Page 1

CHANGE OUT

SWEET

ARTS

SC R E C I PE

The heat is on when making syrup from sugar cane

Holiday gifts from the kitchen HUMOR ME

NOV/DEC 201 7

There’s no need for alarm

VE DE I S U GUI L C EX ME GA


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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 71 • No. 11 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

NOV/DEC 2017 • VOLUME 71, NUMBER 11

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739-3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread

FEATURE

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

16 Cane-cooking school

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins

Join a Lowcountry family as they refine the delicate art of making syrup the old-fashioned way.

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITOR

L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

Jayne Cannon, Mike Couick, Amy Dabbs, Jan A. Igoe, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Susan Hill Smith, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

MIC SMITH

22

SC LIFE

PUBLISHER

STORIES

ADVERTISING

8

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

Cooperative news

6 ON THE AGENDA

Start planning now for seasonal light festivals. Plus: Your guide to the 2017 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl, our exclusive Mr. Football Reader Poll and a chance to win tickets to the game.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Unexpected gratitude for chaos As we head into the busy holiday season, Mike Couick shares the life lessons he’s learning from Bernie, his unpredictable Goldendoodle puppy. ENERGY Q&A

12 Stylish, efficient lighting

for your home

Looking for a way to save up to $75 a year on power bills? It’s as easy as changing your lightbulbs. SMART CHOICE

14 Present perfect Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

Shopping for holiday gifts? Our gadget columnist has eight great options to suit children of all ages.

Reed and Ethan Severance keep South Carolina history alive with every batch of grits, cornmeal and flour they produce at Hagood Mill. TRAVELS

22 Hit the slopes

Need to get away this winter? The ski, snowboard and snow-tubing parks of North Carolina are a short drive away. GARDENER

28 The secrets of

bare‑root planting

Follow these tips to spruce up your landscape with bare-root trees, shrubs, roses and vines you can order online, plant this fall and enjoy for years to come.

GINA MOORE

© COPYRIGHT 201 7. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

21 Meet the millers

APPALACHIAN SKI MTN./SAM DEAN

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

RECIPE

30 Made for giving

30

Homemade food gifts are a thoughtful and affordable way to treat family and friends. HUMOR ME

38 Rise and schlep

In the battle between humor columnist Jan A. Igoe and her alarm clock, the alarm clock is winning.

SWEET

ARTS

SC R E C I PE

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS

The heat is on when making syrup from sugar cane

Holiday gifts from the kitchen HUMOR ME

There’s no need for alarm NOV/DEC 201 7

Lou Green

IVE E LUS UID EXC ME G GA

Friends and relatives stir the pot at an old-fashioned cane boil hosted by the Hagood family. Photo by Mic Smith.


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

Highlights

TOP PICK FOR KIDS NOVEMBER 30–DECEMBER 3

ChristmasVille

LINDSEY GRAHAM

Old Town Rock Hill becomes a storybook holiday village with more than 75 different events, including a nighttime Christmas parade, winter carnival, outdoor ice-skating rink, horse-drawn carriage rides, strolling carolers, gingerbread-house contest, story times and visits with Santa.

DECEMBER 1–3

For details, visit christmasvillerockhill.com or call (803) 329-7090.

“Patriot Games” is the theme for this festival steeped in Revolutionary War history. Fields at Graham’s Historic Farm in Lake City, where Francis Marion and his troops staged attacks and held British prisoners, will host daily battle reenactments, a Colonial sutlers village, encampments, and period games like hatchet and skillet throwing and cricket. A torch-lit night parade and cannon and musket firings close evening festivities with a bang. For details, visit theamericanheritagefestival.com or call (904) 200-1232.

SHANE McCAULEY/FAMOUSLYHOTNEWYEAR.COM

American Heritage Festival

DECEMBER 31

Famously Hot New Year

Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Elle King, whose music crosses lines between country, soul, rock and blues and includes the hit single “Ex’s & Oh’s,” headlines this year’s New Year’s Eve blowout in downtown Columbia. Come for the music and the street festival; stay for the fireworks over the Capitol. For details, visit famouslyhotnewyear.com or call (803) 730-3521.

THROUGH JANUARY 1

Holiday lights festivals

If twinkling colored lights make your holidays merry and bright, you can find sites across the state staging holiday light displays, including these festive options: COLUMBIA: Lights Before Christmas, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Nov. 18–Dec. 30 riverbanks.org/events/lights-before-christmas.shtml; (803) 779-8717

Roper Mountain Holiday Lights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Nov. 23–Dec. 30

GREENVILLE:

DECEMBER 2

Christmas at the Farm

For details, visit horrycountymuseum.org or call (843) 365-3596.

6

Holiday Festival of Lights, James Island County Park, Nov. 10 through Jan. 1

JAMES ISLAND: JAMES ISLAND HOLIDAY FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS

Wish you could take holiday celebrations back to a simpler time? Give it a try at L.W. Paul Living History Farm. This Horry County “one-horse farm” recreates farm life from the early 20th century. Getting ready for Christmas means creating homemade ornaments, making your own candy and cooking holiday meals on a wood-burning stove, all to the tunes of traditional music.

ropermountainholidaylights.com; (864) 355-8900

HolidayFestivalofLights.com; (843) 795-4386

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH: Great Christmas Light Show, North Myrtle Beach Park & Sports Complex, Nov. 24–Dec. 31

greatchristmaslightshow.com; (843) 281-3805

Fantasy of Lights, Swan Lake Iris Gardens, Dec. 1–31

SUMTER:

sumtersc.gov/fantasy-of-lights; (803) 436-2640

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

SC SNAPSHOT

Scenic South Carolina

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

NOVEMBER

16 10:46 5:31 17 11:16 6:01 18 11:46 6:46 19 7:16 12:16 20 8:01 12:46 21 8:46 1:16 22 9:31 1:46 23 10:31 2:16 24 11:31 3:01 25 – 3:46 26 – 5:01 27 12:16 6:16 28 2:16 7:31 29 3:31 8:46 30 9:31 4:16

PM Major

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

DECEMBER

4:31 4:46 – 12:16 1:01 1:31 2:16 3:16 5:31 9:01 8:16 8:31 2:16 2:46 3:16

11:16 11:46 5:16 5:31 6:01 6:16 6:31 7:01 7:31 12:31 1:16 1:46 9:16 9:46 10:16

17 11:31 18 7:16 19 8:01 20 8:31 21 9:01 22 9:46 23 10:16 24 11:01 25 11:46 26 – 27 2:01 28 8:01 29 9:16 30 10:16 31 11:01

5:16 4:01 6:01 4:31 6:46 12:01 12:16 12:46 1:01 1:31 1:46 2:31 2:46 3:31 3:31 5:16 4:31 7:01 5:46 8:01 7:01 1:46 8:01 2:16 4:16 2:46 5:01 3:16 5:31 3:46 6:16 4:16

11:01 11:31 5:01 5:46 6:31 7:16 8:01 9:16 12:16 1:01 8:46 9:31 10:01 10:31 11:01 11:31

1 – 6:46 12:01 5:01 2 7:31 12:16 12:31 5:46 3 8:16 1:01 1:16 6:31 4 9:01 1:46 2:16 7:16 5 9:31 2:31 3:16 8:01 6 10:16 3:01 4:16 9:16 7 11:01 3:46 10:46 5:46 8 4:31 11:46 – 7:16 9 1:16 5:31 12:31 8:16 10 7:01 3:16 1:16 9:01 11 8:16 4:31 2:01 9:46 12 9:16 5:16 2:31 10:16 13 10:16 5:46 3:16 10:46 14 10:46 6:16 3:46 11:16 15 11:31 6:46 4:16 11:46 16 – 7:01 12:01 5:01

DECEMBER

1 10:31 2 11:16 3 – 4 7:31 5 8:31 6 9:16 7 10:16 8 11:16 9 – 10 – 11 1:31 12 3:16 13 9:01 14 9:46 15 10:31 16 11:01

Minor

6:46 – 4:46 12:01 12:16 5:16 12:31 12:46 5:31 1:01 1:31 6:01 1:31 2:16 6:31 2:01 3:01 7:16 2:31 4:16 8:01 3:16 9:31 5:31 4:01 11:46 6:46 5:01 12:31 7:46 6:31 1:16 8:31 3:31 2:01 9:16 4:31 2:46 10:01 5:16 3:31 10:46 6:01 4:16 11:31

JANUARY

MIKE TRULL

There’s still time to participate in the last SC Snapshot challenge of the year. Send us your best scenic photos from anywhere in the ­Palmetto State. If we publish your image in the pages of South Carolina Living, we’ll send you a $25 gift card just like the one we sent to York Electric Cooperative member Mike Trull for this gorgeous shot from Huntington Beach State Park. To share your images and to tell us when, where and how you took them: u Email us at SCLSnapshot@gmail.com u Message us on Twitter @SC_Snapshot u Upload your photos at SCLiving.coop/snapshot DEADLINE: Dec. 1. Images must meet format requirements to be considered for publication. By submitting your photo and story, you grant South Carolina Living and The Electric Cooperatives of S.C., Inc., full rights to edit and publish the material in all media.

WE HOPE YOU ENJOY this combined November/ December issue of South Carolina Living. We’ll be back in your mailbox—with an exciting new look—in January. In the meantime, stay in touch with us on the web at SCLiving.coop and by signing up for our email newsletter at SCLiving.coop/newsletter. We’ll be posting and mailing out new recipes, stories and sweepstakes links throughout the holidays that you won’t want to miss.

O N LY O N

SCLiving.coop

Homemade truffles

Got chocolate lovers on your holiday gift list? Surprise them with your own candy creations covered in chopped nuts, shredded coconut or favorite toppings. Learn how from Chef Belinda at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Win $100 holiday spending cash

Enter our November Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could be celebrating the holidays with an extra $100 in your pocket. We’ll select two lucky winners to receive Visa gift cards in time for holiday shopping. Sign up today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. All entries must be received by Nov. 30.

Like us on Facebook

Join us on Facebook as we celebrate the holidays and all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda READER POLL

Name your top pick for Mr. Football

Five finalists are vying for the prestigious title of Mr. Football in South Carolina. The award, presented by the S.C. Athletic Coaches Association, will be announced on Dec. 9 during halftime of the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl.

Amir Abrams

Running back, Newberry High School

Colton Bailey Quarterback, Chapman High School

Bowl kicks off Dec. 9 will battle on the gridiron in the 2017 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 9, in Myrtle Beach. The annual game, organized by the S.C. Athletic Coaches Association, takes place at the newly renovated Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium with a 12:30 p.m. kickoff. The match-up, now in its 70th year, is the oldest continuous all-star football game in the South. Get your tickets early to save $5. Advance-purchase tickets are $15 and are available at TouchstoneEnergyBowl.com. After Nov. 24, tickets will cost $20 each. This marks the fifth year South Carolina’s electric ­cooperatives have sponsored the bowl game. Fans will be treated to giveaways including Touchstone Energy T-shirts and rally towels. The game also will be broadcast live on the South Carolina Radio Network. THE STATE’S TOP HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PLAYERS

Dakereon Joyner

Quarterback, Fort ­Dorchester High School

Connor Shugart

Linebacker, Spartanburg High School

Channing Tindall

Linebacker, Spring Valley High School

To vote for your favorite, visit

SCLiving.coop/football

8

WIN

GET IN THE GAME

Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl Dec. 9. Kickoff at noon. WHERE: Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium, 705 33rd Ave. North, Myrtle Beach TICKETS: Advance-purchase tickets are available online for $15 at TouchstoneEnergyBowl.com. After Nov. 24 and at the stadium, tickets will cost $20 each. DON’T MISS: The 2017 Mr. Football award—the state’s highest honor for prep athletes—will be presented during halftime. WHEN:

BIG IN THE TOUCHSTONE ENERGY COOPERATIVES BOWL SWEEPSTAKES

South Carolina Living wants you and a friend to enjoy the North-South All-Star Football Game on us. Sign up today for our 2017 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl Sweepstakes and your chance to score:

A $100 Visa gift card • 2 tickets to the game • 2 Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl T-shirts • 2 rally towels Register today at SCLiving.coop/touchdown for your chance to win. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Dec. 1. The winner will be notified by email.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


WHO POWERS YOU

Bowl organizer nominated as a local hero

Shaw shines in 2017 THE HOME OF THE TOUCHSTONE ENERGY COOPERATIVES BOWL

has a new look for 2017. Doug Shaw Memorial Stadium in Myrtle Beach underwent a $5.4 million renovation project earlier this year. Upgrades to the stadium include a new press box, video scoreboard and locker rooms. Other improvements include a new field surface, track surface, public restrooms and entryway plaza. Crews also installed handrails in each aisle, allowing for easier access up and down the bleachers. Myrtle Beach High School football coach Mickey Wilson, who’s also the director of game operations for the Touchstone Energy Bowl, promises fans will love the new look. “The renovations make the place look really professional,” he says. “The bleachers look so professional and, of course, the JumboTron (video scoreboard). Being a high school team and having a JumboTron and having the ability to really make it like a college atmoGET MORE sphere here—I think it’s just made it Visit the really neat.” Featured Videos section The City of Myrtle Beach paid of SCLiving.coop to for the renovations to the stadium, see the stadium’s new which it owns jointly with the Horry improvements. County School District. Built in 1968, the stadium was known as Memorial Stadium, but, in 1995, it was renamed to honor Doug Shaw, the longtime football coach at Myrtle Beach High School who died suddenly at the age of 52. In addition to hosting the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl, the stadium is home to the Myrtle Beach Seahawks and a host of regional and national track-and-field events.

Keith Richardson, a director for the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives Bowl, has been nominated as a local hero in a national Touchstone Energy Cooperatives contest. The #WhoPowersYou contest recognizes people who are making a difference in their communities. Keith Richardson organizes a Each December during bowl shopping spree for 44 deserving week, Richardson organizes a children each year. holiday shopping spree for 44 deserving children in Horry County. He raises money to provide the children with $100 gift cards to Target. Richardson then pairs each child with two football players—one from the North squad and one from the South squad. The players are tasked with helping the kids find the items on their wish lists and stay within budget. “If I couldn’t find the money to do this, I’d do it out of my own pocket,” Richardson says. “It’s one of the best things we do during our week in Myrtle Beach. And it means as much to the football players as it does to those kids.” Bob Paulling, CEO at Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative and one of the game’s sponsors, agrees. “To see these players help these little kids try on shoes and buy jackets is very touching,” he says. “It’s the most impactful thing we do with the players all week. Something they’ll remember for the rest of their lives.” If Richardson wins the #WhoPowersYou contest, he could receive up to $5,000 to help with future shopping trips. Winners will be announced in December. For more on the contest and to see all nominees, visit WhoPowersYou.com.

Two players from the North and South squads team up to escort each child through the shopping and budgeting process.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


Dialogue

Unexpected gratitude for chaos tiniest bit angry with a dog that looks at me with eyes that one second can be thought that, at my age, angelic and the next second diabolic. I would be grateful for a Why is chaos such an essential small measure of chaos? teacher for me? At certain points of The most immediate my life, I have, for whatever reason, source of therapeutic tried to exert control over things that chaos in my life isn’t my were, by all rationale, uncontrollable. job, despite all that may I was prone to accept a mix of blame be going on with two and anger for things that I could unfinished nuclear units, not make turn out right or took an a lack of clarity in energy inordinate amount of credit for things policy emanating from that did turn out right, only to find Washington, D.C., and a out later that (1) what was going to very heated political discushappen was going to happen and sion in South Carolina. It (2) there was a bigger plan and, ineviwasn’t the marriage of our eldest daughter in July, nor tably, a better plan. is it our two teenagers and Bernie reminds me daily, and by all that they bring, including the minute, that some things are far our 17-year-old son evaluatbeyond my control and expectations, in particular the great moment when ing which college to attend he leaps into my lap, licks my face next year and our 15-yearand looks at me as if he likes me even old daughter’s daily decision more than a good roll in the cow as to whether Daddy is still Five-month-old Bernie is teaching Mike how to embrace chaos. pasture or grabbing a sandwich off the her friend or her enemy. picnic table. Who could ever program and produce such No, my ultimate source of chaos to learn and grow from emotions and affection from him? is a 5-month-old Goldendoodle puppy by the name of As we enter a season bookended by holidays celebratBernie. He teaches me the lesson for which I am most grateful: I have very little control over anything in life, and I am ing hope and renewal, I will choose to be grateful for the much happier when I surrender to that lack of control. unexpected blessings that can come out of life’s challenges. How does Bernie teach me? Maybe it’s the fact that I only feel the pain or fear of chaos when I seek to exert his favorite place to “do his business” is my wife’s prized control over that which is uncontrollable, and it helps to rug, the one she inherited from her grandmother. Maybe remember the timeless guidance of Ecclesiastes 3:1—to it’s that his favorite toy box is her lingerie hamper in the everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose laundry room. Maybe it’s his habit of turning the shoes I under heaven. keep in my closet into his favorite chew toys or the trouble There is even a time for friendship between growing he has deciding whether going outside at 2 a.m. is to go to puppies and middle-aged men. the bathroom or to play. God bless you and yours, and best wishes for a peaceful This dog, which the whole family voted that they new year. wanted, down to the breed and name, is suddenly my dog because of all his habits. That’s OK with me now, even though we are both frequently banished to “our room” after supper. He and I get along fine there, as long as we accept each other—even when his favorite chew toy is my feet hanging off the end of the bed. The real lesson that flows from Bernie’s chaos is that it’s MIKE COUICK President and CEO, just so darn unpredictable. It’s hard for me to get even the The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina WHO WOULD HAVE EVER

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Stylish, efficient lighting for your home

Q

After 20 years with the same lighting in our home, it’s time for a change. With so many types of light fixtures and bulbs to choose from, how do I select something practical, affordable and efficient?

A

How much do those “cheap” bulbs really cost? Bulb type

Watts 60 watt equivalent

Lifespan in hours

Annual energy cost*

12

50,000

$1

15

9,000

$1.20

43

1,000

$4.80

LED

CFL

Halogen

*Based on two hours per day of use, and an electricity rate of 11 cents per kilowatt-hour SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV AND COLLABORATIVE EFFICIENCY

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

BRAD THIESSEN

We often take lighting for granted. We choose fixtures and bulbs without thinking through the specific lighting needs of a room, how fixtures work together and how to save money on energy bills. Saving energy starts with choosing the correct bulb. Efficiency standards for incandescent bulbs between 40 and 100 watts, which came into effect in 2012, led to the halogen bulb (also known as an energy-efficient incandescent). These bulbs are at least 25 percent more efficient than the old incandescents. The other two common types of household bulbs, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), are even more efficient. Energystar.gov estimates you can

save $75 a year by replacing your five most-used incandescent bulbs or light fixtures with Energy Star-certified LED or CFL lighting. Of the three types, LEDs tend to save more money over the long run, and LED prices have decreased in recent years. A downside of CFLs is that they contain a small amount of toxic mercury that can be released into your home if one breaks. When you’re considering which type of bulb to buy, look at both watts and lumens. Watts indicate how much energy is used (and, therefore, how much it costs) to produce light. Lumens indicate how much light the bulb produces. An 800-lumen bulb is about equal to the amount of light from a traditional 60-watt incandescent bulb. Lumennow.org offers an excellent guide to understanding bulbs. Bulbs also give off different colors of light, known as color temperature. If a bulb burns out—or, in the case of an LED, as it dims over time—it can be challenging to find a replacement that matches other lights in the room. If the variation bothers you, purchase and install bulbs of the same brand and wattage for an entire room at the same time. Installing dimmer switches is a good way to save energy while giving you greater control of the amount of light in the room. Not all bulbs are dimmable, so check the label on the bulb. It’s worth hiring a licensed electrician if you decide to install new lighting and switches. Now, let’s consider fixtures. Different types of fixtures have different func­tions. Ambient lights, such as sconces and glass-covered fixtures, provide gentler, overall lighting, while direc­tional fixtures, such as pendants, desk lamps and track lighting, provide task lighting that focuses on areas

Using the same type and age of bulb in each fixture ensures consistent color and extends bulb life.

where work is done. Each has its own bulb requirements. Choose a light fixture that can provide the brightness you need, fitted with the appropriate size and number of bulbs. It can be disappointing to install a ceiling fixture you love, only to realize it doesn’t provide enough light for the room, or that your room is flooded with too much light, wasting energy and money. Don’t mix bulb types in a fixture; excess heat from an incandescent or a halogen light can diminish the performance of an LED. The Lighting Research Center fea­ tures a “Lighting Patterns for Homes” guide (lrc.rpi.edu/patternbook) with sample lighting layouts for different rooms in the home. With a little planning, you can have a well-lit energy efficient home you’ll enjoy for years to come. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041.


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(5:1

“In the infantry, two things happened at Anzio: You got wounded, or you got killed.” Charles L . “Flop” Shaw of Sumter was wounded in a fight to liberate Italy from the German army. Read his and 99 more fascinating stories from S.C. WWII veterans.

Order Honor Flight online at scliving.coop/honor-flight-book or complete and return this form with a check made payable to Electric Cooperatives of S.C. PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY NAME

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS

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Number of books _____________________ at $29.95 each. Amount enclosed $___________________________________________ Mail form and check (made payable to Electric Cooperatives of S.C.) to: Honor Flight Book, ECSC, P.O. Box 896568, Charlotte, NC 28289-6568 Price includes shipping and sales tax. Allow 3 to 4 weeks for delivery. Questions: HonorFlight@scliving.coop • (803) 739-3066 SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


SmartChoice

BY JAYNE CANNON

Shopping for holiday gifts? From little ones to seniors, there’s an electronic toy for every age.

Present perfect FOR SMALLER KIDS

FOR BIGGER KIDS

SNUGGLY SHARK They have the rest of their lives to tackle email. While they’re young, make communication fun with Gory, the Talkie by Toymail. Safely send voice messages from your smartphone to kids as young as 3; they access them by pressing a simple button. Choose from five cozy characters, including a shark, a pig and a unicorn. $52. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.

THE DROID YOU’RE LOOKING FOR Admit it—you’ve wanted your own droid since you first saw Star Wars. Your dream can come true with the Sphero Star Wars BB-8 App-Enabled Droid. Its built-in camera creates virtual holographic videos, and you can command it through an app on your smartphone. $150. (888) 237‑8289; bestbuy.com.

DRONE STRIKER What’s better than Nerf all-terrain battle? How about a live recording of a Nerf all-terrain battle? You’ll get that—and more—with the Nerf N-Strike Elite TerraScout. Blast your target with remote control, view it all on live video feed, and relive the recorded battle over and over again. $200. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com. A REAL DOLL Talking dolls have been around for years, but Luvabella is as close to real as it gets. She giggles, learns new words and animal sounds, and even has a heartbeat. Feed her, comfort her and get her to talk to you. No strings to pull; she’s totally interactive. $100. (800) 591‑3869; target.com. AT YOUR FINGERTIPS It blows kisses, talks in baby babble and grabs your fingers, just like a baby—but much tinier. Kids can hold a Fingerlings Interactive Baby Monkey in their palms, and the colorful mini primate responds with sound, blinks and movement. $21 and up. (800) 925‑6278; walmart.com.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

STYLISH STEPPING It’s hard to find a smartwatch without that clunky stopwatch look. Enter the slim and snazzy FitBit Alta. The Alta tracks your movement during the day and your sleep quality at night. Make it fit your style by customizing bracelets in metal, leather and a rainbow of chic colors. $130. (877) 623‑4997; fitbit.com. GAME FOR NOSTALGIA? Is someone on your gift list longing for the days of shoulder pads and leg warmers? Take them back to the future with the Atari Flashback 8 Gold game system. Fan favorites are ready to play—Space Invaders, Frogger, Millipede and more. Crank up the Duran Duran, and party like it’s 1985. $70. (800) 591‑3869; target.com. JUST SHOW ME Some of us are visual learners; we have to see it to grasp it. That’s the ideal audience for the Echo Show, a step up from Amazon’s voice-commanded Alexa. It adds a screen to show you the news, song lyrics, weather, recipes, your calendar and anything else you ask your virtual assistant to retrieve. $200. (888) 280‑4331; amazon.com.


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Devoted to saving Southern culinary traditions, Jimmy Hagood shares the process of making sugarcane syrup with his daughter, Catherine, and other family members.

16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


O O C K E I N N G A C SCHOOL Join a Lowcountry family as they refine the delicate art of making syrup the old-fashioned way BY SUSAN HILL SMITH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIC SMITH

Years ago, when sugar was harder to come by, Southern farms would harvest fields of sugarcane stalks, extract the nectar and boil it down for hours, until the magical moment when the fire’s ­cumulative heat produced a syrup to savor and save for later. Over the past decade, Jimmy Hagood, an authority on barbecue and Lowcountry culinary traditions, has joined his uncle David Maybank in resurrecting the process of making syrup from sugarcane crops at Lavington, the family’s homestead in the ACE Basin. “Anytime you cook something for five hours, it’s got to be good,” says Hagood, who jars and sells the distinct syrup as part of his specialty-product line, Food for the Southern Soul. They’ve had considerable help from Ben Ferguson, who has worked for the family for 37 years and who grew up in the Southern caneboiling tradition. With each fall harvest, the men have refined their methods through research, trial and error, though they must keep the process somewhat fluid, because there are so many variables that can impact the outcome. The boiling can be especially tricky to navigate to achieve the desired thickness and sweetness

without taking a batch too far. “I think we’ve made every mistake you could make,” Ferguson admits. They stick with it regardless, and Hagood has ramped up production with the purchase of a more efficient mill. He also sought to engage younger generations of the family by inviting them to help make a batch during last year’s November holidays. He plugged it as “Cane Cooking School,” and, as it turned out, everyone learned from the experience.

From the fields to the mill

It’s the Tuesday afternoon before Thanksgiving as Ferguson and two other machete-wielding men slice tops off harvested sugarcane, then toss the stalks onto a trailer. They will need about 600 to 700 stalks to produce enough juice to fill the 80-gallon pot that’s set up a short drive away for the next morning’s boil. In previous years, they would start earlier in the day, so they had enough time to juice the cane,

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


Rentz feeds sugarcane stalks through a newly acquired antique mill, generating a stream of sweet juice.

A machete-wielding crew (left to right: Jared Rentz, Richard Harrison and Ben Ferguson) works to cut and collect sugarcane at Lavington in the ACE Basin.

but this year, a newly acquired antique mill should speed things up by allowing them to press more stalks at a time. “We’ve experimented with it, but it’s the first time we’ve put it to the test,” Ferguson says. In fact, this family batch is really a dress rehearsal for the next week, when they will make more syrup and mill hundreds of gallons of juice for Charleston’s High Wire Distillery to turn into rhum agricole, a French-styled rum that starts with sugarcane juice rather than molasses. Hagood meets the crew with his 10-year-old daughter, Catherine. She’s the only kid in the mix today, though cousins and friends will be on the scene tomorrow. Dressed in camo with her spunky spaniel, June, in tow, Catherine’s ready to pitch in and curious about the machinery once it’s assembled. “Mad scientist” mechanic John Cooksey has refurbished the Chattanooga Plow Company mill—model No. 44— and painted it green to match the larger 1941 Model H John Deere tractor that will power the mill, a job given to mules in earlier eras. “What is that?” Catherine asks her dad, pointing to the extended belt that will link the tractor to the mill, 18

which sits on the platform of a separate trailer. Hagood explains how one end of the belt hooks to the tractor while the other wraps around a wheel on the mill, making a continuous loop that will drive the mill once the tractor starts. Soon the apparatus is rumbling, and the crew starts feeding stalks through the mill’s roller drums. They try up to four and five at a time, then settle on three stalks, which is still more than they’ve been able to press simultaneously in the past. The No. 44 mill has lived up to its promise and is also producing more liquid per stalk than other mills they have used. “It’s really squeezing just about every ounce of juice out of it,” Hagood says as he snaps some photos. A frothy, greenish stream flows down a PVC half-pipe into a bucket. The juice is strained and pumped through a hose to the 80-gallon, cast-iron kettle, where it will stay in the overnight cool until they ignite the hearth below it in the morning. Hagood smiles. “How about the way this is working out?” Catherine asks if she can stick her finger into the juice for a taste. “Mmmmm,” she hums in approval before jumping on the trailer to help rake up flattened cane stalks.

Heating things up

The spark for this exploration of Southern foodways actually came from the world travels of Hagood’s uncle. When Maybank visited Salvador, Brazil, he was intrigued to see vendors milling sugarcane stalks on street corners, where they sold the juice on ice like Coca-Cola. He acquired a small mill of his own on a sailing stop in Salvador in the

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Jimmy Hagood (second from right) recruits friends and family to pitch in and learn the complex process of creating sugarcane syrup. With Hagood are (left to right) his nephews Banks and Alex Hagood, David Maybank III, Ben Ferguson, and Jimmy Hagood’s son, Andrew.

1990s, and each year, he would press fresh cane juice during the family’s Thanksgiving gathering at Lavington. All the kids have tasted the juice, but most have not had the chance to help make the syrup. “With the past few years, we’ve been hearing about it, but this is the first time we’ve gotten to see it,” says Banks Hagood, one of Jimmy’s nephews. Banks, 20, and his brother, Alex, 24, are among the first to arrive Wednesday morning for the boiling. They have worked for their uncle Jimmy in the past at his warehouse and on his barbecue rigs, and they are quick to pitch in with the “cleaning process”—skimming off impurities that

Ben Ferguson (left) guides David Maybank III and young family friend Will Walters in sending sugarcane stalks through the mill.

Those tending the kettle cool the hot liquid by scooping it up with a special bucket.

rise to the top as the cane juice starts to heat up. There’s an art to cleaning and controlling the liquid’s temperature so it progresses at the right pace. “If it gets to boiling before we clean it properly, that’s when it gets dirty,” says Jimmy Hagood. The group will feed the brick hearth below the kettle with pine logs to gradually heat the liquid from roughly 45 degrees to well over 200. Ferguson ignited the fire at 8 a.m., and because things seem to be progressing slowly, they estimate that this batch will take at least five, maybe six hours or more to finish. Timing seems to be affected by a variety of factors, including weather conditions like air temperature and humidity. For every 10 gallons of cane juice, they expect to produce about one gallon of syrup. In comparison, as much as 50 gallons of tree sap or more might be needed to produce one gallon of maple syrup in the Northeast. Maybank arrives on the scene by mid-morning with the growing swirl of family and guests. The patriarch says the real trick to boiling down sugarcane juice is knowing at what point in the evaporation process to remove the liquid from the heat. Cook it too long, and it might crystallize. Take it off too early, and you might wind up with a watery syrup. “Everybody who comes has their own opinion about whether it’s ready to come off.” This group has the benefit of newer tools to help in the decision-making process: a hydrometer to measure viscosity—or thickness and flow—and a refractometer to measure the sugar concentration. Maybank grabs a squeeze bottle of sugarcane syrup from

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


Held the week of Thanksgiving, the sugarcane boil becomes a gathering for family and friends, with a lunch including local rice and Brunswick stew.

every morning, and hominy grits, it improves a lot.” Hagood and his sister-in-law Elizabeth both have recipes for Raising Cane cocktails, and she likes to use it in homemade granola, too.

The defining moment

Catherine Hagood enjoys the rewards of helping out as she scoops up some of the unexpected finished product with an apple.

a past batch to show what they want to achieve. “Let me have your finger, and you can taste what it’s all about.” He shares a few drops. The consistency seems thinner than corn syrup or maple syrup, but with an intense, earthy flavor. “It takes some getting used to,” Maybank admits. “It goes real good on corn bread. I have some on my oatmeal

GET MORE Learn about Jimmy Hagood’s handcrafted cane syrup and line of specialty products—including barbecue sauces, grits and rice—at FoodfortheSouthernSoul.com. Syrup produced this fall can be ordered online. 20

By 11:30 a.m., the solution has reached a steamy, rolling boil, and over the next hour, the color loses its green and darkens into a deep amber. Kids and adults alike come over to look as the crew scoops through the bubbles with a metal bucket poked with holes. Streams drip through the bottom and back into the kettle, helping to cool things down, so the temperature stays consistent once it exceeds 200 degrees. Ferguson estimates that it might take until 2:30 p.m. before they are done, and he walks over to the mill to show newcomers the juicing setup. Others tend the kettle, but after 1 p.m., the deciding moment sneaks up on everyone as the bubbles shrink in size and suddenly disappear. Hagood grabs the hydrometer to check the thickness of a sample, but, in the blink of an eye, the boil sinks into an unexpected goo at the bottom of the kettle. He calls for Ferguson, who rushes back over and scoops the results over into a metal container draped with a sheet to cool. A line forms to scoop up the velvety reduction with apple slices, and it appears to be a lip-smacking crowd pleaser. However, Hagood’s not sure what he can do with it once it cools down. “We made caramel today,” he says with wry resignation. “It’s not cane syrup.” “That’s one mistake we hadn’t made yet,” Ferguson admits a few moments later as the flurry dies down. No doubt, they will dissect what went wrong over future kettles of syrup. Maybank, however, doesn’t see it as a failure. In fact, the taste reminds him of an old-fashioned Mary Jane candy. “It didn’t work like it was supposed to,” he tells his nephew Jimmy with consolation, “but it was even better.”

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


SC Life

Stories

Meet the millers

Father and son, they show up faithfully every third Saturday, in sweltering heat or bitter cold. They unlatch rustic window shutters to let fresh air and sunlight seep into the historic wooden gristmill. They crank up the huge waterwheel and haul 50-pound bags of grain into place for a full day of milling, just as millers have done here for 172 years. At Hagood Mill in Pickens, a site dedicated to preserving remnants of a bygone way of life, Reed and Ethan Severance are living history. “Here, you can actually be in a place from the 19th century, doing pretty much the exact stuff they did then, feeling the building shake, smelling the smells,” says Reed, who dresses the part in period clothes, with pocket watch and pocketsful of old money. They churn out milled grains for sale to customers. If any part of the mill’s mechanism breaks, they figure out how to fix it. Reed tracks each day’s output and repairs by hand in an old-fashioned log book. Ethan is fully focused on running the mill. He was captivated by its working parts at age 3, on his first visit. The rolling wheel, water gushing through the sluice, raw grain transforming into grits, cornmeal, flour—“It’s always been interesting,” Ethan says. Soon, they were visiting the mill so often, they decided to help. Ethan’s earliest chore was watching buckets fill with processed grain and tapping the miller’s leg when it was time to change them out. Dad was “making sure Ethan didn’t get into trouble by sticking a finger somewhere he shouldn’t!” Now, while Ethan mans the mill, Reed juggles the day’s chores with telling the mill’s story, helping modern visitors connect with history. “That’s the job we volunteered for when we came here,” Reed says. “Running the mill is the tool.” —BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

Reed and Ethan Severance Reed, 58; Ethan, 18 Pickens, where they are Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative members WEEKEND AVOCATION: Volunteer grist millers at Hagood Mill’s Third Saturday festivals in Pickens DAY JOBS: Reed has a degree in mechanical engineering and is a process engineer for Jacobs Engineering in Greenville; Ethan is a Clemson University freshman, majoring in engineering TRAINING: Both are among the 37 certified historic millers trained by the Society for the Preservation of Old Mills; Reed was the 16th to complete the program; Ethan is one of the youngest BIRTHDAY: Both were born on July 14 AGES:

MILTON MORRIS

HOMETOWN:

GET MORE Read “Hagood

Mill keeps history alive” at SCLiving.coop for more about Third Saturdays at Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folk Center in Pickens.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

21


SCTravels

HIT THE

SLOPES

BY JAYNE CANNON

EVERY WINTER WEEKEND, John Matherly sets out from his Fort Mill home for his own personal nirvana. He’s found it less than three hours away, a scenic drive on winding mountain roads in western North Carolina. His love for Beech Mountain, he says, is akin to an addiction. “Beech is my escape from reality,” Matherly says. For South Carolina residents like

Top: A snowboarder slices through the snow at Beech Mountain Resort.

BEECH MOUNTAIN TOURISM

22

Matherly who love winter sports, western North Carolina offers something unique: a chance to ski, snowboard and snow tube relatively close to home. Matherly, a York Electric Cooperative member, bought a vacation home in Beech Mountain in 2000, mostly for a cool respite from the summer heat. But, after a couple of winter weekends, he was hooked. “I can’t stay off the slopes,” he says, laughing. His daughter was only a year old, but almost as soon as she could walk, Lauren was on skis. She was a member of the Beech Mountain

Above: The Matherly family—John, daughter Lauren and wife Wendy—bought a vacation home at Beech Mountain as a summer getaway, but soon found themselves there every winter weekend. Left: Spotlights on the slopes mean skiing doesn’t have to stop when night descends at the resort. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

ABOVE: BEECH MOUNTAIN TOURISM/SAM DEAN LEFT: COURTESY OF JOHN MATHERLY

Need to get away this winter? The ski, snowboard and snow‑tubing parks of North Carolina are just a short drive away


A handful of resorts are a short drive from the Upstate—quicker and less expensive than flying out to Colorado or Utah.

BEECH MOUNTAIN TOURISM/AMY MORRISON

Resort’s race team for 13 years, which brought the family to the mountain every winter weekend. Ski season in western North Carolina typically runs from the third week in November to late March. A handful of resorts are a short drive from the Upstate—quicker and less expensive than flying out to Colorado or Utah. The easy accessibility brings Jake Mendenhall and his family to Beech Mountain from Greenville several times a year. Mendenhall stands by his black Yukon as his sons Bode and Everett clamber out of the vehicle, giggling and excited, clutching orange sleds. It’s Bode’s birthday, and he’s starting the first day of his fifth year with a few trips down the Sledding Hill. Mendenhall has been coming to Beech Mountain and other resorts in the area since he was a kid. He couldn’t wait, he says, to introduce his sons to skiing. Even at 5 and 4, the boys are comfortable on skis. A ski trip was Bode’s first choice for a birthday event. After a little fun on sleds, the Mendenhalls are headed for a day on the slopes. The Sledding Hill is right on the main drag in Beech Mountain, just beside the Visitors Center. Open from early December to late March, the hill is something of a gathering place for youngsters 12 and under. Music blares from loudspeakers, competing with squeals and screams from the kids as they sail down the hill on plastic sleds. Parents line the fence surrounding the sledding

The Sledding Hill is a popular stop for families enjoying a day at Beech Mountain Resort.

area, waving and ­shooting video. Beech enjoys an average snowfall of 90 inches. Elevation makes the difference. At 5,506 feet, Beech Mountain is the highest-elevation town east of the Rocky Mountains. But when nature doesn’t cooperate, the snow gun springs into action at the Sledding Hill and on the slopes at the resort, so there’s always plenty of powder. Beech Mountain tourism director Kate Gavenus can look out her office window and watch the sledding action. “The Sledding Hill is the gate­ way drug to Beech Mountain,” she says, adding that, for many families, like the Mendenhalls, a Beech Mountain tourism director trip down the Kate Gavenus snowy hill is the first stop in town. The tourism center—and its bathrooms—are open 24 hours a day, which is helpful to those young sledders.

Often, after some energetic sled­ ding, families end up across the parkway at Famous Brick Oven Pizzeria, a Beech Mountain staple for more than 25 years and a hub of town activity. In addition to pizza, a full bar and freshbaked cookies, the restaurant offers a Cinema Under the Stars outdoor movie on Saturday nights. But for most visitors to Beech Mountain, life revolves around the 95-acre ski resort. With a choice of trails—the resort labels them “easiest” (three trails), “more difficult” (seven trails) and “most difficult” (four trails)—there’s opportunity for every level of skier. Rounding out the choices is the Park, where skiers can jib and do other tricks that aren’t allowed on alpine trails. Beech also has an outdoor ice-skating rink in the middle of its Alpine Village and a snow-tubing area, which is popular with all ages. Even on a winter weekday, the parking lot fills up early and there’s a line for snow tubing. Activity stretches into the night at Beech Mountain Resort, with night skiing attracting many to the slopes. The

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


TRAVELS

FUN IN THE

SNOW

APPALACHIAN SKI MTN. INSET: CATALOOCHEE SKI AREA

Skiers schuss the slopes at Appalachian Ski Mtn. and learn the basics at Cataloochee Ski Area.

Cataloochee Ski Area

Moonshine Mountain

940 Ski Mountain Road, Blowing Rock (828) 295-7828 appskimtn.com

Offers 18 trails, skiing, night skiing and one terrain park. Cataloochee also runs Tube World, located at 4821 Soco Road, Maggie Valley, about four miles from the resort. There is a 42-inch height requirement for tubing, but no age or weight requirement.

Snow tubing only. The 500-foot run at Moonshine Mountain allows tubers to link together to form “trains” for a faster run to the bottom. Riders must meet a 36-inch height requirement and 300-pound weight limit.

The operation offers skiing and snowboarding on 12 trails and three terrain parks.

Hawksnest Snow Tubing Resort

Sapphire Valley Ski Resort

Offers 30 snow-tubing and zip-lining runs. For snow tubing, children must be 3 years old with a maximum weight of 300 pounds. Ages 5 and up for zip-lining with a maximum weight of 250 pounds.

Offers two trails for skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing. No age, weight or height requirements.

North Carolina’s ski season typically runs from late November to late March. Contact individual resorts for specific opening and closing dates and the latest snow reports.

1080 Ski Lodge Road, Maggie Valley (828) 926-0285 cataloochee.com

Appalachian Ski Mtn.

2058 Skyland Drive, Seven Devils (828) 963-6561 hawksnesttubing.com

Beech Mountain Resort

1007 Beech Mountain Parkway, Beech Mountain (800) 438-2093 beechmountainresort.com

Black Bear Snow Tubing

373 Kerr Road, Hendersonville (828) 685-1155 blackbearsnowtubing.com Offers rides for ages 4 and up. Tubes have a 300-pound weight limit.

HAWKSNEST SNOW TUBING RESORT

With 17 trails, the resort offers skiing, snowboarding, night skiing, snow tubing, ice skating and a terrain park. There is a 42-inch height requirement for tubing, but no age or weight requirement.

5865 Willow Road, Hendersonville (828) 696-0333 moonshinemountain.com

U.S. 64, Sapphire (828) 743-7663 skisapphirevalley.com

Scaly Mountain Outdoor Center 7420 Dillard Road, Scaly Mountain (828) 526-3737 scalymountain.com

Offers snow tubing and ice skating in winter and “summer tubing” in the warmer months. Must be 4 years old and at least 42 inches tall for tubing. Younger kids can ride on a kiddie slope.

Sugar Mountain Ski Resort

1009 Sugar Mountain Drive, Sugar Mountain (828) 898-4521 skisugar.com Offers 21 trails. Skiing, snowboarding, night skiing, snowshoe trails, snow tubing and a terrain park. Guests must be at least 3 years old for tubing; no height or weight requirement.

BUSHPHOTO.COM

Wolf Ridge Ski Resort

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Adventurers opt for snowshoes at Sugar Mountain Ski Resort and slide down a run at Hawksnest Snow Tubing Resort. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

578 Valley View Circle, Mars Hill (800) 817-4111 skiwolfridgenc.com Offers 15 trails for skiing and night skiing, plus a terrain park.


TRAVELS

missing something special, she says. “If you can ski in the Southeast, you can ski anywhere,” Snider says, as she relaxes over a glass of wine at nearby Banner Elk Winery. “We have all conditions right here. Sometimes the slopes are like mashed potatoes— soft and lumpy. And other times, it’s just smooth powder. I always say, don’t go out West without getting your ski legs here.” Like other western North Carolina ski towns, Beech Mountain sees its population nearly quadruple during ski season, as winter-sports enthusiasts from neighboring states head north for the terrain and climate they just can’t find at home, says Talia Freeman, Beech Mountain Resort’s director of marketing. “Check the license plates in the parking lot,” she says. “You see a lot from Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.”

BEECH MOUNTAIN TOURISM

trails are brightly lit, so much that you can easily see them from the parkway that cuts through the middle of town. On Friday and Saturday nights, Beech is packed with skiers on the trails. Afterward, many of them gravitate to the Beech Mountain Brewery, the resort’s onsite craft brewery. At the top of the mountain, Beech boasts 5506', which they claim is the highest indoor/outdoor sky bar and restaurant east of the Mississippi. Accessible only by chair lift, 5506' provides spectacular views of the Blue Ridge Mountains and, perhaps as important to a tired skier, heated bathrooms. Wendy Snider, who lived in Beaufort for eight years before moving to the Beech Mountain area, is a ski instructor who has whizzed down the slopes all over the country. Skiers who eschew the resorts in North Carolina for resorts out West are

GET MORE Visit SCLiving.coop for a roundup of winter festivals to enhance your ski weekend, and pay a visit to Fred’s General Mercantile, a Beech Mountain institution.

PHOTO: MIKE WATTS

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SCGardener

BY AMY L. DABBS | PHOTOS BY RUTA SMITH

1

4

2

3

5

The secrets of bare-root planting WINTER IS THE PERFECT TIME TO PLANT

trees and shrubs in the South. Arbor Day, the traditional start to tree-planting season, is celebrated in South Carolina on the first Friday of December. If you’re of a mind to plant trees to cover a large area, to establish your own fruit orchard, or to introduce rare, expensive, or hard-to-find trees in your landscape, you may want to consider ordering budget-friendly bare-root plants. Bare-root plants, as the name implies, are trees, shrubs, roses, vines and herbaceous perennials that are

sold, by mail order, without soil or containers around their roots. They are also devoid of leaves, because they are dug and shipped during the dormant season. They’re less expensive than container plants, so you can order rare specimens or bulk quantities without busting your budget. High-quality plants are harvested when an order is received during fall and winter months, then carefully prepared for shipping. First, their roots are washed to remove soil. Then, they are dipped in a clay-based slurry to coat and protect the fragile roots from drying out. The roots are packed

in moistened peat moss, wood chips or shredded paper, then wrapped in plastic and burlap before being boxed and shipped. Planting bare-root plants requires a bit of faith on the part of the gardener. What you receive often resembles a small brown stick with roots on one end. But, with a little extra care, these young, vigorous plants are easy to establish. As soon as you get your bare-root plants, it’s critical that you immediately unwrap and check the roots. Remoisten the packing material if it is dry. Keep the material around the

L.A. JACKSON

T E M P T I N G T U L I PS

28

This month, we welcome a new gardening columnist to South Carolina Living. L.A. Jackson, the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine, has a wealth of experience as a gardener, writer and garden photographer to share with our readers. His first column, “Tempting tulips,” explains everything you need to do today to make these stunning flowers a part of your spring landscape with no worries over their care and feeding. Jackson will also share handy reminders for how you can make the most of your time in the garden each month and offer seasonal tips, such as this month’s advice on how to keep your African violets blooming beautifully throughout the winter. Check out his column and more helpful information in the Home and Garden section of SCLiving.coop.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP


1. Select an appropriate spot to plant your tree or shrub. 2. Keep the hole shallow but wide, giving the roots room to spread. A stick placed across the hole will show if you’re at the correct depth. 3. The hole should be donut shaped, with a mound in the middle over which the roots are carefully spread.

7

4. Gently backfill the hole, covering the roots. 5. Firm the soil to remove air pockets, but don’t step on the soil to compact it. 6. Important! Be sure to keep the root flare, where the topmost root emerges from the trunk, at or slightly above ground level. 7. Check with the stick again to make sure the plant hasn’t settled too low in the hole. 8. Mulch, leaving a bare area near the stem, and water, but don’t drown, your new plant.

6

Bare-root plants are less expensive than container plants, so you can order rare specimens or bulk quantities without busting your budget. roots damp, but not saturated. Store your plants in a cool, shady location until you’re ready to plant—within a day or two, at most. Prior to planting, protect plants from freezing by placing them in an unheated but protected location, like a garage. If you can’t plant immediately, you can pot them in a container or heel them in by temporarily planting them on the north side of your home until you can plant them permanently. Just before planting, soak bare roots in a bucket of tepid water for 30 minutes to one hour. Never leave roots in water for more than a few hours. If you have more than one plant in a bundle, be careful when separating tangled roots.

New research suggests a better way to prepare soil for planting trees and shrubs. Instead of digging and loosening a large hole and heavily amending soils, new recommendations suggest digging a wide, shallow hole and using amendments, like compost, sparingly. This encourages roots to spread beyond the walls of the planting hole. Heavily amended soils encourage roots to remain within the confines of the hole, which leads to circling roots that can “choke” or girdle a tree, shortening its lifespan. To help ensure survival of bare-root plants, dig a hole that looks like a donut, not a bucket. Create a shallow depression, leaving a cone of soil in the center to support the plant’s crown and roots. Carefully spread roots over the cone, and, using your hands, replace backfill around the roots. Firm the soil to remove air pockets, but don’t step on the soil; this leads to irreversible compaction. Finally, mulch. Use one to three inches of bark mulch or pine straw, keeping mulch well away from trunks and stems. If rodents or deer are an issue, a simple wire cage can minimize damage until plants are larger.

8

The most important step is to ensure the root flare—the part of the trunk where the topmost root emerges—remains at the same level or slightly above the ground around it. If the soil is loose or compacts easily, plant a little higher to allow for settling. The flare at the base of the trunk or stem should be visible above the soil line after you finish planting and mulching. Water your new plants so they are thoroughly moist but not waterlogged. Water every other day for the first week or so, then only once a week (when no rainfall has occurred) during the first year. Don’t drown your new plants! If you aren’t sure if the roots are too dry or too wet, use your finger to test the soil two to four inches below the soil line. Bare-root trees can be slow to come out of dormancy in spring; be patient. Don’t fertilize the first year. After that, a soil sample will tell you what, if anything, should be added. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Charleston County. Contact her at adabbs@clemson.edu.

AMY L. DABBS

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Recipe BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Made for

SPICY MARINATED OLIVES MAKES 2 CUPS

2 cups olives (manzanilla, Kalamata, black or combination) 1 tablespoon dried thyme 1 tablespoon dried rosemary 1 tablespoon dried oregano G teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 2 cloves garlic, minced G cup olive oil

In a large bowl, thoroughly combine all ingredients. Pour into a wide-mouth Mason or clamp-top jar, and seal. Refrigerate. These will last up to six months. PHOTO BY GINA MOORE

giving For those who love to cook, there’s as much joy in creating food gifts as there is in being one of the lucky recipients. Homemade gifts from the kitchen are thoughtful, easy and affordable ways to treat family and friends at the holidays. Make them even more festive by dressing up jars, bottles and boxes with decorative paper, ribbon and raffia.

A gift box filled with homemade truffles is an indulgent treat for the chocolate lovers on your list. Learn how to make them at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda 30

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

CHOCOLATE AND PEANUT BUTTER ALMOND BRITTLE MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

2H cups almonds, toasted H teaspoon cinnamon G teaspoon cayenne pepper 3 cups sugar 1H cups water 1¾ cups chocolate morsels/chips (semisweet or bittersweet) H cup peanut butter morsels/chips

Spray a large baking sheet with cooking spray, and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine toasted almonds, cinnamon and cayenne pepper. Set aside. Spray inside of a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan with cooking spray; add sugar and water. Over mediumhigh heat, stir and bring to a boil. Stop stirring; cover, and cook 3 minutes over medium heat. Uncover, and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook until sugar is a light-amber color, 7–10 minutes. Watch closely to ensure sugar does not boil up and out of pan; if mixture starts to boil too high, lower heat or remove from heat for a few seconds. (Note: Handle hot sugar carefully to avoid burns.) Stir almonds into sugar mixture, and mix thoroughly. Immediately pour onto baking sheet. Using a buttered spatula, spread the mixture thinly, so nuts are a single layer. Let rest 2 minutes. Sprinkle mixture all over with chocolate morsels, and let rest an additional 5 minutes. Using a clean spatula, spread chocolate evenly, and sprinkle with peanut butter morsels. Cool completely, and break into pieces.


CARAMEL-COVERED PETITE POUND CAKES

HERB-INFUSED OILS AND VINEGARS

MAKES 3 SMALL LOAVES

Use 3-inch-by-6-inch disposable paper mini-loaf pans for baking and packaging the cakes as gifts. CAKE ICING Cooking spray 2 sticks unsalted butter at room temperature 1 cup sugar H cup sour cream 4 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 teaspoons lemon extract G teaspoon kosher salt 2 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups light brown sugar 1 stick unsalted butter 3H ounces evaporated milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract N cup chopped white melting chocolate, for drizzle

Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray inside of loaf pans with cooking spray, and place on a baking sheet. Set aside. FOR THE CAKE: In the bowl of a stand mixer, blend 2 sticks butter, sugar and sour cream until light and fluffy, about 3–4 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add vanilla and lemon extracts, and continue beating until combined. Blend salt with flour. Reduce mixer speed to lowest setting, and add flour mixture gradually, until thoroughly blended, but do not overmix. Divide mixture into loaf pans. Bake 40–45 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into center of cakes comes out clean. Cool completely in pans. FOR CARAMEL ICING: In a medium saucepan, combine brown sugar, 1 stick butter, evaporated milk and vanilla extract. Over medium-high heat, bring to a boil. Stir well, and turn heat down to low. Gently boil 7 minutes. Remove from heat, and let cool 5 minutes. With a wooden spoon, beat icing 3–5 minutes, until it thickens. Working quickly, spoon on top of cakes, spreading to all corners, and let harden. FOR DRIZZLE: In a microwave-proof container, microwave chocolate 30 seconds, and stir. If not completely melted, continue to microwave, 15 seconds at a time, until spreadable. Drizzle over top of pound cakes.

MAKES 2 CUPS EACH

Use any combination of your favorite oils, vinegars and herbs. These make a perfect base for homemade salad vinaigrettes and meat marinades. ROSEMARY-INFUSED VINEGAR

1 sprig fresh rosemary, rinsed and thoroughly dried 2–3 strips lemon zest 1 tablespoon whole peppercorns (or to taste) 2 cups white wine vinegar

In a 2- to 3-cup jar or bottle, insert rosemary, lemon zest and peppercorns. Using a funnel, pour in the vinegar. Close with a tight-fitting seal or stopper. Use right away, or refrigerate up to one month. The longer the vinegar sits, the more the flavors will infuse the vinegar. BASIL-INFUSED OLIVE OIL 2 cups olive oil G teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 4 garlic cloves, whole and peeled 1 cup fresh basil, rinsed and loosely torn

In a small saucepan over low heat, heat oil until a few bubbles start to appear. Do not let this come to a boil. Remove from heat, and let cool for 10 minutes. In a 2- to 3-cup jar or bottle, insert pepper flakes, garlic and basil. Using a funnel, pour in the oil. Close with a tight-fitting seal or stopper. This infused oil will last in the refrigerator up to six months.

SCLIVING.COOP   | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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NOTE: Co-op members should already receive this magazine as a membership benefit. Please make check payable to South Carolina Living and mail to P.O. Box 896568, Charlotte, NC 28289-6568. (Please allow 4 – 8 weeks.) Call 1-803-926-3175 for more information. Sorry, credit card orders not accepted.

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Calendar  of Events Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

UPSTATE

NOVEMBER

16 • TRIO 2017—Art, Food and Spirits, The Arts Center of Clemson, Clemson. (864) 654-8277. 16–18 • “Much Ado About Nothing,” Rodeheaver Auditorium, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 770‑1372. 17 • Freedom Gala, First Presbyterian Church, Greenville. (864) 350‑0281. 17–19 • Holly Jolly Holiday Fair, Anderson Civic Center, Anderson. (864) 710‑7393. 17–19 • “The Lion King,” Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 335‑4862. 17–19 • “Little Women: The Broadway Musical,” Rodeheaver Auditorium, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 242‑5100. 17–Jan. 17 • Ice on Main, Main Street, Greenville. (864) 467‑4355. 18 • A Mill Town Christmas in Pelzer, Historic Pelzer Gym, Pelzer. (864) 947‑6231. 18 • Animal Signs Scavenger Hunt, Paris Mountain State Park, Greenville. (864) 244‑5565. 18 • Laurens Holiday Fair, The Ridge at Laurens, Laurens. LaurensHolidayFair@ gmail.com. 18 • Liberty Holiday Bazaar, Liberty City Gym, Liberty. (864) 372‑6093. 18 • Miss Southern States Beauty Pageant, Pendleton High School, Anderson. MissSouthernStates@yahoo.com. 18 • Native American Celebration, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 23–30 • Christmas Gift Light Festival, at Martin Luther King Boulevard and Woodcrest Drive, Anderson. info@andersonlightsofhope.org. 23–30 • Roper Mountain Holiday Lights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 235‑2293. 25 • Battle of Blackstock’s Anniversary Celebration, Blackstock Battlefield Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 30 • A Festival of Lessons and Carols, Twichell Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9078. DECEMBER

1 • A Child’s Haven Holiday Benefit Breakfast, Embassy Suites, Greenville. (864) 298‑0025. 1 • Courtney Elise LeBauer, Daniel Recital Hall, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑9173. 1 • Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas’ Holiday Gala, TD Convention Center, Greenville. sbauer@rmhcarolinas.com. 1–2 • “A Christmas Carol,” Rodeheaver Auditorium, Bob Jones University, Greenville. (864) 770‑1372.

36

1–25 • Christmas Gift Light Festival, Martin Luther King Boulevard and Woodcrest Drive, Anderson. info@andersonlightsofhope.org. 1–30 • Roper Mountain Holiday Lights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 235‑2293. 2 • The Farm’s Holiday Craft and Vendor Fair, The Farm at Sandy Springs Community, Piedmont. (877) 252‑3327. 2 • Holiday Market, South Main Street, Simpsonville. (864) 963‑3781. 2 • Musgrove Mill Battlefield Guided Hike, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938‑0100. 2–3 • Christmas at Rose Hill, Rose Hill Plantation, Union. (864) 427‑5966. 7–9 • A Connie Maxwell Christmas, Connie Maxwell Children’s Home, Greenwood. (864) 942‑1400. 8 • Emile Pandolfi at Christmas, Walhalla Civic Auditorium, Walhalla. (864) 638‑5277. 16 • Ed Harrison Memorial Celtic Christmas, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 22–23 • The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville, Peace Center, Greenville. (864) 421‑0940. JANUARY

1–17 • Ice on Main, Main Street, Greenville. (864) 467‑4355. 11–21 • Restaurant Week South Carolina, various restaurants, greater Greenville area. info@scrla.org.

MIDLANDS NOVEMBER

16 • Vista Lights, Gervais and Lincoln streets, Columbia. (803) 269‑5946. 17 • Main Street Lights: Community Christmas Tree Lighting, downtown, Newberry. (803) 321‑1015. 17–19 • Palmetto Health Foundation Festival of Trees, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 434‑6021. 17–Dec. 29 • Vernon Grant’s “Santa’s Workshop,” Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 18 • Holiday Market and Craft Show, Newberry Academy, Newberry. (803) 276‑2760. 18 • Capt. Tom Garrity Firefighter BBQ Challenge, Sumter County Civic Center, Sumter. (803) 775‑2623. 18 • Jingle Bell Bazaar, Chester War Memorial Building, Chester. (803) 581‑2030. 18 • Riverbanks Run, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. 18 • Selfie with a Snake, Poinsett State Park, Wedgefield. (803) 494‑8177. 18 • Twilight Trek: Sea Lion Special Edition, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779‑8717.

18–19 • Southern Steel Guitar Convention, Belvedere Jaycee Building, Belvedere. (803) 593‑0454. 18–Dec. 30 • Lights Before Christmas, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779‑8717. 19 • South Carolina Oyster Festival, Robert Mills House and Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252‑2128. 22–Dec. 31 • Holiday Lights on the River, Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia. (803) 772‑3903. 23 • Blessing of the Hounds, Hitchcock Woods, Aiken. (803) 642‑0528. 24–25 • McConnells Christmas Craft Show, McConnells Community Center, McConnells. (803) 230‑3845. 25 • Chitlin Strut, Salley Town Hall, Salley. (803) 258‑3485. 25 • Christmas in the Backcountry, Living History Park, North Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. 25 • Knights of Columbus Fall Car Show, St. Mary Help of Christians Church, Aiken. (803) 663‑1777. 27 • Governor’s Carolighting, South Carolina State House, Columbia. (803) 545‑0269. 28 • Beyond Snap! Crackle! Pop! with Linda Williams, 429 Guilford St., Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 30–Dec. 3 • ChristmasVille in Rock Hill, Main Street, Rock Hill. (803) 325‑2571. DECEMBER

1 • Dutch Fork Choral Society presents “Messiah,” St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Columbia. (803) 318‑0488. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 • North Pole Nights, downtown, Newberry. (803) 321‑1015. 1–31 • Fantasy of Lights, Swan Lake Iris Gardens, Sumter. (803) 436‑2640. 2 • Christmas for the Birds, Living History Park, North Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. 2 • Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 2 • Hunter Trials, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173. 2 • Moonlight Float and Fire, Poinsett State Park, Wedgefield. (803) 494‑8177. 2 • St. Nicholas Festival, Holy Apostles Orthodox Church, Columbia. (803) 926‑8744. 7 • Night of 1,000 Lights, downtown, Aiken. (803) 649‑2221. 8 • Holiday Party, Art Gallery on Pendleton Square, Pendleton. (864) 221‑0129. 9 • Camden Candlelight Tour of Homes, Camden Archives Museum and various homes, Camden. (844) 826‑1010. 9 • The Celtic Tenors, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 9–10 • Christmas in Hopelands, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 642‑7631. 10 • Crafty Feast, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 348‑8861. 13 • Schooling Dressage Show, Stable View Farm, Aiken. (484) 356‑3173.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

14–21 • Christmas in Hopelands, Hopelands Gardens, Aiken. (803) 642‑7631. 31 • Famously Hot New Year, Main Street, Columbia. (803) 730‑3521. JANUARY

4 • First Thursday on Main, Main Street, Columbia. info@firstthursdayonmain.com. 7 • WNOK Bridal Expo, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 786‑1888. 11–21 • Restaurant Week South Carolina, various restaurants, greater Columbia area. info@scrla.org. 13 • Hog Butchering Day, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327.

LOWCOUNTRY NOVEMBER

10–Jan. 1 • Holiday Festival of Lights, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 406‑6990. 16–19 • Music to Your Mouth, Palmetto Bluff, Bluffton. (843) 706‑6451. 17–19 • Atomacon, North Charleston Convention Center, North Charleston. info@atomacon.org. 17–19 • Charleston’s Holiday Market, Charleston Area Convention Center, North Charleston. (336) 282‑5550. 18 • Bair-ly Pulling Tractor Pull, Bair-ly Pulling Tractor Pull, Saint George. (843) 563‑4114. 18 • Chili Cook-off and Oyster Roast, Riverfront Park, North Charleston. (843) 437‑5701. 18 • From Seeds to Shillings: Growing Wealth at Charles Towne, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 18 • Live Birds of Prey in Flight, Avian Conservation Center, Awendaw. (843) 238‑0874. 18 • Meatball Madness Fest, Shelter Cove Park, Hilton Head Island. (401) 524‑1416. 18 • Sew Your Own Sweetgrass Basket, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, McClellanville. (843) 546‑9361. 18 • Ultra Chili 50K, Laurel Hill County Park, Mount Pleasant. (843) 762‑8103. 23 • Turkey Day Run and Gobble Wobble 5K, Marion Square, Charleston. RaceDirector@turkeydayrun.com. 23 • Turkey Trot, Dockside Restaurant, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 23–25 • South Carolina State Bluegrass Festival, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (706) 864‑7203. 24–Dec. 30 • Celebrate the Season Holiday Lights Driving Tour, Santee Cooper Headquarters, Moncks Corner. (843) 899‑5200. 24–Dec. 31 • Great Christmas Light Show, North Myrtle Beach Park & Sports Complex, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 281‑3805. 30 • Nights of a Thousand Candles, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235‑6000.

DECEMBER

1 • Winter Wonderland Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 1–2 • Holly Hill Christmas Festival, Holly Hill Depot, Holly Hill. (843) 709‑3706. 1–2, 7–9, 14–17 • Nights of a Thousand Candles, Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235‑6000. 1–3 • American Heritage Festival Patriot Games, Graham’s Historic Farm, Lake City. (904) 200‑1232. 1–3 • Jubilee, Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. jubilee@gardenandgun.com. 1–31 • Florence Festival of Lights, Hoffmeyer Place, Florence. (843) 388‑5968. 2 • Christmas at the Farm, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. 2 • “Defending Charles Towne,” Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 852‑4200. 2 • Holiday Swing: A Charleston Jazz Tradition, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 2 • Reindeer Run, Lagunitas Taproom, Charleston. (843) 792‑3321. 2–3 • Spirituals Concert with Ann Caldwell & The Magnolia Singers, Drayton Hall, Charleston. (843) 769‑2638. 3 • Pineville Chapel Christmas Concert, Pineville Chapel, Pineville. (843) 509‑3408. 3 • Wine Under the Oaks, Boone Hall Plantation, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑4371. 7 • Holiday Hoedown (Special Needs Event), North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 8 • Glow in the Dark Color Run 5K and 1-Mile Fun Run, Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island. (843) 768‑6001. 8–11 • Singing Christmas Tree, First Baptist Church of Georgetown, Georgetown. (843) 546‑5187. 9 • Holiday Farmers Market and Craft Show, Mount Pleasant Farmers Market Pavilion at Moultrie Middle School, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. 9 • Kiawah Island Golf Resort Marathon and Half Marathon, Kiawah Island Golf Resort, Kiawah Island. (843) 768‑6001. 9 • Spirituals Concert featuring Ann Caldwell & The Magnolia Singers, Drayton Hall, Charleston. (843) 769‑2638. JANUARY

1 • First Day Hike, Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site, Summerville. (843) 873‑1740. 5, 9, 11 • Taste of OLLI, Coastal Carolina University’s Litchfield Education Center, Pawleys Island. (843) 349‑6584. 7 • Chamber Music at Dock Street Theatre, Memminger Auditorium, Charleston. (843) 763‑4941. 11–14 • Society of Stranders Mid-Winter Break/Winter Workshop, Ocean Drive Beach and Golf Resort, North Myrtle Beach. (800) 438‑9590. 13 • Charleston Marathon, South Carolina Aquarium, Charleston. (843) 790‑9288.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Rise and schlep FOR MOST OF MY LIFE,

I have been ­surrounded​ —as in trapped, ambushed or held hostage—by morning people. Perky, peppy morning people whose primary purpose for existing is to make the nocturnal more miserable than we already are at 6 a.m. It’s not really their fault. When nature wires us up, everybody is assigned an internal clock. But you can’t reset it, replace it or regift it. We’re biologically compelled to strut around crowing at the first glimpse of dawn or doomed to be vampire bats in a world full of early worm catchers. I’ve always done my best sleeping when it’s time to rise and shine—or in my case, stumble and schlep—into another premature day. Years ago, to make sure I’d get to 8 a.m. classes on time, I’d strategically station five of the loudest alarm clocks I could find around my apartment. (There’s strength in numbers.) Many of them got free flying lessons while I was semiconscious. Turns out that crash landing into unsuspecting walls will silence their buzzers just as well as the off button, but it gets expensive. Finally, science has come to rescue the hard-of-waking. Ingenious inventor Simone Giertz, who dubs herself the “mistress of malfunctions,” has devised a state-of-the-art wake-up machine that has a synthetic rubber arm, attached to a rotating motor, that sits above your head. When morning

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arrives, the arm starts spinning and smacks you upside the head (at 165 revolutions per minute) until diving out of bed is a matter of survival. Judging from all the duct tape, the wake-up machine is still in the prototype stage, but I found some other alarms to help pry that first eye open. The latest thinking is to get your body moving right away, so your brain will follow. That’s what the target alarm can do. It wakes you up Clint Eastwood style. This alarm features a small, round target over the clock. When the alarm sounds, you’re supposed to grab the laser gun that came with it (unless you sleep packing) and shoot the bull’s-eye to shut it up. If you can’t get both eyes open simultaneously, have trouble finding your fingers or need trifocals to see who is in the mirror, the alarm will keep blaring long enough to awaken most of the block.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017  |  SCLIVING.COOP

I may try a Clocky first. It’s an alarm clock sandwiched between two big wheels that leaps off your nightstand and runs around beeping (and possibly laughing) until you capture it. Clocky must be pretty quick, because one Amazon reviewer had to chase his all the way to the kitchen. If there’s coffee waiting there, Clocky and I could be buds. I’ve looked at other contraptions that make you lift weights, answer test questions, jump on a floor pad or chase a flying propeller to turn the alarm off, but they all require mental and physical dexterity that some of us can’t summon before noon. There’s a more extreme option I’m considering: electric shock. Pavlok makes a wristband to vibrate or zap the unwilling into consciousness. Since no one likes getting zapped, the device trains you to get up right away. It’s the same premise as an electric fence that keeps dogs in their yard, but you don’t have to wear a collar. If any fellow vampires have been electrocuted or injured by any of these alarms, please let me know. We’ll schlep on over to my attorney and start a class-action suit. Hopefully, they’ll hear the case in night court. JAN A. IGOE loves morning people. Especially those who serve coffee and don’t crow above 40 decibels. Join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


Calling Young Authors & Illustrators

5th Grade Students

Write and illustrate a book that focuses on the power of electricity in our lives Teachers, showcase your students’ knowledge of electricity in South Carolina by applying skills in creative writing, social studies and art. Learn more and register online at

www.enlightensc.org by December 31, 2017.

Contest open to individual students and teams of up to four. Cash prizes awarded to winning student(s) and teacher. From - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Sponsored by South Carolina’s electric cooperatives


South Carolina Living Nov./Dec. 2017  
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