Free On Board (FOB) — The seller delivers when the goods are on board the vessel nominated by the buyer at the named port of shipment. This means that the buyer has to bear all costs and risks of loss or damage to the goods from that point. The FOB term requires the seller to clear the goods for export.

Cost and Freight (CFR) — The seller delivers when the goods are on board the vessel nominated by the seller at the port of shipment. The seller must pay the costs and freight necessary to bring the goods to the port of destination BUT the risk of loss or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after delivery on board at port of shipment are for the buyer. The CFR term requires the seller to clear the goods for export but has no obligation to clear for import. Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) — The seller delivers when the goods are on board the vessel nominated by the seller at the port of shipment. The seller must pay the costs, insurance and freight necessary to bring the goods to the port of destination BUT the risk of loss of or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to events occurring after delivery on board at port of shipment are for the buyer. The CIF term requires the seller to clear the goods for export but has no obligation to clear for import.

As a grower who exports produce you will most commonly use FOB or CIF for your goods. We would suggest that no matter what option and even if you aren’t exporting that you ensure you have Marine Transit insurance. Marine Transit insurance will cover you door to door, whether this be from the farm to Canning Vale markets or from the farm to Singapore. If you are unsure whether you have adequate cover, contact the vegetablesWA team ((08) 9481 0834 or finance@vegetableswa.com.au) and we can put you in touch with a reputable insurance broker. Cargohound are an online freight market place and can reduce time, costs and risks. They have a range of relevant blogs, tools and resources. Check out their website for further information https://cargohound.com/. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact on exporting produce contact Dominic Jenkin on 0427 373 037 or dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au.

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THE Export Market Development Grants scheme encourages businesses to increase international marketing and promotion expenditure to achieve more sustainable international sales.

Export market development grants at a glance The Export Market Development Grants (EMDG) scheme is a key Australian Government financial assistance programme for small to medium aspiring and growing export-ready businesses.

Who can apply?

What can be claimed?

An Australian individual, partnership, company, association, cooperative or statutory corporation that has:

• Overseas representation expenses

It encourages businesses to increase international marketing and promotion expenditure to achieve more sustainable international sales. It also provides businesses with an opportunity to enter and embed themselves in global value chains — something that encompasses 80% of global trade. EMDG recipients include many of Australia’s best known exporters. The vast majority of recipients report that the scheme is invaluable in helping them access new markets, and develop better international business and cultural understanding.

• Promoted certain services in Australia to non-residents

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• Carried on business in Australia • Promoted the export of goods • Promoted the delivery of services outside Australia

• Promoted inbound tourism • Promoted the export of intellectual property and know-how outside Australia • An income of less than $50 million for the year • Spent at least $15,000 on eligible export promotional activities. A trustee may also apply on behalf of a trust.

• Marketing consultant expenses • Marketing visits expenses • Communications expenses • Free samples expenses • Trade fairs, seminars, in-store promotions expenses • Promotional literature and advertising expenses • Overseas buyers’ expenses • Registration and/or insurance of eligible intellectual property expenses.

What do you get? • Up to 50% reimbursement of eligible expenses, less the first $5,000 • Each applicant may receive a grant of up to $150,000 per application, to a maximum of eight annual grants


YOUR MARKET

• Grants are regarded as assessable for income tax purposes

In the 2014–15 financial year:

• The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has confirmed that GST will not apply to EMDG grants.

• Grants worth $140.8 million were distributed to 3,137 exporters

What cannot be claimed?

• 793 exporters entered the scheme for the first time

Expenses that: • Relate to trade with New Zealand, Iran and North Korea • Are of a capital nature • Relate to sales or product development • Are fraudulent, unsubstantiated or related to an illegal activity. The GST component of incurred expenses cannot be claimed under EMDG.

• Businesses that received grants generated $3.9 billion in exports • 15% of grants were to rural and regional Australia • 72% of recipients had turnover of less than $5 million • The average grant was $44,270 • Clients have consistently given the scheme a satisfaction rating of over 85%.

Special approval applicants Industry associations and joint ventures are able to seek ‘special approval’ status from Austrade to enable them to apply for a grant. Special approval status is effective for five years from the approval date. If you would like further information about how to apply for these special status categories, please contact Austrade.

The EMDG scheme was reviewed in 2015 by Mr Michael Lee, the former CEO of Zip Industries. The review report can be accessed on the Austrade website at www.austrade.gov.au then go to: For Australians > For Exporters > Export Grants > 2015 Review of the EMDG scheme.

Key facts about EMDG After the 2013 election, the Coalition Government allocated an additional $50 million to the scheme over four years from 2013–14.

How to apply To find out more about the application process, go to www.austrade.gov.au/ Export/Export-Grants and select ‘How to apply’. From this page you can also make sure your business is eligible to apply by reviewing the EMDG eligibility check list.

You can contact Austrade on 13 28 78 at any time to clarify your eligibility. When to apply For expenses incurred in the 2014–15 financial year, you must complete and submit your online application, including the required documents, between 1 July 2015 and close of business 30 November 2015. Or you can use an approved EMDG Consultant who can lodge a claim on your behalf until 29 February 2016. MORE INFORMATION This project has been funded by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA. Dominic Jenkin, Export Development Manager dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au Contact Austrade on 13 28 78 or go to www.austrade.gov.au/export/export-grants

EXPORT Market Development Grants provide businesses with an opportunity to enter and embed themselves in global value chains — something that encompasses 80% of global trade.

Austrade

13 28 78 to apply!

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What’s on the menu in 2016?

BY ROD ARENAS MARKET DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, FOOD INNOVATION AUSTRALIA LIMITED

Australia’s growth driver will rest increasingly on food exports as international buyers diversify their product sourcing options. Supported by a Government now focused on innovation, the opportunity is here for those willing to improve their processes, connect to the market opportunity to take advantage of the recent free trade agreements as the Market Development Manager at FIAL, Rod Arenas explains.

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Australia’s reputation for supplying natural high quality products, supported by strict safety standards and regulation across the supply chain, gives Australian products a superior level of prominence among other nations.

DEMAND from Asia for premium healthy and safe Australian food products are at an all-time high.

Australian made food and beverage products are internationally perceived as clean and premium.

Combining these advantages with the push in Asian markets to provide imported ranges beyond European and United States products, the opportunity for Australian exporters has never been better.

Demand for Australian food and beverage products are at an all-time high. Interest from Asia is soaring and there is significant opportunity for local manufacturers to leverage the demand for premium Westernstyle products that are healthy and safe. Australia also has excellent research and development facilities both public and private — with the Government now focused on assisting in the innovation process by facilitating development of new and differentiated products as well as continual improvements to packaging and production processes.

Key advantages for the Australian market are our renowned notability for quality, safety and traceability, as well as our proximity to Asia, which means longer in-market shelf life.

Demand for Australian food and agribusiness products is bolstered by the industry’s multifaceted strengths, including: • High food quality standards and traceability • Clean, green and safe • Premium food and high end beverages • Speed to market • Proximity to market (Asian countries) • Functional foods with nutritional benefits


YOUR MARKET

• Food products that meet cultural or religious requirements • Innovative food products and technologies • Australian supplier shifts from trading to marketing approach. International buyers are diversifying their product sourcing options from Europe and the USA to now include NZ, Korean, Japanese and especially Australian products. Also, the explosion of E-commerce in China and emerging middle class wanting to purchase Australian premium brands & fresh produce creates new export revenue opportunities for the industry. International buyers are not open to all new suppliers. They are seeking businesses that can show they: are reliable suppliers of consistently high-quality products; take a strategic and long-term view to their markets; are prepared to support buyers with promotional activity; and don’t have minimum quantities for initial orders, to enable new buyers to test the product before committing to larger volumes. Buyers of supermarket food and beverages are looking for products that have both a strong marketable story behind their product and unique attributes that makes their product novel compared to others. While price is not the main factor for highend supermarkets, it still plays a part in the decision-making process as the product must still demonstrate value for money as it is being compared with brands globally. Recent free trade agreements have also bolstered export opportunities for Australian food and beverage suppliers.

Trade agreements have opened unprecedented export opportunities for Australian exporters. For example, the Malaysian Australia Free Trade Agreement (MAFTA) has seen a major increase in demand for Australian food and agribusiness products, along with long-term benefits as population growth estimates to a nation of 35 million people of ‘high income’ by 2020. Food Innovation Australia Limited (FIAL) offers opportunities for food and agribusinesses to take part in workshops, training programs, dialogues with other businesses, connections with overseas buyers, matched grant funding to eligible businesses and information to build firmlevel export capabilities and networks to innovate and grow. The goal is to strengthen small and medium businesses global connections to enable them to find new markets for their products or alternate suppliers of key product or services.

In collaboration with expert partners, FIAL develops programs of relevance to industry and delivers these initiatives through a wide range of workshops and seminars across the country. These initiatives provide food and agribusiness with the right information to innovate their process and products, and to give companies the skills and confidence to compete more effectively in local and export markets. In addition, FIAL hosts an eCatalogue — a searchable directory of Australian food and agribusinesses that is developed for both domestic and international buyers to source Australian growers and manufacturers of food and agribusinesses. The eCatalogue is open to all supermarket categories across food and beverages, and is free for businesses to join. MORE INFORMATION This project has been funded by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA. For further information please see the website www.fial.com.au or contact Dominic Jenkin at dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au

INTERNATIONAL buyers are seeking businesses are reliable suppliers of consistently high-quality products.

Trade agreements now in place: • China

• ASEAN

• New Zealand

• Malaysia

• USA

• Korea

• Singapore

• South Korea

• Thailand

• Japan.

• Chile Trade agreements in discussions: • India

• GCC

• Indonesia

• Pacer Plus

• TPP

• RCEP. WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

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UN Comtrade

gaining export market insights using trade data BY DOMINIC JENKIN EXPORT DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, HORTICULTUREWA

The United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database (UN Comtrade) was established in the early 1960s. For almost fifty years, it has provided a wealth of trade information to policy makers, business community, research institutions and the general public. It stores standardised official monthly trade statistics reported by countries and reflecting international merchandise flows detailed by commodity and partner country with coverage reaching up to 99% of world merchandise trade.

TABLE 1 Australia's pome and vegetable exports, 2014 Commodity and trading region

Volume (kg)

Apples^ Eastern Asia

61,280

Eastern Europe Oceania South-Eastern Asia

$2.88

4,032

$0.98

Eastern Europe

$1.92

Oceania

Unit value (USD/kg)

South-Eastern Asia

3,675,439

$0.70

11,340

$0.87

653,441

$1.02

24,456,781

$0.67

314,491

$2.07

Southern Asia

16,632

$1.13

Southern Asia

184,250

$0.63

Western Asia

8,191

$3.11

Western Africa

26,860

$0.41

233,504

$3.20

Western Europe Asparagus* Eastern Asia

9,373

$9.35

Eastern Asia

76,283

353,987

$4.40

Oceania

7,840

$5.98

South-Eastern Asia

17,576

$2.94

Celery, other than celeriac*

1,407

$4.85

South-Eastern Asia

1,666,133

$3.01

4,641

$4.47

Western Asia

Beans, shelled or unshelled*

South-Eastern Asia

$0.69

Cauliflowers and headed broccoli*

Since UN Comtrade became available on the Internet in 2003, it allowed free access to any data record to any user worldwide by enabling them to run unlimited data queries. Recognising that official statistics are a good public resource and that the demand for data has increased, UNSD will ensure that each and every user of trade statistics will have unlimited free access to trade data, subject to our technical constraints.

Oceania

$0.71

580,190

$5.22

Western Asia

Eastern Asia

46,285,345

3,029,796

Oceania South-Eastern Asia

Western Asia Western Europe

Oceania

246,101

$2.14 $2.24

439,690

$2.38

91,669

$1.36

1,276,423

$1.08

Southern Asia

3,375

$0.92

Western Asia

45,392

$1.62

97,769

$1.07

88,843

$3.50

7,523

$3.60

Chicory* except witloof

Eastern Asia

11,286

$2.51

South-Eastern Asia

Oceania

18,324

$2.75

Cucumbers and gherkins

163,437

$3.23

Oceania

8,572

$2.96

South-Eastern Asia Western Asia Brussels sprouts* Oceania South-Eastern Asia Western Asia

*

South-Eastern Asia

Edible brassicas not elsewhere specified* 52,760

$5.61

Eastern Asia

1,930

$2.59 $1.13

1,765

$5.76

Oceania

273,368

118,941

$2.57

South-Eastern Asia

515,514

$1.41

3,400

$4.24

Southern Asia

24,138

$0.55

Western Asia

3,780

$3.75

Garlic* 78,374

$2.48

Cabbage lettuce (head lettuce)* Eastern Asia

33,236

$4.60

Oceania

42,156

$2.07

Oceania

331,215

$3.29

Leeks & other alliaceous vegetables*

18,674

$4.29

Eastern Asia

South-Eastern Asia Western Asia

$2.84

2,634,430

Oceania

Beetroot, salsify, celeriac, radishes etc*

Eastern Asia

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

Volume (kg)

Eastern Asia

1,241,702

Aubergines (egg-plants)*

94

Commodity and trading region Carrots and turnips*

Free data downloading services

For further information and to explore UN Trade data go to http://comtrade.un.org/.

Unit value (USD/kg)

9,462

$4.72

Oceania

28,563

$3.10

South-Eastern Asia

43,759

$2.57


YOUR MARKET

THE UN Comtrade data is there to help you ascertain what price you need to make exports work for your business and grow your market.

Commodity and trading region

Volume (kg)

Unit value (USD/kg) $3.37

Eastern Asia

167,647

$5.19

Oceania

85,142

$2.87

South-Eastern Asia

571,886

$4.49

Southern Asia

25,217

$2.26

Western Asia

965,811

$1.30

Eastern Asia

3,013,196

$1.43

Oceania South-Eastern Asia

South-Eastern Asia

4,828

Lettuce* except cabbage lettuce Oceania South-Eastern Asia Western Asia

8,058,580

Eastern Europe

Melons^

Unit value (USD/kg) $0.65

13,400

$0.73

500,050

$1.39

13,531,195

$0.67

4,900

$1.28

1,758,555

$0.97

Spinach*

Eastern Asia Oceania South-Eastern Asia

3,879,689

$1.21

Western Asia

2,240,225

$1.87

Western Asia

1,450

$4.26

Tomatoes*

Western Europe Onions and shallots* Eastern Asia

Eastern Asia 6,349,430

$0.68

Oceania

740,580

$1.06

South-Eastern Asia

South-Eastern Asia

4,097,965

$0.53

Watermelons

Western Asia

3,067,620

$0.68

Eastern Asia

26,837,280

$0.54

Eastern Europe

4,438

$8.49

South-Eastern Asia

11,029

$2.60

Oceania

Western Europe

Peas, shelled or unshelled* Oceania South-Eastern Asia

Peppers (capsicum, pimenta) Oceania South-Eastern Asia

533,585

$3.46

14,511

$4.14

South-Eastern Asia Western Africa

Western Asia South-Eastern Asia ^

Fresh; Fresh or chilled *

Source: comtrade.un.org

Potatoes seed Oceania

$5.69

5,944

$10.24

86,991

$6.59

5,741

$6.72

30,481

$3.22

550,911

$2.28

197,949

$4.76

2,560

$1.72

16,560

$2.04

2,618,557

$0.99

9,075

$1.51

1,196,396

$1.20

6,692

$10.74

Australia’s pome and vegetable exports, 2014 Table 1 is an example of the type of information that can be extracted from this database. It details the traded volume and average unit values of Australia’s pome and vegetable exports in the 2014 calendar year.

Witloof chicory*

*

Eastern Asia

28,812

^

Oceania

*

Western Asia

Volume (kg)

Potatoes* except seed

Legumes* except peas & beans

Eastern Asia

Commodity and trading region

2,780

$2.93

15,800

$1.23

1,843,430

$0.74

995,000

$1.02

37,980

$2.02

MORE INFORMATION This project has been funded by the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA. For further information please contact Dominic Jenkin on dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au

Department of Agriculture and Food

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YOUR MARKET

Australian dollar where to in 2016? BY PETE JOHNSON ON CARGOHOUND 09/02/16 Op: 0.72839, Hi:0.72999, Lo:0.72039, Cl:0.72107

0.83000 0.82000

The key to trying to work out where the dollar might go probably relies on an understanding of the underlying influences on price — and how they might come into play over the coming twelve months.

0.81000

Commodity prices

0.71000

Iron ore futures prices have fallen from about US$65/MT (CFR China) at the start of last year to around US$42.50/MT at the moment (albeit up from mid-December lows of closer to US$36/MT). That is a yearly fall of about 35% — and compares to an overall slide on the CRB Index of 24%. Thus, with an annual fall of ‘just’ 10% for the AUD/USD it’s arguable that the currency ‘outperformed’ in 2015 based on a direct comparison. ‘Where to’ for the iron ore price is extremely difficult to call — we are now back to levels not seen since late 2007 — but the old adage ‘low prices cure low prices’ may be a misnomer in this case given that prior to 2005, the iron ore price had not traded above US$20/MT CFR China! Toss a coin on this one but on balance, it’s hard to see commodity prices being a ‘positive’ influence on the AUD/USD in 2016.

0.69000 Jan 15 Feb

Interest rate differentials The difference in interest rates between Australia and the USA influences the relative rate of return investors can achieve in either country — and hence demand for each currency. The market expected a tightening in the interest rate differential in 2015, and it got it.

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0.80000

0.7947 (50%)

0.79000 0.78000 0.77000 0.76000 0.75000

0.7400 = medium-term resistance

0.74000 0.73000 0.72107

0.7208 (61.80%)

0.70000

Medium-term uptrend line

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec Jan 16

Month FIGURE 1 Australian dollar/US dollar — Daily Open-High-Low-Close (OHLC) chart Source: Foreign Exchange 04/01/2016

The US FOMC raised official rates from 0.25 to 0.50% through 2015, whilst in Australia, the RBA lowered rates from 2.5% to 2.0%. For 2016, my money would be on a further easing in Australia of around 0.25%, while the US Fed clearly has plenty of room to tighten rates further. The reality is that with the Australian economy generally sluggish at best, and with the US recovery now well under way (and with plenty of room to move on fiscal policy) a further narrowing in the interest rate differential would appear logical — providing further weight on the Aussie Dollar.

Technical Charts are worth watching for the not insignificant reason that they are a key tool for screen based traders at the big end of town — with big money to throw at the market. Technically, the Aussie Dollar is working within a medium term 4-month uptrend within a longer term 4½-year downtrend.

There is strong resistance between 0.7350 and 0.7400 above the market, with trendline support coming in around 0.7150. If support at the uptrend line can be broken, then the September 2015 lows of 0.69 look like the next technical support level.

Summary In summary, from a fundamental perspective it still feels as though headwinds are likely for the Australian dollar through 2016. From a technical perspective, a break above 0.7400 would signal that the long term downtrend is over, whilst a break below 0.715 (and more importantly 0.69) would suggest lower currency levels are in store. MORE INFORMATION For further information contact Dominic Jenkin. Originally published: www.cargohound.com/Blog/Postview/ australis-trading-partners-who-to-watchin-2016


YOUR SELF

YOUR

SELF

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YOUR SELF

12

of the best veggie/vegan cafes in Perth

1 Little Shop of Plenty 217 Railway Parade Maylands

Born from the dream of helping folks to achieve better health simply by eating better food, Little Shop of Plenty have expanded from their regular Saturday stall at the Subiaco Farmers Markets, to a divine cafe in Maylands. Proving that a plant based diet doesn’t need to be boring or dull, the menu is packed full of delicious options. The food is all organic and vegan friendly and could be for breakfast, lunch or a snack — whatever you need! They have Kombucha tea on tap (yep, sold me already) and a fridge entirely dedicated to healthy sweets. Must tries include; Cocowhip — and add on some drool worthy toppings like chuck hazelnut fudge chunks… why wouldn’t you?; Hibiscus & Rose Kombucha tea (ridiculously refreshing and good for your gut!); Original Kombucha and Raw ‘super’ fudge (made from medijool dates and activated almonds).

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BY RACHEL DOWDY GREEN GOODNESS CO

2

3

4

Manna Wholefoods The Wolf The Soul Tree Organic 274 South Terrace Bean The Walnut Café South Fremantle

Whether you’re looking for a colourful salad, delicious sweet treat or want to stock up on some organic products, Manna Wholefoods is a must visit if you are in the Freo area. They are even stocking organic coconut ice-cream! I’m dying to get my hands on the salted caramel flavour (drool). The kitchen offers a range of amazing options — gluten free, dairy free, sugar free. There are racks of rawness, vegan and vegetarian delights. So you are never short for choice here.

6/800 Hay Street Perth

Shop 6, 3-5 Railway Parade Glen Forest

If you haven’t been exploring this little gem in Wolf Lane, then you’re missing out! The food and vibe of the cafe is just as colourful and vibrant as the lane it’s located in! Whether you’re heading in to fuel up before a big day of shopping, or stopping in to get a coffee or juice, the menu does not disappoint.

The Soul Tree’s purpose is to create an awesome space to feed your body, mind and soul. And that is exactly what they’ve done. For a coast dweller like me, this hills based location is a perfect little getaway from every day life. Head up into the hills, with some rockin’ car trip tunes, bring your runners for some bush walking, and then nourish your body with the deliciousness that is their menu. From tree-Mendous burgers to all day breakfast, the menu is full of tasty, veggie and vegan meals.


YOUR SELF

Whether you are vegetarian, vegan or just love your veggies like me, finding café’s that have a wide selection of vegan and vegetarian options can be difficult. To make it easier for everyone who is #livingthegreen to find these, we have put together our top picks for vegan and veggie cafes in Perth! Whilst there are many more you can check out, go to our website http://greengoodnessco.com.au/ to search for the closest to you.

5

6

The Green Bean Organic Store & Cafe

Heaven Raw Cafe Loving Hut 26 Montreal Street Fremantle

366 Albany Highway Victoria Park

Something Raw

This adorable place is a raw, vegan and nature friendly cafe, where you are surrounded by gardens and plants to relax and chill out. These guys offer raw classes and workshops, you can get involved in the community centre, and of course food! Even though the menu isn’t huge, it’s all delicious and wonderful wholesome goodness. Fremantle’s best kept secret. It is hidden away from the main streets and the centre of Freo, tucked away in the FERN community garden on Montreal Street.

Perth’s Loving Hut is a cafe that offers a range of purely plant-based (vegan) food, lovingly prepared and served in a beautiful, friendly and tranquil atmosphere. They use as much organic vegetables and non-GMO products as possible, so you can have natural, healthy and delicious meals. The selection of vegan groceries/candy/snacks etc. is great and features some hardto-find items like Notzarella and Jokers bars. There is lots to try including ice cream, cakes, cupcakes, pies, curries and veggies. This is my local so I have tried alot of the menu, my fav picks are the all of the smoothies, the big breakfast, the salted chocolate and peanut butter tart and the soft serve ice cream. Oh and the macaroons are a must!

Something Raw is a bit of a drive, but once you have been you will be hanging to get back, and drag your veggie friends along. It has lots of delicious veggie sounding options… from wheatgrass shots with lemon to raw pizza, to ‘bacon and eggs’ to the super acai bowl with granola on top and of course lots of delicious salads. My fav is the bruschetta, the tomatoes, onions and herbs are fresh and super flavoursome, and the salad wrap which is huge and packed with fresh salad. There are so many different delicious options. Also if you are interested, the menu offers the calories and macros for the dishes, which is a nice touch!

25D Gallipoli Street Lathlain

You may have seen these guys on our Pet Friendly Cafe list from a few months back! Pet friendly + delicious food = winner for me! They’ve got some really tasty vegan and veg options on the menu like the vegan rice ball and frittata of the day — it’s good, simple food done well. Whilst you’re there, you can get some of your organic shopping done as well!

FOR more vegan and veggie cafes in Perth go to our website greengoodnessco.com.au to search for the closest to you.

There are lots of vegan choices including falafel, burgers, sandwiches, quiche, soups plus lots of salads. The raw desserts looked pretty amazing also! My pick is the infamous enchiladas.

7

8 1/19 Gibson Street Mandurah

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YOUR SELF

12

9

10

Flora and Fauna

Henry Saw

Natures Harvest

The Raw Kitchen

Opening their doors in Northbridge in 2014, this place is an absolute gem! I’m sure you’ve seen amazing pictures of their food floating around on Instagram. If not — look it, it’s delightful!

Fun fact… this cafe was named after Henry Saw, the first known person to roast coffee in Perth. Henry’s original merchant warehouse was located on Hay Street in 1855.

Bowl lovers rejoice! This place has the bowl thang going on. Whether it’s a breakfast bowl, acai bowl, salad bowl or a lentil bowl, you have more choices that you can poke a stick at, it’s impossible to choose just one. This cute little cafe and juice bar is overflowing with goodness. From the amazing food on offer, to Miyuki, the qualified massage therapist with the hands of angel — you will definitely want to visit this place in the near future.

Last, but certainly not least is The Raw Kitchen in Fremantle. This place is basically the holy grail of delicious vegan food. A firm favourite or vegans and non vegans alike, this is one of my favourite places to head to when I feel like going for a bit of a drive. I love it when my friends, who haven’t been before, are amazed at how delicious raw, vegan food can actually be. It’s so hard to choose which dish to have each time because they are all so darn good! The pad thai and yellow coconut curry would have to be in my top three list though. If they have their nice cream available, GET IT, trust me. I dream about that little scoop of non ice cream, nice cream deliciousness.

4/70 Aberdeen Street Northbridge

Must tries include the chia pudding, banana bread (with no refined sugar! Yay!) served with coconut jam, Nutella or organic peanut butter, raw organic Matcha cheesecake, vegan coconut + choc + oat + pink sea salt cookie and Vegan Matcha Green Tea cupcakes.

Grand Lane Perth

Henry Saw, is the latest health themed café in what is now a lively coffee scene in the streets of Northbridge. Tucked away within The Museum of Perth, this little hole in the wall style café is serving delicious vegan/vegetarian food including salads from Raw by Chris and other lunch type options. They use Blacklist Coffee Roasters beans and use a single origin coffee in cold brew too and VEGAN DOUGHNUTS…. So that is probably all you need to know.

11 20 Napoleon Street Cottesloe

all t a e d n a h t r o f o g w o N s! g n i h t s u o i the delic

http://greengoodnessco.com.au/nourish/12-best-vegetarianvegan-cafes-in-perth/

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181A High Street Fremantle


YOUR SELF

Mental HEALTH BY NUTRITION FORCE

In recent months, we have recognised two significant mental health awareness campaigns. These include RU OK day in September and National Mental Health Week in October.

The purpose of these days is to raise awareness of mental health issues and to encourage people to openly discuss this topic and any challenges they may be facing.

Traditionally though, for many farmers, this area is seen as a sign of weakness and many people prefer to just get on with it and keep it to themselves. Unfortunately this often results in constant stress and emotional strain and puts farmers and their families under incredible pressure.

Challenges for farming communities Typically farming life includes many challenges that their city counterparts are blissfully unaware of. Farming is susceptible to natural disasters, drought, floods, bushfires and pest plagues; as well as being vulnerable to economic change and financial insecurity. Throw in some regulatory changes and a challenging rural economy and the pressure starts building as a sense of control declines.

A typical farmer is also subject to long working hours, seasonal pressures, environmental exposure, social isolation from working alone, changing farm practices, increasing age of farmers, increased injury risk and geographical isolation. Their workplace is also often their home, so at times they can feel stuck there without a break. These pressures can build up and cause considerable stress to farmers and their families. The result may include relationship breakdowns, inability to cope mentally, increased risk of accidents and injury, stress, depression and suicide risk.

Barriers to seeking help Despite these challenges, farmers are remarkably resilient and often just deal with it and get on with the job at hand. The culture of farming reflects true Aussie spirit of a hard work ethic and managing things yourself, so many tend to keep stress and issues to themselves rather than seeking help or sharing it with others.

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Here are some tips to assist you in getting help: • Talk to a friend or your family about how you feel • Talk to other farmers both in and outside your area — if you are finding things challenging, they probably are too. It’s important to know you are not the only one There is a perceived stigma that asking for help is seen as a sign of weakness and often the stress is neither acknowledged nor accepted. Although a few seek help, they are in the minority.

Another challenge is the limited access to services in rural areas. Often physical distance and a perceived lack of confidentiality can act as a barrier to access. Rural communities are strong and protective. However, a by-product of this is increased knowledge about other people and their activities. Many are concerned that with everyone knowing everyone’s business, others will be aware of them asking for help or seeking crisis intervention. This stigma that individuals and communities have about seeking help can prevent farmers accessing support or even talking about it with fellow farmers and their families.

• Become an active member of your professional network — use online forums and in person get-togethers • Utilise face to face counselling support services from your own home via smart phones and computers • Ask your GP or local service provider for help • Explore interactive online tools

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

• If possible organise a break from the farm or even swap roles with another farmer who has a different crop/ livestock as an alternative • Educate yourself about mental wellbeing and acknowledge it as a health issue rather than a personal weakness.

These include:

resources

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• Access government support, such as financial assistance, counselling and general support such as meeting regulatory requirements

There are a number of both local and national resources that can assist you in dealing with challenges.

Although seeking help can be construed as a weakness by the individual facing the challenges, it really is just utilising another resource available to you. Just as an Olympic athlete would never go into an event unless in their prime, farmers function, cope and problem solve better when they are in a good headspace, so why not do everything you can to achieve that. There are a lot of opportunities today and it does not have to involve formal counselling.

in WA!

• Utilise alcohol and other drugs programs and associated helplines if required

Resources in Western Australia

Opportunities

Helpful

• Call available help lines (see below)

CALL LINES Rural link 1800 552 052 Rural in reach health consultants 1800 998 399 Beyond Blue 1300 224 636 Crisis Care Helpline 1800 199 008 Lifeline 131114 Kids Helpline 1800 551 800

WEBSITES AND SUPPORT SERVICES www.greenbook.org.au — provides a directory of services in your region www.ruralinreach.whfs.org.au — provides information, support, counselling and community talks www.blackdoginstitute.org.au — a range of educational resources to enhance understanding and reduce stigma associated with mental health issues www.beyondblue.org.au — provides a range of information and support for mental wellbeing www.mentalhealth.wa.gov.au — provides links to getting emergency help and also useful contacts and websites — click on getting help on the main page.


YOUR INDUSTRY

GASCOYNE FOOD BOWL INITIATIVE — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Chương trình dựa lương thực Gascoyne — Gascoyne Food Bowl Innitiative BY TONY DELLA BOSCA, QUẢN LÝ CHƯƠNG TRÌNH — CHƯƠNG TRÌNH DỰA LƯƠNG THỰC GASCOYNE — BỘ NÔNG NGHIỆP VÀ LƯƠNG THỰC

Chương trình dựa lương thực Gascoyne (GFB) (phần 2) được xây dựng năm 2012. Mục đích của chương trình nhằm gia tăng đáng kể sản lượng rau quả của khu vực Carnarvon thông qua việc mở rộng đất trồng và tăng cường nguồn nước để mở rộng diện tích được tưới. Chương trifng này do chính phủ tiểu bang tài trợ và do Bộ Nông Nghiệp và Lương Thực (DAFWA) chủ trì. DAFWA đang tăng cường diện tích đất canh tác và hệ thống nước cũng như các biện pháp quản lý nước và lưu vực đối với một khu vực rau quả phát triển mạnh mẻ về mặt kinh tế, đất đai phù hợp của Carnarvon. GFB hoạch định mở thêm 400ha và có hướng xác định vùng đất thích hợp để nâng lên 800ha.

Chương trình này sẽ đóng góp vào sự đa dạng hóa về mặt kinh teesvaf phát triern của vùng Gascoyne bầng cách gia tăng giá trị của sản xuất nông nghiệp. Chương trình sẽ dẫn đến sự gia tăng an toàn lương thực cho dân Tây Úc cũng như cơ hội để thúc đẩy tăng trưởng thị trường nội địa và phát triển cơ hội xuất khẩu. Các bước tiếp theo có thể diển ra trong chương trình: • Tổng kết kết quả khoan giếng

• Lắp đặt thêm giếng cạn bờ sông

• Tiếp tục quá trình quy hoạch sử dụng đất và thay đổi hiên trạng sở hửu • Tiến trình trình bày sự quan tâm của người muốn mua/thuê (khoảng năm 2016).

THÊM THÔNG TIN

Muốn cập nhật thông tin về Chương trình dựa lương thực Gascoyne xin vui lòng vào trang thông tin điện tử (internet): www.facebook.com/ DepartmentofAgricultureandFoodWA Department of Agriculture and Food

ENVIROVEG MANUAL LAUNCHED IN VIETNAMESE — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Tài liệu thực hành EnviroVeg của ngành rau quả sẽ được phát hành bằng tiếng Việt Phiên bản thiếng Việt của tài liệu thực hành EnviroVeg sẽ được nghị viên tiểu bang Nam Úc, cô Leesa Vlahos, khai trương vào ngày thứ bảy 23 tháng giêng tại sự kiện của Hiệp hội nông dân người Việt bang Nam Úc (VFASA) ở Virginia. VFASA sẽ đánh dấu ngày tết cổ truyền Việt Nam và kỹ niệm 30 năm ngày thành lập Hiệp hội bằng cách đăng cai tổ chức một sự kiện miển phí cho tất cả thành viên của cộng đồng người Việt bang Nam Úc. Phiên bản thiếng Việt của tài liệu thực hành EnviroVeg lâu nay đã là một tài liệu thực hành có giá trị cho nông dân trồng rau ở Úc, với trên 400 trang tài liệu thông tin về biện pháp canh tác tốt và thực hành canh tác bền vững cho thành viên của chương trình EnviroVeg.

THÊM THÔNG TIN

Bà con nông dân có quan tâm có thể tiếp cận tập tài liệu đã phiên dịch bằng cách liên hệ AUSVEG theo số (08) 8221 5220 hay gởi email đến địa chỉ info@ausveg.com.au. Để biết thêm thông tin về EnviroVeg Program, xin vào trang www.enviroveg.com. Chương trình EnviriVeg được tài trợ bởi Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited từ nguồn tiền lệ phí rau cải quốc gia và từ các quĩ của chính phủ Úc.

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YOUR BUSINESS

IMPROVING PROFITABILITY OF PRODUCTION — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Cải thiện khả năng sinh lời trong sản xuất ORIGINALLY WRITTEN BY DOMINIC JENKIN

Sales

Income and costs

NGƯỜI DỊCH: VÕ THẾ TRUYỀN, CHUYÊN VIÊN KHUYẾN NÔNG HIỆP HỘI RAU CẢI TÂY ÚC.

Theo tập quán thì ngành nông nghiệp tập trung hầu hết nguồn lực vào vấn đề gia tăng năng suất và sản lượng thông qua các thí nghiệm ngoài đồng, thử nghiệm giống, phát triển các kỹ thuật canh tác cao hơn. Khi mà người nông dân kiếm lời từ việc gia tăng năng suất thì mối quan tâm hàng đầu của họ là kiếm sống được trên đồng ruộng của mình.

ue

reven

Profit margin

Marketing costs Production costs Prices

Chính vì vậy điều cần làm là tìm kiếm sáng kiến có thể tăng cường khả năng sinh lời trong sản xuất. Làm được điều này bắt buộc phải có kiến thức căn bản về các yếu tố tác động đến lợi nhuận. Các yếu tố căn bản bao gồm giá bán tại vườn và giá tại chợ, khối lượng bán ra và giá thành sản xuất.

Biểu đồ 1: Tương quan giửa giá cả và lợi nhuận

(Ghi chú: Income and cots: thu nhập và chi phí; Sales revenue: doanh thu; Profit margin: chênh lệch; Marketing cots: chi phí tiếp thị; Production cots: chi phí sản xuất; prices: giá cả)

Bảng số liệu dưới đây cho thấy những thay đổi nhỏ trong các yếu tố trên ảnh hưởng như thế nào đến lợi nhuận. Gia tăng giá bán và số lượng bán ra cho thấy có ảnh hưởng đến lợi nhuận lớn hơn nhiều so với việc gia tăng số lượng sản xuất. Số liệu trong bảng chỉ mang tính minh họa.

80%. Giá bán 5$/kg. Tổng chi phí sản xuất bao gồm làm đất, giống, phân bón, phun thuốc, nhân công… hết 10.000$. Chi phí tiếp thị như bao bì, vận chuyển và hoa hồng chợ là 2$ cho mỗi kg bán dược. Tổng doanh thu là 40.000$, tổng chi phí 26.000$, chênh lệch 14.000$ để trang trải chi phí khác (thuê đất, lãi ngân hàng, tiền lương cho chính mình…) và tiền lãi ròng.

Cột thứ nhất: ví dụ làm chuẩn. Cột này tóm tắt chi phí và lợi nhuận cho một nông dân sản xuất 10 tấn sản phẩm. Mặc dù sản xuất 10 tấn nhưng chỉ gởi chợ được

Cột thứ 2: Khi năng suất gia tăng 10%. Chi phí sản xuất tăng 1000$ và chi phí tiếp thị tăng 1600$ do gia tăng lương

Trong các kịch bản khác (từ cột 2 đến cột 7) mỗi kịch bản chỉ thay đổi một yếu tố để thấy ảnh hưởng đến lợi nhuận trong từng trường hợp.

Ghi chú: Chi phí bao bì, vận chuyển, hoa hồng chợ là 2$/kg bán được, ngoại trừ trong cột thứ 7 là 1,8$/kg bán ra.

bán ra. Phần chênh lệch tăng 10% tương đương 1400$.

Cột thứ 3: Khi chỉ bán được phân nủa lượng sản xuất ra (do nhiều lý do chẳng hạn như dư thừa ngoài chợ, nhu cầu tiêu thụ thấp, ít người mua…) phần chênh lệch giảm thê thảm 64% còn 5000$, chỉ bằng khoảng một phần ba so với bình thường. Cột thứ tư: Cho thấy tác động lên lợi nhuận khi giá xuống 10%. Điều này xảy ra khi nhu cầu tiêu thụ thấp hoặc dư thừa. Trong trường hợp này chênh lệch giảm gần một phần ba (29%) còn lại 10.000%. Cột thứ 5: Trong trường hợp giá lên 10% (khi lương hàng trên chợ ít hay nhu cầu

Bảng 1: Tác động của các yếu tố về sản lượng, giá, lượng bán ra và giá thành sản xuất đến lợi nhuận 1 Ví dụ làm chuẩn

Năng suất

Phần trăm bán được

Khối lượng bán được

giá

3 Chỉ bán được 50% sản lượng

4 Giá xuống 10%

5 Giá tăng 10%

6 Bán hết 100% sản lượng

7 Chi phí tiếp thị giảm 10%

(kg)

10,000

11,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

(kg)

8,000

8,800

5,000

8,000

8,000

10,000

8,000

(%)

($/kg)

80% 5

80% 5

50% 5

80% 4.5

80% 5.5

100% 5

80% 5

Doanh thu

($)

40,000

44,000

25,000

36,000

44,000

50,000

40,000

Chi phí tiếp thị

($)

16,000

17,600

10,000

16,000

16,000

20,000

14,400

Chi phí sản xuất Tổng cộng

Chênh lệch

% gia giảm so với chuẩn

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2 Tăng năng suất thêm 10%

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($) ($) ($)

(%)

10,000 26,000 14,000

11,000 28,600 15,400

+ 10%

10,000 20,000

5,000

- 64%

10,000 26,000 10,000

-29%

10,000 26,000 18,000

+29%

10,000 30,000 20,000

+43%

10,000 24,400 15,600

+11%


YOUR INDUSTRY

REDUCED TILLAGE VEGETABLE PRODUCTION & DRIP IRRIGATION — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

tiêu thụ tăng cao). Chênh lệch gia tăng 29% tương đương 4000$.

Cột thứ 6: Toàn bộ sản phẩn trồng ra bán được hết. Có thể do các kết nối thị trường được cải thiện, nông dân tìm hiểu thị trường kỹ hơn hoặc nhu cầu thiêu thụ tăng mạnh. Chênh lệch gia tăng hơn 40% tương đương 6000$. Cột thứ 7: Trong trương hợp giảm được 10% chi phí tiếp thị, phần chênh lệch tăng 11% tương đương 1600$.

Thí nghiệm biện pháp cày xới tối thiểu và tưới nhỏ giọt trong sản xuất rau màu

Từ những phân tích trên chúng ta có thể rút ra nhiều điểm quan trọng trong vấn đề tạo ra lợi nhuận:

Ông nói: “trong canh tác gieo xạ đại trà nhờ nước trời các biện pháp cày xới tối thiểu và không cày xới trở nên phổ biến hơn vì nông dân cố gắng cải thiện độ phì nhiêu và sức sản xuất của đất.

1. Nếu nông dân không thể bán hết sản phẩm trồng ra thì lợi nhuận giảm đáng kể. Điều này nhấn mạnh mối nguy hiểm khi tăng số lương sản xuất mà không chắn chắn bán được hết phần tăng thêm. Chính vì vậy điều quan trọng là tập trung vào khâu tăng cường tỉ lệ bán ra được trong tổng khối lượng sản xuất bằng cách cải tiến kỹ thuật canh tác. 2. Một sự gia tăng về giá có ảnh hương rỏ rệt đến tăng cường lợi nhuận bởi vì chi phí sản xuất và tiếp thị cố định (trừ khi phí hoa hồng tính theo giá bán). Trong thí dụ trên thì giá tăng 10% kéo lợi nhuận tăng thêm gần 30%. Ngược lai khi giá xuống thì chỉ cần giảm giá một ít có thể kéo lợi nhuận giảm xuống đáng kể. Điều này chỉ ra tầm quan trọng của của việc sản xuất đúng sản phẩm theo nhu cầu, chất lượng tốt và thương lượng hiệu quả với thương lái.

3. Chi phí tiếp thi có thể cao hơn chi phí sản xuất, đặc biệt là đối với rau màu. Chi phí tiếp thị có thể được tiết giảm thông qua con đường liên kết hay bán sản phẩm trực tiếp để gia tăng thêm khả năng tạo ra lợi nhuận. THÊM THÔNG TIN

Để biết thêm thông tin xin vui lòng nói với Dominic Jenkin trên 0427 373 037 hoặc email dominic.jenkin@vegetableswa.com.au

Department of Agriculture and Food

“một phần trong biện pháp không cày và cày tối thiểu là giử lại gốc rạ của vụ trước, trồng cây che phủ trong các khoảng thời gian nghỉ giửa hai vụ và bổ xung phân chuồng và chất hửu cơ cho đất”. “Thêm nhiều chất hửu cơ giúp cải thiện cấu trúc và khả năng cầm giử nước của đất củng như cung cấp dinh dưỡng cho cây trồng tốt hơn”. Giảm thiểu áp lực bệnh và đất bớt chai cứng là 2 phát hiện đầu tiên trong thí nghiệm áp dụng biện pháp cày xới tối thiểu trong sản xuất rau màu. Thí nghiềm này do Applied Horticultural Research cùng phối hợp với Netafim tiến hành, trong đó một loạt các loại hoa màu khác nhau được luân canh trên 4 nghiệm thức quản lý đất đai gồm: không cày xới (tưới nhỏ giọt); cày xới tối thiểu (tưới nhỏ giọt); cày xới bình thường theo tập quán với tưới nhỏ giọt và cày xới bình thường theo tập quán với tưới phun.

Một cuộc tham quan điểm thí nghiệm đã được tổ chức hồi đầu năm tại trang trại rau cải của Bulmer ở Lindenow gần Bairnsdale phía Đông Gippsland, Victoria. Có 55 nông dân tham dự chuyến tham quan và họ rất chú ý đến các phát hiện đầu tiên của thí nghiệm trên hệ thống luân canh cải nhí (Baby leaf lettuce), xà lách bắp (iceberg lettuce) và bông cải xanh lai (broccolini). Chuyên gia nông học của Netafim, Sam Birrell, cho biết ằng các đặc tính đất đai đang được theo dõi và sản lượng thương phẩm của mỗi nghiệm thức trong thí nghiệm đều được đo lường. Ông nói rằng trong khi biện pháp cày xới tối thiểu và không cày xới rất phổ biến trên ruộng gieo xạ đại trà (trồng ngủ cốc và các loại hạt như cải dầu, hướng dương), chúng tương đối mới trong ngành trồng rau màu nhưng cũng có nhiều triển vọng.

Sam củng nói rằng tưới nhỏ giọt có tác dụng tốt khi kết hợp với biện pháp cày xới tối thiểu và không cày và các kết quả ban đầu của thí nghiệm đã chứng minh điều đó. Các lô thí nghiệm áp dụng biện pháp này đều cho kết quả giảm áp lực bệnh và đất ít chai cứng. Ông ấy nói: “ Tưới phun có thể gây chai cứng đất và kỹ thuật tưới này làm giảm tác dụng của các biện pháp khác được đưa vào nhằm cải thiện cấu trúc đất”.

Cung cấp nước và phân bón vào đất dưới hình thức tưới nhỏ giọt có tác dụng đồng bộ với các nổ lực cái thiện cấu trúc đất bằng cách giử lại gốc rạ và giảm thiểu cày xới. Sam nói rằng:” Kết quả cho đến nay cho chúng tôi thấy có sự giảm thiểu một cách đáng kể bệnh Varnish spot trên cải thảo, dù chỉ là kết quả bước đầu nhưng điều đó củng rất đáng quan tâm”.

Ngoài biện pháp tưới nhỏ giọt, thí nghiệm củng đưa vào áp dụng thử sản phẩm mới của Netafim, đó là dạng ống cái có đính sẳn đầu nối để nối ống nhỏ giọt. Mọi việc cần làm chỉ là trãi cuộn ống ra và đấu đầu ống nhỉ vào, rất tiết kiệm công lao động và cũng rất bền.

Thí nghiệm sẽ kéo dài đến cuối năm 2016.

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VEGETABLE DISEASE OUTBREAK NORTH OF PERTH — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Tình trạng xuất hiện nhiều loại bệnh trên rau cải khu vực phía bắc thành phố Perth Xác định tác nhân gây bệnh BY VO THE TRUYEN FIELD EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA Bệnh vàng lá héo rủ do tác nhân là nấm fusarium (Fusarium Solani và Fusarium Oxysporum f.sp. licopersici.) gây ra từng gây hại trên cà chua ở khu vực Carabooda đầu năm 2015. Bệnh này cùng với bệnh đốm đen (black dot disease — colletotrichum Coccodes) lại tiếp tục được phát hiện gây hại nghiêm trọng các khu vực phía bắc Perth bao gồm Carabooda, Nowergup, và Gnangara suốt thời gian cuối 2015 đến đầu năm 2016. Nghiêm trọng hơn nữa là các loại bệnh có tác nhân gây hại trong đất lại được phát hiện cùng với các loại bệnh dể lây lan khác do vi khuẩn và vi-rút gây ra như bệnh thán thư trên cà chua (tomato bacteria canker — Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. Michiganensis), Bệnh cháy lá héo rủ cà chua (Tomato spot wilt virus) và bệnh khảm vàng lá trên cây bí ngồi (Zucchini Yellow Mosaic virus)

Hình 1: Bệnh vàng lá héo rủ fusarium trên cây dưa leo.

Một cuộc diều tra về tình hình bệnh trên các loại rau ăn trái nằm trong chương trình điều tra dinh dưỡng đất — chất lượng nước tưới — dinh dưỡng cây trồng do cơ quan quản lý tài nguyên tài trợ đã được tiến hành từ cuối năm 2015 dến đầu năm 2016. Cuộc điều tra nầy không được thiết kế như các thí nghiệm khoa học chính quy nhằm mục đích thiết lập một kết luận ở cấp độ học thuật về mức độ phân bố hay qui luật phát triển của các loại bênh cây, hay là mối tương quan giửa các biện pháp canh tác lạc hậu với sự xuất hiện của các loại bệnh này trên địa bàn.

Tuy nhiên cuộc điều tra này củng khẳng định được sự xuất hiện của các loại bệnh thông qua xét nghiệm các mẩu thu thập được bằng các kỹ thuật trong phòng thí nghiệm. Thông tin về thiệt hại do các loại bệnh này gây ra trên đồng ruộng củng do chính những người nông dân bị ảnh hưởng cung cấp tại chính trang trại của họ. Kết quả phân tích mẩu cây và mẩu đất thu thập trong quá trình điều tra cho thấy các loại bệnh có tác nhân gây hại trong đất gây ra do Fusarium Solani và Fusarium Oxysporum f.sp. licopersici; Pythium sp.; Collectrotrichum sp.; và Rhizoctonia sp. tiếp tục xuất hiện trên diện rộng. Các loại bênh này được phát hiện trongtaast cả 11

Hình 1b: Bệnh vàng lá héo rủ fusarium trên cây cần tây lá vún nhỏ

mẩu thu thập bao gồm cà chua, dưa leo, bí ngồi và 01 mẩu rau thơm là cây cần tây lá vún nhỏ (parsley) (hình 1a, 1b và 1c).

Cuộc điều tra củng phát hiện thấy có nhiều loại tác nhân gây bệnh xuất hiện trên cùng một mẩu thu thạp như nấm Fusarium và Pythium trên cây dưa leo hay Fusarium với vi-rút khảm vang lá trên mẩu cây bí ngồi. Ngiêm trọng hơn, Các loại tác nhân gây hại có nguồn gốc trong đất này còn được thấy xuất hiên trên cùng một cây với các loại tác nhân như vi khuẩn và vi-rút gây bệnh thán thư trên cà chua (tomato bacteria canker — Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. Michiganensis), Bệnh cháy lá héo rủ cà chua (Tomato spot wilt virus) (hình 2a và 2b).

Những biện pháp quản lý sâu bệnh hại không đúng Tại các trang trại trồng cà chua mà bệnh cây gây ra thiệt hại nghiêm trọng chúng tôi nhận thấy công tác vệ sinh đồng ruộng như thiết kế trang trai, vệ sinh phòng dịch và xử lý rác thải thực vật không được thực hiện tốt. Bất cập này đi đôi với sự tồn tại quanh năm của các loại cây dại thuộc họ cà và các loại cỏ lá rộng khác

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Hình 4a: một mảnh giẻ đã qua sử dụng được giử lại hôm sau dùng lại

Ảnh 4b : Một nhà máy bị nhiễm bệnh vẫn còn trên một chiếc giường ngày càng tăng.

Hình 2: Tổ hợp bệnh gồm fusarium, thán thư (bacteria canker) và tomato spot wild virus TSWV trên cây cà chua ở Carabooda.

có khả năng làm ký chủ cho mầm bệnh và các loaị côn trùng truyền bệnh trú ẩn trong khu sản xuất và chung quanh trang trại có thể được xem như nằm trong nhóm các nhân tố chính góp phần làm cho dịnh bệnh xảy ra. Dưới đây là một số vấn đề yếu kém ghi nhận được tại các trang trại trong cuộc điều tra:

1. T hiết kế và tổ chức trang trại không hợp lý: Điều nầy chắc chắn là yếu tố đóng góp cho sự lây lan của các loại mầm bệnh có nguồn gốc trong đất tự lô này sang lô khác và từ trang trại này sang trang trại khác. Vấn đề này bao gồm các điểm sau đây:

Hình 3: Một trang trại lớn không có thiết kế giới hạn di chuyển giửa các lô

• Sự di chuyển tuwj do của các phương tiện và nhân công tự lô này sang lô khác và từ trang trại này sang trang trại khác.

• Không thiết kế các điểm tập kết cố định cho phương tiện giao nhận hàng.

• Thiếu biển báo tại nơi ra vào yêu cầu khách đến phải trình báo tại địa điểm nhất định. Thiếu lối đi có tiệt trùng, thiếu bao giày cho khách đến và ít hạn chế khách di chuyển trong trang trại củng như khu sản xuất.

2. T hiếu biện pháp duy trì vệ sinh trang trại

• Không vệ sinh phương tiện thiết bi, xe cộ, quần áo vad giày lao động. • Có trang bi gang tay cho nhân công nhưng không có qui trình nghiêm ngặt thay găng tay mỗi ngày hay thay đổi khi chuyển sang làm việc ở lô khác. Nhân công đã làm nửa ngày từ nơi khác đến củng không thay đồ lao động mới. • Không loại bỏ cây nhiểm bệnh khỏi luống trồng.

Hình 5: xác bả cây cả vụ trước nằm trên mặt đất bên cạnh cây cà mới trồng

• Không bố trí công việc một cách hợp lý để hạn chế nguy cơ bệnh lây lan. Chẳng hạn như lô cây non làm trước rồi mới tới lô cây già vì cây già có nguy cơ mang mầm sâu bệnh hại cao hơn. • Xác bả cây trồng, sản phẩm loại thải không được xử lý đúng cách, kể cả các thứ biết rỏ đã nhiểm bệnh trong vụ trước.

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3. Thiếu biện pháp kiểm dịch

• Không tiến hành kiểm dịch đẩu vào các loại cây giống và vật liệu trồng.

• Thường nông dân quan niệm rầng công tác kiểm dịch không thuộc trách nhiệm của mình mà là của chisng nhà cung cấp cây giống, vật liệu. Thường không có hợp đồng ma cây giống. Nếu có thì hợp đồng mua cây giống củng thiếu điều khoản kiểm dịch.

4. T hiếu kỹ năng xác đinh và thiếu kiến thức về đặc tính tự nhiên của các loại sâu bệnh hại phổ biến.

Biện pháp khống chế sâu bệnh hại đang áp dụng Biện pháp phổ biến nhất đế khống chế sau bệnh hại nông dân cho biết là dủng thuốc. Các loai thuốc được sử dung sau khi phát hiện đã có biểu hiện lạ về hình dạng, màu sắc trên các bộ phận của cây. Nông dân củng phun định kỳ các loiaj thuốc gốc đồng để phòng bệnh.

Tất cả nông dân tham gia điều tra đều có áp dụng thuốc trị bệnh cho cây trông khi phát hiện có vấn đề trước khi gọi đến người có chuyên môn củng nhằm mục đích tìm thuốc khác hiệu quả hơn. Thường thuốc được áp dụng dưới dạng phun hay hòa vào hệ thống tưới hay cả hai. Tuy nhiên không có nông dân nao được hỏi cho biết đã thỏa mản với kết quả khống chế các bệnh nêu trên bằng cách dùng thuốc. Bệnh không giảm mà củng không chận đứng được. Các trang trại được điều tra cho biết năng suất giảm khoảng 50%. Cá biệt có nơi thiệt hại 100%

Khuyến cáo Khuyến cáo này dựa trên kiến thức và kinh nghiệm của người điều tra 1. H ảy lưu ý rằng sử dụng thuốc khống chế các loại bệnh trên mang lại rất ít hiệ quả.

2. N ông dân phải xác đinh tư tương một cách dứt khoát là cần phải thay đổi biện pháp canh tác và biện pháp quản lý trang trại áp dụng lâu nay vì các biện pháp này góp phần gây nguy cơ xâm nhập và phát tán các loại bệnh kể trên 3. X em xét lại toàn bộ các khâu trong canh tác và quản lý tranh trại để xác định khâu nào cần phải mạnh dạn thay đổi.

4. L ập kế hoạch thực hiên thay đổi để chuẩn bị đủ các thứ cần thiết kể cả kiến thức và nguồn lực.

5. L iên hệ những người có chuyên môn để được hổ trợ tham vấn. Các mối liên hệ

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thuận tiện bao gồm người tư vấn hay cung cấp vật tư tại địa phương, chuyên viên phát triển bộ Nông nghiệp, Hiệp hội Rau Tây Úc.

• Bất đầu công việc trong ngày trên lô cây tơ trước cây già sau vì thông thương cây tơ ít nguy cơ mang sâu bệnh hại hơn cây già.

• Hạn chế máy móc thiết bị lạ, người lạ di chuyển vào trang trại.

• Dọn sạch tàn dư cây trồng vụ trước càng sớm càng tốt. Trồng cây che phủ đất để giảm sói mòn. Chọn loai cây che phủ đất không phải là ký chủ của các loại sâu bệnh thương xuất hiện.

6. K iểm tra so sánh kết quả các khâu trong canh tác và quản ly trang trại với các điểm then chốt dưới đây:

• Phải bố trí điểm tập kết thu gom, tiếp nhận hàng hóa, sản phẩm gần đường chính, tránh xa khu trồng trọt.

• Đặt bảng báo yêu cầu khách đến thăm thông báo trước khi vào trang trại. Nếu họ cần vào bên trong thì cung cấp cho họ nơi tẩy trùng giày và bao giày. • Làm sạch máy móc thiết bị, quần áo. Tổ chức nơi tẩy trùng giày và cung cấp bao giày cho nhân công và khách. Có nhiều loại chất tẩy rửa bán tại địa phương. Hảy tham khảo ý kiến người bán. • Kiểm tra sau bệnh trên cây giống. Chỉ mua cây giống ở các cơ sở uy tín và bảo đảm cây giống không mang theo sâu bệnh. Lưu ý nguy cơ lây sâu bệnh khi mua các vật liệu. • Nếu người tư vấn hay cung cấp vật tư đến trang trại, hảy lưu ý họ tôn trọng các nguyên tắt vệ sinh vì có khả năng họ đã đến thăm trang trại khác trước đó. Hảy yêu cần nhân công thời vụ di chuyển qua nhiều trang trạng thực hiện đúng nguyên tắt như vậy.

• Nếu sử dụng dịch vụ thu hoạch và thùng chứa củ, hảy đảm bảo tất cả các thứ đưa vào trang trai phải sạch sẻ.

• Tăng cường càng nhiều càng tốt kiến thức về sâu bệnh hại trong trang trại và ở địa phương kể cả các loài mới. Nhận diện đúng đối tượng sâu bệnh hại cùng với các kiesn thức cần thiết liên quan như vòng đơi của chúng là rất có lợi khi tổ chức thực hiện vệ sinh trang trại. THÊM THÔNG TIN

Nếu bạn cần thêm thông tin xin vui lòng liên hệ với Truyền Võ trên 0457 457 559 hoặc Truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au. Dự án này đã được tài trợ bởi Bộ Nông nghiệp và Thực phẩm, WA, APC — VPC và vegetablesWA .

Department of Agriculture and Food


YOUR PRODUCTION

SPOTLIGHT ON MANAGING SOIL-BORNE DISEASE

Thêm một nguồn lực tập trung vào vấn đề phòng trừ các loại bệnh trên cây trồng có nguồn gốc từ đất BY DR GORDON ROGERS APPLIED HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH Các loại bệnh trên cây trồng có nguồn gốc từ đất đang là mối đe dọa chính trong các hệ thống thâm canh rau cải và gây thiệt hại mỗi năm khoảng 120 triệu trong ngành công nghiệp rau cải có giá trị 4 tỉ đô la của Úc. Trong khi việc phòng trừ các loại bệnh này ngày càng khó khăn với ngày càng ít các loại nông dược có hiệu quả thì luân canh ngày càng nhiều hơn và người tiêu dùng củng đòi hỏi sản phẩm hoàn hảo hơn. Củng không có gì ngạc nhiên khi người trồng và các nhà tư vấn nông nghiệp đều xác điịnh các loại bệnh này là thách thức chính trong công tác quản lý đất đai và bảo vệ cây trồng. Một dự án mới kéo dài 3 năm do một hội đồng đại diện nông dân và một nhóm các nhà chuyên môn điều phối nhằm cung cấp cho nông dân trồng rau cải nước Úc các thông tin, công cụ, và kỹ năng cần thiết để quản lý rủi ro thiệt hại do các loại bệnh này gây ra trên một số vùng sản xuất rau màu chính. Tiến sỹ Gordon Rogers của Viện ngiên cứu ứng dụng rau quả, giám đốc dự án, cho biết rằng: “ có 5 nhóm bệnh chính trong đất đang tiếp tục là vấn đề nổi cộm trên các vùng trồng. Chúng bao gồm: • Bệnh mốc trắng — Sclerotinia spp. (S. sclerotiorum and S. minor).

• Bệnh vàng lá héo rủ — Fusarium spp. (F. oxysporum and F. solani), • Bệnh thối nhủng gốc — Water moulds (chủ yếu do Pythium spp.),

• Tuyến trùng — Nematodes

• Bệnh thối gốc, chạy cây con — Rhizoctonia spp

Thông qua dự án này chúng tôi sẽ cung cấp dịch vụ phòng trừ hửu hiệu các loại bệnh này cho nông dân Úc, ứng dụng hệ thống khuyến nông và phục vụ đã thành công trong các dự án bảo vệ tổng hợp cây trồng và độ phì nhiêu đất đai”. Các dự án bảo vệ tổng hợp cây trồng và độ phì nhiêu đất đai do AHR và tiến sỹ Doris Bleasing của RMGC cùng điều hành đã xây dựng được một hệ thống quốc gia để chuyện giao thông tin về đất và bảo vệ thực vật đến nông dân trồng rau Úc.

Các dự án này mang lại nguồn tư liệu và cách tiếp cận để chuyển giao thông tin và kỹ năng cho ngành rau cải. Nguồn tư liệu này được đăng chi tiết trong ấn bản Nông dân Tây Úc Hè 15 — Summer 15 WA Grower — gồm có:

• Các điểm mô hình trình bày các biện pháp canh tác tốt với nông dân tiên tiến trên 10 vùng của Úc. • Trang thông tin trên internet và trên facebook

• Một lớp tập huấn cho chuyên viên, nông dân nòng cốt hồi tháng 9/2015 • Các buổi tham quan đồng ruộng, các hội thảo vùng và hội thảo nhóm.

• Băng hình, tờ rơi và các phương tiện truyền thông phát các thông tin và tập

huấn cho nông dân và chuyên viên nông nghiệp

• Một mạng lưới bao gồm 1500 nông dân, các nhà nông học, các đại lý và công ty nông dược có quan tâm đến các bệnh này. 25 nông dân và nhà tư vấn, những người tham gia khóa tập huấn cho chuyên viên, nông dân nòng cốt đã học được các nguyên tắt cốt yếu cũng như được nghe các khuyến cáo tiên tiến nhất về phòng trừ các loại bệnh trong đất trên nhiêuf mô hình sản xuất rau màu khác nhau.

Mảng nghiên cứu trong dự án do tiến sỹ Len Tesoriero (chuyên gia bệnh cây của Bộ Nông Nghiện New South Wales — NSW Department of Primary Industries) và Kym White (nhà kinh tế học của RMGC dẩn đầu sẽ tập trung vào các công cụ mới đánh giá rủi ro kinh tế khi các nhu cầu được xác định. THÊM THÔNG TIN

Để biết thêm chi tiết xin liên hệ: Dr Gordon Rogers 0418 517 777 hoặc (02) 8627 1040, gordon@ahr.com.au Dự án này được tài trợ bởi Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited sử dụng tiền phí rau cải và từ nguồn quĩ của chính phủ.

Sản phẩm sạch bệnh dể bán và bán được giá hơn. Sự khác biệt đáng kể giửa cây hành tây mạnh khỏe trồng trên đất phì nhiêu không mầm bệnh sau khi được trồng cỏ che phủ có tác dụng tiệt trùng (hình tráI) so với sản phẩm xấu hơn (hình phải) trồng trên đất không có trồng cỏ che phủ trươc đó.

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

109


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits Permit no.

Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Various insect pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Jun-16

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Nov-16

Confidor 200 SC Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly and green peach aphid

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

Avatar (indoxacarb)

Garden weevil

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

Alliums PER13088

Apple varieties PER12864

Polyram (metiram)

Artichoke — globe PER14203

Propyzamide

Asian root vegetables PER12716 Asparagus PER12777 Beans PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14701

Pyriproxyfen

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

30-Jun-20

Beetroot PER14245

Score Foliar Fungicide

Leaf spot

CURRENT

31-Aug-18

PER81260

Imidacloprid

Aphids & thrips

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Alternaria leaf spot

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER11949

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Various Insects

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off and downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14043

Chlorothalonil

Various diseases

CURRENT

30-Nov-18

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Bitter melon PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Brassica leafy vegetables PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Nov-20

PER11990

Chlorothalonil

Downy mildew, Alternaria spot & grey mould

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14127

Pendimethalin

Weeds

CURRENT

31-Aug-18

PER11848

Clethodim

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14292

Secure 360SC (chlorfenapyr)

Lepiotera and mites

CURRENT

31-Mar-16

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Downy mildew and other diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14433

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off and downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14907

Emamectin

Various pests

CURRENT

30-Nov-19

PER14584

Imidacloprid

Aphids, whitefly and thrips

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-17 31-May-20

PER10845

Barmac Zineb Fungicide

Cercospora leaf spot and downy mildew

CURRENT

PER80538

Mancozeb

Anthracnose and Septoria

CURRENT

31-Mar-25

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14596

Chlorpyrifos

Vegetable beetle adults

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

Broccoli PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14164

Clethodim

Rye grass, winter grass

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Brussels sprouts

110

PER14432

Pendimethalin

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14164

Clethodim

Rye grass, winter grass

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER80910

Iprodione

Grey mould

CURRENT

31-Jul-20

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

Capsicum PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

CURRENT

30-Nov-16

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Botrytis rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER81408

PHOSPHOROUS ACID

Phytophthora soil fungus

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Botrytis rots

"

CURRENT

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER11564

Switch Fungicide

Botrytis and sclerotinia

CURRENT

30-Nov-17

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER13031

Maldison

Fruit fly

CURRENT

31-May-17

PER12399

Ridomil Gold MZ Systemic & Protective Fungicide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

Capsicums (protected) PER14050

Flint 500 WG Fungicide

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-23

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

30-Sep-23

Carrot PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off and downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14816

Azoxystrobin

Powdery mildew, sclerotinia rot (white mould), black rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER10918

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly and aphids

CURRENT

31-May-18

PER12048

Prometryn

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER12567

Various

Sclerotinia, botrytis rot and black rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14535

Clethodim

Grass weed control

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER13305

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Certain broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-20

Cauliflower PER14164

Clethodim

Rye grass, winter grass

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20 30-Nov-19

PER13147

Lontrel

Capeweed and clover

CURRENT

PER10272

Diazinon

Onion fly and onion seedling maggot

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER14037

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Staphylinid beetle

CURRENT

31-Mar-23

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18 30-Nov-18

Celeriac PER14043

Chlorothalonil

Various diseases

CURRENT

PER13323

Score Foliar Fungicide (difenoconazole)

Cercospora leaf spot and Septoria leaf blight

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

PER13114

Prometryn

Grass weeds listed on Label

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER10875

Pirimor WG Aphicide (pirimicarb)

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER13367

Linuron

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Apr-16

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Sclerotinia rot

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Various insect pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Aphids

CURRENT

31-May-20

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

eliothis, lightbrown apple moth, lucerne leaf roller and H vegetable weevil

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

Celery

PER14812

Score Fungicide

Cercospora and Septoria leaf spots

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14436

Applaud Insecticide (buprofezin)

Greenhouse whitefly

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14341

Chess Insecticide (pymetrozine)

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14049

Permethrin (Ambush )

Helicoverpa and looper

CURRENT

31-Mar-23

PER13496

Linuron

Range of weeds

CURRENT

30-Apr-17

PER13122

Proclaim Insecticide

Heliothis, lightbrown apple moth and cluster caterpillar

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER11686

Nufarm Regent 200SC Insecticide

Western flower thrips (celery) and onion thrips (lettuce)

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Late blight, Septoria leaf blight and downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora and Septoria

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11127

Nufarm Filan Fungicide

Sclerotinia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

111


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Virus

PER14071

Pirmicarb

Aphids

Status

Expiry date

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

Chicory PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Bental)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-May-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora and Septoria

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER10677

Propyzamide

Grass and broadleef weeds

CURRENT

30-Apr-18

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis and Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11848

Clethodim

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Nov-17

PER80538

Mancozeb

Anthracnose and Septoria

CURRENT

31-Mar-25

Chillies PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

CURRENT

30-Nov-16

PER12823

Trifluralin

Various broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21

PER12399

Ridomil Gold MZ Systemic & Protective Fungicide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Chilli peppers PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER82359

Pirimor (pirimicarb)

Aphids

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Botrytis rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13254

Dimethoate

Queensland and Mediterranean fruit fly

CURRENT

5-Oct-17

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Chinese onions PER14906 Chives PER14906 Choko PER12712 Cucumber PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER12391

Prodigy Insecticide

Lepidopteran pests

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Aphids

CURRENT

31-May-20 30-Nov-18

PER14043

Chlorothalonil

Various diseases

CURRENT

PER14433

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER7909

Scala 400 SC Fungicide

Botrytis rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

30-Sep-23

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

CURRENT

30-Nov-16

PER13031

Maldison

Fruit fly

CURRENT

31-May-17

PER80891

Pyranica Miticide

Two-spotted mite and European red mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14046

Mancozeb

Grey mould

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14050

Flint 500 WG Fungicide

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-23

PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, T Tomato russet mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Cucurbit vegetables PER14765

112

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER80138

Alpha-cypermethrin

Cucumber fruit fly

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

PER14840

Bupirimate

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER13304

Paramite

Two-spotted mite, red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

Eggplant PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER12823

Trifluralin

Various broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21

PER12391

Prodigy Insecticide

Lepidopteran pests

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14839

Zineb

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER80717

Trichlorfon

Fruit fly

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

PER11451

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER80910

Iprodione

Grey mould

CURRENT

31-Jul-20

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14186

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Melon thrips

CURRENT

30-Sep-18

PER14036

Bupirimate

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER13351

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

31-Mar-19 31-Oct-18

PER12506

Dimethoate

Queensland fruit fly and Mediterranean fruit fly

CURRENT

PER8930

Phorate

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

CURRENT

31-Jul-16

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14047

Methidathion

Rutherglen bug

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER13122

Proclaim Insecticide

Heliothis, lightbrown apple moth and cluster caterpillar

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

Endive PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11848

Clethodim

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Bental)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-May-20 30-Jun-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, Cercospora & Septoria

CURRENT

PER10677

Propyzamide

Grass and broadleef weeds

CURRENT

30-Apr-18

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis and Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

Bravo 720 SC

Downy mildew, purple blotch

CURRENT

31-Jul-16

Fennel PER13036

Fruiting vegetables PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER80099

Alpha-Cpermethrin

Mediterrean fruit fly and Queeensland fruit fly

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER80100

Sumitomo Samurai Systematic Insecticide

Mediterranean fruit fly & Queensland fruit fly

CURRENT

30-Sep-18

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Garlic PER14484

Green beans PER12567

Various

Sclerotinia, botrytis rot and black rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Leafy lettuce PER10918

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly and aphids

CURRENT

31-May-18

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

CURRENT

30-Nov-16 30-Jun-20

PER12351

Confidor Guard Soil

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Downy mildew & other diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER12391

Prodigy Insecticide

Lepidopteran pests

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

113


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

Leafy vegetables PER14837

Mandipropamid (Revus Fungicide)

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER13322

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Potato moth

CURRENT

31-May-17

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Downy mildew & other diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

Leeks PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-19 31-Mar-18

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

PER13367

Linuron

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Apr-16

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21 30-Jun-18

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Downy mildew, purple blotch & botrytis rots

CURRENT

PER13653

Maldison

Onion thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-18

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Nov-17

PER81271

Various Actives

Specified grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Oct-21

PER10272

Diazinon

Onion fly and onion seedling maggot

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER13257

Select Herbicide (clethodim)

rass weeds as per label including winter grass (Poa G annua)

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-May-20

Lettuce PER81196 PER81241

Phenmedipham (Bental)

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

CURRENT

30-Nov-20

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Botrytis rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER11686

Nufarm Regent 200SC Insecticide

Western flower thrips (celery) & onion thrips (lettuce)

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

30-Sep-23 30-Sep-18

PER81136

SWITCH FUNGICIDE

Anthracnose

CURRENT

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Bottom rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14430

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 SC)

Bottom rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14351

DC-Tron Plus

Various bugs

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Damping off

CURRENT

30-Sep-18

PER14210

Acramite Miticide

Two-spotted (red spider) mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-18

PER13301

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite & vegetable weevil

CURRENT

31-May-20

PER12386

Dacthal (chlorthal-dimethyl)

Stinging nettle

CURRENT

31-Aug-16

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Botrytis rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER14336

Prodigy

Cluster caterpillar, looper and light brown apple moth

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

Lettuce (protected crops only) PER12846

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Botrytis rots

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Marrow PER12712 Melons PER14650

Paramite (etoxazole)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-May-18

PER14649

Acramite (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER13170

Dimethoate

Various fruit fly species

CURRENT

5-Oct-17

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Confidor Guard Soil

Silverleaf whitefly

CURRENT

30-Jun-20

Navy beans PER13626 Okra PER12351

Onion (bulb & seed)

114

PER14602

Boscalid, Iprodione & Chlorothalonil

Botrytis neck-rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-18

PER82018

TRIADIMENOL

White rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Nov-17

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

CURRENT

31-Jul-24

Orchard cleanup fruit fly host crops PER13859

Dimethoate

Fruit fly

Paprika PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER12823

Trifluralin

Various broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21

PER12399

Ridomil Gold MZ Systemic & Protective Fungicide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off and downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Parsnip PER14184 PER14043

Chlorothalonil

Various diseases

CURRENT

30-Nov-18

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14858

Pendimethalin

Grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER11348

Clethodim

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-22

PER12048

Prometryn

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Sep-20 31-Mar-18

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

PER14695

Ridomil Gold 25G (metalaxyl-M)

Pythium Spp. and Phytophthora Spp.

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER13696

Trifluralin

Wintergrass

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER12357

Linuron

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Peas PER11451

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14035

Diflufenican

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-23

PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

Trichlorfon

Fruit fly

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

Pepino PER80717 Peppers PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly and mite species

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER12391

Prodigy Insecticide

Lepidopteran pests

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER8930

Phorate

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

CURRENT

31-Jul-16

PER14840

Bupirimate

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER11440

Sumiclex 500 (procymidone)

Sclerotinia rot

CURRENT

31-Jan-20

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Sclerotinia rot

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14047

Methidathion

Rutherglen bug

CURRENT

30-Jun-18 31-May-20

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Aphids

CURRENT

PER11127

Nufarm Filan Fungicide

Sclerotinia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Pome fruit PER80790

Samurai Systemic Insecticide (clothianidin)

Fruit flies

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER14562

Calypso Insecticide

Mediterranean fruit fly

CURRENT

30-Nov-18

Potatoes PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER80344

Chlorpyrifos

lack beetle, wingless grasshopper, red-legged earth B mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER12612

Alpha-cypermethrin

Garden weevil

CURRENT

30-Apr-16

PER10822

Sodium hypochlorite

Various insect and fungal pests

CURRENT

30-Nov-19

Chlorpyrifos

African black beetle

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

Pumpkin PER11768

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

115


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

Radicchio PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis and Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER11848

Clethodim

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Bental)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-May-20

Radish PER14433

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17 31-Mar-20

PER11949

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Various insects

CURRENT

PER11451

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER13035

Clethodim

Control of grasses

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER14126

Methomyl

Various

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER11441

Propachlor

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Dec-19 31-Mar-23

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER13444

Propiconazole

Cercospora

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Rocket PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14433

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14127

Pendimethalin

Weeds

CURRENT

31-Aug-18

PER14292

Secure 360SC (chlorfenapyr)

Lepiotera and mites

CURRENT

31-Mar-16

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Nov-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

Various insect pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

Root vegetables PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Shallot PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Downy mildew, purple blotch & botrytis rots

CURRENT

30-Jun-18 31-Oct-18

PER13653

Maldison

Onion thrips

CURRENT

PER8930

Phorate

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

CURRENT

31-Jul-16

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds.

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

30-Nov-20

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14073

Diazinon

Thrips (excluding WFT) and onion seedling maggot

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER13205

Secure 360 SC (chlorfenapyr)

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER13257

Select Herbicide (clethodim)

rass weeds as per label including winter grass (Poa G annua)

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-23

PER14142

Ioxynil

Broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14471

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Various pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

Silverbeet PER14433

116

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Late blight, Septoria leaf blight & downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, Cercospora & Septoria

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis and Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14839

Zineb

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER12567

Various

Sclerotinia, botrytis rot and Black rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER14034

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds.

CURRENT

30-Jun-17 30-Nov-20

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER10918

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly and aphids

CURRENT

31-May-18

PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER11991

Legend Fungicide (quinoxyfen)

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14703

Tramat 500 SC Selective Herbicide (ethofumesate)

Various weeds

CURRENT

31-Jul-19

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Sin qua PER12906 Snake bean PER12906 Snow peas PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER12846

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18 31-Mar-20

PER13899

Etoxazole

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Apr-17

PER14211

Fenhexamid

Grey mould and chocolate spot

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER11964

Chlorothalonil (Bravo)

Downy mildew & chocolate spot

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER11764

Spiroxamine

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Grey mould (botrytis)

CURRENT

30-Jun-19 31-May-18

PER14033

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Pasture webworm, cutworm, Rutherglen bug and thrips

CURRENT

PER10988

Bladex 900 WG (cyanazine)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER10976

Bentazone

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER10938

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly

CURRENT

31-Jul-18

PER12399

Ridomil Gold MZ Systemic & Protective Fungicide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER80558

Bifenazate

Various mites

CURRENT

31-Aug-20

Alpha-cypermethrin

Various insects

CURRENT

30-Jun-17 31-Mar-20

Spinach PER14433 PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Downy mildew

CURRENT

PER14034

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-17 30-Nov-20

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER10918

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly and aphids

CURRENT

31-May-18 30-Sep-16

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Late blight, Septoria leaf blight & downy mildew

CURRENT

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, Cercospora & Septoria

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis and Alternaria

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14839

Zineb

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER12567

Various

Sclerotinia, botrytis rot and black rot

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Bental)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-May-20

PER13397

Clethodim (Select Herbicide)

Fops annual ryegrass and winter grass

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

Various weeds

CURRENT

31-Jul-19

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea only) PER14703

Tramat 500 SC Selective Herbicide (ethofumesate)

Spring onions PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14071

Pirmicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

117


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER8930

Phorate

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

CURRENT

31-Jul-16

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-21 30-Jun-18

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Downy mildew, purple blotch & botrytis rots

CURRENT

PER13653

Maldison

Onion thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-18

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

CURRENT

30-Nov-17

PER14034

Chlorothalonil

Various fungal diseases

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf and grass weeds.

CURRENT

30-Jun-17 30-Nov-20

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-19

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-19

PER14073

Diazinon

Thrips (excluding WFT) and onion seedling maggot

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER13205

Secure 360 SC (chlorfenapyr)

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER13257

Select Herbicide (clethodim)

rass weeds as per label including winter grass (Poa G annua)

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-23

PER14471

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Various pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER14142

Ioxynil

Broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17 30-Sep-20

Squash (all type) PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Sugar snap peas PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER12846

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER13899

Etoxazole

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER14211

Fenhexamid

Grey mould and chocolate spot

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER11964

Chlorothalonil (Bravo)

Downy mildew & chocolate spot

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER11764

Spiroxamine

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-18

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Grey mould (botrytis)

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER14033

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Pasture webworm, cutworm, Rutherglen bug and thrips

CURRENT

31-May-18

PER10988

Bladex 900 WG (cyanazine)

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER10976

Bentazone

Broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-20

PER10938

Imidacloprid

Greenhouse whitefly

CURRENT

31-Jul-18

PER12399

Ridomil Gold MZ Systemic & Protective Fungicide

Downy mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-16

PER80558

Bifenazate

Various mites

CURRENT

31-Aug-20

Swede PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14126

Methomyl

Various

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER11441

Propachlor

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Dec-19

PER14337

Trifluralin

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-20 30-Sep-20

Sweet corn PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

PER14474

Methoxyfenozide

Lepidopteran pests

CURRENT

30-Jul-17

PER13116

Propiconazole

Northern corn leaf blight

CURRENT

31-Mar-21

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14071

Pirmicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

Sweet peppers PER12378

118

Acephate

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Virus

Status

Expiry date 31-Mar-18

Sweet potato PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

CURRENT

PER13153

Regent 200 SC

White fringed weevil & wireworm

CURRENT

31-Dec-16

PER13151

Mouseoff and Rattoff Zinc Phosphide Baits

House mouse and introduced rats

CURRENT

31-Dec-16 30-Sep-16

PER12047

Tecto Flowable SC Fungicide (thiabendazole)

Field rots caused by scurf & root rot

CURRENT

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

CURRENT

30-Jun-19

PER13902

Phorate

phids, thrips, jassids and organophosphate susceptible A two-spotted mite and wireworm

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

Fruit fly

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

Thai eggplant PER80717

Trichlorfon

Tomatoes PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18 30-Jun-18

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

CURRENT

PER12378

Acephate

Western flower thrips

CURRENT

31-Oct-20

PER13675

Maldison

ueensland, Mediterranean and lesser Queensland fruit Q fly and cucumber fly

CURRENT

31-May-18

31-May-16

Tomatoes (proteced) PER13721

Switch

Grey mould (Botrytis)

CURRENT

PER80216

Torque Insecticide (fenbutatin oxide)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER14100

Buprofezin

Greenhouse whitefly

CURRENT

31-Mar-16

PER13726

Trifloxystrobin

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13725

Chess

reenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly, green peach G aphid

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13724

Previcur

Root rot

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13723

Avatar

eliothis (corn earworm), looper, cluster caterpillar, H leafhoppers, green mirid

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13722

Teldor 500SC Fungicide

Grey mould (Botrytis)

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13720

Pristine

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13717

Amistar Top (azoxystrobin + difenoconazole)

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

31-May-16

PER13716

Abrade Abrasive Barrier Insecticide

Various insect pests

CURRENT

31-Jan-20

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Botrytis

CURRENT

30-Jun-20

Turnip PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Jun-17

PER14126

Methomyl

Various

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER11441

Propachlor

Grass and broadleaf weeds

CURRENT

31-Dec-19

PER14337

Trifluralin

Weeds

CURRENT

30-Jun-20

Various vegetable crops PER14583

Chlorpyrifos

Various insect pests

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

PER14479

Propiconazole

Various pests

CURRENT

30-Nov-19

PER14038

Products containing Copper

Various diseases

CURRENT

30-Sep-23

PER13695

Ecocarb Fungicide

Powdery mildew

CURRENT

30-Sep-17

PER14565

Various Products

Stable fly larvae

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

Ioxynil

Broad leaf and grass weeds

CURRENT

31-Mar-19

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

CURRENT

30-Sep-20

Welsh onions PER14142 Zucchini PER14722 PER12906

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

CURRENT

31-Mar-18

PER12712

Applaud Insecticide

Greenhouse whitefly, silverleaf whitefly and leafhoppers

CURRENT

31-Mar-17

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

119


WA Grower ADVERTISING SPECIFICATIONS

Preferred format: press ready PDF

FULL PAGE Full page with bleed 210mm(W) x 297mm(H) plus 3mm bleed — 216mm(W) x 303mm(H)

Must be saved as: • 300dpi • CMYK • Fonts embedded

HALF PAGE vegetablesWA

Half page without bleed 190mm(W) x 130mm(H)

Horticultural House 103 Outram Street, West Perth 6005

t: (08) 9481 0834 f: (08) 9481 0024 e: finance@vegetableswa.com.au

ONE THIRD PAGE One third page without bleed 190mm(W) x 80mm(H) or 60mm(W) x 254mm(H)

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

Website/Email

Address

AUSVEG (p53)

www.ausveg.com.au

273 Camberwell Rd, Camberwell VIC 3124

Bentonite WA (p5)

www.bentonitewa.com.au

Commonwealth Bank (p27)

tim.svehlak@cba.com.au

Clarendon Realty (p18)

www.clarendonrealty.com.au 4/216 Stirling St, Perth WA 6000

C-Wise (p9)

www.cwise.com.au

Nambeelup Rd, Nambeelup WA 6207

David Howey

(08) 9581 9582

Dobmac Ag Machinery (OBC)

www.dobmac.com.au

36–38 Industrial Dv, Ulverstone TAS 7315

Mark Dobson

(03) 6425 5533

edp australia pty ltd (p52)

www.edp.com.au

33–37 O’Brien St, Mooroopna VIC 3629

4 Farmers (p19)

www.4farmers.com.au

35 McDowell St, Welshpool WA 6106

HM.Clause Pacific (p87)

www.hmclause.com

165 Templestowe Rd, Lower Templestowe VIC 3107

Horticulture Innovation Australia (IBC)

www.horticulture.com.au

Level 8, 1 Chifley Square, Sydney NSW 2000

IQ Property & Projects (IFC)

nick.dilello@iinet.net.au

216 Seventh Ave, Inglewood WA 6052

Nick Di Lello

0422 230 230

Mirco Bros (p47)

www.mircobros.com.au

800 Rockingham Rd, Henderson WA

Johny Mirco

0419 909 648

Perth Energy (p73)

www.perthenergy.com.au

24th Floor, Forrest Centre, 221 St Georges Tce, Perth 6000 Steve McDonald (08) 9420 0300

120

WA Grower AUTUMN 2016

Contact name

Contact number (03) 9882 0277 0418 140 929

Level 14d, 300 Murray St, Perth WA 6000

Tim Svehlak

0477 724 462 (08) 9227 5522

(03) 5820 5337 (08) 9356 3445 Kevin Swan

0400 622 314 (02) 8295 2300


JUMP ON BOARD BECOME A MEMBER NOW MEMBERSHIP IS FREE AND KEEPS YOU IN THE LOOP OF THE INNOVATIONS HAPPENING IN YOUR INDUSTRY. IT’S EASY TO APPLY AND ONLY TAKES A FEW MINUTES AT WWW.HORTICULTURE.COM.AU/MEMBERSHIP OR CALL 1300 880 981 FOR MORE INFORMATION.


ONION GRADING & PACKING SOLUTIONS M & P Onion Peelers • Small Peeler for 18-45mm Onions or Shallots • Large Peeler for Onions over 45mm • Stainless Steel Construction • Variable Speed Drive • Dry Peeling Process

• Manual Orientation of Onions • Adjustable Operator Station • 415v 3 Phase 50 Hz • Unique Peeling System

Baxmatic®

Fully automated Bagging System Combination Weighing Scale (Optional)

• High capacity (up to 1200 bags/hr) • Quick start-up & changes • Automatic bag placement • Automatic sewing & closing • Bag sizes from 2.5kg to 50kg • Heavy duty construction • Integrated labelling • Online support system • 12 & 16 Head Combination Scales • Up to 1500 scale movements per hour

Turn Key Pack House Solutions • Onion Toppers • Pre Sizers • Intake Hoppers • Dirt Separation • Inspection Tables • Box/Big Bag Fillers • 5-25kg Baggers • Semi & Fully Automatic Palletisers

36-38 Industrial Drive (PO Box 93) Ulverstone TASMANIA. 7315 AUSTRALIA Phone: (03) 6425 5533 Fax: (03) 6425 5847

PO Box 1021, Pukekohe. New Zealand Phone: 0272 907 281

Email: dobmac@dobmac.com.au Website: www.dobmac.com.au A leader in the design, manufacture & supply of specialised agricultural machinery