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CHANGE OUT

FALL WINTE&R TRAVEL ISSUE

ONLY IN

SOUTH CAROLINA Your guide to one-of-a-kind attractions SC R E C I PE

SEPTEMBER 201 7

Two-for-one dinners HUMOR ME

UNIQUE TO S.C. Pearl Fryar Topiary Garden

Discipline matters


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Š Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2017


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 71 • No. 9 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

SEPTEMBER 2017 • VOLUME 71, NUMBER 9

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739-3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars

Charleston residents Camilla Van Eeckhoven and son Alexander enjoy a picnic in the shade of Angel Oak.

CONTRIBUTORS

Mike Couick, Jayne Cannon, Amy Dabbs, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, Patrick Keegan, Thomas Kirk, Sydney Patterson, Anne Prince, Belinda Smith‑Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

FEATURE

22 Only in South Carolina Grab your camera phone, and gas up the car. We’re going on a road trip to our state’s one-of-a-kind destinations and attractions.

PUBLISHER

FALL WINTE&R TRAVEL GUIDE

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

RUTA SMITH

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SC LIFE

6 ON THE AGENDA

17 Sweet taste of success

Learn how electricity could replace fossil fuels as the power source for many everyday activities.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Bringing light to the

dark world of cancer

Learn how the S.C. chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society raises funds for research and helps families deal with the challenges of fighting blood cancer. ENERGY Q&A

12 Benefits of air-source

heat pumps

Quiet and efficient, airsource heat pumps are a popular way to heat and cool South Carolina homes. SMART CHOICE

14 Safety first Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

Stay safe and keep your prized possessions well guarded with these personal-security gadgets.

STORIES

Now in her 45th year of feeding Hilton Head Island, Palmetto Electric Cooperative member Signe Gardo shares her recipe for a successful bakery business. RECIPE

18 Two-for-one dinners

Transform one night’s delicious dinner into two with Chef Belinda’s clever recipes and tips.

18

GARDENER

20 Cut and come again

Boost your garden’s output with fall vegetables you can harvest more than once. HUMOR ME

46 Wait till the pacifist gets home Are the kids getting out of hand? Humor columnist Jan Igoe argues it’s time to forget about “time out” and bring back some old-school parental discipline.

42 MARKETPLACE 44 SC EVENTS

FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

ONLY IN

SOUTH CAROLINA Your guide to one-of-a-kind attractions SC R E C I PE

Two-for-one dinners HUMOR ME

UNIQUE TO S.C. Pearl Fryar Topiary Garden

Discipline matters

Bishopville’s Pearl Fryar put South Carolina on the horticulture map with his awardwinning topiary garden. Photo by Milton Morris.

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

© COPYRIGHT 201 7. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

SEPTEMBER 201 7

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181


On the Agenda

Highlights TOP PICK FOR KIDS

For a listing p m co lete s, see t n of Eve 4 page 4

OCTOBER 7–8

Harvest Home Weekend Festival

Jump into all things fall at this two-day festival at Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, with hayrides, scarecrow building, pumpkin painting and “Not So Spooky” boat rides, plus crafts and take-home activities just for kids. Children’s musician Roger Day performs whimsical songs from his “Marsh Mud Madness,” about the critters that live in saltwater marshes. Grown-up entertainment includes artisan potters, sweetgrass basket makers and gourmet food samples. For details, visit brookgreen.org/HarvestHome.html or call (843) 235‑6000.

SEPTEMBER 16

Jubilee: Festival of Black History & Culture

Anchored by the historic Mann-Simons Site, where a Columbia family lived, worked and helped build a community for more than 100 years, Jubilee celebrates African-American culture in South Carolina. The day of festival fun includes performances by musicians—including “soul jazz” vocalist Cheri Maree—artisans, craftsmen, dancers and storytellers, as well as tours of local African-American historic sites. For details, visit historiccolumbia.org/jubilee or call (803) 252‑1770, ext. 23.

SEPTEMBER 16

SEPTEMBER 30

Outlanders with a wee taste for Scottish culture, dinna fash (that’s Gaelic for “don’t worry”)—just head to Mount Pleasant for this annual gathering of clans at Boone Hall Plantation. The day is packed with competitions, including male and female contestants in heavy athletics, such as tossing tree-like cabers, and piping, drumming and fiddling contests. Entertainment will feature traditional Highland and country dancers, children’s games and a rainbow of tartans.

Go outside and play—that’s good advice from the City of Pickens, and they’ve lined up family-friendly fun in their favorite outdoor spaces. Run a half marathon on the rails-to-trails Doodle Trail, or head to Town Creek Bike Park for a 5K trail run and a mountain-bike race. Try kayaking on City Lake or sample free workshops at the town amphi­theater on fly fishing, beekeeping, hiking, outdoor photography and more.

Charleston Scottish Games and Highland Gathering

For details, visit charlestonscots.org or call (843) 276‑4532.

Venture Outdoors Day

For details, visit cityofpickens.com/ ventureoutdoors or call (864) 952‑9660.

OCTOBER 4–7

United States Disc Golf Championship

Keep an eye out for Fort Mill phenom Ricky Wysocki (left) when Winthrop University in Rock Hill once again hosts this season-climax event. Wysocki, a two‑time world champion, is one of the favorites, competing for the title against a lineup of standouts from the Professional Disc Golf Association. For details, visit discgolfworldtour.com.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

Beneficial electrification for the home

NRECA

IMAGINE A TYPICAL SATURDAY. You wake up, take a hot shower, cook breakfast, mow the yard and then drive the kids to the park. Now imagine doing all of these things with electricity, instead of fossil fuels. That’s the concept of “environmentally beneficial electrification,” says Keith Dennis, an energy programs analyst with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. As utilities invest in renewable sources of electricity and clean up older power technologies, generating electricity uses less fossil fuel per kilowatt-hour of energy produced than burning natural gas or gasoline on site. Simply put: Electricity becomes the “greener” choice for powering our daily lives, and consumers enjoy products that are cleaner, quieter and easier to maintain. “Over their life, electric ­products can support the integration of ­renewable-energy generators, on-site renewable generation, and thermal- and batterystorage programs. The same cannot be said Electricity is of appliances that require fossil fuel on site,” the ‘greener’ omelets without burning a fossil fuel (or Dennis says. “This applies to electric vehicles, breakfast) in the process. Yard work is less of systems that heat and cool homes, and many choice for a chore with an electric lawnmower and leaf other end-use technologies.” blower. Cordless models are particularly easy Here’s how the concept applies to that typical powering our to handle, and they run quietly while emitting Saturday morning. daily lives. no noxious fumes. Electric water heaters have a long history of Finally, electric cars are perfectly suited for that drive to quiet, reliable service, and in South Carolina, they are a the park, not to mention trips around town and daily comkey component of load-control programs that allow your co-op to lower systemwide energy use during peak hours. muting. Electric vehicles are widely praised for being safer With the right electric water heater, your family can enjoy and easier to maintain (no oil changes!) and for performing all the hot water they need, while helping everyone in the better on the road with more acceleration and torque. cooperative benefit from lower power costs. While they are currently more expensive to buy than their In the kitchen, electric induction stovetops are a smart gas-fueled counterparts, electric vehicles will fall in price as alternative to natural gas stoves. They heat faster and apply more companies enter the market and battery technology heat evenly, so Chef Dad can whip up his world-famous improves. —THOMAS KIRK

Efficient kitchen lighting

Whether your kitchen is large or small, old or new, upgraded lighting is a reliable recipe for energy savings and a more enjoyable home. Efficient lighting in the kitchen does not necessarily mean more lights, but rather more versatile lighting. Consider these tips: Make the switch. LED lights use a small fraction of the energy of CFL, halogen or traditional incandescent bulbs, and they are known for their longevity and efficiency. Try a dimmer switch. There are times when maximum illumination is required for tasks such as food preparation or

cleanup. At other times, it makes more sense to turn down the lights to create a cozier ambiance. By placing different sets of lights on dimmer switches, you increase your options and minimize the energy used for lighting. Light the right surface. Task lighting, such as under-cabinet lighting (right), illuminates a particular work surface without a shadowing effect. Energy-efficient options include thin-diameter fluorescent tubes and LED-powered puck lights that can be placed precisely where they are needed most. When installing lights under cabinets, place them toward the front, so they illuminate the whole countertop rather than the wall. —ANNE PRINCE SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda O N LY O N

HEATING AND COOLING TIPS FOR MANUFACTURED HOMES

SCLiving.coop

If you own a manufactured home, take measures to ensure you have an efficient heating and cooling system. You canHeating also make simple that save energy andimprovements Cooling Tips and make your home more comfortable. for Manufactured Homes If you own a manufactured home, take measures to ensure you have an efficient heating and cooling system. You can also make simple improvements that save energy and make your home more comfortable.

$ Install ceiling fans

$ Option for smaller budgets Install ceiling fans throughout your manufactured home. Ceiling fans are energy efficient and can be $$ Option for flexible budgets used to keep warm or cool air moving throughout your home. Be sure to turn them off when you’re away. Remember, ceiling fans cool people, not rooms.

Pocket pastries

Empanadas are perfect for anyone who likes to eat with their hands—little pastry pockets stuffed with sweet or savory fi­ llings. Watch Chef Belinda make a batch at SCLiving.coop/food/ chefbelinda.

$$ Efficient roof color Choose a light-colored roof if you live in the southern part of the U.S. and a dark-colored roof if you live in the northern U.S.

ZONE 2

ZONE 1

$ Install awnings

Install awnings over windows to keep sunlight from overheating your home during the summer.

Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes

South Carolina Living and the South Carolina State Fair are teaming up to welcome fall with this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. The names of three lucky readers will be drawn at random to receive a $100 Visa gift card and an S.C. State Fair Family Fun Pack (fair admission for four people, plus ride tickets). All entries must be received by Sept. 30. Register today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

$$ Add insulation

Picture yourself in South Carolina Living

CARROLL FOSTER

Calling all shutterbugs. This month’s SC Snapshot challenge is to send us your best selfies from any of the destinations ­profiled in the feature story “Only in South Carolina” (starting on page 22). Upload your photos and tell us about your trip at SCLiving.coop/snapshot. If we publish your image and story, we’ll send you a $25 gift card for your effort.

Like us on Facebook Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at ­facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving. 8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

If you have a home that was manufactured before 1976, you could add insulation to your home’s underbelly to reduce any heat loss. SOURCE: U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY

$$ Install a mini-split system

Eliminate unnecessary heating and cooling by installing a single-zone strategy throughout your manufactured home. A zone system allows you to save energy by only heating or cooling rooms that are occupied.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

PM Major

Minor

15 2:22 9:37 10:37 16 3:37 10:37 11:07 17 4:37 11:22 11:52 18 5:22 11:52 12:22 19 — 6:07 6:52 20 12:52 6:52 7:07 21 7:37 1:22 7:37 22 8:07 1:52 2:07 23 8:52 2:22 2:37 24 9:52 3:07 2:52 25 10:52 3:37 3:22 26 — 4:37 12:52 27 — 5:52 9:22 28 — 7:22 12:07 29 — 8:37 10:22 30 2:22 9:37 10:37

5:07 5:37 6:07 6:22 12:37 1:07 1:37 7:52 8:22 8:37 8:52 9:07 3:37 4:07 4:37 4:52

1 3:37 2 4:22 3 5:07 4 — 5 — 6 7:22 7 8:22 8 9:07 9 10:22 10 11:37 11 — 12 — 13 — 14 2:37 15 3:52 16 4:52

Minor

AM Major

SEPTEMBER

AM Major

OCTOBER

10:22 10:52 11:37 5:52 6:37 1:07 1:37 2:22 3:07 4:07 5:07 6:37 8:07 9:22 10:07 10:52

Minor

PM Major

11:07 11:37 12:07 12:07 12:37 1:22 1:52 2:37 3:22 4:22 10:07 12:37 9:52 10:22 10:52 5:22

5:07 5:37 5:52 12:37 6:37 7:07 7:37 7:52 8:22 9:07 1:37 3:07 3:52 4:22 4:52 11:22


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Dialogue

Bringing light to the dark world of cancer

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

GET MORE Discover

more about the S.C. chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society at lls.org/south-carolina. To watch a video on the T-cell therapy that cured Emily “Emma” Whitehead, go to SCLiving.coop/tcells.

10

“1, 4, 7, 5, 9.” Tens and sometimes up to 100 times a day, my wife and I provided the patient ID number of our 2-year-old son, Campbell, to the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital staff in Memphis as he progressed from assessment to assessment, treatment to treatment, and surgery to surgery. For two years (1997–1999), that number was one of the few constants in our family’s life. Out the door went the predictability of my career’s usual workweek, seeing friends in our hometown and taking our daughter to school in Columbia. One day, our life was predictable, and then, all with a diagnosis of biphenotypic childhood leukemia, our entire extended-family’s life changed. With the resources, support and love of our family and the incredible St. Jude network, we came out of the experience able to recount blessings and miracles. On most days, we are even able to accept and embrace our son’s death at age 4 as an unexpected answer to prayer. Not all families struck by leukemia are so fortunate. Hearing the words “You have cancer” is one of the darkest moments in life, and according to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), someone in the U.S. is diagnosed with a blood cancer every three minutes. In South Carolina alone, more than 700 people were diagnosed with some form of leukemia and nearly 1,000 were diagnosed with lymphoma in 2012. Paul Jeter, executive director of the S.C. chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, explains that his organization’s role is to “bring light to the dark world of cancer.” The society raises funds for research and supports the families affected by blood cancers with patient services and a copay assistance program. Whether a family needs to talk with someone who has experienced a similar diagnosis or needs help meeting the financial demands of cancer treatment, the society provides very real and practical assistance. In addition, the LLS has established online communities to help capture insights of patients and address the real-world challenges of living with blood cancer.  More important, the society is working to find a cure.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

One of the most exciting research developments saved the life of a little girl named Emily “Emma” Whitehead, who was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at age 5. After her second relapse, the doctors told her family they were out of options to treat her cancer. Looking for a miracle, her parents sought an experimental treatment that had never been tried in a child or in anyone with her type of leukemia. The experiment used Emily’s genetically reprogrammed T cells to find and kill her cancer cells. When the modified T cells were put back into her body, Emily became very sick and spent several weeks on a ventilator. At one point, her doctor said she had a one-in-1,000 chance of surviving the night. Emily beat the odds, and a few weeks later, her family received the miracle they had prayed for. The T-cell therapy worked, and today, Emily is living cancer-free. This promising research is still in its early stages, and many questions remain about why the treatment works. But these breakthroughs provide hope for those affected by cancer. And, for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to be able to respond to the words “You have cancer” with “We’re finding a cure” is enormously powerful. On a local level, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society brings communities together with its annual Light the Night Walk to raise funds, celebrate those who are fighting and honor those who have lost. On Nov. 2, people from across the state will gather at the S.C. Statehouse in Columbia to walk with illuminated lanterns and bring light to the darkness of cancer. In the past, this event has raised $800,000 in South Carolina alone and $80 million nationally. To learn more about this inspiring event and how you can get involved, visit lightthenight.org.


EMPOWERING VISION By combining our low-cost, reliable energy and diverse property portfolio with South Carolina’s low cost of doing business, creative incentive packages and unparalleled quality of life, Santee Cooper, working with the South Carolina Power Team and the state’s electric cooperatives, continues to help new businesses picture a better future – and continues to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

www.scpowerteam.com • www.santeecooper.com


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Benefits of air-source heat pumps

Q A

We’ll need to replace our furnace soon and wonder if a heat pump would help us save some money. Do you have any suggestions?

How heat pumps work

In the summer, an air-source heat pump acts as an air conditioner that draws heat from your home’s interior and transfers it outside. In the winter, the direction is reversed, so heat is pulled from the outside air and moved into your home. The heat pump has two major components: the condenser (also called the compressor), which circulates

GetMore Visit SCLiving.coop for more information on HVAC upgrades and energy audits. GIVE YOUR HOUSE AN ENERGY UPGRADE

When it’s time to renovate, consider replacing HVAC systems for maximum energy savings. scliving.coop/energy/give-your-house-an-energy-upgrade

HOME ENERGY AUDITS

A detailed assessment of your home’s energy use can provide a road map to savings. scliving.coop/energy/home-energy-audits

12

Selecting and installing

The abbreviations SEER and HSPF can help you compare the efficiency of different heat pumps. SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) measures cooling efficiency for airsource heat pumps. HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor) measures heating efficiency. The minimum standards for heat pumps are SEER 14 and HSPF 8.2. Look for an Energy Star label, which indicates the unit is at least 15 SEER and 8.5 HSPF. Visit energystar.gov for more

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Cooled air Warm air Outside air

Thermostat

Warm air

WINTER

Heated air

Cool air Outside air

Thermostat

Cool air

Condenser Outside coil Inside coil Air handler Reversing  valve

SOURCE: NRECA

For most of us, heating and cooling account for the largest part of our household energy use. An electric air-source heat pump can be a good alternative to a furnace system that runs on propane or fuel oil. Heat pumps not only reduce energy costs, they can also eliminate the risk of carbon-monoxide poisoning and problems that can occur with on-site storage of propane or heating oil. A heat pump is also a cost-effective alternative to the electric-resistance heat used in electric furnaces and in baseboard and wall units.

refrigerant through the system, and an air handler, which distributes the conditioned air, usually through a duct system. Most heat pumps are split systems, with the condenser located outside and the air handler inside. A packaged system contains both components in one unit placed outside your home. In winter, heat pumps must work harder as the outdoor temperature drops, because there is less heat to extract from the outside air. At some point, the heat pump switches to ­electric-resistance mode, similar to how a toaster creates heat, to maintain the home’s temperature at the thermostat setting. This is less efficient and more expensive. For greater efficiency during cold weather, consider a dual-fuel system, which uses a heat pump along with a gas or propane furnace. If your old furnace has an air conditioner attached, replacing both the heating and cooling system with the all-in-one solution of a heat pump might save money. If you are cooling with window units or have an older central-air conditioner, moving to an air-source heat pump could reduce your summer energy bills.

SUMMER

HOW AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS WORK By transferring heat between a house and outside air, these ­devices trim electricity use by as much as 30 to 40 percent in moderate climates.

about equipment, proper installation, qualified contractors, and information and calculators to help you predict energy savings. How much can a heat pump reduce your energy costs? This depends on the size and efficiency of your home, local energy prices and local climate. Some data have shown the cost of heating in South Carolina, using a new heat pump and national-average fuel costs, to be less than half the cost of heating with a typical propane furnace or an electric-resistance system. Energy auditors can predict energy savings with greater precision, advise about brands and proper size for the unit, and suggest ways to improve comfort or reduce energy use, such as duct sealing or insulating the building envelope. Visit resnet.us for information about energy audits. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


Tired of struggling on the stairs? Introducing the Affordable Easy Climber® Elevator

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Revolutionary elevator can give you– and your home’s value– a lift

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without an expensive shaft-way. Its small “footprint” and self-contained lift mechanism adds convenience and value to your home and quality to your life. It’s called the Easy Climber® Elevator. Call us now and we can tell you just how simple it is to own. For many people, particularly seniors, climbing stairs can be a struggle and a health threat. Some have installed motorized stair lifts, but they block access to the stairs and

No more climbing up stairs No more falling down stairs Plenty of room for groceries or laundry Perfect for people with older pets Ideal for Ranch houses with basements

are hardly an enhancement to your home’s décor. By contrast, the Easy Climber® Elevator can be installed almost anywhere in your home. That way you can move easily and safely from floor to floor without struggling or worse yet… falling. Why spend another day without this remarkable convenience. Knowledgeable product experts are standing by to answer any questions you may have. Call Now!

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Elevators have been around since the mid 19th century, and you can find them in almost every multistory structure around… except homes. That’s because installing an elevator in a home has always been a complicated and expensive home renovation project… until now. Innovative designers have created a home elevator that can be easily installed almost anywhere in your home by our professional team

Imagine the possibilities


SmartChoice

Safety first

BY JAYNE CANNON

You want to be careful out ther e. Th tools will help yo ese u stay safe and secure .

SAFE AWAY

SAFE AT HOME

WAKEY-WAKEY You’ve tried black coffee, blaring music and frosty air-conditioning. Now stay awake on the road with help from the Nap Zapper Anti-Sleep Alarm. Wear it over your ear, and the second your head starts to nod, you’ll hear wake-up beeps. Then, you can pull over safely and take a nap. Please. $6. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.

SMART ALARM There’s nothing like the panic that sets in when a smoke alarm goes off. Nest Protect smoke + CO alarm helps calm jangled nerves by sending an alert to your phone that tells you exactly where the problem is. You can silence the alarm from your phone—no broom handles needed to stop the noise. $119. (855) 469‑6378; nest.com.

CANDID CAMERA Your word against another driver’s? A video record could clear things up. The Magellan RoadMate 6230-LM is more than a GPS—it’s also a dash-mounted camera that records wide-angle video of action around your car while you drive. In case of a collision, a lock feature preserves the video and data. $161. (800) 720‑5537; magellan.factoryoutletstore.com. EASY ACCESS Locker keys are a nuisance while you’re working out, and lock combinations can be tough to remember. Master Lock Bluetooth Padlock comes in handy by unlocking automatically with your smartphone or, when needed, its keypad. You can even share access with others. $70. (800) 464‑2088; masterlock.com.

WHO’S THERE? A peephole is fine, but you have to walk all the way to the door to use it. With the Ring Video Doorbell, just glance at your smartphone to see who’s standing at the door—whether you’re home or not. You can have a conversation, too. Night-vision capability means you don’t have to leave the porch light on. $199. (800) 656‑1918; ring.com. THROW AWAY THE KEY Tend to forget your housekey? No spare under the mat? Let your smartphone do the work with help from the August Smart Lock, which can lock and unlock doors, create virtual keys for guests and track when people come and go. It fits right over your existing deadbolt, so installation is simple. $229. (844) 284‑8781; august.com. ON WATCH You can’t be everywhere, but the Ezviz Mini Trooper can. This tiny security camera mounts just about anywhere, indoors or outdoors, without wires. Connect through your router, and you can sync up to six cameras to get alerts and keep track of the action on your smartphone. $110. (855) 693‑9849; ezvizlife.com. FLOOD PROTECTION Ah, the soothing sound of water. Except when it’s pouring from your water heater, dishwasher, tub, sink or sump pump. With a D-Link Wi-Fi Water Sensor, you’ll get a smartphone alert when there’s a leak, giving you time to act before there’s serious flooding. $60. (800) 326‑1688; dlink.com.

14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


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(5:1

Both of these devices create hot air but which uses less power?

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visit us at waterfurnace.com WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc. ©2017 WaterFurnace International Inc. 1. 7 Series unit uses approximately 900 watts while running in speeds 1-2.

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Complete Air (843) 592-7186 • completeairllc.net

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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OCT. 11–22

There’s so much to see and do this fall!

THREE LUCKY WINNERS! Enjoy the season with an extra $100 and tickets to the S.C. State Fair!

The South Carolina State Fair and South Carolina Living are teaming up to help you celebrate fall. Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a S.C. State Fair Family Fun Pack (admission for four people, plus ride vouchers). Three lucky winners will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Sept. 30. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon.

READER REPLY TRAVEL SWEEPSTAKES Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card and S.C. State Fair Family Fun Pack. Name Address 

 City/State/ZIP  Email*  Phone

SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or

travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Sept. 30, 2017, to be eligible. *Winner will be notified by email.

BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS: jj Aiken County Visitors Center jj Alpine Helen/ White County, Ga. jj Culture & Heritage Museums, Brattonsville jj Camden Tourism Development jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden jj Dorchester County jj Edisto Chamber of Commerce jj Fairfield County, Rock around the Clock Festival jj Fayetteville, N.C. Convention and Visitors Bureau jj Hammock Coast & Georgetown County Chamber of Commerce Tourism Development jj Historic Bluffton Arts & Seafood Festival

jj Lake Hartwell Country jj Living History Park, North Augusta, S.C. jj The Lowcountry & Resort Islands Tourism Commission jj McCormick Gold Rush Festival jj Morris Heritage Center jj N.C. Transportation Museum jj Newberry Opera House jj Santee Cooper Country jj SCDA — AgriTourism jj SC Parks, Recreation and Tourism jj South Carolina State Fair jj Upcountry S.C. jj Visit N.C. jj Walhalla Chamber OktoberFest jj South Carolina Living magazine

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply 16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


SC Life

Stories

Sweet taste of success

Signe Gardo remembers Aug. 11, 1972, like it was yesterday. Any doubts she had about opening a boutique food emporium in Harbour Town vanished when she counted the register and realized she had made $28. Forty-five years and two locations later, Gardo is still feeding Hilton Head Island, energetically working seven days a week at Signe’s Heaven Bound Bakery and Cafe. Along the way, she’s been featured on television and in the pages of the New York Times, Bon Appetit, Travel & Leisure and Southern Living, earning a national reputation as the island’s most creative pastry chef and wedding-cake baker. What’s her recipe for success? Expand the menu. Her reputation as a baker took hold in the 1970s with oversized chocolate chip cookies—they had customers lining up outside her door—and continues to grow with her latest culinary creations, including the gooey, chocolatey mud dauber cake. “I never lost any of my old items. I just continued to add new ones,” she says. “We’re still pumping out cookies like crazy.” Work with the best. “Staying in business this long, I didn’t do it by myself,” Gardo says of the more than 2,000 employees she’s worked with over the decades. “They are part of my life, and I just try to be respectful and appreciate what they’re doing to make it happen.” Take it one day at a time. Gardo admits that, in 45 years, she never followed a business plan, other than making her customers happy and living by her faith. “When it came to 35 [years], I was wondering how long this would last. I did not think of an exit plan, and I still don’t have one,” she says. “I try to listen to the Lord and do what I’m supposed to do today. Tomorrow? I’m not really thinking about that.” —KEITH PHILLIPS

Signe Gardo

MILTON MORRIS

AGE:

76

HOMETOWN: Hilton Head Island since 1965; born and raised in Connecticut CLAIM TO FAME: Owner and recipe artist at Signe’s Heaven Bound Bakery and Cafe MAJOR MILESTONE: In August, Gardo celebrated her 45th continuous year in business. A MATTER OF FAITH: She and husband Tom are members of Christian Renewal Church. PASSION PROJECT: “I would like to finally get the time to write the cookbook that so many people have been asking me for.” CO-OP AFFILIATION: Member of Palmetto Electric Cooperative

GET MORE See what’s on the menu at Signe’s Heaven Bound Bakery and Cafe, 93 Arrow Road, Hilton Head Island, by visiting signesbakery.com or calling (866) 807-4463.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Two-for-one dinners Busy coo appreciate ks laborsaving sh o at the en rtcuts for meal p d of the day. With rep planning a little a n d so m you’ll sav e e time, m pantry staples, oney and reserving energy by part head start of one dinner to use as a on a seco n recipes a re perfec d meal. These transform tly designed for ing on dinner in e night’s to two.

EASIEST-EVER ROASTED CHICKEN SERVES 4

1 whole fryer/broiler chicken, about 3–5 pounds Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 5 whole garlic cloves, peeled 1 lemon, quartered Handful of fresh oregano stems (or favorite herb) Olive oil

Place a large, cast-iron skillet in the oven. Preheat oven to 500 F. Rinse chicken, pat dry and season inside and out with salt and pepper. Insert garlic, lemon and herbs in cavity of chicken. Using kitchen twine, tie legs together, and fold wings under chicken. Rub all over with olive oil. When oven reaches 500 F, carefully remove hot skillet, and transfer chicken to skillet. Return skillet to oven; cook 15 minutes. Lower temperature to 350 F, and cook an additional 40–45 minutes, or until chicken temperature reaches 165 F. If chicken is browning too fast, loosely cover with foil. Remove skillet from oven, and transfer chicken to a cutting board. Let rest 15 minutes before cutting and serving. Reserve about 1–2 cups shredded chicken for second dinner: Creamy chicken-potatobacon casserole.

CH ICK EN BY GW ÉN AË L LE VOT

CREAMY CHICKEN-POTATOBACON CASSEROLE SERVES 2–3

1 cup heavy cream Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves Olive oil or butter 2 large russet potatoes, peeled and sliced* 1–2 cups shredded chicken 2–3 slices cooked, crispy bacon, chopped 1½ cups shredded cheddar cheese 1 large green onion, thinly sliced (white and green parts) Fresh thyme for garnish

18

Preheat oven to 375 F. In a medium bowl, whisk together cream, salt, pepper and thyme leaves. Set aside. Grease a medium-sized baking dish with oil or butter. Layer half of potatoes in dish, followed by half of chicken, bacon, cheese and onions; then pour on half of cream mixture. Repeat with second layer. Bake, uncovered, 1 hour. Remove from oven; let rest 15 minutes. Garnish with fresh thyme. *For a lower-carb version of this recipe, replace potatoes with sliced zucchini.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


BEEF-AND-ONION EMPANADAS MAKES 12 5-INCH EMPANADAS

BEEF BY KAREN HERMANN

SLOW-COOKER POT ROAST WITH CHILIES SERVES 6

4-pound beef roast (e.g., chuck, rump, bottom, eye round) Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper N cup all-purpose flour (more if needed) 2–3 tablespoons canola oil 2 onions, thickly sliced 2 celery sticks, cut diagonally in 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, peeled, cut diagonally in 1-inch pieces

6 whole garlic cloves, peeled 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 cup whole pepperoncini chilies (about 8)* 1 ½ cups beef stock 2 large bay leaves 4 fresh oregano sprigs 1 pound small red potatoes, halved or whole Fresh oregano for garnish

Season roast on all sides with salt and pepper, and dust with flour. In a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat, heat oil. Brown roast on all sides; remove from skillet, and place in slow cooker. In the same skillet, saute onions, celery and carrots until onions are translucent. Add garlic and tomato paste; stir to combine. Add to slow cooker on top of roast. Add pepperoncini and enough beef stock to almost cover the roast. Add bay leaves and oregano. Cover with lid, and cook on low 6–8 hours. (If you don’t have a slow cooker, cook roast in a roasting pan in a 350 F oven for 2½ hours.) During the last hour of cooking time, add potatoes. Before serving, discard bay leaves, garlic cloves and oregano sprigs. Slice roast. Reserve 2 cups shredded pot roast for second dinner: Beef-and-onion empanadas. Serve remainder with peppers, potatoes and carrots. Garnish with fresh oregano. *Pepperoncini chilies are mild, sweet chilies. If you prefer a spicier flavor, substitute the pepperoncini with 2 jalapeno peppers.

2½ cups all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon kosher salt 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut in small cubes, chilled ½ cup ice-cold water 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ onion, thinly sliced 2–3 garlic cloves, minced

2 teaspoons cumin 1 teaspoon thyme 1 teaspoon oregano Pinch of cayenne pepper ½ cup tomato sauce ¼ cup beef stock 2 cups shredded pot roast 1 egg, whisked

In bowl of a food processor fitted with a dough blade, add flour and salt, and pulse a few seconds until combined. Add butter; pulse again until flour and butter form pea-like consistency. Gradually add cold water until a ball starts to form and pulls away from sides of bowl. Wrap dough ball in plastic wrap; refrigerate at least 30 minutes (can be made a day ahead). In large skillet over medium-high heat, heat oil. Saute onion until translucent; add garlic, and cook one minute. Lower heat to medium-low; add spices, and stir. Add tomato sauce, stock and shredded pot roast; stir to combine. Let simmer until liquid evaporates, about 2–3 minutes. Remove from heat; let cool to room temperature. Remove chilled dough from refrigerator, and divide into two balls. Keep one ball chilled while you work with the other. On a floured surface, roll out dough into a thin layer. Using a 5-inch biscuit or cookie cutter, cut dough into circles. Scoop a tablespoon of meat mixture onto one side of each circle. Fold blank side over, and seal the edges. Place on a parchment-lined, rimmed baking sheet. With a pastry brush, brush tops of empanadas with whisked egg. Repeat process with the other chilled dough ball. Chill empanadas for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 F; bake 25 minutes or until golden brown.

Empanadas are small, stuffed pastries, common in Spanish and Latin American cuisine, that can be stuffed with different fillings. Pick up some tips for filling and shaping empanadas at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SCGardener

BY AMY L. DABBS

Cut and come again Fall vegetables you can harvest more than once SMART VEGETABLE ­GARDENING

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

ZACK SNIPES

is all about planning. We choose the plants we want and how to grow them, but we don’t always plan ways of harvesting to maximize our yields. One thoughtful way to extend crop harvests is by growing “cut and come again” vegetables and herbs. “Cut and come again” refers to plants that can be harvested several times over the growing season. The young, outer leaves or growth of many edible plants can be harvested, leaving behind the center growing point, where new plant parts are formed, to allow new growth to develop for future harvests. Cut and come again makes efficient use of limited space in raised beds, containers and small gardens, because more edible plant parts are harvested from each plant over a longer period. Lettuce is perhaps the most popular and easiest-to-grow vegetable for cut-and-come-again harvests. Several types of lettuces thrive during our mild fall and winter seasons (iceberg is the only exception) and can be grown and harvested during those cooler months. Store-bought lettuce is typically cut once and sold as a head of lettuce. The farmer cuts the entire plant, leaving only the roots behind. Home gardeners who grow loose-leaf or head-forming lettuces can harvest using the cut-and-come-again method, picking only a few leaves from the outside of each plant as needed for meals. Clemson Extension recommends a few cultivars for Southern gardens: Simpson Elite, a green loose-leaf; Red Sails, a red loose-leaf; Buttercrunch, a Boston type; or Parris Island Cos, a heat-tolerant romaine lettuce. Mesclun lettuce refers to a mixture of red and green loose-leaf lettuces, along with other greens, such as endive, escarole, arugula and chervil, that are grown together and harvested while young for tender, flavorful salads. Harvest

the baby leaves using sharp, clean scissors when they are only a few weeks old. These tender greens can be cut two or three times before the plants cease production. Seed mixes of gourmet leaf lettuces and mesclun greens are widely available and easy to grow in garden beds or in shallow containers such as wooden boxes, flats or garden pots. Sprinkle seeds over the surface of the bed or a container filled with soilless growing media. Press the BROCCOLI BOUNTY Small seeds down lightly, and florets grow from the stem after the first large head keep them well watered as has been harvested. the tender leaves develop. Don’t cover lettuce seeds completely; they need light to germinate. Provide a little shade from intense sunlight to keep the leaves tender and sweet. Other fall-grown greens to cut and come again include Swiss chard, kale, Chinese cabbage, mustard greens and collards. Fresh, garden-grown broccoli is unmatched for its nutty, sweet flavor. While the entire plant is edible, most people prefer the cluster of unopened flower buds, or florets. Gardeners can harvest more florets by using a sharp knife to remove the first large head, leaving the foliage and main stem in place. Soon after, smaller florets will grow along the main stem; these can also be harvested with a knife. Don’t discard florets that have opened flowers; they are just as tasty and can be sauteed or roasted with garlic and olive oil for a delicious treat. Cool-season herbs, such as parsley and cilantro, are great cut-and-come-again plants. Snip their outer leaves, leaving the central rosette behind. Cilantro grows well in zones 8–10 from fall until spring, when the heat forces the plants to flower and die. Harvest and save the seeds (coriander) to add to soups and dressings. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Charleston County. Contact her at adabbs@clemson.edu.

AMY L. DABBS


Calling Young Authors & Illustrators

5th Grade Students

Write and illustrate a book that focuses on the power of electricity in our lives Teachers, showcase your students’ knowledge of electricity in South Carolina by applying skills in creative writing, social studies and art. Learn more and register online at

www.enlightensc.org by December 31, 2017.

Contest open to individual students and teams of up to four. Cash prizes awarded to winning student(s) and teacher. From - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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FALL & WINTERL TRAVE GUIDE

Nine must-see attractions unique to the Palmetto State

What are you doing this weekend?

If you don’t have a better plan (and, for the record, binge-watching old TV shows is not a better plan), we’d like to suggest a road trip. You live in the great state of South Carolina, which means you’re within easy driving distance of destinations and attractions found nowhere else. What’s more, a lot of them are free. Yes. Free. Plus, it’s fall, which is a perfect time to enjoy the Palmetto State’s scenic beauty along the way. So, no more excuses. Grab your keys, charge up your camera phone and gas up the car. We’re hitting the road to nine unique destinations found only in South Carolina.

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Angel Oak

ANGEL OAK It’s named for the Angel family who once owned it—not, as some guess, for the strong, graceful limbs that drape protectively around it. This 400-year-old live oak tree on Johns Island is thought to have survived so well because it lived on private property for many of its years. As a popular public landmark, it continues to thrive under the cautious protection of the City of Charleston, whose parks department took over its care and management in 1991. It’s a beauty. Inside the chain-link fence around Angel Oak Park, it stands 65 feet tall, with a circumference of more than 25 feet—you need at least 10 people with outstretched arms, holding hands, to circle the trunk. And if you’re looking for shade, you’ll find plenty. Its shade covers about 17,000 square feet. Giant, gnarled limbs—the largest is 89 feet long—branch in all directions, some dipping all the way down to the sandy soil below, some propped on wooden posts for added support. Feathery ferns grow across thickly ribbed bark on these limbs, many of which are hollow inside. As soon as the gates open each day, tourists flock to the tree for photo ops. Rules are strict here—no sitting, climbing or standing on the tree; no picnic blankets or tripods close enough to endanger the root system. Plenty of signs and park staff are there to remind you, including its chief guardian, park manager Barbara Taylor, who has watched over the tree for 12 years. “Just respect the rules, so the tree can survive another 300 or 400 years,” Taylor says. —DIANE VETO PARHAM

ART IMITATES LIFE Charleston painter Frank deLoach is a regular visitor to Angel Oak and has painted a series of seven works featuring the 400-year-old live oak.

GET THERE Angel Oak is located at 3688 Angel Oak Road, Johns Island, on a dirt-and-gravel road that runs behind St. John’s Parish Church on Maybank Highway. The park, which has picnic tables and a gift shop, is open Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free, but reservations are required for special-event photo sessions. For more information, visit charleston-sc.gov.

PHOTO BY RUTA SMITH

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He likes to describe himself as just a guy who cuts up bushes. But Pearl Fryar’s fame as a topiary artist has spread around the globe and draws more than 10,000 visitors a year to his magical three acres of sculpted garden shrubs, all surrounding his modest, brick ranch home in Bishopville. Fryar was 40 years old when he bought a cornfield just outside town, built a house and started planting the property with cast-off shrubs rescued from a wholesale nursery. Self-taught and armed with hedge trimmers and a vision of what could be, he started shaping shrubs and trees, one by one, into abstract topiaries. “Been working on it ever since,” says Fryar, now 77. “The idea was to create a garden where you would see things you never saw before in a garden.” No two pieces are exactly alike. There’s a fishbone tree (a cypress resembling a skeletal fish) and a rippling hedge of “sailing ship” junipers. There are loops and arches and angles and tiers. There are more than 40 different ­varieties of trees and shrubs, including hollies, pines, firs, live oaks, cedars, dogwoods and spruce, dotting the landscape, though Fryar couldn’t pinpoint the exact total of topiaries. “I don’t even want to know,” he says, flipping a hand to dismiss the idea. “That way, I don’t know how many I’ve got to take care of!” 24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

SHAPED WITH LOVE Love, peace and unity are recurring themes in the creative topiaries and scrap-metal art that decorate Pearl Fryar’s garden.

Tourists arrive by the busload on this otherwise average residential street and are delighted to find Fryar himself wheeling around the property on his well-used John Deere utility vehicle. Happy to greet guests, he answers questions, poses for pictures, and philosophizes about the best ways to nurture plants or young people (either way, as Fryar sees it, it involves letting their unique gifts shine). “It’s something different,” Fryar admits of his nowfamous garden. “You’re only going to get so much credit doing what somebody else is doing.” —DIANE VETO PARHAM

GET THERE The Pearl Fryar Topiary Garden, located at 145 Broad Acres Road in Bishopville, is open to visitors Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., year-round. The garden is in a residential neighborhood, so the Fryars ask that visitors be respectful of neighbors’ property and street access. There is no entrance fee, but donations to offset maintenance costs are welcome. For details, visit pearlfryar.com.

PHOTOS BY MILTON MORRIS

PEARL FRYAR TOPIARY GARDEN


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL GUIDE

Pretty Place Chapel Pearl Fryar Topiary Garden

PRETTY PLACE CHAPEL

SC SNAPSHOT

With fall leaf-peeping season just around the corner, make plans now to visit our state’s prettiest scenic overlook—Fred W. Symmes Chapel (more commonly known as Pretty Place Chapel) on the grounds of YMCA Camp Greenville. Built in 1941 and renovated in 2012, the open-air sanctuary overlooks a picturesque valley in the Blue Ridge foothills. When it’s not in use for summer-camp worship services or rented out for weddings, visitors are welcome to soak in the view during daylight hours, says Cory Harrison, executive director of YMCA Camp Greenville. “The chapel is booked often, especially on Saturdays and Sundays,” he says. “We strongly recommend visiting our website to check the schedule to avoid conflicts with weddings or other private events.” If you visit the chapel, bring your camera and a sense of wonder. “There are no other places in South Carolina that have this view,” Harrison says. “There is a feeling that you get when standing at Pretty Place and looking out over the mountains. … We call that feeling ‘Magic on the Mountain.’ ” —KEITH PHILLIPS

GET THERE YMCA Camp Greenville is located at 4399 YMCA Camp Road in Cleveland. Visitors can find out when the chapel is open at campgreenville.org/pretty-place or by calling the camp office at (864) 836‑3291. To reserve the chapel for a wedding or memorial ceremony, email djaques@ymcagreenville.org.

COURTESY OF YMCA CAMP GREENVILLE

VIEW FROM THE TOP It’s easy to see why 100,000 people a year visit the Fred W. Symmes Chapel.

Only in S.C. selfies Earn $25 if we publish your picture of these unique Palmetto State destinations To celebrate the unique attractions found only in South Carolina, we’re challenging you to submit your best self-portrait taken at any of the destinations profiled in this month’s feature. Scan the QR code or visit SCLiving.coop/snapshot to upload your photo and tell us about your in-state travel adventures. If we publish your image and story in South Carolina Living, we’ll send you a $25 gift card. THE FINE PRINT: By submitting your photo and story, you grant South Carolina Living magazine and The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc., full rights to edit and publish the material in print and digital publications, via social media and on our websites.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

25


GAFFNEY PEACHOID

JONATHAN SHARPE

Products unique to South Carolina

SMOKIN’ ED’S CAROLINA REAPER

Turning up the heat

26

Mason

The famous peach-shaped water-storage tank in Gaffney may be the only S.C. roadside attraction to get a boost in fame from the Netflix TV series House of Cards. It’s not the only oddly shaped water tower in the state. There’s one painted to look like a baseball in Fort Mill, off I-77, left over from when the Charlotte Knights played ball in South Carolina. And there’s one shaped like an egg in Newberry, off I-26, a nod to the town’s rank as the state’s leading egg producer. But neither of those seems to attract the level of attention the Peachoid does for, well, giggleinducing comparisons to human anatomy. When House of Cards worked the Peachoid into the plot of a 2013 episode, the water tank’s fame spread well beyond South Carolina, and fans of the show were delighted to discover the 135-foot-tall landmark was a real site they could visit. “The show kind of reintroduced it to younger generations,” says Kim Fortner, assistant manager of the Gaffney Board of Public Works. Built in 1981, the tank holds 1 million gallons of water to serve customers in Gaffney and Cherokee County. Functionality was never the only goal—the BPW board wanted to celebrate Gaffney’s status as a major peach producer, and they knew the tank’s visibility from the Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (S.C. 11) would give tourism a boost, too. A stem, a green leaf, a shaded cleft and a bottom tip give the tank its defining peach look. Thanks to a fresh paint job completed in June, the Peachoid is in great shape for photos. “It looks like a different peach,” Fortner says. “A riper peach.” —DIANE VETO PARHAM

HOT STUFF

GET THERE The Gaffney Peachoid is located at 294 Peachoid Road, Gaffney, off I-85 between exits 90 and 92. Peachoid Road runs along the northbound side of I-85. Admission to a gated parking and viewing area near the Peachoid is free and open at all times. Visit gbpw.com/peachoid-information or call (864) 488‑8800 for more information.

CARROLL FOSTER

In the four years since Guinness World Records officially declared Smokin’ Ed’s Carolina Reaper the world’s hottest chili pepper, the bumpy, red firebomb bred and grown in Fort Mill has only gotten hotter—figuratively and literally. Figuratively, in that production has quadrupled to keep up with international demand for Carolina Reaper organic pepper mash, used to spice up “sauces, salsas, ketchups, mustards, salad dressings, candy, chips, drinks—all sorts of stuff,” says Ed Currie, president, founder, mad scientist and chef at PuckerButt Pepper Company. “The Carolina Reaper has become a pretty mainstream thing.” Literally, in that the peppers Currie and a team of 70 workers are growing and processing today on the nation’s largest hot-pepper farm contain even more of the tongue-torching capsaicin oil than ever. The peppers that earned the record in 2013 registered a blistering 1.5963 million on the Scoville heat unit scale, or 300 times hotter than a jalapeno. Recent tests by Winthrop University show the current Carolina Reaper crop is “quite a bit” spicier, Currie says. “It continues to get hotter as we refine our growing techniques.” While Currie is breeding other super-hot pepper varieties with an eye to one day setting a new world record, he’s content for now with the Carolina Reaper’s success and the attention it’s drawn to South Carolina. “It’s Carolina grown, and we advertise that in everything we do,” he says. “That’s the reason it’s called the Carolina Reaper—to give pride to our state.” Learn more about the Smokin’ Ed’s Carolina Reaper super-hot chili pepper at puckerbuttpeppercompany.com, or visit the Puckerbutt Pepper Company store at 235 Main St. in Fort Mill. Phone: (803) 802‑9593. —KEITH PHILLIPS

Gaffney Peachoid

JUST PEACHY Gaffney’s famous water tower sports a new paint job.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL GUIDE

MASON, THE WORLD’S LARGEST SWEET TEA

GET THERE Mason’s courtyard is open to the public year-round. Parking in the adjacent garage is free. If you want to fill up on the sweet-tea experience in Summerville, pick up a souvenir Mason-shaped glass mug—with a complimentary sweet tea—at the town Visitors Center Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Another good time to visit is the upcoming Sweet Tea Festival (Sept. 21). Go to visitsummerville.com to learn more and to watch a short video of the town’s effort to set the world record.

RUTA SMITH

The sleepy town of Summerville first steeped its way into the Guinness World Records in June 2015 by brewing up 1,452 gallons of sweet tea and serving it from Mason, a giant, fiberglass, jarshaped container complete with oversized straw and a lemon wedge on top. For a town that bills itself as “the birthplace of sweet tea,” it was spot on. But, just months after Summerville achieved the world’s largest iced tea, Lipton brazenly upped and snatched the record away while celebrating the 125th anniversary of its tea business. Well, Summerville was having none of that. Last summer, on National Iced Tea Day, the town reclaimed the Guinness record by filling Mason with 2,524 gallons of iced tea, using 210 pounds of loose-leaf tea, 1,700 pounds of sugar and 3,000 pounds of ice. Mason now towers 15 feet over a cozy courtyard next to Town Hall. The location has no official address, but you’ll get close if you aim for 200 S. Main St., Summerville. That’s the address for the municipal complex at the corner of South Main Street and West Richardson Avenue. Lamppost banners along West Richardson will point you toward Mason, wedged between the Town Hall Municipal Annex and a brick-sided parking garage, just behind the street-front shops. Finding Mason requires a bit of a hunt, but when you do, he’s worth a souvenir selfie. “People come in all the time asking where it is, so they can take their picture with it,” says officer Roger Medlock of the Summerville Police Department. —DIANE VETO PARHAM

CHEERS TO SUMMERVILLE Town of Summerville employees Peter Ruth, Officer Roger Medlock and (seated, from left) Meredith Detsch, Kayla Halberg and Michelle Beltz raise a toast to Mason.

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FALL & WINTER TRAVEL GUIDE

CHARLESTON TEA PLANTATION

MILTON MORRIS

The sign in front of the fields at the Charleston Tea Plantation tells the story of an attraction that’s unique not only to South Carolina, but to all of North America. Arrows point the way to the next nearest commercial tea plantations—Argentina, 4,823 miles; China, 7,320 miles; Kenya, 7,816 miles. “There are some other places that are trying to grow tea in the states, but the way to describe us best is the only large-scale, commercially grown tea in America,” says managing partner William Barclay Hall, a third-generation tea taster. Hall opened the farm on Wadmalaw Island in 1987 and now oversees 127 acres of fragrant Camellia sinensis plants, which are harvested and processed on site into black and green varieties sold exclusively under the Charleston Tea Plantation brand. “Our product is strictly 100 percent American-grown teas,” Hall says. “We’re definitely a specialty product and obviously one of the rarest teas in the world.” More than 65,000 visitors a year take the free, self-guided tour of the processing factory. For those who care to learn more about the cultivation of tea plants, the plantation also offers a $12 trolley tour running every 45 minutes. Both tours end in the plantation gift shop, where visitors are treated to as many free cups of iced or hot tea as they can drink while they stock up on freshly harvested tea. “It’s a great place to visit, because it is very educational. Most people don’t have a clue how tea is made,“ Hall says. “The place is absolutely beautiful with the neatly trimmed tea bushes. You really can’t beat coming out and seeing a working tea farm.”

BLENHEIM GINGER ALE HOT STUFF

South Carolina’s native soft Products unique drink—famously spicy Blenheim to South Carolina Ginger Ale—got its start quite by accident in the late 1800s. Marlboro County physician Dr. C.R. May often prescribed mineral water from a small spring located near the town of Blenheim as a stomach tonic, but his patients hated the taste. So, the good doctor began adding ginger and sugar to make the medicine go down easier. People loved the concoction so much that May and a business partner revised the formula to make a soft drink and launched a commercial bottling operation in 1903. For decades, the zesty ginger ale won the hearts of South Carolinians, including one Alan Schafer, a Marlboro County businessman best known as the proprietor of South of the Border (see page 31). By 1993, Blenheim Ginger Ale had fallen on hard times and was producing fewer than 20 cases a week. That’s when Schafer bought the company and moved operations to a new bottling plant on the grounds of his famous roadside attraction. Today, some 100,000 cases a year roll out of the facility to satisfy a growing national and international demand, says Ryan H. Schafer, co-owner of the Blenheim Bottling Company. “Blenheim has sort of a cult following,” he says. “We ship thousands of cases to Japan, England, India and to many other places around the world. And you can find Blenheim in upscale stores like Whole Foods and The Fresh Market.” Blenheim Ginger Ale now comes in three varieties, each identified by a different-colored bottle cap— pink for the spiciest blend, gold for the regular and white for the diet version. “It just continues to grow,” says Schafer. “We are constantly getting new customers. I guess people are just willing to pay for what is considered a boutique item.” While the plant doesn’t offer tours, fans of Blenheim Ginger Ale can learn more about their favorite soda by calling (843) 774‑0322 or visiting blenheimgingerale.com. —TIM HANSON

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—KEITH PHILLIPS

GET THERE The Charleston Tea Plantation is located at 6617 Maybank Highway, Wadmalaw Island, and open for public tours year-round (except major holidays) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday. To learn more, call (843) 559‑0383 or visit charlestonteaplantation.com.

A GROWING CONCERN Tea plants at Charleston Tea Plantation are harvested from May to October.

MIC SMITH

The secret is out

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Landsford Canal State Park

CATCH THEM WHILE YOU CAN Peak blooming season for Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies runs from midMay to mid-June.

Charleston Tea Plantation

CARROLL FOSTER

ROCKY SHOALS SPIDER LILIES, LANDSFORD CANAL STATE PARK If you missed the show this year, mark your 2018 calendar now to see a natural wonder found only in South Carolina—the world’s largest colony of Rocky Shoals Spider Lilies in full bloom. This rare, flowering stalk grows only in the rivers of Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina, and the 20-acre patch found on the Catawba River within Landsford Canal State Park is both the biggest and the most accessible, drawing thousands of spectators each season to witness a giant, natural bouquet. “The peak bloom—mid-May to mid-June—is what everybody wants to see. It’s 20 acres of 4-foot-tall plants all covered in white,” says Al James, manager of Landsford Canal State Park. Park visitors can thank a rare combination of natural factors for the chance to witness the river in bloom, he says. This section of the Catawba River flows over a craggy dome of granite—perfect habitat for lily bulbs, which anchor firmly in the crevices and sprout three to five flowering stalks. Each flowering stalk can produce five to eight flowers,

allowing the colony to stay in peak bloom for 40 to 45 days. Visitors can take in the show from an observation deck built along the park’s nature trail or kayak to the colony and explore the archipelago of flowers from the inside. “It’s amazing to get out there in the middle,” James says, and guests are welcome to do just that—provided they follow state law and park rules. “We don’t want people jumping up and down in them or picking flowers.” —KEITH PHILLIPS

GET THERE Landsford Canal State Park, located at 2051 Park Drive in Catawba, is open from dawn to dusk year-round. From May 1 to June 30, admission fees are $5 for adults, $3.25 for seniors and $3 for children ages 6–15. The park holds an annual festival to celebrate peak blooming season with live music, food vendors and botanists on hand to provide in-depth information on spider lilies. The event always falls on the third Sunday in May, putting next year’s celebration on May 20 from noon to 5 p.m. The festival is free with park admission. For more details, park office hours are 11 a.m. to noon daily. Call (803) 789‑5800 or visit southcarolinaparks.com/landsfordcanal. SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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South of the Border

MIC SMITH

Warren Lasch Conservation Center

KEITH PHILLIPS

PRESERVING HISTORY During weekend tours of the Warren Lasch Conservation Center, visitors learn about the tools and techniques scientists use to prevent corrosion from destroying the Civil War submarine H.L. Hunley while they search for clues about her sinking.

H.L. HUNLEY TOURS AT THE WARREN LASCH CONSERVATION CENTER For the past 17 years, maritime archaeologists and conservators have been studying and preserving the wreck of the H.L. Hunley, the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in combat. And for just as long, history buffs have been drawn to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center in North Charleston to revel in the suspense of a great Civil War mystery. Attempting to break the Union blockade of Charleston Harbor, the eight-man crew of the Hunley made history on Feb. 17, 1864, by exploding a black-powder mine under the stern of the USS Housatonic off Sullivan’s Island. When the submarine failed to return to port, her whereabouts and the fate of the crew became matters of intense debate and speculation. For decades, theories about what happened that night captured popular imagination, but there were few hard facts. That began to change in 1995, when divers found the Hunley intact and buried in silt not far from the Housatonic wreck site. The submarine was lifted from the sea floor in 2000 and placed in a specially built conservation tank on the former Charleston Naval Base. Like detectives working a “cold case,” scientists began the delicate work of halting the corrosion that threatened to destroy the submarine, excavating the silt-filled interior to give her crew a proper burial, and uncovering clues that may one day solve the mystery of what sank the Hunley. 30

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

From the start, curious crowds swarmed the facility, hoping to glimpse the historic submarine. To accommodate public interest in the project, volunteers with the nonprofit Friends of the Hunley began offering tours of the lab on weekends. Over time, museum-style exhibits have been added and expanded with each new discovery. Today, some 38,000 visitors a year tour the facility, and interest in the Hunley project shows no sign of diminishing, says Kellen Correia, executive director of Friends of the Hunley. Tours, led by volunteer docents, are limited to 40 guests at a time and culminate on a viewing platform, where visitors can see the submarine submerged in the conservation tank as they learn about the groundbreaking work of the Clemson University Restoration Institute. The experience also covers biographies of the Hunley crew and the story of Charleston before and during the Civil War. “Charleston has such a rich maritime history, and the Hunley fits right in there,” Correia says. —KEITH PHILLIPS

GET THERE The Warren Lasch Conservation Center is located at 1250 Supply St., North Charleston. Tours are offered on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or on site. Prices: $16 for adults, $8 for students and children ages 6–17. For more information, contact Friends of the Hunley at (843) 743‑4865, ext. 10, or visit hunley.org.


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL GUIDE

SOUTH OF THE BORDER Love it or hate it, South of the Border—the Palmetto State’s largest roadside ­attraction—is still going strong. Each year, thousands of weary travelers motoring along I-95 spot the 300-foot-tall observation tower shaped like a Mexican sombrero and are lured into stopping to see what the place is all about. What they discover are curiously enticing gift shops filled with a remarkable variety of kitsch—and South Carolina’s only native soft drink, Blenheim Ginger Ale (see page 28). Visitors also have the option to eat at multiple restaurants, enjoy amusement rides, shop at a massive fireworks store, spend the night at the motel or campgrounds, and visit a live reptile exhibit. At the center of it all stands Big Pedro, a 97-foot-high neon sign that prompts nearly all travelers to stop and snap a photo or two. Even after 70 years of ups and downs (including $1 million in damages from Hurricane Matthew in 2016), there is no sign that the popularity of South of the Border is on the decline, says Ryan H. Schafer, president and co‑owner of the iconic roadside attraction. “Traffic has been good,” Schafer says. “We have been up every year since 2009. There is just nothing else out there like South of the Border.” —TIM HANSON

STANDING TALL Big Pedro welcomes weary motorists to South of the Border.

MILTON MORRIS

GET THERE South of the Border is located near Hamer at the intersection of I-95 and

Highway 301. Just follow the billboards by day and the neon glow by night. For more information, call (843) 774‑2417 or visit thesouthoftheborder.com.

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Real Just off I-95 and I-26, Santee Cooper Country is the five county region surrounding lakes Marion and Moultrie. Visit our web site: www.santeecoopercountry.org, call (803) 854-2131 or email us at tourscc@oburg.net for your get-away information.

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Calendar  of Events Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

UPSTATE

30 • Venture Outdoors Day, downtown, Pickens. (864) 878‑6421.

14–16 • SpartOberfest, Jesus Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, Spartanburg. (864) 576‑1164. 15 • Storyteller/Comedian Andy Offutt Irwin, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638‑5277. 15–16 • Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire—Viking Edition, Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, Greenville. (864) 271‑4883. 15–17 • Indie Craft Parade, Huguenot Mill at the Peace Center, Greenville. (864) 406‑6253. 16 • Old Time Fiddling Championship, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 16 • PRAI Awareness Walk and Children’s Fun Run, Legacy Park, Greenville. (864) 346‑7547. 16 • South Greenville Agricultural Fair, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 430‑1412. 16 • Upstate Splash Charity Open Water Swim, Devils Fork State Park, Lake Jocassee, Salem. (864) 400‑9967. 16 • Walk with Compassion, Falls Park on the Reedy, Greenville. (719) 761‑7496. 17 • Walk Like MADD, Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research, Greenville. (803) 397‑4514. 19 • Drop the Mic: Auditions for TEDxGreenville 2018, Zen, Greenville. (864) 430‑0636. 21–24 • Euphoria Festival, downtown, Greenville. (864) 233‑5663. 22 • Rick Wade’s Tribute to Elvis and Conway, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638‑5277. 22–23 • Mauldin BBQ Cook-Off, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 26 • Powdersville Fall Golf Tournament, Southern Oaks Golf Course, Easley. (864) 859‑2693. 29–Oct. 1 • Symphony Tour of Homes, Crescent and McDaniel avenues area, Greenville. (864) 370‑0965. 30 • Holy Smoke BBQ, St. John’s Lutheran Church, Walhalla. (864) 638‑6363. 30 • Jammin’ for Genes Barbeque & Music Lawn Festival, Greenwood Genetic Center, Greenwood. (864) 388‑1801.

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

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1 • United Ministries Transformation Walk, Fluor Field at the West End, Greenville. (864) 382‑0417. 5–7 • Albino Skunk Music Festival, Skunk Farm, Greer. info@albinoskunk.com. 5–8 • Oktoberfest, NOMA Square on Main Street, Greenville. (864) 248‑1568. 5–8 • South Carolina Humanities Festival, various locations, Gaffney. (803) 771‑2477. 6–7 • Squealin’ on the Square KCBS State Championship BBQ Cook-Off, Historic Square, Laurens. (864) 984‑2119. 7 • Belton Standpipe Heritage and Arts Festival, Belton Square, Belton. (864) 338‑8556. 7 • Hartness Half Marathon and 5K, Hartness Property, Greenville. jdavis@setupevents.com. 7 • Spartanburg International Festival, Barnet Park, Spartanburg. (864) 562‑4195. 7–8 • Aunt Het Quilt Show, Fountain Inn Activity Center, Fountain Inn. (864) 862‑3202. 13 • Guest speaker Dana Howard, Art Gallery on Pendleton Square, Pendleton. (864) 221‑0129. 13 • Upstate Stand Down 2017, Spartanburg Expo Center, Spartanburg. (864) 342‑0907. 13–14 • Artober Festival, Upcountry Provisions Bakery and Bistro, Travelers Rest. (864) 834‑8433. 13–15 • Fall for Greenville, downtown, Greenville. (864) 467‑6667. 14 • Benson OctoberFAST 5K, Greer First Baptist Church, Greer. (864) 877‑1937. 14 • Clusters for Kids Oyster Roast, Arran Farm, Easley. (864) 506‑0737. 14 • Craft Show and Cookie Factory, McCormick United Methodist Church, McCormick. (864) 852‑2394. 14 • Fall for All Festival, Roberts Presbyterian Church, West Anderson. (864) 225‑9950.

MIDLANDS SEPTEMBER

14–17 • Columbia’s Greek Festival, corner of Sumter and Calhoun streets, Columbia. (803) 461‑0248. 16 • 5K Nun Run, St. Anne Catholic School, Rock Hill. (803) 324‑4814. 16 • BBQ Dinner Train, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. 16 • Forrest Ray 5K, Sumter County Library, Sumter. (803) 773‑7273. 16 • Jubilee: Festival of Black History and Culture, Mann-Simons Site, Columbia. (803) 252‑1770, ext. 23. 17 • An Afternoon with Ronni Lundy, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 909‑7244. 17 • Dollar Sunday, Robert Mills House and Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252‑1770, ext. 23. 22 • Art on Tap, Gettys Art Center, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 22 • Riverbanks Zoofari, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. 23 • Midlands Health and Wellness Expo, Jamil Shrine Temple, Columbia. (813) 463‑2712. 29 • Military Appreciation Picnic, Shaw Air Force Base, Sumter. (803) 775‑1231. 29–30 • Irmo Okra Strut Festival, Irmo Community Park, Irmo. (803) 781‑7050. 29–Oct. 1 • Oktoberfest Advanced Horse Trials, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. 30 • Fish Fry and Music, Friendship United Methodist Church, Rock Hill. (803) 324‑0482. 30 • Oktoberfest, downtown, Aiken. (803) 649‑2221. 30 • Rosewood Art and Music Festival, Rockaways, Columbia. (803) 960‑3552. OCTOBER

3–8 • Orangeburg County Fair, Orangeburg County Fairgrounds, Orangeburg. (803) 534‑0358. 4 • Stable View Jumper Night, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. 5–7 • Blues and Jazz Festival, various venues, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 6–7 • Over the Edge to End Hunger, The Hub, Main Street, Columbia. (803) 540‑2011. 7 • Congaree Bluegrass Festival, Historic Columbia Speedway, ONGOING Columbia. (803) 550‑9520. Sundays through October • 7 • Gaston Collard and BBQ Woodburn and Ashtabula Historic Festival, Gaston Civic Center, Home Tours, multiple locations, Gaston. (803) 796‑7725. Pendleton. (864) 646‑7249.

7 • Newberry Oktoberfest, downtown, Newberry. (803) 321‑1015. 7 • October Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 7 • Think Pink Banquet, Manning Junior High School, Manning. (803) 460‑6679. 8 • Gospel Bluegrass Gathering, Historic Columbia Speedway, Columbia. (803) 550‑9520. 11 • Schooling Dressage Show, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. 11–22 • South Carolina State Fair, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3387. 14 • Butts and Bluegrass BBQ Festival, Clover Community Park, Clover. (803) 222‑9493. 15 • Aiken Kitchen Tour, various homes, Aiken. (803) 641‑6777. 15 • MFHA Qualifier Hunter Trials, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173.

16 • Ride the Tide, Litchfield Plantation Marina, Pawleys Island. (843) 333‑6178. 17 • Kiawah Island Golf Resort Triathlon, Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island. (843) 768‑6001. 17 • Pedal Hilton Head Island, Coligny Plaza, Hilton Head Island. pedalhiltonheadisland@ bgclowcountry.org. 17 • Yacht Hop of Hilton Head Island, Harbour Town Yacht Basin, Sea Pines Resort, Hilton Head Island. (843) 706‑2296. 20 • Lowcountry Christian Women’s Connection, Hampton Hall Clubhouse, Bluffton. (843) 705‑7604. 21 • Share the Bounty, Harbour Town Golf Links Clubhouse, Hilton Head Island. (843) 689‑3689. 21 • Sweet Tea Festival, downtown, Summerville. (843) 821‑7260. 22 • Dine, Dance and Discovery Gala, Hilton Head Lakes Clubhouse, ONGOING Hilton Head Island. (843) 284‑9227. Daily through Sept. 17 • “Home 22 • Dive-In Movie: Jaws, Island Sweet Home,” Museum of York Rec and Senior Center, Hilton County, Rock Hill. (803) 684‑3948. Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. Daily in September • 22–23 • Golden Leaf Gretchen Hash-Heffner Festival, Smith Haven Park, exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Mullins. (843) 464‑5200. Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 22–24 • Home Improvement Daily in October • Pumpkin and Outdoor Living Show, Patch, St. John’s United Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Methodist Church, BatesburgMyrtle Beach. (843) 438‑4124. Leesville. (803) 532‑6968. 23 • Bark in the Park, North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, North LOWCOUNTRY Charleston. (843) 762‑5585. SEPTEMBER 23 • Beard and Mustache 14–17 • Charleston Scottish Competition, Rockin’ Hard Saloon, Games & Highland Gathering, Murrells Inlet. (843) 340‑6564. various venues, Charleston. charlestonscots@gmail.com. 23 • Bluffton Boiled Peanut Festival, Old Town Bluffton, 15 • Moonlight Mixer, Edwin S. Bluffton. (843) 757‑1010. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 762‑9516. 23 • Shrimp Fest, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑3867. 15–16 • Hardeeville Catfish Festival, behind 23 • Turtle Trek 5K, Isle of City Hall, Hardeeville. Palms County Park, Isle of hardeevillecatfishfestival@ Palms. (843) 720‑1990. gmail.com. 23–24 • Art in Common Fall 15–16 • Pamplico Cypress Festival, Valor Memorial Garden, Festival, Main Street, Myrtle Beach. (843) 748‑0133. Pamplico. (843) 687‑3349. 23–24 • Progressive Show 16 • Authors Under the Live Jumping, Mullet Hall Equestrian Oaks, Frampton Plantation House, Center, Johns Island. (843) 762‑9965. Yemassee. (843) 597‑0912. 27 • Wine Down Wednesday, 16 • Aynor Harvest Hoe-Down Old Towne Creek County Park, Festival, Aynor Town Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. Aynor. (843) 358‑1074. 29 • Thrive: Lowcountry Women’s 16 • Chucktown Showdown, Conference, Sonesta Resort, Hilton Brittlebank Park, Charleston. Head Island. (843) 785‑3673. (860) 307‑6271. 30 • Chili Cookoff, Shelter Cove 16 • Fam Jam, Marion Square, Community Park, Hilton Head Charleston. (843) 853‑8962. Island. bhaley@hhivacations.com. 16 • Italian Heritage Festival, 30 • Irish Italian International Coastal Discovery Museum, Hilton Festival, Main Street, North Head Island. (401) 524‑1416. Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

30 • The House That Beer Built, fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity, Bohemian Bull Beer Garden, Charleston. (843) 768‑0998. OCTOBER

5–21 • Pawleys Island Festival of Music and Art, The Reserve Golf Club of Pawleys Island, Pawleys Island. (843) 626‑8911. 6–7 • Beaufort Shrimp Festival, Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 525‑6644. 6–7 • Myrtle Beach Seafood Festival, between 8th and 9th avenues, Myrtle Beach. (843) 855‑0527. 7 • Burger, Bacon & BBQ, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 7 • Live Oak Art and Music Fest, Horry County Court House, Conway. (843) 248‑3558. 7 • Moonlight Canoe Float, Cheraw State Park, Cheraw. (843) 537‑9656. 7–8 • Festa Italiana, The Market Common, Myrtle Beach. (843) 333‑7523. 7–8 • Harvest Home Weekend Festival, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235‑6000. 11 • Wine Down Wednesday, Old Towne Creek County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 12 • Yappy Hour, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 406‑6990. 14 • Cast Off Fishing Tournament, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. 14 • Cruise to the Coast Classic Car Show, Barefoot Landing, North Myrtle Beach. (866) 805‑5642. 14 • Lowcountry Trail Half Marathon and 5K, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island. (843) 795‑4386. 14 • South Carolina Sweet Potato Festival, Public Square, Darlington. (843) 393‑3526. 15 • Children’s Day Festival, Park West Recreation Complex, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. 15 • Latin American Festival, North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 762‑5585. ONGOING

Daily through Sept. 24 • “Artist, Scientist, Explorer: Mark Catesby in the Carolinas,” Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722‑2706. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 7 • “Places and Spaces: Plantation Lives,” Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, Mount Pleasant. (843) 883‑3123, ext. 213.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Wait till the pacifist gets home “You’ll be dining in the laundry room”

AS A SURVIVOR OF

post-WWII parents, I will always remember the feel of hairbrush bristles stinging my bottom and the thrill of dodging incoming projectiles whenever Mom exceeded her brat quota for the day. My own kids, especially the feral one, had it much easier. Armed only with wussy timeouts—the next generation’s idea of parental waterboarding—I was left to battle my tempestuous second-born, who could outsmart most adults by the time she was 2. Her older sister was more like a collectible doll than a human infant. She was the perfect baby who cried rarely, smiled all the time and was so Zen-like, she practically pooped sunshine. That’s the way nature tricks you into keeping the species going. When your first kid is a saint, you go back for seconds. But next time, you might get a firebreathing Tasmanian devil who was born to defy your toothless timeouts. That’s when you start wishing your parents’ antiquated methods were still legal. Most of my mom’s specialties have gone out of style, but they were certainly classics: “I’m going to count to three”

This threat probably explains my generation’s high incidence of math anxiety. The subliminal message was that we wouldn’t live long enough to hear “four” unless we stopped whatever felony was in progress. Perhaps that was the highest Mom could 46

If you made Mom’s persona non grata list, your dinner would be served on the washing machine beside piles of dirty clothes. She wouldn’t deny us food, but we’d have to eat it standing up at Cafe Whirlpool.

“Just wait till your father gets home”

count, but I’ll never know, what with running for my life at two-and-a-half. “Stop crying, or I’ll give you something to cry about”

When a child cries, tantrums notwithstanding, it’s safe to assume she’s upset about something that’s as real as a root canal in her tiny world. But rather than consider the trigger—be it the tragic demise of a gerbil, a national cupcake shortage or a big brother who kidnapped Elsa and Anna for target practice—mothers would instinctively respond with an ambiguous threat that meant nuclear war to a toddler. Of course, the thinking was flawed. Why not let a child who is already crying just keep going, if that’s the goal? Not a chance. The prevailing parenting advice was to disrupt the cry in progress and threaten to initiate a new one, which only increased the volume, ferocity and duration of the wailing. Go figure.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

This was my personal favorite, since Mom did all the roof-raising and Dad did what he was told. We all knew he was a plant-eating pacifist, but Mom would banish us to our rooms to wait for this fearsome alpha predator to dole out justice. After a long day at work, the only thing my father wanted to hit was a bottle of Miller High Life, but she’d sic him on us the moment he trudged through the door. So we’d all go through the motions for Mom’s sake. “Yell louder,” he’d urge behind the bedroom door. “Make your mother happy, so I can eat dinner.” Apparently, she never heard us giggling. My kids probably don’t remember timeouts, but I can still hear my mom bellowing ultimatums. Even now, decades later, I only buy hairbrushes with soft bristles.

sympathizes with her beleaguered mom, who was outnumbered by a bunch of snarky kids and a viciously witty husband. RIP, Mom and Dad. Write to HumorMe@SCLiving.coop with your parenting tips or war stories. JAN A. IGOE


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South Carolina Living September 2017  

Only in South Carolina: Your guide to one-of-a-kind attractions.