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April 2002 There is no emoticon

S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y for 115 y e a r s

Hope C o l l e g e

Joseph gives annual Chavez address This year's speech focused on immigration issues with U. S. and Mexico Courtney Klein C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

On M o n d a y , April I 4 l h , H o p e c o l l e g e hosted the fourth annual Cesar E. Chavez Address. T h e address, tilled " C r o s s i n g Borders M e n d i n g Bridges; US- Mexico Immigration Debate and C h a l l e n g e s " w a s given by D a n i e l H e r n a n d e z J o s e p h , C o n s u l of M e x i c o and b r o t h e r of L o r n a H e r n a n d e z

have," Joseph said. O n e idea that Joseph focused on in his speech is the idea of the migrant worker living in fear. "The experience of the worker is that of Chavez, living in fear of immigration officials. They have lost the right to exist because they live in fear," Joseph said. W h i l e highlighting the feelings of immigrants, Joseph also mentioned the feelings of those w h o live in the United States. " S o m e [Americans] believe they [immigrants] should have no rights, because of their

Jarvis, professor of Religion at Hope. Joseph has been a Diplomat in Lardeo, T X since 1999, and has held many positions that dealt with migratory issues. Joseph was quick to d e f i n e what the migrant worker is, and what their goals are. "Migrant workers are workers looking for jobs that pay better than the ones they already

immigration s t a t u s / ' Joseph said. Joseph's speech focused on the relationship between the United States and Mexico regarding the immigration issue. W h a t Joseph mentioned was the fact that M e x i c o d i d n ' t want to talk about immigration issues, because they didn't want to talk about preventing people f r o m leaving their country,

A N C H O H P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

Walter Nelson ('05) and Prabhu Tamilarasan ('05) enjoyed the warm weather covering much of the midwest on Tuesday by tossing around a frisbee near the Fried International Center.

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Stein addresses campus Speaker series declared a success by organizers James Pierce CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

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P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

Ben Stein spoke to a capacity crowd in Dimnent Chapel last week for the Student Congress Speaker Series.

Ben Stein c a m e to c a m p u s last Tuesday and left on Thursday, as often happens with speakers in the Student C o n g r e s s Speaker Series. T h e time in between Stein's arrival a n d d e p a r t u r e , t h o u g h , w a s described as "amazing" and "the highlight of the year" by A m y Avery ('02), chairperson of the Speaker Series Task Force, and Matt Scogin ('02), Student Congress president. " H e w a s here for t w o nights " S c o g i n said. " H e s p e n t t i m e on

c a m p u s , he spent t i m e with students, he played frisbee with students, he checked his email in the library - it was just cool." Stein could be frequently seen obliging students' requests for pictures and autographs, and was also spotted pounding nails at Habitat for H u m a n i t y ' s Habifest event on the Dewitt Patio. " T h e r e w a s n o b o d y he w o u l d turn d o w n for a picture or an autograph or anything," said Avery, who also chaired last y e a r ' s c o m m i t t e e to bring M a y a Angelou to c a m p u s f o r the series. "In the m i d d l e of checking his email he would get u p and take a picture with somebody. I thought it would get really old and really annoying at first for him and

he totally w o u l d d o it. W h e n w e first brought him here it was almost 10:30 and he didn't want to check in. H e wanted to go meet people. H e w a s j u s t really excited to be here." Scogin feels that Hope students are still saying positive things about the Ben Stein visit, and it seems that H o p e has left a lasting impression on Stein himself. " H e emailed me and told m e that he wants to live in Holland," Scogin said. " H e said it's the warm center of the universe and h e ' s like, 'Forget M a l i b u , forget M i a m i , forget Washington D.C., 1 want to move to H o l l a n d . ' " Avery relates a similar sentiment

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Former Hope student, Nobel prize winner to speak New technology innovations may lead to replacement of computer chips Danielle Koski BUSINESS MANAGER

N a n o t e c h n o l o g y s e e m s like a f o r e i g n planet to most pebple, but in short time it could b e c o m e a part of everyday life. Richard Smalley won the Nobel Prize in 1996 for his preparation of fullerenes, which e v e n t u a l l y led to Buckyballs and Buckytubes, and has b e c o m e o n e of the main c o m p o n e n t s in n a n o t e c h n o l o g y r e s e a r c h . Smalley will be speaking at Hope on Friday,

r .j April 19, at 4 p.m. in VanderWerf 102, and will be talking about " B u c k y t u b e s ! N e w Materials and Devices from C a r b o n . " "Folks used to think that carbon occurred only as diamond or graphite, [but] Smalley f o u n d a t h i r d f o r m of t h e e l e m e n t , Buckyballs," said Don Williams, a Hope pro-

i n the u n iuniverse," v e r s e . " s said aid the stiffest damn object in Smalley in an interview he gave to Essential Science Indicators (ESI) in March 2002. T h e s e properties h a v e o p e n e d d o o r s in technology, especially in the field of elec-

fessor of chemistry. B u c k y t u b e s are extremely small c a r b o n tubes that are arranged in a net-like pattern similar to the pattern of soccer balls, if they were made into cylinders. T h e tubes have a m a z i n g properties, like being 3 0 to 100 times stronger then steel, and having superb

computer chips " Williams said. To use Buckytubes in areas of the computer industry could mean super thin flat screens with high definition, and micro-sized

conducting capabilities. "Well, when you pull on [a buckytube], it's

tronics. " [ B u c k y t u b e s ] might replace silicon as

transistors. "Within five years, I ' m confident we will find single-wall nanotubes in c o m m e r c i a l products, and most likely those will be products that exploit the electronic conduction

properties nronerties [of nanotubes]," nanotubesl, Smalley said in ii the March 2002 ESI interview. Smalley has w o n multiple awards for his r e s e a r c h in n a n o t e c h n o l o g y , b e s i d e s the Nobel Prize. H e w a s elected to the National A c a d e m y of S c i e n c e s in 1990, a n d t h e American A c a d e m y of Arts and Sciences in 1991. His work has been published and cited in various scholarly journals, including Science, "[Smalley] is personable, charming, smart and w o n a prize m o s t of us only d r e a m about," Williams said. Smalley was a H o p e student from 1961 to 1963, then left to c o m p l e t e his chemistry

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Inside A n c h o r 速 Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Four Hope profs to retire Campus, Page 2.

Senior art show in DePree Arts, Page 3.

Lake Mac water quality examined Infocus, Page 5.

Ultimate frisbee Sports, Page 8


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A p r i l 17, 2 0 0 2

Fine Grove to be rocked by Earth Jam Saturday EIG sponsors annual Earth-friendly event James Pierce STAFF REPORTER

A N C H O R P H O T O C O U R T E S Y PUBLIC R E L A T I O N S

Harvey Blankespoor, Robert Elder, Ronald Wolthius, and Donald Williams (from left) are retiring from Hope after a combined 109 years of service.

Four Hope profs plan to retire after this year Biology, political science, chemistry and education will all lose professors Becca Haynes STAFF REPORTER

F o u r l o n g l i m e m e m b e r s of the Hope C o l l e g e faculty will say g o o d b y e this year Harvey Blankespoor, the Frederich Garrett and Helen Floor D e k k e r P r o f e s s o r of B i o l o g y ; Robert Elder Jr., professor of political science; Donald Williams, professor of chemistry ; and Ronald Wolthuis, associate professor of education will be retiring at the end of this school year. Blankespoor j o i n e d the H o p e faculty in 1976. In 1980 H o p e students presented him with the t4 Hope O u t s t a n d i n g P r o f e s s o r Educator" (H.O.P.E.) Award. Since 1990, he has conducted M a y terms f o r H o p e students in South America and East Africa. Blankespoor and his wife Marlene w e r e Resident Directors in Cosmopolitan Hall from 1993-2001. Elder joined the Hope faculty in 1969. H e helped to establish H o p e ' s M a y term in Washington D.C. in the early 1 9 7 0 ^ , and the H o p e Washington H o n o r s Semester in 1976. In 1993 he instituted a faculty e x c h a n g e with Bishop H e r b e r College in Tamil Nadu. He was also a faculty consultant to the political science dep a r t m e n t at the University of C o l o m b o in Sri Lanka through a Fulbright grant. In 2000, he was H o p e ' s exc h a n g e p r o f e s s o r at M e i j i Gakuin University in Japan. E l d e r c o - a u t h o r e d the text "American Government: Essentials and P e r s p e c t i v e s " with Jack Holmes, professor of political science and Dr. Michael Engelhardt. Williams has been a m e m b e r of the Hope faculty since 1969.

W i l l i a m s has c r e a t e d c o u r s e s concerning the environmental consequences of electrical p o w e r gene r a t i o n , and t h e h i s t o r y of t h e atomic bomb. H e has developed the c o u r s e " S c i e n c e and H u m a n Values," since the implementation of the S e n i o r S e m i n a r p r o g r a m in 1969. He has also consulted with the Holland Board of Public Works and has served on the Board of Governors of the Michigan L o w - L e v e l Radioactive Waste Authority. He has won state and national American Nuclear Society C o m m u n i c a tion Awards for his ability to c o m municate with the public. W i l l i a m s ' w i f e Susan is retiring this year as director of the college's F O C U S and S O A R programs. Williams' feelings about retirement are bittersweet. " I ' v e k n o w n t r e m e n d o u s students w h o h a v e helped m e grow. But I ' v e been an eighteen year old student for 4 6 years, and it's time for m e to m o v e on. I want to retire at the top of my game. I ' v e loved t e a c h i n g , but I look f o r w a r d to other things," Williams said. Williams intends to pursue a variety of interests. " I ' v e got to feel useful. But I also plan to do a lot of traveling and photography. I ' m going to take my slide show of my f u n n y signs coll e c t i o n to r e t i r e m e n t c e n t e r s in June, where I'll also do talks on the history of the atomic bomb. If it w o r k s , I'll take it o n the r o a d , " Williams said. Wolthuis is a 1964 graduate of Calvin College. Wolthuis b e c a m e a m e m b e r of the H o p e faculty in 1985, focusing in special education. During the current school year he has taught " T h e Exceptional Child," "Introduction to Emotionally Impaired," "Psychoeducational Strategies," and "Senior Seminar." Wolthuis has also been active at the state and national levels, includi n g the P r o f e s s i o n a l A d v i s o r y Boards of the Autism Society of

Michigan and the Michigan Association for C h i l d r e n with Emotional Disturbance, Institutions f o r Higher Education Advisory C o m m i t t e e , and the E d u cation C o m m i t t e e of the Autism Society of America. . He was elected recipient of the fall. 2 0 0 0 "Honorary Professor/Staff M e m b e r A w a r d " award by the student body. He will present the c o l l e g e ' s C o m m e n c e m e n t address on Sunday, M a y 5. Wolthuis intends to continue teaching after his retirment. "We |Wolthius and Sherrie W o l t h i u s l a r e going to teach in s c h o o l s f o r m i s s i o n a r y ' s kids. I'll use my special e d u c a t i o n training and work with special needs students. M y w i f e has a considerable ESL background which will also be useful. We share a vision for this kind of work. I will also probably work in recruitment, training special education teachers to use their s k i l l s in t e a c h i n g a b r o a d , " Wolthuis said. Wolthuis considers retirement as a window to several years of numerous opportunities. "Retirement closes a phase of my career life and opens another. It's a w o n d e r f u l e x p e r i e n c e to take all of the gifts I have been given and to use those further," Wolthuis said. Wolthuis considers his years at Hope to be invaluable. " H o p e has been a wonderful experience for m e and my family. E a c h of my sons has had a great experience at Hope. It has helped m e to learn how to integrate my faith and my profession." Wolthius said. "At Hope I began to understand how the t w o vastly different aspects can c o m p l e m e n t o n e another. I have also learned more on h o w to be an e f f e c t i v e e d u c a t o r o n this campus. I have a deep respect and affection for my colleagues here, and I k n o w God is doing important things on this c a m pus."

Earth Day is fast approaching, and H o p e ' s Environmental Issues Group is throwing a celebration in the pine grove this weekend. Live music, poetry readings, and paper making are all part of this y e a r ' s event, a c c o r d i n g to D y a n Couch ( 4 04), one of the e v e n t ' s organizers. Earth J a m will a l s o f e a t u r e a r a f f l e and prizes, with p r o c e e d s going to buy a tree to replace the ones near DeWitt that fell d o w n recently.

"Earth Jam is a day of celebrating the E a r t h , " C o u c h said. "It's about trying to enjoy being outside, learning about how to protect the Earth, and teaching people about how to m a k e simple decisions on how to help the environment." W T H S will be broadcasting live from the pine grove as Earth Jam is taking place between 11:30 am and 5:30 pm this Saturday, April 20. Earth Jam has been an a n n u a l feature at H o p e for m o r e than 12 years, according to Couch. Admission to the Earth Jam is free, and the only expense for part i c i p a n t s is in the r a f f l e tickets, which cost 25 cents each. In the event of rain on Saturday, Earth Jam will m o v e to the Kletz.

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P H O T O BY C O U R T N E Y K L E I N

Daniel Hernandez Joseph delivered the fourth annual Cesar E. Chavez Address in the DeWitt Center theater. but that Mexico finally met with the United States to discuss Mexican human rights. O n e of the problems w i t h t h i s i s s u e is t h a t M e x i c o merely wanted to "renew the program, not solve it, like the U. S. Wanted to d o , " Joseph said. Joseph also highlighted the fact that American government officials in the tend to stray away from immigration issues, because dealing with them is "political suicide." And contrary to popular belief, most w h o immigrate are not poor. "It is not the poorest of the poor

in the immigration cycle. It takes money to immigrate," Joseph said. T h e government took the initiative to form the I R C A , the Immigration R e f o r m and Control Act, which gave illegal immigrants already existing in the United States a green card, but that w e w o u l d "shut the door behind them," Joseph said. T h e immigration issue is a continuous one, but Joseph explained what he believed would happen. "Immigration will continue, but it will change phases," Joseph said.

STEIN from 1 "He really loved it," Avery said."He told me yesterday that he w a s speaking at Baldwin-Wallace C o l lege in Cleveland, and he said he didn't think it was going to be o n e tenth as good as H o p e was." C o m p a r e d to last y e a r ' s speech from M a y a Angelou, which had a price tag larger than Stein's $20,000 fee, Avery and Scogin described t h i s y e a r ' s i n s t a l l m e n t of t h e speaker series as much more student oriented. T h e y felt that this

year's was more in line with how the speaker series is supposed to be, since it is essentially financed with tuition money. Scogin estimated the audience in Dimnent at around 1300, most of whom were students. " H e w a s a s k in g us a f t e r w a r d , ' H o w many people go to H o p e ? ' and we said about 3,000, and so he said ' H o l y cow, that's almost half of the student body.' It will be hard to top next year." Scogin said.

TUBES from 1 degree at the University of Michigan in 1965. According to Williams, Smalley took all the courses Hope had to offer, and left after a key professor died. H e then earned his master and

doctorate from Princeton. Smalley is now a professor of chemistry and physics at Rice University in Houston, Texas, where he is also the director of the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology at Rice.


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Senior art show shines in DePree gallery Maureen Yonovitz SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

For those w h o h a v e n ' t been to the DePree gallery in a while, the senior art show "Art Addicts: Dealers W e l c o m e " is now underway. T h e display, featuring the work of senior art m a j o r s , b e g a n Friday, April 5 and will continue through Sunday, M a y 5. From its initial planning to the hanging of the artwork, the show is run completely by the senior artists. Each artist chooses four works to display and presents an artist's statement. ' i t is a time when they [the artists) can truly s h o w w h a t their work is about," said Jenna Anderson ('02). A n d e r s o n is p r e s e n t i n g f o u r paintings in the show. For t w o of t h e m , entitled R e s u r r e c t i o n and White as Snoe, she used encaus-

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tic, which she explains is a waxpaint like substance that must remain heated in order to keep f r o m drying and then fused to the surface of the painting with a heat gun after being applied. "I am relieved because I worked so long to think of and finish the works for this show and I can finally j u s t stand back and appreciate them," Anderson said. T h e show includes work from a range of artistic forms. Anna Kohls ( ' 0 2 ) , whose m a j o r focus is in ceramics, has a number of bowl and c u p sets in the display. " M o s t people think of art as just painting, or just drawing. T h e art show provides viewers an access to many other media and a variety of styles," Kohls said. All students are e n c o u r a g e d to come to the show and experience the many different types of art on display. T h e artists h o p e everyone will

Nightlife:

— BY R O B O N D R A Monique Murray's ('02)"My Skin and Soul", right, and Steve Haulenbeek's ('02) "Suicide Machine", left, are a few of the works featured in the annual Senior Art Show. find some enjoyment in seeing what others have d o n e and possibly gain s o m e inspiration in learning-something new about what they see. ' i t ' s just f u n to wander around a gallery and wonder 'what is that big blue square supposed to m e a n ? ' " Kohls said. "Art opens u p a new

line of thinking." Also, in addition to their artwork being displayed, t w o graduating art history majors Jennifer Chalifoux ('02) and Lauren H e r m e s ( ' 0 2 ) will be presenting their senior papers T h u r s d a y , April 18 at 7 p . m . in C o o k Auditorium of DePree,

Creativity award given to artistic seniors Emily Moellman

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A R T S EDITOR

Three Hope seniors in the arts will graduate with s o m e t h i n g to show for all their hard work, dedication and creativity. S u s a n D e K a m of the m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t , Rachel P r i d g e o n of the E n g l i s h department and Charlotte van C o e v o r d e n of the d a n c e department were recently awarded the Mary Van Tamelen Prize f o r Creativity in the Arts. T h e prize Is awarded annually to a graduating senior or group of seniors on the basis of extraordinary creativity in the general arts d e m onstrated by original work worthy of critical a c c l a i m in the larger world, appearing in print or other medium. In addition to the honor of the award, the students are also given a cash prize.

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Each department in the arts, literature, creative writing, music theatre, fine arts, film or television, has the opportunity to nominate one student. After the student is nominated, he or she is required to present a portfolio Up a selection c o m m i t t e e highlightmg their accomplishments in creativity while at Hope. This year, a selection c o m m i t t e e c o m p r i s e d of professors f r o m the arts headed by William Reynolds, Dean f o r the Arts and Humanities, deliberated several hours over the candidates materials before awarding the Van Tamelen Prize to the lucky three artists. It's always a difficult decision to m a k e because w e have very talented students here at H o p e w h o receive gbod teaching and m e n t o r i n g , " s a i d R e y n o l d s . 44 In picking the best of the best, you are

presenteda with s o m e j'trytrxravciyif* mpressive artists" Van C o e v o r d e n r e c e i v e d t h e award for her work in choreogra-

phy. "I was happy when I heard the n e w s , " van Coevorden said. 4 4 T h e dance department hasn't had a rec i p i e n t of t h e a w a r d in s e v e r a l years. It is not only a good thing for me but also for the department." Van Coevorden has incorporated m a n y other f o r m s of art into her choreography, including the poetry of Hope student Ben Falk ( 4 02) and the painting " N e w York C i t y " by abstract artist Mondrian> P r i d g e o n w a s selected f o r her work in creative writing including fiction, nofiction and poetry. She also included original photography in her portfolio. "It has been a huge honor, mostly

Kfr-aiic** II w u/hq n n m i n a f p H by the because a s nominated faculty I have admired for the past four years," Pridgeon said. 44 T h e nomination is actually more important to m e than the award itself." Pridgeon plans to put the prize money towards the purchase of a new lap top c o m p u t e r to use while attending Western Michigan University next fall for graduate studies in creative writing. D e K a m w a s awarded the Van Tamelen for her p e r f o r m a n c e work in piano and organ. S h e recently placed second in the collegiate org a n c o m p e t i t i o n at t h e M u s i c Teachers National Association an-

nual c o n f e r e n c e in March. All of Van T a m e l e n a w a r d e e s will be publically honored at the a n n u a l H o n o r s C o n v o c a t i o n on T h u r s d a y , April 24 in D i m n e n t Chapel.

Common Grounds Coffee House: Tues. & Sun.: Chess. Call Ahead for current schedule of offerings. Grand Rapids. 454-2999. Uncommon Grounds Coffee House: poetry readings and book signings. Call ahead for dates. Located in d o w n t o w n Saugatuck. D i v e r s i o n s : K a r e o k e . Call ahead for dates. Grand Rapids. 451-3800. T h e Grotto: d a n c i n g and theme nights. Grand Rapids. 956-9790. H o w l i n ' M o o n Saloon: Contemporary country music and linedancing. Thrus.-Sat.: live music.

Hope Happenings: S A C movie "Harry Potter" Fri. and Sat. 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m., and Midnight, Sun 3 p.m. Graves Hall. April 17: C o f f e e House in the Kletz 9-11:00. With C o r e y A d o m i t i s and Matt Workman.. April 22: " S o m e t h i n g Every T u e s d a y " sponsored by O f f i c e of S t u d e n t A c t i v i t i e s : Organizing 101.

Late night jazz concert will jive local restaurant Rebecca Haynes STAFF REPORTER

On Thursday, April 18, the H o p e j a z z ensembles and the A n c h o r Band will give reason to stay up past your bedtime. T h e Jazz C h a m ber E n s e m b l e I, Jazz E n s e m b l e I, and the Anchor Band will present a concert beginning at 10 p.m. at 84 East Restaurant d o w n t o w n , H o p e jazz faculty m e m b e r and director of the Jazz Ensembles Brian C o y l e considers the concert to be an important experience for student musicians.

"We try to h a v e a concert at least once a year in a club setting. It's the best place to see j a z z music, because the atmosphere is m o r e relaxed. It's important for the musicians; the students always play better in this kind of situation because t h e y ' r e m o r e relaxed," Coyle said. Drummer Mike Kopchick ('04) echoes C o y l e ' s sentiments. • " W h e n y o u ' r e playing in a c l u b it's more intimate of an environment. It doesn't feel so much like y o u ' r e putting on a concert because there's less pressure. It seems to lessen the g a p between

the [musicians] and the audience," Kopchick said. "It's going to be fun. There aren't a lot of o p p o r t u n i t i e s to h e a r live j a z z this c l o s e to Hope." T h e Jazz C h a m b e r E n s e m b l e I, consisting of five musicians, will play selections f r o m a repertoire including "Lennies Pennies," by Lennie Tristano; Michael Brecker's "Tea Bag"; " S t o p , " by Paquito D ' R i v e r a ; D u k e Ellington's ''Carav a n " ; and "Witch H u n t , " by W a y n e Shorter, among others. T h e 16-member Anchor B a n d , directed by faculty m e m b e r s Steven Ward and T h o m Working, will play a selection of songs such as Shelly B e r g ' s " M i l e s M o o d , " " L o a f i n , " by F r a n k Mantooth; Jeff Jarvis' "The Right Track '; and " C u a b a , " by Frank T. Williams. T h e Jazz E n s e m b l e I, consisting of 16 m e m bers with a different array of instruments, will play selections from a diverse repertoire such as " T h r e e and O n e , " by Thad Jones; Charles M i n g u s ' "Fables of Faubus"; "The Diver," by Malt Harris; "April in Paris," by Vernon D u k e ; Dizzy Gillepsie's " B e B o p " ; and a c o m m i s sioned piece: "Stella by Holland," written by James Miley. Coyle anticipates an exciting show. "Every time w e play |in this type of setting], it's a blast. Students should come d o w n , see their friends, have something to eat. It promises to be a great

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The Jazz Ensemble performs at concert this year held in Dimnent Chapel, This Thursday, the Ensemble will perform at 84 East Restuarant

concert." T h e public is invited and admission is free.

April 19: H y p o n o t i s t F r e d W i n t e r s in P h e l p s at 8:30. F r e e for all.

Concerts: April 17: Beta Band at A n d r e w s in Detroit.

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April 18: P e t e Yorn at the Riviera in Chicago. April 19: Super Furry Animals at the Abbey in Chicago. April 20: Chemical Bros, at the Allstate Arena in Illinois. April 23: Dave Mathews Band at the Palace in Auburn Hills.

Do you have an event you want to be advertised in WHATS GOING DOWN?? If so. please drop off information (including date. time, price, telephone number of venue, etc.) about your arts-related event in the box outside the Anchor office in the Dewitt Building.


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Opinion Matt

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The Best and Worst of 2001-2002

Next week will be the last issue of the Anchor for the year and we will be running a "year in review" page, highlighting the campus happenings of the past school year. This year has been a strange one for me. On one hand, I'm editor of the Anchor and inextricably involved with Hope College. On the other hand, I ' m a graduating senior, sick of Hope College, eager to move on with my life and not interested at all in being involved. I think this has given me a unique vantage point for what's gone on. Next week, we'll take a closer look at this year, but for now, here is my top four list of the best and worst Hope College moments of the 20012002 school year. 4 (worst): S A C and Hope Asian Perspective Association (HAPA). In October (Anchor, 10/17), HAPA asked for an

apology from S A C for showing the film "Sixteen Candles," which featured a racist depiction of an Asian character. My problem is not with SAC, who did the right thing in apologizing, but in the campus in general, who responded with a resounding " w h a t ' s the big deal?" The big deal is that any group has the right to speak out in their own defense. Hope college students still have a lot to learn about diversity. 4 (best): Ben Stein. W h o would have thought that a deadpan Jewish gameshow host would become Hope College's patron celebrity (Anchor, 4/17)? Although his speech was a little cheesy and much too long. Hope's bubble expanded that much more because finally someone from outside the Dutch Michigan world showed interest in us. 3 (worst): Hockey Club not allowed to play on Sunday. When the Hope College powers-that-be told the

Anchor Staff

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Hockey Club that if they made it to the championship game they wouldn't be allowed to play (Anchor, 2/27), the story was picked up by the local press and Hope became the laughingstock of college sports. It's ironic that a college so obsessed with image shot itself in the foot by showing itself to be hypocritical and backwards. W h y would anyone want to.play sports at a college that cares more about oldfashioned rules than winning a championship? 3 (best): Gay-Straight Forum (GSF) fights on. Despite being denied official recognition two years in a row, the G S F showed determination this year both before and after the C a m p u s Life Board decision, even enlisting the help of the A C L U and some gaysupporting alumni. It's still an uphill battle away, but I predict the G S F will be recognized officially in the next two years. 2 (worst):

Post 9/11 intolerance. In the weeks that followed the terrorist attacks of September 11, religious articles were stolen from an Islamic student's room, a bulletin board about Islam was defaced and a racist flyer was seen on campus (Anchor, 10/31). These things may not have been caused by Hope students, but if they were, they were an embarrassment to us all. Racial and religious hatred is just not acceptable ever. I still hope that the perpetrators will have the guts to apologize for what they did and then make the effort to become friends with a person of a different religion. 2 (best): Post 9/11 unity. September 11 changed the country forever and scared the hell out of us (Anchor, 9/12). 9/11, and the few days after, was one of the few times that I ' v e actually seen the campus getting along, as we stopped being stupid for a little while to help each other regain some

purpose in our lives. D o n ' t forget what that felt like. 1 (worst): G S F denied recognition. I think I ' v e already said enough about this in past Anchors. Actually I ' v e gotten quite notorious for it. The long and short of it: unless Hope College fully accepts gay people and their lifestyle (because they're not changing), students and faculty will continue to feel unwanted and a Hope College education will completely lose its relevance. 1 (best); Michael Brecker plays Great Performance Series. When the great saxophonist was on stage in Dimnent Chapel playing a virtuoso solo rendition of John Coltrane's " N a i m a , " even unspiritual people experienced what it means to be divine (Anchor, 11/28). Hope College should teach us more lessons like that.

Your voic

Your voice

Anchor Staff

Student clarifies some pronunciations editor-in-chief Mall Cook production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Courtney Klein Jamie Pierce infocus editor Erica Heeg arts editor Emily Moellman sports editors Ben Dellaan John Rodslrom spotlight editor Jen Troke photo editor Rob Ondra copy editor Rebekah Oegema business manager Danielle Koski ad representative Nick Denis production assistant Rachael Pridgeon distribution manager Ellen Vigants advisor Diana Breclaw

To the Editor: In last week's "Dialogue on Diversity (Infocus, 4 / 1 0 ) " Treasure Givan pointed out that Oregon is pronounced like organ, not Or-egone. At Hope College, people often unfairly mispronounce words. So 1 have complied a list of my own frequently mispronounced words to

better Hope College's diversity. A N o n C h a p e l - G o e r is p r o n o u n c e d "mislead-demonic-sinner." Encounter with Cultures is most properly p r o n o u n c e d "the politically correct propaganda I took because I couldn't get my cultural diversity credits waved." Finally, cultural diversity should be pronounced "no

big deal because Hope College is a racial Utopia where students love each other so much that no minority could ever feel misunderstood."

Phil W a a l k e s ( l 0 4 )

Letters to the Editor Guidelines Open to anyone within the college and related communities T h e Anchor reserves the right to edit due to space constraints No personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous Letters chosen on a first come first serve basis, or a representative sample is taken No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief may verify identity of writer

Senior Staff Reporter: Maureen Yonovitz

Please keep letters below 300 words

Mail letters to the A n c h o r c/o H o p e College, d r o p t h e m Staff Reporters and p h o t o g r a p h e r s : Angela Matusiak, Abbey Stauffer, Becca Haynes, Anneke Meeter, J ared Gall

off at t h e A n c h o r o f f i c e ( l o c a t e d in t h e c e n t e r o f D e w i t t , behind

WTHS),

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2001 tall semester,

e-mail

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The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor re seres the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

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Issue #24 of 25

Today's Count:

2 9

Last year, Student Congress used $ 5 0 0 of the student activity fee to buy this scrolling marquee sign in the lobby of the DeWitt Center. Although active last year, the sign has yet to display anything this year. As a service to you, the Anchor will keep track of h o w many w e e k s it has been blank in the 20012002 school year.


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A p r i l 17, 2 0 0 2

SpotligHt

Hope "Iron Chefs": secrets and passions Hope's culinary professionals speak from the kitchen. Jen Troke S P O T U G H T EDITOR

Todd Van Wieren, Certified Exe c u t i v e C h e f f o r the H a w o r t h Center and Cook Hall, got his first j o b in the food industry at the tender age of 13. "My dad w a s a chef, so I started early," V a n Wieren Oi said. ./i H e has n o w been in the food service f o r 24 years. H e g r a d u a t e d from Grand Rapids Community College, then G. R. Junior College, which boasts one of the top three c u l i n a r y s c h o o l s in t h e U n i t e d

and d e m o n s t r a t e d his cooking skills. He was chosen over about 12 to 15 other candidates. Now, Van Wieren is in charge of food aspect of the dorm and conference center. His favorite part of the arrangement is the diversity. "During the week, we cook for the students, and on the weekends, we'll cook something a little more upscale for the conference center," Van Wieren said. A c c o r d i n g to Van Wieren. the kitchen facilities are among the best in i Holland. T h e set-up e v e n includes airc o n d i t i o n i n g - a r a r i t y f o r large kitchens. Van Wieren d o e s n ' t have as much time to enjoy the facilities,

time you just have to your passion. } I -Rebecca Russcher ('96), Chef

States. Van Wieren worked at the Holland Holiday Inn b e f o r e c o m i n g to Hope. H e cooked there for the hotel's first 10 years and was the Executive chef f o r the last six. Until the Haworth Center was built, Holiday Inn w a s the only conference center of that size. "This was going to be o u r direct competition," Van Wieren said. H e interviewed for the position

however. " I ' m m o r e m a n a g e m e n t . " Van Wieren said. "1 do the training and the scheduling and basically oversee the kitchen. 1 have a staff of chefs that work for m e . " Six chefs work for Van Wieren, three of whom have taken the culinary courses at G . R. C. C. O n e of t h e c h e f s is R e b b e c a Russcher ('96). Although Russcher w a s a history m a j o r at Hope, she has followed a different path since graduation. " A s much as 1 enjoyed my time

Jalapeno and Cheddar Corn Bread R e c i p e by: Servings:

Todd Van Wieren is the Certified Executive Chef for Cook Hall and the Haworth Center. here [at H o p e ] , s o m e t i m e s you just h a v e to f o l l o w y o u r p a s s i o n , " Russcher said. Russcher loves cooking, and she says the j o b at Hope s e e m e d tailormade for her. They are able to make some of the dishes f r o m scratch. " I t ' s really very gratifying- doing food well and having p e o p l e appreciate it." Russcher said. D u r i n g t h e s u m m e r , s h e will teach classes out of her kitchen and return to her n i c k n a m e at P e d i ' s pastries: "pastry goddess."

Hope's Culinary Hopefuls Culinary aspirations of two Hope students Jen Troke

alternative to finishing Hope or as an option for later. She is also looking at w a y s to explore the world, such as a culinary school in Pasa-

dena. " O n e of my aspirations, at least P r o f e s s i o n a l c h e f s are not t h e at the m o m e n t , is to be a c h e f , " only o n e s at H o p e interested in the Ligtenberg culinary arts. said. Hope stuS h e thinks dents are also she would be into cooking. a career chef Most don't in an upscale have the farestaurant or cilities and own a bakopportunities ery. to c o o k t h a t "I m i g h t certified chefs get into behave, but they ing a pastry make do as chef, because best they can. it allows for a L e n e e lot of creativLigtenberg Lenee Ligtenberg ('04) i t y . " ('04) says exLigtenberg ercise is what got her interested in cooking. S h e said. For M a r i a n n e Hoyt ( ' 0 2 ) ; cookran in high school, and she was aling has been a ways hungry for something good. p a r t of l i f e " S o m e t i m e s to find good food, from a young you have to seek it out," Ligtenberg age. said. " M y family, Her interests in food h a v e been m y parents, pushed somewhat to the side since h a v e a lot of she came to Hope, though. friends from "1 tend to put it on hold during other counthe year, but I work at the Kletz, so tries." Hoyt it's kind of the feeling of f o o d . " said. Ligtenberg said. " R i g h t now, it's S o m e basically one of my hobbies." friends from S h e also looks at magazines to India c o m e evk e e p in touch with the world of Marianne ery year and food. S h e sees food as art. cook. Her famL i g t e n b e r g is c o n s i d e r i n g the ily began attempting Indian food culinary school at G r a n d R a p i d s themselves. C o m m u n i t y College, either as an SPOTUGHT EDITOR

T h e family tradition first got her i n t e r e s t e d in t h e c u l i n a r y a r t s . Hoyt's background is Italian, so she c o m e s f r o m a long line of good cooks. Hoyt said. At H o p e . Hoyt has kept up with cooking through a favorite magazine, along with reading recipes and watching the cooking channel. " I ' m o b s e s s e d with Food and Wine Magazine" Hoyt said. " T h a t is my goal- to write for that magazine." S h e took a trip during her time at the college that encouraged her interest in cooking as well. "I was really inspired by a trip I did to Paris last M a y . " Hoyt said. Hoyt has also pursued other interests, including creative writing. S h e w a s torn b e t w e e n e n t e r i n g graduate school to pursue a creative writing degree and heading to a culinary school. "I threw out all my grad school applications without thinking, and that w a s my answer," Hoyt said. " I ' m going to the French C u l i n a r y Institute [in N e w York] in the fall." She will enter a sixmonth accelerated program there. The first Hoyt ('02) three months will be s p e n t p r a c t i c i n g in the kitchen, and the last three months

. Todd Van Wieren, C E C

1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 cups corn flour 2/3 cups sugar 5 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon kosher s a l t 1 large egg 1 1/3 cups milk 5 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 teaspoon bacon drippings 1 cup cheddar cheese 3 tablespoons jalapeno, seeded and chopped

1. Preheat oven to 350. 2. Combine flours, sugar, baking powder and salt in large bowl. 3. Lightly beat egg, then whisk in milk, butter and bacon drippings in small bowl. 4. Pour wet ingredients in the flour mixture and mix until smooth. 5. Fold in cheddar cheese and jalapenos. 6. Transfer into baking pan and bake 5 0 minutes, until golden brown.

In Love A food poem by M a r i a n n e Hoyt

This 15 not to say I'm not afraid fear drapes like a feather blanket or like an artichoke split doujn the center, the sharp leaf once nothing more than a commodity severed from duty to protect the one inch, tear shaped heart nouj left to be prepared soft alone on a flat rim white plate garnished ujithaslice of tomato, melted butter basil on the side

will be filled with cooking for the french restaurant connected to the school. F o r the summe r H o y t will11 . • i m x be c o o k ing at an upscale restaurant in Oxford, near her home in Ohio. She cooked two nights to audition for the j o b at the Governor's R o o m . T h e future plans will not overshadow past loves, however. Hoyt will continue in her creative writing, despite the busy months that

are sure to lie ahead. " I ' m going to still write," Hoyt said. " B u t there^s con-

/7b find good food, you have^*™ (£& nectin to seek it out. ^ ^ and a nL -Lenee Ligtenberg ('04) c e s s i t y about eating and about sharing in a meal, and I just feel really passionate about it." W h e t h e r running, writing or something completely different, Hoyt and Ligtenberg can agree on one thing: food is an art, and it takes creativity and persistence.


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A p r i l 17, 2 0 0 2

Lake Mac has problems but solutions too Erica Heeg I N F O C U S EDITOR

M a n y m a y r e a l i z e thai L a k e M a c a l a w a isn't the cleanest lake around but probably didn't k n o w that it is the sight of intense environmental work and c l e a n u p efforts. "The state of Michigan collected s a m p l e s f r o m various lakes, ran them through the lab, and discovered L a k e Macatawa had a phosp h o r u s p r o b l e m , " said G r a h a m Peaslee, p r o f e s s o r of geological and environmental sciences. "We had a lot of phosphorus; it's probably o n e of the highest in the state of Michigan." According to Peaslee the lake used to be different: in 1927 an eighty-pound c a r p was caught in Lake M a c a t a w a . "There are no longer 8 0 lb c a r p because the lake is not that healthy, and the reason it's not that healthy is because it's called eutrophic," Peaslee said. "Eutrophic means nutrient rich, too many nutrients...and to you and I that means too much fertilizer." T h e L a k e M a c a t a w a watershed is 5 0 - 6 0 percent agriculture, according to Peaslee. A n d , for farmers, fertilization is necessary. T h e w a t e r s h e d is t o p o g r a p h i c a l l y d e f i n e d h e r e as t h e a r e a around L a k e M a c a l a w a where any drop of water hilling the g r o u n d w o u l d u l t i m a t e l y g e t to L a k e Macatawa. T h e watershed includes 100,000 acres in Southern O t t a w a and Northern Allegan counties. " T h i s i n c r e a s e in n u t r i e n t s causes...algae blooms and things like this which basically reduces the water quality," said Jonathan P e t e r s o n , p r o f e s s o r of e n v i r o n mental science. "It's primarily affecting s u r f a c e water, its uses, recreational things...also the ecosystem. Algae growth takes away oxygen f r o m fish and other things in the water." Pollution w a s really bad in the late 'GO's and early 'TO's and c o n s eq u e n t l y , says Peterson, in the ' 7 0 s some major regulations and laws were passed, specifically the Clean Water Act. "Part of that w a s the regulation of point sources—point sources are literally l h a l - s o m e t h i n g you can point to where you see discharge or contamination c o m i n g out...like a factory's discharge," Peterson said. "Point source regulation has been very effective. In the last 25 years w e h a v e reduced the c o n t a m i n a t i o n and h a v e essentially

m . ANCHOR

P H O T O BY

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Sludge and run-off pool along the shores of Lake Macatawa. While the water quality has improved considerably since the '70s, in recent years high levels of phosphorus have been found in the lake, affecting plant and animal life. cleaned u p a lot of the surface water." Peaslee agrees. "Since the ' 7 0 s water quality has improved considerably. T h e lake is m u c h cleaner in t e r m s of toxins; there is very little D D T or mercury being a d d e d , " Peaslee said. Also, according to Peaslee, environmental indicators have turned around; the n u m b e r s of hawks really c a m e u p f r o m the '70s, which means m o r e fish. " W e h a v e b e e n v e r y g o o d at regulating the c o n t a m i n a n t s from point sources. We can't get much better on the point sources. N o w the challenge is what w e call non-point sources or runoff from parking lots, a g r i c u l t u r a l f i e l d s , and r o a d s , " Peterson said. In 1996, the M a c a t a w a Area C o ordinating Council ( M A C C ) agreed to oversee a comprehensive watershed project aimed at reducing the l e v e l of p h o s p h o r u s in t h e M a c a t a w a Watershed. The M A C C f o r m e d a partnership with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality ( M D E Q ) . " T h e M D E Q is lending technical expertise to water quality sampling and data collection, and is

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P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

A dead fish lies on the shores of Lake Mac; phosphorus increases algae growth, taking away oxygen f r o m fish.

so it's time to get back into groundwater," Peterson said. Both professors also claim that it's easy for any student, science m a j o r or not, to get involved. " S t u d e n t s can begin by getting involved in our environmental scie n c e minor p r o g r a m at Hope. In those courses w e talk a lot about solving problems technically,"

acting as a liaison to the U S EPA w h o is f u n d i n g part of this watershed," said M A A C ' s website. M A A C , a nongovernmental and non-for-profit organization, began in 1999 and is a ten year program with the goal of reducing phosphorus by s e v e n t y - p e r c e n t in L a k e M a c a t a w a by 2 0 0 9 . • " S o the state is involved, agricultural groups are involved, municipal townships, etc are involved in t r y i n g to r e c t i f y this s i t u a t i o n , "

our e c o n o m y and our society. W e have to do this in a careful and prudent manner." In addition to agricultural problems, the Macalawa watershed only has o n e lake, which is an unusual topography. "That means there is nothing to s l o w a p a r t i c l e of dirt that gels washed d o w n the river here all the way into the lake. We have very mobile soil, and when it rains the river gets b r o w n really quickly,"

Peterson said. H e r m a n Miller Inc., Holland Country Club, H o p e College, and Zeeland T o w n s h i p are among the many of M A C C ' s c o m m u n i t y part-

Peaslee said. Peaslee adds that M A C C is tryGES. ing to educate the c o n s u m e r about " A n environmental studies prosoil testing and retention ponds. g r a m For the w h i c h is past 7 non-sciy e a r s e n c e oriPeterson ented and has been includes working the phion labolosophy ratory exof e n v i p e r i ronmenm e n t s t i o n tal s t e w " * t h a t will -Jonathan Peterson^) ^ ardship h e l p us and the undersociological aspects of the environstand how to cleanup contaminated ment is emerging as well," Peterson groundwater, particularly regarding

ners. "Basically, everybody's working together to try and to do it the right way," Peaslee said. Both professors say that M A C C is implementing a series of B M P s (Best Management Practices), which are ways to reduce the input of fertilizers into the water. Best m a n a g e m e n t practices might include suggestions for farmers to try d i f f e r e n t c r o p rotation techniques and m a y include state matching money. P e a s l e e , w h o is in c h a r g e of M A C C ' s technical subcommittee is looking at the technical aspects and prioritizing what needs to be d o n e first and foremost. " T h e r e are so many things to d o ; you d o n ' t want to wait forever to . have s o m e results," Peaslee said. Lake M a c a t a w a ' s problem certainly isn't unique. Peterson says that the Clean Water Act is up for r e a u t h o r i z a t i o n in the U.S. C o n gress, and o n e of the sticking points is non-point sources. " H o w do you regulate not-point sources in an intelligent e c o n o m i c and effective way? It's not as easy as the point sources and agriculture will be a f f e c t e d , " Peterson said. "Agriculture is very important to

Peterson said. A l s o o f f e r e d is a public policy course: environmental public policy, which is cross-listed with economics and political science and

state is involved, agricultural groups are involved, and municipal townships are involved in trying to rectify this situ a-

fuel c o n t a m i n a n t s , g a s o l i n e contaminants, spills from underground storage tanks. "This s u m m e r will be the first s u m m e r I ' m taking a turn in the research, and I'll actually be invest i g a t i n g the g r o u n d w a t e r in the Macatawa watershed," Peterson said. " N o w this will not be for petroleum contaminants, but it will be looking at nutrient contaminantsnitrates and phosphates which are f r o m fertilizers." Peterson says that the surface water has been studied extensively, and the connection between surface water and groundwater is just beginning to be realized. " T h e last t h o r o u g h s t u d y of groundwater was published in 1958

said. Peaslee says that students can do a lot in terms of the sciences: research, s u m m e r related p r o j e c t s , volunteer organizations, and especially education. " T h e w a y t h e M A A C is a p proaching this is they are going to educate at the K-12 level because those are the people you have to c a t c h . S o m e d a y they'll be landowners," Peaslee said. "They are always looking for volunteers; I ' m looking for volunteers to read rain gauges. I encourage everyone to be a w a r e of what's going on." H e adds that something even as simple as voting in a local election can m a k e a difference for the future of H o l l a n d ' s Lake Macalawa.


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Aric±vor

A p r i l 17, 2 0 0 2 Rob Ondra

L O O K AT T H I S , I D O N ' T G E T I T

A Sludge Tour of Lake Macatawa

Photo Editor

e d g e s and e n t a n g l e d in the grass,

'rust d u s t ' that settled u p o n

m e n t of taking pictures o f the

h o w e v e r was the g r i m e I had set

H o l l a n d and the i m m e d i a t e area a

s l u d g e which f o r m s a fine

o u t to find. Aside f r o m the more natural b u i l d u p of twigs, leaves

few years back. Several p o o l s of this w a t e r had

and grasses, there w a s f o r s o m e

f o r m e d , r e f l e c t i n g the late a f t e r n o o n sun with a n iridescence

H a v i n g received the assign-

layer o n L a k e M a c a t a w a , I set o f f last T u e s d a y t o c o m p l e t e

s

C o n t i n u i n g n o w to w h e r e R i v e r A v e n u e crosses the M a c a t a w a

by. I d o u b t s h e ' s evpr seen the g r i m e that c l o g s L a k e M a c a t a w a

River, I noticed a rather large fish

have.

that w a s c a m p e d out o n the land, well picked over. M o r e pictures

The Wastewater Treatment Facility m a y filter out raw

o f the fish and the m a r v e l o u s

s e w a g e a n d the like so that we d o n ' t i m m e d i a t e l y keel over

the task set b e f o r e m e . T u e s d a y w a s the first truly nice d a y of

r e a s o n , an area that w a s an unhealthy s h a d e of light green

spring; the sun w a s s h i n i n g

and o n e of m y s t e r i o u s tan. T h e

usually reserved for e r o t i c beetle shells. T h i s intrigued me, so I

w h i c h kept the c l o u d s that had

w a t e r in the river p r o p e r w a s a

m o v e d in closer to get a g o o d

crossed the bridge, I realized that

haunted Western M i c h i g a n for

m u d d y b r o w n . T h a t m a d e sense,

picture. W h i l e I w a s w a l k i n g over

the last m o n t h at bay. C a m e r a

as it had rained the day b e f o r e . I

•litter f o r m s a sort of a border b e t w e e n civilization (the bridge)

b a g s over both s h o u l d e r s , I started my q u e s t , w a l k i n g

s n a p p e d a f e w pictures of w h a t e v e r w a s in the w a t e r with

north o n C o l u m b i a A v e n u e to

both c a m e r a s . T h e n I saw s o m e t h i n g new. T h e r e w e r e t w o otters building a

M a c a t a w a River. T h e rancid f r a g r a n c e of the Holland Area Wastewater T r e a t m e n t Facility w a f t e d on the chill s p r i n g breeze. An old red brick b u i l d i n g stood a l o n g the"waterfront, l o n g s i n c e a b a n d o n e d . It had a n e w e r , w o o d e n w a l k w a y built a r o u n d

nest, in b e t w e e n the g r e e n and tan water. I also g r a b b e d a picture of t h e m b e f o r e I left. I w o n d e r e d

array of litter and f i l t h ' w e r e stored in my c a m e r a s . As I

. the d e a d f o l i a g e , I felt a bit like

dead f r o m d r i n k i n g the water, but c a n they c a t c h all of the pesticides and fertilizers that H o p e C o l l e g e and m a n y individual residents like to p o u r

and nature (the river). I m a d e my w a y across the

Luke Skywalker wading through the Death S t a r ' s g a r b a g e pit. F r o m w h a t I c o u l d tell, the p i p e

o n their l a w n s f r o m spring t o a u t u m n ? H o w a b o u t all the rock

street to W i n d m i l l P a r k , which is

salt that is d u m p e d o n roads

o p p o s i t e Pfizer. I still w o n d e r w h a t c o m e s out of that large,

originated at the W a s t e w a t e r T r e a t m e n t Facility. 1 w o n d e r e d h o w treated o u r w a s t e w a t e r really is. L o o k i n g back t h e w a y I c a m e , 1

c o n c r e t e d r a i n p i p e that is well

every winter? There's a whole lot m o r e than that. W e c a n ' t

f e n c e d o f f . T h e d o c k area of W i n d m i l l Park is a l m o s t c o m -

really avoid it either. Water is essential t o life, and

pletely c o v e r e d in sludge. M o s t of the solid matter is m a d e u p of

tap w a t e r c o m p o s e s the m a j o r i t y of e v e r y drink in P h e l p s with the

v a r i o u s pieces of trees and s o m e

e x c e p t i o n of milk.

w h a t it w a s like to live in per-

noticed a n o t h e r pipe, this one

petual toxicity. F u r t h e r d o w n the path, 1 c a m e

concrete. It w a s slightly h i d d e n b y a rise in the t o p o g r a p h y . I

a c r o s s the first of several drain/

inspected this o n e and f o u n d it to

garbage, all of w h i c h w a s c o v e r e d

o f industrial s e w a g e hell are w e

S o I ' m w o n d e r i n g : W h a t kind

it s o p e o p l e c o u l d g a z e u p o n

runoff pipes l e a d i n g into the river.

be e m i t t i n g t h e tan liquid I s a w

in a f i l m of s o m e t h i n g industrial.

the river. I look that path with

A s i m p l e steel pipe, e m b e d d e d in

collecting near the otters' d e n .

the a s s u m p t i o n that it w o u l d lead m e directly to t h e afore-

c o n c r e t e with a loose-fitting c a p o n the e n d , it looked like it w a s a

Disgusted (and h u n g r y , as it w a s n o w six o ' c l o c k ) , 1 h e a d e d

setting o u r s e l v e s up f o r ? O n e r e o c c u r r i n g thought I had during

m o v e d on. I had my s e c o n d

back to H o p e , I c o u l d i m a g i n e a

my w a l k w a s that of the w h o l e

e n c o u n t e r with w i l d l i f e as I s a w t w o d u c k s sitting o n t h e s u r f a c e

tour g u i d e driving a r o u n d t o w n ,

incident with G E and the

commenting on how Holland has not only it's s h a r e of solid waste,

H u d s o n R i v e r back h o m e in N e w York State. O n c e its there,

but an a b u n d a n c e of liquid

e v e n by d r e d g i n g or w h a t e v e r your f a v o r i t e f o r m of industrial

mentioned sludge. I guessed

o v e r f l o w pipe. Water w a s f l o w i n g

right. S u r r o u n d e d by the tall,

f r o m it, but s o m e t h i n g a b o u t the

I took s o m e m o r e p i c t u r e s and

b r o w n grass that g r o w s along r i v e r b a n k s w a s a little c l e a r i n g .

situation s e e m e d out of place. P e r h a p s it w a s t h e fact that e v e r y t h i n g this w a t e r trickled

of t h e river. I w a s g o i n g to take a picture of t h e m , but they s a w m e first a n d hastily left, c r y i n g

pollution c o m b i n i n g for a truly

A g o o d portion o f this w a t e r

o v e r w a s a hearty fust color. Dirt, g a r b a g e , r o c k s , plants, e v e r y -

squalid e f f e c t . M y faith in h u m a n i t y w a s

t o x i c w a s t e r e m o v a l is, it can

w a s surprisingly clear: I c o u l d

furiously, w h a t I can only translate as ' f i l t h y h u m a n ! filthy h u m a n ! ' I met t h e m later o n ,

restored w h e n a girl in a w h i t e car

will e v e n t u a l l y f i n d a h o m e in

d i g g i n g for f o o d a m o n g s t the

rolled her w i n d o w d o w n and s h o u t e d ' H e y s e x y ! ' as I w a l k e d

s o m e o n e ' s b a c k y a r d . T h e only

see d o w n to the b o t t o m , w h i c h c o u l d n ' t h a v e b e e n m o r e than half a f o o t . Built up a l o n g the

thing. W h a t w a s c o m i n g o u t of this p i p e ? 1 later w o n d e r e d if it w a s related to the m y s t e r i o u s

probably poisonous muck.

only b e s h u f f l e d a r o u n d , but it

q u e s t i o n is w h o s e ?

Boulder, C o l o r a d o . . . w h e r e great things happen!

Classified Want to get away from Michigan for the summer? Work hard, gain great experience, earn $8,000 a summer! Call 1-800-5097080 Hey Zipperheads! Let's rumble.

Amy- Sorry about the monkeys. Hope your back gets better- N Maybe god is a plastic container. That's the most emo thing I've ever heard.

Career

Opportunities

A r c y o u g r a d u a t i n g w i t h a »c»cnti(ic d e g r e e ? U s e y o u r biology, c h e m i s t r y o r b o c h e m i i t r y k n o w l e d g e t o d e v e l o p life-saving p h a r m a c e u t i c a l s .

Ji

Live, w o r k a n d p l a y tn t h e R o c k y M o u n t a i n s w h e r e t h e q u a l i t y o f life is s e c o n d t o n o n e C o m e join o u r t e a m of w o r l d - c l a s s scientists a n d m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e For tnvrediatc c o n s i d e r a d o n . send your riwmt lo

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Ultimate teams advance to regionals Both men's and w o m e n ' s ultimate teams place third at sectional tournament.

the w o m e n ' s t e a m . "It w a s the best t o u r n a m e n t I ' v e e v e r b e e n to w i t h t h e w o m e n ' s t e a m , " said S a m S a n d r o ( ' 0 2 ) . T h r o u g h o u t the day, the m e n defeated Eastern M i c h i g a n University 15-5, University of M i c h i g a n B 151, C a l v i n C o l l e g e 12-10, Western

In the true spirit of the g a m e , both the H o p e C o l l e g e M e n ' s and Women's Ultimate teams , o v e r c a m e m u d d y fields and

M i c h i g a n U n i v e r s i t y 15-5 and fell to U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n A 1512 and M i c h i g a n S t a t e University 15-10 in t w o very c l o s e

1

solid d i v i s i o n I o p p o n e n t s U

games. Against M S U , Hope was t e m p o r a r i l y c o n f u s e d by an

for regional competition, ^ e a c h p l a c i n g third in their re- \ spective sectional tourna-

unorthodox zone defense

m e n t s last Saturday. Each team

and fell behind early, be-

used a c o m b i n a t i o n of inten-

ing forced to play catch up

sity, f u n , and t e a m w o r k in or-

for t h e rest o f the g a m e . In

d e r to win. t4 I t h o u g h t we p l a y e d really well, and the k e y s w e r e that

H o p e o n c e again fell b e h i n d

victorius against C a l v i n 11-4, Uni-

players returning, but new m e m -

v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n B 11-2, a n d Western 8 - 4 ( t i m e c a p ) , b u t lost to

b e r s of the t e a m , e v e n p e o p l e w h o

big t e a m s . " " I j u s t w a n t t o h a v e f u n , and play

h a v e n e v e r t h r o w n a disc b e f o r e are

well a s a t e a m . I d o n ' t think w e ' d

U of M g r a d u a l l y pulled away, but H o p e missed several

M S U 11-4, a n d to U n i v e r s i t y o f

h a v e any p r o b l e m getting into t h e

M i c h i g a n A 11-5.

a l w a y s w e l c o m e at practices. " E v e n t h o u g h w e are r e g i o n a l

c h a n c e s in the e n d z o n e that

E a c h t e a m is l o o k i n g f o r w a r d t o d o i n g well at regionals, and t o w a r d

c o n t e n d e r s , w e are a l w a y s l o o k i n g for p e o p l e w h o w a n t to play, j u s t

t o p 8 at r e g i o n a l s , " J o h n s o n said. " I t ' s a b i g g e r t o u r n m e n t , just bec a u s e it c o u l d end o u r season any-

next y e a r ' s s e a s o n . T h e m e n espe-

talk

t i m e . You w a n t to g o o u t and play

D i e k e m a , or m y s e l f , " said G o u p e l l ,

really hard a n d m a k e it y o u r best

" W e ' r e d e f m a t e l y a n up a n d c o m ing team, considering how we

e f f o r t . Its g o i n g to b e t o u g h , b u t I think o n any g i v e n day, w h o e v e r

lying a 5 - 0 run b e f o r e halftime.

t e a m , " said m e n ' s c o captain Brad Johnson ('03). " I t w a s t h e best w e ' v e ever played

the s e m i f i n a l s against U of M , b y a s c o r e of 7 - 2 , b e f o r e ral-

w e p l a y e d t o g e t h e r as a

c o u l d h a v e m a d e u p the difas a t e a m ,

A M C M O f f P H O T O BY J O H N R O D S T R O M

Tony Cappa ('02) lays out for a disc to score against the University of Michigan.

ference. " U of M w a s r e a l l y s c a r e d , it

to

Brad

Johnson,

Ken

w e ' v e h a d the w h o l e t e a m t o g e t h e r for a tournament," said Clay

c a m e d o w n to t h e w i r e . W e j u s t

cially a r e l o o k i n g to gain e x p e r i e n c e to m a k e a n e v e n better r u n

b l e w o u r last c h a n c e , " said J o h n

next year. T h e y will only lose o n e

Cressler ('03)

Goupell ('04).

senior, T o n y C a p p a ( ' 0 2 ) , this y e a r

p l a y e d against M S U and U o f M . It

w i n s is j u s t w h o e v e r w a n t s it

and h a v e several y o u n g p r o m i s i n g

j u s t s h o w s that we c a n play with

m o r e , " G o u p e l l said.

it w a s t h e first t i m e this s e a s o n

T h e s e n t i m e n t w a s the s a m e for

O n the w o m e n ' s side, H o p e w a s

Flying Dutchmen baseball extends winning streak BJ Maas's grand slam lifts Hope past Aquinas College

that d i d n ' t s e e m t o a f f e c t him a s he

e n c e r e c o r d r e m a i n s at 6 - 0 s i n c e

a p p r o a c h e d the p l a t e o n T u e s d a y

A q u i n a s is n o n - c o n f e r e n c e .

evening. With the b a s e s l o a d e d , H o p e

T h e g a m e t u r n e d into a slugfest

until the sixth inning, w h e n H o p e r e s p o n d e d to an A q u i n a s run with a

three-run

homer

by

Eric

trailing 10-7, and the s c h o o l ' s

f r o m the very first inning, and the lead w o u l d c h a n g e four times

Mackenzie (404). Clisby Jarred ( l 0 3 ) w a s then d r i v e n in to e x t e n d

record w i n n i n g streak on the line,

t h r o u g h o u t the a f t e r n o o n . A q u i n a s

Maas

M a a s ' s big hit secured t h e victory. Hope cycled through four pitchers d u r i n g the g a m e . A n d r e w Vlasek ( 4 05) pitched s e v e n innings, giving u p f i v e hits a n d striking out three, but it w a s M i k e Billingsley

w e n t up 2 - 0 in the first inning o n

H o p e ' s lead to 7 - 3 . Aquinas would overthrow the

It is e v e r y little l e a g u e p l a y e r ' s

c e n t e r f i e l d , r e m o v i n g any d o u b t o f

two solo h o m e runs,

H o p e would

H o p e d e f e n s e in their final t w o at -

d r e a m to b e a b l e t o hit a g r a n d slam

w h e t h e r the streak w o u l d c o n t i n u e

s c o r e a run in t h e s e c o n d inning,

bats, h o w e v e r , s c o r i n g s e v e n r u n s

final inning. T h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n will travel

in t h e b o t t o m of t h e ninth with t w o

or n o t , g i v i n g H o p e an 1 1 - 1 0

then K y l e T r a p p ( 4 0 5 ) a n d Justin

o f f f i v e hits a n d a f e w H o p e e r r o r s

to A d r i a n this w e e k e n d f o r an

Kribs ('04) would be waved home

t o m a k e t h e s c o r e 1 0 - 7 in t h e

M I A A tripleheader against the

in the third t o put H o p e up 3-2. The game would remain close

b o t t o m of the ninth. A f t e r H o p e loaded the bases with two outs.

Adrian

o u t s t o win t h e g a m e .

H o p e first

b a s e m a n B.J. M a a s ( ' 0 3 ) m a y not h a v e d o n e that in little league, but

cranked

a

shot

over

victory. T h e w i n put H o p e ' s o v e r a l l record at 19-3, w h i l e their c o n f e r -

Ben DeHaan

M a a s ' s ( ' 0 3 ) g r a n d slam in the last inning g a v e H o p e the win over A q u i n a s and put their

Unbreakable?

his t e a m in a m e e t i n g last fall, he d i s c u s s e d typical issues: o f f season w o r k o u t s , tryouts,

w i n n i n g streak at 17.

1936. T h a t ' s a total of 7 5 titles in

s c o r e a s i n g l e point against

a row. the m o s t by any c o l l e g e

Kalamazoo. His team enters

sport. K a l a m a z o o has not b e e n totally f l a w l e s s in their w i n n i n g

t o d a y ' s m a t c h at 8-7 overall, with a 2 - 0 M I A A record. " T h i s is the first year that

etc. O n e t h i n g h e m a d e sure not

streak, t h o u g h . In 1962. the H o r n e t s lost an M I A A dual match

to l e a v e o u t . t h o u g h , w a s a

to H o p e . T h e D u t c h m e n w e r e

e v e r y person o n the t e a m b e l i e v e s they c a n b r e a k the

p i e c e of N C A A history. " I ' v e a l w a y s told R a y S m i t h ,

u n a b l e to take d o w n K a l a m a z o o

streak," Gorno

H o p e C o l l e g e ' s Athletic

in the c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p i o n s h i p s , h o w e v e r , giving the H o r n e t s a

" W e u n d e r s t a n d that b e i n g m e n t a l l y t o u g h is the m o s t

Director, that I plan to c o a c h

s h a r e of the title and a l l o w i n g

m e n ' s tennis at H o p e until I either die, get fired, o r beat

t h e m t o k e e p their record alive. W h e n K - Z o o takes the court

i m p o r t a n trait a team n e e d s t o h a v e against K a l a m a z o o . In

Kalamazoo. However. I don't plan o n d y i n g or getting fired

against H o p e today, they will b e l o o k i n g to take the first step t o w a r d s their 76th title. T h a t is,

a n y t i m e s o o n , s o it looks like there is only o n e w a y o u t o f h e r e . " G o r n o laughed. T h e H o r n e t s have w o n the M I A A title e v e r y year s i n c e

unless G o r n o ' s D u t c h m e n h a v e a n y t h i n g to say about it. In his ten years c o a c h i n g H o p e tennis, G o r n o has not been a b l e t o

Gametime

bj. mnns

xtra When Hope men's tennis coach Steve Gorno addressed

Bulldogs.

b e g i n s F r i d a y at 4 p.m.

ANCHOR ALL-STAR

T H E EXTRA POINT

Sports editor

( ' 0 5 ) w h o picked up the win in the

explained.

the past, they h a v e a l w a y s w o n the key points w h e n they a p p e a r e d , and I feel that if w e win t h o s e key points, it's going to be a d i f f e r e n t result. T h e t e a m is w a l k i n g into the match t o m o r r o w with the heart that they can d o it....they c a n w i n . "

HOPE COLLEGE

Non-Profil

ANCHOR

Organization

141 E I 2 T H S T

U.S. P o s t a g e

P O B O X 9000 H O L L A N D Ml 49422-9000

PAID Hope College


04-17-2002