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VOLUME 8 | ISSUE 2 flip for fashion

IN THIS ISSUE

FALLING OUT OF THE STREAM OF SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS:

Pallavi Sen THE CREATURE ALFRED GETTING OFF IN THE NAME OF ART

+ much more!

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Spring/Summer 2015

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Brandon Geib COPY EDITOR

Jessica Morgan ART DIRECTOR

Kelly Reyes WEB EDITORS

Sarah Thaw + Will Singleton SENIOR FASHION EDITOR

Aaron Ni’jai JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR

Britnie Dates FASHION EDITOR-AT-LARGE

Giovanni V. CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Cierra Artis

STAFF WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS

Wyatt Booth Luis Cabrera Perry Conner Porcelyn Headen Vaidehi Kumar Jessica Shim Nicholas Von Thrower Gloria Wyszynski Allison Oberlin Moriah Briscoe Madison Doeckl Josh Maclin Dina Alemu Tobi Oluwo Lizz Bruce Alyssa Michener

HEAD FASHION COLUMNISTS

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS

Shaun Jackson + Andrea Philbin

Ilana Bean Clayton Bontrager Mark Espinosa Rachel Hume

Ink Magazine and the Student Media Center Offices

TWITTER

817 W. Broad St. P.O. Box 842010 Richmond, Va. 23284 Phone: (804) 828-1058

INSTAGRAM

Ink magazine is a student publication, published quarterly with the support of the Student Media Center.

Ink Magazine VCU

To advertise with Ink, please contact our Advertising representatives at inkmagazineads@vcustudentmedia.com Material in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the VCU Student Media Center.

DESIGNERS

Miranda Leung Ashley Moody Sarah Butler Desiree Choe Rachel Lee COVER PHOTO

Nicholas Von Thrower AD STAFF

Katie Gallant Taylor Hankins Shaun Jackson Abigail Keatinge SMC ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER

Sam Foster

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All content copyright © 2016 by VCU Student Media Center, All rights reserved. Printed locally

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Table of Contents 01 Word on the Street 03 Clarity Through Color 07 Skip the Hotel, Try a Couch 12 You Should be Listening 21 The Creature Alfred 27 Getting Off in the Name of Art 33 Falling Out of the Stream of Self Consciousness: the Artwork of Pallavi Sen

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Editor’s Note Ink is an unexpected adventure. Every semester I am amazed by my fellow editors and staff that help keep this magazine the ever changing source of entertainment and information it is. We are inherently based on the constant change of a university life, and are continually reinventing ourselves because of that. It’s in this constant turning of the wheel that inspiration finds its root. We only have so long as students, and we have to make it count. So whether we’re looking for new jams or examining the female form in contemporary art it’s always so we can prolong the life of ideas that matter to us and you. So check out our website, follow our instagram, and tell us what you think. Time is fleeting, let’s make our mark. BRANDON GEIB EDITOR IN CHIEF

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WRITTEN BY JESSICA SHIM PHOTOS BY NICHOLAS VON THROWER

William, senior

What’s a cool band or artist on your radar right now?

Tell us about the importance of voting.

I’m really into this cool indie rapper named Yung Lean. He’s a Swedish rapper and no one knows who he is but he does a lot of music with Travis Scott.

Every citizen is given the right to his or her own elected representatives, and that’s how a democracy functions. If people don’t participate in democratic process by voting, democracy essentially stops right there. That’s the key element to democracy. If you value your freedoms, your own opinions, and even your life in this country, then it’s your civic duty to vote, and to at least give yourself that option to choose who your representative should be.

Devin, freshman

W or d

on

Kandace, sophomore

If you had to fight for one issue for the rest of your life what would it be? Probably women’s rights. There’s a huge disparity in how women are treated and men are treated. A lot of people can be misogynist these days. Why is that particular issue so important to you? I just feel like in certain subgroups, there’s a lot of hypermasculinity and people who don’t treat women as people as much and I just feel like people are people [in general].

Srikar, freshman What’s your favorite club on campus? Global Medical Training. I actually had my interview yesterday for their service trip to Nicaragua this summer and I got accepted, so I’m pretty excited. We’re gonna be providing dental and medical services to underprivileged people in Central America. We go for a week and work at an established clinic along with certified MDs. Why is that important to you? I believe it’s a unique experience, and it’s a priceless experience because you’re not only helping those in need in an area you’ve more than likely never been exposed to before, but you’re also gaining invaluable experience about the career choice you’re looking into.

What is your number one goal for this year? To get anything above D’s. 1

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Emily (left) and Cassandra (right), sophomores How many people do you fall in love with every day? I definitely feel like I fall in love with strangers, I just see them and I’m like, ‘Oh, god I love you. Can’t wait until we get married! It’s gonna be awesome,’ and then I never see them again so, yeah, that happens a lot. —Emily

Chris, senior What do you think cats dream about, if they dream at all? They dream about a giant bag of catnip floating on people’s faces because they like to sleep on people’s faces. If you had to fight for one issue for the rest of your life what would it be?

Michael, senior What is your number one goal for the year? My number one goal for the year is to save up some money, enough to buy a new car. What’s your dream car? It’s a brand new Mercedes. So, I’m working towards that and graduation.

th e

Environmentalism and green energy. As an engineer, I think it’s my purpose to help advance humanity and I think the environment is a really important part of that. Getting green energy and preserving our climate and Earth is very important.

St re et

There’s this guy in my Intro to Anthropology class and we always make really intense eye contact and he’s a stranger… I think he knows who he is, it could be the fact that I’m always sitting in front of the professor but I always think he’s looking at me. —Cassandra

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Clarity Through Color WRITTEN BY WYATT BOOTH PHOTOS BY VAIDEHI KUMAR

Graffiti is often claimed to be the vandalistic artwork of miscreants and troubled teens, but maybe that’s not entirely true. Maybe it’s just the artwork speaks to a truth, not yet understood by mainstream society. Maybe it addresses everything that went wrong with the older generations or might go wrong with the newer ones. Maybe it symbolizes the conflicts everyone fears to voice both internally and externally, or even the surrealistic nature of a dream actually worth living. In Richmond, Virginia, the message becomes clearer. Alleyways are decorated with flourishing fantasies. Decrepit factories housed in shadows and ridden with filth address the ignorance of a society once set on equality

and prosperity. Trivial images speak for the voiceless whilst the country’s officials fight to remain on top. Images are so vile and virtuous simultaneously, the mere action of creating them is even deemed highly illegal, so artists must remain mute, praying that their messages are heard. On a desolate solitary wall, a whirlwind of colors screams out Black Lives Matter, outlined with rivers of tears and bloodstained flames. African American individuals appear to rise out from an American Flag, shrouding the racial prejudice still felt throughout the country. Red and blue join hands by the support of a third party, symbolic of how even the Bloods & Crips joined forces for the benefit of their ink 4

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The graffiti can be found in the Belle Isle area and in an abandoned factory along the river.

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people. Throughout history, these two gangs have been afflicted by death and prejudice. An alliance was unimaginable, but with the recent stresses of cops, politics, and racial prejudice, anything is possible. To the right, “VICTIM” appears to gesture toward the pain mothers and children have felt from recent losses. The additional apparel, texts, and weapons define the borders of a country in chaos. Buried within a decaying factory, shrouded in darkness, another image showcases the more traditional sense of good versus evil in a biblical context. An angel seems to be delightfully defending itself against a demon with a gun. On another crumbling brick wall, two cartoony ghosts join together in the traditional image of Yin and Yang. The caption “Laugh Now… Cry Latin” circumscribes the image, reflecting a sense of ironic desperation into the mind of the viewer. Although graffiti tends to be associated with the unruly behavior of young adults, a closer look leads potentially anyone to the realization that graffiti is in fact, a language of truth that has not yet been lost, but yearns to be uncovered. Whether the words are ambiguous letters displayed in a collage of electric colors or a seemingly monotonous mural of a facet to everyday life, the artwork screams out. And only those truly searching for meaning and abstract understanding will come to understand that in every little nook and cranny of Richmond, there’s just a splash of color, of life, and even clarity.

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Skip the Hotel, Try a Couch WRITTEN BY GLORIA WYSZYNSKI PHOTOS BY PERRY CONNER

As someone who enjoys traveling, and when I say traveling, I don’t mean your typical commercialized kind of traveling, discovering the concept of Couchsurfer was a godsend. To those who don’t know, the name really says it all. Couchsurfer is a website where travelers from all over the world can connect online to look for people who will let you stay in their house for free. It’s also a place where you can look for events or locals who are down to grab dinner on a night you’re in town. While some critics are quick to claim the lifestyle is risky or a waste of time, there’s not a single person I’ve met who hasn’t truly enjoyed their couchsurfing experiences. It’s wild, exciting, adventurous, and the definition of setting your own path and letting events unfold as they may. You never really know what lies ahead in your travels and honestly, isn’t that the point? To dig even deeper into the invigorating lifestyle of a couchsurfer I met up with Jessica Bishop, a VCU senior who’s done some extensive traveling. From Iceland to Germany to Austria, if anyone knew anything about traveling as a student, it was her. As someone who has both hosted and traveled, Bishop has loved every

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minute she’s spent meeting new people and embarking on incredible journeys. We both quickly realized that we had similar views on the idea of couchsurfing as a whole. There’s a certain timeless philosophy behind the idea of accepting travelers into your home and generously providing shelter, food, and company. Leaving the planner behind and opening yourself up to different opportunities as well as challenges changes you from someone who only thinks they’re traveling, to a citizen of a world in which we’re all connected by the deep desire to go out and try something new. Coming from a small, rural town with parents who were also raised in rural settings, Bishop said coming to VCU was a big step and that while her parents wanted her to go to a smaller college, she really wanted to come to the city. Being at VCU showed her many different things, “it helped me grow up,” she said. After a while she started to get antsy, she knew she wanted to go somewhere else which prompted her to apply for a study abroad program last summer in Dresden, Germany. Knowing she had to complete an internship before going into the two week program, she looked around and found an internship opportunity in Germany that allowed her to fulfill the school’s internship requirement while experiencing Germany for all its worth. From finding an apartment to simply navigating around, she said Couchsurfer was always available in case she needed to make friends or find a place to stay. Finding locals was important to her as it allowed her to meet with people who showed

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her the city, not your on-the-map tourist locations but hole-in-thewall cafes and hip spots where all the students were spending their summer days. When it comes to hosting travelers, Bishop says Richmond can be such a wonderful place for travelers to stay because of the unique culture and fun things to do. From an outsider’s point of view it might seem quite small and uninteresting but it’s chock full of amazing restaurants, galleries, parks, and so much more. “It’s worth couchsurfing here in Richmond because when you pair up with a local you can discover Maymont Park, Belle Isle, Hollywood Cemetery, and all the little nooks and crannies here in the city,” said Bishop. If someone wants to shop she’ll take them to Carytown, if they want to immerse themselves in nature she’ll take them to the river, overall there’s something for everyone. She said she has a lot of fun when people come stay with her and that often times there’s so much to do they can’t fit it all in. From shows to museums, she makes sure the traveler leaves with amazing memories of Richmond. Bishop says in her travels she’s become more comfortable with herself as a person and what continually surprises her is the fact that traveling without a set agenda can make you so much more grateful for every little thing you come across. When talking to people who are thinking about trying out Couchsurfer for the first time, Bishop tells them to go in without any set expectations.

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Jessica and her dog Taz

“Look at people’s profiles on the site and check out their references and just use your best judgement,” she said. Overtime you learn how to navigate in such a way that it becomes less about the exact details and more about the journey. Whether you’re trying to travel to another state or even to another country, couchsurfing can open so many doors, you’ll meet people you’ll never forget and do things you’d never imagine. Find your time and do it. For more details visit Couchsurfer.com

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When people stay with her, it’s common for Jessica to take them to local parks like Hollywood Cemetery.

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you should be listening WRITTEN BY BRANDON GEIB

Richmond’s got it all. With a vast and thriving music scene it is easy to find something for every occasion, and most nights of the week if you’re looking for it. With new bands always being formed it’s hard to keep track, and sometimes old favorites can slip our minds. Sometimes it’s easy to look back on the past few months and realize you’ve only been at dingy punk shows. But at Ink we’re firm believers that the genre wars are bull shit, and the music is what matters. So in light of all the ear banging, tear worthy, lighter lifting musicians in this city we decided to round up a few of our favorite musicians and artists from across the genre spectrum to share their thoughts, and sounds with all of you. Whether you’re looking to kick it, throw down, or question the existential meaning of your life, we’ve found someone for you to listen to, live or online.

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The Dharma Bombs Jams like Pokey LaFarge / Devil Makes Three / Louis Armstrong

WRITTEN BY PORCELYN HEADEN ILLUSTRATION BY ILANA BEAN

The Dharma Bombs, which consists of Trey “Puddin’” Hall (Vocals, Mandolin, Guitar), Stephen “Jelly Roll” Moser (Trumpet), Josh “Buffet” Smith (Soprano Clarinet), David “Lil’ Plum” Brunson (Banjo, Alto Saxophone), Mike “Roxanne” Ferster (Vocals, Plectrum Banjo), and Drew “Olga” Brunson (Bass), is a band that “fuses dixieland jazz with Appalachian folk music to create their own blend of southern fried melodies.” The Dharma Bombs started back in 2014; they were first known as Rivers Crude or Rivers Nude. After a rotation of lineups, the Dharma Bombs became what they are today. Reminiscent of Pokey LaFarge, Devil Makes Three, and Louis Armstrong, their music is like bringing a yellow umbrella to a funeral, or getting road head with the windows down while listening to Bon Jovi. Seeing them live is like a modern day hoedown, but even cooler. If you’re lucky, maybe they’ll even take their pants off during the show (they will if it’s a house show). Great jams by them are “St. James”, “Sunny Always”, and “Memoir of a Drunk.” Look them up on facebook.com/dharmabombs soundcloud.com/dharma_bombs

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Mishika Jams like Bjork / Erykah Badu / Radiohead

WRITTEN BY SARAH THAW ILLUSTRATION BY MARK ESPINOSA

Defying a rigid genre altogether, listening to Mishika’s music feels like experiencing raw emotion, which she draws inspiration from to create her content. The 20-year-old VCU Journalism student just released her first full project, “Industrial Deconstruction,” an EP she created completely on her own. Lyrics, composition, production, and mixing/mastering were all done solo, to create an otherworldly sound with electronic, R&B, and industrial influences. “There again goes my hope, here come the jaded lens, you might as well have jumped rope, with my intestines, that would’ve hurt me less.” This line from her song “Lopsided,” perfectly conveys her use of translating personal experiences into sound. But to Mishika, it’s less about the lyrics or meaning behind

her songs, but rather focused on the overall feeling she aims for them to convey. “I want people to feel connected. Even if I hear a song and I don’t exactly know what it’s about, I can still connect with it deeply because of how it sounds or the emotion in the voice or some other musical aspect. I want people to envision themselves in my songs so to speak…to step into my psyche, as well as theirs, and share space. Each song has its own mood, but they are all quite dreamy with the exception of “Lopsided”, which is sort of a dark and demented,” she said. If you want to listen to Mishika’s EP, check her out on soundcloud.com/mishikat

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Sunstone Jams like Shabazz Palaces / Flying Lotus / Shlohmo

WRITTEN BY SARAH THAW ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL HUME

“Jazzy, electronic, and soulful.” That was Eman El Saied’s response when asked to describe the music of her solo project Sunstone, in three words. Inspired by her mother, a poet, musician and fashionista, Eman was surrounded by creativity at a young age. Her first introduction to playing an instrument was in elementary school, where she picked up the clarinet and then switched to viola. There are two uploaded tracks on her Soundcloud so far, “i made this song sober, but i put it out a lil tipsy” and “I didn’t have class today because it snowed.” Her song titles are charming and give context into her mindset and environment in which she composed them. Even the most frazzled person would unwind upon listening to her smooth compositions.

Daydreaming in a jazz café on a rainy day is the kind of vibe her music portrays, and according to Eman, she gets this influence from female artists in the United Kingdom. “Europe does groundbreaking things,” she says. As far as favorite musicians, Eman admires the sound and ideas of New York based singersongwriter Empress Of. “She is doing something very interesting,” she commented. Making intimate connections with others through sound is important to Eman. One of her most memorable moments involved a performance at a house show where the audience sang her lyrics back to her. “I said ‘holy shit’ on the mic. I had only read about these kinds of moments online.” As far as success is concerned, she believes it is something personal, something you feel. “Physically and emotionally, if you don’t feel something crazy, then you’re not doing it right.” If you want to listen to Eman’s creations, check her out on soundcloud.com/sunstonesounds

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Toward Space Jams like The B-52’s / Jay Retard / Ty Segal

WRITTEN BY NICHOLAS VON THROWER ILLUSTRATION BY CLAYTON BONTRAGER

Toward Space is one of Richmond’s newest art rock groups, and is perhaps one of the only art-driven acts in town. As the charismatic duo explained, this platform allows them to create and experiment without the constraints or boundaries normally tied to the “band unit.” Seyla Hossaini & David Pahtoon put on a show that never fails to keep the crowd coming back for more. Hossaini’s jaunty swagger and Pahtoon’s multi-instrumentation (he plays kick drum and shreds guitar simultaneously) produce quite the spectacle. Inspired by The Ramones and other alternative bands in the New York punk scene, David began playing the guitar at about 11 years old. Seyla also found her sonic calling at a young age, “I have been singing and writing songs since about 4th grade and started playing the bass guitar

when I was 14. I joined a band with no intention of playing the bass, it just kind of happened.” When asked how they would define success, David says, “Making your shit... fame doesn’t matter as long as you’re finishing your work.” Seyla added, “Personally, I would consider myself successful when I can support myself and maybe a dog just from playing music.” After hearing Toward Space perform live and speaking with them about their music, it’s apparent that making art is what drives them to keep evolving and making music. “It’s the feeling that we are always running out of time, whether just running late or the fact that we’re going to die someday, that really keeps us going... like, feeling the crunch and importance of getting these ideas realized.” If you want to listen to Toward Space’s music, check them out at soundcloud.com/towardspace

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The Creature Alfred WRITTEN BY SARAH THAW PHOTOS BY NICHOLAS VON THROWER

It’s been said that true art is a mirror of the mind of the artist, which seems to be the case with Aaron Brown, who goes by the stage name “Alfred.” He is a 20-yearold Communication Arts/African American Studies double major at VCU who, for the past seven years, has expressed himself through rapping. Unlike a lot of rappers who grew up embedded within the culture, Alfred paved his own way. Growing up, his parents didn’t allow him to listen to hip-hop music. A strict upbringing in a suburban environment didn’t exactly create the best foundation for becoming a rapper, but that all changed when he got to high school and heard Lauryn Hill’s album, “The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.” He says that her “crazy melodic shit” opened his eyes to a realm he never ventured in before.

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”I

don’t want to rap about shit I’m not experiencing and fall into the habit of creating metaphors I can’t live up to. ” He considers Lauryn Hill to be his first biggest influence, but Odd Future a close second. Their music breaks through the barriers of what is socially acceptable and considered normal, telling a story through the use of metaphors to touch on deeper subject matters. Odd Future exposed him to another side of rap, where it was “cool to be weird,” with nothing off-limits. Weird is definitely something that Alfred embraces in his own creative process. The name Alfred describes his alter ego, the persona he embodies when making music. He grew up feeling as if he was two different people, and he believes that this was part of him his whole life. “It’s kind of like the dichotomy that some kids have. They have to be this way in one space and a different way when they’re not being monitored,” he explains. His persona, “The Creature Alfred” transports him to a storybook-like imaginary world. He describes the feeling as one similar to a kid going to their bedroom to draw on the wall with crayons. When he raps, he is meaningful, although he enjoys the freedom of being unfiltered. “It’s pretty fun, you get to say weird shit that means a lot to you but may not mean much to anyone else,” he says.

Authenticity is an important part of Alfred’s work, as his content is about his life experiences through the lens of his alter ego. He tries to steer clear of rapping about a lifestyle he doesn’t live, a trap he feels a lot of other suburban-raised rappers fall into. “They try to stick to a narrative that has already been written,” Alfred says. “I don’t want to rap about shit I’m not experiencing and fall into the habit of creating metaphors I can’t live up to.” Instead, his subject matter is inspired by everyday struggles like money and family issues. Living in Richmond has been a catalyst in Alfred’s creative and personal development. In the beginning, he was not a fan of the grungy, crowded dirty basement house-show scene. But after joining B.ckwards Haus Operations, a collaborative group of artists based on visual arts, electronic darkwave hip-hop/r&b and acoustics, his perspective changed. The group helps to organize shows and music installations in houses and galleries in Richmond. Alfred evolved from someone grossed out by the atmosphere of house shows, to a coordinator and performer at them. He credits the city in providing him with more to draw from for his music. “I feel like people do their best to follow their own

pattern here,” Alfred says. Before placing making music as a priority, he says he had to come to the understanding that no one’s progress is identical and not to expect to grow in the same pattern as someone else. As far as success is concerned, Alfred defines it as “using your own terms of creation to be your resolve.” He says that creating something that brings you peace, whether in the form of monetary support, acceptance, or understanding is what makes someone truly successful. “It’s like a mission complete if you are able to find resolve through the shit you make. That’s the coolest thing a person can do.” To stay up to date on Alfred’s music ventures, follow him at facebook.com/alfredthecreature & soundcloud/alfred-15

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Luis Cabrera � It was nice out. The kind of nice outside when it's been really shitty and cold lately and then you get a warm day all of a sudden. Allyson was telling me about how she'd been dealing with dysmorphia since gaining a little weight, and was really trying to get comfortable enough to take pictures again. She wanted to let go for a bit. The mood was free and the attitude was fuck it.�

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Getting Off In the Name of Art WRITTEN BY KELLY REYES PHOTOS BY NICHOLAS VON THROWER & LUIS CABRERA

The female body can sell anything. If you put a girl in a bikini on something, you’re pretty much guaranteed that eyes are on whatever you’re trying to sell. The fact that sex sells has never been a secret, but the overt sexualization of women seems to have infiltrated the work of some photographers calling themselves artists. I’ve noticed a considerable rise in this type of work on social media and thus the rise of predatory photographers. The rise of this type of photography on social media has brought upon us a new wave of young photogs eager to get in on the action. Yes, there are young photographers who do the female form justice and whose intents are not malicious nor illegitimate. That being said, there are others that see these types of images online and assume that picking up a DSLR gives them the power to exploit a woman’s body for likes on Instagram. Art is made with a purpose but art is also subjective. While the objective of an image of a naked woman might be to elicit a certain emotion or get a message across, some do not see the image on that level and mistake it for an easy opportunity to create trendy work. I like to call them the fuckboys of photography. Those who are ignorant to the damage they are doing and who knowingly use this practice to exploit

women for their own benefit. The line between art and exploitation is fine, but it’s there. I reached out to Luis Cabrera, a Richmond based photographer who often works with the female form, to comment on the difference between appreciation and exploitation. “It all depends on the idea you’re trying to convey. A lot of photographers, specially young male photographers, get lost in the sauce when trying to photograph the female form. They end up over sexualizing and even objectifying their images of women,” said Cabrera. “They believe that all the attention their photos get comes from their photography skills, when in reality it’s just people liking them because there’s a hot naked girl in it.” Cabrera also said, “The idea they originally set out to convey about artistry, and appreciation of the human form gets lost, and it becomes more about portraying their subjects as being sexually approachable.” I can see how this happens, and I do not doubt that misconceptions can be born out of ignorance. However, ignorance does not justify the disrespect of women and their bodies. It’s the Information Age, and not making the effort to become more informed on a subject is quite honestly a choice. Google is your friend.

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Nicholas Von Thrower � Focusing on the contrast between the pale skin and red hair of the subject with the green grass, I thought made her stand out even more.�

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Nicholas Von Thrower �This concept was all the idea of the subject. Blurring everything that was in the background drew all of the focus to the subjects face and details on her skin.�

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Luis Cabrera “ Inspired by a conversation and a joke really. My friend Roshelle had been though recent heartbreak by dealing with a fuckboy, and would constantly joke about how she feels dead inside because of it. So we used a projector and her body to capture this. The images in this series convey a sense stillness and death, to a transition of implied movement and resurrection from death.”

While ignorance might be the culprit in some cases, there are those who are fully aware of what they are doing. These fuckboys of photography see the popularity of this imagery, the convenience of social media, and young women as a perfect combination to legitimately pass off being a total creep. I have heard many horror stories from women who have felt targeted, pressured and used by men passing themselves off as professional photographers.

She met a photographer through a legitimate networking site for photographers and models to work together, which had been recommended to her by a fellow model. Alyssa recalled the photographer wanting to do a lingerie shoot but she made it clear beforehand that complete nudity was not an option. Nevertheless, shortly after the shoot began, the photographer started to aggressively pressure Alyssa to take off her clothing or to pose in overly sexual poses.

Alyssa, a VCU student and occasional freelance model, shared a particular experience in which the photographer crossed the line.

“I was so nervous, so anxious. At that point I was doing things I wasn’t comfortable doing. I was alone with this guy and had no

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control over the situation whatsoever – I just felt completely vulnerable and uncomfortable,” said Alyssa. She was fortunately able to leave the photoshoot physically unharmed, but was never contacted for compensation or allowed to view the photos as she was promised. Sarah Thaw, INK magazine web editor and freelance model, says that although she has no problems with posing nude or seminude, she too has received invitations from photographers that “seemed sketchy” and decided against working with them. “I think a lot of photographers, in it for the wrong reasons, would see a girl confident in posing nude and assume that she would be down with crazy oversexualized photo shoots, which is not the case. Not that there is anything wrong with posing provocatively, if that’s what makes someone feel empowered and beautiful, props to them. What people need to understand is that the naked body does NOT equal sex and by choosing to share my

“ Sometimes it’s a mood you chase after and try to capture. In these images I was trying to capture a sense of vulnerability.” —Luis Cabrera body confidence, I am not giving anyone the right to objectify me or assume that I would pose nude for them, especially in ways that I don’t find personally empowering,” said Thaw. The point is that a woman’s body is not faceless. Consent should never be assumed, and a woman’s body was not created to please the male gaze on command. Photographers should be explicitly clear in what their direction is, and above all have the respect to ask first. Otherwise they have no place calling themselves professional photogra-

phers. It’s sad to say that this still gets looked over in the professional industry today. I fully support the use of the nude female form in art, for the human figure itself will forever be a fascinating subject. But its presence should be relevant to the piece. It is a matter of respect. If a woman is willing to take her clothing off in front of a camera in the name of art, photographers must have the respect to look further beyond what is there and create something new. It’s easy to look at the naked body and snap a quick picture just because history has proven sex will sell. This being said, I’m not condemning sex positive shoots, but it should be done in an environment where all parties are fully informed and consenting. When asked about her views on photo shoots following her experience, Alyssa said, “Once you go in having set boundaries and they chip them away, it becomes a place where it is unsafe and uncomfortable and exploitative.”

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Falling Out of the Stream of SelfConsciousness: The Artwork of Pallavi Sen

WRITTEN BY BRANDON GEIB

Going into Pallavi Sen’s body of work is mystic. Whether you look at it, wear it or live in it her detail oriented pieces take you to a world of her own creation. The use of pattern and layering across medium and space helps tie her creations from the past to the present. Pallavi is a graduate student working towards completing her thesis in the Sculpture + Extended Media department at VCU. She received her Bachelors of Fine Art in Printmaking from the Columbus College of Art and Design. Pallavi’s work has developed significantly in her time as a jeweler and artist assistant. She has also worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and with the MARPHA Foundation’s art program in Nepal.

Circus Circus In the blue face paint you can see Pallavi adorned in her own work, a mode of presentation that became common to her practice. 33 spring / summer 2016

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Rooster

Bombay Duck

Scarab

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While all valuable experiences Pallavi has said that one of the biggest impacts on her work is still India. Born there in 1989, she sees a lasting impact in her work that she can’t seem to escape, and doesn’t want to. During her undergraduate degree the inspiration came through as a focus on detail and pattern. She explains that “Even though you had few things [in India] each thing had a lot of time spent on it. So if you had a quilt, it would be a quilt that took someone three months to make… the richness would be in how much you can do to one thing, rather than the material.” This influence and philosophy of making becomes obvious when looking at the linocuts that populate her work from that period.Recently the effects have become different. They are more nuanced and personal to the essence of cities. “Now the way I feel India in my work is more in the way that an Indian city feels to me. So when you’re walking in a street in Bombay, the street is really narrow. You have a lot of different festivals that have happened. Processions that have gone down that street. Some people like drop something. There will be banners and flags. Then that festival will be over, there will be a new one, but the old ones will still be there. So things will just keep being layered. And it’s not like ‘Oh this means that’ or you know, you don’t think of it like that. It’s just walking through this hive of activity, where it’s like you can’t point out specific things but you get this feeling of ‘Oh this is Bombay’, or that kind of zestfulness. Now I feel that is something I love so much that I find it difficult to move away from that.

I don’t even think I want to. You know I love it so much.” While India’s influences are always present other major themes in her work have evolved as well, including a focus on mixing media and breaking down the wall between craft and art. The wearable sculptures that morph between fine art and avant garde fashion help to establish a world that seems to be exclusively Pallavi’s, and devoid of craft versus art based distinctions. At the time of their formation the works seem to be the perfect storm for a perfect project. There was a passion for fashion and fabric, but she admits there was a sense of “I don’t dress well, so I can’t study fashion.” The barrier allowed for that passion to manifest in an unexpected way when while lugging one of her fabric draped sculptures across campus someone commented, “Oh that looks really exciting,” and it clicked right there - she started to wear her works. Once she decided to wear the sculptures herself, the collaborative side of her practice began to emerge. She sought out photographers and models for documentation, then eventually all of the wearable sculptures became collaborations with photographers. “I think those were my most exciting collaborations cause I knew that I could make something and it would look completely different with whoever was photographing them, and the mood would change completely,” she recalls. When talking more about these works the relationships between the models, photographers and herself became key. She said collaborations in which the

Lover Photobooth Snapshots from the photo booth Pallavi created for the Art in Odd Places performance art festival in Manhattan. The booth was set up so anyone could come by, dress up, and be photographed. The patterns on the clothes were made using an appliqué technique, based on her own work and found prints. ink 38

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” I think those were my most exciting collaborations ‘cause I knew that I could make something and it would look completely different with whoever was photographing them, and the mood would change completely.” —Pallavi Sen

friendship was new and exciting, made it so her work was stronger. While in the past, when Pallavi worked with a photographer she had just started dating, an air of self consciousness made the experience less enjoyable. Ultimately, it’s the relationships that make the collaboration a success for Pallavi. In addition to the friendships made along the way, she says, “I love working with people who are very good at something so that they can do that part, and I can do this part, and there is no friction in that way.” Overcoming her own self consciousness has also been an important focus of Pallavi’s practice since her undergraduate days. She first began overcoming her nerves by modeling in her own work. While part of it was for the sake of convenience, “I am always there for myself,” as she put it, the other part seems more considered. “One of the reasons I use to feel self conscious is if you’re dancing or doing something where everyone is looking at you, your body becomes more obvious and I was very self conscious about it and now it’s like I can do all the things I wanted with a shape that was so new, even to me. And it didn’t mean anything. It didn’t mean I was fat or thin, it was nothing. And so it made me feel so amazing, and that was the reason I started doing that and being in my own work,” says Pallavi. Talking with her you can see how much it must have helped. She’s quick to comment, warm and easy to be around, all things

that one wouldn’t expect from someone who claims to be overtly self conscious. Instagram has also surfaced as a way for her to battle self consciousness in her more recent work. “I think it’s just been something for me to be less constricted in how I present myself” she said. She continues on to explain how when it comes to her shyness barrier Instagram is great because “someone is only going to look at it for so many seconds, and the sound is really cut off. No one is going to be like ‘oh she has a terrible voice’ or ‘she has a great voice,’ it doesn’t matter, it’s irrelevant.” Beyond the personal benefits Instagram has become a big part of her work. One perk being the confidence to help her get over any anxiety about not being a photographer. It has also changed how she views her own process. “I think about micro moments in everything that will document well” she explains. “It’s made a lot of what I make, something that has to be documented.” While still in production, her thesis struggles with her present concerns, such as her place as an artist or whether she should even be making more stuff in a world overflowing. “My recent interests are more ecology, and I do not work with materials that are not sustainable.” She explains, “I don’t want to work with anything that is going to outlast me by a significant amount of time.”

work, so she is creating a greenhouse. Evidently stressed, she still seems excited. When she puts everything together the greenhouse will have ceramic tiles, quilts, wallpaper, and lots of books to create her environment. Talking about the project she explains “there are women everywhere in it, so lots of women doing things, and a greenhouse made out of golden frames.” In the end Pallavi manages to inspire herself, and the audience with her creations. The works, that are always fantastic, are sure to brighten the days of anyone with the opportunity to view them. You can follow her on Instagram @superfeministgirl

While her dream project is to grow a forest, she had to dial back a bit in her most recent

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VOLUME 8 | ISSUE 2 flip for culture

IN THIS ISSUE

DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT:

Zoe Pulley RETRO WASTELAND THE RUNWAY, YOUR WAY

+ much more!

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Table of Contents 00 Senior editor’s choice 00 Junior editor’s choice 01 The Favored Physique 05 The Runway, Your way 07 At a Loss 14 Thrifty Missies 15 Fashion on Speed 17 In my closet 21 Retro Wasteland 36 Designer spotlight 44 Get this look

Retro Wasteland

Thank you We had an incredible time making this issue, mostly because we were able to collaborate with some dope talent in the Richmond area. We would like to take the opportunity to thank the following for their assistance and amazing support throughout this process: the Roan team, Soul.eil, Professor Kimberly Guthrie, Katie Williams, the VCU photography studio, and students Alyssa Michener and Jessica Frenzel for allowing us to use their home for an all out rager/ photo shoot. We would also like to thank Conde’ Nast Media Company for allowing us to use their images. INK FASHION EDITORS

Designer Spotlight

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Editor’s Choice AARON NI’JAI, SENIOR FASHION EDITOR

One thing is inevitable: continual growth. Along with that comes change. Britnie and I decided to take our editor’s choices to a different level by expanding our choices. Instead of just discussing fashion trends, we will also cover social movements, pop culture and many other things that not only catch our eyes but speak to our hearts. DEED BE DONE

In society these days we always hear about the bad things that people do. We are over-consumed by negativity especially on social platforms. Engage the Foundation wants to flip that on its head with good deeds. In 2015, Engage the Foundation created #1000GoodDeeds to increase awareness of Engage the Foundation's encouragement for everyone to assist in doing more good deeds.

LESS IS MORE

DENIM DYNAMICS

Because of its versatility, denim isn't going anywhere anytime soon. From light washes and distressing, to black and acid washed denim, you can find denim that fits your style. There are many different types of denim out there, so why not have a few in your closet? It can be dressed up with a white button up and a bowtie or dressed down with a graphic tee. Denim shirts, jeans, trench coats and accessories show that no matter what your style is, you can always find a place for it. Get it: Zara.com, Uniqlo.com, Jcrew.com

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The saying "less is more" has always been around, but now this really covers what's going on in the fashion industry. Gender-LESS and season-LESS fashion are becoming more popular every single day as people in society tries to not put things into a box. Fast fashion retailer, Zara has just announced that they will be introducing a genderless collection in their store and there are many new shops popping up with the main focus of blending lines. Also, as seasons seem to become more obsolete because of the ever-changing weather people love to have pieces that can be worn any time of the year. These trends are showing how things aren't always black or white and are highlighting the grey areas. Get it: Uniqlo.com, Zara.com, Needsupply.com, Notequal.co

It's designed to encourage everyone to do good deeds on a regular basis and share pictures/videos of their good deeds on social media with the hashtag #1000GoodDeeds. I encourage you to brighten someone's day and do one or more good deeds each week. Feel free to use Engage the Foundation’s hashtag as well. How to: Take a minute and do something good.

STAND OUT IN PRINT

Guys only wearing basic colors are starting to become a thing of the past. This season it’s time for guys to be daring with prints. There are various types of print options for guys. From shoes and ties, to button downs and blazers; anything with a unique print can be a statement piece for multiple occasions. Instead of being scared of a unique (sometimes flashy) print, embrace it. Get it: Topman.com, Zara.com, Urbanoutfitters.com

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BRITNIE DATES, JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR

BEST FOOT FORWARD THE EYES HAVE IT

SMALL BUSINESS EVERYDAY

I rarely experiment with makeup, but I think I’m ready to take the plunge into bolder waters after seeing Creature of the Winds Spring 2016 runway show. The gold glitter eyeshadow that adorned the models’ lids was gorgeous and sent me on a mad dash to browse makeup tutorials on YouTube. To make the look more appropriate for daytime, I plan to do a light swipe of shadow over my lids and wear it with a classic white-tee and denim combo.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the kind of community I want to live in and how my personal spending fits into that. Being in Richmond has definitely spoiled me; the local businesses here are true gems and promote a “can-do” attitude that I’m totally here for. Whether it’s groceries, fashion, entertainment, or hospitality, there’s an entrepreneur who’s made greatness happen. Supporting local is nothing new, but I aim to be more conscious of where I spend my money.

Get it: sephora.com, ulta.com, drugstore.com

Get it: shopnanin.com, videofanforever.com, stockprovisions.com

Babouches (ba-booshes) are the flat shoe of the season and I fully intend to indulge. Inspired by traditional Moroccan slippers, this season’s variations will literally go with everything in your closet. Don’t believe me? Just study Celine’s Resort ‘16 looks and take notes. My favorites are by Brother Vellies, a CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund awardwinning brand that collaborates with artisans throughout South Africa, Kenya, and Morocco. Get it: brothervellies.com, needsupply.com, soul.eil.com

CAN I KICK IT?

Denim is a wardrobe staple and this season’s update will put your favorite shoes front and center. Kick flare jeans are slim through the thigh and crop right above the ankle, revealing a sexy bit of flesh. Coming in an assortment of washes, these jeans would look great with an off-the-shoulder top and your strappiest stilettos. Get it: gap.com, urbanoutfitters. com, topshop.com

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KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

Author and journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates was on the top of everyone’s best-selIer list after the release of his acclaimed book Between the World and Me back in the summer of 2015. I myself was completely blown away by his honesty in this open letter to his son about what it means to grow up a Black man in today’s world (like seriously, the last sentence of the book should have read, “drops mic.”). I intend to catch up on more of his work this summer, along with the book that inspired Between the World and Me, James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time. Get it: theatlantic.com, barnesandnoble.com, chopsueybooks.com

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The Favored Physique: the trend that's come full circle

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WRITTEN BY MORIAH BRISCOE ILLUSTRATION BY SHANNON WRIGHT

Venus figurines, of the Paleolithic era, come in a variety of shapes that span the globe each with an inherent beauty. Similar to the figurines, our bodies hold this inherent beauty as well. Except in more recent history, we naively celebrated one figure, thus discarding the rest and at last, doing more harm than good. It was the buxom body that made Marilyn Monroe a staple in fashion and entertainment was the envy of American women in the 50’s, then a boyish Twiggy popped onto the late 60s and early 70s scene. Leotards ran amuck and fad diets were in their stride by the 80s. It wasn’t long that slow running athletic beach babes in red bathing suits would become a thing of the past. Thus making way for the “heroin chic” body of the 90s. It was the waif thin supermodel, Kate Moss who made this body type popular by way of a Calvin Klein ad in 1993. Though only originating over two decades ago, this ideal body has been challenged via social media and other campaigns from large companies such as Dove and Victoria’s Secret – a company that

Moss herself is fond of. More recently, France banned this excessively thin body on their runways due to protests and in response to model Isabel Caro’s death. Caro died of anorexia, but used her platform to speak out against eating disorders prior to. While the internet was used for no more than AOL Instant Messenger and angsty Livejournal posts during Moss’s iconic reign, the web wouldn’t be used to its full potential until the mid-2010s. In May of 2013, fashion blogger and plus-size swimwear designer Gabi Gregg made a name for herself by coining the term “fatkini,” thus going on to design just that – bikinis for plus-size women. With this, she challenged the notion that plus-size girls couldn’t be fashionable too. One year later, she made a video alongside plus-size model Tess Holliday and plus-size fashion blogger, Nadia Aboulhosn called #everybodyisFLAWLESS. Made in the same vain as Beyonce’s single “Bow Down / I Been On,” the girls lip-sync and dance to the empowering song. What greatly sets it apart from Mrs. Knowles’

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track is at the end where Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s quip about feminism is substituted for a comment on Huffpost Live’s account calling for body acceptance and respect for all. By November, Victoria’s Secret showcased their misguided “The ‘Perfect’ Body” campaign. Models of the usual proportion were shown in the company’s new Body bra with the “The Perfect Body’ slogan splayed in front. Lane Bryant, a plus-size clothing brand, responded with their #IAmNoAngel campaign in disapproval of Victoria’s Secret’s perpetuation that one body size is the perfect one. This notion would also be defied as model Ashley Graham became the first plus-size model to grace the cover of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2016 edition. It’s achievements like these that are intended to challenge the minds of those set on shaming people for looking different. Though the pressure to be thin is being phased out, it’s being replaced by a new standard. It’s one that’s cinched in at the waist and arms, only allowing for women to be wide where men see fit. Plastered and celebrated

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on social media, this Coke bottle body, popularized by Nicki Minaj and Kim Kardashian, can be achieved by those either born with it, or willing to pay for it. It’s acknowledged that someone’s natural figure and the changes people choose to undergo is no one’s business. But it’s imperative to recognize that setting yet another standard only serves to dehumanize and objectify both parties’ bodies. Author David Wong put it best, “But remember, there are two ways to dehumanize someone: by dismissing them, and by idolizing them.” This is achieved by unabashedly disassembling a plus-size woman’s body; only to praise the thick woman, who is essentially the conglomerate of the plus-sized woman’s more acceptable parts. While we have come far in changing views regarding body size and its aesthetic, there still remains a standard. Though astronomical idolization is dehumanizing, recognizing the privilege it gives and using it to love and support those who deviate from the norm, can transform it into a force that compels the world to celebrate every body.

spring / summer 2016

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The Runway, Your Way:

2016 Spring Beauty BY: MADISON DOECKL PHOTOGRAPHY: WILL SINGLETON MAKEUP: STEPHANIE NIMOH

Base Look Stila Stay All Day Foundation and Concealer (applied with a Pro beauty blender) Laura Mercier Translucent Setting Powder

Spring is the perfect opportunity to try new things, not only with your wardrobe, but also with your makeup. The runway for this spring birthed many new makeup trends, but none were more prevalent than exaggerated lashes, bright lips and -wait for itblue eyeshadow. So ready or not, everyone, this spring fashionistas

everywhere will be sporting long, curly lashes, pops of color on their kissers, and eyes as blue as the sky. Trying out these new makeup trends can be hard, especially when you have a makeup routine that you love, but I really think switching things up can be so much fun. We asked makeup artist Stephanie Nimoh to show

us how to recreate these runway looks and make them our own. Her advice? “Put your own spin on it. Take what you love from the look, and add it to your everyday style. Make it fresh, make it fun, make it you!” For more tips, visit Stephanie’s Instagram and Youtube Channel @makeupbynimoh.

Exaggerated Lashes Stephanie recommended doing a subtle eyeshadow and lip color when sporting the long lash look. She used Red Cherry #43 fake lashes cut into separate, smaller pieces and finished off the look with a matte pink lip color that wasn’t too bright so as not to take away from the lashes or over do it. When paired with simple jeans, a T-shirt, and sneakers I could wear this look to the library, class, and then dinner with a friend later that night.

Marni

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Bright Lips For some reason I am a little bit braver when it comes to trying new lip colors and the lip color for this look is now one of my new favorites. For this look I wore no eyeshadow and just a little bit of mascara so my lips would really pop. For my colorful lips, Stephanie used Rimmel London’s Coral Shimmer. This trend was super easy to accomplish and so simple, which makes it perfect to wear anytime and anywhere. It would be great during the day, going to a concert in the park, or maybe even a fun dinner with your significant other.

Victoria Beckham

Blue Eyeshadow Stephanie used L’oreal’s HighIntensity Pigment Eyeshadow in ‘Striving’ all over my lid starting from the lash line all the way up and slightly past my crease. To make the look even more intense and make my eyes pop, she smudged the same shadow just below my bottom lash line; creating a dramatic and readyto-wear anywhere look. Finally, she topped the look off with some mascara and a little bit of pink gloss and I was ready to go out for a nice lunch and shopping with my girlfriends for the day.

Diane von Furstenberg

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Co at, Dr As es os s, M Z ero ara na Tig hts ,T arg et 7

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AT A LOSS Be it minimal or maximal, loss coalesces death and rebirth, like a shift in the solstice from winter to spring. So go ahead, lose yourself to the imagery.

PHOTOGRAPHER: VIRGINIA STROH MODEL: CAM MCMULLEN STYLIST: P.FRANCO MAKEUP: KATIE WILLIAMS HAIR AND NAILS: AARON NI’JAI CREATIVE DIRECTOR: GIOVANNI L. VOLIDOR ASSISTANT: KRISTINA DICKEY

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Dress, Charlotte Russe Pearl Necklace, Zara

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Shirt, Zara Coat, HRH Collection Pants, H&M Heels, Zara ink 10

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Pumps, Stuart Weitzman Hat, Nasty Gal 11 spring / summer 2016

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Floral Mask, made by Patricia Franco 13 spring / summer 2016

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Thrifty Missies FEATURING LIZZ BRUCE AND ALISSA PIVARAL PHOTOS BY PORCELYN HEADEN

If you thought you couldn’t have style with ease while wearing thrift clothes think again. When you want to buy clothes on a budget but you don’t want to get low quality disposable fast fashion, you can easily buy good quality items from the thrift store. It is amazing how easily you can find high-end clothing for such a low price. It’s also notable that most vintage clothing is much

higher quality than today’s fast fashion. The great part about saving money on classy quality clothes is not only will they last longer than fast fashion, but you can also spend that leftover money on those swanky shoes or that expensive bag you’ve had your eye on! **Thrifting tip** Every Salvation Army is 50% off everything on Wednesdays!

QUIRK Teal sweater dress -Rumors- $10 Clear vinyl raincoat -Rumors- $10 Flats -Salvation Army- $6 Black T-shirt dress (H&M) -Ashby’s- $6 CHOP SUEY Floral dress -Rumors- $29

Leather backpack (NastyGal) -$20 Black Boot Heels (Top Shop) -$45

Blush pink blazer (Forever 21) -Ashby’s- $12

SUGAR AND TWINE

Beige dress shoes (Aldo) -Rumors- $10

Velvet top (The Limited) -Salvation Army- $5

Lime green leather bag -Ashby’s- $13

Vintage pants -Vintage thrift shop- $15

Black blazer (Express) -Salvation Army- $6

Pocketknife necklace -Ashby’s- $10

Blue blouse (Diane Von Furstenberg) -Goodwill$10

Velvet maxi (Rachel Comey) -Rumors- $9

Black pants (GAP) -Rosewood Clothing Co.

Combat heels -DSW- $30

Platform loafers (Forever 21) -Ashby’s- $12

Fringe duster -Buffalo Exchange- $15

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Fashion on Speed BY ALLISON OBERLIN ILLUSTRATIONS: ALISSA PIVARAL

Technology has changed everything we used to know about the fashion industry. Now Fashion Week, or rather Fashion Month, is intensely broadcasted through social media, news publications and blogs. Street style images, interviews with designers, live streaming and Snapchat videos give the public a play-by-play of each show. Readers, industry professionals and media struggle to keep up with the pace for the entire week and are left overwhelmed. Now designers of couture houses are leaving after a few years due to all the stress and burnout. The whole process has sped up so consumer demand is now immediate. With the influx of technological advancement, the industry and consumers are confused. What is happening to fashion? Why are we not maintaining consumer needs? The industry has two problems: how to publicize for their brand and get their product to consumers now. Decades ago fashion already felt fast paced and consumer-based. Even in the 1970s, designers like Oscar de la Renta and Yves Saint Laurent could tell the future of fashion was in ready to wear. Today, fashion is influenced by street culture and as a result, must cater to the consumer. With the influx of technology, fashion has become faster and more overwhelming, even for the most creative talents. Now designers produce about six shows per year, and if they work for another brand, it can be around ten. Some are finding the media and the financial pressure a burden on their creativity. Designers like Raf Simons and Alexander Wang left their highbrow couture positions after only a few years due to burnout. They also had very little time to get acclimated to their positions, a picture which was painted from Simons’ experience in the documentary Dior and I. “When you do six shows a year, there’s not enough time for the

whole process, you have no incubation time for ideas, and incubation time is very important,” said Simons to New York Magazine. Aside from burnout, these shows are presented six months prior to their product’s arrival in stores. Despite all of the planning, money and creativity that was spent developing the perfect show, it loses the consumer’s attention with time. For six months consumers have been bombarded with the same images, that one Gucci dress that everyone likes on Pinterest. Once it arrives in stores, they are tired of it, no matter how much they liked it before. However, they do like it enough to buy a reimagined, knockoff from Zara or Topshop. “With the current system and the way it is, the only people who benefit are the people who copy it,” said Diane von Furstenberg to Women’s Wear Daily. Last December, the Council of Fashion Designers of America proposed a new idea to fix what they called a “broken system”. They proposed changing the schedule of shows so that designers would present clothes that were already in stores. The old six-month show cycle was confusing for the public. They saw new designs all week and wanted to buy them immediately. With this new method, designers could use shows as an advertising tool. In return, consumers could get excited about new designs and could purchase them right when they needed them. This solution would account for today’s consumers who are not thinking about the next season, they are wondering what they should wear this week. “In a world that has become increasingly immediate, the current way of showing a collection four months before it is available to consumers is an antiquated idea and one that no longer makes sense,” said Tom Ford to Women’s Wear Daily.

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Many designers are beginning to change their cycle to these “consumer shows” that will have high paying clients on the guest list rather than industry professionals. Some brands like Proenza Schouler said that they would not release any images of their Pre-Fall 2016 collection, or allow outside photography until the items arrived in store. Brands that produce consumer driven shows are being referred to as “show-now, see-now, buynow, wear-now” companies. They hope it will fulfill the consumers growing desire for immediacy. Brands that have transitioned to this method include Burberry, Tom Ford, Versus Versace and Thakoon. However, not every design company is changing to this system. Some, like Rebecca Minkoff, are increasing the number of customers invited to shows to 30-50 percent of their audience, reported Women’s Wear Daily. The old show system has been in place for decades and this new system is a drastic jump for consumers. Burberry devised a way to make the transition easier for customers. In February they showed their Fall 2016 Ready to Wear line in London. After the show, the brand put the entire col-

lection on display at their Regent Street flagship. The line will be displayed in their Paris store next and will be available for preorder in both cities. This means that their clothes will officially hit shelves in the fall, but as a part of their transition to “see-now, buy-now”, they can still profit off of the initial reveal. Their line also featured some menswear. This is another shift in the cycle, as some designers consider combining menswear and womenswear into one show. Many reporters cover both menswear and womenswear, so it makes sense to combine the two. This will save the company money from producing two different shows and journalists money on travel expenses.

brand. “Expanding the number of eyes that can see a collection is definitely good for increasing the designer’s message and helping enhance brand awareness and visibility,” said Ralph Lauren to Women’s Wear Daily.

The new proposal is a bit controversial for the industry as well. Despite the burnout, many designers are concerned that the schedule change will further speed up the system. However, the only other option for remedy is limiting media access. This may work for a few shows, however not in the long run. Media is the public’s primary source for information and without any coverage, the brand will be forgotten. Technology may be exhausting but it is vital for maintaining a competitive

The fashion industry appears to be experiencing an identity crisis amidst the quickening pace of technology. Alber Elbaz, who recently left his position as creative director of Lanvin last October, wonders if fashion is becoming a source of entertainment. This is especially true for newer brands who need to make a statement to attract attention and develop their brand. “Today, I have a feeling that people come to see a show or they see a show on the Internet, and they’re looking for

entertainment. Are we turning into an entertainment business? Is that the fashion business … I feel that today in order to have a voice, it has to be loud. You have to be loud, otherwise you cannot exist,” said Elbaz to Women’s Wear Daily. To many, fashion is considered an art, the way it follows trends and caters to the changes in a culture. However, the fashion industry is also a business, focused on pleasing the consumer. The future of fashion is uncertain but the success of a brand or designer will depend on how well they handle change. Those slower to adapt may fall behind, and those like Versace, who evolve with the consumer, will flourish.

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In My Closet JESSICA MORGAN AND CHRIS MCLAURIN PHOTOS BY DINA ALEMU ASSISTANCE BY JOSH MACLIN

JESSICA MORGAN INK: Explain the accessories or articles of clothing that mean a lot to you. Why are they important? What’s the history? JM: The accessory that means the most to me is a solid gold band I wear every day, it was a gift from my bestfriend and boyfriend, Joshua about 2 years ago. It’s engraved and it has a lot of sentimental value but it’s also really simple and beautiful. He has good taste. He’s given me a lot of great pieces that mean a lot to me and that I would never get rid of. He tends to gift me with things I wouldn’t buy myself (mostly because I’m cheap) but I always end up loving it all. He’s really helped me grow into myself and my style and it’s not like a Kanye and Kim “I dress her everyday” thing but when I met him he never saw me in jeans, sneakers or without a blazer. I was very, very girly in high school because that’s how I thought women should be. But without knowing or even saying anything related to the topic he helped me loosen up, breathe and wear whatever I wanted not just what I thought girls should wear. INK: What would you call your style? JM: I would call my style tasteful versatility. I don’t think I have a particular style personally. I like to wear a little bit of everything but I also know to stay in my lane. Everything is not for me but a lot is. It’s all about what makes me feel good. I think of my wardrobe as a place to play dress up and be anyone I want be on any day. INK: What inspires you to create your personal style? JM: Bloggers like Yanin Namasonthi of IDRESSMYSELF, Karla Deras of Karla’s Closet, and Danielle from WeWoreWhat all inspire me. I also love Alexa Chung and Krystle Rodriguez. If you know them you

know they have nothing in common, they have extremely different styles which I really enjoy. Karla is ridiculously sexy and wears stuff I can’t wear in my lifetime, Alexa is super preppy, Krystle mixes affordable and expensive street to have this funky cool look where she’ll wear a Thrasher shirt, a mink coat, jeans, Stan Smiths, a Celine bag and chunky glasses your grandpa would wear but it’s super cool. Joshua inspires my boyish side and my friends Britnie and Carmen inspire me to do anything I want. Tumblr has been a source for inspiration since 9th grade. Also I’m a creep, so I people watch when I go anywhere..these people don’t even know they inspire me but they do. INK: What do people say to you about your style? JM: Uhmmm I get that I always look clean and put together but that’s really all I can think of. I think the way people look at me says more than they ever will aloud. Most people look at me like “who does this girl think she is” but I just really think I’m Jessica lol. INK: What would you say to a student or anyone that wants to dress uniquely like yourself, but is afraid to? JM: In the words of my older sister, I would say do what makes you happy, you have one life (and good things sell out quick) you don’t have time to BS around! It’s that simple. Don’t worry about other people’s thoughts, your parents thoughts, nothing, make yourself happy or you’ll regret it. INK: Which celebrity style do you like the most? JM: Rihanna but I ain’t got Rihanna money or Rihanna’s life.

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CHRIS MCLAURIN INK: Explain the accessories or articles of clothing that mean a lot to you. Why are they important? What’s the history? CM: The clothes that mean the most to me are my shoes because to me an outfit is nothing without the proper shoes. I would also say the new watch I just got for Christmas because I’ve been wanting a nice watch for a long time and my mom finally got me one I was so hyped. Lastly, I would say my asymmetric wool coat because I’ve been wanting one ever since I’ve seen that style of coat. It’s a very different look and puts your outfit on a whole nother level.

INK: What would you call your style? CM: I would compare my style to a swiss Army knife because I dress in a multitude of ways it just depends on the situation and how I’m feeling that day. My style can go from one side of the spectrum, laxed all the way to the opposite side of the spectrum, professional. INK: What inspires you to create your personal style? CM: I just try to be myself to be honest and buy what I like. I always want to diversify my closet and be different from others. I’m always trying to put outfits together differently, constantly trying to switch it up. I also pick up things from others as well. INK: What do people say to you about your style? CM: People definitely say they like my style a lot and where did I learn to dress? I get hit with a lot of compliments as well, which I really appreciate. They tend to ask me where I get some of my clothes from as well. INK: What would you say to a student or anyone that wants to dress uniquely like yourself, but is afraid to? CM: I would encourage them to take risk and be themselves. It’s a good thing to be different from others and stand apart from the crowd. I would definitely tell them dress how you want and wear what makes you feel good. INK: Which celebrity style do you like the most? CM: There’s a lot of celebrities’ style I like. I really like the way Russell Westbrook dresses because he dresses like no other. I also like Pharrell Williams, and some of Kanye West outfits. Also I can’t forget about James Harden’s or Nick Young’s style either.

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fa sh io n

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For more reports on the latest trends, beauty tips and other fashion news, make sure to keep up with us at inkmagazinevcu.com If you want to be a part of the ink fashion team or featured in our section, contact us via email at inkfashionrva@gmail.com

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retro

WAST ELAN D

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PHOT OGRA PHER: MO D TOBI ELS: S O LU W A MI BACK O/TH WEB GROU S TE R EBOY ND M + TAY INTIM ALYS ODELS QUA E SA M NA D : T IC E S HENE SA H EM E R C HA M A R, W Y RNIS BE R S ILL SIN CH, T FASH AH M G LET ION S ON, AR I T T Y C LI UPPO YN N STS: J AN D ADA N CO REA W YN PHILB , NOR TE R , MAKE T IN SHAH H INGT (BAC UP AR EED ON + K T G IS R T CREA : K AT OUN JESSIC TIVE D IE W D MO A MO ILLIA IRECT DEL S RGAN ASSIS MS ION: ) TANT , A A RON S: AL YSSA NI’JA MICH I+B R ENER ITNIE , WIL DATE L SIN S G LET ON

Sami Black Fringe Top and Leggings Roan Latex Boots Zara Tayquana 10 Crosby Derek Lam Dress Roan Jeffrey Campbell Wedges Rumors ink 22

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Vintage Leather Jacket Soul.eil Tibi Culottes Roan Jessica Simpson Pumps Stylist’s Own 23 spring / summer 2016

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Norma Kamali Wrap Dress Roan Vintage Headscarf Stylist’s Own Jeffrey Campbell Heels Rumors

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Sami Vintage Shirt Blue Bones Vintage Urban Outfitters Jeans Stylist’s Own Leather Belt Rumors Jeffrey Campbell Shoes Rumors Tayquana Tibi Top Roan L’Agence Jeans Roan Jeffrey Campbell Wedges Rumors

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Patterned Shirt Blue Bones Vintage Vintage Leather Jacket Blue Bones Vintage Leather Skirt Rumors Latex Boots Zara

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Sami Patterned Dress Rumors Blue Top (worn underneath) Front Row Shop Latex Boots Zara

Tayquana Norma Kamali Wrap Dress Roan

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Sami Charlotte Russe Bodysuit Stylist’s Own Glamourpuss Fur Vest Roan Jeffrey Campbell Heels Rumors Tayquana Karolina Zmarla Top Roan Bralette, Urban Outfitters Skirt Stylist’s Own Naturalizer Boots Stylist’s Own 31 spring / summer 2016

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Sami Dress H&M Vintage Headscarf Stylist’s Own Tayquana Paula Hian Sweater Roan Bralette Urban Outfitters Pantyhose Stylist’s Own ink 34

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Zöe Pulley BY BRITNIE DATES

PHOTOS BY JOSH MACLIN

MAKEUP BY LOURDES BOGADO MODEL: MICHELLE OWUSO ASSISTANT: BRITTANY BIANCA

Speaking one on one with fashion designer Zoe Pulley brings to mind one word: authenticity. It is hard to find the point where she ends and her work begins; her work is truly an extension of her own honesty and awareness of the current issues affecting the world. The clothing Pulley creates reinterprets average fabrics into wearable designs that speak volumes. Her latest collection is a prime example. A 10-week interdisciplinary course taken during her final semester at VCU prompted her to create the Dress-a-Week project. Her intentions? To visually document America’s current media landscape by designing a zero-waste dress each week based on articles in the news. With themes ranging from feminism to the current politi-

cal climate, Pulley touches on it all. As a black woman, her pieces related to the social issues within the African American community are the most poignant. The muses for her designs are also black women who, as Pulley comments, possess “black girl magic.” After seeing her designs, it’s only a matter of time before the world sees Pulley’s own black girl magic. In this Spotlight, we share six of the 10 dresses in Pulley’s collection along with the news headlines that inspired them. Visit her site to read more on her background and process of creating the Dress-a-Week project. www.zoepulley.com instagram: @zpulley

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INK: Is there an essential part of your design process? ZP: My overall process starts by first having some sort of idea that’s really inspiring me. With the Dress-a-Week project, I was really inspired by current events in the political and social sphere, especially racially. There have been plenty of buzzwords over the past 12 months revolving around ‘Black Lives Matter’, the new wave of feminism and the presidential election and I wanted to speak to that. Next, I try to collect materiality like color or street inspiration that serves as research for what I’m trying to explore and achieve. Like, what’s the point if you’re exploring something and aren’t learning in the interim? Next is working through the idea in the form of a process book-this is the most fun part for me because it can take various forms whether it be 2D or 3D. After that it’s the actual process of creating the pieces. I usually go in with an exact idea of how I want something to look; it’s pretty straightforward and I’m very hands on. I like to try and evolve my projects into something that’s hopefully cool in the end…hopefully.

Women’s Underwear Company Getting Hassled Over Subway Ads “Thinx’s approach is to cease the day in which talking of the female menstrual cycle is either sugar coated to disbelief or just not talked about at all.” 37 spring / summer 2016

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Does Anyone Own the Cornrow?

“Black hair is a huge part of black identity and, in my candid opinion, the overall black experience.”

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INK: Who is your ideal muse and what type of woman do you see wearing your clothes? ZP: I have a few. One is Solange Knowles. Like, what Black girl doesn’t love her? Another one is a new designer Loza Maleombho. She’s another one that screams Black girl magic. One of her Spring/Summer 2016 looks was actually featured in Beyoncé’s Formation video. Her home country, the Ivory Coast, inspires all of her designs so the pieces are very Afrocentric. She’s super beautiful too, she’s great. I also love Kai Avent-deLeon; she owns a boutique in New York called Sincerely, Tommy. I don’t know much about her, but I love the clothes she wears and what she’s been able to do with her store is amazing. She’s a girl crush right now for real. I love what she represents for people of color in the industry. INK: What inspired you to become a designer? ZP: Other than my family and the people around me always telling me, “Oh you’re very creative, you’re really good at making things,” it’s been my Gransan (what I call my grandma). I’ve always had a very supportive family, but my Gransan is a designer and artist. She’s always made clothes and was completely self-made, selling her pieces and hosting her own fashion shows. She bought me my first sewing machine and I don’t think I’d be here if it wasn’t for her.

Thousands of Life Vests Left Behind Show Scale of Migration

“I wanted to create a piece utilizing the vibrant orange of the life vests while still capturing the massive amounts of the vests themselves.” 39 spring / summer 2016

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INK: What’s your earliest memory with fashion? ZP: I remember when I was younger, my sister and I used to make “movies” with a Digital Blue [movie creator]; my cousins had one too so we’d all make movies. I would make costumes with very janky things like tape and stuff. But I also got into a summer program at Princeton when I was in high school and one of the courses was on fashion history. At the end of it we had to create a piece based on 20th century fashion and that was the first time I had really sewed something. The professor told my parents that I was really talented and at that point it clicked that this may be something I should explore. INK: Have you ever doubted pursuing a career in this industry? ZP: Yes and no. Like I said, I’ve always had a really great support system from my family and they really showed me the realities of having a creative career. They wouldn’t just let me know that I can do it, but also supplied me with all the means to do it whether through summer courses, materials, whatever I needed. I wouldn’t have been able to do it without them. In college, I definitely closed myself off from working for certain sectors of the industry like super high-end contemporary because they didn’t always seem to get paid well and worked ridiculous hours. I looked more towards corporate companies who have set hours and better pay. But now after graduating, my mindset has kind of changed because [in class] we had the opportunity to create without boundaries and be innovative and new, so I understand how you’d want to continue that kind of freedom after graduating. Now I’m starting to consider those contemporary labels.

Hundreds of Protesters Block Black Friday Shoppers in Chicago “I decided to dye my fabric black this week to not only reference the name of the day itself, but the black bodies that have been lost due to this problem and the black voices that were fighting to be heard by demonstrating.”

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INK: In terms of design, who would you hope to be compared to? ZP: Instead of compared to, I would say admired by. The designers I admire are literally amazing and I would hope to work for them one day. They include Issey Miyake; he’s amazing and I’m really inspired by everything he does pretty much and of course the Pleats, Please collection. Also Yohji Yamamoto, another one from that era. I also like what the Okpo sisters do at William Okpo. I like the personal story involved with their products. I love Helmut Lang, like love love love. That brand is my absolute favorite and always will be. Brother Vellies is definitely up there as well-- more black girl magic. INK: What helped you grow as an artist? ZP: I guess overall just always pushing myself to keep making. Since I’ve moved this year, that’s been harder because I have a job and a new place so I want to get back to that. I want to push myself to keep making because when you do, that’s how you learn and discover new things. Even if it’s just doodling for an hour, keep doing it because it’s satisfying. Creating is a skill, you have to practice to get better.

The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration

“I knew I wanted to create this piece as a commentary to these numbers, and how arguably this judicial system’s intention to lock away so many black bodies and to throw away the key is a very similar system that was commonplace in this country for over 200 years.” 41 spring / summer 2016

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INK: For this collection, what was your inspiration and do you have a favorite piece? ZP: Overall, what really inspired this collection were the current media climate and the different issues that have been happening domestically. It seems like lately things have been very heated when discussing topics like race or gender and it’s led to new conversations that are important to discuss. I wanted to make something that spoke to that. I also love the concept of “zero waste garments,” which is using all of the fabric that you can, including the scraps, to create the garment. It’s sustainable (another buzzword). Combining these two was definitely something I wanted to do. One of my favorite dresses to create was one inspired by an article in The Atlantic by Ta-nehisi Coates called “The Black Family In The Age of Mass Incarceration.” It was one of my favorite pieces to read because it was filled with substance and I learned a whole lot; it’s something I definitely encourage everyone to read even though it’s like 20 pages long and in very tiny print. It was also super fun to make with all the embroidery and hand dying of the garments. I also enjoyed making the piece about the shooting of Laquan McDonald in Chicago because when you hear about Chicago in the media, it seems like it’s always in reference to black on black crime. But with this story, you have a 17 year old boy who was shot after turning his back to a white cop 16 times. And while there were already plenty of people talking about it, I wanted to be another person who added to the conversation. It was an important topic to discuss and I really loved how it turned out.

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INK: Where do you see your design aesthetic in the future? Has this collection impacted that at all? ZP: I’ve been told that my design aesthetic is urban and durable because I really like using classic working-wear fabric like the denim seen in this collection and I like creating newness with it-- it’s the reason why I love Helmut Lang so much because they use simple fabrics to create something new. So I hope my aesthetic can stay true to that idea and I aspire for my collections to always be rooted in story; I want to build on strong concepts from the beginning. I want to create clothes with meaning, not ones that are solely focused on how they look. I feel like as a creative person it’s easy to be “surface” and I want to go beyond that.

End The Gun Epidemic In America

“The intention was simple-- for the guns to represent what it would look like for those who support open carry laws and the bullet holes to represent what it would look like to those who oppose them.”

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Get This Look! GIOVANNI V, FASHION EDITOR AT LARGE

Spring is here and with it all new looks from all our favorite celebrities. Celebrities have taken a liking to the warmer weather with an expression of florals, bright tones, and casual looks. Beyoncé is wearing a floral form fitting dress with nude heels and a blazer. This look is easily achieved by wearing a floral print dress of

your own and a blazer or cape to go with it. Remember to make the look your own, you only need the key elements to achieve this style. Now we have Victoria Beckham with a loose tee-shirt and a long floral print skirt. This look is perfect for the warmer weather that is just around the corner as well as a good mix

of casual and dress allowing you to wear it anywhere. Finally, we have Diane Kruger with her summer knitted sweater and mid-length jean shirt. You could use bright colors for the sweater to make the look your own and wear wide leg or flare leg jeans if the skirt is not for you.

MAISON 24, MANHATTAN ROLLING STONES PURSE

BISHOP BOUTIQUE, ALEXANDRIA

$120

OPAL SANDAL $320

Beyoncé

DOR L'DOR, MANHATTAN

DOR L’DOR, MANHATTAN

Blue Fower Dress

Cape Blazer

$35

$49

MARISSA’S CLOSET, MANHATTAN

DOLCETTI BOUTIQUE, SAN DIEGO

Orange Cable Knit Sweater

Pommel Work Boot $119

$75

CAREFUL PEACH BOUTIQUE, ILLINOIS Orange Pasadena Bucket $298

MYTHS OF CREATION, BROOKLYN Let’s Dance Skirt $80

Dianne Kruger MINT MARKET, NEW JERSEY

ROXY HEELS, JEW JERSEY

50’s Floral Midi Skirt

Suzannatoo Heel

$45

$129

MASON 24, MANHATTAN Cat Pouch APRICOT LANE, DULUTH

$70

Boyfriend Tee

Victoria Beckham

$36 ink 44

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Ink Magazine; Vol. 8.2  
Ink Magazine; Vol. 8.2