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Electoral Rights & Wrongs


“Together for change. Together for Jobs” became the DA’s slogan. I discovered that many homeless and lower class people were taking employment into their own hands. -

Refentse Malatji


The taxi rank and metrorail stations of Cape Town are a space of convergence where the general public simultaneously interact yet isolate themselves. Wandile Dhlamini


2 May 2019| Volume 78 | Edition 3

UCT extends food vendors’ contracts until December

Image by Soligah Solomons

By Soligah Solomons Following engagements between the university and food vendors, it has been agreed upon that UCT’s proposed construction programme be placed on hold. This made way for vendors to receive an extension on their lease agreements until December 31, 2019.

T

he University of Cape Town (UCT) together with its Commercial Development team is set to consider wider development plans on all campuses and as part of such developmental change, the future supply of food to students and staff is regarded as a significant consideration.

“Online petition witnessed over 1,000 signatures and counting”

Recently, food vendors situated next to the Chris Hani building nearly witnessed a closure of their businesses as their contract renewal was offered until May 2019. However, the university acknowledged that the physical developments on campus might impact the provisioning of food and during deliberations with the impacted vendors, decided to extend their lease agreement until the end of the fourth quarter. In response to VARSITY’s questions, the spokesperson for the university – Elijah Moholola – declared that the university envisaged a new food supply landscape that will comprise of a combination of Food and Connect, as well as independent trading vendor outlets. Additionally, VARSITY asked how the new developments will impact the UCT community financially and learned that, “affordability will be a prerequisite in any vendor selection process” as commented by Moholola. Subsequent to the expiration of their lease agreements, the owners of Rainbow Chinese Takeaway, Bill and Angel Chan, placed a petition online which witnessed over 1,000 and

signatures and counting to prevent the closure of the family-run food stall.

arrangements will be negotiated, should this be amenable to vendors.

In an interview with the owners, VARSITY learned that the food outlet served the UCT community for the past 15 years and as such formulated relationships with staff and students.

The owners of Rainbow Chinese Takeaway commented that should they be relocated, they are open to considering a food truck that will have ample space for them to perform their duties as well as something that will be economically viable for them. “We need something like a food truck if relocated, something similar to the food trucks we’ve seen next to the Leslie Social Science building,” Bill Chan commented.

“Mobile operations via supply of leased trucks are on the table” Moreover, Moholola declared that the impacted vendors were informed in October 2018 about the construction programme for the space they occupy, and that all tenants accepted and signed their contract renewals at the time. Further deliberations between all parties continued in November 2018 and solutions were brought to the table, these including: mobile operations via supply of leased food trucks. However, no commitments have been made yet, but the university assured that a suggested framework is being worked on and that further economic

When asked whether this physical change has any connection to the food vendors in the Steve Biko building, the university commented that the process is not related at all and that separate conversations will be held regarding their respective leases. Apart from receiving comment from Rainbow Chinese Takeaway outlet, VARSITY reached out to the other vendors occupying the space and were unable to secure a comment. This is a developing story, and further updates will be provided.


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019|V78 E3|Page 4

NEWS

Gabriel Vieira & Sophie Fischer news@varsitynewspaper.co.za

By Chandré Cupido

F

rom April to May, a ‘Leadership Lessons’ program will be in place for interested UCT students. Organised by the Department of Student Affairs (DSA) and the Student Representative C o u n c i l (SRC), Leadership Lessons is a program that provides a brief impactful session on a range of topics and skills.

their role within that structure”, says Student Governance and Leadership Co-ordinator Christine Immenga.

“Lessons are impactful, interactive and engaging”

The lessons began on Monday- April 1st- and is expected to run until May 15th 2019. Sessions are held every Monday to Thursday during meridian in Hoerikwaggo building Lecture Theatre 2. The idea is that the 45-minute lessons are impactful, interactive and engaging and focuses on practical skills that are useful to all students. Societies and Day House Co-ordinator, Lindi Gayiza, explains that the program is a Student Development project that is run by DSA Development Cluster and is a program that is not ony limite to student leaders, but for students as well as staff.

The design of the program acknowledges that time for student leaders is a scarce commodity and that every moment is an opportunity to learn, reflect and grow. Thus, the lessons allow students to learn in a fun, interactive and experimental way. “The aim of the sessions are to develop leadership competencies that complements the leadership journey of student leaders and Budgeting for a Student other development program”. Organisation, Mental Health, Professional Writing and Leadership are sessions that “We found that student leave students with a few key leaders would go onto their lessons and skills that can student leadership journey and be applied to their personal, get inducted in their various academic and social lives. sectors which prepares them for

Source: UCT Faculty of Science

LEADERSHIP SKILLS CREATING WELL-ROUNDED STUDENTS Furthermore, subject experts are invited to discuss various topics in their field to provide students with expert advice and knowledge on the topic of discussion. However, the sessions are done in collaboration with students who are asked what these sessions should entail and who should be invited to present on the topic.

“DSA offers holistic approach which in turn enable students to succeed academically”

Therefore, the lessons are one of the sup port services offered by the DSA whose role is to facilitate development opportunities and to provide students with a responsive service. They are devoted to enabling students to succeed academically and encourage students to become engaged citizens by offering a holistic approach that will help students become well-rounded individuals.

Cyclone Idai : Mozambique By Sinothando Siyolo

E

arly March, Mozambique was hit by an extreme tropical disaster, also known as Cyclone Idai which brought about devastation that affected students from Mozambique at the University of Cape Town (UCT) and their families. This cyclone took a toll on Mozambique and Zimbabwe leaving thousands of people injured, homeless and dead. The cyclone has had an especially devastating effect on the abovementioned countries, both of which were the natal states of significant numbers of students. Many international and national organizations have tried to help aid Mozambique after this immense disaster. Within the UCT community, there are many efforts being made, both by the UCT governance, and different student societies to aid with disaster relief. UCT eResearch has partnered with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team and Missing Maps, a joint venture between The American Red Cross, The British Red Cross, and Doctors without Borders with the stated goal of putting the world’s vulnerable people on the map. The aim of the partnership is to support the disaster relief operations following Cyclone Idai, by means of remote mapping, meaning that they will be using satellite to identify those areas that are affected by disasters but

are not on the map, making it easier for humanitarians to give aid. UCT Chancellor Graça Machel, and Graça Machel Trust (a Pan-African advocacy organization focused on child health and nutrition, education, women’s economic and financial empowerment) has additionally joined forces with the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and the Foundation for Community Development, to open up a fund where donors could donate.

Recently there have been reports from news outlets that another cyclone is soon to hit Mozambique, Cyclone Kenneth. This is a developing story.

“Societies on campus assisted through donations and created awareness” Some societies such as the Zimbabwe society UCT and Zimbabwe national student union created a disaster relief program where they accepted blankets, clothes and non-perishables to give to those affected in Mozambique. UCT residence house committee also helped with the relief by encouraging students to donate. Most of the organizations and societies like SHAWCO in UCT wrote statements, circulated posters of disaster relief on their social media platforms and created awareness and encouraged the student populous to donate things such as clothes, non-perishables, just to name a few. Source: Egypt Independent


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 | V78 E3 | Page 5

How xenophobia presents itself during the national elections By Sara Abdullah Lagardien

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enophobia – defined in the context that it is most prominently used in – refers to “‘the deep dislike of non-nationals by nationals of a recipient state.” South Africa has witnessed a profound presence of xenophobia and xenophobic attacks in recent years, with political parties employing xenophobic policies and campaigns in an oftensuccessful attempt to garner support from voters. With national elections fast approaching on the 8th of May, politicians have recognised an opportunity to capitalise on and exploit xenophobic rhetoric. Xenophobia has a long established history in South Africa and xenophobic attacks have indisputably been on the rise.

“Another student revealed how South Africans do not realise the damaging ripple effects that xenophobic violence has and the blacklash that arises from it.” Across the University of Cape Town, many students have expressed their indifference towards the upcoming national elections and their failure to comprehend

By Anna van Renen

I

n March of this year, the University of Cape Town’s (UCT) council decided that they would implement an academic boycott on Israeli universities that operated within Occupied Palestinian Territories and contributed to the gross human rights violations that are taking place along the Gaza Strip. This was done as a form of protest against the violence that occurs in Israel and Palestine, and against those who have been perpetuating it. However, this decision was recently sent back to the senate to be discussed again.

“The decision was labelled by some as victorious and entirely necessary, but by others as discrimination against Jewish students” Following an uproar from societies, academia, and even the South African Zionist Federation, the council believed there were a number of issues with the original proposal of the academic boycott that required clarification. The decision was labelled by some as victorious and entirely necessary, but by others as discrimination against Jewish students, and a restriction of academic

South Africa’s current affairs as well as their unwillingness to be informed. One student vehemently articulated: “In all honesty I don’t keep up with the news or anything so I haven’t seen anything.” While another student simply stated that, “I’m not particularly interested in voting so I won’t sit and listen to the news.” Other comments included observations and remarks such as, “They’re all saying something, but how many of them are actually fulfilling their promises?” as well as, “I’m not going to vote and I don’t think I’ll ever vote, because whatever they say is a lie.” While some students’ attitudes towards elections and South Africa’s political climate as a whole might seem as unpromising as claims and empty promises made by political parties, students who had an opinion on how xenophobia presents itself during national elections did not shy away from expressing their thoughts. Mame-Diara, who was born and raised in South Africa and whose parents are Senegalese – possessing dual citizenship – highlighted that, “It seems as though political parties are drawing on the general xenophobia that is already present in South Africa.” Mame-Diara continues by asserting that xenophobia largely targets black African foreign nationals.

By extension Rwandese-South African, Sandrine Mpazayabo, states: “Migration is not a phenomenon that has a deadline. People aren’t going to stop coming to South Africa and South Africa is not going to stop being a recipient of immigrants from all over the continent.” It is clear that the reality of xenophobic violence in South Africa is not only confined to election season, but an ongoing pandemic that calls for urgent and immediate interventions.

“Xenophobia... is not merely a subject to be capitalised on and exploited for votes, but involves the lives, as well as the deaths, of people.” Political parties in South Africa primarily view and quantify the value of foreign nationals in South Africa in terms of how they are able to grow our economy. Whilst political parties have employed xenophobic tactics to gain citizens’ backing, they are operating to their detriment. A student noted that, “If we are wanting to build South Africa economically, we can’t. We can’t use other people’s skills because we are very xenophobic.” Moreover,

another student revealed how South Africans do not realise the damaging ripple effects that xenophobic violence has and the blacklash that arises from it. Xenophobia is a deeply rooted phenomenon that has been widely normalised and seldom deemed of significance. The Pan-Africanist Student Movement of Azania’s Philip Kgosana branch at the University of Cape Town stated that, “When citizens are disappointed by political parties they misdirect their anger to our African siblings as scapegoats rather than dealing with the big elephant in the room of corrupt officials.” Repeatedly, a host of reasons for the incline in xenophobia is presented as a justification for the inhumane and ultimately, unjustified, violence enacted on foreign nationals. Xenophobia – both physically and through rhetoric spewed by political parties is not merely a subject to be capitalised on and exploited for votes, but involves the lives, as well as the deaths, of people.

UCT’s Stalled Action Against Israel Why was the boycott sent back to the drawing board? rights. Because of this, further consultation was seen as necessary before a boycott was officially implemented. After their senate meeting, UCT made a number of clarifications which they communicated to staff and students via an email announcement. They confirmed their commitment to recognise the rights and freedoms of all people and reaffirmed their commitment to academic freedoms. However, they also clarified that UCT will continue to condemn acts of human rights violations in Occupied Palestinian Territories, and that they do have the right to dissociate themselves from academic institutions that support

and enable such violations. They also encouraged other institutions to join them in considering such a boycott.

“Provided their intentions remains the same, and as long as they are still intending to boycott Israeli universities, UCT has support from the MSA.” Speaking to the head of UCT’s Muslim Student Association, Ilyaaz Toefy, it is clear that their society stands in support of the decision to boycott Israel. “The MSA stands in solidarity with Palestinians,” commented Toefy. “There is an oppression taking place, and any boycott against that is something that we should

Source: My Jewish Living stand for and support.” Despite action from UCT being delayed for now, he said that provided their intention remains the same, and as long as they are still intending to boycott Israeli universities, UCT has support from the MSA. In past conflicts, boycotts and sanctions have had great effects at bringing about peace. Even in South Africa, a contributing factor towards Apartheid’s end was the sanctions that were imposed on the country from major trade partners, such as the UK and the USA. Sanctions on Israel

could potentially have the same result, bringing an end to the violence and human rights violations that are occurring. UCT has made it clear that they intend to implement this boycott and do indeed have support from some societies. When the boycott will formally begin has yet to be announced, but for now, one can assume that it will happen, and soon.


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 | V78 E3 | Page 6

EDITORIAL

The Collective

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Soligah Solomons editorial@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Notes from the Creative Director...

DEPUTY EDITOR Akhona Matshoba editorial@varsitynewspaper.co.za

ACTING MANAGING EDITOR Aidan Croy managingeditor@varsitynewspaper.co.za

COPY EDITOR Ntombi Khulu copyed@varsitynewspaper. co.za

Soligah Solomons Editor-in-Chief

ONLINE EDITOR Arin Barry online@varsitynewspaper.co.za CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tasneem Jacobs creativedirector@ varsitynewspaper.co.za CONTRIBUTORS Chace Brand, Anna van Renen, Matthew Field, Luke Albert, Ntokozo Mahlangu, Ngazibini Sityebi, Cayla Clement, Luphiwo Tanda, Ronel Koekemoer and Alfredo Guillermo PRINT NEWS Gabriel Vieira & Sophi Fischer news@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Tasneem Jacobs

T

he month of May has dawned upon us, and this means that the political chatter which has been reverberating around the country is finally coming to a head. Whether you are a seasoned voter or like me, this is your first time, any election always ushers in an array of mixed feelings. For some, there is the excitement of an impending change for the better in our political landscape, while others approach elections with a more jaded sense of skepticism. Then there are those who choose to abstain from voting completely, either out of a sense of apathy or extreme disillusionment with the government as a whole (to read more about this, visit VARSITY’s online edition). Perhaps your views vacillate across the spectrum, depending on both the day and the latest manoeuvrings of our country’s politicians.

VARSITY is committed to upholding excellent reporting

One thing that has become increasingly clear to me is this: whatever your political stance may be, the need for reputable journalistic coverage of the election is critical. The media possesses a formidable influence on the ways in which the public views political parties, and whether they choose to accept or reject the goals these parties promote. Moreover, the media serves to expose the wrongdoings and corruption that pervade our country’s politics. When the media wields this power ethically and unbiasedly, it can function as a vital bridge between politicians and the electorate. We are lucky to have access in this country to top quality news outlets that are committed to upholding excellent reporting.

This is what VARSITY, in turn, aims to do. Our wrap edition this semester is aptly titled ‘Electoral Rights and Wrongs’. It is filled with content to help you engage with this upcoming election, and explore the differing views around it. Our cover page article deals with the rampant xenophobia present during elections. Elsewhere in this edition a tongue-incheek summary of the leading parties’ manifestos can be found, sure to provoke some chuckles.

PRINT OPINIONS Kelsey Maggott & Zahirah Benjamin opinions@varsitynewspaper.co.za PRINT FEATURES Sebastian Moronell features@ varsitynewspaper.co.za

Akhona Matshoba Deputy Editor-in-Chief

PRINT LIFESTYLE & FITNESS Alistair Nyamuda sport@varsitynewspaper.co.za NEWS REPORTERS Mantwa Mehlape & Sinothando Siyolo IMAGES Tao Varty & Lebo Notoane images@varsitynewspaper.co.za ONLINE NEWS Lew Blanks & Jasmine Jacobs onlinenews@varsitynewspaper.co.za ONLINE LIFESTYLE & FITNESS Tiyani Rikhotso & Alistair Nyamuda onlinesports@varsitynewspaper.co.za

ONLINE CONTENT EDITOR Nolitha Ngamlana

Check out our centrespread

STAFF WRITERS Julia Rowley, Shameeka Voyiya, Chandré Cupido, Sara Largardien Abdullah, Stephanie Wild, Brad Brinkley

Check out our centre spread Ntombi Khulu for a photojournalistic op- Copy Editor ed around gentrification in the city of Cape Town. Most importantly, the photography on the cover of this wrap edition is courtesy of the immensely talented 3rd year Multimedia Production class which I am proud to be a part of. We each produced a photojournalism essay in the first term that focused on the fulfilment of electoral promises in the Western Cape. I want to personally extend a special thank you to everyone who Arin Barry contributed their work and made this wrap edition what Online Editor it is: a timely and necessary engagement with politics from a student perspective. We here at VARSITY hopes this issue leaves you feeling more aware and empowered. After all, an informed vote is a powerful one.

Aidan Croy Acting Managing Editor

ONLINE OPINIONS Ruhi Ghaza & Salma Noor Mahomed onlineopinions@ varsitynewspaper.co.za WEB EDITOR Mukhetwa Ravele web@varsitynewspaper.co.za

MARKETING & BRANDING Tshepiso Mokabu marketing@ varsitynewspaperco.za

ACTING ADS MANAGER Teboho George ads@varsitynewspaper.co.za

FINANCE MANAGER Aidan Croy finance@varsitynewspaper. co.za

HR & OPERATIONS MANAGER Joseph Moloto hr@varsitynewspaper. co.za

VIDEOGRAPHY SiyambongaJubeju videographers@ varsitynewspaper.co.za

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Malusi Ngidi socialmedia@varsitynewspaper.co.za


Images Weekly

Credits: @IEC South Africa Twitter @Theolandey Twitter @Sherwiebp Twitter

58 065 097 SOUTH AFRICA’S CURRENT POPULATION


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 8

FEATURES

Sebastian Monorell Features@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Jammie Plaza as a threshold space

By Luphiwo Tanda

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n Architecture, the Jammie Plaza can be defined as the threshold of UCT upper campus. Thresholds are spaces of transitioning. Of movement in between destinations. Framing Jammie Plaza as a threshold allows us to draw parallels the space and the activities which activate it and through which it acquires agency.

Jammie Plaza has different meaning to the various constituents of the UCT and indeed the Cape Town community. Spatially, the dominating stairwell leading to the classical architectural of Jameson Hall is the starting point of many academic journeys. The initial orientating encounter with the university. Both a reference point of departure and a center for crisscrossing to various destinations which hold the programs of the university.

“a site where geographical and body political norms are contested.” Jammie Plaza takes on an agency of its own as the living room of the university. A space the everyday happenings of life are performed all the actors participating in the life of the university. Of the everyday rhythms, textures and expressions creating vast and unique set of shows which compose the culture of the institution.

accommodations. They constructed a shack below the stairs of the Jammie Plaza. In an act that sought to invoke the memory of forced removals of the apartheid South Africa. A policy of spatial injustice which continues to have socioeconomic implications in the present. In this event, the Jammie Plaza became a threshold in the historic sense. A platform for calling for more just student housing policies that acknowledge historical inequities.

Moreover, every other weekend, for newlyweds, particularly from the cape colored community, the classical stone architecture and its images present a desirable setting to embed the event in time. New beginnings is a theme that is associated with thresholds spaces. A space to pause and consider the next move. A space through which a person gains control over their movement to participate in freedom of choice. The Jammie Plaza is therefore a threshold space both in terms of time and space.

Enlivened debates about institutional culture would fall short if they overlooked the pivotal role that Jammie Plaza plays in the formation of the university subject. No doubt throughout history Jameson Plaza has continued to be a site where geographical and body political norms are contested. And therefore, a stage for new forms of protest. Shackville protest in 2016 was one such occasion, when student activists were confronting the issue of UCT mal-administration in residential

Masixole Feni: Students erect a shack on during Shackville Protest, University of Cape Town. Photo.

De Lille and Marais, political prostitution epitomised?

By Shameeka Voyiya

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atricia de Lille and Peter Marais are known for their involvement in multiple political parties and organisations throughout their careers, and they can be used as examples of political prostitution in South Africa. This phenomenon is cause for concern because of its potential for corruption and other threatening means of obtaining power in politics, which ultimately affect the public.

De Lille was a member of the Pan-African Congress (PAC) during the 1990s, and later broke ties with the party to form her own party, the Independent Democrats (ID), in 2003. In 2010, the ID merged with the DA, and after officially leaving the party in 2018, has formed another political party called GOOD, which is a candidate for the upcoming elections. De Lille has been involved in many political controversies, and especially after rumoured ties with the ANC after leaving the DA.

“one cannot help but question whether their ‘party hopping’ is done for efforts at attaining power across multiple spheres of politics” These politicians are classic examples of what political prostitution looks like. When looking at the history of these public figures, one cannot help but question whether their ‘party hopping’ is done for efforts at attaining power across multiple spheres of politics. De Lille is known for constantly changing her ideological views on certain topics when it suits her agenda, and Marais is currently targeting the Coloured population as part of his comeback to politics for the election campaigns.

“Do these cases represent a history in which politics lends itself to political prostitution, or are they merely an anomaly?”

Calling all students! Have your theses, dissertations, project reports, academic papers, etc proof read for accuracy, consistency, grammar and spelling.

Source: TimesLive

Peter Marais has been a member of numerous parties such as National Party, the DA and Congress Of The People (COPE), just to name a few, and he is now the leader of Freedom Front Plus (FFP). The former Western Cape premier has been accused of ‘party hopping’ by the public, and his dubious history has created a questionable reputation for his political career.

Do these cases represent a history in which politics lends itself to political prostitution, or are they merely an anomaly? Other well-known politicians such a such as Helen Zille, Mmusi Maimane and Julius Malema have stayed with their respective parties for long periods of time, as well as many others. It is therefore safe to say that political prostitution tends to present itself in few instances, additionally, it is usually politicians with controversial histories who lend themselves to this phenomenon. Do we blame the complexities of politics for political prostitution, or are individuals doing it to hold on to more power?

Rate: R500 per hour.

Source: TimesLive

Contact Dr Aussie Austin PhD Telephone: 082-4429888 or E-mail: aussie.eng@gmail.com


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 9

Manifestos and their faces

By Alfredo Guillermo

Source: Twitter@ricoschacherl

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ow can we begin to rethink manifestos?

This piece was supposed to be about election manifestos and their promises. Clench them in your hand, wave them in the air, spew forth an ideology (much like Commander-in-Chief Malema did in Pretoria) manifestos. But the election manifestos seemed too sinister to me – the smiling faces heading each manifesto an affront to the common decency of suffering.

“every discussion around manifestos also needs to be a discussion about how manifestos are framed”

that I had done what I should never have done – I replaced the manifesto with a face; I had abstracted the manifestos to a litany of smiling faces. I had become enamoured with the frenzy of knowing what Ramaphosa says with his charming smile, Maimane with his white teeth, and Malema with his extraordinary weight loss. But I was compelled to do this – to look at the person and expect them to answer my desires for justice. Why? I do not know – there was just something that drew me to their faces.

“Manifestos are usually thought of as documents of solitary purpose – of carrying a political truth outside of the party that created them

As I scrolled through these faces I realised

Through this process I began to realise the link between the face and the manifesto – the manifesto could not exist without a face. The face gives life to the manifesto. It made me think that every discussion around manifestos also needs to be a discussion about how manifestos are framed. They are framed as documents of change, as the dreams of a political party, grounded in a sense of reality. But more than that, I began to think of their relationships vis-à-vis political parties and their public image, that which is usually obscured. Manifestos are usually thought of as documents of solitary purpose – of carrying a political truth outside of the party that created them. But that is false – they function for a reason. Thus to begin understanding manifestos, we need to understand both how they are framed and how they obscure particular relations when they are created. Let us take for example, the EFF manifesto.

At 170 pages, the EFF manifesto has been criticised for being impossible at best and a socialist utopia at worst. But it does not function as a policy document, but rather as a response to increasingly desperate demands of economic transformation. It exists as a public document to show the political commitment to economic transformation. However, politics continues in its stride and the manifestos remain. They become documents that political parties will in the future have to grapple with - these documents will be used to measure the enormity of a generation of unfulfilled dreams and desires. In essence, manifestos begin to take on a political afterlife outside the control of political parties.

What’s the Party Line on Sex Work? By Alfredo Guillermo

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Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT), roughly 182 000 people make their living selling sexual services and, because it remains illegal in SA, are vulnerable to violence, discrimination and stigma. With the election coming up on 8 May, here is a summary of what some of the political parties have to say about sex work and why we should care.

“there is a strong correlation between the criminalisation of sex work and the violence experienced by those in this industry” According to research by the Sexual and Reproductive Justice Coalition (SRJC), the three major political parties—the ANC, DA and EFF—have become increasingly vocal about possibly changing the laws on sex work in SA. This is due to the growing recognition that there is a strong correlation between the criminalisation of sex work and the violence experienced by those in this industry. Sex work is an issue that is often used as part of politicking, and the three major political parties all have something to say about sex work. The ANC resolved to decriminalise sex work at its conference in 2017, but has done little to further this goal. The EFF are the only of the three major political parties that explicitly state their stance on sex work in their manifesto. However, their aim is to legalise

(rather than decriminalise) sex work by the end of 2019. The DA’s stance on sex work is vague in that its current party line is that it will “explore the possible legal models around sex work”.

“a study done by SWEAT showed that 12% of sex workers in Cape Town had been raped by policemen” Because sex work is illegal, sex workers are especially vulnerable to abuse and sexual violence. Similarly, being forced to operate in an underground industry means that there are no official measures in place to protect them from exploitation. Exemplifying this, a study done by SWEAT showed that 12% of sex workers in Cape Town had been raped by policemen. Other ways that sex workers are targeted by law enforcement include being forced to provide sexual favours as bribes, unlawful arrest when they are not working and not believing sex workers when they report rape. Asikiji, the coalition to decriminalise sex work in South Africa, have highlighted that decriminalisation would significantly minimise this vulnerability. According to Asikiji, decriminalisation is “the only approach to sex work based on the human rights of sex workers, and designed around policy measures sex workers have demanded”. This would mean that the laws that criminalise sex work would be removed and sex work would be ruled by the same laws that govern other forms of employment and industry. Sex workers

could unionise, regulate the industry themselves and expect protection from law enforcement. Important to note, however, is that legalising and decriminalising sex work is not the same thing. Asijiki have outlined that legalising sex work would put regulations on sex work that are “unnecessary and unreasonable”. Legalisation would mean that sex work is wholly controlled by the government, who could significantly limit the conditions under which sex-work is legal. In countries where sex work is state-regulated, many sex workers complain that the laws do not reflect the realities under which sex workers work but instead are based on stigma and assumptions about selling sex.

“decriminalisation removes laws that make sex work a criminal offence” By contrast, decriminalisation removes laws that make sex work a criminal offence but also requires that sex workers must operate according to the laws that govern other forms of work. When deciding who to vote for on May 8, it is important to consider what the different parties have to say about how they plan to protect the vulnerable. Sex workers are one such group and voting is a crucial part of advocating for their rights.

Source: Gail Orenstein ZUMAPRESS Newscom


A Victory for Bo Kaap Text and photography by Tasneem Jacobs

Bo Kaap, formerly known as the Malay Quarter, has been the traditional home of Cape Town’s Muslim population since 1760. The area is essential to the history of Cape Town, and is a haven of culture, tradition and religion. The space represents the heart of the Cape Malay community. For the last decade, the spectre of encroaching real estate de-velopers seeking to gentrify Bo Kaap has posed a serious threat to its continued exist-ence as residents know it. More often than not, these renovations result

gentrification noun gen·tri·fi·ca·tion

definition of gentrification: the process of repairing and rebuilding homes and busi-nesses in a deteriorating area (such as an urban neighbour-hood), accompanied by an influx of middle-class or affluent people often resulting in the displacement of current, eco-nomically disadvantaged residents.

in the eviction of local, low-income residents coupled with a skyrocketing increase in rental prices which makes continued This development ensures that the area is safe from the hands of existence in that space financially im-possible. Residents who gentrifiers. However, this triumph is no feat of the government. The cannot afford to comply with price increases are then relocated Democratic Alliance promised in 2016 to ensure that the spatial to other areas outside the city of Cape Town. They are forced to legacy of apartheid was undone and that urban planning would aim part ways with their homes and heritage as the gentrified area to integrate people from diverse backgrounds. Yet, the last decade transforms into a commercialised shadow of its former self. It is prior to Bo Kaap being afforded heritage site status has seen a rise no surprise that this has been likened to the apartheid forced of gentrification throughout the city of Cape Town. This has resulted removals that occurred in District 6 more than 50 years ago. in the displacement of its economically challenged residents, many That is the most insidious aspect of gentrification; structures of whom are elderly people of colour who have lived in these spaces built by black people to displace black residents at the hands of for decades, in favour of a newer, richer, and foreign middle class white owned businesses. In the midst of this impending fear, Bo demographic. The spatial apartheid in Cape Town still remains. Kaap was officially named a heritage site on March 28th 2019. Clearly, in this regard the DA has failed to adhere to their promise.

This lone victory in Bo Kaap can only be attributed to the local residents, activists and allies who campaigned relentlessly for the rights of those in the area. Throughout the last year, protest action in Bo Kaap has gained traction amongst its community to call for an end to gentrification. The Auwal Masjid (photographed below), located on Dorp Street has been in existence since 1794 and is a seminal place of Muslim worship. The mosque has been highly active in hosting rallies and protests and as the residents raised their voices, the government had little choice but to act. It was through their efforts and displays of re-sistance that this shift occurred. As positive as this is, we cannot absolve our government of its responsibility to its citizens above the demands of businesses. Gentrification contin-ues to impact communities in Woodstock and Salt River, with no foreseeable end. The onus remains on the elected party to prioritise safeguarding the rights of its citizens. We should not have to protest continuously just to see this become a reality.


@VarsityNews |2 May 2019 | V78 E3 | Page 12

Column

It’s not whether they achieved cum-laude, it’s whether they have a compass As homing pigeons, we tend to choose a leader based on how informed they are about routes and the flock make-up.

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ollowing a misinformed leader can mean life or death for us when it is time to migrate, and so we are quite flexible in switching from one leader to the next — depending on which pigeon has the better internal compass. I have heard that humans do, for the most part, follow this method for the ruler selection of their own species — although they are not as quick as us in changing inadequate leadership (case in point, Jacob Zuma).

“Being an ‘nformed leader’ does perhaps not have as much to do with understanding different schools of thought... as it does with having a moral compass.” A big part of how humans qualify leaders is on

their tertiary education. But I hesitate to say that being an ‘informed leader’ does perhaps not have as much to do with understanding different schools of thought from Wits or Damelin, as it does with having a moral compass. Having watched the recent graduates buzzing with base and highlighter on their cheeks as they walk through the doors of Sara Baartman Hall, I make the assumption that they value their qualifications and will measure other people’s ability to be in positions of intellectual power by whether they have university degrees. Whether obtaining a tertiary qualification is important or not in politics is a contentious matter, not only for students and the public who vote these people into power, but also for party leaders themselves when selecting members. Recently, the EFF leader Julius Malema reiterated that one of his party’s goals is to insist on attracting educated leaders, and has stated on a 702 radio interview that “It is only through education that we’ll be able to reclaim the black pride”. The EFF’s spokesperson, chairperson, general secretary, and deputy leader all have tertiary qualifications. The Citizen lists Julius himself as one of the top 5 educated leaders in the EFF with a two year diploma in Youth Development, a BA

degree in Communication and African Languages and a BA Honours in Philosophy—all from UNISA. The outcome is that Julius’ reputation is currently two-fold: some of the population believe him to be imbecilic, whipping crowds of South Africans up into a frothy milkshake and making radical promises that he is unlikely to be able to keep; the remainder believe him to be the change the country needs and the only one gutsy enough to push for ruthless land expropriation without compensation. Only time will tell whether he will achieve popularity and help to make a difference, or tear our country apart at the seams when he gets the chance. Arguably, no matter how much information he will have gathered or how many people he will have come to know, it all comes down to what he will decide to do with this power—which is seated in morality.

“Whether obtaining a tertiary qualification is important or not in politics is a contentious matter, not only for students and citizens who vote these people into power” Our

current

president

By The Anonymous Pigeon columnist@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Cereal Ramaphosa, (also known as Cyril –but us birds like this nickname as much as we like the grain), got a Baccalaureus Procurationis (Bproc) from UNISA. It could be contended that subjects like Law and Philosophy teach ethics—but this is essentially knowledge and doesn’t equate to being ethical in practice.

“If we have concluded that morality lies at the heart of being a good leader, we can extend by saying that once moral, education can only further a leader’s ability to better lead.” Cyril’s career led him to become not only a prominent politician and activist at the forefront of the ‘new’ South Africa post-1994, but also a leading businessman in companies like MTN, SA Breweries, FirstRand Limited and Alexander Forbes, among others. His business knowledge and logical manner in dealing with matters has given him a reliable reputation, one that he would likely not have achieved without his tertiary qualification. It does, however, stand that had he been dishonest and corrupt, his level of knowledge without a moral backing could have brought South Africa to its knees (or ankles, I think JZ already brought the country to the former).

Jacob Zuma was entirely uneducated, claiming he never went to school, but educated himself, as stated by City Press. Never achieving even primary school education, he turned out to be horrendous for South Africa’s political and economic landscape. But the highly esteemed Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill lacked formal tertiary education, and you didn’t see them stealing tax money to build themselves a private empire behind the scenes. If we have concluded that morality lies at the heart of being a good leader, we can extend by saying that once moral, education can only further a leader’s ability to better lead. Just like the pigeon needs to have a good sense of direction, being higher up and well fed helps him to lead the flock to the best of his ability. The way of testing for leadership ability lies not in assessing the level of one’s education, but by assessing their decision-making process and reputation.

DISCLAIMER This section of the VARSITY is a vehicle for expression on any topic by the columnist. The opinions within this section are not necessarily those of the VARSITY collective or its advertisers. Letters to the Editor can be sent to: editorial@varsitynewspaper.co.za


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019| V78 E3|Page 13

OPINIONS

Kelsey Maggott & Zahirah Benjamin opinions@varsitynewspaper.co.za

TRAILBLAZER South Africans in previouslydisadvantaged communities since it was launched seven years ago, creating a network of change agents that make an impact in their communities daily.

“Political parties need to open up space within their government structures for young people to participate” Dr Mutami says generally young people in South Africa There is an urgent need to engage youth feel that their votes do not voter apathy ahead of national elections. matter, and that those within the ruling elite - irrelevant of which political party they are affiliated By Chace Brand with - are immune to changing their ways of governance. Young people feel rejected he youth of South Africa needs to have and excluded, which decreases their motivation to hope for the future in order to create participate in the democratic process, he adds. meaningful change in their lives and “Political parties need to open up space within those of their communities, revealed recent their governance structures for young people to research by ACTIVATE! Change Drivers. participate, give them the opportunity to chart a better future, influence politics and decision-making. You Despite the fact that young people in South cannot design anything for the youth without them. Africa are the largest demographic group and They need to be involved and they need to sensitise have the power to influence the outcome of the every plan with their reflected experience.” upcoming national elections on May 8, many do not believe that their vote will have an impact. This is explained by Activate!’s Dr Cephas Mutami, who “If you have hope for a better tomorrow, conducts the NGO’s YouCount research each year. The issue is something that Government, political you change your mindset, attitude and parties and civil society urgently need to address.

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feel that tomorrow is better than today, so maybe they can see themselves as drivers of a better tomorrow.”

“The goal is to develop ‘innovative and active citizens who can drive positive social, economic, and political change for South Africa” Activate! joined forces with the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) this year in a campaign to encourage the youth to register to vote. This was after the IEC published research that showed significant voter apathy among South African youth, who were not registering to vote in the elections. Through its youth programmes, Activate! provides a provocative platform to engage the youth in its network on issues which affect them. This includes equipping them with the skillset to connect to resources and opportunities, so they are inspired to see a better future. The goal is to develop “innovative and active citizens who can drive positive social, economic, and political change for South Africa and the global good”. South Africa’s culture is also one of “keeping the youth quiet” and drowning out their voice, says Meintjes. “Politicians are not really listening to young people. Young people are desperate to be heard and have access to meaningful platforms that will make their lives better.”

behaviour.”

Activate! is a national non-profit organisation with the primary objective of equipping the youth to become active citizens, in order to influence and provoke positive change in their communities. Activate! has trained and empowered over 3000 young

Activate! CEO, Chris Meintjes explains: “If you have hope for a better tomorrow, you change your mindset, attitude and behaviour. You are more likely not to engage in risky behaviour. The youth need to

Black and Brown Bodies in SA: The Site of Violence and Disorder

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he word protestor By Nolitha Ngamlana in South Africa has had negative connotations attached to it for years. Particularly during apartheid, Black and Brown bodies were the site and subject of protests due to living under discriminatory and violent times. In Africa, holding large protests filled with singing, dancing and barricading roads has been a way of attracting the public’s attention. We live in a society that is desensitised to a lot of things, so just holding a poster has little to no impact on change. This is likely why protestors have resorted to defacing colonial objects/ institutions that they believe still segregate people - it is a way of getting the attention of the public.

“Black and Brown bodies along with protests have been viewed for many years as the sight of violence and disorder.” When students or other South Africans start

protests, onlookers make dangerous assumptions before even bothering to ask why they are protesting. These assumptions spark an immediate response from the usual suspects (the minority group of South Africans who hold much ‘power’) into doing the good ol’ calling the popo to disperse the crowd. Why? Because Black and Brown bodies along with protests have been viewed for many years as the site of violence and disorder and the practice of shoot first, ask later, has always been prominent in South Africa.

“Often, you’ll see that white owned media typically frames Black and Brown bodies as people who disrupt the peace, people who are lazy.” Often, you will see that white-owned media in South Africa typically frames Black and Brown bodies as people who disrupt the peace, people who are lazy. Apart from them doing this to further diminish the image/representation of Black and Brown bodies-drama sells, and so they pump this particular perspective. The word ‘protest’ or ‘strike’ in South Africa has been associated with wasting taxpayers money and people using it as an opportunity to

Source: SAFTU service protests

loot shops etc. However, during the #FeesMustFall season in 2017, protesting students from UCT and other universities asked for those documenting the protests via news and social media to recognise them as protesting students and not just protesters. Often the media does not care about people’s cries and suffering which is the reason why our people are protesting in the first place. Silencing Black and Brown bodies and their concerns has always been something that society and the media excel at. Interesting times we are living in…we can’t speak freely or even be African in Africa…

DISCLAIMER

This section of the VARSITY is a vehicle for expression, on any topic by members of the UCT community. The opinions within this section are not necessarily those of the VARSITY collective or its advertisers. Letters to the Editor need to be kept at a maximum of 300 words and can be sent to: editorial@varsitynewspaper.co.za


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 | V78 E3 | Page 14

Common sense calls me to vote for the ANC By Matthew Field

#VoteEFF for Economic Freedom in By Ntokozo Mahlangu our Lifetime

Source: Financial Times

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can understand why this may be a shocking thing to say. The ANC are far from perfect. Their administration has been choked by State Capture, gutted by looting and bound by bad choices. This is fact. On the 8th of May, I will don my ANC cap and yellow shirt. I am voting with my heart, and according to the truth.

“The have been honest in their self-reflection and internal battle against corruption.” The truth is that the ANC is the closest thing we have to a truly non-racial and non-sexist movement. As far back as the signing of the Freedom Charter, the ANC has rejected racialism (and all other ‘isms’) in all their forms. And these are not just words on a piece of paper. I have felt the ANC live it. I have seen it too in my involvement with SASCO UCT. Having lived in a DA Ward my whole life, I have not seen the same

inclusivity – the opposite actually. Having watched the rhetoric of the EFF, I come to the same conclusion. I also recognise the respect the ANC has for democracy. They have been honest in their self-reflection and internal battle against corruption. Few organizations are brave enough to do this. Look at most liberation movements, especially in Africa. Too often, they have turned into oppressors, and too often democracy has died after the first election. Not so with the ANC. Mandela stepped down after one term, and we have had free elections since 1994. That is the ANC. Lastly, one must look at where we were in 1994. Armed conflict was narrowly avoided, the sanctionburdened apartheid economy had collapsed, and a famine of education starved the minds of the people. It is a miracle South Africa survived – and we have the ANC to thank for that. Looking at where we were, the political freedom we enjoy, and their rare honesty, I have to vote for the ANC. For me, it is common sense.

Source: Alon Skuy

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ince the formation of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), the political landscape of South Africa has never been the same. True to its name, the EFF has been able to centre the national discourse around Economic Freedom in our lifetime.

“voting periodically whilst not having access to education as a result of your economic position, is not freedom.”

outsourced and exploited as a worker is not freedom. Voting whilst violence against women and children remains, ignored by political leaders is not freedom. The EFF positions itself as a vanguard party, which speaks out against the ill that persists to haunt the majority of the people in South Africa. Any honest and impartial reader would agree that the EFF has been able to address these issues, all centred around economic freedom. This is why the EFF should win. Economic oppression is, arguably, the most pervailing evil in South Africa and the EFF directly opposes it.

This is important because part of what 1994 did, was to create a superficial idea of what it means to be free in South Africa. To us, voting periodically whilst not having access to education as a result of your economic position, is not freedom. Voting whilst being

Source: Knysna Plett Herald

By Luke Albert

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n any democratic, pluralistic society, the freedom of the individual - which includes the individual’s freedom of association and expression - is paramount. It is the foundation of any modern and functional civil society. Within the context of our country, for a quarter of a century we have enjoyed those political rights. However, in the runup to our elections, a more pertinent challenge faces us: how do we as a nation achieve economic prosperity for all of those who live within it?

“No matter your demographics, creed, sexuality or ethnicity, you can contribute and gain from society.”

The DA: A New Hope As a liberal party, the Democratic Alliance places its focus on ensuring that the individual in society is able to realise their potential, whether it be political or economic. This becomes even more appropriate for South Africans since we have eleven official languages, a multitude of ethnic groups and a population facing very different needs and desires. In the focus on pursuing interests of choice, everyone is given the opportunity to follow their own paths which allows all spheres of society to flourish. No matter your creed, sexuality or ethnicity, you can contribute and gain from society. This leads to everyone being united behind one purpose, that being mutual benefit through cooperation. On a more empirical level, the DA has shown to be the only party (whether it be in the municipalities or the Western Cape) that cares about proper governance and service delivery. Since the DA has taken over its respective governments, there has been

a significant improvement in financial stability and job opportunities. Recently, Cape Town was named the financial hub of sub-Saharan Africa. Over the past ten years, the Western Cape has been responsible for 50% of the jobs created in South Africa. Coupled with that, is the fact that the province went from zero clean audits (2009) to 83% clean audits (2018) in its departments. And so, the list goes on.

“With election day around the corner, South Africa finds itself at a crossroad leading to either a path of gradual deterioration or one of change.” With election day around the corner, South Africa finds itself at a crossroad leading to either a path

of gradual deterioration or one of change. To me, there is no need to deliberate. There is only one logical choice and that is the DA.

DISCLAIMER

This section of the VARSITY is a vehicle for expression, on any topic by members of the UCT community. The opinions within this section are not necessarily those of the VARSITY collective or its advertisers. Letters to the Editor need to be kept at a maximum of 300 words and can be sent to: editorial@varsitynewspaper. co.za


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 15

Corruption in South Africa is not only an ANC crime

Contrary to popular belief, corruption in the South African government has been rampant since the apartheid era and is still having a negative impact on its citizens. By Julia Rowley

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or most South Africans, the term ‘corruption’ has become commonplace. Whenever we read the news or listen to the radio, a story can be found about one government official or another who has used their political power in a fraudulent way. Although this may seem to be an inherent characteristic of the current ANC government, this is not the case.

“Corruption, and specifically state capture, has been pervasive in South Africa ever since the unjust rule of the National Party (NP).” Corruption, and specifically state capture, has been pervasive in South Africa ever since the unjust rule of the National Party (NP). The “Broederbond”, a male white Afrikaner nationalist group, mostly controlled National Party policies and implementation. ‘Broeders’ were given special advantages, such as being the first to know about upcoming large government procurements. This level of manipulation and control of government officials can easily be compared to the Gupta brothers’ control over Jacob Zuma and other ANC officials. The apartheid government, similarly to the ANC, experienced its fair share of large-scale

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“corruption is a major factor in the deteriorating quality of life of millions of South Africans.”

Decorux Cape Town The perfect playground for interior design enthusiasts. The Decorex design expo brings together chic art and likeminded individuals. Tickets available at Computicket Where: CTICC

May

Kunene and The King John Kani’s inspiring new play brings to life a story where two men from contrasting walks of life are thrust together to reflect on a quarter century of change. Where: The Fugard Theatre When: Tue-Fri 8pm, Sat 3pm & 8pm, Sun 3pm

This corruption is a major factor in the deteriorating quality of life of millions of South Africans. It affects the most vulnerable in our society and sustains poverty. Funds that are meant to be used for providing social services to the poor, such as government housing, education and healthcare, are instead used for selfish purposes. In a country with a history like South Africa’s, our first priority should be protecting the vulnerable and marginalised. Upliftment of the impoverished will only begin once the truly caring are voted into power, and the dishonest have been punished. The upcoming sixth general election, the public’s mark on the ballot sheet, will be our only chance to do so.

Even petty corruption was occurring during apartheid as it is now. White farmers would sell their wine at cost-price to government officials, and white landowners took Ministers on hunting trips in the winter. These actions were a form of bribery intended to win them favour and influence with government officials. These actions mirror the petty corruption happening in service delivery today, such as bribing traffic and police officers.

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May

‘til 25

corruption scandals. Between 1978-1986, the South African Defence Force (SADF) participated in Africa’s largest illegal ivory smuggling ring. SADF officials would smuggle elephant and rhino horns from Angola and Mozambique into South Africa, where it would be sold to foreign markets. The ring was responsible for the deaths of over 100 000 elephants, and state funds were used in this operation to increase the profits of government officials. Additionally, an investigation by the TRC of this time period showed that over R52.3 billion in secret funds were allocated to various government departments, including the SADF (in 2005, this was valued at R339,19 billion).

Two Weeks Tonight May

Cape Town Opera First Thursdays’ long list of entertainment includes Behind the Scenes of the Cape Town Opera on show. Where: Cape Town Opera, 153a Bree Street.

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May

Whisky Live Festival Cape Town One of the biggest whisky festivals in the city welcomes its pesky younger brother Gin and its best brands to the party. Tickets available on www.ticketpros. co.za. Where: The Lookout at the V&A Waterfront.

4-5 May

Poetry Nights Every Thursday Aspiring poets get together to recite spoken word, write poetry and talk everything about poetry. Where: A Touch of Madness, Observatory When: 19:30

May

Riebeek Valley Olive Festival Celebrate the end of a good olive harvest at the Riebeek Valley Olive Festival. R80 gets you a glass of wine and stunning views and delicious delights. Tickets available at www.riebeekvalleyolivefestival.co.za. Where: Riebeek - Kasteel


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 | V78 E3 | Page 16

Promises, Promises, Promises…

By Stephanie Wild

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he upcoming elections have brought on an onslaught of campaign promises. As voters, we are left in this sea of false hope, forced to distinguish between politicians we can trust and those we cannot. Although a trustworthy politician appears to be an oxymoron, we are forced to choose the lesser of the evils presented to us every five years.

“This wholesome image of good leadership with Aunty Pat at the helm is tempting, but we cannot forget her own corruption charges” As per usual, there are promises directed at South Africa’s Achilles’ heel: corruption. This has been the particular agenda of our ‘Aunty Pat’. As she expressed in the unveiling of her new political party, Good, De Lille’s narrative is one of providing the country with good, wholesome leadership. Having only recently weathered her own political storm of corruption allegations that resulted in her leaving the DA, her campaign implies that such wholesome leadership is sorely lacking in the DA and ANC. This wholesome image of Good leadership with Aunty Pat at the helm is tempting, but we cannot forget her own corruption charges, where she was accused of shutting down the Special Investigations Unit for nefarious reasons. Despite maintaining innocence and the courts ruling in her favour, the old adage of ‘where there’s smoke, there’s fire’ comes to mind.

Mashaba has since labelled this a “criminal lie”. An intuitively impossible task appears to be a blatant empty promise, but to those desperate residents still awaiting adequate housing, it could serve as an effective campaign tool. That being said, Ramaphosa has made an effort to keep his 2018 SONA promises. He went through with his 2018 Job Summit, and he launched the Youth Unemployment Service, although the programme has not yet reached its targets. Similarly, his promise to have an additional 2 million people on antiretrovirals by 2020 has also fallen short with the department target being reduced to 610 000 by 2021.

“As is the South African norm, these elections appear to have presented us with a class dichotomy.” Clearly, we will never be able to find a politician that we trust entirely. As voters, the best we can do is simply pick the narrative we prefer. In this case, either De Lille’s focus on fighting corruption, or Ramaphosa’s focus on service delivery. As is the South African norm, these elections appear to have presented us with a class dichotomy.

Applications for VARSITY are open! We’re looking for students who are passionate about writing, journalism and media, and web and management. Positions open are:

• • • • • • •

Ramaphosa’s campaigning has been directed at service-delivery, promising to build one million houses for the residents of Alexandra. Johannesburg mayor Herman

Lifestyle & Fitness Editor Deputy Features Editor Staff Writers and News Reporters Deputy Web Editor Ads Manager Deputy Finance Manager Deputy HR Manager

Is Election Campaigning Culture Just a Scheme to Attain Votes?

By Shameeka Voyiya

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ith election day around the corner, political parties have ramped up their campaigning activities, visiting communities with the aim of gaining or reestablishing the trust of potential voters. However, these political parties and leaders are often very removed from the communities that they visit. They have limited insight into the reality of the lives of the people within these communities, and with these insights, they keep making promises that raise the hopes of citizens.

“Time and time again, citizens are abandoned after each election period, seemingly forgotten.” Political parties promise to fight corruption, decrease unemployment, provide better service delivery, improve infrastructure, and the list goes on. Time and time again, citizens are abandoned after the election period, forgotten. Do they really care about the public as much as they claim to?

“It seems as if election campaigns target vulnerable areas in which residents are most likely to hope for change” There are numerous examples of change that parties have planned to implement, but these plans usually end up falling through, and promises are hardly fully delivered. Many townships are in dire conditions, with people living in informal settlements with poor sanitation and lacking quality water and electricity. Recently, president Cyril Ramaphosa visited the township of Alexandra in Johannesburg, where many residents are living in such conditions, and he promised to ‘build a million houses’ for them and fight crime. We’ll see how this plan unfolds in the future. In Cape Town, the township of Nyanga has had many instances in which the government implemented RDP projects, where people were provided with housing. However, many of these projects were stalled and eventually left incomplete. It seems as if election campaigns target vulnerable areas in which residents are most likely to hope for change, and political parties know that this is a strategy that they can use to attain

votes. Should citizens be voting for leaders who use vulnerable communities in this manipulative way? I think we should rather consider what these parties have done for the public in the past to have a more informed decision as to which one would be better to vote for.


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 17

Lifestyle & Fitness

Mastering your moves By Tiyani Rikhotso

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e’ve all struggled through a

crunch, our necks straining and abs about to cave in. Or perhaps you’re one of the many whose arms threaten to snap as you lower down into a push up. Let’s face it, working out can be difficult, and mastering the correct form can make it even harder. However, it’s important to focus on getting the moves right instead of simply powering through a routine. Whether you are a beginner starting a fitness regime, a seasoned professional in the gym or with at home workouts. Perhaps the reason your knees

get strained when you squat, or you never quite feel the burn when you do a lunge is all up to the fact that you’ve had the wrong posture all along. In the name of preventing muscle strain and injury, here are the do’s and don’ts of popular body weight exercises. Sit ups Don’t: Pull on your neck or lead with your chin. You should also refrain from anchoring your feet. Do: Keep your neck straight and your chin tucked in. Open up your chest by sending your elbows back as you elongate your neck – it should be in line with your upper back and your feet stable on the ground. Plank Don’t: Lift your hips too high or hang them too low. Do: Your hips should stay in line with your shoulders and heels allowing your body to take up the straight form of a plank. Squats Don’t: Bend your knees first or allow them to cave in towards each other. Do: Instead, move into the squad sending your hips back first and keeping your knees in line with your toes or slightly tilted outwards.

Alistair Nyamuda sports@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Lunges Don’t: Take a step that is too small or bend your front knee too far forward as this will put lots of strain on your front knee. In addition, you shouldn’t lean forward over your knee. Do: Keep your back straight and send your gaze straight ahead as your front knee is bent just over your toes.

putting pressure on your shoulders Lastly, breathing correctly throughout each move is equally as important as getting your form right. You want to make sure that you are not holding or straining your breath. Sustain slow and deep breaths ensuring that you exhale during the hardest part of the move where you exert the most force. A small change can go a long way when working out, be it paying attention to your breathing or a slight adjustment in your posture. Next time you are ready to smash out a routine, pay attention to the finer details. This could be the secret to unlock a better workout and will definitely help you prevent strain or injury.

Source: s3.amazonaws.com

Push-ups Don’t: Position your hands wider than your shoulders. Do: Place your hands underneath your wrists when getting into your push up position. This will ensure that you are Source: Ayo Ogunseinde on Unsplash working your triceps and chest without

Do We Really Need Supplements?

By Cayla Clement

Source: Elliot L’Angelier on Unsplash

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itamins and minerals are vital components of a healthy life and many opt for supplements to ensure they are getting exactly what they need. The supplement market continues to grow, promising longevity, improved sleep, cosmetic remedies, enhanced physical performance and overall amazing health. However, some claim that supplements are unnecessary and overindulging in certain vitamins can be detrimental to one’s health. Let’s explore the health benefits and risks of taking supplements and conclude whether they really are needed in our diets.

Most people obtain the correct amount of vitamins their bodies need to function at its best through a healthy and balanced diet. However, many of the foods we consume today are processed in the way that most of the vitamins and nutrients are not processed in the body. Although the average human is able to meet their vitamin needs through its diet alone, some individuals are at risk for deficiencies. These groups include

vegans and vegetarians, pregnant women and babies, the elderly, women experiencing menstrual cycles or those prone to anemia, and people with autoimmune diseases.

“science shows that taking one every day can be beneficial for your health” Those at risk for deficiencies will often seek medical help and will be instructed exactly what vitamin to take, but what about the average person? Do we really need supplements? In regards to a multivitamin, science shows that taking one every day can be beneficial for your health. Some of these benefits include: Healthy, long hair and nails from Vitamin B3, Biotin and Vitamin C Immune system support and antioxidant boosts from Vitamin C, D and E. Better bone health from Calcium and Vitamin D

A better night’s rest and relief from muscle pain and stress from Magnesium. Increased energy throughout the day and increased neurological function from B12.

“Vitamin overdose and toxicity is also possible when supplements are taken in excess” However, it is important to note that along with these benefits, there are some risks to taking supplements including. Some may rely on supplements rather than consuming a balanced and healthy diet. Vitamin overdose and toxicity is also possible when supplements are taken in excess.

This can cause a build-up of some vitamins in your body’s tissue. Migraines, an upset stomach, organ damage and in extreme cases lifethreatening toxicity can also occur from consuming more than the recommended dose of vitamins for the day. Taking supplements and multivitamins are more likely to be beneficial than detrimental to your health. If you are interested in taking a particular supplement it’s important to speak to your health care provider. This is especially important if you feel you are at risk for a vitamin deficiency or start to feel any adverse effects. Taking the right type of vitamin, in the right dose such as a daily multivitamin is a great and convenient way to ensure your body is getting all of the nutrients it needs to function properly.


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 18

THE BACK PAGE

In this Issue Red Redemption: Can Liverpool win the league? How

Leardership skills creating well rounded students

2

3

By Alistair Nyamuda

xhenophobia presents itself during the national elections

7

What’s the Party Line on Sex Work?

A Victory for Bo-Kaap

8-9

What the Pigeon heard

13

Two Weeks Tonight

Do we

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15

really need Supplements?

Mohamed Salah in particular has proved to be one of Liverpool’s most valuable players, having the season of his life last year, scoring 44 goals last season, earning him the golden boot. He has been instrumental in Liverpool’s success this season too, scoring 23 goals and making 12 assists in 47 appearances, helping his team to challenge for the league title.

Liverpool vs Chelsea Source: liverpooloffside.sbnation.com

T

his has by far been the most enthralling season of premier league football to date. The reason for this is the fact that there’s no small team in the league, every game is a big game. Traditionally the premier league elites Manchester united, Liverpool, Arsenal and Chelsea did not face as much contention as they do now, with teams like Tottenham and Manchester city making a name for themselves in the league. Manchester city has been the more successful of the two, winning three titles in the last eight years. There is however another awoken giant. “The Reds” to their fans, but Liverpool to the rest us, the performances shown by them have made many believe they can succeed, and win the title.

German coach, Jurgen Klopp arrived in 2015, and since then, he has managed to create a vibrant attacking side, that can also defend. Liverpool last won the league almost 30 years ago, during the 1989/90 season, prior to the creation of the premier league so to speak. They have, then, never actually won the league. Despite enjoying some success in winning the UEFA champions league in 2005, and winning the league cup in 2012, Jurgen Klopp’s side does not have much to show for in terms of success. The coming of Jurgen Klopp marked a turning point for Liverpool. He has put together an exciting team, that score brilliant goals on a regular basis. The signing of Mohamed Salah, Saudio Mane and Roberto Firmino has helped create one of the most ferocious attacking forces in not only the United Kingdom, but Europe.

Tiger’s Historic Win

“Their attack has managed to tally an impressive 79 goals with games left to play” The addition of Virgil van Dijk at the end of 2017, has helped solidify Liverpool’s defence greatly only conceding 20 goals. Their attack has managed to tally an impressive 79 goals with games left to play. The attacking trio in Salah, Mane and Firmino, the defensive efforts Van Dijk, the leadership of Jordan Henderson, and the tactical brilliance of Jurgen Klopp have all been instrumental in the Reds’ success this season.

“The Premier league gets more challenging each year, with more investments being made, and more teams wanting to challenge for the title” The question still begs: Can Liverpool go all the way and win the league? Well, at present they are a point behind Manchester city, and with three games left to play, it’s anybody’s guess. The Premier league gets more challenging each year, with more investments being made, and more teams wanting to challenge for the title. This could be Liverpool’s best chance to win the league in a long time, and they may not get this close in a while. There is hope for the men from Merseyside However, who have played brilliantly this whole season. There’s still every chance that the Red side of Liverpool will be singing songs of victory, as they did many years ago.

By Ngazibini Sityebi

T

iger Woods made one of the greatest comebacks in sport’s history as he won the 2019 Masters Tournament. This is his 5th Masters win, coming fourteen years after his 4th; going down as the biggest gap in golf history. The win comes after years of facing setbacks both personally and professionally, specifically through an onslaught of injuries that greatly affected his performance, and saw him fall out of the top 1000 golfers. In a 6-year period after his dominance, Woods tore an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), sprained his medial collateral ligament (MCL)which are both knee ligament injuries, had a neck injury, tore his Achilles and had 3 back surgeries – one being a back fusion.

There is perhaps nothing as satisfying as the viral clip of the victorious Woods watching the doubters go on and on about how he is “finished” and “should just retire”. Post-injury, with successful surgery and rehabilitation, Woods was slowly able to rebuild his career and paved the route he would walk on now as he rises out of the ashes. Last year, Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event, tied 6th at the Open and later placed 2nd in the PGA championship. The highlight of the year was his triumph in the Tour Championship which cemented his steps on his journey towards redemption.

“Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event”

Woods caught the attention of the world and recaptured many hearts as he pulled off the Masters win. Most notable of Tiger’s performance during the deciding game was him hitting three birdies of his last six holes. He finished one shot ahead of fellow players, Dustin Johnson, Brooks Koepka and Xander Schauffele. However, the story of Tiger’s comeback goes beyond what he did on the field.

Not only did Woods defy the odds, he rose above the negative voices that vowed about his career being over.

After watching his decline, many never thought they would have the opportunity to cheer him on again. But Tiger was able to build himself

back up after career-altering injuries and had many glued to their screens rooting for him. The chance of seeing him rise again almost felt like a Hollywood movie. Luckily, it was one with a happy ending, and don’t we all love happy endings.

Tiger Woods Final Game - Sourced from sbnation.com


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 17

Lifestyle & Fitness

Mastering your moves By Tiyani Rikhotso

W

e’ve all struggled through a

crunch, our necks straining and abs about to cave in. Or perhaps you’re one of the many whose arms threaten to snap as you lower down into a push up. Let’s face it, working out can be difficult, and mastering the correct form can make it even harder. However, it’s important to focus on getting the moves right instead of simply powering through a routine. Whether you are a beginner starting a fitness regime, a seasoned professional in the gym or with at home workouts. Perhaps the reason your knees

get strained when you squat, or you never quite feel the burn when you do a lunge is all up to the fact that you’ve had the wrong posture all along. In the name of preventing muscle strain and injury, here are the do’s and don’ts of popular body weight exercises. Sit ups Don’t: Pull on your neck or lead with your chin. You should also refrain from anchoring your feet. Do: Keep your neck straight and your chin tucked in. Open up your chest by sending your elbows back as you elongate your neck – it should be in line with your upper back and your feet stable on the ground. Plank Don’t: Lift your hips too high or hang them too low. Do: Your hips should stay in line with your shoulders and heels allowing your body to take up the straight form of a plank. Squats Don’t: Bend your knees first or allow them to cave in towards each other. Do: Instead, move into the squad sending your hips back first and keeping your knees in line with your toes or slightly tilted outwards.

Alistair Nyamuda sports@varsitynewspaper.co.za

Lunges Don’t: Take a step that is too small or bend your front knee too far forward as this will put lots of strain on your front knee. In addition, you shouldn’t lean forward over your knee. Do: Keep your back straight and send your gaze straight ahead as your front knee is bent just over your toes.

putting pressure on your shoulders Lastly, breathing correctly throughout each move is equally as important as getting your form right. You want to make sure that you are not holding or straining your breath. Sustain slow and deep breaths ensuring that you exhale during the hardest part of the move where you exert the most force. A small change can go a long way when working out, be it paying attention to your breathing or a slight adjustment in your posture. Next time you are ready to smash out a routine, pay attention to the finer details. This could be the secret to unlock a better workout and will definitely help you prevent strain or injury.

Source: s3.amazonaws.com

Push-ups Don’t: Position your hands wider than your shoulders. Do: Place your hands underneath your wrists when getting into your push up position. This will ensure that you are Source: Ayo Ogunseinde on Unsplash working your triceps and chest without

Do We Really Need Supplements?

By Cayla Clement

Source: Elliot L’Angelier on Unsplash

V

itamins and minerals are vital components of a healthy life and many opt for supplements to ensure they are getting exactly what they need. The supplement market continues to grow, promising longevity, improved sleep, cosmetic remedies, enhanced physical performance and overall amazing health. However, some claim that supplements are unnecessary and overindulging in certain vitamins can be detrimental to one’s health. Let’s explore the health benefits and risks of taking supplements and conclude whether they really are needed in our diets.

Most people obtain the correct amount of vitamins their bodies need to function at its best through a healthy and balanced diet. However, many of the foods we consume today are processed in the way that most of the vitamins and nutrients are not processed in the body. Although the average human is able to meet their vitamin needs through its diet alone, some individuals are at risk for deficiencies. These groups include

vegans and vegetarians, pregnant women and babies, the elderly, women experiencing menstrual cycles or those prone to anemia, and people with autoimmune diseases.

“science shows that taking one every day can be beneficial for your health” Those at risk for deficiencies will often seek medical help and will be instructed exactly what vitamin to take, but what about the average person? Do we really need supplements? In regards to a multivitamin, science shows that taking one every day can be beneficial for your health. Some of these benefits include: Healthy, long hair and nails from Vitamin B3, Biotin and Vitamin C Immune system support and antioxidant boosts from Vitamin C, D and E. Better bone health from Calcium and Vitamin D

A better night’s rest and relief from muscle pain and stress from Magnesium. Increased energy throughout the day and increased neurological function from B12.

“Vitamin overdose and toxicity is also possible when supplements are taken in excess” However, it is important to note that along with these benefits, there are some risks to taking supplements including. Some may rely on supplements rather than consuming a balanced and healthy diet. Vitamin overdose and toxicity is also possible when supplements are taken in excess.

This can cause a build-up of some vitamins in your body’s tissue. Migraines, an upset stomach, organ damage and in extreme cases lifethreatening toxicity can also occur from consuming more than the recommended dose of vitamins for the day. Taking supplements and multivitamins are more likely to be beneficial than detrimental to your health. If you are interested in taking a particular supplement it’s important to speak to your health care provider. This is especially important if you feel you are at risk for a vitamin deficiency or start to feel any adverse effects. Taking the right type of vitamin, in the right dose such as a daily multivitamin is a great and convenient way to ensure your body is getting all of the nutrients it needs to function properly.


@VarsityNews | 2 May 2019 |V78 E3 | Page 18

THE BACK PAGE

In this Issue Red Redemption: Can Liverpool win the league? How

Leardership skills creating well rounded students

2

3

By Alistair Nyamuda

xhenophobia presents itself during the national elections

7

What’s the Party Line on Sex Work?

A Victory for Bo-Kaap

8-9

What the Pigeon heard

13

Two Weeks Tonight

Do we

10

15

really need Supplements?

Mohamed Salah in particular has proved to be one of Liverpool’s most valuable players, having the season of his life last year, scoring 44 goals last season, earning him the golden boot. He has been instrumental in Liverpool’s success this season too, scoring 23 goals and making 12 assists in 47 appearances, helping his team to challenge for the league title.

Liverpool vs Chelsea Source: liverpooloffside.sbnation.com

T

his has by far been the most enthralling season of premier league football to date. The reason for this is the fact that there’s no small team in the league, every game is a big game. Traditionally the premier league elites Manchester united, Liverpool, Arsenal and Chelsea did not face as much contention as they do now, with teams like Tottenham and Manchester city making a name for themselves in the league. Manchester city has been the more successful of the two, winning three titles in the last eight years. There is however another awoken giant. “The Reds” to their fans, but Liverpool to the rest us, the performances shown by them have made many believe they can succeed, and win the title.

German coach, Jurgen Klopp arrived in 2015, and since then, he has managed to create a vibrant attacking side, that can also defend. Liverpool last won the league almost 30 years ago, during the 1989/90 season, prior to the creation of the premier league so to speak. They have, then, never actually won the league. Despite enjoying some success in winning the UEFA champions league in 2005, and winning the league cup in 2012, Jurgen Klopp’s side does not have much to show for in terms of success. The coming of Jurgen Klopp marked a turning point for Liverpool. He has put together an exciting team, that score brilliant goals on a regular basis. The signing of Mohamed Salah, Saudio Mane and Roberto Firmino has helped create one of the most ferocious attacking forces in not only the United Kingdom, but Europe.

Tiger’s Historic Win

“Their attack has managed to tally an impressive 79 goals with games left to play” The addition of Virgil van Dijk at the end of 2017, has helped solidify Liverpool’s defence greatly only conceding 20 goals. Their attack has managed to tally an impressive 79 goals with games left to play. The attacking trio in Salah, Mane and Firmino, the defensive efforts Van Dijk, the leadership of Jordan Henderson, and the tactical brilliance of Jurgen Klopp have all been instrumental in the Reds’ success this season.

“The Premier league gets more challenging each year, with more investments being made, and more teams wanting to challenge for the title” The question still begs: Can Liverpool go all the way and win the league? Well, at present they are a point behind Manchester city, and with three games left to play, it’s anybody’s guess. The Premier league gets more challenging each year, with more investments being made, and more teams wanting to challenge for the title. This could be Liverpool’s best chance to win the league in a long time, and they may not get this close in a while. There is hope for the men from Merseyside However, who have played brilliantly this whole season. There’s still every chance that the Red side of Liverpool will be singing songs of victory, as they did many years ago.

By Ngazibini Sityebi

T

iger Woods made one of the greatest comebacks in sport’s history as he won the 2019 Masters Tournament. This is his 5th Masters win, coming fourteen years after his 4th; going down as the biggest gap in golf history. The win comes after years of facing setbacks both personally and professionally, specifically through an onslaught of injuries that greatly affected his performance, and saw him fall out of the top 1000 golfers. In a 6-year period after his dominance, Woods tore an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), sprained his medial collateral ligament (MCL)which are both knee ligament injuries, had a neck injury, tore his Achilles and had 3 back surgeries – one being a back fusion.

There is perhaps nothing as satisfying as the viral clip of the victorious Woods watching the doubters go on and on about how he is “finished” and “should just retire”. Post-injury, with successful surgery and rehabilitation, Woods was slowly able to rebuild his career and paved the route he would walk on now as he rises out of the ashes. Last year, Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event, tied 6th at the Open and later placed 2nd in the PGA championship. The highlight of the year was his triumph in the Tour Championship which cemented his steps on his journey towards redemption.

“Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event Woods recorded a top-five finish in a PGA event”

Woods caught the attention of the world and recaptured many hearts as he pulled off the Masters win. Most notable of Tiger’s performance during the deciding game was him hitting three birdies of his last six holes. He finished one shot ahead of fellow players, Dustin Johnson, Brooks Koepka and Xander Schauffele. However, the story of Tiger’s comeback goes beyond what he did on the field.

Not only did Woods defy the odds, he rose above the negative voices that vowed about his career being over.

After watching his decline, many never thought they would have the opportunity to cheer him on again. But Tiger was able to build himself

back up after career-altering injuries and had many glued to their screens rooting for him. The chance of seeing him rise again almost felt like a Hollywood movie. Luckily, it was one with a happy ending, and don’t we all love happy endings.

Tiger Woods Final Game - Sourced from sbnation.com


“Together for change. Together for Jobs” became the DA’s slogan. I discovered that many homeless and lower class people were taking employment into their own hands. -

Refentse Malatji


The taxi rank and metrorail stations of Cape Town are a space of convergence where the general public simultaneously interact yet isolate themselves. Wandile Dhlamini


WRAP EDITION PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTORS: Tasneem Jacobs, Refentse Malatji, Sumitra Naidoo, Caroline Peterson, Louise Van Den Berg, Jade Peterson, Caitlin Bowes, Wandile Dhlamini, Jesse Booysen, Simoa Nangle, Kelsey Maggott, Julia Evans, Micaela Baatjies, Kendra Stewart, Cindy Makau

Profile for VARSITY

2019 Edition 3 (Wrap Edition)  

VARSITY is the official student newspaper of the University of Cape Town,since 1942

2019 Edition 3 (Wrap Edition)  

VARSITY is the official student newspaper of the University of Cape Town,since 1942

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