__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CHANGEOUT

On the right track Helping sea turtles survive and thrive NOV/DEC 2019

SC TR AVE LS

Apollo 50 has landed SC RECIPE

Make the most of holiday leftovers


4th & 5th Grade Students

Write and illustrate a book that focuses on new technologies in energy Teachers, showcase your students' knowledge of electricity in South Carolina by applying skills in creative writing, social studies and art. Learn more and register online at by November 30, 2019 Contest open to individual students and teams of up to four. Cash prizes awarded to winning student(s) and teacher. FroIIl _____________________________________________________________________________________

Sponsored by South Carolina's electric cooperatives

™


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 11 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

2019|nov•dec

14 Saving sea turtles

Travis Ward

Patrol the Isle of Palms with the Island Turtle Team, a cadre of dedicated citizen scientists who ensure hatchling sea turtles have a fighting chance at survival.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

4 CO-OP NEWS

Andrew Chapman

Updates from your cooperative

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler

6 AGENDA

COPY EDITORS

Win tickets to the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl all-star game in Myrtle Beach and vote for your favorite player in the Mr. Football reader poll.

Jennifer Jas L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

Michael Banks, April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Andrew Haworth, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan

10 DIALOGUE Doing well by doing good Giving back is rewarding in its own right, but for Rachel Larson, a senior at Aiken High School, her community spirit has been recognized with a $5,000 college scholarship.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

12 SMART CHOICE Kid-endorsed gifts Electronic goodies to keep your child plugged in throughout the holiday season.

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

For an avid outdoorsman like Scott Poore, managing South Carolina’s only fish hatchery dedicated to raising trout is the perfect job.

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

22

© COPYRIGHT 2019. The Electric Cooperatives

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network. $5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

Apollo 50: Journey to the Moon

30

RECIPE

Maximizing holiday leftovers The traditional Thanksgiving feast may be over, but there are plenty of great meals to be made when you follow Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s recipes for repurposing leftovers.

32

30

GARDENER

Lasting beauty: species tulips Enduring and elegant, species tulips can tolerate our Southern climate and produce beautiful blooms for multiple seasons.

34 36 38 Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

CALENDAR MARKETPLACE HUMOR ME

On the right track

I love Lucy Humor columnist Jan A. Igoe raises a mug of organic hazelnut coffee to toast her friend, neighbor and occasional muse. FRO M TO P : M IC SM ITH; A N DRE W H AWORTH; G I N A MOORE

Helping sea turtles survive and thrive SC TR AVE LS NOV/DEC 2019

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

SC TRAVELS

The S.C. State Museum’s latest exhibit highlights the contributions South Carolinians have made in the quest to explore outer space.

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

22

21 STORIES In his element

Apollo 50 has landed SC RECIPE

Make the most of holiday leftovers

A newly hatched loggerhead sea turtle takes its first steps toward a lifelong swim in the Atlantic Ocean. Photo by Mic Smith.


M AT T S I LFER

SC | agenda GET THERE

Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl Dec. 14, 2019. Kickoff at noon. WHERE: Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium, 705 33rd Avenue North, Myrtle Beach. TICKETS: Advance-purchase tickets $20 at TouchstoneEnergyBowl.com. After Nov. 29 and at the stadium, tickets will cost $25 each. DON’T MISS: The 2019 Mr. Football award—the state’s highest honor for prep athletes—will be presented during halftime. WHEN:

SCORE BIG

with the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl Sweepstakes South Carolina Living wants you and a friend to enjoy the all-star game on us. Sign up today for our 2019 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl Sweepstakes and your chance to score: u A $100 Visa gift card u Two tickets to the game u Two Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl

blankets Register today at SCLiving.coop/touchdown. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Dec. 1. The winner will be notified by email or phone, so please provide all requested contact information. 6

Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl kicks off Dec. 14 Save $5 on advance-purchase tickets The state’s top high school football players will face off one last time this season in the 2019 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 14. The annual northsouth game, organized by the S.C. Athletic Coaches Association, takes place at Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium in Myrtle Beach with a noon kickoff. The match-up, now in its 72nd year, is the oldest continuous all-star football game in the South. This marks the seventh year South Carolina’s Touchstone Energy Cooperatives have sponsored the bowl game, which recognizes 88 students from across the state, not just for their athletic ability, but for their character on and off the field. These young men develop a true spirit of camaraderie throughout the week leading up to the big game—honing their skills and developing friendships that last a lifetime. Touchstone Energy is an alliance of local, independent, member-owned electric co-ops that work together to deliver energy solutions and support for their communities. Advance-purchase tickets are now available online at TouchstoneEnergyBowl.com for $20. After Nov. 29 and at the stadium, tickets will cost $25 each. Fans in attendance at the game will also see the halftime presentation of the 2019 Mr. Football award. Seven players are in contention for the prestigious honor recognizing the state’s top athlete of the year. —CHASE TOLER

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Mr. Football reader poll Visit SCLiving.coop/football this month to cast your vote for the high school athlete most deserving of the 2019 Mr. Football award. The poll closes Dec. 1. NOAH BELL

Saluda High School Undecided

MIKELE COLASURDO

Chapman High School Committed to Georgia State LUKE DOTY

Myrtle Beach High School Committed to the University of South Carolina RAHJAI HARRIS

Byrnes High School Committed to East Carolina University JALIN HYATT

Dutch Fork High School Committed to the University of Tennessee DUANE MARTIN

Laurens District 55 High School Committed to the University of Louisville TYLER VENABLES

Daniel High School Committed to Clemson University


EDITOR’S NOTE

Happy holidays and see you next year! As we head into the holiday season, the staff and contributors of South Carolina Living hope you enjoy this combined November/ December edition. We’ll be back in your mailbox in January with more co-op news, festivals and events, profiles of interesting South Carolinians, award-winning photos and all the delicious recipes you’ve come to expect from your co-op magazine. We invite you to keep in touch during December by signing up for our email newsletter at SCLiving.coop/newsletter and visiting SCLiving.coop. On Dec. 1, we’ll post new, seasonal stories including:

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Put an extra $100 on your holiday wish list    Just in time for the holidays! Sign up today for our November Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. We’ll draw the winning name from all eligible entries received by Nov. 30. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

Like us on Facebook If you love living in South Carolina as much as we do, like and follow us on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Join the fun at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

GONE FISHIN’ G I N A MOORE

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

HOLIDAY DESSERTS. Celebrate the season with Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s recipes for decadent sweet treats like this cranberry lemon cheesecake. THE GIFT OF AMARYLLIS. Brighten your ­landscape with this winter-flowering plant. It also makes a great gift. HUMOR ME. Humor columnist Jan A. Igoe delivers holiday cheer with tales of her latest misadventures. ELECTRONIC FUN. See what electronic toys, gifts and games top our gadget guru’s wish list this year. May you and yours enjoy a wonderful holiday season! —KEITH PHILLIPS, EDITOR

Trim your holiday costs by choosing energy-efficient LED lights. LED holiday lights use less electricity and can last up to 40 seasons. They’re also easier to install—you can connect up to 25 LED strings without overloading a wall socket. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

NOVEMBER

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

DECEMBER

16 10:01 2:01 2:31 6:46 17 11:16 3:01 3:46 7:16 18 — 4:01 8:31 12:31 19 — 5:16 11:46 1:31 20 — 6:46 8:46 2:01 21 1:46 8:01 9:16 2:46 22 3:16 9:01 3:16 9:46 23 9:46 4:16 3:31 10:31 24 10:31 5:16 4:01 11:01 25 11:16 6:01 4:31 11:46 26 11:46 6:46 — 5:01 27 7:31 12:16 12:31 5:31 28 8:31 1:01 1:01 6:01 29 9:16 1:31 1:46 6:16 30 10:16 2:01 2:46 6:46

DECEMBER 1 11:16 2:46 4:16 2 — 3:31 — 3 — 4:16 8:31 4 — 5:31 8:31 5 1:31 6:46 9:01 6 3:01 8:01 2:31 7 9:01 4:01 2:46 8 9:46 4:46 3:16 9 10:31 5:16 3:46 10 11:01 6:01 4:16 11 11:46 6:31 — 12 7:16 12:01 12:16 13 8:01 12:31 1:01 14 8:46 1:16 1:46 15 9:46 2:01 2:31 16 10:31 2:46 3:46

Minor

17 11:31 3:46 5:31 18 — 4:46 7:01 19 — 6:01 8:01 20 2:01 7:16 1:46 21 8:16 3:31 2:16 22 9:16 4:31 2:46 23 10:16 5:31 3:31 24 11:01 6:16 4:01 25 11:46 7:01 — 26 7:31 12:01 12:16 27 8:16 12:46 1:01 28 8:46 1:16 1:46 29 9:16 1:46 2:31 30 10:01 2:16 3:31 31 10:31 2:46 4:31

9:31 12:16 1:01 9:01 9:31 10:16 11:01 11:31 4:31 5:16 5:46 6:16 6:46 7:31 8:16

JANUARY 2020 7:01 12:16 1:01 1:31 2:01 9:31 9:46 10:16 10:46 11:16 4:46 5:16 5:46 6:16 7:01 8:01

1 11:16 3:31 9:31 6:16 2 4:01 11:46 — 7:16 3 12:31 4:46 12:16 8:01 4 6:16 3:01 1:01 8:46 5 8:01 4:16 1:31 9:16 6 9:16 4:46 2:16 9:46 7 10:16 5:31 3:01 10:31 8 11:01 6:01 3:31 11:01 9 11:31 6:31 4:16 11:46 10 — 7:16 12:16 5:01 11 7:46 12:31 1:01 5:46 12 8:31 1:16 1:31 6:31 13 9:01 1:46 2:31 7:31 14 9:46 2:31 3:16 8:31 15 10:16 3:16 10:01 4:31 16 11:01 4:16 — 6:01

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


|

SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS NOV. 16–JAN. 1

ATOMACON NOVEMBER 22–24

Atomacon, short for “all types of media arts convention,” is North Charleston’s annual science fiction and fantasy gathering. The weekend includes a film festival, costume contest, inter­ active games, and panels on literature, fandom, paranormal activity, visual effects and makeup and costuming. This year’s guest of honor is fantasy author Myke Cole of Shadow Ops fame. Tickets run from $5 to $40 for regular admission. atomacon.org

HARBOUR TOWN LIGHTS NOVEMBER 29—JANUARY 1

TRINITY BAZAAR NOVEMBER 16

That pretty pink church in downtown Columbia, otherwise known as Trinity Episcopal Cathedral at 1100 Sumter Street, is as well known for its yearly bazaar as it is for beautiful Gothic Revival architecture. The bazaar is part rummage sale, part bake sale, and part carnival, with plenty of vintage and homemade goods to satisfy any taste. Proceeds benefit local service nonprofits, making this an all-around feel-good event.

The lighthouse isn’t the only beacon of brightness shining at Harbour Town this holiday season. The entire marina at Sea Pines Resort on Hilton Head Island will be decorated throughout the holidays, starting with a tree lighting and free concert at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 29. The lights will shine on through New Year’s Day, and visitors who come out to enjoy the spectacle are encouraged to bring canned goods or unwrapped children’s toys to contribute to charity. (843) 842‑1979; seapines.com/events

(803) 771‑7300; trinitybazaar.org CLUSTERS FOR KIDS OYSTER ROAST NOVEMBER 23

Oyster season is in full swing and there’s no better time and place to shuck a few than the Clusters for Kids Oyster Roast in Easley. Hosted by the Friends of Pickens County Guardian ad Litem, the event includes a dinner buffet, open bar, live auction and cornhole competitions. Advance tickets are $50 per person ($90 for a couple’s ticket), and all profits go directly to programs assisting mistreated children.

NIGHT OF A THOUSAND CANDLES

(864) 506‑0737; friendspcgal.org

THURSDAYS–SUNDAYS DEC. 5–21

CHRISTMAS IN THE 1800s DECEMBER 12

For one evening in Aiken, travel back in time as author, storyteller, and living historian Kim Poovey regales the audience with Christmas stories and carols from the 1800s. Dinner, catered by Uncle Bill’s BBQ, is included in the $35 per-person ticket price and proceeds go to the Diann Shaddox Foundation to find a cure for essential tremor. diannshaddoxfoundation.org/christmas-in-the-1800s.html

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 34, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Get into the holiday spirit at Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, where the spectacular gardens and sculptures are lit each Thursday through Sunday in December with more than 2,700 hand-lit candles and more than a million ­twinkling LED lights. Stroll along the pathways with a hand-warming cup of cider, cocoa or wine and take in the spectacle considered the state’s best holiday display. Tickets range from $12–$25 and should be purchased in advance. (843) 235‑6000; brookgreen.org


REGISTER TO WIN!

Put an extra $100 on your holiday wish list

Just in time for the holidays! Sign up today for our November Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. We’ll draw the winning name from all eligible entries received by Nov. 30. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon below. By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: jj Alpharetta, Ga. Convention and Visitors Bureau jj Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. jj City of Aiken Tourism jj Culture & Heritage Museums, Brattonsville jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj ChristmasVille, Rock Hill jj Fountain Inn Christmas Festival jj Newberry Opera House jj SCDA – Agritourism jj South Carolina Living magazine

R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 Visa gift card. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone*

South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Nov. 30, 2019, to be eligible. *Winner will be contacted to verify mailing address.

SEND COUPON TO:

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


|

SC   dialogue

Doing well by doing good GIVING BACK IS UNIQUELY REWARDING at every stage

Rising high school

of seniors from all across life. But for Rachel Larson, a senior at Aiken High School, her the state were giving community spirit and genuine care and concern for children back to their communities in need was rewarded with a this summer through $5,000 college scholarship by The Electric Cooperatives of volunteer projects they South Carolina, Inc. developed and The R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship is named organized themselves. for Robert D. Bennett, the first general manager and executive vice president of The Electric was then invited to propose a Cooperatives of South Carolina, summer service project in their who led the state association community and share that idea from 1950 until his retirement in with their local co-op. The project 1980. Bennett strongly believed ideas were then reviewed by a Rachel Larson, a senior at Aiken High School, earned a $5,000 that electric cooperatives should panel of judges based on their college scholarship in recognition of her community service work at Children’s Place, a therapeutic childcare center. support their local communities impact on the community. and provide a better quality of life As a representative in the for their members, so this scholarship is a perfect expression Cooperative Youth Summit and a member of Aiken Electric of those ideals. Cooperative, Rachel’s project was ultimately selected as the “I just wanted to be more a part of the community,” says winner of the statewide competition. Rachel. “The reason behind this scholarship is to encourage everyAn avid soccer player, Rachel shared her love of the sport one to go out and do something big in their community,” with kids at Children’s Place, a therapeutic childcare center in explains Van O’Cain, director of public and member relations Aiken that works with children who have experienced early for The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina. “And there trauma. Over the summer, Rachel organized a soccer clinic were some really good projects this year.” with several of her teammates to teach kids the basics of the For everyone involved, the value of this experience goes far sport and to give them a day of fun, exercise and learning. beyond the scholarship—it’s benefitted both the giver and the “The most rewarding thing was seeing how happy the kids receivers in ways that will impact them all for years to come. were and seeing my project be a success,” says Rachel. “It was just an amazing experience,” says Rachel. “I plan to Like Rachel, rising high school seniors from all across the continue my partnership with Children’s Place and find more state were giving back to their communities this summer ways to fulfill their needs.” through volunteer projects they developed and organized And according to Children’s Place Executive Director Peggy themselves. The one thing these students all had in common: Ford, “Rachel’s that kind of kid who wants to do for others. They attended either the 2019 Cooperative Youth Summit in The children had a fabulous day and continue to play soccer Columbia or the Washington Youth Tour—trips paid entirely today because of what she raised on behalf of our children. We are really grateful.” by their local electric cooperative. A four-day trip to Columbia to learn about co-ops and state government, the Cooperative Youth Summit selects 55 students from around the state to attend. A six-day trip to Washington, D.C., the Washington Tour selects more than 70 students to visit our nation’s capital where they meet their elected officials and learn about public service. Each student MIKE COUICK who was selected for this year’s Cooperative Youth Summit President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina 10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


Oakleaf Village

Delivering Reliable, Compassionate Senior Living Options to Greenville and Spartanburg Families

A Place to Call Home • Home-Style Sensations Gourmet Dining • Charming Suites, One- and Two Bedroom Apartment Homes • Caring, Friendly Team of Experienced Professionals • Southern Senior Living at Its Very Best

Come See What Everyone’s Been Talking About. Schedule a Tour and Your Lunch Is on Us

Call 864.663.1750 TODAY! OakleafSeniorLiving.com 1560 Thornblade Boulevard Greer, SC 29650 ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE Prices, plans and programs are subject to change or withdrawal without notice. Owned and operated by Discovery Senior Living. Void where prohibited by law. ©2019 Discovery Senior Living. OLVG-0091 9/19

See what you can do online at SocialSecurity.gov

SocialSecurity.gov

Produced at U.S. taxpayer expense

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

11


|

SC   smart choice

Kid-endorsed gifts These days, kids need screens and batteries to have a happy holiday. These electronic goodies will keep your tot thoroughly plugged in throughout the season, and they make great holiday gifts. BY DAVID NOVAK

GAMER GEAR

Kids are serious about their gaming, and PowerA knows it. Their latest offering—the FUSION Pro Wired Controllers for the Xbox One— lets you map buttons on the fly, has a custom protective case and magnetic impulse triggers and it sports dual rumble motors, so you can feel what’s happening in your gaming world. $80. PowerA.com.

YOU KNOW! IT

Family game night just got interesting with kNOW!, a board game from Ravensburger that’s powered by Google Assistant. You can play the quiz game the old-fashioned way with 1,500 challenging questions, but having your digital ­companion involved allows the questions and answers to evolve based on your location, the day you’re playing and who you’re playing with. Google Assistant will also read the instructions out loud for you. $25. walmart.com.

CEEK AND YOU SHALL FIND

FINGERTIP BLISS

Perfect for your family gamer, the ROCCAT Vulcan 120 Series Mechanical Keyboard combines lights and tactilefeel switches for quicker inputs when the action is intense. It’s also got a silky feel for regular typing when it’s time to work on that school paper. $160. (914) 345‑2255; roccat.org. YOUNGSTER’S PC

Don’t let the kid-friendly ergonomics fool you. The Tanoshi 2-in-1 Kids Computer is a fully functional PC that runs on Android 7.0 and has a 10.1-inch detachable touch screen. It comes pre-loaded with Google Docs and Sheets, a kids’ coding app, educational software and parental controls so your youngster age 6–12 can learn computer skills and complete school assignments on their own. $200. tanoshikidscomputers.com.

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Designed for use with virtual reality systems, the CEEK 4D Advanced Headphones attempt to re-create that surround-sound experience you get in movie theaters—with a twist. Sounds not only come at you from all directions, they also change in response to your movements. $250. (877) 407‑9797; ceek.com.


New rate plans, now with more minutes!

Easier is better with the Jitterbug. The Jitterbug® Flip, from the creators of the original easy-to-use cell phone, has big buttons and an exclusive 5Star® Urgent Response button on the keypad. EASY TO USE Today, cell phones are hard to hear, difficult to dial Plans as low as Plans as low as and overloaded with features you may never use. That’s not the case with the Jitterbug Flip. A large screen and big buttons make it $ $ easy to call family and friends. The powerful speaker ensures every month conversation will be loud and clear. Plus, straightforward YES and NO buttons make navigating the menu simple.

Plans

as it low as and Plans EASY TO ENJOY Wherever you go, a built-in cameraPlans makes easy fun as forlow youasto capture and share your favorite memories. And a built-in reading magnifier with LED $ you need, the$ Jitterbug Flip flashlight helps you see in dimly lit areas. With all the features month month also comes with a long-lasting battery, so you won’t have to worry about running out of power.

Plans

1499 1499 $1 2

*

2

1499 1499 $1 2

2

Plans as low as**

Plans as low as

EASY TO BE PREPARED Life has a way of being unpredictable, but you can be prepared in any uncertain or unsafe situation with 5Star Service. Simply press the 5Star button $ $ to be connected immediately with a highly-trained Urgent Response Agent who will month confirm your location, evaluate your situation and get you the help you need, 24/7.

Plans

1499 1499 $1 2

The Jitterbug Flip is one of the most affordable cell phones on the market and comes with dependable nationwide coverage. Friendly customer service representatives will help figure out which phone plan is best for you, and with no long-term contracts or cancellation fees, you can switch plans anytime. You can even keep your current landline or cell phone number. For a limited time, get 25% off for the holidays. Plus, get more minutes with our great new rate plans! Powered by the nation’s largest and most dependable wireless network.

Available at:

NO LONG-TERM CONTRACTS No cancellation fees

Why the Jitterbug Flip is your best choice for a new cell phone: phone: No Nocontracts long-term to sign, ever contracts

Keep youryour current Keep current phone number phone number

To order or learn more, call

1-866-668-0053

powered Free U.S.-based No hidden Brain Games Affordable, Free U.S.-based No hidden fees fees by Posit Science® customer serviceservice monthlymonthly customer flexible plans

or visit us at

greatcall.com/Flip

¹25% off of $99⁹⁹ MSRP is only valid for new lines of service. Offer valid 11/3/19 through 1/4/20. ²Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a GreatCall device and a one-time setup fee of $35. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can be made only when cellular service is available. 5Star Service tracks an approximate location of the device when the device is turned on and connected to the network. GreatCall does not guarantee an exact location. Jitterbug, GreatCall, and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2019 GreatCall, Inc.


14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


Saving sea turtles Loggerhead protections pay off, but new threats to the species emerge

hatchling from the start, and conservationway across the beach to the Atlantic Ocean an ists say that loggerheads, which have been hour or so after daybreak on a Sunday mornlisted as threatened since 1978 under the Endangered Species Act, face ­escalating ing in August. They just hatched into the manmade threats including boat strikes, world out of Isle of Palms Nest 28, bubbling coastal development, plastic pollution, up from a sand dune as true instant celebriBY SUSAN HILL SMITH climate change and rising sea levels. ties and drawing a crowd of beachgoers. PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH Yet there are reasons for hope as the Island Turtle Team volunteers called to logger­head nest count along South Carolina the scene carry stragglers—each no bigger shores has trended upward over the past decade, spiking in than the palm of a human hand—closer to the water’s edge 2019 to a record 8,721. Of those, 40 percent are concentrated so the hatchlings aren’t accidentally stepped on by passersby in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, where staff and on this popular stretch of coastline. ­volunteers race to tend to them all. Tiny waves lap over the last few just as a trio of surprised The numbers are an encouraging sign that the global surfers walks out of the ocean. Even though they are visiting sea turtle conservation movement our state has helped from Greenville, they know about the magic of sea turtles and lead for more than 40 years is paying off larger dividends the perils of their journey. than expected. “It’s been sort of jaw-dropping,” admits Sally “No way!” they exclaim as they verify what they are witMurphy, a champion for sea turtles since her early days with nessing with the turtle team. “That’s so cool!” S.C. Department of Natural Resources in the 1970s. The tallest, 21-year-old Will Logan, welcomes a baby sea turtle coming toward his feet. “I believe in you,” he says as Digging in with turtle teams the turtle’s dive instinct kicks in and tiny flippers take the first strokes of a potentially epic swim. “Shred the eternal gnar!” The data-driven effort to protect sea turtles and unravel their Other surfers would understand the meaning: Live large secrets involves a multitude of South Carolinians each year, inand never give up. And for a baby sea turtle, that’s good cluding more than 1,100 volunteers who are part of a coastal advice. Nature stacks significant odds against an individual network of 30 nest protection projects reporting to DNR. By the start of May, “turtle teams” begin early morning beach walks looking daily for tracks of mother turtles, mostly BUCKET BRIGADE A volunteer (top) gives baby loggerhead stragglers logger­ h eads, which typically arrive under cover of night, a lift to water’s edge in the turtle team’s signature red bucket. THE BABY LOGGERHEADS WRIGGLE THEIR

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


Saving sea turtles

laying an average of 120 eggs at a time before slipping back into the ocean. The volunteers continue their efforts to protect and catalog nests through mid-October, when the ­season’s hatchlings have finished erupting. The Island Turtle Team for Isle of Palms and neighboring Sullivan’s Island monitors 10 miles of beaches with 180 members and a waiting list of others eager to join. Its ranks include resident novelist Mary Alice Monroe, whose 2002 breakthrough bestseller, The Beach House, and the 2018 Hallmark movie it inspired have drawn national attention to the cause and spurred many to get involved with turtle teams in their own communities. A few days after the initial “boil” of hatchlings at Nest 28 on Isle of Palms, volunteers are scheduled to investigate the nest’s remains, but because they are at the apex of the hatching period in a record-breaking year, it will be one of the last of five nests inventoried this morning. Back home from a book tour, Monroe joins them in a team T-shirt, ready to dig in, both as a volunteer and a writer. While her environmental fiction has also drawn attention to other animals, like dolphins and shorebirds, she intends to return to sea turtles with a sixth title in The Beach House series, compelled by issues related to climate change and pollution as well as the triumphs and questions emerging out of the busy nesting season, which got off to an exceptionally early start. “I wasn’t planning on doing another Beach House for a while,” she says, “but so much is unusual this year.”

Citizen scientists Monroe may be the literary celebrity in the mix, but her longtime friend, Mary Pringle, is the team’s project leader. She holds the team’s DNR permit, helps train volunteers, documents nesting success and writes regular turtle updates for the island newspaper. Pringle explains to the group gathered that she feels attached to the first nest on the morning’s schedule because she’s the one who found it, so she will take the lead on the inventory. Soon she’s on her knees, plunging her arm into a cavity about 20 inches down into the sandy beach. Smiling in spite of the stench, she pulls out what’s left behind for sorting by three other veterans, including Monroe. “So what’s the count, ladies?” Pringle asks once she finishes retrieving the leathery shells left behind by hatchlings, each with the appearance of a dented ping pong ball. Of the 117 eggs in the clutch, 112 hatched. Four didn’t develop, and only one hatchling died without making it out of the nest—a high success rate that fits another of the year’s trends. These citizen scientists rebury the shells to enrich the dune ecosystem. When the nest was originally found, they saved a sample for an ongoing DNA fingerprinting project by University of Georgia researchers that now involves all sea turtle nests counted in Georgia, South Carolina and North 16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

While there’s still much to learn about the loggerhead’s life cycle, it’s commonly cited that as few as one in 1,000 hatchlings may survive to adulthood. TEAM PLAYERS Mary Pringle (above) greets onlookers at a nest inventory early one August morning on Isle of Palms. Loggerhead hatchlings leave tell-tale tracks (below) when they erupt from a nest and head to the ocean.


TREASURE BELOW The Beach House author and Island Turtle Team member Mary Alice Monroe pulls out what’s left of the eggs—leathery shells that look like dented ping pong balls—from a loggerhead nest on Isle of Palms while Tee Johannes begins the inventory.

Carolina. After 11 years, the project has identified around 11,000 loggerhead moms, and started to follow their reproductive habits. The team follows the same script as they travel down the beach to four other inventories, ending mid-island with Nest 28 and Nest 29, which are next to one another. Two months earlier, volunteers moved these nests here from the island’s northeast tip, where they were more vulnerable to being washed away, to safer ground, as DNR allows them. Before the season’s end, the volunteers will log 72 nests for their two islands, the most recorded by the team since it officially formed in 1995. This morning, the excitement comes when seven live hatchlings are found underground in Nest 29. Volunteers place them in the team’s trademark red bucket and carry them close to the water, but several hatchlings struggle in the waves. Monroe quietly acknowledges that those left behind in the nest are less likely to survive in the ocean, where everything that’s bigger than them is a potential predator. That’s nature’s hand, and while there’s still much to learn about the loggerhead’s life cycle, it’s commonly cited that as few as one in 1,000 hatchlings may survive to adulthood. Those hatchlings that navigate ocean currents across the North Atlantic gyre to waters as far away as the Canary Islands will return to the U.S. southeast coast in about 8 to 10 years. By then they may grow up to 3½ feet long and 350

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


The loggerhead, our state reptile, accounts for most of the sea turtles swimming and nesting along South Carolina’s coastline.

THE GREAT ESCAPE A baby loggerhead instinctively heads for the water after emerging from a nest in the dunes of Isle of Palms, where more than 180 Island Turtle Team volunteers help watch out for sea turtles from May through October. On the beaches of Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge (below) employees of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service patrol daily to keep tabs on thousands of turtle nests each season.

18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


Saving sea turtles

pounds. At that point, the big threats they face come from sharks and humans.

Persistence pays off To understand why the upward trend in nest numbers makes sense, it helps to know more about sea turtle biology and some history. Female loggerheads are estimated to reach reproduction age between 25 to 35 years old, so the first generation of hatchlings to benefit from turtle teams and other protective efforts just started coming of age and laying their own eggs in recent years. South Carolina’s turtle teams emerged from Murphy’s initial work with DNR to establish a stranding network of volunteers to record the number of adult turtles washing up after being injured or killed. As the effort started in 1980, with only half the beaches monitored, the count of dead turtles on South Carolina shores reached nearly 600, which Murphy maintains was only a fraction of the adult turtles dying, many from becoming tangled in the nets of shrimp trawlers. She needed data to support requirements for commercial shrimpers’ nets to have turtle excluder devices (TEDs). But as her recruits walked the beaches, they also noticed turtle nests at risk. “It was their initiative that started the nest protection projects,” recalls Murphy, who released her memoir, Turning the Tide, in 2018. “As one beach had a project, the island next door would find out about it, and they would call and say they wanted to start a project, too, just sort of a domino effect all along the coast.” At the same time, Murphy continued the controversial fight for TEDs even after shrimpers, stirred by fears that the devices would diminish their harvests, strung up a likeness of her after one of their meetings. South Carolina set the stage for TED requirements, first passing regulations in 1988, ahead of other states and the federal government. While legal wrangling would continue into the early 2000s, TEDs are credited with playing a significant role in preventing sea turtle deaths. With Murphy’s pioneering leadership, South Carolina became increasingly protective of sea turtles, naming the logger­head as the state reptile, clamping down on egg poaching and launching Lights Out campaigns to keep beaches dark at night, allowing turtles to nest without disruption or disorientation. With the 2000 opening of the South Carolina Aquarium in Charleston, the attention magnified thanks to the popularity of its resident loggerhead, Caretta, and the aquarium’s Sea Turtle Hospital, which has returned more than 280 turtles to the ocean in public releases that attract crowds of fans. The Sea Turtle Hospital expanded in 2017 with an exhibit to give all visitors a window into care for patients recovering from boat strikes, entanglement in fishing lines, ingestion of plastic bags and other stresses.

FINDING REFUGE Jerry Tupacz with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service keeps meticulous records on turtle nests within the boundaries of Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. The island had more than 2,000 nests in 2019, with nearly 3,500 total recorded in the refuge, the most significant loggerhead nesting ground north of Cape Canaveral.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


Saving sea turtles

PVC MARKS THE SPOT Chris Crolley with Coastal Expeditions Foundation surveys the loggerhead nests on Cape Island, each marked by a PVC pipe. “This year, we had more nests than anybody alive has ever seen,” he says, though he worries about the island’s future due to rising sea levels.

Kelly Thorvalson has worked with the aquarium since before it opened and now serves as its conservation programs manager. While those in her field have patiently persisted, waiting for positive results like this year’s sea turtle nest totals, they now worry about new disruptors on marine ecosystems. Climate change, sea level rise and plastic pollution were constant topics at this year’s International Sea Turtle Symposium in Charleston. “There is a lot of optimism for sea turtle populations,” Thorvalson says. “But there are looming conservation issues that could undo the progress we’ve made.”

Critical Cape Romain The drama of this year’s sea turtle nesting season in South Carolina was at its most intense in Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, where nest numbers for Bulls, Lighthouse and Cape islands totaled 3,538. Located off the coast near the fishing village of McClellan­

How you can help turtles DONATE TO THE CAPE ROMAIN NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SEA TURTLE PROJECT, created by Coastal Expeditions Foundation to protect South Carolina’s largest turtle nesting site. coastalexpeditions.com/foundation

BECOME A SEA TURTLE GUARDIAN with the South Carolina Aquarium and its Sea Turtle Care Center. scaquarium.org/guardian

SUPPORT S.C. DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES PROTECTION EFFORTS by getting a sea turtle license plate, contributing to the Endangered Wildlife Fund on your state taxes or joining DNR’s Adopt a Nest program. portal.dnr.sc.gov/marine/turtles/support.htm 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

ville, Cape Romain provides the most significant loggerhead nesting ground north of Cape Canaveral, Florida. At the ­refuge’s easternmost point of Cape Island, small teams working seven days a week on the remote spit of sand staked off 2,040 loggerhead nests with numbered PVC pipes in dense clusters along the beach. “This year, we had more nests than anybody alive has ever seen,” says Chris Crolley of Coastal Expeditions Foundation, one of the groups helping to staff the refuge’s sea turtle program after significant losses in federal funding. Loggerhead nesting numbers are cyclical and can vary widely from year to year. Over the past decade, state totals dropped as low as 2,080 in 2014, yet pushed up overall with a previous high of 6,435 recorded in 2016, including 2,498 nests counted that year at Cape Romain. This year’s count at Cape Romain surpassed its 2016 count by more than 1,000, though Hurricane Dorian’s visit at the start of September likely ruined some late-season nests before they could hatch. Dorian’s impact could have been worse if it had turned into more of a flooding event, Crolley says, but even as he recognizes the problems hurricanes can pose, his larger concerns revolve around rising sea levels, which could lead to more drowned nests and cause Cape Island to eventually disappear. Crolley, who provides nature tours through Coastal Expeditions outfitters, says there’s no better place than Cape Island to bolster the loggerhead population through nest protection and research. In fact, Cape Island has already made significant contributions to the DNA data set being amassed. Scientists can see that turtles arriving there are nesting alongside their mothers and grandmothers, even though evidence also suggests nesting “site fidelity” is not universal. A turtle typically lays several clutches of eggs through a season, and may return to the same area each time, or choose different locations, with a small percentage laying clutches in different states. Solving mysteries like these could play an important role in safeguarding a future for these ancient creatures as they adapt to a rapidly changing world. “The more we can understand about sea turtles,” Crolley says, “the better position we are in to make right choices when trying to help them.”


|

SC   stories

In his element Scott Poore is as much a product of the Appalachian foothills as the trout that swim in its waters. He grew up hunting, hiking and exploring the woods near Walhalla. That love of nature was the first step on a career path that would lead to joining the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and becoming manager of the Walhalla State Fish Hatchery. Poore, who graduated from Clemson University with degrees in wildlife and fisheries biology, is responsible for making sure that 475,000 trout are available each year for stocking the state’s rivers and streams. He and his small staff raise brown, brook and rainbow trout from eggs to a young fry to fingerling and eventually adult fish measuring anywhere from 9 to 12 inches. It’s a demanding job, but one he enjoys. “For me, growing up and enjoying the outdoors, this is a place where I’m not confined by four walls in an office,” says Poore, who lives adjacent to the hatchery with his family. “As long as I’m producing the fish that have been requested, providing an outreach opportunity to the visitors who come here, and the anglers are happy, I’ve accomplished what I set out to do.” Taking full advantage of living on the East Fork of the Chattooga River, Poore is passing on his love of the outdoors and of fishing to his sons, ages 13 and 10. “I love being outside. To be in the mountains and see all the seasons, it’s just an enjoyable experience,” he says. “There certainly are jobs that I could have majored in at Clemson that paid a lot more, but I feel rich in non‑monetary things.” —MICHAEL BANKS | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

Scott Poore AGE:

45.

Mountain Rest. Manages the Walhalla State Fish Hatchery, keeping the Upstate’s lakes and rivers stocked with rainbow, brown and brook trout. HIS NEMESIS: Packs of buzzards that flock to the trees near the hatchery’s outdoor raceways each afternoon, waiting for Poore and his team to leave before swooping down to feast. “It’s a buffet,” he says. FAVORITE FISH: An avid fly fisherman in his spare time, Poore is partial to catching brook trout, the only species native to South Carolina. HOME TURF:

CLAIM TO FAME:

GET MORE The Walhalla State Fish Hatchery is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily except for Christmas Day. To learn more about the hatchery, visit hatcheries.dnr.sc.gov/walhalla/index.html. SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


|

SC   travels

Apollo 50: Journey to the Moon S.C. State Museum’s latest space exploration exhibit highlights South Carolinians STORY AND PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

MOONSTRUCK D.J. and Katie Carlberg of Columbia play with a dynamic animated globe in the S.C. State Museum’s Apollo 50 exhibit, which will run until September 2020.

22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

You may not be familiar with astronaut Charles Duke, but you’ve almost certainly heard his voice. In the tense final moments of the July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 moon landing, Commander Neil Armstrong guided the lunar module Eagle over the cratered surface in search of a suitable landing area. Specialists in NASA’s Mission Control in Houston, along with the rest of the world, waited anxiously for confirmation of touchdown. With seconds of fuel remaining, Armstrong brought the craft to a soft landing and made his historic report: “Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Duke, who grew up in Lancaster, South Carolina, was the Apollo 11’s “capsule communicator,” or CAPCOM. In a distinctly Southern accent, he responded with some famous words of his own. “We copy you down, Eagle,” Duke said. “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot.”


The 50th anniversary of that historic landing is the theme of the South Carolina State Museum’s exhibition, “Apollo 50: Journey to the Moon.” Sponsored by Boeing, the exhibition interprets the 1960s, both from social and technological perspectives, and expounds upon the role South Carolinians, like Duke, played in the history of space exploration. A year in the making, the exhibition recognizes “the greatest achievement of the 20th century,” Education Director Tom Falvey says. Duke’s involvement with Apollo 11, and later as an Apollo 16 moonwalker, was a “natural” fit, Falvey said.

“They said Charlie Duke’s Southern drawl was so calming it kept those guys focused.” —S.C. STATE MUSEUM EDUCATION DIRECTOR TOM FALVEY Duke grew up in Lancaster before attending Admiral Farragut Academy, and later the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received science degrees at both schools and became a fighter pilot and test pilot. He was in the fifth group of astronauts chosen by NASA and was on the Apollo 10 support team before his CAPCOM assignment for Apollo 11. “They always had an astronaut at CAPCOM because they knew the system,” Falvey says. “They also said Charlie Duke’s Southern drawl was so calming it kept those guys focused.”

‘WHETHER IT WILL BECOME A FORCE FOR GOOD OR ILL DEPENDS ON MAN’ The exhibition begins with a dramatic moonscape as the backdrop to President John F. Kennedy’s historic 1962 “We choose to go to the moon” speech.

Duke was a backup pilot for the ill-fated Apollo 13, but caught a case of German measles and exposed the prime crew to the disease. He would finally get his seat on Apollo 16 in 1972, along with a nickname from the crew: Typhoid Mary. At age 36, Duke became the youngest man to walk on the moon. He spent more than 20 hours outside the lunar module, which included driving the lunar rover. Duke retired as an Air Force brigadier general. The main room of the Apollo 50 exhibit contains some of Duke’s personal items, such as his spacesuit, helmet and various tools he used in space. Items are on loan from the Smithsonian, or were donated from Duke’s personal collection. The museum’s exhibit team created a model of the lunar rover guests can sit in. “It’s great to be able to see objects that actually traveled to the moon,” Falvey says. “I’m kind of fond of his Omega Speedmaster watch. This is a commercial watch that was able to survive the temperatures and G-forces.” In addition to artifacts, the exhibition illuminates the social climate of the 1960s. Guests enter, passing a dramatic moonscape featuring a video of President John F. Kennedy at Rice University delivering his famous 1962 “we choose to go to

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


|

SC   travels

p HOME-GROWN EXPLORERS

A gallery in the exhibition features photos and information about all of South Carolina’s astronauts.

u THE EAGLE HAS LANDED An

enlargement of the patch designed for the Apollo 11 mission is displayed in the main hall.

q LAND ROVER Thomas Daniel, with grandmother Annette Daniel, of northeast Columbia, take a closer look at the model lunar rover.

the moon” speech. Continuing, guests pass a wall with images from key events of the era, such as the civil rights struggle and the Russian space race. “We really wanted to show what the ’60s were like,” Falvey says. The museum elected to tell a story that’s broader than just that of the first moon shot. Not everyone was supportive of the effort, which clocked in at $25 billion at the time. “Polling was pretty much split 50-50 and plenty of people thought we needed to address what was going on in the

GET THERE The South Carolina State Museum is located at 301 Gervais Street in Columbia. HOURS: Monday, Wednesday through Friday: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Tuesday: 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday: 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday: noon–5 p.m. ADMISSION: Apollo 50: Journey to the Moon is free with museum general admission or membership. Adults 13–61, $8.95; seniors (ages 62 and up), $7.95; children ages 3–12, $6.95; infants 2 and under, free. Active duty military personnel in uniform receive free general admission on Thursdays. DETAILS: Apollo 50 will run until September 2020, when most of the exhibition will be rolled into the museum’s new space gallery. For more information on this exhibit and other space-related events, visit scmuseum.org or call 803-898-4921. DON’T MISS: A space fan’s trip to the museum wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the observatory or a show at the 55‑foot planetarium. While there, be sure to check out the museum’s collection of antique telescopes.

24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


THE MAN ON THE MOON Guests browse artifacts in the main gallery of the Apollo 50 exhibit. Many of these items were used in space by Apollo 16 astronaut Charles Duke, who grew up in Lancaster, S.C.

United States, rather than spending all that money on the space program,” he says. While the Apollo program is the main focus, a large photo wall recognizes the legacy of all space explorers from South Carolina. Featured are former NASA administrator Charles Bolden; Ron McNair, who perished on the Space Shuttle Challenger’s fatal 1986 mission; five-time shuttle flyer Frank Culbertson; John Casper, who flew four shuttle missions; and Catherine Coleman who flew on both the shuttle and a Soyuz mission to the International Space Station. In another local connection, the exhibit features a gallery of exciting images of the Apollo 11 capsule splashdown and recovery effort as photographed by two South Carolina Navy vets, Milt Putnam of Newry, and Robert Coggin of Columbia. “It’s always great to tell those stories because they get lost,” Falvey says. “It’s our job to bring them out.” On a Friday afternoon in late August, Annette Daniel of northeast Columbia browsed the gallery with members of her family and reflected on the excitement of watching the first moon landing. “I was in awe,” she says. “When they landed on the moon, it made my goose pimples have geese.” Passing by the wall of South Carolina astronauts, she pointed to Bolden, Duke and McNair and reveled in their achievements. “This is just beyond comprehension.”

In another local connection, the exhibit features a gallery of exciting images of the Apollo 11 capsule splashdown and recovery effort as photographed by two South Carolina Navy vets.

BACK ON EARTH The exhibit includes photos from the July 1969 Apollo 11 mission, including this of navy divers assisting in the recovery after splashdown. Photo by and courtesy of Milt Putnam.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

25


December 7 & 14

Ticket details at chmuseums.org

PHOTO: MIKE WATTS

HISTORIC BRATTONSVILLE • CHMUSEUMS.ORG • 1444 BRATTONSVILLE RD. MCCONNELLS, SC 29726 • 803.684.2327 PROJECT ASSISTED BY CITY OF ROCK HILL AND YORK COUNTY ACCOMMODATIONS & HOSPITALITY TAX PROGRAMS

a f r t m x e a n dvent r u o y u n re a l P AT S C F A R M F U N . O R G

In every season SC Agritourism offers you a new experience, from choose n’ cut Christmas trees to farm & culinary tours, trail rides, wineries, botanical gardens, farm stores, other year-round family friendly activities, and so much more!

26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


Christmas "Inn"Our Town December 5 - 22 6 PM - 9 PM

Santa & Carriage Rides Wednesdays - Sundays www.fountaininnevents.com SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27


 

 Get your tickets before they sell out! August 2019 8/24 Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder 8/25 Restless Heart 8/31 The Swingin’ Medallions

 Heating &Air Conditioning Inc.

Hill C ocaC ck

McKINNEY, TUCKER & LEMEL, LLC

ol a

November 2019 11/5 Big Bad Voodoo Daddy 11/6 Macbeth Presented by Warehouse Theatre 11/10 “Pirate School!� 11/13 Iron Butterfly 11/15 John Hiatt 11/20 Aaron Neville 11/21 Oleta Adams 11/22 Edwin McCain 11/23 Edwin McCain 11/24 Joey Alexander Trio 11/26 ’Twas the Night Before Christmas

It Takes aViage December 5th - 8th ATTORNEYS AT LAW Bo

t tli n

ny

October 2019 10/2 Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives 10/3 Fireside Collective 10/4 Blue Ă–yster Cult 10/5 Mac McAnally 10/6 Angelina Ballerina, The Musical 10/12 The Marshall Tucker Band 10/13 Once: Broadway Musical 10/15 Nobuntu, A Cappella from Zimbabwe 10/17 Jackyl 10/18 The Kingdom Choir 10/20 Dali Quartet 10/26 Thunderstruck AC/DC Tribute

Ro

September 2019 9/8 Cornell Gunter’s Coasters 9/11 “Love Letters� Starring Barbara Eden & Barry Bostwick 9/12 Hot Club of Cowtown 9/15 John Wager & friends 9/20 Everclear 9/21 The Buckinghams 9/27 William Bell, Soul Pioneer 9/28 Forever Motown

p g Com

a

THE CITY OF AIKEN IS THE

December 2019 12/1 The Tams & The 14k Gold Band 12/3 The Velveteen Rabbit 12/5 Stop Light Observations 12/6 Rhythm of the Yuletide Dance 12/11 Christmas with John Berry 12/12 The TEN Tenors Home for The Holidays 12/13 An Evening with CeCe Winans 12/15 The Nutcracker

PERFECT PLACE TO BEGIN A

Holiday Tradition Christmas in Aiken means exciting

January 2020 1/10 Jimmy Fortune 1/11 Heart By Heart 1/12 Menopause – The Musical 1/16 Verdi’s La Traviata 1/17 Balsam Range 1/18 Unspoken Tradition 1/21 Travis Tritt, Solo 1/22 Travis Tritt, Solo 1/24 Night Fever- The Bee Gees Tribute 1/25 Jake Shimabukuro 1/31 Delbert McClinton

holiday packages, magical events, festive shopping + dining experiences, caroling on the street corners and so much more...

February 2020 2/1 Harry Potter & The Sacred Text 2/13 Cirque Zuma Zuma 2/14 The Don Felder Band 2/16 Dinosaur World 2/21 Sierra Hull 2/22 Rhonda Vincent & The Rage 2/23 An Intimate Night With Sandi Patty 2/28 Ken Ford, King of Strings 2/29 James Gregory March 2020 3/5 The Lettermen visit our website to view the full season listing!

Box Office 803-276-6264 NewberryOperaHouse.com

28

VISIT

AikenIsMagical.com

FOR

2019’S CALENDAR OF EVENTS

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Photograph by Mark Hudson


ClemsonBlueCheese.com ClemsonsBest.com


Maximizing holiday leftovers BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Concerned ab out what to do with ho liday leftovers? Don ’t be. You can repurpose all those won derful dishes and flavors in snacks, appe to tizers, soups and breakfas continue to en t tre at s and joy them afte r the big cele With these ea br at ion. sy recipes, no thing will go to Each of these w as te! recipes can be adapted to utilize the ingr edients from your special holiday menus.

TURKEY AND PASTA SOUP SERVES 6–8

G I N A MOORE

A quick soup but no less fulfilling than one that has been simmering all day.

1 tablespoon olive oil 2 carrots, sliced 1 medium onion, chopped 2 stalks celery, sliced 2 cloves garlic, minced 6 cups chicken or turkey stock 1 28-ounce can stewed or diced tomatoes 1 cup uncooked pasta or noodles (your favorite shape) 2–3 cups cooked turkey, shredded ½ tablespoon Italian seasoning Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground Red pepper flakes, pinch 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed (optional) Parmesan cheese, grated

30

MAKES ABOUT 12

This spicy appetizer can also be served as a “side” to a follow-up holiday meal. 3 cups cold leftover mashed potatoes 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 small jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (less, depending on “heat” preference) ½ tablespoon fresh chives, chopped 1 large egg, lightly beaten ½ cup all-purpose flour ¼ cup vegetable oil, more if needed Sour cream, for serving

In a large bowl, combine potatoes, cheese, jalapeno, chives, egg and flour. Using clean, moistened hands or a medium-sized scoop,* form mixture into 12 round patties. Place onto a parchment-lined half-sheet pan and refrigerate for 15–30 minutes.

In a Dutch oven or large pot, over medium heat, heat oil. Saute carrots, onions and celery until onions are soft. Add garlic and cook an additional minute. Add stock and tomatoes and bring to a boil; cook 10–15 minutes. Add pasta, turkey, seasonings and beans and bring to a boil. Cook for an additional 10–12 minutes until pasta is cooked. If soup is too thick for your preference, add additional stock. To serve, ladle into individual bowls and top with grated Parmesan cheese.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

When a recipe calls for herbs, remember this formula. One tablespoon of fresh herbs can be substituted with 1 teaspoon of dried. Likewise, if the recipe calls for one teaspoon dried, substitute with one tablespoon of fresh. Remember that dried herbs always get introduced to the pot early in the cooking process, whereas fresh herbs are added near the end of cooking, to preserve their delicate fragrant properties. CHEF’S TIP

CHEDDAR JALAPENO POTATO CAKES

In a large skillet, over medium heat, heat oil. Fry the patties until golden brown and crispy on both sides, approximately 3–4 minutes per side. Do not crowd the pan—fry in batches if necessary, adding more oil if needed. Drain on a large paper towel-lined half-sheet pan. Allow to rest for at least five minutes. Transfer to a serving dish and serve warm or at room temperature with sour cream. * I use a #20 spring-release scoop for 12, 3-inch patties.


|

SC   recipe

MINI TURKEY, STUFFING AND CRANBERRY TARTS MAKES 12

2 sheets frozen puff pastry, thawed according to package instructions 1 ½ cups cooked turkey, shredded 1 ½ cups leftover stuffing ¾ cup leftover cranberry sauce Egg wash (1 large egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water)

Preheat oven to 400 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Unfold puff pastry onto a lightly floured surface and cut along the fold lines to form three sections per sheet. Cut each section in half, forming 12 pieces of pastry.

PHOTOS BY G I N A M OO RE

This delicious handheld snack is a wonderful reminder of the special holiday meal shared with family and friends.

In a large bowl, combine turkey, stuffing and cranberry sauce. Divide mixture among the puff pastry pieces, placing in the middle of the pastry. Brush the far edge with the egg wash, and roll the pastry tightly over the filling and continue rolling to meet the egg-washed edge. Place on baking sheet seam side down. Brush all pastry rolls with remaining egg wash. Using a sharp paring knife, make slits across the top of each roll. Bake 20–25 minutes until golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop

If you have egg allergies in your family, a safe substitute for egg wash is heavy cream or milk.

CHEF’S TIP

Get more delicious recipes, expert cooking tips and fun, how-to videos from Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan any time of day or night. Just point your web browser to

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

SWEET POTATO, BROCCOLI AND HAM STRATA SERVES 10–12

A strata is an egg casserole, similar to a quiche or frittata, with primary ingredients of bread, eggs and cheese. It could also include meats and vegetables. 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion, diced 2–3 cups leftover rolls, cut into cubes (or use French or Italian bread) 2 cups leftover (not mashed) sweet potatoes, cut into ½-inch cubes or pieces 2 cups leftover broccoli, broken into florets 1 cup leftover ham, ½-inch cubed 6 large eggs, lightly beaten

1½ cups half-and-half (or half heavy cream and half milk) 2 scallions (green onions), green tops only, sliced 1 teaspoon dry mustard Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground Red pepper flakes, pinch 1½ cups cheddar cheese, shredded

Preheat oven to 350 F. Heat olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat and saute onions until soft. Spray a 2- to 3-quart baking dish or cast-iron skillet with cooking spray. Combine bread cubes, onions, sweet potatoes, broccoli and ham and mix together. GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, scallion tops, mustard, salt and peppers. Pour over bread mixture and top with cheese. Let rest on counter for 30 minutes to allow bread to absorb the liquid. Bake in preheated oven 35–40 minutes or until the center is set and cheese is melted and bubbly. Allow to cool 5–10 minutes before serving.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


|

SC   gardener

NOVEMBER IN THE GARDEN

Lasting beauty: species tulips BY L.A. JACKSON

n If squirrels have been having way too much fun digging into your newly planted, spring-blooming bulb beds, spread small-diameter chicken wire over the growing grounds and then, for cosmetic appearance, add a light covering of mulch. n Houseplants should be tucked inside now, but before they completely settle into the new environment, check their leaves for signs of insects or insect eggs. Also, some tender plants might initially lose leaves or have some of their foliage turn yellow. If no signs of insect activity are present, it is probably their way to readjust to indoor living.

TIP OF THE MONTH Look‑

L . A . JACKSO N

ing for a gardengrown Christmas gift? Try herb vinegars. You just need clean bottles—​1 2- to 20-ounce-sized will do—with tight caps or corks, white vinegar and any mix of herbs still lingering in the garden. Parsley, dill, lemon grass, fennel, thyme, chives, tarragon, rosemary and basil are popular choices, but for extra zing, also think about adding cinnamon sticks, hot peppers, garlic cloves, peppercorns or citrus rinds. Prepare bottles early this month and let them steep indoors (not in direct sunlight) to allow tints to deepen and flavors to deliciously meld in time for Christmas.

32

such fleeting beauties in the garden. Planted from November into early January, they greet the following spring with dazzling displays of color that, unfortunately, are usually one-off shows because these cold-loving bulbous plants, not used to such relatively mild winters, refuse to answer curtain calls in succeeding years. However, there is a little-known gang of spunky tulips that rather like it here, so much so that they often stick around to bloom spring after spring. Welcome to the interesting world of species tulips, often also referred to as botanical tulips. These pretties are not as tall as typical hybrid tulips— most won’t grow over 12 inches high— but they still pack plenty of charm and color to welcome many new springs, even to the point of naturalizing in a proper setting. The secret of making species tulips happy so they flower each year and

These pretties are not tall, but they still pack plenty of charm and color. even multiply, is to mimic their native growing conditions as closely as possible. This means, along with a sunny location, sharp drainage and neutral soil are the keys to proper development. The drainage requirement can be met in a rock garden setting, raised bed or even containers, while neutral pH can be maintained with the addition of lime to the soil every year or two. As far as which of these lasting tulips (easy online finds, by the way) to try in our state, consider the popular Tulipa bakeri cultivar for starters. With purplish-pink petals surrounding a spot of radiant yellow in each flower center, it is a rather pleasant sight in the spring

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

n The beginning of this month is the time to force paperwhite narcissus bulbs by planting them indoors in pots so they will be ready as pretty flowering presents by this Christmas.

IN SOUTH CAROLINA, TULIPS ARE

ENDURING AND ELEGANT Lilac Wonder (left) and Cynthia tulips are two varieties that can tolerate the Southern climate and produce beautiful blooms for multiple seasons.

garden. It only grows to about 8 inches tall, but since it needs less chill time in the winter than hybrid tulips to develop blooms, it can be a dependable repeat performer in the South. Ditto for selections of T. clusiana, such as the red-and-white bicolor Lady Jane, along with its aptly named lookalike, Peppermint Stick. Tinka is another T. clusiana two-tone showoff with blooms in red and creamy yellow, while Cynthia sports a deeper yellow to go along with the red in its petals. And spring sunshine will get competition from the bright yellow, sweetly scented flowers of T. sylvestris, a European native made popular by Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. It seems to be more forgiving of shade than other tulips, making it a good candidate for a woodland garden setting. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


|

SC   calendar NOV 5–JAN 15

Upstate NOVE M BE R

8–9  UpCountry Quilters Guild Quilt

Show, Pickens View Wesleyan Church, Pickens. (864) 373‑1217. 9  Fall for Liberty Bluegrass Festival, downtown, Liberty. (864) 506‑0737. 9  Hartness Half Marathon and 5K, Hartness Property, Greenville. jdavis@setupevents.com. 9–10  Greenville Open Studios, various studios, Greenville. (864) 467‑3132. 15–16  Native American Celebration—Selugadu, Hagood Mill, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 15–17  Disney’s Frozen Jr., Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 16  An Evening with Nikki Haley: With All Due Respect, Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 577‑9349. 16–Jan. 21  Skating on the Square, Morgan Square, Spartanburg. (864) 325‑5361. 21  Opening Reception: [Create]ures: Animals in Contemporary Art, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 22  Homegrown, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 22  Mistletoe Market, Anderson County Museum, Anderson. (864) 226‑5258. 23  Battle of Blackstock’s Anniversary Celebration, Battle of Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 23  Clusters for Kids Oyster Roast, Arran Farm, Easley. (864) 506‑0737. 23  HOPE 5K, 20K Run Relay and Boot Camp 5K, Hartness Living, Greenville. (864) 676‑0028. 23  A Walk Through History, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 23  Susto, Second Stage at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑8107. 24  Land of Sweets: A Nutcracker Party, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 30  Holiday Craft Market, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. D EC E M BE R

2  Robert Earl Keen’s Countdown to Christmas: Lunar Tunes & Looney Times, The Peace Center for the Performing Arts, Greenville. (864) 467‑3000.

34

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 3–5  Hospice of the Foothills

Christmas Tree Festival, Best Western Plus, Clemson. (847) 942‑2085. 6  Christmas Celebration, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 242‑5100. 6  Hearts and Hands Gala, Greenville Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 235‑0506. 6–7  A Charlie Brown Christmas, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 6–7, 13–14  Festival of Trees and Holiday Market, Dorn Mill Complex, McCormick. (808) 201‑5150. 7  Greenville Poinsettia Christmas Parade, Main Street, Greenville. (864) 233‑0461. 7  Home Free, Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑8107. 7  Ranger Guided Battlefield Hike, Battle of Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 7–8  Christmas at Rose Hill, Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site, Union. (864) 427‑5966. 8  Uptown Greenwood Christmas Parade, Main Street, Greenwood. (864) 942‑8448. 13  Becky Buller Band, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 13–14  The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville, The Peace Center for the Performing Arts, Greenville. (864) 421‑0940. 13–15  Ballet Spartanburg’s The Nutcracker, Twichell Auditorium at Converse College, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9724. 14  Christmas on the Farm, Kings Mountain State Park, Blacksburg. (803) 222‑3209. 14  The Snowman and Other Holiday Favorites, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. 14–15  The Nutcracker, Brooks Center Theatre for the Performing Arts at Clemson University, Clemson. (864) 888‑0300. 20  One-Inch Museum—Button Making Workshop, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 21  Celtic Memories, Hagood Mill, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936.

16  Sicilian Tenors Special: Local Chorus Members, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. of The People, Milliken Art Gallery at Converse College, Spartanburg. 16  USO 1940s Party, McCormick’s (864) 596‑9181. Historic Cotton Gin, McCormick. mccormickschistory@gmail.com. 10–19  Hank Williams: Lost Highway, Spartanburg Little Theatre, 17–18  Ultimate Outsider Spartanburg. (864) 585‑8278. Experience, Barnwell State Park, Blackville. (803) 284‑2212. 13–15  Composer in Residence: Michael Ching, Daniel Recital Hall 21  Vernon Grant Ornament and at Converse College, Spartanburg. Card Debut, Museum of York County, (864) 596‑9021. Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. 22  Gem, Mineral & Jewelry Show, ONGOING Jamil Shrine Temple, Columbia. Every other Wednesday  (803) 736‑9317. Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg 22  Lunch and Learn: InDigitizing County Public Library, Spartanburg. Stories of the Cherokee Snowbird (864) 948‑9020. Day School, USC-L Native Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, American Studies Center, Lancaster. downtown cultural district, (803) 313‑7172. Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. 22–23  Edwin McCain, Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Newberry Opera House, Newberry. Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (803) 276‑5179. (864) 355‑8900. 22–24  Festival of Trees, S.C. State Saturdays and Sundays  Historic Museum, Columbia. (803) 434‑6021. Building Tour, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638‑0079. 23  Trinity Bazaar, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Columbia. (803) 771‑7300. Daily from Thanksgiving to 24  Hail Britannia Concert, Harbison Christmas Day  Anderson Theatre at Midlands Technical College, Christmas Lights, Old Country Irmo. (803) 400‑3540. Farm Circle, Anderson. info@andersonlightsofhope.org. 29–30  McConnells Craft Show, Daily in December  The Christmas McConnells Community Center, Park, Mineral Spring Park, Williamston. McConnells. (803) 230‑3845. (864) 847‑5743. 29–30  Artist-in-Residence Nancy Basket, USC-L Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 30  Christmas in the Backcountry, Living History Park, North Augusta. NOVEMBER (803) 279‑7560. 5–23  Carolina Pine Quilters Quilt Show, Aiken County Historical DECEMBER Museum, Aiken. (803) 642‑2015. 5, 8  Community Chorus 8  Darryl Worley & Ray Scott Holiday Concert, SLV Special, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. Recreation Center, McCormick. (803) 436‑2616. info@mccormickscchamber.org. 9  Kudzu Trail Race, Historic 5–6  Artist-in-Residence Nancy Brattonsville, McConnells. Basket, USC-L Native American Studies (803) 684‑2327. Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 10  Out of the Darkness Community 5–8  ChristmasVille, Old Town, Walk, H.O. Weeks Activity Center, Rock Hill. (803) 325‑2571. Aiken. (803) 226‑1304. 6  Madrigal Dinner, The Reserve Club 13  Gateway to the Army’s at Woodside, Aiken. (803) 645‑7504. Centennial Park Fundraiser, 6–7  Festival of Trees & Holiday Columbia Metropolitan Convention, Market, Dorn Mill Complex, Columbia. (803) 546‑3295. McCormick. (864) 852‑2835. 16  Fall Festival & Oyster Roast, 7  Carolina Carillon, Sumter Street, Greater Lexington Chamber & Visitors Columbia. carolinacarillon.com. Center, Lexington. (803) 359‑6113. 7  Christmas for the Birds, 16  Holiday Market & Silent Living History Park, North Augusta. Auction, Chapin High School, Chapin. (803) 279‑7560. (803) 960‑5241. JANUARY

9  Reception: Unfadeable Spirit

Midlands

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

7  Colonial Christmas, Historic

Camden Revolutionary War Site, Camden. (803) 432‑9841. 7  December Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 7  Jingle Bell Run—Midlands, Cayce Tennis Center, Cayce. (704) 802‑7536. 7  Piedmont Folk Art Show and Sale, St. Luke Methodist Church, Lancaster. (803) 804‑2498. 7  Saint Nicholas Festival, Holy Apostles Orthodox Church, West Columbia. (803) 926‑8744. 7  Winter Native American Art & Craft Sale, USC-L Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 7, 14  Christmas Candlelight Tours, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 8  Lexington Community Band Winter Concert, Lexington One Performing Arts Center, Lexington. (803) 331‑3949. 8  Prosperity Christmas Parade, Main Street, Prosperity. (803) 364‑2622 12  Dutch Fork Choral Society presents Winter’s Hope, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Columbia. (803) 318‑0488. 13  Lunch and Learn: Jesus, Mary and Frosty, USC-L Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 14  Tab Benoit, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 14  Cayce-West Columbia Holiday Parade of Lights, 12th Street, West Columbia. (803) 794‑6504. 14–23  Christmas in Hopelands 2019, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 643‑2178. 20–21  Artist-in-Residence Nancy Basket, USC-L Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172. 22  Christmas in the 1800s, Aiken Municipal Building, Aiken. diannshaddoxfoundation.org. 31  Famously Hot New Year, Main Street, Columbia. famouslyhotnewyear.com. JANUARY

9  Stringing and Singing with Sonia Lee and Friends, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 10  Jimmy Fortune, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 11  Heart by Heart, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179. 11  Hog Butchering Day, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327. 12  Menopause the Musical, Newberry Opera House, Newberry. (803) 276‑5179.


O NG O I NG

Daily until Dec. 31  Annah Chriswell Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Daily until Jan. 20  Holiday Ice Rink, Fountain Park, Rock Hill. sarah.key@cityofrockhill.com. Daily until Jan. 31  Aiken Art Haus Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557.

Lowcountry NOVE M BE R

5  Chamber Music at the Dock

Got big plans for Dec. 31? Downtown Columbia cer‑ tainly does. For the ninth year running, the city’s Famously Hot New Year street party aims to be the largest free New Year’s Eve celebration in the Palmetto State. Ring in 2020 with a massive fire‑ works show (staged above the S.C. State House dome) and the music of 1990s hip-hop sensation Salt-N-Pepa (above), the headlining act. It all takes place at the inter‑ section of Main and Gervais streets in downtown Columbia. Admission is free and the gates open at 6:30 p.m. For more information, visit famouslyhotnewyear.com.

14–17  38th Annual Dickens

Christmas Show and Festivals, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 448‑9483. 15  Friday Speaker Series: Sulmaan Khan, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 15  Trident United Way’s Day of Caring, various service locations, Charleston. dayofcaring@tuw.org. 15–17  Pedal 4 Kids Community Ride, multiple venues and ride courses, Hilton Head Island. pedalhhi.org. 15–17  Sensory Friendly Family Fun Weekend, Harbour Lights Resort, Myrtle Beach. katie@championautismnetwork.com. 15–24  The Nutcracker, Hilton Head High School Seahawk Cultural Center, Hilton Head Island. (843) 842‑3262. 16  AARP Driver Safety Program, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 21  The Doctor Visits a Plantation, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 22–24  Atomacon, Hilton Garden Inn, North Charleston. atomacon.org.

22–24  Beaufort Homes for the Holidays, various homes on historic Bay Street, Beaufort. (843) 522‑6503. 25–Dec. 30  The Great Christmas Light Show, North Myrtle Beach Park & Sports Complex, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570. 28  Surfside Beach Turkey Trot, Surfside Pier, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 29–Jan. 1  Harbour Town Lights, Sea Pines Resort Marina, Hilton Head Island. (843) 842‑1979. DECEMBER

1  Holiday Swing in Walterboro, Colleton Civic Center, Walterboro. (843) 641‑0011. 5  75 Years Later: Creating Wartime Family Reunions with DNA, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 5  Surfside Beach Christmas Tree Lighting, Surfside Beach Town Hall, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 5–8, 12–15, 19–21  Brookgreen Gardens Night of a Thousand Candles, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235‑6000.

J EFF B L A KE

Street Theatre, Dock Street Theatre, Charleston. (843) 763‑4941. 7–9  Penn Center Heritage Days Celebration, The Penn Center, Saint Helena Island. (843) 525‑8500. 8  Book Club at the Morris Center: The Indigo Girl, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 8–9  Hilton Head Oyster Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 8–9  YALLfest, multiple venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑2666. 8–10  Carolina Beach Music Awards and Weekend, multiple venues, Myrtle Beach. (910) 281‑4400. 9  Dog Daze, Moore Farms Botanical Garden, Lake City. (843) 210‑7592. 9  Guy Osborne Memorial Pawleys Island Turtle Strut, Pawleys Island Nature Park, Pawleys Island. (843) 237‑1698. 9  Hilton Head Island Bridge Run, Crossing Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 757‑8520. 9  Long Bay Symphony’s War and Peace—Georgetown, Howard Auditorium, Georgetown. (843) 545‑3530. 9  Rockabillaque, Southern Roots Smokehouse, North Charleston. rockabillaque.com. 9–10  Mythical & Medieval Fest, R.H. Acres, Myrtle Beach. (843) 360‑9052. 10  Long Bay Symphony’s War and Peace—Conway (2 p.m.), First United Methodist Church, Conway. (843) 488‑4251. 10  Long Bay Symphony’s War and Peace—Myrtle Beach (5:30 p.m.), St. John the Baptist Greek Orthodox Church, Myrtle Beach. (843) 448‑3773. 11  Surfside Beach Veterans Day Service, Surfside Drive, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 14  Liberty Trail and the Revolutionary Battle Sites of the Lowcountry, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227.

Go big on New Year’s Eve

5, 12  Candlelight Open House:

Designer Holiday Showcase, Kaminski House Museum, Georgetown. (843) 546‑7706 6  Friday Speaker Series: Michael Shifter, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 8  Mount Pleasant Christmas Light Parade, Coleman Boulevard, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. 12  Plantation Profiles: Colleton County with Morris Center Curator, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 13–22  Charleston Christmas Special, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 416‑8453. 14  Breakfast with Santa, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 14  Charleston Holiday Parade of Boats, Charleston Harbor, Charleston. (843) 724‑7414. 14  Surfside Beach Christmas Parade, Ocean Boulevard, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548. 15  A Classical Christmas, South Carolina Society Hall, Charleston. (843) 763‑4941.

JANUARY

10  Friday Speaker Series: Admiral

Cecil Haney, First Presbyterian Church, Hilton Head Island. (843) 384‑6758. 11  Learn the Facts: Modern-Day Slavery, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 12  Chamber Music at the Dock Street Theatre, Dock Street Theatre, Charleston. (843) 763‑4941. 15–16  SC AgriBiz & Farm Expo, Florence Civic Center, Florence. miriam@scagribizexpo.com. ONGOING

Daily until Dec. 31  Holiday Festival of Lights, James Island County Park, James Island. (843) 795‑4386. Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesdays  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOV/DEC 2019   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

35


|

PALMETTO STATE   marketplace

To advertise, please go to SCLiving.coop or email ads@scliving.coop

Arco Steel Buildings 1-800-241-8339

• Water/Mildew/Mold in your crawlspace? • Bouncing floors? • Rotten wood work? • Cracks in your walls or doors won’t close? • Need crawlspace encapsulation?

We Can Fix It! We Serve all of South Carolina • No Cost Consultations

866.668.7335 sefoundations.com

BBB A+ rating for 40 years!

Highest Quality Low Prices! 40 x 60 x 10 • 50 x 75 x 12 60 x 100 x 12 • 100 x 150 x 20 20 x 100 x 8’6” Mini Storage

All sizes available!

40

Years

(Buildings not as shown above) (FOB plant-local codes may affect prices)

All your metal building design, fabrication and supply needs under one roof. • Standard and Cut-to-length Roof & Wall Panels

• 18,000 Sq. Ft. of Quality Metal Building Inventory

• Red Iron Components

• Many Items on Our Floor Available for Immediate Pick-up

• Building Kits & Complete Customized Building Systems

Contact Mary Watts to learn how our cost‑effective package ad rates will work for you. (803) 739‑5074 ads@scliving.coop

• Metal Building Accessories

• Buyers Guide Available

Stop by or call us for a quote today.

800-922-8039

www.MetalBuildingSupplyCo.com 1500 Elrod Road, Piedmont, SC 29673

$11,495 - 30x40x10

EASTERN

DIVISION

Painted Enclosed Built Price (Not Shown)*

STORAGE BUILDINGS HAY BARNS HORSE BARNS GARAGES *Custom building shown. Call for pricing.

Hurricane Upgrade E of I-95 • Fully Insured • #1 Metal • Custom Sizes 4/12 roof pitch • Engineered trusses • Local codes/freight may affect prices

www.nationalbarn.com

Mini-Storage Available Call Now for a Free Quote

1-800-882-5150 36

1-888-427-BARN (2276)

ABEL BUILDING SYSTEMS Post Frame Buildings Affordable Pricing

Serving South Carolina with Pride

24x30x8 $10,580 30x30x10 $15,582

30x50x12 $25,400 40x60x12 $35,585

www.AbelBuildings.net

Call Us Today!

803-536-1187 803-534-6063 FAX

When you contact one of our advertisers, please tell them you saw their ad in South Carolina Living.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP


|

SC   humor me

I love Lucy BY JAN A. IGOE

When you run out of coffee and barge into your neighbor’s kitchen uninvited, it’s not polite to question her attire. There might be millions of women in America enjoying breakfast in a flowered bathrobe and matching blindfold this very morning. “Who’s there?” Lucy asked, exploring the room with outstretched arms like an extra from The Walking Dead. “Just me,” I whispered, pouring myself a cup of her organic hazelnut. “I’ll take it to go.” I was hoping to sneak out without a monologue on what inspired her getup, but she tracked my voice toward the door. It was almost a clean getaway when she picked up speed and tripped on her robe, sandwiching me to the wall when she crashed. Still blindfolded, of course. “I’m echolocating,” she said, clicking her teeth. “It’s what bats do.” (Well, she is batty.) Truth be told, Lucy is the best friend any imagination could have. When I’m uninspired and deadlines are looming, five minutes at her house is my antidote. Lucy is the one who introduced me to vampire face lifts. Another bat thing. Her whole face turned bright red and splotchy after she paid a doctor (with a medical license, she says) to inject her very own blood into every crevice he spotted. It didn’t change her looks, but she did abandon Google Maps for echolocating and her next car might be a Batmobile. When she studied Rumpology, Lucy offered me a free fanny forecast. Every bump, fold and mole on your derriere is a clue to your past and future. Who knew? Sylvester Stallone’s mom is “the world’s 38

Lucy is the best friend any imagination could have. When I’m uninspired and deadlines are looming, five minutes at her house is my antidote. foremost American Rumpologist,” according to her website. She charges $300 per cheek. (Lucy would do it for $25.) I never heard of a Flat Earther until Lucy held a meeting at her house. She’s open to anything, including the possibility that people on the other side of the planet are lucky they don’t fall off. When there are breakthroughs in the food world, like that 1-ton German schnitzel, she makes sure I know about it. Without her, I would have totally missed the Guinness World Record for artichoke salad assembled by 200 volunteers in Peru. Weighing over 1,720 pounds, it was 16 feet long and 5 feet across. Let’s hope everybody brought Tupperware. I also learned that 2,344 thirsty Ohioans shattered another world record

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  NOV/DEC 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

by s­ imultaneously popping soda cans. Without Lucy, I would not have realized people can get that bored. Whenever I start kvetching about ruthless Carolina mosquitoes, Lucy reminds me to be grateful that I’m not a Siberian moose herder. Sometimes I forget. Most of my moose perceptions are based on Bullwinkle, a congenial fellow who wouldn’t harm a squirrel. Since I live in South Carolina, that’s enough. But according to Lucy, climate change could cause mass moose migration, so we should familiarize ourselves, just in case. Guess what? Bullwinkle is a dwarf. All his relatives are bigger than SUVs. They can hit 30 mph on a dead run and their hobbies include stomping stuff. These are a few reliable signs of an impending moose attack, in case you want to post them on your fridge: 1. The moose or moosette will stop grazing to stare menacingly at you. 2. Ears will flatten back and one hoof may stomp. 3. It will start licking its chops. (Don’t believe that stuff about them being vegan.) 4. A short Russian guy in a black trench coat will be lurking behind a tree. Don’t worry just yet. Moose don’t like beach sand, so South Carolina isn’t their ideal vacation spot. But Peru should worry. Bullwinkle would love that artichoke salad. JAN A. IGOE loves most animals, but she keeps a safe distance from the ones with antlers who happen to be charging. Especially if they’re echolocating. Join her tribe at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


SUPER COUPON 1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com SUPER COUPON • 15,000 cu. in. of storage • 700 lb. capacity 30", 5 DRAWER MECHANIC'S CARTS • Heavy duty locking casters

SUPER COUPON

20% OFF

FREE

OVER 5,000

WITH ANY PURCHASE

5 STAR REVIEWS Customer Rating

SUPER BRIGHT LED /SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT • Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3 - AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

$ Item 56429, 64031, 64033, 64059, 64721, 64722, 64720

NOW AVAILABLE IN WHITE

POWDER-FREE NITRILE GLOVES PACK OF 100

Customer Rating

5

7

$ 99

MODEL: VEN4145

SAVE 50%

ITEM 69385/62388/62409/62698/30900 shown

119

99

HIGH OR LOW

VOLTAGE CONTROL

AC

OUTPUT

Customer Rating

$ SAVE 17999 $ 80 IRONTON MODEL: 45433

32 LBS.

$

99

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

$1 9

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE AIR COMPRESSORS

59UR99CHOICE

29

99

SAVE 57%

ITEM 64410

ITEM 69269 97080 shown

COMPARE TO

INOLED $

47

ITEM 61615/60637 95275 shown Customer Rating

$

COMPARE TO

MODEL: SNT28B-12

9 $399

PANCAKE

PORTER-CABLE

9862

MODEL: PCFP02003

SAVE 59%

15 LBS.

99

LIGHT & COMPACT

179 99

$

Customer Rating

$

19999

ITEM 56359/56355 shown

COMPARE TO $ SAVE LINCOLN 439 $ 259 ELECTRIC MODEL: K2513-1

*85117355 * 85117355 LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

29 PIECE RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON TITANIUM LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM DRILL BIT SET FLOOR JACK • Weighs 33 lbs. Customer Rating NOW NOW

YO

HOT DOG

POWERFUL & EFFICIENT 90 AMP @ 30% LONGER RUN TIME

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

• Air delivery: 0.6 CFM @ 90 PSI

46-3/8"

DC

WEIGHT

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

99

EASY TO USE

CLEAN WELDS

90 AMP @ 20% DUTY CYCLE

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

$

VARIABLE CONTROL

TECHNOLOGY ADVANCED INVERTER

CONVENTIONAL TRANSFORMER

*85104094 * 85104094

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

Professional Features

Great Value

FLUX 125 120 VOLT EASY FLUX 125 INPUT WELDER WELDER

*85098683 * 85098683

NOW

COMPARE TO

$1 0 99

SAVE 83%

DEWALT $ 14

68

MODEL: DW1369

$

1899

ITEM 5889/62281/61637 shown

SAVE $ 91

9 $599

COMPARE TO

K TOOL $ 42

151

$

MODEL: KTI63094

7999

ITEM 60569/68053/62160/62516 64552/64832/64980/64545 shown

*85120552 * 85120552

*85129874 * 85129874

*85133851 * 85133851

*85139213 * 85139213

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

8750 WATT MAX. STARTING GAS POWERED GENERATOR

Customer Rating

ITEM 63086/68530/56169/56171/63085 shown ITEM 68525/63088/56168/56170/63087 CALIFORNIA ONLY

40 PIECE, 1/4" AND 3/8" DRIVE SAE AND METRIC SOCKET SET

Customer Rating

• 9 hour run time

NOW

$499

SAVE $2,119 COMPARE TO

Not available in AZ, OH, OK and VA. Wheel kit and battery sold separately.

2,669 $ 64999

MODEL: EB6500X1AT

NOW

$549

99

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

49

$ 98 CRAFTSMAN MODEL: CMMT12018

COMPARE TO

SAVE $ 99 90% 5

ITEM 47902/975/61328/63015/62843 shown

4 CHANNEL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM WITH 2 CAMERAS

SUPER COUPON

30" x 18" HARDWOOD DOLLY

• 1000 lb. capacity

• Night vision

NOW

NOW

$21 9 $

99

249

99

SAVE $ 40

259

$ 99 ITEM COMPARE TO MODEL: ALC-AWS3266 63842 ALC

$1 1 99 $

Customer Rating

1599

COMPARE TO

MILWAUKEE

$

1997 SAVE 39%

MODEL: 33700

ITEM 92486/39757/60496/62398/38970/61897 shown

*85146073 * 85146073

*85147341 * 85147341

*85148362 * 85148362

*85157377 * 85157377

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

$1 999

Customer Rating

24 FT., 18 BULB, 12 SOCKET OUTDOOR LINKABLE YOUR CHOICE OF COLOR STRING LIGHTS Customer Rating

$ BLACK

R PE N SU UPO CO

COMPARE TO

MODEL: FR1055

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Central Machinery, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/20.

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/20 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

ITEM 63583/63582 shown

8

FARM & RANCH

*85094667 * 85094667

*85087145 * 85087145

*85098031 * 85098031

5000 LUMEN LED HANGING SHOP LIGHT

HONDA $

13

52 ITEM 63878/63991 PERFORMANCE $ 64005/69567/60566 MODEL: W2364 TOOL 63601/67227 shown

$

$ 09

COMPARE TO

ITEM 97581, 37050, 64417, 64418, 61363, 68497, 61360, 61359, 68498, 68496 shown

$

830

MODEL: KRBC10TBPES

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE

$ 99

$5 99

14

COMPARE TO

$3 99

NOW

COMPARE TO

$

Snap-On

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT

99

NOW

• 5 mil thickness

VENOM $ 97

$1 99

COMPARE TO

BLUE-POINT

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

Customer Rating

22999

SAVE $630

*85096319 * 85096319 SUPER COUPON

SAVE 59%

Customer Rating

E YOUR CHOIC OF COLOR

WHITE

ITEM 64486 ITEM 64739 63483 shown

SUPER COUPON

40" x 72" 10 FT. x 10 FT. PORTABLE SHED RECIPROCATING SAW MOVING Customer Rating WITH ROTATING HANDLE BLANKET

2799

SAVE SAVE 60% 50% COMPARE TO

39

$ 98 COMPARE TO PORTFOLIO MODEL: SLC12BK

NOW

9

4

$ 99 NOW

$ 98 PRATT RETAIL SPECIALTIES MODEL: HDMOVBLAN ITEM 69504/62336/47262 shown

$3 99

COMPARE TO

SHELTER LOGIC $ 99

299

MODEL: 70833

SAVE $ 170

$129 $

99

15999

ITEM 56184/63297 shown

Customer Rating

Blade sold separately.

COMPARE TO

PORTER-CABLE $ 98

59

MODEL: PCE360

NOW

$1 999

SAVE 66% $

ITEM 65570/61884/62370 shown

SUPER COUPON

2999

*85165508 * 85165508

*85174289 * 85174289

*85176469 * 85176469

*85184323 * 85184323

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 1/12/20*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 1/12/20.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living November/December 2019  

Patrol the Isle of Palms with the Island Turtle Team, win tickets to the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl and get your kids plugged in wi...

South Carolina Living November/December 2019  

Patrol the Isle of Palms with the Island Turtle Team, win tickets to the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl and get your kids plugged in wi...

Profile for vanocain
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded