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CHANGE OUT Cutting-edge RC planes take off in Woodruff

OCTOBER 2016

SC SC E N E

Winning the race for turtle survival SC R E C I PE

Flavors of fall


HURRY!—55% TAX CREDIT EXPIRES SOON

FIND YOUR BURIED TREASURE

LYMAN, S.C.

MARY & ALLEN DISCOVERED A TREASURE IN THEIR YARD How did you learn about WaterFurnace? We heard about WaterFurnace systems on television and researched them online.

Why did you choose a geothermal system over a conventional unit? Previously, we used a heat pump by itself or in combination with a gas furnace. The science behind geothermal heat pumps demonstrated how they can be more efficient in providing comfort to the homeowner. Once we received the federal rebate, the geothermal system became as affordable as the best and most efficient heat pump.

Are you enjoying a lower power bill? We are experiencing an overall savings of $100 to $200 per month, depending on the season and how severe the weather.

THE MAGIC ISN’T ALWAYS on THE FIELD. Football is here again! While you treasure your favorite team for the magic they create on the field, sometimes the real magic is hidden just out of sight. A WaterFurnace geothermal comfort system taps into the stored solar energy just below the surface of the earth to provide savings of up to 70% on heating, cooling, and hot water. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer to learn how geothermal can be a game changer for your home and get up to $2000 in instant rebates on select packages during our Geothermal Upgrade Event.*

What are your favorite features? We immediately noticed and appreciated the lack of cold or hot spots in the house. It is uniformly heated or cooled. No certain area is colder or warmer than another. The system is quiet. You don’t even realize the thing is running. No kick-start noises. No shut-down noise. Cooling in the summer is amazing throughout the home.

Would you recommend a WaterFurnace system to your friends and family? Most definitely. It is expensive on the front end, but with the federal rebate, this system is a win-win. We tell anyone who is looking for a new system to at least look into this.

How did you select your contractor?

waterfurnace.com/football YOUR LOCAL WATERFURNACE DEALERS

Upstate

CAROLINA HEATING SERVICE INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (864) 412-2651 • carolinaheating.com

Rock Hill/Charlotte

PANTHER HEATING & COOLING, INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (803) 792-0788 • pantherhvac.com

We searched online and researched the material Carolina Heating Service provided (not just their company stuff). We listened to other people. We made sure the contractor had knowledge and experience with this system.

Myrtle Beach/Georgetown

Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how you can discover treasure in your backyard.

CASSELL BROTHERS HEATING & COOLING (803) 932-6003 • cassellbros.com

visit waterfurnace.com

WACCAMAW HEATING & COOLING GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 235-1158 • waccamawgeo.com

Columbia

Charleston

BERKELEY HEATING & AIR GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 779-3551 • berkeleyheating.com WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc. *Rebate amounts vary on package purchased. Contact your dealer about which rebate is right for you. Promotion ends December 9th, 2016.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 10 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 573,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

OCTOBER 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 10

FEATURE

16 Field of dreams Triple Tree Aerodrome takes off as South Carolina’s ultimate aviation playground and classroom.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

Cooperative news

Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

Ron Aiken, Katherine Tandy Brown, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Patrick Keegan, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

Learn how the next generation of smart meters will give consumers more control over their home energy use. ENERGY Q&A

Turning leaves and cooler temperatures are friendly reminders to check attic insulation and seal up air leaks before winter arrives in full fury. Go gaga over the latest innovations in the booming baby-care market.

OCTOBER 2016

SC SC E N E

SC R E C I PE

Flavors of fall

Go inside the Turtle Survival Center to see how rare and endangered species are winning the race against extinction. TRAVELS

26 Gobbling up outdoor

learning

SMART CHOICE

Winning the race for turtle survival

South Carolina’s reigning surf queen plans to ride her passion for the sport all the way to the 2020 Olympic Games.

22 Fighting for survival

up for winter?

14 Goo-goo gadgets

21 Making waves

SCENE

12 Is your attic bundled

Cutting-edge RC planes take off in Woodruff

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

STORIES

10 Game changers, part 3

ITH

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

DIALOGUE

30

SM

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

SC LIFE

O R E S T T U R T L E BY ESI F MIC

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181

POWER USER

Take a walk on the wild side at the National Wild Turkey Federation’s Winchester Museum and the new Palmetto Shooting Complex and Outdoor Education Center near Edgefield.

RC pilots like Stanley Johnson of Tennessee gladly make a week-long pilgrimage to South Carolina each May for the chance to fly their model planes at Triple Tree Aerodrome near Woodruff. Photo by Carroll Foster.

L AW

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

Fall is in full swing with Halloween fun, car shows, horse-andcarriage competitions and a look back at American history. Plus: A Summerville teen earns a generous college scholarship by serving her community.

SU

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

6 ON THE AGENDA

CARROLL FOSTER

WEB EDITOR

22 RECIPE

30 Flavors of fall

Celebrate the season with four new recipes to satisfy your fall cravings. GARDENER

32 Fending off frost

Extend your gardening season with simple plant coverings. HUMOR ME

38 Got gravity?

Not everyone can be an elite gymnast. Some of us have to watch from the sidelines and threaten to strangle the judges with our swim goggles.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS


On the Agenda For a listing complete s, see of Event 6 page 3

OCTOBER 21–30

Highlights

Things that go

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

BOO

If you want to go wild for Halloween in a family-friendly way, how about trick-or-treating at the zoo? Greenville Zoo’s safe and non-scary Boo in the Zoo runs for two consecutive weekends, Oct. 21–23 and 28–30. Kids 12 and under will enjoy an “extinct species graveyard,” a princess castle and an un-haunted house. Bring favorite photos from past Boo in the Zoo events for the 30th-anniversary memory wall.

Costume up for a nightly Boo at the Zoo “spook-tacular” at Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens in Columbia on Oct. 21–30. Frightless fun includes Frankenstein’s Foam Zone, an Eeky Freaky Dance Party (pictured), and rides on the Haunted Carousel and Spooky Spots and Stripes Railroad.

For details, visit greenvillezoo.com or call (864) 467‑4300.

OCTOBER 28–NOVEMBER 6

Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival and Concours d’Elegance

For details, visit riverbanks.org or call (803) 779‑8717.

NOVEMBER 5–6

Katydid Combined Driving Event

Carriage driving, an equine sport that showcases horse and driver working in harmony, is Be on the lookout for historic made-in-S.C. featured in the three elements of combined Anderson Motoring Company automobiles on driving: the precise elegance of dressage, display at this year’s motoring festival, including the excitement of the marathon obstacle a 1920 Anderson convertible roadster owned course, and the speed and agility of the by Laurens Electric Cooperative member Paul cones challenges. See the action, including Ianuario Sr. The 10-day festival will also showcase this year’s North American Intermediate rare and vintage vehicles, like a Panhard & Levassor Combined Driving Championship competition, (pictured) from the Collier Collection in Florida at Katydid Farm in Aiken County. and others from Nashville’s Lane Motor Museum. For details, visit hhiconcours.com or call (843) 785‑7469.

6

For details, visit katydidcde.com or call (803) 295‑6785.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

NOVEMBER 5–6

Revolutionary War Field Days

Take a front-row seat as the British Redcoats face off against America’s Continental troops in one of the oldest Revolutionary War reenactments in the U.S. Two days of battle at Historic Camden offer a sensory immersion into the sights, sounds and smells of an 18th-century battlefield. Visitors can also interact with costumed interpreters to learn about Colonial dance, campfire cooking, games, crafts and more. For details, visit historiccamden.org or call (803) 432‑9841.


MICAH PONCE, BERKELEY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

2 0 1 6 WA S H I N G TO N YO U T H TO U R S E RV I C E P RO J E C T S Madison Pittman (center) received the 2016 R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship at an Aug. 31 award presentation at Faith Christian School in Summerville. With her are (left to right) parents Steve and Mary Alice Pittman, Van O’Cain of ECSC, and Rita Worthy and Eleanor Gillins of Berkeley Electric Cooperative.

Berkeley student wins $5,000 community service scholarship

something was up when she spied her family and her Washington Youth Tour advisor in the crowd at her school assembly. Soon after, she got a “huge, awesome” surprise—she was awarded the 2016 R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship presented by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina. Pittman, a 17-year-old senior at Faith Christian School in Summer­ ville, was chosen to receive the $5,000 award on the basis of a project she designed and implemented— 5K 4 Kids, a community road race that raised $2,000 for pediatric care at Summerville Medical Center and MUSC Children’s Hospital. “The judges were amazed with what Madison put together in just a few short months,” says Van O’Cain, director of public and member relations with ECSC. As one contest judge wrote, “You have embodied what this program is all about—showing leadership while helping out in the community.” Pittman, the daughter of Steve and Mary Alice Pittman of Berkeley Electric Cooperative, plans to major in pre-med at Liberty University in Virginia and pursue a career in pediatric anesthesiology. Her project was a natural fit with her interest in sports and her volunteer work at Summerville Medical Center. Although the work involved in MADISON PITTMAN SUSPECTED

planning and staging her July 30 5K was more than she had anticipated, Pittman says she was excited to see the community support it garnered, including attracting a group of participants from the nationwide nonprofit Ainsley’s Angels, which pairs specialneeds athlete-riders with runners who push them in wheeled vehicles in road races like Pittman’s. “I think this is a really good opportunity for people to get out in our communities and do good stuff,” Pittman says of the scholarship competition. “Make it something you’re passionate about, because it makes all your hard work more meaningful at the end.” The competition is open to S.C. students who attend the annual Washington Youth Tour, which sends rising high school seniors to the nation’s capital for a week of learning about co-ops and government. The award recognizes a student whose service project best exemplifies the cooperative principle of “concern for community.” The scholarship is named for Robert D. Bennett, the first general manager and executive vice president of ECSC. Bennett, who led the state association from 1950 until his retirement in 1980, strongly believed that electric cooperatives should support their local communities—­providing a better quality of life for their members. —DIANE VETO PARHAM

Ashley Addison, Tri-County Electric Cooperative Children’s Health Fair: Organized event to educate local youth about health issues and provide free screenings Erin Bedenbaugh, Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative Little Free Library: Promoted literacy through neighborhood mini libraries in old newspaper-vending boxes Emily Cleveland, Aiken Electric Cooperative The Great Bedtime Story Pajama Drive: Collected new pajamas and books to distribute to children in the community Marcus Crawford, Pee Dee Electric Cooperative Clean Drive 4 a Strive: Collected cleaning supplies and toiletries to benefit Pee Dee Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Assault Taylor Gordon, Aiken Electric Cooperative Backpacks for Students: Distributed donated backpacks to students in the community Katie Minichan, Aiken Electric Cooperative Swimming Lessons Scholarship Fundraiser: Hosted bake sale and car wash to raise funds for swim lessons for children in need Madison Pittman, Berkeley Electric Cooperative 5K 4 Kids: Organized 5K race to raise funds for Summerville Medical Center and MUSC Children’s Hospital Erin Roland, Tri-County Electric Cooperative Math Mania Day: Coordinated fun math activities for kindergartners in Calhoun County William Swicord, Santee Electric Cooperative Grocery Bags for Kids: Delivered bags of food to children in need and underprivileged families in Williamsburg County Taylor Thompson, Aiken Electric Cooperative AP Chemistry Science Day: Showcased science projects for young chemistry students at local schools Hunter Thorpe, Edisto Electric Cooperative American Red Cross Blood Drive: Coordinated blood drive for residents of the St. George area Jackson Tomaszewski, Palmetto Electric Cooperative Technology Outreach Program: Created organization to encourage high school students to assist with technology outreach in local retirement communities

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


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6

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9/12/16

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Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the ­conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

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South Carolina Living

Oodles of squash noodles. Chef Belinda has the answers to all your questions about spaghetti squash, including why it’s named after pasta and how to cut, cook and serve it. Watch the video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Lou Green

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Register to win a $100 gift card. Visit SCliving.coop/reader-reply to register for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 gift card. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Oct. 31.

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GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after.

energyEFFICIENCYtip  

AM Minor Major

OCTOBER

PM Minor Major

17 8:07 1:22 1:52 7:22 18 9:07 2:07 2:22 7:52 19 10:07 2:52 3:07 8:22 20 11:22 3:52 4:07 8:52 21 — 4:52 9:52 1:07 22 — 6:07 12:07 2:37 23 — 7:37 9:52 3:22 24 2:22 8:52 10:22 4:07 25 3:37 9:37 10:52 4:22 26 4:37 10:22 4:52 11:22 27 5:22 11:07 5:07 11:37 28 11:37 5:52 5:22 12:07 29 — 6:37 12:07 12:37 30 — 7:07 12:37 6:07 31 7:52 12:52 1:07 6:22

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AM Minor Major

NOVEMBER

1 7:31 2 8:16 3 9:01 4 10:01 5 11:16 6 — 7 — 8 — 9 1:46 10 3:01 11 9:46 12 10:31 13 11:16 14 — 15 7:16 16 8:16

PM Minor Major

12:31 12:46 1:01 1:16 1:31 2:01 2:01 2:46 2:46 4:16 3:46 8:46 5:01 7:46 6:31 8:31 7:46 9:01 8:46 3:01 4:01 3:46 4:46 4:16 5:46 4:46 6:31 12:01 12:16 12:46 1:01 1:16

6:01 6:16 6:31 7:01 7:31 12:16 1:16 2:01 2:31 9:46 10:16 11:01 11:31 5:16 6:01 6:31

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An average household dedicates about 5 percent of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. By replacing your home’s five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the Energy Star rating, you can save $75 each year. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

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Clemson University TigersŽ Precision Crafted in Stainless Steel Bold Watch Face Shows Off the Team’s Colors and the TigersŽ Logo Features 3 Sub-dials, Stop Watch Function Plus a Date Window Etched on the Back with the Team Logo, School Name and the Year it was Founded—1889

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A Remarkable Value... Available for a Limited Time Always a top contender in college football, the Clemson Tigers Ž just wrapped up a truly historic season. So get ready to show your loyalty and pride like never before with a stylish new jewelry exclusive that can’t be beat—the “Clemson TigersŽ� Collector’s Watch only from The Bradford Exchange. The watch comes with a Certificate of Authenticity in a custom presentation case. An exceptional value at $149*, you can pay for it in 5 convenient monthly installments of $29.80, backed by our unconditional, money-back, 120-day guarantee and a full-year limited warranty. To reserve yours, send no money now; just fill out and send in the Reservation Application. But don’t delay! This is a limited-time offer not available in stores!

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Dialogue

Game changers, part 3 peak hours and adjusting temperature settings in smart your home. meters could be true game changers. Funny, isn’t it, how power use spikes at 4 p.m. For decades, the old, gray utility box with when the kids get home and the refrigerator the protruding glass display was the only way door opens 20 times, every light in the house to tell how much electricity a home or business goes on, the microwave is popping popcorn, the used. That system, which utilizes a spinning oven is making pizza and both TVs are in use? disc to measure power consumption for billing (Too bad there’s no app for automatically conpurposes, was invented in 1888. While it was easy to see that the faster the wheel turned, trolling teenagers!) the more energy you were If there is one overusing, there wasn’t any way arching trend in the game Smart meters allow your to precisely assess what the changers we’ve covered rate of spin meant or even so far—the leaps in techco‑op to manage the identify which devices were nology that include smart delivery of electricity the biggest users of power. meters and new and Clearly, the old techbetter methods of energy in a way that eliminates storage—it’s conservation. nology could use some innovation. New technologies and waste and helps all In the utility industry, a innovative business models members save money. “smart meter” is shorthand can make the creation and for Advanced Metering distribution of electricity Infrastructure (AMI). AMI devices gather an more efficient, safe, reliable and environmentally enormous amount of data that help both coopresponsible. The investment in game changers has the potential to pay dividends in the form eratives and consumers understand power of savings for all consumers today and a brighter consumption in precise detail. future for our children tomorrow. AMI data allow your co-op to manage the South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperdelivery of electricity in a way that eliminates waste and helps all members save money. Smart atives are at the forefront of these issues, and we meters also allow, for the first time, two-way take enormous pride in embracing innovations communication between your home’s electrical that help us better serve our members. As we systems and the cooperative. Our engineers can move into an energy future that’s more dynamic use the system to monitor power use, discover and technical than it’s ever been, you can rest problems and send commands to make the grid assured that you have a friend in the utility operate more efficiently. business whose first, last and only purpose is to As home energy-management technologies look out for you. grow in popularity, smart meters will work hand in glove with high-tech thermostats, smart appliances and mobile apps to allow homeowners control over nearly every electrical system in the house. Imagine turning off appliances during IN THE WORLD OF ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES,

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

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EmPowering new business

Before the first aircraft flew, and before people showed up to their new job, Santee Cooper helped power Executive HeliJet’s expansion to Myrtle Beach, creating a $1 million economic partnership for South Carolina.

Since 1988, we’ve been a driving force behind more than $11 billion in industrial investments that have produced over 67,000 new jobs. And we’re not slowing down. With our low-cost, reliable power, creative incentive packages and diverse property portfolio, Santee Cooper, working with the South Carolina Power Team and the state's electric cooperatives, continues to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

POWERING SOUTH CAROLINA

www.santeecooper.com/SL • scpowerteam.com


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN

Is your attic bundled up for winter? If you venture outdoors in the winter with no hat or coat, you’ll feel much colder than you’d feel covered up. Similarly, when your home is not properly sealed and insulated, cold air sneaks in and heat escapes. Insulating your home to efficient levels can cut your heating and cooling costs by an average of 15 percent and make you more comfortable in your home. Your attic is a great place to consider insulating. It’s usually accessible and easy to inspect for air leaks and insulation levels. And most homes do not have enough attic insulation. Insulation standards for new homes increased in 2012, and many homes built before then do not have the current recommended amount of attic insulation. Insulation is graded by its “R-value”​ —the higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power. If you live in a mild climate, such as South Carolina, your attic should have a minimum grade of R-38, or about 13–14 inches of insulation. More may be needed, depending on your home and exact climate. How can you tell if your attic is lacking in insulation? Generally, if you can see the ceiling joists on your attic floor, there’s not enough insulation. A trained energy auditor can diagnose shortcomings with insulation or air leaks. If you decide to add attic ­insulation, prepare the space first: u If you store items, such as holiday decorations, in your attic, consider another storage location. If you

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Common winter attic air leaks

SOURCE: U.S. EPA

Q A

Winter will be here soon, and I’m wondering if more insulation could help lower my heating bills. Where should I add insulation?

Exterior wall top plate

Supply grill

Attic access hatch

Interior wall top plate

Return grill

Recessed can light

Low insulation level

Before adding insulation, be sure to inspect and seal air leaks.

must use your attic for storage, build a platform high enough to allow for the recommended level of insulation. u If you live in an older home, check your attic’s electric wiring. Is the insulation around the wires ­degrading? Do you have outdated knob-and-tube wiring? If so, you may need to replace the wiring before proceeding. Decide who will do your insulation work. Do-it-yourselfers should do some homework first. Installing insulation is messy, potentially dangerous and requires special equipment. If you’d rather use an insulation professional, discuss your attic’s specific needs before you hire a contractor: u Be sure your contractor will seal any air leaks, such as around furnace flues and exposed air ducts in the attic. Air leaks can bring warm, moist air into the attic, which can reduce insulation value and create mold. u Pay particular attention to your attic door or hatch. This entry point is a significant contributor to heat loss and heat gain in the home. u It’s not usually necessary to remove existing insulation unless it’s

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wet, moldy or contains animal waste. u Make sure there is sufficient ventilation in the attic. Warmth and moisture can build up in an improperly ventilated attic, leading to roof problems, such as roof rot or ice dams. Two types of insulation work well for attic floors: batt/roll or blown-in/ loose fill. Blown-in insulation requires special installation equipment, but it fills the space better than batt insulation, which can leave gaps unless it is carefully cut and placed around ceiling joists, vents and other impediments. Most insulation is made from fiberglass, cellulose or mineral wool. Blown-in cellulose insulation offers superior coverage, high R-value and air-sealing abilities. It’s also treated with boric acid, which acts as a fire retardant and insect repellent. Consult with an energy auditor or insulation contractor to determine what type and material of insulation will work best in your home. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739‑3041.


WE ARE ALL WORKING TOWARDS THE SAME GOAL. Using energy wisely is the job of every electric co-op member. And when we work together, our combined strength is more than enough to accomplish anything. Learn more about the power of your co-op membership at TogetherWeSave.com.


SmartChoice

BY RON AIKEN

Goo-goo gadgets SLEEPY TIME

FEVER FINDERS

MOTION MAKER The mamaRoo mechanical cradle by 4moms features five distinct movements to rock your child to sleep: car ride, kangaroo, tree swing, rock-a-bye and wave. Play one of its built-in sounds, or plug into your own MP3 player for customized entertainment. $199. (412) 434‑8380; 4moms.com.

SMART PAJAMAS While your little one sleeps, you can monitor her positions, motion, breathing and more with Mimo Smart Baby Monitor sleepwear. The monitor fits into a custom onesie and broadcasts directly to your smartphone, where you can store the information and get live audio. $199. (877) 415‑6466; mimo.com.

PASS THE PACIFIER A pacifier is a soothing prop for a cranky baby. Why not let it double as a thermometer? Summer Infant’s Pacifier Thermometer includes a glowing fever-alert feature for quick nighttime readings, with soft beeps to let you know when the reading is complete. $12. (800) 268‑6237; summerinfant.com.

Gone are the days of scratchy-audio baby monitors and glass thermometers. Go gaga over the latest innovations in the booming baby-care market.

EAR TEMP Kinsa’s Smart Ear Thermometer reports your child’s temperature in one second with the press of a button. It also connects to your phone, allowing you to track health history for your entire family and share details with your doctor. $48. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.

EXTRA CARE

MODERN MONITOR Those early baby monitors were great for simply hearing when your baby was awake and needing you. Today’s monitors tell you the nursery’s air quality, stream high-resolution video and connect to your smartphone—just for starters. The iBaby Monitor M6S has night vision and can report room temperature and humidity and provide charts to track your baby’s sleeping habits. $230. (650) 396‑2436; ibabylabs.com. 14

BABY BATH Who says the spa experience is only for adults? With gentle water jets and bubbles, Summer Infant Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa and Shower comes with a newborn sling for the smallest bathers and can be used in standard tubs for older children. $54. (800) 966‑6546; walmart.com.

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SMART POTTY The product itself may not be high-tech—it’s a plastic potty seat with a stand for holding an iPad (sold separately). But the CTA Digital 2-in-1 iPotty may be just the thing for a weary parent trying to get a child excited about potty training. A touchscreen protector is included. $34. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.


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rodrome takes off as South Triple Tree Ae Carolina’s

sroom s a l c d ultimate aviation playground an

BY KEITH PHILLIPS | PHOTOS BY CARROLL FOSTER

ailerons, rudder and elevators waggle in response. After priming the engine, he spins the propeller counter­ clockwise. Once. Twice. A third time. On the fourth try, the 170 cc, two-cylinder engine sparks to life, and the men take positions on opposite sides of the fuselage, holding the aircraft stationary as Galle performs the final check by revving the engine to full power. With the plane ready for flight, Carmen raises a signal pole to announce their takeoff to other pilots and spotters. Making sure the runway is clear, Galle nudges the ­throttle, smiling as he watches the Decathlon roll forward, execute a sharp, 90-degree turn and begin a smooth takeoff roll. Within seconds, the tail is up and the plane leaps skyward, climbing at full power to find its place in a squadron of RC planes orbiting the skies over the 400-acre airfield near Woodruff.

ALAN GALLE IS MAKING HIS PREFLIGHT CHECKS WHEN A FELLOW

RC pilot passing by nods in admiration of the red-whiteand-blue Super Decathlon parked alongside the grass runway of Triple Tree Aerodrome. “Have a nice flight,” the man says with a friendly wave. “Thanks!” Galle answers, but his eyes never leave his pride and joy​— GO BIG, OR GO HOME Alan a 47-percent-scale replica of the venGalle of Glen Ellyn, Illinois, takes his newest RC plane out erable civilian airplane. With spotter for a spin at the Triple Tree George Carmen standing by, Galle Aerodrome. The giant-scale manipulates the twin joysticks on his replica of a classic taildragger is one of 40 planes he’s built transmitter and watches the plane’s or flown over the years. “I love it,” Galle says. “I just wanted to fly something unusual. Something different. Something big.”

Build it, and they will come

KEITH PHILLIPS

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Welcome to Joe Nall Week, one of the world’s biggest fly-ins for RC pilots. Organized and hosted by the volunteers of Triple Tree Aerodrome, the annual event draws more than 13,000 people from around the world for a f­amily-friendly celebration of aviation, says Rob Traynham, the airfield’s volunteer spokesman. “In the RC modeling world, this is the premier event,” he says. “Our guests are always just so happy to be at Triple Tree.” Throughout the week, an incredible array of model aircraft, covering every era and style of flight, crowds the taxiways and fills the skies at Triple Tree. From sunrise to


sunset, the whoosh of miniature jet and generosity of Triple Tree founder engines rises above the roar of proPat Hartness and the tireless work of a tight group of volunteers and peller-driven craft and the electric supporters. whine of the latest in quadcopter READY FOR TAKEOFF The power-to-weight ratio of The Hartness family has a long drones. At the main viewing gazebo, 3D aerobatic model airplanes makes them capable of extreme maneuvers, including vertical tail stands connection with aviation in South where Galle is piloting his giant-scale where the aircraft hover like a helicopter. Pilots Carolina, and young Pat grew up Decathlon, a visitor may see biplanes, sometimes compete to see who can dip the lowest building and flying RC model planes World War II bombers, modern without touching the ground. before eventually learning to fly the fighter jets—even an executive busifull-size ones. After a long career in the bottling business, ness jet—all sharing the skies in a freestyle aerobatic ballet. Hartness decided to give something back to the aviation The airfield itself, served by Laurens Electric Cooper­ community. He purchased a former cotton farm on the ative, is a thing of beauty. Owned and operated by a nonbanks of the Enoree River, built the ultimate airfield and profit educational foundation, it boasts one of the world’s then deeded it to the 501(c)3 educational nonprofit. longest grass runways—7,000 feet long by 400 feet wide; Today, a cadre of 100 dedicated volunteers maintains big enough to land full-sized airplanes, even some jets. The the facility, working to fulfill the foundation’s mission “to control tower, used during general-aviation fly-ins, is a tanignite and expand the passion for aviation.” That includes gible piece of South Carolina aviation history. It previously maintaining a hangar filled with an impressive collection stood over Donaldson Air Force Base in Greenville, where of vintage aircraft and running what Traynham calls “the countless B-25 pilots trained during World War II. heart of the operation,” a brand-new educational center Everything else on site—including campgrounds with with classrooms and flight simulators designed to teach visRV hookups, bathroom and shower facilities, a beautiful wooden pavilion and a 52-acre lake for RC floatplanes— iting school groups, Boy Scout troops and civic clubs about the wonders of flight. l l [PAGE 20] has been custom-built since 1998, thanks to the vision

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HIGH-FLYING Images from Joe Nall Week 2016

OUT FOR A SPIN FPV quadcopters are the newest form of radiocontrolled flying featured at Joe Nall Week. FPV stands for first-person view. Pilots maneuver the tiny drones through obstacle courses by watching a live video feed from the drone’s camera on headset goggles or flat-screen video monitors.

IN MEMORY OF JOE NALL A tribute wall inside the main Triple Tree Aerodrome hangar complex commemorates Joseph Trippe Nall, the namesake of the annual RC fly-in. Nall was a Furman University classmate of Pat ­Hartness, and the men shared a lifelong love of aviation and RC flying. Until his death in 1989, Nall served as the master of ceremonies at ­annual RC events in South Carolina.

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KEITH PHILLIPS

THE NEED FOR SPEED Powered by a four-cylinder engine, the “Galloping Ghost” P-51 replica is one of the fastest RC planes in the sky. Sponsored by a manufacturer of model-plane parts and accessories, pilot Otto Widlroither of Munich, Germany, travels to international RC events to fly demonstrations and always enjoys Triple Tree Aerodrome. “I’ve been all over the world, but this is the best,” he says.

HARD AT PLAY RC flying buddies Keefe Lemmon (left) and Stanley Johnson, both from Tennessee, enjoy their fifth visit to Joe Nall Week. As pilots of largescale, 3D aerobatic planes, they appreciate the wideopen airspace of Triple Tree Aerodrome. “This is heaven for RC pilots,” Johnson says.

FOUNDING FATHER OF TRIPLE TREE Pat Hartness (left), the chief architect of Triple Tree Aerodrome, poses for a picture with his son and fellow pilot, Sean Hartness.


FUN

FLYING COLORS Keith Sessions serves as the chief financial officer of the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), but, like every other pilot at Joe Nall Week, his primary mission is fun and fellowship. “We have friends that we see only once a year, and this is the place we see them,” he says. “For model airplanes, this is the biggest event.” A 1990 graduate of Clemson University, Sessions decorates his Yak 54 3D aerobatic plane with the team colors and tiger paw logo.

FUN ON THE WATER Harold and Melinda LaVere of Delaware take advantage of the 52-acre lake at Triple Tree Aerodrome to fly their RC float plane. The lightweight craft runs on batteries and gets about 10 minutes of flight time on a single charge. In winter, the couple replaces the pontoons with skis to land on ice and snow.

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON Steve Hoyt and his son, Quin, drove from Panama City, Florida, to fly their RC float plane at Triple Tree Aerodrome during Joe Nall Week. “We’re very lucky to have a place like this,” Steve Hoyt says. “They go out of their way to make sure you have a good time.” At age 9, Quin is already an accomplished pilot, capable of delicate water takeoffs and landings and switching out the batteries in the plane without his father’s help. “I’ve been doing it since I was 5,” he says.

INSIDE THE HANGAR During Joe Nall Week and other fly-in events, visitors are invited to explore the airfield’s hangar complex, which contains vintage military, civilian and RC aircraft used in Triple Tree’s educational programs.

WORKING HOLIDAY Rob McClanahan of Dayton, Ohio, readies his jet-powered replica of a Chinese J-10 fighter for takeoff. When he’s not flying unmanned airplanes for fun, Capt. McClanahan is working on them as an engineer in the U.S. Air Force. “My experience growing up flying RC planes helped land me my job in the military,” he says.

GET MORE For more information on Triple Tree Aerodrome, the educational mission and upcoming RC and general aviation events, visit tripletreeaerodrome.com. For the safety and security of guests, access to all events is limited to members of aviation organizations and their guests. “It’s not that we’re trying to be private or exclusive,” says spokesman Rob Traynham. “It’s the fact that there are only about 100 volunteers. A large, public crowd would overwhelm us. In the pure interest of safety, we want our guests to be at least tuned into aviation a little bit. We want everyone that attends to have fun and be safe.” The easiest way to be a part of the fun is to join the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) at modelaircraft.org. Adult memberships are $75 a year; youth memberships are free. Through AMA, prospective RC pilots can link up with one of 36 model-airplane clubs in South Carolina. Many even have introductory programs for new AMA members.

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FIELD OF DREAMS

TRIPLE TREE FLY-IN

PHOTOS BY KEITH PHILLIPS

Of the 12 general-aviation and RC events held at the airfield each year, the Triple Tree Fly-In may rival Joe Nall Week for sheer spectacle and fun. For five days each fall, the grass strip becomes one of the busiest airfields in South Carolina when more than 800 private pilots navigate their way to the aerodrome to show off their planes, talk shop, socialize and enjoy

tent camping along the banks of the Enoree River. The collection of aircraft on display runs the gamut from everyday civilian craft to World War II trainers, fighters and cargo planes, experimental ultralight planes and even helicopters. There’s also an occasional flying boat, like the Republic Seabee RC-3 flown in from North Carolina by Edgar “E.T.” Tello and his wife, Melissa. Melissa Tello says the couple enjoys the relaxed environment of the close-knit aviation community. “It’s so cool to come here,” she says. “The neat thing about pilots is that it takes a certain caliber of person. You know they are grounded. You don’t worry about theft or anything. You’ve got good people simply by the fact of their love of aviation and the diligence it takes to become a pilot.” Tom Smith of Sarasota, Florida, made his

POINT OF PRIDE Pilot Tom Smith of Sarasota, Florida, displays his 1942 Vultee BT-15 Valiant, a World War II military trainer. Smith’s plane is one of only four BT-15s still flying.

[FROM PAGE 17] “Triple Tree is intended to give them an aviator’s field of dreams,” he says. “It’s designed to be the ultimate environment where kids, and I say kids of all ages, can get plugged into aviation in all its forms.”

Big-boy toys

Plugging into RC aviation is what Joe Nall Week is all about. The airfield is large enough that organizers can give each segment of the hobby a dedicated space to play. Near the control tower, there’s a field for control-line planes, beginner-friendly, string-controlled aircraft that can inexpensively launch a young pilot’s interest in RC model­ ing. At the lower end of the runway, the pilots of largescale, 3D aerobatic airplanes have all the space they need to perform low-altitude twists, loops, dives, rolls, spins, stalls— even vertical tail stands in which the planes hover like helicopters just inches off the ground. Moving up the runway, 20

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LENDING A HAND John Helmke, one of the volunteers who worked the 2016 Triple Tree Fly-In, guided planes down the taxiway the old-fashioned way. As a pilot, he’d rather be flying but volunteers his time on the ground, making sure visiting aviators enjoy the weekend. “I do this as a labor of love,” he says.

first visit to Triple Tree in a restored 1942 Vultee BT-15 Valiant, a two-seat trainer built for the U.S. military during World War II. Smith says he enjoyed camping out on the airfield with hundreds of his fellow pilots and getting to meet Triple Tree founder Pat Hartness. “Quite a guy, quite a vision,” Smith says of the Triple Tree team. “They’re doing it right, and everybody loves to come here because of it.” THE BIG ATTRACTION Tinker Belle, a 1944 Curtiss C-46F transport plane brought to the 2016 Triple Tree Fly-In by the volunteers of Warriors and Warbirds, stole the show. The flying museum, owned by the city of Monroe, North Carolina, is dedicated to the men and machines that flew “The Hump,” a treacherous World War II supply route over the Himalaya mountains between India and China. Pilot Tom Mulcrone says the restored cargo hauler, rescued from the scrap yard at Tinker Air Force Base decades ago, is the only C-46 still flying in the lower 48 states.

there’s a dedicated section for battery-powered planes, and over on the lake, RC floatplanes skim across the water on takeoffs and landings. At the center of the airfield, in front of the main viewing gazebo, you’ll find pilots flying everything from $200 offthe-shelf planes to custom, giant-scale aircraft costing $20,000 or more. Attendees also gather here to watch the world’s top pilots and RC-flying teams perform aerobatic demonstrations, often set to music. Near the entrance gate, visitors can explore the world of RC helicopters and the newest kid-friendly rage—first-person video quadcopters. For visiting pilots like Jacob Helber of Richmond, Texas, meeting his fellow pilots and learning about other forms of RC flying is all part of the appeal. “You get to talk to people from all over,” he says. “I think I have more fun walking around and watching other planes than I do flying.”


Stories

SC Life

Making waves Go ahead and memorize the name Savannah Bradley now. If all goes to plan, you may see her in the 2020 Olympics. The addition of surfing to the upcoming Tokyo Games was well timed for the Folly Beach surfer, coinciding with her rediscovery of the sport she loved as a kid. Bradley took to the waves naturally during a surfing camp at age 9 and quickly became a phenomenon, competing around the world before she was 14. By age 15, she says, “I absolutely hated it.” Surfing had become a chore, so she gave it up. She went mainstream—attended college on a crosscountry/track scholarship, earned a degree in exercise physiology and found a job as a holistic pediatrics medical assistant. And then came the epiphany: wrong life plan. “I decided to drop everything,” Bradley says. “I threw caution to the wind and said, ‘God, take it.’ ” In May 2015, she quit her job and called her childhood coach, Josh Wilson, in Folly Beach, who immediately hired her to teach surf lessons. “I saw so much passion for the sport among everyone I was teaching that summer,” she says. “I fell in love again.” Bradley channeled her pediatrics training into creating a surfing clinic for kids with autism. The sport creates “white noise” that heightens their sense of calm, body awareness and verbal skills, she says. Just for fun, she started entering competitions again last summer—and winning. Now, her new life plan centers on competing globally to earn a spot in the 2020 Games. “It’s kind of the big, blinking red dot in the middle of my radar,” she says. —DIANE VETO PARHAM

Savannah Bradley AGE:

23

Originally from Cocoa Beach, Florida; now lives in Folly Beach OCCUPATION: Competitive surfer; instructor at Charleston Surf Lessons LATEST ACHIEVEMENT: Won her second consecutive women’s championship title in Governor’s Cup of Surfing at Folly Beach, August 2016 WHEN SHE’S NOT SURFING: Listens to audiobooks on psychology and is learning to speak Portuguese; “I have this concept that we always need to be stretching our brains”

MILTON MORRIS

HOMETOWN:

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SCScene

L A V I V R U S R FIGHTING FO

So, when we hatched these South Carolina’s Turtle Survival collections. guys for the first time last year, we drying his hands, zoologist Clint Doak Center offers hope for rare were super excited.” reaches into an aquarium tank and lifts out Eddy, a rare, Chinese bigand endangered species ‘Committed to zero turtle extinctions’ headed turtle hatchling about the size BY KEITH PHILLIPS of a silver dollar. Pampering rare and endangered PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIC SMITH “We don’t take chances with anyturtles is all in a day’s work at the facility operated by the nonprofit thing,” Doak says of the hygiene regiTurtle Survival Alliance (TSA). The men, designed to prevent the spread international coalition of zoos, aquariums, of disease in the nursery of the Turtle Survival SAVED FROM SOUP Zoologist Clint Doak NGOs, universities and conservation-minded Center near Cross. Every feature in the room— examines a colorful individuals formed in 2001 with an ambitious from special UV lights that stimulate shell growth Indochinese box turtle goal: stop turtle extinction by breeding genetito the bank of spigots and drains that ensure a (above). The Turtle Survival Center houses healthy water supply—is designed to nurture cally diverse turtle colonies in captivity, termed one of the country’s young turtles through their first year of life. “assurance colonies.” largest breeding Similar in appearance to an American snap“We are committed to zero turtle extinccolonies of the critically endangered species, ping turtle, Chinese big-headed turtles live in shaltions,” says biologist Cris Hagen, TSA’s director of thanks to a supporter animal management. low, cold-water streams in Southeast Asia, where from Hong Kong who Of the 330-plus turtle species in the world, they have been hunted for food and medicine, donated 55 animals she rescued by purchasing more than half are considered endangered, he putting them on a fast path toward extinction. them from a fish says. But the tiny creature resting in Doak’s left palm, market. “We’re trying to take care of animals that are hatched in captivity with three healthy siblings, slipping through the cracks,” Hagen says. “There represents hope that the species will recover. are species that are down to 100 to 500 individu“We are one of the few places in the country breeding these guys,” Doak says. “We only have als left in the world, and they haven’t been seen a few pairs, and we have one of the largest in the wild in five or more years. There’s a good AFTER METICULOUSLY WASHING AND

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


chance that there might be one or two or 10 of them out there in the wild, but they are functionally extinct.” The Turtle Survival Center specializes in breeding species native to Southeast Asia. Turtles in that region have been especially hard hit since the 1980s, when China’s currency became convertible, causing demand for meat and shells from neighboring countries to skyrocket. “A lot of people suddenly had the ability to purchase turtle medicine and have turtle soup on the table,” he says. “Millions of people in China began buying turtles from all over Southeast Asia and beyond.” The international pet trade (both legal and illegal) is another major threat to turtle and tortoise populations around the world. By the early 2000s, Hagen says, “several turtle species were already on the brink of extincton in the wild.” Scarcity led to escalating prices, and that economic incentive remains one of the primary obstacles to protecting some species in their native lands. “We are not currently sending animals from here back to Vietnam and China, but that is the plan,” Hagen says. “In most cases, the habitat is there. There are even protected areas; there’s just often not enforcement of protected areas. If someone is willing to pay $20,000 or $30,000 or $50,000 for a single turtle, it’s ­virtually impossible to protect them in the wild.”

‘Live, breathe and sleep turtles’

With 650 animals under their care, a nursery full of recent hatchlings and more eggs “cooking” in the incubator, the five-person staff

‘We’re trying to take care of animals that are slipping through the cracks.’ —CRIS HAGEN, TSA’S DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL MANAGEMENT

TURTLE TRACKING A recently hatched McCord’s box turtle has an assigned number, as do unhatched eggs. In the nursery, veterinarycare manager Sheena Koeth (left) compares a Chinese big‑headed turtle adult to a hatchling held by zoologist Clint Doak. “Turtles are extremely difficult patients,” says Koeth. “It’s hard to tell if they feel good or not. You can’t access most of their body.”

at the Turtle Survival Center “live, breathe and sleep turtles 24/7,” Doak says. Most of the team live on-site, where, in addition to daily care and feeding of turtles, they maintain and build new enclosures with plants, terrain and water features that mimic natural habitats. They couldn’t do it without a network of community partners, including Berkeley Electric Cooperative, says Ilze Astad, TSA’s director of development. The center relies on Berkeley Electric to power lighting, security cameras, electric fences, climate-controlled greenhouses, nursery equipment and a complex system of wells, pumps and filters that circulate clean, fresh water throughout the property. Efficiency expert Eddie Plowden, Berkeley’s director of marketing and energy services, recently completed a comprehensive energy audit to help the facility better manage power use. “We are working with Berkeley Electric to learn the next steps for being greener and more efficient with our energy costs,” Astad says. “The relationship with the co-op has been amazing.” The cooperative’s right-of-way maintenance crews supply mulch that lines turtle enclosures and greenhouse paths. “Mulch is a constant need for us,” Doak says. “We can never have too much.” Berkeley Electric employees volunteer to spread the word about the need for turtle conservation— around the world and close to home. “We’ve been working with Berkeley Electric to organize field trips and provide an immersion opportunity for students of all ages to come out and have a hands-on experience with some very rare turtles,” Astad says.

Slow and steady wins the race

As breeding programs succeed and more turtles are rescued from international black markets, new buildings, infrastructure and enclosures must be built to house the growing population. In effect, the Turtle Survival Center is in a constant state of gradual construction, Hagen says. Current facilities include the nursery or “baby room,” a greenhouse, a forested enclosure and the tortoise barn, each planted and maintained to meet the needs of different species. At every turn, TSA staffers go to great lengths to keep their turtles healthy, happy and in top breeding form. In the nursery, they number each hatchling

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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turtle species. All 13 species of the genus Cuora are in jeopardy, and the Turtle Survival Center now has breeding populations for 12 of them. Male and female box turtles are kept separate before and after breeding season. “That’s how they evolved, and that’s how they interact,” Doak says. “If males and females are kept together, it can be very stressful and they will often fight.” During the reproductive season, March through July for most of the species at the center, Koeth uses digital X-rays and ultrasound equipment to monitor gravid females and determine the number of fertilized eggs. She keeps an eye on the enclosures for nesting behavior, and when female turtles deposit their eggs, the staff carefully excavates and numbers each one before rushing them to the incubator. “If we see six eggs on an X-ray, we know we need to get six eggs,” Koeth says.

SAFE SPACES Enclosures inside the Cuora Complex (above) provide a convenient way to keep nesting females under close observation. Adult turtles sometimes eat their eggs, so TSC staffers monitor nests and immediately remove eggs to an incubator to ensure successful hatching. The structure also includes multiple safeguards to protect the rare turtles inside from predation by other animals. CHOWING DOWN Burmese mountain tortoises (right) at the Turtle Survival Center are “very personable,” says zoologist Clint Doak, especially when it’s feeding time. “These guys are very much like a dog. They see a person, and they know it means food.”

and meticulously record veterinary and feeding records in a database. Asked what they feed the juveniles, Doak and veterinary-care manager Sheena Koeth open large, plastic containers filled with prime turtle food—wriggling earthworms and swarms of hissing cockroaches, which also get special treatment. “It’s called gut-loading,” Doak explains. “We feed the insects a super-rich diet, because that diet gets transferred to the turtles.” The tropical greenhouse containing Sulawesi tortoises and the world’s largest known captive collection of Sulawesi forest turtles—a species discovered by biologists in the early 1990s—is a carefully controlled microenvironment planted with banana trees, hibiscus and other edible vegetation. The TSA staff regularly releases ladybugs into the enclosure as a form of natural insect control. One of the highlights of the facility—the closely guarded Cuora Complex—is one of two areas dedicated to the center’s extensive populations of several critically endangered Asian box

Feeding time

‘We are working with Berkeley Electric to learn the next steps for being greener and more efficient with our energy costs.’ —ILZE ASTAD, TSA’S DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

GET MORE For more infor­mation on the Turtle Survival Center and the Turtle Survival Alliance, contact Ilze Astad at (843) 830‑4040 or visit turtlesurvival.org. 24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Turtles at the center are fed three times a week and enjoy a surprising ­variety of food. Papayas, bananas, mulberries and blackberries grown on-site provide food and shade and mimic native habitats. Limehouse Produce donates surplus vegetables and fruit nearing its sell-by date, and the monks of Mepkin Abbey donate surplus mushroom cuts. “Our turtles eat really well,” Astad says. When it’s feeding time at the Burmese mountain tortoise enclosure, three massive reptiles— each weighing in excess of 40 pounds—lumber toward the staff the moment they enter the enclosure. On the menu: shiitake and oyster mushrooms, ripe strawberries and freshly picked blackberries. But the real treat in the large bowl of turtle chow is a stack of thick-sliced tomatoes. As the caretakers begin laying out the buffet, the tortoises stretch their leathery necks forward, jaws gaping open in hungry anticipation. “Tomatoes for turtles are like candy,” Doak says with laugh. “It is the sweetest, most delicious thing. They absolutely love tomatoes.” Doak, Astad and Koeth are all smiles as they take a moment to watch the tortoises enjoy their meal, then it’s back to the long list of chores demanding their attention. “Anything and everything,” Doak says with a shrug. “The five of us do it all.”


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BY KATHERINE TANDY BROWN

Gobbling up outdoor learning IF YOU WERE A HEN TURKEY, DO YOU

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NATIONAL WILD TURKEY FEDERATION

think you’d have what it takes to attract a handsome tom? You can find out at the National Wild Turkey Federation’s (NWTF) Winchester Museum in Edgefield. The only such facility in the country dedicated to the bird that almost ousted the eagle as our national symbol, this Smithsonianquality gem will broaden your gobbler knowledge, especially if your only contact with turkeys has been savoring a hefty drumstick at Thanksgiving. On a recent visit, I learned how hunters use turkey calls to lure the big birds into sight. An inclusive display features an impressive num­ber of these calls throughout history, from simple, early Native American models to present-day ­decorative calls made from turkey-wing bones. Here, I got to try to sound like part of a mating couple. I walked into the world’s largest turkey call—yes, it’s that big—and, using a handsized turkey box call, gently scraped a wooden arm against the box it was attached to and got a decent squeak.

One of the Winchester Museum’s life-sized dioramas shows the bone structure of wild turkeys and these impressive birds in a natural woods habitat.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

No toms came running, however. “Turkeys become a lot more vocal during mating season,” says Pete Muller, NWTF public relations specialist. “There’s fighting among the males over who gets the hens. They drag their wing tips over the ground, strut around and put on a show.” More turkey tidbits are showcased throughout the museum, where lifesized and lifelike three-dimensional exhibits show wild turkeys in their

Conservation, along with increasing the numbers of both wild turkeys and new hunters, is the mission of the museum and the federation itself. habitat. An animatronic Cherokee explains how his ancestors used every part of the turkey, while an animatronic grandpa-like character chats about the importance of conservation. Conservation, along with helping to increase the numbers of wild turkeys and the numbers of new hunters, is the mission of the museum and the federation itself, which began in 1973 to help relocate and grow the wild turkey population up to seven million after its near extinction around the turn of the century due to overharvesting. One detail came as a surprise. “Turkeys are living descendants of the dinosaurs you see in the movies, like T. Rex and velociraptors,” museum director P.J. Perea says. Who knew? Kids love climbing aboard a retired Forest Service helicopter for a simulated ride. With helicopter background noise clattering, they strap in,


The center’s open-air pavilion sports a massive stone fireplace and can accommodate 500 to 600 people. Open to the public, the shooting complex hosts trap shooting, skeet shooting and sporting clays tournaments.

NWTF’s Palmetto Shooting Complex and Outdoor Education Center The National Wild Turkey Federation recently expanded its Edgefield site to become the Hunting Heritage Center, a stateof-the-art facility encompassing the museum; an Outdoor Education Center on 400 acres with forests, rolling hills, wetlands, observation decks, a stocked lake and lots of wildlife; and the Palmetto Shooting Complex on an adjoining 300 acres. “There’s not many places where you can learn about conservation, then walk outside and see it in practice,” spokesman Pete Muller says. “That’s our goal for these 400 acres.” Folks can enjoy guided nature tours, camping, hunting, wing shooting, sporting clays, trap shooting, primitive survival skills, fly fishing, landowner classes for managing wildlife, field-to-fork events, youth classes and a summer youth camp.

wide-eyed, to watch a video of a live, prescribed-burn mission to clear out undergrowth for turkey habitat. “The helicopter serves as part of our conservation message,” Muller explains. Parents can take a quiet break in a virtual-reality theater to experience a spring forest. Scooting into a cushy seat, I relaxed into the pine-woods scent and sounds of crickets chirping and birds warbling. Early-morning air blew cool on my cheek. Suddenly, I heard a distinct gobble. Turns out turkeys can also purr, whine, cackle, yelp and kee-kee. I realized I’d been holding my breath, waiting. And here came the birds in their glory, ­feathers shining iridescent reds, coppers, bronzes, golds, greens and purples. I’d always thought turkeys were brown or black with pretty tails. The males in particular can be simply gorgeous. The museum is all about having

Built through private donations, grants and partnerships, the shooting complex features a 9,300-square-foot, open-air pavilion for large-group gatherings; five trap and skeet shooting overlays; two one-mile-long, conservation-themed sportingclays courses—one with fun targets, the other with more difficult targets; and one overflow course. “Anybody can come here and shoot or learn,” says Rhett Simmons, the manager of the Palmetto Shooting Complex. “We’re here to ensure the future of shooting sports, and one of the easiest ways to get people GetThere hunting is to start them shooting first.” The National Wild Turkey Federation is located at 770 Augusta fun while learning. Road in Edgefield. “Our programming targets everyHOURS: The Winchester Museum one from the novice who hasn’t been is open Monday through Friday, for more than a walk in the woods to 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; closed weekends, on the most seasoned outdoorsman who Fridays from June through August and on hunts and fishes every weekend,” says national holidays. Tours are self-guided. Perea. “The museum helps us do that.” Reserve ahead for a guided tour. Offered alongside museum exhibits The Palmetto Shooting Complex at are more than 100 NWTF-sponsored 535 Gary Hill Road in Edgefield is open programs that give hands-on learning Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to opportunities. Included are programs 7 p.m. Winter hours (November–February) are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for youth 17 and younger to safely try target shooting, clay-target shootADMISSION: Winchester Museum is $5 for ing, shotgunning and archery and to adults, $2 for youth ages 3–17, free for children under 2. explore the outdoors through local events and hunts. Wheelin’ Sportsmen The Palmetto Shooting Complex rates vary provides disabled folks opportunities with activity; see website for specifics. to hunt, fish and shoot, while Women DETAILS: For more information, visit in the Outdoors offers outdoor learnnwtf.org or call the Winchester Museum ing through activities such as archery, at (803) 637‑7639 and the Palmetto Shooting Complex at (803) 637‑7480. shotgunning and hunting.

And everyone—including museum visitors—gets to learn how to call a turkey.

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

KAREN HERMANN

Flavors of fall

ol weather The first hints of co . turn to fall cravings make our taste buds and sh ua sq er nt wi , ples, pears ats. tre Brussels sprouts, ap s ’ ason just a few of the se add d, ice sweet potatoes are pr dance and reasonably ix m to aid While they’re in abun afr be ly menus. Don’t ls se us Br them to your week e th th wi in me apples and match—toss so pears sweet potatoes with e ut sa or sprouts riety. for a little flavor va

FAVORITE SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE SERVES 6–8

FILLING

SERVES 6

1 ½ pounds Brussels sprouts 3–4 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces ½ medium red onion, sliced 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano

Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil Grated Parmesan cheese Fresh lemon juice

Trim the stem ends of sprouts, cut in half and discard any torn or bruised leaves. In a large bowl, prepare an ice bath consisting of ice cubes and cold water. In a large pot over medium-high heat, add enough water to cover Brussels sprouts, but do not add sprouts yet. Bring water to a boil, then submerge sprouts for 40–50 seconds, just until they turn bright green. Using a slotted spoon or skimmer, remove sprouts to the ice bath. Allow to cool completely; drain, pat dry and set aside. Preheat oven to 375 F. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook bacon pieces until brown. Remove from skillet, drain on a paper towel and set aside. In a large bowl, combine sprouts, onion, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper. Toss with olive oil, and spread in a single layer on a foil-lined, rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle cooked bacon pieces on top of sprouts. Bake 20–25 minutes, until sprouts are tender and can be easily pierced with a fork. Remove to serving dish; sprinkle with grated cheese and lemon juice. W H AT Õ S C O O K I N G AT

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BACON AND ONIONS

Softened butter, for baking dish 4 large (or 6 medium) sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed 4 tablespoons butter ¾ cup brown sugar ¼ teaspoon cinnamon ½ cup golden raisins 1 teaspoon vanilla extract N cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons bourbon (optional)

TOPPING

1 cup brown sugar N cup flour 4 tablespoons butter, softened ½ cup chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly butter an 8-inch-by-8inch baking dish. In a medium pot, add potatoes and enough water to cover. Bring to a boil over mediumhigh heat, and cook until soft, about 20 minutes. While sweet potatoes are cooking, in a small bowl, combine the first three topping ingredients—1 cup brown sugar, flour and softened butter—using a fork or dough blender until crumbly. Add chopped pecans. Stir to combine, and set aside. When potatoes are finished cooking, drain, and place in the large bowl of a stand mixer. Add butter, ¾ cup brown sugar, cinnamon, raisins and vanilla extract, and beat until thoroughly combined. Add heavy cream and bourbon. Beat until smooth. Pour sweet potato mixture into prepared baking dish. Top with brown-sugar topping. Bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until top is golden brown.


FRENCH TOAST WITH MULLED PEARS SERVES 3–6

MULLED PEARS

3 pears, peeled, cored and quartered 2 tablespoons lemon juice ½ gallon apple juice 2 strips lemon peel 1 cinnamon stick 4 cloves 1 ½-inch slice of fresh ginger, peeled

FRENCH TOAST

4 eggs 1 cup buttermilk or half‑and‑half 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon orange zest ½ teaspoon cardamom or cinnamon 1 teaspoon almond extract Pinch of kosher salt 1 loaf day-old or stale bread, sliced in 1-inch slices Butter for the griddle/pan Powdered sugar Whipped cream

GINA MOORE 

In a medium bowl, place pears and lemon juice; toss to combine, to prevent pears from turning brown. In a Dutch oven or large pan over medium-low heat, add apple juice, lemon peel, cinnamon stick, cloves and ginger, and bring to a simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and let sit for 15 minutes to allow flavors to meld. Return pan to mediumlow heat, and add pears; cook 30 minutes, until pears are tender but still maintaining their shape. Remove pears from liquid, and let cool. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, buttermilk, sugar, orange zest, cardamom, almond extract and salt. Pour into a shallow dish wide enough for a slice of bread. Dip bread slices in the mixture, covering both sides, and place on a flat dish or pan in a single layer. Let stand for 15 minutes, until egg mixture is absorbed into bread. Preheat oven to 250 F. Heat griddle or skillet over medium heat, and melt 2 tablespoons of butter. Working in batches, add 2–3 slices of bread to griddle, and cook until brown on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Place on a baking sheet, and keep warm in oven. Repeat until all slices are cooked. Transfer to serving plates, and sprinkle with powdered sugar. Top with pears, and garnish with whipped cream.

EASIEST APPLE-BERRY COBBLER SERVES 8–10

FILLING

Unsalted butter, softened, for pie pan 4 large granny smith apples, peeled, cored and sliced 2 tablespoons lemon juice ½ teaspoon lemon zest 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ½ cup brown sugar 1 ½ tablespoons cornstarch ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ teaspoon cardamom or cinnamon Pinch of kosher salt 1 ½ cups berries (blueberries, raspberries or blackberries)

TOPPING GWÉNAËL LE VOT

1 cup flour 1 cup sugar Pinch of kosher salt 1 stick unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled

Preheat oven to 350 F. Coat a deepdish, glass or ceramic pie pan with softened butter. In a large bowl, combine apples with lemon juice, zest and vanilla. In a small bowl, combine brown sugar, cornstarch, nutmeg, cardamom and salt; add to apples, and stir. Add apples to pie pan, and arrange berries over apples. In a medium bowl, combine flour, sugar and salt. Gradually stir in melted butter until a sticky and crumbly dough is formed. Pour dough over fruit. Place pie pan on a foil-lined, rimmed baking sheet to catch any spillover in the oven. Bake 45–50 minutes, until topping is golden brown and fruit is bubbling. Remove from oven, and allow to cool slightly before serving. Serve warm or at room temperature.

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


SCGardener

BY S. CORY TANNER

Fending off frost in the South? Summer’s oppressive heat and humidity give way to cooler nights, drier air and changing leaf colors. While we relish a comfortable return to outdoor gardening, fall reminds us that frost is right around the corner and, with it, the inevitable end to the growing season. Many of our warm-season plants delight in moderate fall temperatures. Late plantings of vegetables, such as tomatoes and peppers, really shine in this season of change. Annual flower and ­foliage plants like petunia, zinnia and coleus and even tropical perennials like elephant ears and hardy bananas excel in the fall. It’s a shame to lose them to an early frost right at their peak. A little proactive protection can help prolong summer color a bit. First, start paying close attention to weather forecasts for frost advisories around midOctober. The first frost usually arrives between Oct. 15 and the second week of November in the Upstate. Coastal areas south of Charleston may remain frost-free until Christmas. Once a frost is forecast, make preparations to protect tender plants. Covering, when done correctly, is the simplest and most effective means of protection for short-term frost

Forecast: frost or freeze? What does it mean for your garden if weather advisories call for a frost or a freeze? A frost can occur at temperatures between 36 F and 32 F under the right conditions. Even a light frost can damage or kill tender plants like tomatoes, basil and coleus. A freeze occurs at 32 F and below. Temperatures below 24 F are considered a severe or “hard” freeze. A freeze brings a definitive end to the growing season.

32

PHOTOS BY S. CORY TANNER

WHAT’S NOT TO LOVE ABOUT FALL

p Cloth row covers are commonly used to protect tender vegetables and other plants from fall and spring frosts. t A nursery plant container weighted with a stone or brick is a good cover for a small plant in a pinch.

Covering a plant to the soil surface traps the heat around the plant and provides several degrees of frost protection. events (one or two nights). The best covers are fabric materials like cloth sheets, burlap, quilts and commercial frost blankets. They should be large enough to cover the plant to the ground. Covers draped on plants without making contact with the soil will provide slight protection, but they’re more effective when they enclose the plant fully to the soil. Soil holds heat gathered from the sun. At night, that heat is radiated back to the air. Covering a plant to the soil surface traps the heat around the plant and provides several degrees of frost protection. A cover that leaves gaps between the soil and the cover loses much of that insulating potential. Try to avoid plastic sheeting as a covering material. Plastic robs heat from plant shoots, causing frost burn wherever it touches. If plastic is all you have, suspend it above the plant canopy. Also, plastic must be removed or ventilated during the sunny parts of the day to avoid overheating. Cloth

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

covers may be left on all day, which is helpful for multiple nights of frost. For small plants, I use what gardeners have in abundance: ­garden pots. Black plastic nursery pots work great on small plants and transplants, so long as the plastic doesn’t contact the plants. Pots made of clay and other ­materials also work well. These are my go-to ­protection for tender vegetable transplants in the spring when a late frost is predicted. Use a brick or rock to anchor lightweight containers, so they won’t be blown off the plant by wind. You can also use an incandescent lightbulb under cover to add heat on colder nights, and you can wrap tender plants with white Christmas lights (the incandescent types; LEDs don’t produce enough heat). Leaving the lights on overnight may provide enough heat to prevent frost damage. These strategies are helpful for protecting individual, high-value plants. Finally, don’t attempt the irrigation method of frost protection. You may have seen this used on fruit crops in the spring, but it is very difficult to do and will likely cause more harm than good if not done correctly. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Greenville County. Contact him at shannt@clemson.edu.

S. CORY TANNER


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Calendar  of Events UPSTATE

OCTOBER

14–16 • Fall for Greenville, downtown, Greenville. (864) 467‑6667. 15 • Bazaar and Bake Sale, McCormick United Methodist Church, McCormick. (864) 391‑8048. 15 • Hub City Brewfest, Main Street and Broad Street, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑2026. 15 • Storytelling Festival, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 16 • Out of Darkness Walk, Conestee Park, Greenville. (864) 477‑8056. 16–20 • Starburst Storytellers Festival: Celebration of Edgar Allan Poe, Anderson County Library, Anderson. (864) 260‑4500. 21–22 • Sugarfoot Festival, Main Street, Honea Path. (864) 369‑1605. 21–23 • Oktoberfest, Main Street, Walhalla. (864) 638‑2727. 21–23 • WWII Aircraft to Land, Runway Park at GMU, Greenville. (864) 270‑6660. 21–23, 28–30 • Boo in the Zoo, Greenville Zoo, Greenville. (864) 467‑4300. 22 • 20x20 Invitational Clay Exhibit and Sale, ARTS Center of Clemson, Clemson. (864) 633‑5051. 22 • Art on the Trail, downtown, Travelers Rest. traa@ArtinTR.com. 22 • Clusters for Kids Oyster Roast, Arran Farm, Easley. (864) 506‑0737. 22 • EURO Auto Festival, The Preserve at Verdae Green, Greenville. (864) 501‑3892. 22 • Fall Bazaar, Disciples United Methodist Church, Greenville. (864) 297‑0382. 22 • Fall Harvest Festival, Village Green, Pendleton. (864) 646‑9409. 22 • Fountain Inn Chorale: Sing for Joy, Younts Center for Performing Arts, Fountain Inn. (864) 409‑1050. 23 • Transformation Walk, Fluor Field, Greenville. (864) 232‑6463. 27 • Campfire Social Charity Event, Greenbriar Farms, Easley. (864) 855‑9782. 28 • Mac Arnold and Plate Full o’ Blues, Liberty Civic Auditorium, Liberty. (864) 855‑3770. NOVEMBER

4–6 • Greenville Open Studios, various locations, Greenville. (864) 467‑3132. 4–6 • Santa’s Shoppe, Spartanburg Expo Center, Spartanburg. (864) 594‑5000. 5 • Foothills Skills and Craft Show, James Medford Family Event Center, Greenwood. (864) 941‑8400.

36

Mondays through Saturdays, through July 2017 • “A Compass to Guide: S.C. Cabinetmakers Today,” McKissick Museum, Columbia. (803) 777‑7251. Tuesdays in October • 22 • Civil War Reenactment, 4–6 • Southern City Film Hickory Hill Milk Fall Festival Historic Brattonsville, Festival, downtown, Aiken. and Dairy Tour, Hickory Hill McConnells. (803) 329‑2121. hello@southerncity.org. Farm, Edgefield. (803) 480‑3312. 22 • Duckfest, downtown, 5 • Guided Walking Tours: Saturdays through Nov. 24 • Summerton. (803) 435‑4405. Civil War Battle of Congaree Downtown Market, downtown, Creek, Cayce Tennis Center, Sumter. (803) 436‑2500. 22 • Guided Walking Tours: Cayce. (803) 765‑2200. Civil War Battle of Congaree Second Saturdays • Big Tree Creek, Cayce Tennis Center, 5 • Guided Walking Tours: Hike, Congaree National Park, Cayce. (803) 765‑2200. Colonial Fort Congaree, Cayce Columbia. (803) 776‑4396. Tennis Center, Cayce. (803) 765‑2200. 22 • Guided Walking Tours: Fourth Saturdays • Mountain Native American Lifeways, Cayce 5 • Pine Needle Basket Dulcimers of Aiken, Aiken Tennis Center, Cayce. (803) 765‑2200. Workshop, Lee State Park, Visitors Center and Train Museum, Bishopville. (803) 428‑4988. ONGOING Aiken. (803) 293‑7846. 22 • Hook & Cook Festival, Jackson Community Center, 5 • November Monthly Gospel Third Thursdays • Art Walk, Jackson. (803) 645‑0268. Singing, Midland Gospel Singing downtown, Spartanburg. LOWCOUNTRY Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. (864) 542‑2787. 23 • State Fair Concert Series: OCTOBER Kirk Franklin, State Fairgrounds, 5 • Pumpkin Smash, Second Saturdays • 14–16 • S.C. Jazz Festival, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Heartstrings, Hagood Mill Historic Columbia. (803) 799‑3387, ext. 114. Historic District, Cheraw. Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. Site, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 27 • Growl at the Moon, (843) 537‑8420, ext. 12. South Carolina State Museum, 5–6 • Revolutionary War Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, 15 • History Day, Coastal Discovery Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. Field Days, Historic Camden, Chapman Cultural Center, Museum at Historic Honey Horn, Camden. (803) 432‑9841. Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 27 • Rhonda Vincent & Hilton Head Island. (843) 686‑6560. The Rage, McCelvey Center, 9 • Under the Stars Dressage, 15 • Fall Arts and Crafts Fair, York. (803) 328‑2787. Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. MIDLANDS Centenary United Methodist 28 • Warehouse Theatre: 10 • Wine, Women and Shoes, OCTOBER Church, Conway. (781) 267‑5493. “Twelfth Night,” Sumter Opera University of South Carolina Alumni 12–23 • South Carolina State 15 • Loris Bog-Off Festival, House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. Center, Columbia. (803) 254‑0118. Fair, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. downtown, Loris. (843) 756‑6030. 29 • Beyond the Gravestone, 10 and 12 • Floral (803) 799‑3387, ext. 114. 15–16 • Georgetown Wooden Plantation State Historic Demonstrations by Designer 15 • Millford’s 175th Anniversary Redcliffe Site, Beech Island. (803) 827‑1473. Don Chestnut, Weldon Auditorium, Boat Show, Front Street, Celebration, Millford Plantation, Georgetown. (843) 520‑0111. Manning. (803) 478‑6062. 29 • Fall Steeplechase, Ford Pinewood. (212) 369‑4460. 16 • Bark in the Park Conger Field, Aiken. (803) 648‑9641. 11 • Arts and Draughts, 15 • Snakes of the South Carolina Oktoberfest, North Charleston Columbia Museum of Art, 29 • Guided Walking Tours: Coastal Plain, Lee State Park, Wannamaker County Park, North Columbia. (803) 799‑2810. Native American Lifeways Bishopville. (803) 428‑4988. Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. Evening Lantern Tour, Cayce Tennis 11 • Bob Dylan, Township 15 • Spirits and Stories: 20–23 • Pat Conroy Literary Center, Cayce. (803) 765‑2200. Auditorium, Columbia. Brattonsville by Twilight, Festival, University of South (803) 576‑2350. 29 • Jack-O-Lantern Historic Brattonsville, Carolina-Beaufort Center for the Jubilee, downtown, North 11 • Langley Winds Chamber McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. Arts, Beaufort. (843) 521‑4145. Ensemble, Sumter Opera House, 15–16 • Colonial Times: A Day to Augusta. (803) 441‑4311. 21 • Dive-In Movies: “Goonies,” Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 29 • Last Saturday at the Remember, Living History Park, Hilton Head Island Recreation Park, Living History Park, North 11–13 • Craftsmen’s Christmas North Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. Center, Hilton Head. (843) 681‑7273. Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. Classic Art & Craft Festival, 19 • State Fair Concert Series: 22 • Blues + BBQ featuring Deas S.C. State Fairgrounds, 29 • Pumpkin Patch Express, Alabama, State Fairgrounds, Guyz, Historic Mitchelville, Hilton Columbia. (336) 282‑5550. S.C. Railroad Museum, Columbia. (803) 799‑3387, ext. 114. Head Island. (843) 255‑7301. Winnsboro. (803) 712‑4135. 12 • Clover Scottish Games and 20 • A Taste of Wine and Art, 22 • Cast Off Fishing Tournament, Scotch-Irish Festival, Blue Eagle 29 • Spooky Science Saturday, Aiken Center for the Arts, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Academy, Clover. (803) 222‑9495. Museum of York County, Aiken. (803) 641‑9094. Pleasant. (843) 795‑4386. Rock Hill. (803) 909‑7244. ONGOING 21 • An Evening with Patrick 22 • Hilton Head Plantation Davis and His Midnight Daily through Oct. 31 • NOVEMBER Craft Workshop and Bake Sale, Choir, Sumter Opera House, “The Wizard of Oz” 4-D Christ Lutheran Church, Hilton 1 • Carolina Pine Quilters Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. Experience and Saturdays Head Island. (843) 681‑8407. Show, Aiken County Historical in Oz, S.C. State Museum, 21 • State Fair Concert Series: For Museum, Aiken. (803) 642‑2015. 27–Nov. 6 • Coastal King & Country, State Fairgrounds, 2 • Under the Stars Jumper Night, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. Carolina Fair, Exchange Park, Columbia. (803) 799‑3387, ext. 114. Daily through Oct. 31 • Andrea Ladson. (843) 572‑3161. Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. Smith Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors 28–30 • Fall Festival of Houses 21 • Spirits of Hallowed Eve 3 • Katydid Combined Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Dinner, Living History Park, and Gardens, various locations, Driving Event, Katydid Farm, North Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. Daily through Feb. 26, 2017 • Beaufort. (843) 916‑2000. Windsor. (803) 295‑6785. “Wild Fabrications” and “Nature’s 29 • Howl-O-Scream, North Myrtle 21–30 • Boo at the Zoo, 3–4 • VoicePlay, AECOM Tapestries,” Museum of York Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Beach Park and Sports Complex, Center for the Performing County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. Little River. (843) 280‑5570. Arts, Aiken. (803) 643‑4774. Daily through June 18, 2017 • 22 • All Hallowed Eve Ghost Walk 4 • Richland Creek Antique NOVEMBER “South Carolina and the and Illusion Show, Living History Festival, Richland Creek Farms, Great War,” S.C. State Museum, 2–6 • Charleston International Park, North Augusta. (803) 979‑9776. Ward. (884) 445‑2781. Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. Film Festival, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 817‑1617. 5 • Run 4 Life, Caine Halter YMCA, Greenville. (864) 797‑7738. 8 • Mercy Me: Greater Than Tour, Bon Secours Wellness Arena, Greenville. (864) 241‑3800. 12 • 2016 Carolina Christmas Shop, Union County Fairgrounds, Union. (864) 427‑9039. 12 • Hope Relay, Kroc Center, Greenville. (864) 907‑8449. 12 • Mushroom Cultivation Workshop, Mushroom Mountain, Easley. (864) 855‑2469. 15 • Selugadu VIII: Native American Celebration, Hagood Mill Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936.

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

4–6 • Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival and Concours d’Elegance, Port Royal Golf Club, Hilton Head Island. (843) 785‑7469. 5 • Arts Festival and Pauwau, Waccamaw Tribal Grounds, Aynor. (843) 358‑6877. 5 • Bluffton International & Craft Beer Fest, Bluffton Oyster Factory Park, Bluffton. (843) 757‑8520. 5 • Farmer’s Table Dinner, Habersham Marketplace, Beaufort. (843) 846‑3444. 5 • Harvest Festival, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island. (843) 795‑4386. 5 • Lowcountry Hoedown, Visitor Center Bus Shed, Charleston. info@gustogroupllc.com. 5 • Movie Night in the Park: “Cars,” Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 686‑3090. 5 • South Carolina Pecan Festival, downtown, Florence. (843) 678‑5912. 5–6 • Art in the Park, Chapin Memorial Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446‑3830. 5–6 • Charleston Mac-Off, The Grove at Patriots Point, Mount Pleasant. (843) 640‑3800. 11 • Holiday Festival of Lights, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 11–12 • Lowcountry Reads for the Holidays, Christ Lutheran Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 686‑6560. 11–12 • Smoke on the Harbor BBQ Throwdown, Lookout Pavilion at Charleston Harbor Resort and Marina, Mount Pleasant. (843) 284‑7022. 11–13 • Oyster Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 12 • Beaux Arts Ball, Tabby Place, Beaufort. (843) 379‑2787. 12 • Hilton Head Island Bridge Run, Crossings Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 757‑8520. 12–13 • Art in the Park, Valor Park, Myrtle Beach. (843) 446‑3830. 13 • Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 842‑2055. ONGOING

Thursdays through Sundays, through Oct. 30 • Fall Tours of Homes and Gardens, downtown, Charleston. (843) 722‑4630. Saturdays through Nov. 30 • Charleston Farmers Market, Marion Square, Charleston. (843) 724‑7309. Saturdays • Snakes and Reptiles, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 237‑4440.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Got gravity? AS SOMEONE WHO PREFERS TO CHEW

gum while seated, I didn’t want to miss a minute of the Olympics. Especially women’s gymnastics and those little cannonballs who think the laws of physics are just suggestions. As a kid, I took acrobatics. That’s like gymnastic kindergarten, where you learn to do cartwheels and flips— the basic stuff that most kids can master without hospitalization. But it didn’t take long to find out how special I was. All the other girls were shorter than my legs, which took off wherever they felt like going when I was upside down and they knew I couldn’t see them. The other girls had little, tiny legs that followed directions. But I persisted and finally mastered a onehanded cartwheel with all my appendages going along for the ride. The next step was an aerial, where the cartwheel is so fast, you don’t need the ground at all. Like magic, you’re airborne. I moved all the chairs out of the dining room and propped the back door open, giving me a clear shot from the porch to the living room, where I would attempt my first gold-medal stunt. The other girls were doing it, so I thought gravity might be my friend, too. Out on the back porch, I revved up like the Road Runner and motored into the living room, fearlessly launching into “Look, Ma, no hands!” mode. 38

But, just as my legs got over my head, a dubious little voice deep in the backseat of my brain stopped the world with a question. I remember being upside down with all my disorderly limbs suspended in midair when it said, “Hey, genius, does the name Isaac Newton ring a bell? Put your

hands down before you crash.” And I did, taking out my mother’s favorite lamp in the process. The doctor coaxed my dislocated shoulder back into place, but there was no emergency room for the lamp, which made Mom even crankier than finding her house converted into a gymnasium. The next day, she signed me up for flute lessons. Eventually, I got into distance swim­ming, where beanstalks are welcome and it’s harder to break things​—but I’d still rather watch

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   OCTOBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

gymnastics. And I’m very defensive of those tiny, flipping females who should be filing flight plans before their floor routines. I’ll do battle with anyone who doesn’t show respect. During the Olympics, I kept a defibrillator charged in case one of Simone Biles’ BFFs came crashing through the TV set needing medical attention after three half-twisting something-or-others with a double back-flop. And any time an announcer said, “No one in history has ever completed 19 aerials in layout position before, but Gabby’s middle toe was slightly crooked on the landing. That’s a two-tenths deduction,” I wanted to shove my fist through the screen and strangle him with my swim goggles. If I scored gymnastics, those girls would get extra points for every limb that was still attached on the landing. Three more points if their leotards don’t rip. Extra points for being utterly adorable. And some more points for being 4 feet tall and fearless. Although I love them, it’s a good thing the Olympics are over. It’s been exhausting sitting here lifeguarding the gymnasts. And I’m out of gum. was never discovered by Bela Karolyi, but if he needs swim lessons, he’s always welcome to call. Share the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.

JAN A. IGOE


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South Carolina Living October 2016  

South Carolina Living's October 2016 edition.

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