__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Net assets CHANGEOUT Minor league hockey finds its zone in South Carolina

SC FE ATURE

Riding the rails SC RECIPE

JANUARY 2020

Slow cooker entrees


BATMOBILE? BUCKET TRUCK.

We’re not your typical energy company, we’re a local, not-for-profit electric cooperative. That’s because we don’t have customers, we have members. Putting people first is our super power. To learn more about the cooperative difference, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 74 • NUMBER 1 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 600,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

2020 | jan

16 Riding the rails Two men, one engine and more freight than you can count. Ride along with the crew of the Greenville & Western Railway, one of the state’s thriving short line railroads.

Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITORS

Walter Allread, Josh Crotzer PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

4 CO-OP NEWS

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

Updates from your cooperative

DESIGNER

6 AGENDA

Susan Collins

Applications are now available for the 2020 Jenny Ballard Opportunity Scholarships.

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas

10 DIALOGUE Telling stories from the heart The new year is full of opportunities to tell the old stories that define who we are and remind us that anything is possible.

CONTRIBUTORS

Jennifer Becknell, April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Kevin Dietrich, Abe Hardesty, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Maria Kanevsky, Patrick Keegan, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Jenna Schiferl, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

12 ENERGY Q&A Start the new year with energy savings Tips that can keep your family comfortable and your energy bills low throughout the year.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green

14 SMART CHOICE The heat is on

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

21 STORIES Open to interpretation What do you see when you gaze upon the work of metal sculptor Bob Doster? The artist would like to know.

22

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2020. The Electric Cooperatives

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

SCENE

Hooked on hockey Die-hard fans and up-and-coming players bring a passion for ice hockey to South Carolina.

28

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

TRAVELS

Telling the Cherokee story Experience a rich heritage and culture with each exhibit and artifact at Walhalla’s Museum of the Cherokee in South Carolina.

30

RECIPE

Slow cooker entrees Relax and enjoy more quality time with the family when you serve these slow cooker recipes from Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan.

32

30

GARDENER

A dragon for all seasons Closely related to citrus trees, Poncirus trifoliata Flying Dragon shrubs are full of year-round surprises.

34 36 38 Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR

Net assets

HUMOR ME

Minor league hockey finds its zone in South Carolina

Auto motives When the car won’t start on those cold winter mornings, you can always call on humor columnist Jan A. Igoe. FRO M TO P: M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER; JO H N G I LLESPI E; M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

SC FE ATURE

Riding the rails SC RECIPE

Slow cooker entrees JANUARY 2020

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

22

Fight back against the winter chill with these sizzling gadgets.

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

Greenville Swamp Rabbits defenseman Chad Duchesne blocks an opposing player’s attempt on the goal during a minor league hockey game against in-state rival the South Carolina Stingrays. Photo by John Gillespie.


SC | agenda BY THE NUMBERS

Alexa, how much are you costing me? The numbers tell the tale: Americans love their smart speakers and those oh-so-handy “digital assistants” that let us turn off the lights, listen to the news and order food simply by using voice commands.

66.4 million

40% Share of users who have more than one smart speaker in the home.

2014 The year smart speakers became available.

$25 to $180 Retail price for smart speaker systems ranging from the most basic to the most advanced.

$6.93 Approximate cost of electricity needed to play your favorite music at full volume through an Amazon Echo, nonstop, for one year. Rock on, Alexa. —MARIA KANEVSKY

WA LTER A LLRE A D

$3.15 Approximate cost of the electricity needed to operate an Amazon Echo smart speaker in standby mode for one year.

WOMEN RETURNING TO SCHOOL to earn college degrees may now apply for financial assistance from the 2020 Jenny Ballard Opportunity Scholarship program. Sponsored by South Carolina Women Involved in Rural Electrification (SCWIRE), a service organization associated with South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives, the scholarship is a one-time award based on financial need and personal goals. In 2019, Linda Cohen, a Laurens Electric Cooperative member, and Christine Sawyer, a Pee Dee Electric Cooperative member, each earned $2,500 awards. For Cohen, the scholarship was a chance to restart her business education. She left Greenville Tech 36 years ago when she married and had her first child. Scholarship funds are helping her earn a bachelor’s in business administration from Strayer University, and she plans to continue her education by earning an MBA. Sawyer used her scholarship to pay tuition at Francis Marion University where she is studying pre-pharmacy and chemistry. Her ultimate goal is to ­complete pharmacy school. Applicants for the program must: u Be a member of a South Carolina ­electric cooperative. u Have graduated from high school or earned a GED at least 10 years ago. u Be accepted into an accredited S.C. college or university. u Demonstrate financial need and clear academic goals.

WA LTER A LLRE A D

Number of Americans who own a smart speaker device and have the ability to summon a digital assistant like Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant to do their bidding.

Apply now for 2020 WIRE scholarships

ALL SMILES Linda Cohen, top, and Christine Sawyer are recipients of the 2019 WIRE scholarships.

The deadline for applications is June 1, 2020. Recipients will receive scholarships for the Fall 2020 or Spring 2021 semester, with funds paid directly to the college or university.

ECHO DOT BY A M A ZO N

To apply for the 2020 scholarship, visit ecsc.org/content/wire-scholarship and fill out the online form. Paper forms are available at your local electric cooperative or can be downloaded as a PDF from SCLiving.coop/scholarship. Completed paper forms can be emailed to Peggy.Dantzler@ecsc.org, or mailed to Peggy Dantzler, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, 808 Knox Abbott Dr., Cayce, SC 29033.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Honoring all Fort Jackson soldiers The Gateway to the Army Association would like to thank South Carolina Living for publishing an article in its October 2019 issue about our Centennial Park project and our first fundraiser. The fundraiser, held on Nov. 13, was a great success as it was attended by more than 250 people and we were fortunate to exceed our fundraising goal by more than $10,000. Several of your readers responded to the article by purchasing granite pavers for the park’s “Pathway of Patriots” or by making a donation via our website gatewaytothearmy.org. Our association would also like to clarify that Centennial Park will honor all U.S. Army soldiers, volunteers and those who entered the Army via the military draft, who have trained or served at Fort Jackson since 1917. These patriots are deserving of this honor and our association is committed to seeing the project through to completion. Thanks again for your support! MARTIN WELLS, FOUNDING CHAIRMAN, GATEWAY TO THE ARMY ASSOCIATION

Centennial Park will honor all U.S. Army soldiers who have trained or served at Fort Jackson.

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Seafood and a C-note South Carolina Living and the Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival have teamed up to celebrate our state’s rich seafood tradition. Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival prize package, which includes two VIP tickets to the festival, a gift bag and admission to the Celebrity Chef Tour, Pig Pickin’ & Oyster Roast, and Seafood Sunday Brunch. One lucky winner’s name will be drawn at random from entries received by Jan. 31. Register online today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. For dates and details on all festival events, visit hiltonheadseafoodfestival.com.

Like us on Facebook If you love living in South Carolina as much as we do, like and follow us on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Join the fun at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

JANUARY

WRITE US Do you have a comment or question about the stories in

South Carolina Living magazine? Don’t keep it to yourself. Write us at Letters, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or letters@scliving.coop.

16 11:01 17 12:01 18 6:31 19 8:01 20 9:16 21 10:16 22 11:01 23 11:31 24 7:16 25 7:46 26 8:16 27 8:31 28 9:01 29 9:16 30 9:46 31 3:01

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

FEBRUARY 4:16 11:46 2:16 4:01 5:01 5:46 6:16 6:46 12:01 12:31 1:01 1:31 1:46 2:16 2:31 10:01

— 6:01 — 7:16 12:31 8:31 1:16 9:16 2:16 10:01 3:01 10:46 3:46 11:16 — 4:31 12:16 5:01 12:46 5:46 1:16 6:16 2:01 7:01 2:46 7:31 8:31 3:31 9:31 4:16 11:31 5:16

1 3:16 2 — 3 7:16 4 9:16 5 10:16 6 10:46 7 11:31 8 — 9 7:16 10 7:46 11 8:16 12 8:46 13 9:16 14 3:31 15 12:01 16 3:01

10:31 11:01 4:31 4:46 5:16 5:46 6:16 6:46 12:16 1:01 1:31 2:16 3:01 9:46 10:16 11:16

— 6:31 — 7:31 12:01 8:31 1:16 9:31 2:31 10:16 3:31 11:01 4:31 11:31 12:01 5:16 12:31 6:01 1:16 7:01 2:01 7:46 8:46 2:46 10:01 3:46 — 5:01 — 6:31 — 8:01

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS JAN. 16–FEB. 15

SOUTHERN SOUND SERIES JANUARY 18–APRIL 18

The popular Southern Sound Series returns to the McCelvey Center in York this month, with a powerhouse lineup of top bluegrass and Americana acts. Chatham County Line (right) starts the series on Jan. 18 with their inventive brand of bluegrass honed over 20 years and seven albums. Back by popular demand, Grammy Award-winners Steep Canyon Rangers will make their sixth appearance on the McCelvey Center stage Feb. 15. Next up is two-time IBMA entertainers of the year Balsam Range on March 21. And the Grammynominated all-female string band Della Mae closes out the series April 18 with their high-energy show. All concerts start promptly at 7:30 p.m., but the fun starts two hours before with Vittles & Fiddles, a pre-concert mini-festival on the McCelvey Center lawn.

THE COLOUR OF MUSIC JANUARY 29–FEBRUARY 1

Transport yourself back to the days when intellectuals congregated in salons for nights of conversation and to immerse themselves in culture, art and music. The Colour of Music series in Charleston will bring back that setting in historic buildings around the city to celebrate the best black classical musicians and composers currently performing in the United States. colourofmusic.org THE ROYAL HANNEFORD SHRINE CIRCUS FEBRUARY 6–9

RD

UE

chmuseums.org/southernsoundseries

PU

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, children of all ages—the Royal Hanneford Shrine Circus rolls into Columbia Feb. 6–9 with clowns, bejeweled dancers, performers doing awe-inducing stunts on motorcycles, plus lions, tigers and elephants to dazzle the crowd. Make plans now to attend one of the eight shows at Columbia’s Jamil Temple. RI

CK

THE AMERICAN HERITAGE FESTIVAL FEBRUARY 15–16

Throughout the Revolutionary War, Graham’s Farm near modern-day Lake City provided food and shelter for Patriot militia troops under Gen. Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion. There’s no better place to hold The American Heritage Festival, a weekend immersion into local military history, with Revolutionary War and WWII reenactments, Francis Marion artifacts, cannon and musket firings, a Colonial village and seminars from military historians. Admission is $15 for a full weekend of history that engages all the senses.

WINTERSKUNK MUSIC FEST

(904) 200-1232; theamericanheritagefestival.com

FEBRUARY 8

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 36, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

8

(803) 772-9380; jamilshriners.com

The groovy crew behind the long-running Albino Skunk music festivals are at it again with a new, one-day indoor fes-taa-vul at The Spinning Jenny music hall in Greer. There won’t be camping, but they will have food trucks and Upstate Brewing on tap to give festival-goers a skunky experience. The lineup includes Jacob Johnson, David Childers and Kyle Petty, the Henhouse Prowlers, Sierra Ferrell, Urban Soil, and the night closes out with Tuatha Dea (above). albinoskunk.com

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


ADVANCED DIGITAL HEARING AID TECHNOLOGY BUY 1 GET 1

FREE Reg: $399.98

Only $ 199 99

Each When You Buy a Pair – LIMITED TIME ONLY!

How can a digital hearing aid that costs only $19999 be every bit as good as one that sells for $2,400 or more?

“I was amazed! Sounds I hadn’t heard in years came back to me!” — Don W., Sherman, TX

The answer: Although tremendous strides have

been made in Advanced Digital Hearing Aid Technology, those cost reductions have not been passed on to you. Until now... MDHearingAid® uses the same kind of Advanced Digital Hearing Aid Technology incorporated into hearing aids that cost thousands more at a small fraction of the price. Over 350,000 satisfied MDHearingAid customers agree: High-quality, digital FDA-registered hearing aids don’t have to cost a fortune. The fact is, you don’t need to spend thousands for a digital hearing aid. MDHearingAid is a medical-grade digital hearing aid offering sophistication and high performance, and works right out of the box with no time-consuming “adjustment” appointments. You can contact a licensed hearing specialist conveniently online or by phone — even after your purchase at no cost. No other company provides such extensive support. Now that you know... why pay more?

Can a Hearing Aid Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s and Dementia? A study by the National Institute on Aging suggests older individuals with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s and dementia over time than those who retain their hearing. They suggest that an intervention — such as a hearing aid — could delay or prevent this by improving hearing!

45-DAY RISK-FREE TRIAL! If you are not completely satisfied with your MDHearingAids, return them within 45 days for a FULL REFUND!

For the Lowest Price Call

1-800-745-8205 www.MDBOGO.com

Use Code

JV48

and get FREE Batteries for 1 Year Plus FREE Shipping DOCTOR DESIGNED | AUDIOLOGIST TESTED | FDA REGISTERED

Proudly assembled in America!

Nearly Invisible

BATTERIES INCLUDED!


|

SC   dialogue

Sharing stories from the heart ON COLD WINTER DAYS IN THE YORK COUNTY

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

of my childhood, it was fun for us kids to lace up our waterproof duck boots and walk the wet ditches, stomping on the ice that spewed up out of the red clay. Sooner or later, the cold would catch up with me, and I would make a beeline for the fireplace in the den or the buck stove in the basement. I was rarely alone by the fire, as my parents, brother, grandparents, and other visiting relatives grabbed a chair, joined in the conversation, and enjoyed participatory snacks. I call them ­participatory because they required active eater engagement. The parched peanuts had to be shelled, the walnuts or pecans had to be cracked and picked, and—my favorite—the apple should be peeled so carefully that the peel was removed as a single continuous strip. And we talked. Folks recalled stories from their own childhoods. The recollections were generally uplifting, but occasionally a painful shared memory provided fresh insight into the power of childhood hurt. The bottom line was that we connected. Time seemed to slow down, and we stepped out of our hurriedness to embrace common experiences. There was power in those moments. I had a moment like that at a recent electric cooperative gathering, as a friend recalled a childhood story. The power of the recollection hangs with me now. My friend’s grandmother graduated from Winthrop College in 1906. Grace Edwards Buster was one of 14 graduating students studying to be teachers. Grace’s father, a Batesburg doctor, had died two years earlier from the third most common cause of death at that time, tuberculosis, even as he treated patients for the disease. Half of the state lived below the poverty line. One third were illiterate. Education was seen as a cure for all three, and Grace wanted to make a difference.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

She would later tell my friend, her grandson, that her most cherished memory was when Helen Keller gave the commencement address to that small class of young women. I ­immediately asked how Ms. Keller—who was blind, deaf and mostly mute—was able to speak to the audience. His grandmother had told him that Keller signed the speech to an assistant who then voiced the remarks. Drawing upon her vast reservoir of life experience, she assured them that “anything is possible.” Then Hellen Keller, herself still a young adult of 26, made the most extraordinary request of the school’s dean. “Could I touch the faces of the girls I just addressed?” she asked. She touched each girl with her fingers, tracing their faces into her memory, and in the process touched Grace Buster’s heart. That was the nugget of truth Keller wanted Grace to feel. As Keller had said, “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched; they must be felt with the heart.” Until her death in 1984, Grace was making a difference teaching school, leading the Women’s Missionary Society, organizing the Girl Scouts of America in Columbia or volunteering at the Baptist Medical Center. She was a force of nature. She was busy. But one day she gathered her grandchildren around her, slowed down and shared the memory of Ms. Keller touching her face and heart. A half-century later, the story inspired one grandchild to repeat the famous woman’s belief that “anything is possible.” As we start this new year, I hope you will join me in cracking some walnuts, peeling an apple and sharing a bit of ourselves with those we love.


#

Clip this offer to apply for coverage!

Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company and Companion Life Insurance Company...

Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 85*? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! >> Choose from 4 benefit levels - up to $25,000! >> Rates “lock-in” at the age you apply - never go up again!

NO medical exam!

Plus... Proceeds paid directly to your beneficiary

>> Call for your FREE all-by-mail application packet! >> Call TOLL-FREE

Builds cash value and is renewable up to age 100!**... Then automatically pays YOU full benefit amount!***

1-866-386-8005

Or apply online at

Policy cannot be canceled – EVER – because of changes in health!

www.MutualGuaranteedLife.com Why this policy? Why now? Our graded death benefit whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, final medical expenses...or other monthly bills. You know how important it can be to help protect your family from unnecessary burdens after you pass away. Maybe your own parents or loved one did the same for you. OR, maybe they DIDN’T and you sure wish they would have! The important thing is that, right now, you can make a decision that could help make a difficult time a little easier for your loved ones. It’s a responsible, caring and affordable decision. And, right now, it’s something you can do with one simple phone call. You may have been putting off purchasing life insurance, but you don’t have to wait another day. This offer is a great opportunity to help start protecting your family today.

NO health questions!

Your affordable monthly rate will “lock-in” at your application age* ... $3,000.00 Benefit

Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85

Male $10.45 $11.50 $14.20 $17.20 $20.50 $27.40 $37.00 $50.50

Female $8.80 $9.70 $11.95 $13.30 $16.00 $21.40 $30.10 $42.55

$5,000.00 Benefit

Male $16.75 $18.50 $23.00 $28.00 $33.50 $45.00 $61.00 $83.50

Female $14.00 $15.50 $19.25 $21.50 $26.00 $35.00 $49.50 $70.25

$10,000.00 $25,000.00 Benefit

Benefit

Male Female Male Female $32.50 $27.00 $79.75 $66.00 $36.00 $30.00 $88.50 $73.50 $45.00 $37.50 $111.00 $92.25 $55.00 $42.00 $136.00 $103.50 $66.00 $51.00 $163.50 $126.00 $89.00 $69.00 $221.00 $171.00 $121.00 $98.00 $301.00 $243.50 $166.00 $139.50 $413.50 $347.25

The rates above include a $12 annual policy fee.

This is a solicitation of individual insurance. A licensed insurance agent/producer may contact you by telephone. These

policies contain benefits, reductions, limitations, and exclusions to include a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership. In NY, during the first two years,

110% of premiums will be paid. Whole Life Insurance is underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, 3300 Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha, NE 68175 which is licensed nationwide except NY. Life insurance policies issued in NY are underwritten by Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788. Each company is responsible for its own financial and contractual obligations. Not available in all states. Benefit amounts vary by state. Policy Form ICC11L059P or state equivalent (7780L-0505 in FL, 828Y-0505 in NY). *Ages 50 to 75 in NY. **In FL policy is renewable until age 121. ***All benefits paid would be less any outstanding loan. 452747


|

SC   energy Q&A

Start the new year with energy savings

S P OT S W

HE

RE RC

AT O ST

AN

RN OF

G H TS W H

EN N OT I

E

NP O S S I B L E)

DO

R EF FICIE N CY

N’

HE

U

FO

ST

RU

vents and radiators aren’t blocked by ­furniture or other objects. If the floors feel cold even when the room is warm, put down area rugs for additional warmth. Open curtains and blinds to let the sunshine in, and close them at night. Enlist the help of an energy auditor or HVAC specialist to test for duct leakage and ensure your whole system is ­balanced and running efficiently. Make bright moves with your lights.

The obvious first step is to make sure lights are turned off when they’re not in use. You can do this manually or employ one of many automated strategies. If you’re still using incandescent bulbs, you could switch the five mostused bulbs to LEDs and save about $75 per year. LEDs last much longer and use about one-fourth as much energy. Prices on LED bulbs have decreased in the past few years, and you can

(

W

T

OB

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

US

AT

S

N

ER RE

C T H EAT S O U

E RC

S

save more if you buy them in packs. Over time, plan to replace all your old incandescent bulbs, and consider smart lighting options that can be programmed to turn off when a room is not in use. Eliminate drafts. Look carefully around your home for signs of air leaks. If you have a gap under an exterior door, you can block it with a towel, or better yet, install some weather stripping. Make sure windows are sealed with caulk, and you can also seal areas around plumbing and wiring penetrations. Taking some of these easy steps now should provide quick energy savings. To save even more, ask your local electric cooperative for advice on how to conduct an energy audit. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.

REFRIG ER ATO R: M A RCE L A GA R A / RESOU RCE M EDI A ; OTH ERS: DEPOS IT PH OTO

F LI

ET

12

N CE TE MP

tor and freezer aren’t set to a colder temperature than needed. The fridge should be at 38 F to 40 F and the freezer compartment should be 5 F. If you have a separate chest freezer, set it to 0 F. Also check your water heater setting. You should aim for a setting of 120 F. Old refrigerators and freezers can use a lot of electricity. If yours was made before 1993, you can save upward of $65 a year with a new Energy Star model. If you eliminate a second refrigerator or freezer, you can save even more, especially if they are stored in your garage. Maximize the heat you’ve got. Look around each room and make sure the

P LIA

Set refrigerator and freezer temps for efficiency. Make sure your refrigera-

AP

There are many steps you can take today to make sure your home stays comfortable this winter without draining your wallet. Adjust that thermostat. The first place to start is your home thermostat. In most homes, the largest portion of the energy bill goes toward heating and cooling. Setting back your thermostat by 7 to 10 degrees for eight hours a day can save you up to 10% a year on heating and cooling costs. In the winter, you could aim for 56 F at night and when no one is at home, and 68 F when you’re up and around. If you’re used to a warmer house, it may mean throwing on a sweater or pair of slippers. It should be noted this tactic is not as effective for some homes with radiant heat systems. If you have a manual thermostat and don’t always remember to adjust it, consider purchasing a smart thermostat, or at least one that’s programmable.

TU

S

Q A

My energy bills always seem to go out of control in winter. What can I do to stay warm and reduce my energy use?

ADJUST YO

UR

LEAK

TH

INATE

AI

BY PAT KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

M ER

IM EL


Enjoy the ease of

Showering Safely So you can stay in the home you love!

Upgrade your bathroom, upgrade your life. With a new walk-in shower, you can make sure your bathroom ages as gracefully as you do. This shower was designed by experts, with you in mind, focusing on safety and convenience when it matters most. Discover how a walk-in shower can help reduce the risk of falling, giving you the freedom to enjoy your bathroom again.

Introducing the

ALL NEW Walk-In Shower!

✓ Commercial Grade Non-Slip Floor ✓ Easy-to-reach Shower Wand ✓ Professionally Installed in 1 day ✓ Optional Built-in Seat or Fold Down Safety Seat ✓ Tru Temp Anti Scald Shower Valve ✓ Ergo L Shaped Grab Bar ✓ Lifetime Warranty ✓ Optional Barrier Free Wheelchair Accessible

Call today and receive exclusive savings of up to

$750 OFF FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

Call Toll-Free 1-888-593-4708

Call Now Toll-Free

1-888-593-4708

for more information and ask about our Senior Discounts

www.SafeStepShower.com With purchase of a new Safe Step Walk-In Shower. Not applicable with any previous walk-in shower purchase. No cash value. Must present offer at time of purchase. CSLB 983603 F13000002885 13HV08744300

FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT


|

SC   smart choice

The heat is on

WRAPPED IN WARMTH

When the weather gets icy, the sweaters come out and the heat gets turned up. In our world of ever-improving technology, there are now many ways to beat back the cold. Here you’ll find sizzling gadgets to keep you warm and toasty this winter. BY DAVID NOVAK

Take a warm coat, sew in five heating pads and a 7.4-volt lithium ion battery system, and you have the Gobi Heat Nomad Heated Jacket. With three settings and up to 9 hours of battery life, it gets your body heat up fast, all without a bulky design. The lightweight nylon shell is also wind and water resistant. $240. (801) 228‑1948; gobiheat.com.

SET THE MOOD

With a Touchstone AudioFlare Electric Fireplace, you can enjoy the ambience and the extra warmth of a crackling “fire” without the hassles of chopping wood or the risks of an open flame. In the 50-inch stainless version pictured here, LEDs provide a pleasing threecolor flame display, Bluetooth speakers will play your favorite tunes and a built-in 5,000 BTU heater can warm up to 400 square feet. $600. (800) 215‑1990; touchstonehomeproducts.com.

IN CONTROL

Install the Brilliant All-In-One Smart Home Control panel in place of a standard light switch and enjoy onetouch mastery over your home’s smart thermostat. The stylish interface also works with smart home systems for lighting, music, video cams and security systems—and it includes the virtual assistance services of Amazon’s Alexa. Together, you will rule the roost! $300. (855) 650‑0940; brilliant.tech.

TURN UP THE WARMTH

If a hot cup of coffee, tea or cocoa is your way to warm those winter bones, you need the Ember Mug 2. Use the app to program this 10-ounce mug to your preferred drinking ­temperature (anywhere between 120 F to 145 F), and the mug will keep the contents perfectly warm for you for up to 1.5 hours per charge or all day if you keep it on the included charging coaster. $100. (805) 870‑5658; ember.com. Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.

14

HANDS-ON

Think of Heat Factory’s Battery Powered Hand Warmer Muff as a utility belt for outdoor winter fun. Strap it around your waist and set the desired temperature (up to 130 degrees) for the soft, fleece-lined interior. The built-in 5-volt lithium ion battery pack can also be used to charge your mobile devices and a large frontzippered pouch keeps loose items close at hand. $160. (760) 893‑8300; heatfactory.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


New rate plans, now with more minutes!

Easier is better with the Jitterbug. The Jitterbug® Flip, from the creators of the original easy-to-use cell phone, has big buttons and an exclusive 5Star® Urgent Response button on the keypad. EASY TO USE Today, cell phones are hard to hear, difficult to dial Plans as low as Plans as low as and overloaded with features you may never use. That’s not the case with the Jitterbug Flip. A large screen and big buttons make it $ $ easy to call family and friends. The powerful speaker ensures every month conversation will be loud and clear. Plus, straightforward YES and NO buttons make navigating the menu simple.

Plans

as it low as and Plans EASY TO ENJOY Wherever you go, a built-in cameraPlans makes easy fun as forlow youasto capture and share your favorite memories. And a built-in reading magnifier with LED $ you need, the$ Jitterbug Flip flashlight helps you see in dimly lit areas. With all the features month month also comes with a long-lasting battery, so you won’t have to worry about running out of power.

Plans

1499 1499 $1 2

*

2

1499 1499 $1 2

2

Plans as low as**

Plans as low as

EASY TO BE PREPARED Life has a way of being unpredictable, but you can be prepared in any uncertain or unsafe situation with 5Star Service. Simply press the 5Star button $ $ to be connected immediately with a highly-trained Urgent Response Agent who will month confirm your location, evaluate your situation and get you the help you need, 24/7.

Plans

1499 1499 $1 2

The Jitterbug Flip is one of the most affordable cell phones on the market and comes with dependable nationwide coverage. Friendly customer service representatives will help figure out which phone plan is best for you, and with no long-term contracts or cancellation fees, you can switch plans anytime. You can even keep your current landline or cell phone number. For a limited time, get 25% off. Plus, get more minutes with our great new rate plans! Powered by the nation’s largest and most dependable wireless network. NO LONG-TERM CONTRACTS No cancellation fees

1

Why the Jitterbug Flip is your best choice for a new cell phone: phone: No Nocontracts long-term to sign, ever contracts

Keep youryour current Keep current phone number phone number

To order or learn more, call

1-800-650-5210

powered Free U.S.-based No hidden Brain Games Affordable, Free U.S.-based No hidden fees fees by Posit Science® customer serviceservice monthlymonthly customer flexible plans

or visit us at

greatcall.com/Flip

¹25% off of 99⁹⁹ MSRP is only valid for new lines of service. Offer valid through 2/1/20. ²Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a GreatCall device and a one-time setup fee of 35. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can be made only when cellular service is available. 5Star Service tracks an approximate location of the device when the device is turned on and connected to the network. GreatCall does not guarantee an exact location. 5Star is only available with the purchase of a Health & Safety Package. Jitterbug, GreatCall, and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2020 GreatCall, Inc.


Riding the rails Short line railroads serve South Carolina behind the scenes BY KEVIN DIETRICH | PHOTOS BY MATTHEW FRANKLIN CARTER


ngineer Allen Gibbs nudges the throttle forward on the 1,750-horsepower General Motors GP9 locomotive, pulling a string of boxcars, tank cars and flat cars, some loaded, some empty, down a stretch of rail in Anderson County. As he gets up to speed, 20 mph on this late spring day, Gibbs has an unobstructed view for at least a half-mile ahead, but he still peers intently forward, never taking his eyes from a section of rail straight as a sunbeam. As he approaches a road crossing, Gibbs, still peering forward, reaches up and pulls the cord: two long blasts, one short and one final long burst. All the time he scans the track, watching closely for automobiles, people or objects that might damage the train or, more likely, be damaged by the train. Gibbs and coworker Dennis Martin are making one of their thrice-weekly runs between Honea Path and Pelzer, hauling freight for the Greenville & Western Railway, one of a handful of short line railroads that operates in South Carolina. The Greenville & Western runs on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the pair are in Aiken, operating the Aiken Railway on a 19-mile stretch of rail. Both lines are operated by parent company Western Carolina Railway Service Corp., headquartered in Greer. Working in tandem, Gibbs and Martin pick up, drop off and rearrange railcars in a slow-motion juggling routine along a 13-mile stretch of rail with countless spurs. They open and close switches to allow loaded and empty cars to be dropped at the industrial sites the railroad serves. They gather loaded cars that will be moved to a connection point with the major carriers Norfolk Southern and CSX, and they shuttle other cars onto sidetracks, where they’ll be collected when needed. Inside the cab of the diesel-electric locomotive, built originally for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1957, there’s no air conditioning and the only breeze comes from open windows and a small portable fan mounted above the engineer’s seat. It’s hot, dirty and noisy, and Gibbs wouldn’t have it any other way. “I love short lining,” he says. “This is what I picture it being like back in the golden age of railroading.”

The first and last mile For most South Carolinians, railroads conjure images of milelong CSX or Norfolk Southern trains, either stopping traffic at inopportune times or passing through the countryside, loaded with new automobiles, coal or wood chips. Many don’t know that the state, and nation, are also served by an array of short line railroads.

Greenville & Western engineer Allen Gibbs enjoys the variety of work that short line railroading provides. “Everyone is trained on everything,” he says. “One day I might be running a train and the next day I might be cutting back brush from the tracks. It keeps things interesting.”

Short lines are small railroads that provide the first and last mile of service, moving commodities and finished products from industrial operations located off main lines to locations where the cars can be picked up by the large carriers. South Carolina is served by a dozen short line railroads, ranging from the Lancaster & Chester Railroad, which has 60 miles of track in operation below Charlotte, to the Port Terminal Railroad, which operates a single mile of track and provides switching services to the S.C. State Ports Authority and other Charleston County industries. A typical day on the Greenville & Western begins with Gibbs and Martin going over the details of their routes for the day. Both men are qualified as engineers and ­conductors, so they often take turns operating one of the line’s four locomotives. “On the Greenville & Western everyone’s got an engineer’s card and everyone’s got a conductor’s card,” Gibbs says. “Small lines are like that everywhere. Everyone is trained on everything. With a big carrier it would take years to work your way to being an engineer. “I like the variety here on the Greenville & Western,” he adds. “There are a lot of different jobs that need to be done; one day I might be running a train and the next day I might be cutting back brush from the tracks. It keeps things interesting.” On this particular spring morning, Gibbs and Martin

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


Built in 1957, this General Motors GP9 locomotive has 1,750 horsepower under the hood, more than enough to carry the freight for the Greenville & Western Railway. Crew members like Dennis Martin (above) start their day by warming up the 16-cylinder diesel engine that serves as a rolling power plant for the 130-ton locomotive’s electric motors. Operating the train is strenuous work that takes place in all weather conditions, but Martin says he wouldn’t have it any other way. “It sure beats working indoors.”

begin their first route around 10 a.m. The duo has already reviewed their work orders and switch lists, which tell them what they’re picking up, where they’re dropping off, and where they will need to throw switches to access rail spurs—­ secondary tracks used by railroads to load and unload railcars. After this legwork is completed, Gibbs and Martin check the locomotive’s 16-cylinder diesel engine, which takes just a couple of minutes to warm up. The engine is a hybrid of sorts: it powers a generator which sends electricity to traction motors mounted on each of the locomotive’s axles. Technically, the locomotive is electric, but the diesel engine acts as a power plant. The 130-ton locomotive is loud, but the men can still hear each other with only a slight rise in their voices. They then begin the day’s first trip. From the Greenville & Western yard, Gibbs moves the train forward slowly, with Martin walking ahead of the train to stand at a railroad crossing with a temporarily out-of-service crossing signal, where he holds a signal flag to stop any approaching vehicles. After the locomotive has passed the crossing and Martin has reboarded, the engine moves down the line a couple of miles before making its first stop. Martin climbs down, and, after he has thrown a switch, Gibbs slowly begins to move the locomotive toward several cars on a spur. He and Gibbs talk by two-way radio, with Martin telling Gibbs how much space he has, down to the final foot before he connects with a handful of empty railcars. This communication is important because if Gibbs hits the empty cars too hard, he could damage the coupling mechanism, too softly and he’ll have trouble making a successful connection. After the first car has been coupled to the locomotive, Martin ensures the air hoses near the couplers are ­connected. Today’s trains use air brakes, which enable the engineer to slow and stop the train as a whole, rather than relying solely on the locomotive’s brakes to curb the speed of a train. Martin checks the hoses on all the railcars, to ensure all are connected. 18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Between 1890 and 1917, it’s estimated that nearly two dozen railroad workers died on the job each day nationwide. Today, a methodical approach to safety has made rail one of the safest forms of transportation. Once connected, Gibbs pushes the throttle forward and the locomotive advances as Martin climbs up and into the cab. The train then moves down the track at 20 mph, with Gibbs conversing easily above the noise of the engine. Martin is less talkative, but both men relate stories past and present about their time on the railroad. “That house there,” Gibbs says, pointing to a brick home surrounded by pasture, “they have a pig that will sometimes come out and run alongside the train.” Farther up the line, Gibbs points out a spot where two trains collided in 1930, killing two men. “There weren’t nearly the safety mechanisms in place that we have today. It was a dangerous job.” Indeed, between 1890 and 1917, it’s estimated that nearly two dozen railroad workers died on the job each day nationwide. In 2017, by comparison, there were six total deaths related to railroad accidents, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. The advent of automatic brakes, technologically advanced signals and improved communications, plus a methodical approach to safety, have made rail one of the safest forms of transportation. After a 25-minute trek north, the Greenville & Western train pulls alongside a series of spurs near a chemical plant. The first step is to drop off some of the empty cars on a spur where they can be collected another day. Then Gibbs moves the train onto another spur, where he and Martin pick up cars loaded with paper products they’ll deliver to a large


Two well-trained crew members are all it takes to operate a short line train, but the job can be physically demanding. On the Greenville & Western Railway line between Honea Path and Pelzer, the men take turns at the controls and exiting the train to operate rail switches, perform signal duty at road crossings, and connect and disconnect air brake lines that tie the train together. When engineer Allen Gibbs (right) eases the locomotive in to connect with freight cars, he is in constant radio communication with Dennis Martin, who serves as his spotter.

manufacturing facility on the return leg. Other cars will be dropped off for the Pickens Railway, another short line railroad whose tracks intersect with the Greenville & Western. Once the cars are pulled from the spur and onto the main line, Martin throws the switch, which will enable the train to head back the way it came. Once Martin is aboard, Gibbs heads back to the Belton yard. Martin, standing behind him, has been in and out of the engine most of the morning, throwing switches, directing Gibbs and checking air brake connections. The heat, which will top 90 degrees this day, doesn’t bother him. “I like being outdoors. I don’t like the cold weather, but I can handle the heat,” he says. “No matter the weather, it sure beats working indoors.” Martin first came to the Greenville & Western to help rewire one of the line’s locomotives. He eventually hired on with the line full time and worked his way up to his current position. Gibbs says railroading is in his blood; his grandfather worked as an engineer for the Southern Railway, which served the South for nearly a century before merging with the Norfolk and Western Railway in 1982 to form Norfolk Southern.

The business of rail The Greenville & Western is operated by Steven Hawkins and his wife, Cheryl. Steven began his railroading career at age 20 with the Carolina Piedmont Railroad in Laurens and went on to positions with short lines in Texas, Missouri, Nova Scotia and Oregon. He also worked on three divisions of Norfolk Southern before deciding to return to South Carolina and start his own short line operation. In 2003 he formed Western Carolina Railway Service Corp.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


Riding the rails

All in a day’s work As Gibbs powers the train back to the Belton depot, he talks again about safety, specifically one of an engineer’s worst fears: striking a pedestrian or vehicle. Gibbs has never had a mishap, and he intends to keep it that way. “One time I came around a bend and there was a girl, a high school senior, lying on the tracks, with props all around her. Her boyfriend was there, her dad was there and a photographer was there,” Gibbs says.

20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

M I LTON MORRIS

and Western Carolina Railway Consulting Service, spending part of his time scoping out existing stretches of rail that were underused by other companies but that might be turned into profitable short line operations. In 2006, Hawkins was the successful bidder for 13 miles of former CSX track between Honea Path and Pelzer. Greenville & Western Railway was born. The business operates today out of an old depot that once belonged to another short line, the Piedmont and Northern Railway, in Greer. “The wheels of railroad negotiation often turn very slowly, so for me to go from being a virtual ‘unknown’ to a successful first acquisition in just 3½ years, that’s actually pretty fast,” he says. Over the years, Hawkins has upgraded the track, and regulators responded by allowing Greenville & Western trains to increase their top speed from 10 mph to 25. The company also won the right to haul more cars containing “hazardous” material, such as ethanol and other biofuels. By 2014, his railroad was moving about 10,000 carloads of freight a year. Hawkins expanded in 2012, acquiring 19 miles of track in Aiken County from Norfolk Southern. The Aiken Railway, which is served by Aiken Electric Cooperative, has grown from approximately 1,000 carloads a year to about 1,300 annually. The Greenville & Western serves a range of ­customers, including Belton Industries, Belton Metal Co., Komatsu America and a pair of chemical companies. The Aiken Railway serves Advanced Glass Yarns, Grace Davison, Active Minerals, and Carolina Eastern, a feed and seed company.

Steven and Cheryl Hawkins operate their railroad businesses from the former Piedmont and Northern Railway depot in downtown Greer. A $1 million renovation is now underway to create a public events and meeting space. For updates, visit historicgreerdepot.com.

“We were going 25 miles an hour, so we were able to stop. I got out and asked them what they were doing, and they said they were shooting the girl’s senior photo,” he continues. “I said, ‘You know there are trains that run on this line,’ and they told me there weren’t, pointing to some rust on the rails. I turned around, looked back at my engine and said to them, ‘That’s a train, isn’t it?’ ” Gibbs says that during his time at Norfolk Southern, he knew plenty of engineers who had experienced the trauma of hitting cars and individuals. “Among the guys I worked with at Norfolk Southern, it wasn’t ‘Have you hit someone?’ but ‘How many have you hit?’ ” On this day, there are no cars at the mostly rural crossings and no individuals walking the tracks. As the train rumbles along, the only life to be seen up close is a horse, which, unperturbed by the noise of the locomotive, stands against a fence near the rails and watches intently. It’s a bucolic scene that could be taken from the 1950s. By the end of the day, the pair will have moved more than four dozen railcars for delivery or loading, picked up an assortment of products from several different companies and moved empty railcars onto spurs, for future use by customers. “I take a lot of pride in what I do,” Gibbs says. “These locomotives are million-dollar pieces of equipment, and it’s a lot of responsibility. I’m proud the company trusts me to handle a piece of equipment like this, and I’m going to make sure I do it correctly.”


|

SC   stories

Open to interpretation A string of human figures, ascending toward heaven. A cluster of metal panels in geometric shapes, swaying as if brushed by a mountain breeze or an ocean wave. Lines that represent a body, moving in dance. Such are the works that spring from the hands of metal artist Bob Doster, who cuts pieces from stainless and corten steel, then welds them together to form sculptures. “I play with it in ways that I find pleasing,” says Doster, owner of Bob Doster’s Backstreet Studio in Lancaster. The themed sculptures he describes as “souls ascending” became a central part of his work after his adult son died in a 2001 car accident. Some of his most recent works, memorializing people killed in U.S. mass shootings, expanded on that theme. “The reaction I’ve gotten from this has humbled me,” he says. “People look at it and start crying. I didn’t expect that.” The full range of his work is also on display at dozens of schools in North and South Carolina. Since 1975, he has worked with more than 150,000 students, many now parents and teachers. Some of those sculptures feature cutouts of student self-portraits, welded together in wheels, globes and other forms. Doster knows that no two people will ever react to his work exactly the same, but that’s part of the artistic experience. “I like for people to find their own interpretation,” he says. “I learn a lot from what people see in my work.” —JENNIFER BECKNELL | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

Bob Doster AGE: 70. Lancaster. CLAIM TO FAME: Metal sculptor whose work ranges from whimsical collectibles to monumental public works. See: bobdoster.com. GETTING STARTED: When Doster was 8, his father let him use a blow torch to cut metal. The first pieces he made were swords for himself and a friend. INSPIRED BY S.C: Doster’s steel sculptures of a Palmetto tree are available up to 14 feet tall. WORDS TO LIVE BY: “Any time you make something that wasn’t there before, it becomes art.” USC OR CLEMSON?: Doster holds degrees in fine art from both schools. RESIDES IN:

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


|

SC   scene

Die-hard fans and up-and-coming players bring a passion for the game to South Carolina

AT 6:15 ON A FRIDAY EVENING, BARELY AN HOUR

after Bill Nichols ended his workday in Boiling Springs, he and his wife, Susan, settle into their seats at Greenville’s Bon Secours Wellness Arena amid loud music and skaters warming up for the minor league hockey game between the Greenville Swamp Rabbits and the North Charleston-based South Carolina Stingrays. The routine is part of a typical weekend for the couple who got “hooked on hockey” about eight years ago, shortly before they relocated to South Carolina. The 70-mile round trip from Boiling Springs makes attendance difficult on weeknights, but the couple is often at the arena as soon as the doors open on Fridays or Saturdays. “We’re here no later than 6:30 [for a 7:05 start],” Bill Nichols says. “We like to relax and take in the pre-game events.” Three sections away, transplanted Ohioans and fellow season ticket holders Tim and Melissa West also enjoy the pre-game festivities and look forward to another reunion with nearby regulars. “I love it, and Melissa is a bigger fan than I am,” says Tim West, who shares a vocation of nursing with his wife as well as a surprising hockey passion. They weave leisure time around hockey ­schedules, often following the Stingrays to road games in Greenville and Atlanta, where they find kindred spirits. “We love the action-packed aspect of the sport, but the social outlet is a big part of it, too,” Tim West says. “A lot of our best friends are people we’ve met through hockey.” That includes a foursome—Wayne and Kay Pyle, Edie Martin and Kim Baker—who on this night sit one row ahead, dressed in Stingrays jerseys and waving a large Stingrays banner. 22

“I love it,” Kay Pyle says. “I went to a game with some friends from Pennsylvania five years ago, and we’ve been season ticket holders ever since.” These are just some of the hockey fans who keep the Swamp Rabbits and Stingrays, South Carolina’s two professional ice hockey teams, among the most stable franchises in the 26-team ECHL Double-A league, which operates two levels

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

BY ABE HARDESTY PHOTOS BY JOHN GILLESPIE


below the National Hockey League. Both teams draw an average of 4,200 fans per game, a middleof-the-pack figure in the ECHL. Such loyalty comes long after the newness of ice hockey in the South has worn off. And unlike staples such as high school football and local stock car racing, it comes without a natural ­connection to local participants. More than 20 years since its

arrival in the state, ECHL contests remain a battle of young men from cold-weather climates. About half the players on both the Greenville and Charleston teams are natives of Canada, and most others grew up in states that border Canada. Stingrays Director of Communication Jared Shafran smiles at the thought of a South Carolinaborn player reaching the ECHL level. uu

South Carolina Stingrays forward Cole Ully drives for the net, but faces stiff opposition from goaltender Ryan Bednard and defenseman Brett Beauvais of the Greenville Swamp Rabbits. South Carolina’s professional hockey teams are South division rivals in the Double-A ECHL league.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


|

SC   scene

Pregame festivities at a minor league hockey game feature all the loud music and spectacle fans expect from a professional sporting event.

Swamp Rabbits fans show their goaltender, Ryan Bednard— a native of Macomb Township, Michigan—a little Southern hospitality before a recent game.

“We have some very die-hard, loyal, enthusiastic fans who come simply because they love the sport. If one of our players was from here, I’m sure those fans would really be into it.” —JARED SHAFRAN, STINGRAYS DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATION

Have banner, will travel. South Carolina Stingrays fans Kay and Wayne Pyle follow the team on road games to Greenville and Atlanta.

Fans are drawn to the speed and action of professional ice hockey, or what Greenville Swamp Rabbits coach Kevin Kerr calls “the crash-and-bang part of a very physical sport.”

24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


Professional ice hockey is a game of constant action and nothing brings the crowd to their feet faster than a successful goal.

“We love the action-packed aspect of the sport, but the social outlet is a big part of it, too. A lot of our best friends are people we’ve met through hockey.” —HOCKEY FAN TIM WEST Boys will be boys. Young fans get close to the action from the safety of a plexiglass wall surrounding the ice rink.

A young Greenville Swamp Rabbits fan “high-fives” a player as he leaves the ice after a hard-fought game against the South Carolina Stingrays.

Stingrays fans wear their team colors with pride in the stands of Greenville’s Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

25


|

SC   scene

The Greenville Swamp Rabbits take a breather during a strenuous practice in the lead-up to a game against the division-leading South Carolina Stingrays. In its first 30 years, 663 ECHL players have reached the big leagues, a fact that keeps the dream alive for players who make an average of $560 a week. Most see their time in the Carolinas as an opportunity to hone their skills before taking a shot at the top professional ranks.

“We have some very die-hard, loyal, enthusiastic fans who come simply because they love the sport,” Shafran says. “If one of our players was from here, I’m sure those fans would really be into it.” State teams compensate for that lack of local talent with heavy participation in community events, which gives Greenville coach Kevin Kerr a chance to get familiar with the fan base—transplants who brought hockey love from colder climates and South Carolina natives who have discovered the sport in recent years. “The fan base is probably about 50-50,” Kerr says. “I talk to a lot of fans who grew up in NHL cities, and then there are ‘the NASCAR guys’ who grew

GET THERE As this issue went to press, the South Carolina Stingrays stood atop the ECHL South Division rankings with a 19–2 record and 41 points. The Greenville Swamp Rabbits were third in the division with a 13–13 record and 27 points. The ECHL regular season runs through early April before the Kelly Cup Playoffs determine the 2019–20 champion. The South Carolina teams are scheduled to face off again this season in Greenville on Jan. 12 and Jan. 29, and in North Charleston Feb. 15 and Feb. 18. For the latest schedules, rosters and team standings, see swamprabbits.com and stingrayshockey.com.

Greenville Swamp Rabbits The Swamp Rabbits play home games at Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Single-game tickets range from $10 to $30 in advance and from $12 to $35 on game day. For information, call (864) 674-PUCK or email info@swamprabbits.com. Discounts are available for flex tickets, group tickets, military, first responders and senior citizens. South Carolina Stingrays The South Carolina Stingrays play home games

in the North Charleston Coliseum. Single-game tickets range from $17 to $34 in advance and from $19 to $37 on game day. For more information, call (843) 744-2248. Discounts are available for flex tickets, group tickets, military, AAA Club members and senior citizens.

26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

up here and enjoy the crash-and-bang part of a very physical sport.” Building the fan base in a region known for its passion for football hasn’t been easy, especially in light of the immense football success at Clemson, which dominates Upstate interest on fall Saturdays. “It’s an overwhelming shadow,” says Swamp Rabbits Director of Media Relations Jordan Kuhns, a Philadelphia native now in his second season in Greenville. “I think our weekend attendance numbers would be higher if Clemson wasn’t so good, but they’ve been very good lately.” High school and college football are also fierce competitors in Charleston, where Jordan Kuhns, Swamp Shafran says the Stingrays, Rabbits director of like the Swamp Rabbits, typimedia relations, admits it’s a challenge to gain cally try to play road games passionate hockey fans as much as possible during in an area devoted to football season. The 2019–20 Clemson football. schedule included only 10 home games in the first three months of the season and 26 between January and March. Football’s Southern popularity is also a likely factor in the regional talent disparity. When the sport came to Charleston in 1993 and Greenville in 1998, many believed that the exposure would eventually create home-grown players. But that evolution has been slow. Some South Carolina youth programs are in place, but the path to the professional level typically begins long before that. “A lot of players who reach this level start to play hockey at age 3 or 4,” Shafran says. “If you’re not skating by age 5, it might be too late already. Most of the players I’ve talked to were in competition by age 5 and played about 10 years before competing at the junior level.” In addition to the organized youth competition, Canadian-born players like Greenville’s 22-year-old Callum Booth, who began skating at age 2, say the hockey culture gives cold-climate youngsters a big advantage. “It was easy for me to spend a lot of time skating because there was a pond in back of the yard that was frozen all winter. I’d be out there anytime I had a few minutes,” says Booth, who saw his first NHL match at age 10 and has dreamed of playing at that level ever since. “And if I wanted to get into a game, it seemed like there was a rink on every corner.”


WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

Seafood and a C-note South Carolina Living and the Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival have joined together to help you liven up winter.

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj Alpharetta, Ga. CVB jj Cultural and Heritage Museums, York County jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce jj Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival jj Lake Hartwell Country jj Santee Cooper Country jj South Carolina Living magazine

Sign up today for our January Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival Special Events R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S package, which includes two tickets to the festival Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply (Feb. 24–March 1), YES! Enter me in the drawing for a Hilton Head Island Seafood Festival package and a $100 gift card. Celebrity Guest Chef Master Class Series, Pig Name Pickin’ & Oyster Roast, VIP Address Lounge access and the City festival’s Seafood Sunday Brunch. One lucky winner State/ZIP will be drawn at random Email* from entries received by Jan. 31. Register online at Phone* SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Jan. 31, 2020, to be eligible. or mail in the coupon. *Winner will be contacted to verify mailing address.

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


|

SC   travels

Telling the Cherokee story BY JENNA SCHIFERL | PHOTOS BY MILTON MORRIS

Most of the artifacts on display at the Museum of the Cherokee in South Carolina were found locally and donated by area residents “which is beautiful because when we opened the museum, we didn’t have anything,” says director Luther Lyle (above). Prized artifacts include an intact Cherokee pot, a 250-year-old ceremonial drum and jewelry fashioned from Colonial-era British coins. Other displays, like the replica powder horn shown at top, commemorate significant local events, such as the 1761 British expedition against the Cherokee at Keowee Town.

28

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

THERE’S A STORY

behind every exhibit and artifact at Walhalla’s Museum of the Cherokee in South Carolina, and these stories c­ onnect ­visitors to a rich culture that runs deep in the state’s history. Many area ­residents can trace their heritage to Cherokee ancestors, as Cherokee and pre-­Cherokee people lived in the Upstate for thousands of years. At one time, there were at least 27 Cherokee villages in Oconee County alone, says Luther Lyle, the museum’s curator and director. “It’s a major part of our heritage here, especially in Oconee County,” he says. “It’s part of South Carolina history.” And it’s a history that local residents were happy to share. Many of the artifacts on display, as well as those being studied and archived in the museum’s back room, were donated by area residents who shared Lyle’s vision for a stand-alone facility to showcase Cherokee history and culture. Prior to the museum’s opening in 2013, there was only a small exhibit dedicated to the Cherokee in the Oconee History Museum. Each artifact is priceless to Lyle, but one piece on display stands out. The wooden Cherokee effigy is likely hundreds of years old. It’s about five inches tall and is made out of a pine tree knot. Carved to look like a Cherokee man, complete with detailed facial features like eyes, a nose, cheekbones and a traditional Cherokee hairstyle, it was found on a sandbar in Toxaway Creek at the Cherokee village site of Old Toxaway near present-day Westminster. Lyle found it mixed in with pottery fragments donated to the museum in five-gallon buckets. When he cleaned it up and placed it on display, word of a significant find spread quickly. “We had some folks from Cherokee


Carved from a pine knot, this rare Cherokee effigy was found on a sandbar in Toxaway Creek at the Cherokee village site of Old Toxaway near present-day Westminster.

[N.C.] come here and look around at the exhibits. And they got really interested in this piece,” Lyle says. They offered to buy the effigy, but Lyle said it wasn’t for sale. A few days later, the prospective buyers called back and asked Lyle to name his price. His answer remained the same. “It’s not for sale,” Lyle says. “I don’t care how much you offer. It was found here and it will stay here.” Hugh Lambert, the museum’s board chairman and member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, says the rare effigy was likely used in religious ceremonies and rituals. Keeping it and other artifacts on public display is at the heart of the museum’s mission to preserve Cherokee history and culture, he says. “People should be reminded that the history of the Cherokee is an American story.”

Feb. 24–Mar. 1, 2020 CELEBRATING SOUTHERN HERITAGE AND CULTURE WITH FOOD + DRINK

Rock Hill Coca-Cola Presents The 2020 M CCelvey Center Southern Sound Series

HILTONHEADSEAFOODFESTIVAL.COM

YORK, SC • TICKETS AT CHMUSEUMS.ORG PROJECT ASSISTED BY CITY OF ROCK HILL AND YORK COUNTY ACCOMMODATIONS & HOSPITALITY TAX PROGRAMS

All proceeds benefit the nonprofit 501(c)(3) David M. Carmines Memorial Foundation

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

29


Slow cooker entrees it, No doubt about ve you sa n ca er a slow cook mes effort when it co lots of time and e table. th hearty meal on to putting a good s in the nd extra pair of ha It’s like having an And all ! at th o couldn’t use kitchen—and wh eat gr a beginning of of these are the game day feast.

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

BBQ CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS

SOUTHERN-STYLE PEPPERONCINI POT ROAST

SERVES 6 (2 PER PERSON)

5 pounds drumsticks (approximately 12) 2 tablespoons barbecue spice rub (your favorite) 2 cups barbecue sauce, store-bought or homemade 1 –2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, chopped (optional)

SERVES 6–8

3 tablespoons ground beef bouillon cubes 1 cup all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 3–4 pound chuck roast 1 ½ tablespoons all-purpose seasoning 1 16-ounce jar whole pepperoncini, including juices

30

K A REN H ERM A N N

Rub drumsticks all over with the spice rub. Brush drumsticks evenly with one cup of the barbecue sauce and place in the slow cooker. You may have to layer the drumsticks based on the size of your slow cooker and number of drumsticks. Sprinkle chopped peppers over the drumsticks. Cover and cook on high for 3 hours, on low for 5–6 hours. Preheat oven broiler. Remove drumsticks from slow cooker and place in a single layer on a foil-lined sheet pan. Brush with half of the remaining barbecue sauce and broil for 3–5 minutes until slightly charred and bubbly. Remove from oven, turn over and brush with more BBQ sauce. Broil another 3–5 minutes. Serve warm or room temperature.

G I N A M OO RE

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

In a small bowl, combine ground bouillon, flour and pepper. Set aside. In a large skillet, heat oil over mediumhigh heat; sear roast on all sides until brown and transfer to slow cooker. Sprinkle 3 tablespoons flour mixture and all-purpose seasoning on top of roast. (Reserve leftover flour mixture in an airtight jar for future use.) Add pepperoncini to the pot. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours, or high for 5 hours. Slice and serve over mashed potatoes, or shredded on a bun as a pot roast sammie.


|

SC   recipe

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

No slow cooker? No problem. You ca n still make “slow cooked” recipes your oven. For bein results, use a ca st st-iron Dutch oven and cook at 200–25 0 degrees.

CHICKEN, SAUSAGE AND SHRIMP GUMBO

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

SERVES 8

HONEY PARMESAN PORK SHOULDER

½ cup vegetable oil (canola or corn) ½ cup all-purpose flour 1 large onion, chopped 2 bell peppers, diced 2 celery stalks, sliced 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil, more if needed 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken thighs or breasts, cut into bite-size pieces 1 pound andouille sausage, thick sliced 4 cups chicken stock

SERVES 8–10

1 4-pound pork shoulder, boneless pork butt or pork loin ¾ cup grated Parmesan cheese ½ cup honey ¼ cup tamari, or soy sauce 1 tablespoon dried basil 1 tablespoon dried oregano

2 tablespoons minced garlic 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons cornstarch ¼ cup chicken stock

Rinse roast and pat dry. Place roast into the insert of a slow cooker. In a small bowl, combine cheese, honey, soy sauce, basil, oregano, garlic, oil, salt and pepper. Pour over roast. Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 6 hours. Temperature on an instant-read thermometer should read 160 degrees. Remove roast to a cutting board to rest for 15 minutes. Ladle cooking juices, minus the fat, into a small saucepan, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Whisk together cornstarch and chicken stock; pour into the boiling juices. Cook, stirring, until sauce is thickened, 1–2 minutes. Slice roast and serve with sauce. Pork shoulder vs. pork butt? Both are from the shoulder of the pig, with the butt being higher up on the foreleg. The butt is also sold as “Boston butt” and the shoulder is also sold as “picnic shoulder or picnic roast.”

1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes 2 teaspoons Creole or Cajun seasoning 1 teaspoon dried thyme ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 bay leaves 1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined, refrigerated until ready to use 3 cups sliced okra, fresh or frozen, optional ½ cup fresh chopped parsley Cooked rice Hot sauce, for serving

In a medium skillet over medium-low heat, combine oil and flour. Using a flat whisk, whisk continuously until roux is a peanut butter brown and has a nutty smell, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Into the insert of the slow cooker, place the onions, bell peppers, celery and garlic. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat olive oil. Saute chicken and sausage until brown and add to slow cooker. Pour roux over contents of slow cooker, followed by stock, tomatoes, Cajun seasoning, thyme, cayenne and bay leaves. Stir well, cover and cook on low setting for 6 hours. Add shrimp, okra and parsley and continue to cook for an additional 15–20 minutes. Remove bay leaves and serve, in bowls, with rice. Pass the hot sauce. Chicken thighs vs. chicken breasts. Thighs have more fat than breasts, thus less protein. However, thighs hold up better to long, slow cooking in that they do not get overcooked and dry out as quickly as breasts. They will maintain their tenderness after the slow cooking process. CHEF’S TIP

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop

CHEF’S TIPS

When measuring honey, spray your measuring device with cooking spray for easy release.

Get more delicious recipes, expert cooking tips and fun, how-to videos from Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan any time of day or night. Just point your web browser to

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


|

SC   gardener

A dragon for all seasons

JANUARY IN THE GARDEN n Planning on starting a new planting bed this spring? Go ahead and roughly turn over the area’s soil. This will not only help you define the size and shape of the bed, but it will fluff the dirt up to help prevent compaction later and also expose any harmful insects overwintering underground to the killing cold temperatures.

BY L.A. JACKSON

PHOTOS BY L . A . JACKSO N

p This dragon jealously guards its autumn fruit with green claws.

n It is certainly not too early to begin buying seeds from garden catalogs and online sites because new and in-demand selections can sell out quickly!

t Flying Dragon is armed with a wicked thicket

n Water gardens can freeze over during extended periods of extreme cold. Keeping the pond’s water pump going will help prevent total surface icing, as will adding a few floating rubber balls or small scraps of untreated commercial lumber.

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH Now is a good time to clean out, repair, repaint or even replace any birdhouses that served your local population of flying friends well last year. However, don’t be too quick to tinker with any of these miniature retreats. While birdhouses are mainly thought of as spring nesting boxes, many cavity-roosting birds such as wrens, chickadees, titmice and bluebirds also see them as comfortable winter havens. So, first take a few days to watch the houses for signs of activity on the wing before doing any seasonal maintenance.

32

of claw-like, 1-inch, emerald green thorns. When planted in a concentrated row, they can deter pesky animals.

starts to drift into my garden, it hesitates, for I have a dragon lurking. No, not a fire-breathing monster, but rather a strange, thorn-adorned shrub: Poncirus trifoliata Flying Dragon—one beast of a bush with claw-like, 1-inch, emerald green barbs that only the bold dare to come near. Also called hardy contorted orange, Flying Dragon is closely related to citrus trees commonly grown outdoors only in tropical climates, but it will readily survive typical winters in the gardens of our state. With the arrival of spring, a softer side of this thorny plant is seen in the form of small, blush white, fragrant flowers that open in celebration of the new growing season. In the summer, Flying Dragon seems sedate, sleeping in a sea of glossy, deep green foliage. But come autumn, after the leaves turn a pleasant light yellow and drop, its sharp talons are, once again, unsheathed—long, curved and gleaming in a green that remains true through the coldest months. Since it is a member of the citrus family, also very noticeable in the fall are golf ball-sized, yellow fruits that are, at best, barely edible due to their super sour, all-pit-and-little-pulp nature. One note of caution: The seeds can readily sprout, meaning that unless the fallen WHEN WINTER’S DEEPEST CHILL

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

fruits are collected and trashed, this dragon’s offspring could easily spread. Flying Dragon does best when planted in well-drained, slightly acidic soil in partial to full sun. Also, if possible, select an area where it will be exposed to the low winter sun so strong light and long shadows can magnify the visual effect of its bizarre super thorns. Being a slow-growing shrub, Flying Dragon will remain restrained in habit (if not armament) to form a rounded shrub that tops out from 5 to 10 feet, but can be kept at any desired height by pruning after flowering. It is an obvious candidate for a singular specimen plant, but in a concentrated row, several can make a wicked thicket that will deter pesky deer, dogs, cats or even cat burglars. Flying Dragon can be found at select brave in-state nurseries and garden centers. One SC retailer that I know offers it at their store as well as online is Nurseries Caroliniana (nurcar.com) in North Augusta. If you want more web options, when searching, include its botanical name Poncirus trifoliata, or you will be whisked into an e-world of wizards and magic! L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


|

PALMETTO STATE   marketplace

Steel Mobile Home Roofing Leaks? High energy bill? Roof rumble?

Contact us at 800.633.8969 or roofover.com

Arco Steel Buildings 1-800-241-8339

BBB A+ rating for 40 years!

Highest Quality Low Prices! 40 x 60 x 10 • 50 x 75 x 12 60 x 100 x 12 • 100 x 150 x 20 20 x 100 x 8’6” Mini Storage

All sizes available! Mini-Storage Available Call Now for a Free Quote

1-800-882-5150

Mobile Home Roofover Systems Since 1983

40

Years

(Buildings not as shown above) (FOB plant-local codes may affect prices)

OUR New Year’s resolution: Help YOU grow your business! Advertising in South Carolina Living in print and online gets results. Contact Mary Watts today at (803) 739‑5074 or email ads@scliving.coop.

EXPLORE SOME MORE! Get more of what you love about South Carolina Living delivered direct to your mobile device.

Delicious recipes Bonus videos & photos Exclusive stories The latest reader contests And more! Don’t miss out. Sign up today for our FREE email newsletter.

SCLiving.coop/newsletter 34

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


To advertise, please go to SCLiving.coop or email ads@scliving.coop

er row

G

ct

Dire

Grow Half-Dollar sized

Muscadines

and Blackberries. We also offer over 200 varieties of fruit and nut trees plus vine and berry plants.

TRADEWINDS ROOFING $1500 OFF Any New Roof Installation

When you contact one of our advertisers, please tell them you saw their ad in South Carolina Living. $11,495 - 30x40x10

EASTERN

DIVISION

WHY CHOOSE OUR METAL ROOFING?

Painted Enclosed Built Price (Not Shown)*

• • • • • •

STORAGE BUILDINGS HAY BARNS HORSE BARNS GARAGES *Custom building shown. Call for pricing.

Hurricane Upgrade E of I-95 • Fully Insured • #1 Metal • Custom Sizes 4/12 roof pitch • Engineered trusses • Local codes/freight may affect prices

www.nationalbarn.com

1-888-427-BARN (2276)

Value Durability Beauty Economy Lifetime Warranty Financing Available

Call NOW for your Free Estimate and Limited Time Offer 800-290-6437 or 864-343-1933

www.TradewindsRoofingSC.com

January 25 is National Seed Swap Day. Can’t wait for spring? Swap some seeds with a friend, then send a subscription so they can get tips all year from our SCGardener columnist! YES! Send 1 year (11 issues) for just $8

YES! Send 2 years (22 issues) for just $15

GIFT TO

FROM

PHONE

PHONE

ADDRESS

ADDRESS

CITY

CITY

STATE/ZIP

STATE/ZIP

NOTE: Co-op members should already receive this magazine as a membership benefit.

Please make check payable to South Carolina Living and mail to P.O. Box 896568, Charlotte, NC 28289-6568. (Please allow 4 – 8 weeks.) Call (803) 926‑3175 for more information. Sorry, credit card orders not accepted.

SCLIVING.COOP   | JANUARY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

35


|

|

PALMETTO SC   calendar STATE  JAN 10–FEB  marketplace 15

Upstate JA NUA RY

10–19  Hank Williams: Lost

Highway, Spartanburg Little Theatre, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. 13–15  Composer in Residence: Michael Ching, Daniel Recital Hall at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9021. 15  Film: Contemporary Art in Zimbabwe, Mayfair Art Studios, Arcadia. (864) 542‑2787. 17  Mauldin Youth Theatre Fundraising Dinner, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 25  Winter Bluegrass Jubilee 2020, Pickens High School, Pickens. (864) 637‑9672. 30  Oddball 2020, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 31  Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. F EB R UA RY

1  Americana Masters, Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. 1  Sweetheart Charity Ball, Hyatt Regency, Greenville. (864) 233‑6565. 1–2  Winter Chautauqua: Teddy Roosevelt, Wade Hampton High School, Greenville. (864) 244‑1499. 6  Arts on TAP, Ciclops Cyderi & Brewery, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9021. 6  Reception: Determined to Soar, Milliken Art Gallery at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9181. 6  There Goes the Neighborhood, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 7–9  Contempt of Court, Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882‑1910. 8  WinterSkunk Music Fest, The Spinning Jenny, Greer. info@albinoskunk.com. 9  Guest Artist Series: Polaris Piano Trio, Daniel Recital Hall at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9021. 14  Silent Movie with Scott Foppiano: Safety Last!, Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9022. 14–15  Embrace 2.14: Studio Series, Ballet Spartanburg, Spartanburg. (864) 583‑0339. 14–16  Contempt of Court, Oconee Community Theatre, Seneca. (864) 882‑1910. 14–16  Disney’s Aladdin, Jr., Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787.

36

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. O NG O ING

Daily until Jan. 30  Exhibition:

Unfadeable Spirit of the People, Milliken Art Gallery at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9181. Daily Feb. 6–27  Exhibition: Determined to Soar, Milliken Art Gallery at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9181. Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900. Saturdays and Sundays  Historic Building Tour, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638‑0079.

Midlands JANUARY

16  Opening Reception for Panorama: Works by Robert O. Keith IV and Gene Tennison, Dalton Gallery at the Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 16  Verdi’s La Traviata, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 17  Artrageous, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2500. 17  Balsam Range, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 18  Red Shoe Run, Hand Middle School, Columbia. runonsc@yahoo.com. 18  2020 Southern Sound Series: Chatham County Line, McCelvey Center, York. (803) 684‑3948. 18  Unspoken Tradition, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 21–22  Travis Tritt, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 24  Night Fever: The Bee Gees Tribute, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 24  Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra: One Week, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 25  Come Draw With Me, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. 25  Jake Shimabukuro, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179.

26  The Great Amazing Race

Columbia, Sesquicentennial State Park, Columbia. info@greatamazingrace.com​. 31  Delbert McClinton, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 31  Twin City Rotary Club Annual Oyster Roast, Celebrations, BatesburgLeesville. (803) 622‑2745. FEBR UARY

1  Harry Potter and the Sacred Text Q&A, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 1  MGC Long Run, Lady Street at First Citizens Plaza, Columbia. (803) 799‑4786. 7–8  The Red Shoes, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 8  Allison Creek Bluegrass concert series, Allison Creek Presbyterian Church, York. (803) 366‑1302. 8  One Night in Memphis: Presley, Perkins, Lewis & Cash, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2500. 9  Doug & Bunny present: A Tribute to the Music of Peter, Paul & Mary and Simon & Garfunkel, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 13  Cirque Zuma Zuma, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 14  The Don Felder Band, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 15  Gibson Brothers, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 15  The Mystics, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2500. 15  Rock Hill Symphony Orchestra: The Fantastic Flute, South Pointe High School Auditorium, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑7476. 15  2020 Southern Sound Series: Steep Canyon Rangers, McCelvey Center, York. (803) 684‑3948. ONGOING

Daily until Jan. 20  Holiday

Ice Rink, Fountain Park, Rock Hill. sarah.key@cityofrockhill.com. Daily until Jan. 31  Aiken Art Haus Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Daily until Feb. 9  Panorama: Works by Robert O. Keith IV and Gene Tennison, Dalton Gallery at the Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Daily during February  Marlayn

Mars Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Weekdays until March 5  Bloom, works by Ansley Adams, Elizabeth Dunlap Patrick Gallery, Rutledge Building at Winthrop University, Rock Hill. (803) 323‑2493. Saturdays in February  By Way of the Back Door, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327.

Lowcountry JANUARY

15–16  SC AgriBiz & Farm Expo,

Florence Civic Center, Florence. miriam@scagribizexpo.com. 16–19  SOS Mid-Winter Break/ Winter Workshop, Ocean Drive Beach & Golf Resort, North Myrtle Beach. (800) 438‑9590. 18–20  Kids Jamboree, Florence Center, Florence. (843) 679‑9417. 23  Lee Barbour’s Polyverse, Forte Jazz Lounge, Charleston. (843) 822‑7919. 23  Offramp: the Music of Pat Metheny, Forte Jazz Lounge, Charleston. (843) 822‑7919. 23  Cameron & the Saltwater Brass, Forte Jazz Lounge, Charleston. (843) 822‑7919. 23–26  Charleston Jazz Festival, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 24  Exploring Plankton, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 24  WACHH Friday Speaker Program: Sean McFate, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 25  Carolina Country Music Awards, House of Blues at Barefoot Landing, North Myrtle Beach. (570) 447‑2228. 25  The Great Amazing Race, James Island County Park, Charleston. info@greatamazingrace.com​. 25  Hilton Head Snow Day, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 26  Lowcountry Oyster Festival, Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston. (843) 853‑8000. 29–Feb. 1  Colour of Music Festival, various venues, Charleston. (864) 406‑6838.

30  Captain William Hilton and the Founding of Hilton Head Island Book Talk and Signing, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 30  66th Carolopolis Awards, Riviera Theater, Charleston. (843) 722‑4630. 31  A Night in the Valley, The College Center at Trident Technical College–Thornley Campus, Charleston. (843) 574‑6580. 31–Feb. 2  Low Country Winter Coin Show, Exchange Park Fairgrounds, Ladson. (843) 302‑6210. FEBR UARY

1  Defense of a Colony, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 1  Wellness Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 7  WACHH Friday Speaker Series: Dr. Bhavya Lal, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 8  African American Heritage Day, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, McClellanville. (843) 546‑9361. 8  Bacon and Bourbon, Charleston Area Convention Center, Charleston. (803) 240‑8401. 14–16  Southeastern Wildlife Exposition, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 723‑1748. 15  Ellington at Newport, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 822‑7919. 15  Feast or Famine: Colonial Foodways, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 15  Hopeful Horizons Race4Love, Sanctuary Golf Club Cat Island, Beaufort. (843) 379‑6151. ONGOING

Daily through March 31  There’s

Always a Ketch, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200.

Sundays through Feb. 29 

A Renaissance Woman: “Ferdi” and the Gardens of Old Town, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays until March 31  Simply

Living: The Charles Towne Edition, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesdays  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.


|

SC   humor me

Auto motives BY JAN A. IGOE

MORE THAN A FEW YEARS

ago, on a frigid morning in northern California, six guys who lived next door were gathered around the open hood of a car that refused to budge. They were stumped. Apparently, none of them ever worked in a garage to pay for college. This was my chance to be a superhero. Their car was an aging Pontiac LeMans, just like my Jezebel, who regularly made the 2,982-mile trip from the East Coast to California, much to my mechanic’s amazement. (He bet against her surviving a trip across town.) But he didn’t understand women, human or metal. Jezebel just needed adventure. That, and something to pry the butterfly choke open whenever the temperature dropped. So I sauntered up to the frat meeting and casually asked what the problem was. The guys tried to ignore me, of course. “Get in and start the engine,” I commanded while prying the choke open with confident flair. Broooommmmm. Like magic, the engine started purring as their mouths dropped to knee level. I didn’t get a trophy or a thank-you note, but that ­victorious moment is forever etched on my mental highlight reel. (Thank you, Jezebel.) Cars have always been more than just a way to get from here to there. We name them. We polish them. We beg our kids not to throw up in them. Our cars become our protective exoskeletons, best friends and confidants. Your passenger may repeat what you screamed at the last yahoo to cut you off, but your car won’t say a word. 38

As sleek and iconic as Vettes are, they’re stingy, comfort-wise. I’ve ridden skateboards with more road clearance. Having a love affair with a motorized machine isn’t new. Prince had a “Little Red Corvette.” Bruce Springsteen had a “Pink Cadillac.” Wilson Pickett had “Mustang Sally” and Janis Joplin had a “Mercedes Benz,” assuming the Lord agreed to buy her one. Once your life stops revolving around stuffing kids in a minivan, you start rethinking your ride and searching for a vehicle that expresses who you are or wish you were. Maybe that’s what Norma, longtime cashier at Food Lion, was thinking when she abruptly ditched her Ford Flex for a classic Corvette. The Flex wasn’t flashy, but at least her purse fit in the front seat. As sleek and iconic as Vettes are, they’re

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  JANUARY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

stingy, comfort-wise. I’ve ridden skateboards with more road clearance. And as for climbing out of the driver’s seat, Norma—who is allergic to StairMasters—should have waited for a model that offered a built-in forklift. (Nobody said your fantasy car has to be practical.) Smaller and faster didn’t do it for my 72-year-old neighbor. Miss Maggie’s been driving a Honda Civic forever, but last month a 38-foot RV appeared in her driveway. From what I’ve seen, she can’t parallel park a toothpick, but Miss M is ready to maneuver this monster as long as there’s no compelling reason to back up. (If you don’t need that silly reverse gear, you can probably get a better deal.) My personal fantasy car will probably end up being a truck, since my Jeep is always stuffed to the moonroof with art supplies, goodies for some animal shelter and at least three drooling dogs hanging out the windows. We’d fit better in a truck. Driving a Ram, Titan, Gladiator or something with an equally macho moniker would make me feel ­invincible. The way I felt in my dad’s last Oldsmobile. Yeah. Let Bruce keep his pink Cadillac. Give me a 6.2-liter V8, half-ton, eco-diesel, Hemi thing with 420 hp any day.* *I have no idea what I just said, but if there’s a choke, I’ll find it. JAN A. IGOE was shocked by the enormous price tags on new trucks, which cost more than 120 Jezebels. Maybe she can afford one without that reverse thing. Welcome to 2020! Join us at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


SUPER COUPON 1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

Customer Rating

$

CHOICE

SUPER BRIGHT LED/SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT • Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3 - AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

$279

• 9800 cu. in. of storage • 1000 lb. capacity • Weighs 175 lbs.

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT

SAVE 1,470

COMPARE TO

SNAP-ON $

1,750

SUPER COUPON

72" x 80" 5000 LUMEN LED MOVING BLANKET HANGING SHOP LIGHT

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

ITEM 63878/63991 64005/69567/60566 63601/67227shown

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 3/13/20 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

Item 64434, 64432, 64162, 56104, 56105, 56106

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

13

*47133763 * 47133763

MODEL: KRA4008FPBO

20% OFF ANY SINGLE ITEM*

PERFORMANCE $ 52 MODEL: W2364 TOOL

COMPARE TO

*47134169 * 47134169

WITH ANY PURCHASE

5 STAR REVIEWS Customer Rating

29999 YOOFU6RCOLOR9S9 $

FREE

OVER 5,000

26" x 22" SINGLE BANK EXTRA DEEP CABINETS

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

GOOD

Standard Features and Accuracy

12" DUAL-BEVEL SLIDING COMPOUND MITER SAW

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

3-1/2" VERTICAL CROWN MOLDING CAPACITY 2-5/8" TALL SLIDING FENCES

*47133131 * 47133131

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Atlas, Bauer, Central Machinery, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 3/13/20.

BETTER

Superior Features and Accuracy

SUPER 12" DUAL-BEVEL SLIDING COUPON Customer Rating COMPOUND MITER SAW WITH LED AND LASER GUIDE 6-1/2" VERTICAL CROWN MOLDING CAPACITY

LASER GUIDE LIGHT

Customer Rating COMPARE TO

BLUE HAWK $ 99

SAVE 70%

19

MODEL: 77280

8

$ 99 NOW

$5

ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown

99

COMPARE TO $

SAVE $58 PROFESSIONAL WOODWORKER

46-3/8"

NOW

SAVE 33%

$

ITEM 64410

2999 $1 9

179

$

21871

MODEL: 8637

$

COMPARE TO

SAVE 90 RYOBI $

Blade sold separately.

Not available in AZ, OH, OK and VA.

99

LASER GUIDE LIGHT & LED WORK LIGHT

19999 $ 269

MODEL: TSS120L

FREE

BLADE INCLUDED

1999

$

ITEM 61970/56597/56775/61969 shown

ITEM 64686

VALUE

*47136675 * 47136675

*47147409 * 47147409

*47153613 * 47153613

*47154286 * 47154286

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

SUPER COUPON

LATEX COATED WORK GLOVES $ 99 NOW

$1

Customer Rating

130 PIECE TOOL KIT 17 FT. TYPE IA WITH CASE MULTI-TASK LADDER • Customer Rating • • •

49

NOW

SAVE 75%

COMPARE TO

BLUE HAWK $ 98

5

$

COMPARE TO

ANVIL

ITEM 61437, 90912, 61435 90913, 61436, 90909 shown

MODEL: LW30700-L

6639 SAVE 54% $3999

MODEL: A137HOS

298

Customer Rating

NOW

$1 0

NOW

5499 $2999 77

SCHUMACHER $ ITEM 60581/3418 MODEL: SE-1250 60653 shown ELECTRIC

COMPARE TO

GORILLA $ 98

SAVE 189

COMPARE TO

DEWALT

$

6814 SAVE 83%

MODEL: DW1369

$

99

18

99

3

$

MODEL: XE M17

ITEM 63419/67646/62514/63418/63417 shown

MODEL: 78001

SAVE 75%

ITEM 42367

*47157810 * 47157810

*47158685 * 47158685

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

29 PIECE 10" PNEUMATIC TIRE TITANIUM NOW 99 DRILL BIT SET

Customer Rating

59

LITTLE GIANT $ 99

SUPER COUPON

2/10/50 AMP, 12 VOLT BATTERY CHARGER AND ENGINE STARTER

99¢

COMPARE TO

1

$ 69

NOW

99 NOW99

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

SUPER COUPON

COMPARE TO

Versatile - 24 configurations Safe + Secure + Stable Super Strong - Holds 300 lbs. Weighs 34 lbs.

*47155367 * 47155367

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

$

$

SUPER GLUE - PACK OF 3 Customer Rating

9 $299 139 $1 09

ITEM 68998/63248/64080/64263/63091 shown

*47155027 * 47155027

SAVE 49%

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

SUPER COUPON

1

Customer Rating

$3 5

2000 WATT SUPER QUIET INVERTER GENERATOR • 12 hour run time

NOW

$ 99

99 $449

SAVE 50%

$

8

$ 09

COMPARE TO

ITEM 5889/62281 FARM & RANCH MODEL: FR1055 61637 shown ITEM 69385/62388/62409/62698/30900 shown

COMPARE TO

HONDA

ITEM 62523

$

49999

1,009 SAVE $ 559

MODEL: EU2000i

*47189232 * 47189232

*47209027 * 47209027

*47209575 * 47209575

*47210707 * 47210707

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

1 SELLING JACKS IN AMERICA

#

SUPER COUPON

RAPID PUMP 3 TON STEEL HEAVY DUTY FLOOR JACK ®

Customer Rating

NOW

99

Customer Rating

14" ELECTRIC CHAINSAW

NOW

99

SAVE 56621/56622 $ 45 ITEM 56623/56624 shown *47212239 * 47212239

135

$ 27 POWERBUILT MODEL: 647593 COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER 30" x 18" HARDWOOD DOLLY • 1000 lb. capacity

Customer Rating

• Weighs 70 lbs.

$8999 $

4-1/2" TALL SLIDING FENCES

$ 18499 159 99

$

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

$39

99

$

4999

ITEM 64498/64497 shown

COMPARE TO

SAVE 44% COMPARE TO

CRAFTSMAN $ 74

PERFORMAX $ 99

MODEL: 071-45247

MODEL: 2411-1

SAVE 80 50%

17

$

NOW

1499 $9

ITEM 69645/60625 shown

99

COMPARE TO

MILWAUKEE $ 97

19

MODEL: 33700

NOW

1599 $1 1 99 SAVE 39% $

ITEM 38970/92486/39757/60496/62398/61897 shown

*47215045 * 47215045

*47227885 * 47227885

*47236650 * 47236650

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 3/13/20*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 3/13/20.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living January 2020  

Minor league hockey finds its zone in South Carolina

South Carolina Living January 2020  

Minor league hockey finds its zone in South Carolina

Profile for vanocain
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded