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FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

Hit the road Must-see attractions on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway

CHANGEOUT SC RECIPE

Indian cuisine at home SEPTEMBER 2019

HUMOR ME

Space invaders in Vegas


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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 9 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2019 | sept

FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

20 Seven must-see

stops on Hwy. 11

EDITOR

Headed down the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway this fall? Don’t leave home without our 12-page guide to the best roadside attractions.

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

4 CO-OP NEWS

DESIGNER

Susan Collins

Updates from your cooperative

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

6 AGENDA

WEB EDITOR

Learn how a battery storage system can help manage household energy use.

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Jennifer Jas L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

Michael Banks, Jennifer Becknell, April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Derrill Holly, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Maria Kanevsky, Patrick Keegan, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Lynn & Cele Seldon, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen PUBLISHER

Lou Green

10 DIALOGUE Recovery without stigma Overcoming addiction can be a painful process, but the road to sobriety is easier thanks to organizations like The Courage Center.

12 ENERGY Q&A Insulate for comfort and savings Stay comfortable year-round and enjoy lower energy bills when you upgrade attic and wall insulation.

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181

14 SMART CHOICE Cool for school A new school year means loading up on the latest and greatest tech products. Here’s what you need to conquer the classroom this fall.

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

16 STORIES Making music Berkeley Electric Cooperative member Arthur England has a knack for making sweet-sounding guitars from almost anything, including Krispy Kreme doughnut boxes.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2019. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

18 RECIPE Indian cooking at home Enjoy the exotic flavors of Indian cuisine with four of Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s favorite dishes.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

42 44 46

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR HUMOR ME

18

What happens in Vegas stays on Earth Humor columnist Jan A. Igoe isn’t one for conspiracy theories, unless they involve Area 51.

FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

Hit the road Must-see attractions on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

SC RECIPE

Indian cuisine at home HUMOR ME

SEPTEMBER 2019

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

20

FRO M TO P: M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER; I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

Space invaders in Vegas

Fall is the perfect time for a family road trip down Hwy. 11, also known as the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway. Illustration by Ralph Butler.


SC | agenda

TES L A

Making a difference for Monarchs

Battery storage systems like the Tesla Powerwall shown here offer homeowners options for dealing with power outages and managing household energy use.

Home battery systems are an intriguing way to manage energy use and keep your residence functioning during power outages, but there are several factors to consider before buying and installing a system in your home. Some consumers buy battery systems as a quiet alternative to gas-powered backup generators. A battery system can power essentials like the refrigerator and lights during an outage, or power the entire home. On a day-to-day basis, storage batteries can also help consumers manage their energy use and potentially cut power bills. By charging the battery at night when energy costs are lower and using the power during the day when energy costs rise, consumers can save money and help their cooperative manage energy loads to the benefit of all co-op members. Battery systems are an important link in making renewable energy like solar and wind a practical source of reliable energy. Batteries make the energy available to consumers when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing. Depending on the size and features, battery systems can cost between $3,000 and $10,000. Some of the more popular batteries include the Tesla Powerwall, the Enphase AC Battery and Sonnen’s sonnenBatterie. Consumers should carefully research and consider the battery’s capacity, life cycle and depth of discharge before buying, and understand the limits of any battery system. The energy experts at your local electric cooperative can help you weigh all the pros and cons and determine if a system is right for you, and how to use it safely. —MARIA KANEVSKY

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

DAV I DE M IZE J E WS KI , N ATION A L W I LD LI FE FOU N DATION

Is a battery system right for your home?

Feeling the need to travel this fall? You aren’t alone. Some 128 million Monarch butterflies in North America will soon begin migrating south for the winter, says Mara Koenig of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Monarch Butterfly/Pollinator Program. Monarchs in South Carolina will join the largest migration group—those living south of the Great Lakes and east of the Rocky Mountains—to make the long journey to Mexico, Koenig says. “They live for about eight months, overwintering down in Mexico and waiting for the right conditions to return to their U.S. range in the spring.” Migrations encompass multiple generations of the colorful pollinator insects, and a successful round trip depends on two key resources—an abundance of flowering plants to provide food for adults, and plenty of milkweed stalks to host developing caterpillars. That’s why the FWS is partnering with dozens of environmental and conservation groups across the nation to promote the planting of pollinator-friendly vegetation. “Everybody can play a part in Monarch butterfly conservation,” says Koenig. “It takes small, simple actions, such as planting milkweed in a garden or even in a pot on your balcony, to having a large swath of landscapes that are conserved for pollinator habitats.” —DERRILL HOLLY

Milkweed is crucial to the Monarchs’ survival because it is the only plant capable of hosting developing caterpillars.

GET MORE Visit the “Home & Garden” section of SCLiving.coop for information on planting for pollinators, including these stories: Build a better butterfly garden—Go easy on the broad-spectrum insecticides to enjoy a healthy, pollinator-friendly landscape. What’s all the buzz about—Bee City USA pollinator gardens take root throughout South Carolina. Gardening for pollinators—Simple steps to make your landscape bloom year-round.


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop Homemade garam masala u Chef Belinda shows us how to make garam masala, a mainstay spice blend that is a must for authentic Indian flavor in meat dishes. Watch and learn at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Popular pollinator plants Eastern redbud Purple coneflower Clovers (white and crimson) Ironweed Dill/Parsley/Cilantro Joe Pye weed Rabbiteye blueberry Sunflower Tulip tree Goldenrod Black-eyed Susan Aster

Win a State Fair Family Fun Pack and $100

FORREST C LONTS

Sign up today for our September Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could win a State Fair Family Fun Pack (admission for four people and two ride vouchers) and a $100 Visa gift card. We’ll draw the winning names from all eligible entries received by Sept. 30. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

A feast for all five senses GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER 1 9:07 2 10:22 3 11:52 4 — 5 — 6 — 7 1:07 8 3:07 9 4:07 10 4:52 11 5:37 12 — 13 — 14 7:22 15 8:07

2:22 3:07 4:07 5:07 6:22 7:52 9:07 9:52 10:37 11:07 11:37 6:07 6:52 12:52 1:22

2:37 8:07 3:07 8:37 3:52 8:52 2:22 8:52 — 3:52 10:52 4:22 10:52 4:52 11:07 5:07 11:22 5:22 11:37 5:37 5:52 12:07 12:07 12:37 12:37 6:22 1:07 6:52 1:37 7:07

Peony planting time u Gardening columnist L.A. Jackson explains why September is the ideal time to plant coolseason vegetables, spring-flowering bulbs and herbaceous peony plants. Dig into his advice on the “Home & Garden” page of SCLiving.coop.

READER POLL

How sweet it is As part of the July issue’s Reader Reply Travel Sweep­ stakes, we asked you to vote for the ice cream flavor you’d like to see next from Clemson’s Best Gourmet Ice Cream. And the winner is … Blueberry Lemon Cheesecake! Blueberry Lemon Cheesecake Orange Creamsicle

Neapolitan

32%

7%

25%

12%

Loaded Birthday Cake

L . A . JACKSO N

16 8:07 1:52 1:52 7:52 17 8:37 2:22 2:22 8:22 18 9:37 2:52 2:52 8:37 19 10:37 3:37 3:22 8:52 20 — 4:37 12:22 9:07 21 — 5:52 3:07 9:52 22 — 7:22 12:22 4:07 23 — 8:52 10:07 4:37 24 2:37 9:52 10:37 5:07 25 3:52 10:37 11:22 5:37 26 4:52 11:22 11:52 6:07 27 — 5:37 6:37 12:07 28 — 6:37 6:52 12:52 29 7:22 1:07 7:22 1:22 30 8:22 1:52 2:07 7:52

In a web extra feature, Tut Underwood of South Carolina Public Radio shares his fascination with the S.C. State Fair and its unique ability to delight all five senses. Plus: Share your favorite State Fair memories. You’ll find it all at SCLiving.coop/statefair.

Copperbottomed pans heat faster on the stove. In the oven, ceramic and glass dishes are better than metal. With ceramic and glass dishes, you can turn the oven down about 25 degrees, and your meal will cook just as quickly. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV

24% Triple Chocolate Pie

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS SEPT. 16–OCT. 15

WHEELCHAIR TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS SEPTEMBER 19–22

IRISH ITALIAN INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 28

What happens when you combine the food, music and culture of Italy and Ireland? A whole lot of fun, that’s what. More than 15,000 visitors are expected for the 16th annual Irish Italian International Festival. Admission and parking for the cross-cultural bash, held on Main Street in North Myrtle Beach, are free. Enjoy live entertainment, street performers and lots of food vendors, but come hungry if you want to participate in the always-popular, hands-free spaghetti-eating competition.

If you think regular tennis is riveting, try watching wheelchair tennis players as they glide across the court, smacking the ball over the net with one hand and guiding their angled-wheel chairs with the other. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Professional Tennis Registry’s championship tennis matches on Hilton Head Island. Paralympics winners, top players from across the world, and first-time players will all be competing for prize money and the glory of tearing up the court. Spectators are welcome to watch tournaments all weekend, including singles, doubles, up-down exhibitions and round-robin matches.

parks.nmb.us/festivalsevents/festivals/ irish‑italian-international-festival

U.S. DISC GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP OCTOBER 2–5

Disc golf isn’t just a game for friends and families. It’s a legitimate professional sport with dedicated courses, rules and a national championship that returns this year to the rolling hills of the Winthrop University Gold Course in Rock Hill. Enjoy the excitement and pick up a few pointers as some of the sport’s top players, including South Carolina’s Ricky Wysocki, compete on the demanding course. Passes to the tournament are $10 per day and available at the USDGC website. (800) 476-3968; usdgc.com 2019 NAMIWALKS LOWCOUNTRY OCTOBER 5

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 44, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

8

For the one in five adults in the United States who experience mental illness, support groups like the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) are a light on the path to recovery. NAMI Lowcountry is holding its annual NAMIWalks at Coligny Beach on Hilton Head Island to raise awareness and funds for mental health programs and services for Beaufort County residents. There is no fee to register as a participant or team captain for this walk. (912) 678-6903; namilowcountry.org

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

(843) 785-7244; ptrtennis.org/PTRTennis/events

PAIA LOWER EASTERN CHEROKEE NATION POW-WOW SEPTEMBER 28

One of just a few Cherokee tribes in South Carolina, the Lower Eastern Cherokee Nation is celebrating its fourth year of official state recognition, and its 12th annual pow-wow in Gray Court. The daylong event is open to the public and includes traditional drumming, flute music, story­telling, dancing, handmade crafts and Native American foods such as fry bread. The event takes place from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 3688 Warrior Creek Church Road in Gray Court. Adult admission is $5, children ages 3 to 17 years is $3, and children under 2 and veterans are admitted free. (423) 494-4255; paialecherokeenationsc.com


R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Step right up! Register to win an S.C. State Fair prize pack and $100 Visa gift card!

O C TO B E R 9 - 2 0

3

LUCKY WINNERS By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj Aiken County Visitors Bureau jj Alpharetta, Ga. CVB jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj Asheboro, N.C. jj Branchville Raylrode Daze Festivul jj Brookgreen Gardens jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj City of Aiken Tourism jj City of Georgetown Chamber of Commerce jj Culture & Heritage Museums, Brattonsville jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce jj Hagood Mill jj Hammock Coast Tourism jj Hickory, N.C. jj Historic Bluffton Arts & Seafood Festival jj Jackson County, N.C. jj Lake Hartwell Country jj The Lowcountry & Resort Islands Tourism Commission jj McCormick County Chamber of Commerce jj Newberry Opera House jj N.C. Transportation Museum jj Okra Strut Festival jj SCDA – Agritourism jj S.C. Parks, Recreation and Tourism jj South Carolina State Fair jj Upcountry S.C. Tourism jj Visit NC jj Walhalla OktoberFest jj South Carolina Living magazine

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of the S.C. State Fair, we’re giving away three Family Fun Packs—admission for four people, two ride passes and a $100 Visa gift card (to cover those corn dog expenses). We’ll randomly draw the winning names from all eligible entries received by Sept. 30, so use the mail-in form below or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for one of three S.C. State Fair prize packs and a $100 Visa gift card. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone* SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Sept. 30, 2019, to be eligible. *Winners will be contacted to verify mailing address.

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


|

SC   dialogue

Recovery without stigma SEPTEMBER IS NATIONAL RECOVERY MONTH ,

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

which recognizes the millions of Americans in treatment for substance abuse and encourages those struggling with addiction to seek professional help. The truth is, addiction can be a hard thing for people to talk about, especially when it comes to their kids. With all that parents invest in their children’s health, safety and well-being, the idea that a child’s life can be so profoundly and negatively impacted by addiction is deeply unsettling. Often, the stigma of addiction makes it hard for people to seek treatment and care, isolating those who are suffering when they most need a supportive community around them. In fact, several studies indicate that stigma is one of the main reasons people avoid treatment. A 2007 study by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (NCASA) found that 37 percent of college students avoided seeking help for addiction because they feared social stigma. Susan and Randy Rush, who have a 22-year-old son who is now two years sober, understand firsthand the importance of overcoming the stigma of addiction. “At the beginning, we were ashamed,” says Susan. “But then we realized it was not a moral failing, and that helping our son with his addiction was no different than if he had a chronic condition like diabetes.” After connecting with The Courage Center in Lexington, the Rush family learned to approach the issue as a team, she says. “We learned we had just as much recovery work to do as a family as he did.” The Courage Center fills the gaps in the recovery process, offering peer-led recovery coaching and support, free of charge, for people ages 15–26. Additionally, The Courage Center offers community presentations on a variety of topics related to substance use and recovery, including the science of addiction, says Executive Director Adrienne Bellinger. “We provide a safe space where participants can meet new people, have new places to go and have new things to do, as opposed to the people, places

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Often, the stigma of addiction makes it hard for people to seek treatment and care, isolating those who are suffering when they most need a supportive community around them. and things that were part of their lives when they were using drugs or alcohol,” she says. “Our participants may be at one end of the substance use disorder spectrum, having become addicted and gone through treatment and are now working to sustain long-term recovery. Or, our participants may not be ‘addicted,’ but there may be known or suspected use, and they simply need some guidance and support to keep from escalating to the point of addiction.” Recovering from addiction is difficult for everyone, but teens face a unique set of challenges. Although drug use at any age can lead to addiction, research indicates that the earlier a person begins using drugs, the more likely the drugs are to change the brain itself, resulting in cravings and compulsive behavior. Young people need continued and stigma-free support from friends, family and therapists to decrease their chances of relapse and help them stay on a path to recovery. “At the start of this journey, I didn’t understand addiction,” says Susan. “We were scared to death, but soon learned we were not alone. The Courage Center gave us an easier and gentler path into healing because they walk side by side with families dealing with this.” To learn more about the services provided by The Courage Center or how you can help support their mission, visit couragecentersc.org.


Through out for its sign much of the Sou th, Clem ature blue son mea campus. cheese, ns Clemson Blue Che developed on cam football. To the in an aba Tige ese ndo but to the ned railroad tunn dates back to the pus, perfected on r faithful, Clem son also campus rest of the earl el stands and nation, Clemnear Walhalla, S.C. y 1940s, when a college still made on Its son Blue If you’re professo Cheese is fans stretch acro among the r first ss much largely unk blue che of the Sou cured it nown. ese is Ame unfamiliar, may theast be the reci who fina rica’s leas lly pes in this t favorite into mus try it. Clemson Blue Che . But ours tastes cookbook will con hrooms, ese is the mixed into surp dozens of perfect blen risingly “differe vert you. Admitted mas other dish nt,” ly, d es that scor hed potatoes, stirred into of sweet and salt a word used by e big with Our blue many y. It is con grits, crum fans. cheese has tent bled on collected steak, and stuffed by universi won national awa added to rds. Hop ty Chef Chri efully, stian Tho rmose, sure it’s also a winner with you ly you’ll . Out of find som 200 reci ething to pes love.

Chicken with Shiitake and Clemson Blue Cheese Sauce

Eat the Cheese. Don’t be Chicken.

Throughout much of the South, Clemson means football. To the Tiger faithful, Clemson also stands for its signature blue cheese, developed on campus, perfected on campus and still made on campus. Clemson Blue Cheese dates back to the early 1940s, when a college professor first cured it in an abandoned railroad tunnel near Walhalla, S.C. Its fans stretch across much of the Southeast but to the rest of the nation, Clemson Blue Cheese is largely unknown. Admittedly, blue cheese is America’s least favorite. But ours tastes surprisingly “different,” a word used by many who finally try it. Clemson Blue Cheese is the perfect blend of sweet and salty. It is content stuffed into mushrooms, mixed into mashed potatoes, stirred into grits, crumbled on steak, and added to dozens of other dishes that score big with fans. ® — from Tastes of Clemson Blue Cheese, available on Amazon for $21.47.

EIGHT MAKES A WHEEL! GET 8 MINI WEDGES FOR $24.99. Regular $39.92 Order at clemsonbluecheese.com/ DealOfTheDay.asp

CLEMSONBLUECHEESE.COM | TOP 4 FINISH IN THE 2019 U.S. CHAMPIONSHIP CHEESE CONTEST


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SC   energy Q&A

Insulate for comfort and savings BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

We’re dreading winter. It feels like every year, no matter what we do, our home still feels cold and our heating bills go through the roof. We think our home may need more insulation. Any advice before winter hits?

There’s a good chance you are right about the problem. Most older homes, and many newer ones, are not properly insulated. Adding insulation can be a good investment that pays year-round dividends since it can help keep out the summer heat as well. There are many types of insulation, but we’ll focus on the three most common types in residential buildings: batt, loose-fill and rigid. Batt insulation can be made with several kinds of fibers including fiberglass and wool. It’s cut to fit between the framing in your ceilings, walls or floors. Loose-fill insulation is made with small pellets or particles. It can be added by hand or blown in by machine into attic floors or exterior wall cavities. Rigid insulation comes in light sheets and is installed against a solid surface like an exterior wall or foundation. All insulation is measured by its R-value and a higher number is generally better. The R-value of an insulating material tells you how well it resists the transfer of heat—holding heat in when it’s cold outside and keeping heat out on scorching summer days. Manufacturers must show this number on their packaging. The recommended R-value you need depends on your climate and where the insulation is being added in your home.

A

For additional guidance on determining the right amount of insulation for your house, consult the Department of Energy’s website at energy.gov/energysaver/weatherize/insulation.

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DEPA RTM ENT O F EN ERGY

GET MORE

Aim for an R-value of 38 in your South Carolina attic. Loose-fill insulation is a good choice for attic use, but don’t attempt to install it yourself—this is a job for professionals.

If your heating costs are too high, there’s a good chance the attic is part of the problem. Finished attics are usually under-insulated and correcting the problem can be a challenge. If your attic is unfinished, solutions will be simpler and more cost-effective. You can inspect your unfinished attic but be cautious. Loose-fill insulation in older homes may have harmful asbestos that you absolutely do not want to disturb. It’s probably best to just poke your head in enough to look around, since it’s easy to damage wiring or ducts, or step through the ceiling. The attic will likely have loose-fill insulation or batts on the floor. Look carefully to see if the insulation is spread evenly with no gaps or voids. Different types of insulation have different R-values per inch. If your attic insulation is short of the recommended levels— in South Carolina, it’s R-38 for attics— you will likely see major energy savings by having a professional add enough to reach that level. The next place to check is the walls. Many homes built before 1980 have little

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

or no wall insulation, and even newer homes may lack proper insulation. You might be able to see if the walls are insulated by carefully removing an outlet cover. The most common technique for adding insulation to walls is to have it blown in through holes drilled from inside or outside the home. These holes can be easily patched. An alternative, if the house is being re-sided, is to add rigid insulation to the exterior, underneath the new siding. Finally, if your floor gets cold in winter and you have a crawl space, you can install batt insulation between the floor joists. If your home is built on a concrete slab, rigid foam can be installed around the perimeter. Insulation works great if you choose the right approach and the work is done carefully. Contact the energy experts at your electric co-op for more information about insulation solutions. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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www.doctorsmakinghousecalls.com SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   smart choice

Cool for school A new school year means loading up on the latest and greatest tech products. Here’s what you need to conquer the classroom this fall. BY DAVID NOVAK

THE WRITE COMPANION

Study smart with the new Livescribe Aegir Smartpen Education Edition. Digitize handwritten notes for easy search and review on your PC, make audio recordings through the innovative Livescribe+ app on your mobile, and share with the gang via the cloud. $110. livescribe.com.

KINDERGARTEN COP

Parents can enjoy a little peace of mind when they strap a Lil Tracker Kids GPS Watch to their youngster’s wrist. Utilizing GPS, Wi-Fi and LBS tracking, the device can provide location alerts, facilitate two-way voice chats and let parents listen in on their child’s surroundings. Children can place and receive calls to and from up to 15 programmed numbers and the watch features an SOS one-key emergency calling function. It also tells time. $70. (514) 262‑3777; liltracker.com.

VISIONARY

Multitasking on campus just got easier. Vuzix Blade AR Smart Glasses work with your smartphone to display everything from incoming texts, emails and phone calls to the latest news and weather alerts. You can even summon Amazon’s Alexa to do your bidding while the phone stays tucked away in your pocket. Bonus: A built-in camera lets you snap photos of the classroom white board and take videos of lectures with a simple tap on the frame. $700. (585) 359‑5900; vuzix.com.

CHARGE!

Charge up to three mobile devices at the same time with the myCharge HubMax, which gives you a whopping 10,050 mAh battery in a compact, useful form. It comes with one standard USB port, a built-in Apple Lightning cable and a built-in micro USB cable. When it’s time to charge the HubMax, just pull out the integrated wall prong and find the nearest outlet. $100. mycharge.com.

RISE AND SHINE

Start the school day rested and recharged with the Soundcore Wakey. This all-in-one alarm clock serves as a wireless charger for Apple and Samsung smartphones, streams music from any device via Bluetooth and makes it all sound great with compact, 5-watt dual speakers. $100. (800) 988‑7973; soundcore.com.

LOCKER SECURITY

The igloohome Smart Padlock secures your locker and gives you access from the onboard keypad or wirelessly from your phone. You can also issue a time-sensitive special code to others who need to access whatever you’ve locked up. $110. (929) 224‑0688; igloohome.co.

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   stories

Arthur England AGE:

60.

The corner of Summerville, Moncks Corner and Goose Creek. CLAIM TO FAME: Maker of eclectic cigar box guitars. See: facebook.com/BuddahsBoxGuitars. OTHER GIGS: Retired owner of an insulation business; part-time florist and floral designer. MUSICAL PREFERENCE: 1980s “hair bands.” CO-OP AFFILIATION: Member of Berkeley Electric Cooperative. HOME TURF:

Making music Arthur England has been making things his whole life. From furniture to floral arrangements, England can seemingly design anything he sets his mind to. Which gave him a leg up when a devastating motorcycle accident left him temporarily using a wheelchair and forced him to find a harmonious new pursuit. England took up playing guitar. “I learned tons of chords but just couldn’t seem to put them together and make a song,” he recalls. “I decided that if I can figure out how the guitar works, maybe I’ll have that ‘aha!’ moment that will make it work for me.” Research led him to study the handmade cigar box guitars used by blues musicians in the early-1900s. “I found out that it was a pretty basic instrument. They take a box, a stick and a string and they are playing the heck out of it,” he says. “They weren’t taught any music theory. They knew what sounded good.” And thus, Buddah’s Box Guitars was born. Through trial and error, he learned to make guitars from a variety of materials. “I’ve used tennis rackets, buckets, a wooden ironing board, forks and spoons for bridges and Corian samples for nuts at the top of the string,” says England. “My biggest seller of all time is a Krispy Kreme doughnut box.” His whimsical creations caught fire and have been adopted by amateur and professional musicians alike, including guitarists with Lynyrd Skynyrd, Big Head Todd and Daughtry. Orders continue to roll in and while his playing hasn’t improved much, England says, he’s living out a different musical dream. “Guitars are about as full time as I can do these days.” —LYNN & CELE SELDON | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS 16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   recipe

Indian cooking at home BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

CHICKEN VINDALOO This recipe for chicken curry served over basmati rice is perfect for a quick weeknight dinner. It does not require marinating and uses only one pan for preparation. You might make it a regular “go-to” meal! SPICE MIX

2 tablespoon garam masala 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon mustard powder 1 teaspoon brown sugar ½ teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste

CHICKEN TANDOORI SERVES 4–5

CHICKEN

Tandoori-style chicken is marinated in yogurt and spices for several hours, and then baked or grilled. This recipe—served as a main course or appetizer— also works well with chicken wings.

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1  H pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 medium onion, finely chopped 3–4 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon ginger, freshly grated G cup tomato paste H cup white wine or white vinegar 2 cups chicken stock Cilantro, for garnish

1 5-ounce container plain Greek yogurt Juice of 1 lime 1 clove garlic, minced 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger 1 teaspoon garam masala To make it homemade, see this month’s how-to video H teaspoon ground turmeric Kosher salt J teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 pounds skin-on drumsticks Chopped cilantro, for garnish Lime wedges, for garnish

In a small bowl, combine the garam masala, paprika, mustard powder, brown sugar and salt. Set aside. In a large skillet or saucepan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add chicken and cook until all of the pink areas start to brown. Remove to a plate. Add remaining oil to pan and add onions. Cook, stirring until soft, about 4–5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and cook another 30 seconds. Add the spice mix and cook, stirring, another minute. Add tomato paste, wine and chicken stock and stir. Return chicken to pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove top and cook 10 minutes more, allowing sauce to thicken. Garnish with cilantro and serve over basmati rice. 18

In a large bowl, using a whisk or spatula, combine yogurt, lime juice, garlic, ginger, garam masala, turmeric, salt and cayenne. Add the drumsticks and turn to coat thoroughly. Refrigerate and allow to marinate for at least two hours.

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

M ICHAE L PH I LLI PS

SERVES 4–6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Preheat oven to 400 F. Line a baking pan with foil and insert a wire cooking rack. Place drumsticks on rack and bake, turning once, until temperature reaches 165 F on an instant-read thermometer, about 20–25 minutes per side. Turn oven temperature to broil setting and broil until skin is crispy, about 2–3 minutes. Remove from oven, plate on a serving tray and garnish with cilantro and lime wedges.


BEEF CURRY SERVES 4

This dish is similar to what we know as beef stew, except with the unique spices and flavors of Indian food. 1 medium onion, chopped 2 tablespoons tomato paste H cup crushed tomatoes 1 cup beef stock Rice, to serve Raita, to serve See recipe below Cilantro, for garnish Mint, for garnish Sliced red chili, optional garnish

G I N A M OO RE

2 tablespoons garam masala (homemade or store-bought) 2–3 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, grated 2 H tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 pounds beef chuck, cut into 1-inch cubes (or store-bought cubed beef chunks)

GOAN COCONUT CAKE SERVES 6

Goan, also known as Baath cake, is made with semolina flour and grated coconut as its main ingredients. It is a traditional cake from Goa, India, that is customarily served on holidays. Before baking, it is refrigerated overnight to allow the semolina to absorb the moisture from the coconut, which results in a more tender crumb. Although quite tasty, this rustic cake will not be as smooth and moist as most familiar cakes.

In a small bowl, combine garam masala, garlic, ginger and lemon juice to form a paste. Set aside. In a large skillet or saucepan over medium-high heat, add 1 tablespoon olive oil. Add half the beef chunks and brown on all sides, stirring, 2–3 minutes. Remove to a bowl and repeat with remaining oil and beef. Reduce heat to medium, add onions and cook for 1 minute. Add paste and cook an additional minute. Add meat back to the skillet and stir to coat. Stir in tomato paste, crushed tomatoes and stock. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 1 hour 30 minutes or until beef is tender. If beef mixture gets too thick during simmering, stir in additional stock ¼ cup at a time.

Remove top and allow sauce to reduce and thicken, if necessary, about 15 minutes. Serve with basmati rice and raita. Garnish with cilantro, mint and chilis.

2 cups semolina flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon kosher salt 2 cups grated coconut 1 cup unsalted butter

1 cup powdered sugar 4 large eggs, separated 1 teaspoon rosewater or almond extract Powdered sugar, for dusting

Lightly butter and flour a 9-inch round cake pan, and line with parchment paper. Into a medium bowl, sift the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the coconut and whisk until combined. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add egg yolks one at a time and beat until combined. Add the extract. Gradually fold in the semolina mixture. The batter will be thick.

RAITA

Combine 1 cup thick yogurt with H finely diced seedless cucumber and 2 tablespoons freshly chopped mint leaves. Store in refrigerator.

In another medium bowl, beat the egg whites with a hand mixer using the whisk beater attachments, gradually increasing to the highest speed, until stiff peaks form. Reduce stand mixer speed to lowest setting and fold egg whites into the cake mixture. Spread the mixture evenly into the prepared cake pan. Cover with plastic film and refrigerate overnight. Remove batter from refrigerator, uncover and set on counter at least 30 minutes before baking. Preheat oven to 350 F. Bake for 30 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean. Remove from oven and cool slightly in pan. Remove from pan, remove parchment and cool completely on a cooling rack. Dust with powdered sugar before serving, if desired.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

HOMEMADE GARAM MASALA—Chef Belinda shows us how to make garam masala, a mainstay spice blend that is a must for authentic Indian flavor in meat dishes. Watch the video at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


KEITH PH I LLI P S


FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

In search of local color on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway BY JENNIFER BECKNELL

The smoky outlines of the Blue Ridge Mountain foothills rise above the tree line, beckoning me onward as I drive west along South Carolina’s scenic Hwy. 11. Rolling fields of corn and hay, strawberry farms, peach orchards, b ­ arbecue pits and produce stands decorate the 118-mile drive through the Upstate. The mountain view transforms from a hazy gray smudge on the horizon west of Chesnee into a stunning view of Table Rock towering above the road near Pickens. South Carolina’s nationally designated scenic route, officially known as the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway, starts on the north side of Gaffney before it winds and twists through small towns, rural areas and mountains north of Interstate 85, ending at Lake Hartwell State Park near the Georgia line. It’s a road for all seasons, the conduit to some of the Palmetto State’s best state parks, shimmering lakes, waterfalls and stunning fall color displays, but I’m on a quest for something more—roadside attractions with a unique South Carolina twist. Here are seven of my favorites.

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FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

Wildcat Wayside

Pretty Place Chapel

Table Rock Tea Company Caesars Head State Park

Oconee Station State Historic Site Sassafras Mountain

NORTH CAROLINA

Table Rock State Park

GEORGIA

Jones Gap State Park

Devil’s Fork State Park

KeoweeToxaway State Park

Jennifer’s must-see stops Classic attractions S.C. State Parks

Oconee State Park

Stumphouse Tunnel and Issaqueena Falls

Lake Hartwell State Park

Sassafras Mountain

Oconee State Park

Devil’s Fork State Park

Pretty Place Chapel

Keowee-Toxaway

Lake Hartwell State Park 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER: TA B LE ROCK TE A CO M PA N Y, W I LDC AT WAYS I DE , PO I NS E T T B RI DG E , STR AW B ERRY H I LL USA , STU M PH OUSE TU N N E L , SA SSA FR A S M OU NTA I N , A NTIQU E B I KES O N M A I N; KEITH PH I LLI P S: C A M PB E LL’ S COV ERED B RI DG E , PRE T T Y PL ACE CH A PE L; C A RRO LL FOSTER: PE ACHO I D; A M Y TR A I N U M: COW PENS; SCPRT: OCO N EE STATIO N , A LL STATE PA RK PHOTOS .


Poinsett Bridge

Campbell’s Covered Bridge Strawberry Hill USA Gaffney Peachoid Chesnee “Antique Bikes on Main”

Cowpens National Battlefield GAFFNEY

The scenic route Make time to visit these iconic roadside attractions on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway

Antique Bikes on Main Last weekend in July

State Park

Table Rock State Park

Caesars Head State Park

Cowpens National Battlefield

Jones Gap State Park

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

C A RRO LL FOSTER

1 Gaffney Peachoid

who want to enjoy a picnic lunch and take pictures of this enduring curiosity.

The Gaffney Peachoid, a giant, peach-shaped water tower that was the “butt” of a running joke in a 2013 episode of the Netflix series House of Cards, is hard to miss looming over Interstate 85 and the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway. What better way to start a Hwy. 11 road trip than taking a few lighthearted selfies with the iconic landmark? The tower was built in 1981 to honor the region’s peach industry and repainted in 2017 to give it a riper pink hue. “We think it’s the prettiest tank in the country, by far,” says Donnie Hardin, general manager of the Gaffney board of public works. He points out that the 135-foot tower’s design is a copyrighted original, though the City of Gaffney did allow the town of Clayton, Alabama, to build a half-sized replica. Visitors to the landmark will find it enclosed by a fence with a small parking area and picnic tables for visitors

The Peachoid is located at 294 Peachoid Road, Gaffney, off northbound I-85 between exits 90 and 92. Admission is free; gated picnic area open during daylight hours. (864) 488‑8800; gbpw.com/peachoid-information.

Strawberry Hill USA

2 M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER

24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Dozens of red, white and blue streamers fluttering in the breeze welcome travelers to Strawberry Hill USA. The roadside produce stand, farm, cafe and agritourism site west of Chesnee, also known as Cooley Family Farms, is open all year with seasonally changing produce—pumpkins and apples in fall, peaches through the summer, and strawberries in spring. But the farm kicks into high gear in September and October. “The fall is a time when we invite families out for fun on the farm,” says Brandi Easler, the oldest daughter of owner James Cooley. The 10-acre corn maze is scheduled to operate this year between Sept. 22 and Oct. 28. Hayrides to the pumpkin patch, where children can pick a small pumpkin and spend time exploring, will be offered on Saturdays and Sundays from the last week of September through October. Visitors can enjoy breakfast, lunch and homemade ice cream treats at the cafe that sits across the road from the sprawling produce stand, where the bins will be filled with whatever is in season—tomatoes, berries, peaches, apples, melons, beans and more. The farm also offers its brand of bottled ciders, preserves and fruit breads to fuel your Hwy. 11 road trip. Strawberry Hill USA, aka Cooley Family Farms, is located at 3097 Hwy. 11 West, about six miles west of Chesnee. Produce stand hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week. Cafe hours are 6 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday and closed on Sunday. Ice cream parlor is open until 8 p.m. seven days a week. (864) 461‑7225; strawberryhillusa.com. CONT. ON PAGE 25 uu


Campbell’s Covered Bridge A short detour off Hwy. 11 near the town of Landrum takes travelers to South Carolina’s only remaining covered wooden bridge. Built in 1909, the 38-foot-long, 12-foot-wide bridge, which crosses Beaverdam Creek, is the centerpiece of a Greenville County park where visitors can get their feet wet, take a short hike through the woods and explore the foundation of the old grist mill and homestead. The bridge is now a popular spot for photographs and family picnics, but back in the day, it was part of the vital infrastructure, says Colin Young, parks and development planner with Greenville County. Dean Campbell, local historian and owner of Dark Corner Tours, says this particular bridge is named for his great-grand-uncle, Alexander Lafayette Campbell, owner of a local grist mill. “It’s a very unique design,” says Campbell, who explains that while the walls of the old bridge have developed a slight lean, the base is made with four spans, each with a double crossbar of giant timbers and steel rods. “It’s 110 years old and yet it doesn’t sag. And the reason it doesn’t sag is because of the design.” Campbell’s Covered Bridge is located at 171 Campbell Covered Bridge Road, Landrum. Admission is free; park is open daylight hours. (864) 288‑6470; greenvillerec.com/parks/campbells-covered-bridge.

KEITH PH I LLI P S

3

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

25


FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

Ranger Virginia Fowler welcomes visitors to Cowpens.

Cowpens National Battlefield

Just a few miles down the road from Caesars Head State Park, the open-air Fred W. Symmes Chapel on the grounds of YMCA Camp Greenville provides visitors one of the state’s most stunning views of the Blue Ridge Foothills—especially at sunrise and during fall leaf season. Access to the site, commonly known as Pretty Place Chapel, is open to the public whenever it’s not in use by campers or rented out for weddings. The chapel is located at 100 YMCA Camp Road in Cleveland, but before making the trip consult the calendar at campgreenville.org/ pretty-place/reservations/#chapelschedule.

The Battle of Cowpens was a major turning point in the American Revolution, and if you bleed red, white and blue, you’ll feel a powerful sense of pride at what Patriot militiamen accomplished on these rolling fields on Jan. 17, 1781, when they soundly defeated an elite unit of British soldiers. From the interpretive center, visitors can take selfguided walking tours on 1.3 miles of well-marked trails or take the auto loop, a 3.8-mile drive that circles the field’s outskirts. Each January, the park holds a weekend-long Anniversary Celebration (scheduled for Jan. 18–19, 2020) complete with a battle re-creation. Ranger-hosted events include Living History Days (Sept. 7, Sept. 14 and Nov. 9 in 2019) and a performance of the outdoor drama The Night before Kings Mountain on Oct. 6. The park entrance off Hwy. 11 is about three miles east of Chesnee, but your GPS will only recognize it as 4001 Chesnee Hwy., Gaffney. (864) 461‑2828; nps.gov/cowp.

Sassafras Mountain

Antique Bikes on Main

Before a $1.1 million viewing platform opened this spring, a trip to South Carolina’s highest peak (3,553 feet) tended to be a bit disappointing—trees blocked most of the view. Today, visitors enjoy a 360-degree panorama of the Blue Ridge Mountains including lakes Hartwell, Keowee and Jocassee, North Carolina’s Pisgah Mountain and Georgia’s Currahee Mountain. The platform, 21 miles north of Pickens, is located at the end of F. Van Clayton Memorial Highway and open year-round. Admission is free. For more information, visit S.C. Department of Natural Resources (dnr.sc.gov), Foothills Trail Conservancy (foothillstrail.org) or Visit Pickens County (visitpickenscounty.com).

If you take Hwy. 11 through Chesnee on the last weekend in July, you’ll roll into the state’s biggest antique motorcycle festival. Organized as a combination bike show and swap meet, Antique Bikes on Main coincides with the Chesnee City Festival, so there’s plenty of live music, carnival rides for the kids and food vendors on hand. The fun starts on Friday evening and runs through Sunday. Motorcyclists can park their bikes (new or old) alongside the classic rides, and all riders are welcome to join the bike parade and prayer ride. (864) 590‑2141; chesneeclassiccycle.com.

Pretty Place Chapel

Stumphouse Tunnel and Issaqueena Falls Bring a flashlight and jacket to explore this never-­completed railway tunnel from the 1850s that burrows a quarter-mile into solid blue granite. You’ll feel goosebumps from the spooky experience and from the consistent 56-degree temperature that in the 1950s made the tunnel an ideal place to mold Clemson University’s famous blue cheese. The 440-acre Stumphouse Park, operated by the City of Walhalla, is also home to Issaqueena Falls and newly expanded hiking and mountain biking trails that link to the Upstate portions of the cross-state Palmetto Trail. The park is located on Stumphouse Tunnel Road off Hwy. 28, about six miles north of Walhalla. Admission: $5 per vehicle. (864) 638‑4343; visitoconeesc.com/stumphouse-park. 26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

KEITH PH I LLI P S: STU M PH OUS E TU N N E L , PRE T T Y PL ACE CH A PE L; A M Y TR A I N U M: COW PENS; OTH ERS BY M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER


4

Poinsett Bridge

It’s easy to see why this Gothic stone bridge has been the subject of many ghost stories. Poinsett Bridge, completed in 1820 and nestled in the shade of a heavily forested area off Callahan Mountain Road near Travelers Rest, feels like the setting for a medieval fairy tale. Its fitted stone construction—each piece of rock chiseled to match the others and dry-stacked together with nothing but sand and clay—forms a 14-foot arch. But the Gothic arch wasn’t built for looks; it was built so horses or mules could pull a fully loaded wagon up the incline, says Dean Campbell, a local historian and tour guide. The 130-foot bridge which crosses Little Gap Creek was built on a toll road from Charleston to the North Carolina mountains. It’s now at the heart of the 120-acre Poinsett Bridge

Heritage Preserve. A drive through the preserve is a peaceful way to take in peak fall color. The bridge was named for Joel Poinsett, an amateur botanist who chaired the state board of public works at the time. He later became an American diplomat in Mexico and brought back many plants, including the species named after him—the poinsettia. Campbell, who grew up camping near the bridge, says the eerie sounds one hears at night may have inspired ghost stories, but they have a simple explanation. “It’s because of the archway,” he explains. “The wind that whistles through the arch does have a different sound.” Poinsett Bridge is located at 580 Callahan Mountain Road, Travelers Rest, in the Poinsett Bridge Heritage Preserve. Admission is free; open daylight hours. (864) 288‑6470; greenvillerec.com/parks/poinsett-bridge.

KEITH PH I LLI P S

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FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

KEITH PH I LLI P S

Leaf peeping on Hwy. 11

For more on all the ways to enjoy fall color displays, visit scenic11.com. For daily updates and forecasts on the arrival of peak fall color, see smokymountains.com/fall-foliage-map. 28

Wildcat Wayside

5

Hundreds of Upstate waterfalls lure visitors off the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway and into the surrounding hills, but to reach Wildcat Branch Falls, all you have to do is pull off on a paved turnout. The roadside stop is known as Wildcat Wayside. Just steps off the highway, the mountain stream cascades about 20 feet over a slab of granite and flows into a shallow pool that is a perfect place to stop and splash around. “The accessibility is the No. 1 attraction,” says Bryn Harmer, manager of the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area that includes the falls. “It’s just right there on the road. It’s a waterfall that does not require a hike.” If you do care to stretch your legs, an easy, one-mile trail from the lower falls winds through a forest of white pine and hemlock, up stairs and through thickets of mountain laurel and rhododendron to the base of the upper falls. The trail to the top of the 130-foot-tall upper falls is now closed, but visitors can still get an excellent view from the base. Wildcat Wayside is on the right side of S.C. 11, traveling west, about five miles west of the U.S. 276 junction. Admission is free; open daylight hours. (864) 836-6115; sctrails.net/trails/trail/wildcat-wayside.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER

Hwy. 11 is a popular destination during fall when visitors from across the Southeast come to take in the brilliant spectacle of changing leaves that paint the foothills in shades of yellow, orange, red and amber. The best time to see fall colors varies from year to year, but generally occurs from the last week of October through the first week to 10 days of November, says Tim Todd, director of the Discover Upcountry Carolina Association, which promotes tourism in a six-county area along the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway. Teresa Lewis, who with husband Ed owns Aunt Sue’s Country Corner, a cafe and general store on Hwy. 11 between Caesars Head and Table Rock state parks, says the parks draw thousands of visitors in the fall. But there are other places to take in the sight of changing leaves, she says. “You can get off the main route, and take some of the country roads, and see a lot,” says Lewis, a member of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative. She also says the area draws a lot of motorcycle riders because “they really like the curves.” Leaf color varies along the corridor and changes with elevation, Todd says. He recommends visitors enjoy leaf season as part of other outdoor activities along the corridor. “You can see it by car driving along Scenic 11, but you can also enjoy it with a horseback riding trip, a whitewater rafting trip, zip line, hiking,” he says. “It’s all about the outdoors.”


Table Rock Tea Company The newest roadside attraction on Hwy. 11, Table Rock Tea Company, started by accident. Steve Lorch and his wife, Jennifer, founded the business several years ago when they purchased a 17-acre farm practically in the shadow of Table Rock State Park. Tours of the facility where they now grow, harvest and process the leaves from about 6,000 mature Camellia sinensis plants, are offered by appointment, Thursday through Sunday. “We’re actually a tea grower, a tea maker and a tea seller,” Lorch says. “We do everything from start to finish.” The couple learned about tea while in Kenya, one of about

Oconee Station State Historic Site

M AT TH E W FR A N K LI N C A RTER

6 30 countries they visited with Hydromissions International, a nonprofit, nondenominational Christian mission they created to bring clean water to developing nations. When they retired to the farm in 2008, the couple decided to use tea plants to create an ornamental hedge and one thing led to another. “When we got to about 400 or 500 plants, we said, ‘Why don’t we start a tea company?’ So we did.” Table Rock Tea Company is located at 118 High Hills Lane, Pickens, off Carrick Creek Road across from Table Rock State Park. Free tours by appointment Thursday through Sunday. (864) 915‑0571; tablerocktea.com.

7 SCPRT

For the final stop of my journey, I detour off Hwy. 11 to visit Oconee Station State Historic Site near Walhalla and explore a little-known era of South Carolina history. In the post-Revolutionary War period, this 210-acre tract marked the border between South Carolina and territory inhabited by the Cherokee and Creek Indian tribes, says ranger Scott Alexander. The property housed a state militia garrison staffed by 27 men, who probably found the post a bit boring. “In the years after the American Revolution, South Carolina and Georgia were on pretty good relationships with the Cherokee, but not the Creek,” Alexander says. “There were no armed conflicts at this site. What they were really trying to stop was cattle raiding.” The fort closed in 1799 after several years without a skirmish, he says, but settlers continued to occupy the site as a frontier trading town where they exchanged skins, furs, livestock and manufactured goods with Native Americans. A 1792 garrison structure and the 1805 home of trader William Richards still stand. The buildings are open for tours on Saturdays and

Sundays and by appointment, but visitors can see the exterior of the structures at any time. There’s also a four-acre pond on-site and an easy 1.5-mile walking trail from the parking lot into Sumter National Forest that ends at Station Cove Falls, a stepped 60-foot waterfall. Oconee Station State Historic Site is located at 500 Oconee Station Road, Walhalla. Admission is free; hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily; tours offered 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and by appointment. (864) 638‑0079; southcarolinaparks.com/oconee-station.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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FALL & WINTERL TRAVE ISSUE

Always in season BY MICHAEL BANKS

The Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway is both a scenic drive and the main route to some of South Carolina’s top state parks. Don’t miss out on the four-season fun of camping, hiking, fishing and exploring nature at these treasured places.

Oconee State Park  q

Caesars Head State Park  p

624 State Park Road, Mountain Rest (864) 638-5353 southcarolinaparks.com/oconee History and “parkitecture.” This park and its distinctive wood and stone buildings were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) during the Great Depression. A monument honors those who served in the CCC between 1933 and 1942.

KNOWN FOR:

Lake Hartwell State Park  p 19138 S. Hwy. 11, Fair Play (864) 972-3352 southcarolinaparks.com/ lake-hartwell

INSIDER TIP: Bring closed-toe shoes and extra energy for the strenuous, three-hour hike on Hidden Falls Trail, and you’ll be rewarded with an awesome view of the 60-foot cascade, says assistant park ranger Savanna Kelley. “You can see the waterfall more in the fall than any other season.”

KNOWN FOR:

u Outstanding fishing. Striped and hybrid bass, largemouth bass, crappie, bream and catfish inhabit this 56,000-acre lake. u Camping. In addition to 115 paved campsites for RV or tent camping along the lakeshore, the park is one of only a few in the state to offer single-room camper cabins. INSIDER TIP: “A lot of people come in for Clemson football games,” says ranger Brooks Garrett. “They’ll bring their campers in, stay for the weekend and go tailgating.”

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

8155 Geer Highway, Cleveland (864) 836-6115 southcarolinaparks.com/ caesars-head KNOWN FOR:

u The scenic overlook. Perched 3,200 feet above sea level, visitors can enjoy a spectacular view that extends into North Carolina and Georgia. u Hawk watch. From September through November, migratory hawks rise and soar over the park. Visitors can help track the birds as part of the Hawk Watch program. u Hiking. Stretch your legs on a network of 12 trails, ranging from easy to strenuous. The popular Raven Cliff Falls Trail leads to the tallest waterfall in the state. INSIDER TIP: Don’t forget to look down, says Tim Lee, an interpretive ranger for the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area that encompasses both Caesars Head and Jones Gap state parks. “There are a lot of beautiful fall wildflowers that bloom along our trails.”

KEITH PH I LLI P S: C A ESA RS H E A D; M IC SM ITH: TA B LE ROCK ; OTH ERS COU RTESY O F SCPRT


Devils Fork State Park  p

161 Holcombe Circle, Salem (864) 944-2639 southcarolinaparks.com/devils-fork KNOWN FOR:

u Lake Jocassee. Four mountain streams and several

waterfalls flow into the 7,565-acre lake, making it cool yearround and one of the state’s top trout-fishing spots. u Leaf peeping. Fall color doesn’t get any prettier than this. INSIDER TIP: During peak leaf season, bring a boat for an amazing display, says park manager Kevin Evans. “Just get out on the lake and look at all the levels of color change. You can see the progression of fall by viewing the different elevations.”

Table Rock State Park  p

158 Ellison Lane, Pickens (864) 878-9813 southcarolinaparks.com/table-rock KNOWN FOR:

u Table Rock. The towering mountain offers breathtaking views if you can master the strenuous hike to the top. u Bluegrass music. The “Music on the Mountain” program takes place in the park lodge from 2 to 6 p.m. the second Saturday of each month. INSIDER TIP: Ranger Scott Stegenga recommends the guided Sunrise Hikes up Table Rock to watch the full moon disappear from the sky before the sun appears on the horizon. “It’s a long hike, but it’s worth it once you get up there. To sit and take in all the surrounding wilderness, watch the sky change, hear the birds awake, to witness the breaking of a new day—it’s just an exhilarating time,” he says. There is a $25 per person fee and registration is required. The next hikes will be Sept. 22 and Oct. 19.

Jones Gap State Park  u

303 Jones Gap Road, Marietta (864) 836-3647 southcarolinaparks.com/ jones-gap Beautiful waterfalls. Hikers can visit five of the state’s top falls in the park.

KNOWN FOR:

Keowee-Toxaway State Park  p

108 Residence Drive, Sunset (864) 868-2605 southcarolinaparks.com/keowee-toxaway KNOWN FOR:

u Lake Keowee. The 18,500-acre lake is surrounded by stunning views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. u Wildflowers. They are abundant, especially in spring, and include two rare species—the Allegheny spurge and ginseng. INSIDER TIP: “It’s a pretty park, but you really have to get out on the hiking trails,” says park manager Kevin Blanton. Camping? He suggests the No. 3 trailside site. “It’s located out on a finger of land surrounded by Lake Keowee.”

INSIDER TIP: Some of the best fishing for wild trout can be found on the Middle Saluda River, a designated scenic waterway that runs through the park, says ranger Tim Lee. “You get a true wilderness experience where you feel that you are the only person out there. It’s just you and the river.”

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T able Rock State P ark

Share the Gift OF THE

GREAT OUTDOORS

Purchase your Park Passport at

SouthCarolinaParks.com.

Whether you’re looking for a way to spend quality time with your family or for the perfect gift for the outdoor enthusiast in your life, a Park Passport is a great way to explore the Palmetto State. South Carolina’s 47 state parks offer some of the most inviting natural, cultural and recreational destinations in the country, from stunning mountains and towering waterfalls to sandy beaches and treasured historic sites. Park Passports are valid for a year from the date of purchase, so you can take the time to experience everything South Carolina State Parks have to offer.


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

Get your tickets before they sell out! August 2019 8/24 Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder 8/25 Restless Heart 8/31 The Swingin’ Medallions September 2019 9/8 Cornell Gunter’s Coasters 9/11 “Love Letters” Starring Barbara Eden & Barry Bostwick 9/12 Hot Club of Cowtown 9/15 John Wager & friends 9/20 Everclear 9/21 The Buckinghams 9/27 William Bell, Soul Pioneer 9/28 Forever Motown October 2019 10/2 Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives 10/3 Fireside Collective 10/4 Blue Öyster Cult 10/5 Mac McAnally 10/6 Angelina Ballerina, The Musical 10/12 The Marshall Tucker Band 10/13 Once: Broadway Musical 10/15 Nobuntu, A Cappella from Zimbabwe 10/17 Jackyl 10/18 The Kingdom Choir 10/20 Dali Quartet 10/26 Thunderstruck AC/DC Tribute

SAVOR THE SEASONS inUpcountry South Carolina

ANDERSON

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CHEROKEE

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GREENVILLE

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OCONEE

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SPARTANBURG

December 2019 12/1 The Tams & The 14k Gold Band 12/3 The Velveteen Rabbit 12/5 Stop Light Observations 12/6 Rhythm of the Yuletide Dance 12/11 Christmas with John Berry 12/12 The TEN Tenors Home for The Holidays 12/13 An Evening with CeCe Winans 12/15 The Nutcracker January 2020 1/10 Jimmy Fortune 1/11 Heart By Heart 1/12 Menopause – The Musical 1/16 Verdi’s La Traviata 1/17 Balsam Range 1/18 Unspoken Tradition 1/21 Travis Tritt, Solo 1/22 Travis Tritt, Solo 1/24 Night Fever- The Bee Gees Tribute 1/25 Jake Shimabukuro 1/31 Delbert McClinton February 2020 2/1 Harry Potter & The Sacred Text 2/13 Cirque Zuma Zuma 2/14 The Don Felder Band 2/16 Dinosaur World 2/21 Sierra Hull 2/22 Rhonda Vincent & The Rage 2/23 An Intimate Night With Sandi Patty 2/28 Ken Ford, King of Strings 2/29 James Gregory

E

njoy the blooming Dogwoods and Azaleas in Spring. In Summer, explore waterfalls, rivers and lakes. Take a drive along scenic byways for the fabulous Fall foliage. Spend a weekend in a cozy cabin during Winter. Whenever you choose to visit, the Upcountry will be Perfectly Seasoned for you!

November 2019 11/5 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy 11/6 Macbeth Presented by Warehouse Theatre 11/10 “Pirate School!” 11/13 Iron Butterfly 11/15 John Hiatt 11/20 Aaron Neville 11/21 Oleta Adams 11/22 Edwin McCain 11/23 Edwin McCain 11/24 Joey Alexander Trio 11/26 ’Twas the Night Before Christmas

March 2020 3/5 The Lettermen visit our website to view the full season listing! Perfectly Seasoned

UpcountrySC.com | 800.849.4766 | FREE Visitors Guide

Box Office 803-276-6264 NewberryOperaHouse.com

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FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

Step back In Time Come experience the cultural history, folklife and unique people that make Pickens County such a special place to visit. • October 19th Storytelling Festival & Liar’s Competition • November 15th-16th Native American Celebration-Selugadu • December 21st Celtic Memories • January 18th, 2020 Ringing in the New Year • February 15th, 2020 Winter Time Blues *Partially funded by ATAX dollars

Edisto Beach in the Fall... Rent a charming beach cottage and play a round of golf. Enjoy fishing, biking or kayaking when the rates are lower and the temperature is milder.

edistochamber.com

www.HagoodMillFoundation.org

34

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

843.869.3867


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

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Christmas Candlelight Tours • Dec. 7 & 14

A S O U T H E R N - S T Y L E C H R I S T M A S I N T H E C A R O L I N A B A C K C O U N T RY

HISTORIC BRATTONSVILLE • CHMUSEUMS.ORG • 1444 BRATTONSVILLE RD. MCCONNELLS, SC 29726 • 803.684.2327 PROJECT ASSISTED BY CITY OF ROCK HILL AND YORK COUNTY ACCOMMODATIONS & HOSPITALITY TAX PROGRAMS

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FIRSTS THAT LAST and the NC design are service marks of the EDPNC.

The first time Zac & Tomo tasted moonshine, it was distilled from a recipe FIVE generations old.

SEE THEIR STORY AT VISIT NC. COM


Your 360°

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Located in western NC, Jackson County combines outdoor excitement and charming mountain towns. As your gateway to adventures big and small, it’s the perfect place to stay while exploring the Great Smoky Mountains.

up a creek isn’t necessarily a bad thing... www.visithickorymetro.com

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Home of Petty Family Attractions

Sept 27-29, Oct 4-6

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N.C. Transportation Museum Spencer, NC nctrans.org

FOR TICKETS:

Visit dayoutwiththomas.com or call TicketWeb at 866-468-7630

Ask about our special overnight packages!


Raylrode Daze Festivul Branchville, South Carolina September 22-29, 2019

www.scjazzfestival.com

Discover Georgetown, USA Today’s Best Coastal Small Town in America. Visit Georgetown to experience a vibrant, historic waterfront district filled with fine restaurants, stunning photo opportunities and unique boutiques.

Sun, Sept 22: Kickoff Car & Truck Show, 2-5 pm Wed, Sept 25: Magic Show & Balloons, 6:30 pm Thurs, Sept 26: Music by Don Colton Fri, Sept 27: Music by Men of Distinction, 7 pm Sat, Sept 28: Parade, 11 am Costume Contest, 3 pm Music by Cody Webb, 7 pm

OCT 18-20 • FRI SAT SUN FEATURING

FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

51st Annual

Discover Georgetown South Carolina

Pianist Emmet Cohen Trio

Sammy Miller

with special guest trumpeter Bruce Harris

& the Congregation

Come see what sets us apart.

• • • • • • • • •

Arts & Crafts Can Can Girls Western Gun Fights Entertainment Food Including Fiske Fries and Eric’s BBQ DJ Ernie Haigler Live Bands Games all Weekend Long Ride the Cal Smoak Special

Registration is Free for the Car & Truck Show!

Visit us on Cheraw.com or call 888.537.0014

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Plan your nex t far m adventure at scfar m f un .org

South Carolina

AGRITOURISM

PASSPORT Pick up your passport to SC Farm Fun at participating farms across the state and start collecting stamps today to win Certified SC prizes! View the list of participating farms at scagritourism.org.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


• Sept 28

No Bogeys at Boyd Pond Park

• Oct 31 -Nov 3

Katydid Combined Driving Event in Windsor

• Nov 1 -2

Hook and Cook Festival in the Town of Jackson

Aiken County Visitors Center 133 Laurens Street, NW, SC 29801 803.642.7557

FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

Come Explore the Outdoors

www.discoveraikencounty.com

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FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

October 19th & 20th

Street fest dates Juried Fine Art Show features 100 different artists From 10 different states!

Local Seafood and Music!

• • • • • • • •

Children’s Art Activities & Fishing Tournament Pop Up Art Displays Boat Parade Boat, Kayak & Paddleboard Tours Environmental Tours Oyster 10k/5k Run Fireworks Author Night – “Our Prince of Scribes: Writers remember Pat Conroy” • Delectable Culinary Events: State of Mind Supper Soiree Red Apron Sip & Seafood Party • Gullah-Geechee History Celebrations AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!

Spring will be here before you know it. Make plans now to advertise in our Spring & Summer Travel Guide! (803) 739‑5074 ads@scliving.coop

Come Celebrate With McCormick County.

Lexington Medical Center Proudly Presents

Don’t miss our Fall and Holiday Events!

• Dorn Mill Complex Showcase Friday, September 20th Grand Opening of Cotton Gin and Artist Reception.

• 42nd Annual Gold Rush Festival

Saturday, September 21st Pan for Gold at the Heritage Gold Mine Park

• Holiday on Main

Friday, December 6 Festival of Trees & Holiday Market

• Holiday Parade

Saturday, December 7 Festival of Trees & Holiday Market

SEPTEMBER 27 & 28TH @ The Irmo Community Park 7507 Eastview Dr in Irmo, SC 29063 With Evening Music Performances From

Terence Young & the Finesse Band Slippery When Wet

&

Edwin McCain

For more information Call (864) 852-2835 E-mail info@mccormickscchamber.org Visit www.mccormickscchamber.org

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

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|

SC   calendar SEPT 15–OCT 15

Upstate SE P T E M BE R

13–15  Indie Craft Parade, Timmons

Arena at Furman University, Greenville. (864) 406‑6253. 19–22  euphoria Food, Wine & Music Festival, downtown, Greenville. (864) 233‑5663. 19–22  Spartanburg Greek Festival, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Spartanburg. (864) 585‑5961. 20–21  Sooie, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 20–21  South Greenville Fair, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 915‑2746. 21  Charity Open Water Swim, Devils Fork State Park, Lake Jocassee. (864) 400‑9967. 21  McCormick Gold Rush Festival, Heritage Gold Mine, McCormick. (864) 852‑2835. 21  South Greenville Fair Antique Tractor Show, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 430‑1412. 21  Union County Farm Show, Union County Fairgrounds, Union. (864) 426‑0922. 24–28  South Carolina Foothills Heritage Fair, The F.A.R.M Center, Westminster. (864) 723‑0698. 28  Dancing with the Carolina Stars, Greenville Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 467‑3660. 28  Due West Fall Festival, downtown, Due West. (864) 379‑2385. 28  Holy Smoke BBQ! St. John’s Lutheran Church, Walhalla. (864) 710‑1756. 28  Komen Race for the Cure, Fluor Field at the West End, Greenville. (864) 234‑5035. 28  Piedmont American Indian Association 12th Annual PowWow, PAIA Tribal Grounds, Gray Court. (423) 494‑4255. O C TO B E R

3–5  Albino Skunk Music

Festival, Skunk Farm, Greer. info@albinoskunk.com. 3–5  Moonshiners Reunion and Mountain Music Festival, Plum Hollow Farm, Campobello. (864) 357‑0222. 5  Art on the Trail, Main Street, Travelers Rest. (864) 610‑2732. 5  Piedmont Women’s Center Run for Life 5K, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 244‑1434. 5  Ridge Runner Corvettes 4th Annual GM & Hot Rod Fall Car Show, Kevin Whitaker Chevrolet Cadillac, Travelers Rest. (508) 944‑1144 or (240) 271‑7604. 6  Transformation Walk and 5K Run, First Baptist Church, Greenville. (864) 335‑2615.

44

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 7–13  Piedmont Interstate Fair,

Piedmont Interstate Fairgrounds, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7042. 10–12  Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency, Greenville. (877) 803‑7534. 11  Walhalla Makers Market, Durham Hall Courtyard, Walhalla. walhallamakersmarket@gmail.com. 11–13  Fall for Greenville, Main Street, Greenville. (864) 467‑6667. 12  Bluegrass and Apples in Long Creek, Long Creek Park, Westminster. (480) 540‑8021. 12  Pynkalycious Breast Cancer Awareness Event, Younts Center for Performing Arts, Fountain Inn. (864) 862‑6797. 12  Rach 2, Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. 15–29  Union County Agricultural Fair, Union County Fair Grounds, Union. (864) 427‑6259, ext. 112. O NG O ING

Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper

Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900. Saturdays until Sept. 28  Farmers Market, Commerce Park, Fountain Inn. (864) 724‑8044.

Midlands S E PTE MB E R

11–15  Colour of Music Festival, Chappelle Auditorium at Allen University, Columbia. (864) 406‑6838. 12–15  Bicycle Across South Carolina, 150 miles of the Palmetto Trail, Sumter to Awendaw. (843) 937‑5458. 14–15  St. Anne International Festival, St. Anne Catholic Church, Rock Hill. (803) 792‑1442. 19–22  Columbia’s Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Columbia. (803) 461‑0248. 20  Red Jacket Classic Golf Tournament, The Members Club at Woodcreek, Elgin. (803) 254‑0118. 20  Riverbanks ZOOfari, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. 20  Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers 5K Run & Walk, Columbia Regional Visitors Center, Columbia. columbia@tunnel2towers.org. 21  Art in the Park, Historic Memorial Park, Sumter. (803) 406‑2177.

21  Color Me for Life, Westminster

Park, Rock Hill. (803) 746‑4946. 21  Jubilee: Festival of Black History & Culture, Mann-Simons Site, Columbia. jubilee@historiccolumbia.org. 21  Palmetto Peanut Boil, Devine Street, Columbia. info@animalmission.org. 21  Party with PAALS – an UN-Gala, South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 788‑7063. 21  Revolutionary Run Half Marathon and 5K, Camden City Arena, Camden. info@eggplantevents.com. 21  Take a Child Outside: Bio Blitz, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. 21  Walk to End Hydrocephalus, The Village at Sandhill, Columbia. (803) 701‑9255. 22  “Made in America” Concert, Harbison Theatre at Midlands Technical College, Irmo. (803) 400‑3540. 22  Raylrode Daze Car & Truck Show, downtown, Branchville. (803) 378‑5504. 24–29  Sumter County Fair, Little League Park, Sumter. (803) 775‑5200. 27–28  Okra Strut Festival, Community Park of Irmo, Irmo. info@okrastrut.com. 27–29  Raylrode Daze Festivul, downtown, Branchville. (803) 378‑5504. 28  Country Cool Comedy, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 28  Piedmont Pottery & Pickin’, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 28  Teal Day 5K, 2801 Devine St., Columbia. (803) 799‑4786. 29  Peace in the Park, Greene Street at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. interfaithpartnersofsc.org.

5  Fall Festival, Philadelphia

United Methodist Church, Fort Mill. (803) 548‑0102. 5  Fish Fry, Friendship United Methodist Church, Rock Hill. (803) 230‑3223. 5  Ray Tanner Home Run, Founders Park, Columbia. raytannerfoundation.org. 10  Tiffany: Pieces of Me Tour, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 10–12  Ridge Spring Harvest Festival, Ridge Spring, ridgespringharvestfestival.com 12  2019 Walk for Life and Famously Hot Pink Half Marathon, 5K + 10K, Spirit Communications Park, Columbia. (803) 434‑2818. 12  BBQ Cook-Off on Blueberry Hill, First Nazareth Baptist Church, Columbia. (803) 414‑6803.

27  Dine, Dance & Discover Gala, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 28  Golden Leaf Festival, Anderson Brother’s Bank parking lot, Mullins. (843) 464‑9583. 28  Irish Italian International Festival, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5673. OCTOBER

2–6  Association for the Study of

African-American Life and History Annual Meeting and Conference, Embassy Suites by Hilton, North Charleston. (843) 747‑1882. 3  Keepin’ Jazz Alive, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 3  What is Underwater Archaeology? Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 3–5  Gopher Hill Festival, downtown, Ridgeland. (843) 258‑4008. 3–19  Pawleys Island Festival of Music and Art, multiple venues, Pawleys Island. (843) 626‑8911. 4  The Art of Indigo Dyeing, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. ONGOING 4–5  Beaufort Shrimp Festival, Henry Daily until Sept. 30  Gretchen C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. Hash-Heffner Exhibit, Aiken County (843) 525‑8500. Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Daily until Oct. 31  Laurie Adamson 4–13  Greater Pee Dee State Fair & Expo, Florence Center, Florence. Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, (843) 385‑3180. Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 5  Goose Creek Fall Festival, Marguerite H. Brown Municipal Center, Goose Creek. (843) 569‑4242. 5  NAMIWalks Lowcountry, SEPTEMBER Coligny Beach, Hilton Head Island. 12–15  Bicycle Across South (912) 678‑6903. Carolina, 150 miles of the Palmetto Trail, Sumter to Awendaw. 5  Surfside Beach Family Festival, (843) 937‑5458. Surfside Drive, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 12–21  Society of Stranders Fall Migration, Ocean Drive Beach and Golf 7  Palmetto Goodwill Open, Kiawah Resort, Myrtle Beach. (803) 371‑4731. Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island. (843) 377‑2838. 15  Undy 500, Low Country Harley-Davidson, North Charleston. 12  Purrysburg in the American (843) 377‑2838. Revolution, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. 19–21  South Carolina Tobacco (843) 284‑9227. Festival, downtown, Lake City. (843) 374‑8611. 13  Latin American Festival, North OCTOBER Charleston Wannamaker County Park, 21  Aynor Harvest Hoe-Down 1–6  Orangeburg County Fair, North Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. Festival, Aynor Town Park, Aynor. Orangeburg County Fairgrounds, (843) 358‑1074. 13  St. John’s High School Orangeburg. (803) 534‑0358. Scholarship Fundraiser, Fat Hen, 21  Crowfieldfest, Middleton Park, 2–5  United States Disc Golf Johns Island. (843) 559‑9090. Goose Creek. (843) 572‑4758. Championship, Winthrop University, 21  Komen Lowcountry More Than ONGOING Rock Hill. (704) 724‑1352. Pink Walk, Riverfront Park, North Daily from Sept. 28 to Oct. 27  4–5  Rock Around the Clock Charleston. (843) 556‑8011. Legare Farms Pumpkin Patch, Legare Festival, downtown, Winnsboro. 21  Seacoast Artists Guild Art in Farms, Johns Island. (843) 559‑0788. (803) 635‑4242. 5  Artist-in-Residence Nancy Basket, Common Fall Festival, Valor Memorial Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. University of South Carolina–Lancaster Garden, Myrtle Beach. (843) 748‑0133. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. 21–22  Surfside Beach Sea Grant (843) 365‑3596. Native American Studies Center, Beach Sweep, Surfside Pier, Surfside Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. First Saturdays  History in the Beach. (843) 650‑9548. Landscape, Hampton Plantation State 5  Cube Steak Supper Fundraiser/ 26–Oct. 6  MOJA Arts Festival, Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361. October Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 724‑7305. (803) 719‑1289.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Lowcountry


|

SC   humor me

What happens in Vegas stays on Earth BY JAN A. IGOE

IN MEDIEVAL TIMES,

superstitious folks believed that evil spirits lived in cabbage leaves. I believe they live in broccoli spears, but that’s not the point. The point is that people don’t brake for facts in any century. For example, anyone who was around in 1969 remembers being glued to the television to witness Apollo 11 Uber our first astronauts to the moon. But 50 years later, skeptics still claim that Armstrong’s little stroll was not “a giant leap for mankind” at all. Nope. According to them, the whole thing was a government hoax, probably filmed at Area 51, that mysterious military installation in the middle of the Nevada desert. Everybody knows that’s where we keep alien invaders and their coolest gadgets. I see two problems with this theory. First, if aliens are smart enough to travel a gazillion miles from planets so remote that our most powerful telescopes can’t see them, they’re smart enough to land in Tahiti or Bora Bora. I can hear the spaceship commander now: “Which idiot set the GPS for Nevada?” We may never know because the Air Force doesn’t entertain guests at topsecret military sites. Not from this planet, anyway. So if you’re waiting for an “Open House” sign, don’t hold your breath. It’s guarded by hostile hermits, not Martha Stewart. The only intel we have on Area 51 came from Will Smith, when he and Jeff Goldblum saved Earth in Independence Day. But that was before some cuckoo bird invited everybody on Facebook to 46

You got here from outer space, but you can’t pick a lock? Please. storm the installation. “They can’t stop all of us,” his post promised. Seconds later, the Nevada version of Woodstock was in the works. That’s the beauty of social media. A bad plan can go viral faster than medieval spirits on cruciferous vegetables. Which brings me to my second problem: If you are an advanced life form, would you let some dumb Earthling lock you in a cage to perform experiments? You got here from outer space, but you can’t pick a lock? Please. If we want to meet aliens, let’s start thinking like them. Forget Area 51. They’re going to Vegas. From outer space, those bright lights make the perfect landing strip. So what if you’re

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

7 feet tall with six eyes and pink tentacles? You’ll blend right in. And there’s free parking. Besides, even if they spotted E.T. playing roulette, nobody would rat him out. Worst case scenario: Promoters would book him for two shows a night and a Saturday matinee. Remember, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. Or at least, on Earth. Just one day after the plan to crash the Area 51 party caught fire, the Loch Ness monster made news. Thousands of people wanted to storm Nessie’s lake, but the plan lost momentum when they realized it’s open to the public year-round, monsters and all. No gates to crash or guards to battle. So that fizzled. What fun is that? There was still one really great idea to come out of all this social media madness and I hope it takes off. An Oklahoma animal shelter dressed their adoptable dogs in tin foil hats and invited everybody to “storm the shelter.” Why waste your time on potentially hostile aliens when there are so many friendly furry creatures eager to slobber you with gratitude? That’s my kind of storm. So let’s recap: Do not bother the nice people at Area 51 who are armed and might be cranky. Forget aliens. Go adopt a dog. And wash your cabbage ­thoroughly. JAN A. IGOE may have relatives in Area 51. She lives to storm humane societies and adoption fairs, where the most intelligent life forms have four legs and a tail. Join her at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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South Carolina Living September 2019  

Hit the road with must-see attractions on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway, learn how a battery storage system can help manage...

South Carolina Living September 2019  

Hit the road with must-see attractions on the Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway, learn how a battery storage system can help manage...

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