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SC RECIPE

In the mood for chicken

CHANGEOUT

HUMOR ME

35 steps to fitness

MAY 2021

Taste of the Lowcountry The stories behind signature dishes


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 75 • NUMBER 5 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240)

Read in more than 600,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2021 |may 12 A taste of

the Lowcountry Enjoy this tasting menu of South Carolina’s signature coastal cuisine and learn the stories behind some of your favorite meals.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Josh Crotzer

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

6 AGENDA

DESIGNER

Camille Stewart

Meet the winner of the 2021 Children’s Book Challenge sponsored by South Carolina electric cooperatives.

PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler

COPY EDITORS

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas, Jim Poindexter

What can memories of afternoons spent shelling beans on the back porch teach us about the challenges of modern times? Quite a lot.

CONTRIBUTORS

Mike Couick, Dena J. DiOrio, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Cele and Lynn Seldon, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen PUBLISHER

Lou Green

10 ENERGY Q&A Three options for home cooling

Summer will be here before you know it. Get ready with these tips on choosing the right air conditioning system.

ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (512) 441‑5200

17 SC STORIES She shoots, she scores

Go one-on-one with ESPN basketball analyst Debbie Antonelli as she preps for her annual 24-hour free throw marathon to raise money for Special Olympics South Carolina.

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

© COPYRIGHT 2021. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

Moore Farms Botanical Garden may be the state’s best‑kept secret, but there’s no better place to celebrate the change of seasons.

22

Chicken, chicken and more chicken!

26

GARDENER

Plan bee

Want to attract more bees into your garden? Try these tips and plant suggestions to help make your growing spaces more bee-coming for these beneficial buzzers.

26

MARKETPLACE

27 28 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 30 HUMOR ME Fitness is a few steps away Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

The medical experts tell us outdoor exercise is a healthy way to deal with the pandemic, but they never anticipated that it might draw a crowd.

FRO M TO P: COU RTESY O F 82 QU EEN; DEN A J. DIO RIO; L . A . JACKSO N

SC RECIPE

In the mood for chicken HUMOR ME

35 steps to fitness

Taste of the Lowcountry MAY 2021

$8 nonmembers

RECIPE

Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan dishes out four new recipes for everyone’s favorite bird.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$5.72 members,

18

18 TRAVELS Enchanted garden

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

12

8 DIALOGUE A view from the back porch

The stories behind signature dishes

Our search for the origins of classic coastal cuisine took us to Gay Fish Company on St. Helena Island, the birthplace of Frogmore Stew. Photo by Chase Toler.


SC | agenda Bright ideas about energy ­students about electric­ity and ­renewable energy can be a challenge. That’s why EnlightenSC, an e­ ducation ­initiative sponsored by South Carolina electric cooperatives, turns to the experts for guidance: the students themselves. During the annual Children’s Book Challenge, fourth and fifth graders across the state write and illustrate their own books on renewable energy and compete for a $500 grand prize, plus the opportunity to have their book published and distributed to schools across the state. Madeleine Benner, a fourth grade home-schooled student in Fort Mill, won the 2021 Children’s Book Challenge with her book, Angel, The Solar Bird. Benner was one of six regional finalists selected by their local electric co-ops to vie for the state prize, and judges praised Benner’s creativity for crafting a story in which a friendly bluebird helps educate a family about solar energy. The Children’s Book Challenge is an expression of two cooperative principles—education and concern for community—says Porter Gable, communications coordinator of York Electric Cooperative, who announced the 2021 winner. TEACHING GRADE SCHOOL

Treat Mom to something special

Mother’s Day is May 9, so why not show Mom just how smart you are by signing up for our May Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. And if you win, treat her to a nice dinner and some flowers. She deserves it! We’ll draw one lucky reader’s name from all eligible entries received by May 31, so don’t delay. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

Cast-iron cleaning

Don’t shy away from your cast-iron skillet because it’s hard to clean. Chef Belinda has a surefire cleanup solution that she demonstrates in this month’s how-to video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

ERI N C . POW E LL

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Madeleine Benner, a home-schooled student from Fort Mill, was the top winner in the 2021 Children’s Book Challenge, sponsored by S.C. electric cooperatives. Madeleine’s parents, Gretchen and Nicholas Benner, are members of York Electric Cooperative.

“It challenges students to be creative using multiple disciplines for learning,” she says. “We want to make sure our students are engaged and learn about co-ops, but we also want to pro­mote their learning and their success in STEAM subjects— science, technology, engineering, arts and math.” GET MORE See this story online at SCLiving.coop for a link to the digital version of Angel, The Solar Bird. For more information on the Children’s Book Challenge and other educational programs sponsored by South Carolina’s electric cooperatives, visit EnlightenSC.org.

GONE FISHIN’

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. PM Major

Minor

16 3:07 7:07 12:37 3:52 17 4:37 7:07 — 4:37 18 — 1:37 — 5:52 19 11:07 2:22 — 7:07 20 9:37 2:52 2:07 8:22 21 9:52 3:07 3:52 9:22 22 3:37 10:22 10:22 4:52 23 4:07 11:07 11:07 5:52 24 4:37 11:37 12:07 6:52 25 —- 5:07 7:37 12:22 26 12:52 5:37 8:37 1:07 27 1:37 6:22 9:22 1:52 28 2:22 6:52 10:22 2:37 29 3:07 7:22 11:37 3:22 30 4:07 8:07 12:37 4:22 31 5:52 8:52 — 5:22

1 10:37 2 8:52 3 9:37 4 3:22 5 3:37 6 3:52 7 4:22 8 — 9 — 10 — 11 1:07 12 1:52 13 2:37 14 3:37 15 4:52 16 6:22

Minor

AM Major

Minor

M AY

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

JUNE 1:37 2:22 2:52 10:07 10:37 11:07 11:37 4:37 5:07 5:37 5:52 6:22 6:52 7:22 8:07 9:22

— 6:22 1:07 7:37 3:07 8:37 4:22 9:22 10:07 5:22 10:52 6:07 11:37 6:52 7:22 12:07 8:07 12:37 8:37 1:07 9:22 1:37 10:07 2:07 10:52 2:52 11:37 3:22 12:07 4:07 — 5:07


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SC   dialogue

A view from the back porch that I enjoy my home’s air conditioning very much. I’ve been enjoying it even more since—thanks to the advice of an independent energy auditor—I recently had my home’s “thermal envelope” improved with weatherization and installed a more efficient HVAC system. My monthly electric bill took a significant nosedive. I encourage you to reach out to your cooperative to see what programs and services they offer to help your family. Heating and cooling often make up at least half of a typical home’s power costs, but that wasn’t always the case. Before mechanical climate control, many in the South relied on mother nature and innovative architectural designs for respite from heat and humidity. Homes and their porches were positioned and placed strategically to take full advantage of crosswinds and afternoon shade. For example, dogtrot houses—which originated in South Carolina’s Lowcountry—were built with a breezeway that ran through the center leading to the porch in the back. This created differential pressure and increased windspeed as it passed through the house, making it much cooler. However, that kind of openness could also lead to some invited and annoying guests, like flies and mosquitoes. During the Great Depression, a New Deal program called the Federal Writers’ Project put writers, teachers and researchers to work interviewing folks from all walks of life. Their objective was to pull together the history and folklore of our nation. On one project, interviewees were asked to name the single greatest invention of their lifetime. Radio and motor vehicles were common answers, but one straight-speaking farmer offered something unexpected: screen wire. No doubt this farmer and his family found sleeping much easier without a swirl of gnats and mosquitoes and dining much more enjoyable without flies hanging around their fried chicken. When I heard this story for the first time, I immediately thought of all the good times I spent on my family’s screened porches. When I was growing up, the back porch was the meeting place in the late afternoon—about the time the bull bats came out. There would be three or four generations of us shelling butterbeans or peeling peaches, I WILL BE THE FIRST TO ADMIT

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

When I was growing up, the back porch was the meeting place in the late afternoon— about the time the bull bats came out.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

protected from flying insects and cooled by the evening breeze. As a youngster, I listened while my relatives shared stories and truths. Someone from the Federal Writers’ Project should have been there with us. Some of the stories were tales we’d all heard before. I remember my dad would always elicit knowing nods from the others when he recounted experiences like feeding the chickens through floor cracks of the tenant farmhouse where he grew up. Other stories were unexpected laments and confessions. They were about struggles that weighed heavy on the teller’s heart. Because their hands were occupied, their minds were free to associate things happening in their lives and to share them with the people they loved. When neighbors came by, the porch remained the place to gather comfortably and catch up. It’s not hard to imagine that in some communities, the seeds of rural electrification took root in such a fertile environment, as neighbors encouraged neighbors to join the burgeoning movement. I rarely see people on their porches anymore. That’s understandable, since escaping uncomfortable elements is so easy to do now. Electric cooperatives can certainly claim some of the credit or blame for that. Much of the progress our state has enjoyed over the last 80 years is directly attributable to rural electrification. I hope the intimate connections we once felt with family members and neighbors as we were surrounded by screen wire have not been lost to wireless communication and digital screens. I hope the ability to digitally multitask isn’t distracting us from what is really important. As broadband availability reaches more people in rural communities and we implement innovations and efficiencies to make our homes more pleasant and affordable, I encourage us to be mindful of ways that we can still reach beyond our front doors and share ourselves with one another.


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SC   energy Q&A

Three options for home cooling BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

A

Good news: It’s the right time of year to think about installing air conditioning—before the thermometer hits triple digits. Given the size of your home, we recommend you consider these three options.

PAU L SU LLI VA N

Window units and portable A/C

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The condenser unit for a mini-split heat pump system is usually mounted on an exterior wall.

Ductless mini-split heat pumps No ducts? A ductless mini-split heat pump may be your best whole-house cooling solution, depending on how many rooms you have. A mini-split heat pump uses a compressor outside the home that’s ­connected to air handler units in as many as four rooms. Each room’s temperature can be controlled separately.

As always, you can save energy and money by purchasing Energy Star-rated appliances and collecting a few quotes from licensed contractors.

A window A/C unit can be an effective way to cool a single room.

Window unit air conditioners and portable A/C units are the lowest-cost approach. Portable units can be moved from room to room and come equipped with a length of flexible duct to exhaust hot air out a nearby window. Window units are mounted in a window opening and cool one room. Consider this important difference as you shop around. For maximum cooling and efficiency, be sure there is a tight seal around the window unit or the duct framing hardware (this prevents air leaks), and make sure the device you buy is rated for the size of the room or space you are trying to cool. A single unit won’t be able to cool the entire house, so close doors, use ceiling fans to keep air moving, turn off appliances that produce heat, and block direct sunlight with window coverings. These

GA RY CZI KO

Q

steps will make it easier for your window unit or portable A/C to keep the room comfortable and cool. Note that we do not recommend evaporative or so-called “swamp coolers” for South Carolina consumers. Summers in the Palmetto State are simply too humid for these devices to work effectively. Window units and portable A/C units are the cheapest cooling option, costing anywhere from $149 to $1,000, depending on capacity. The efficiency of these devices has improved over the years, but none of them are as efficient as most central A/C units or the popular minisplit heat pumps.

My wife and I have been in our 1,500-square-foot home with no air conditioning for several years now, and we’re tired of it! What options should we look into so we can stay cool this summer?

Central A/C systems typically have a compressor unit located outside the home.

Central cooling If your home has forced-air heating ductwork, those same ducts can be used to deliver cool air in summer from a central A/C unit or heat pump. This is only a good option if the ductwork is sized properly and doesn’t leak, and if ducts run through insulated attics and crawlspaces. Be sure to have the ducts inspected when getting quotes from qualified HVAC contractors, and make sure they are properly sealed before any installation begins. Installing a central air system will cost approximately $3,000 to $7,000 (not including repairs to ductwork).

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

At approximately $3,000 to $10,000 (including installation), ductless minisplits are an especially good choice for smaller homes without existing duct­ work, and can be installed relatively easily by skilled HVAC contractors. They can also be a supplemental source of heat in the winter. As always, you can save energy and money by purchasing Energy Star-rated appliances and collecting a few quotes from licensed contractors. We hope this information on home cooling options will start you on the path to a more comfortable home this summer. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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A taste of the

Lowcountry Signature dishes that define our state’s authentic coastal cuisine BY CELE AND LYNN SELDON

AS YOU LIKE IT B.J. Dennis, chef and Gullah and Lowcountry cuisine expert, believes okra soup is the Lowcountry’s iconic dish. He encourages variations based on ingredients on hand.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP


Cuisine is defined as a set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture or region. South Carolina’s Lowcountry provides the perfect example of a culinary tradition that incorporates ingredients and methods from Native Americans, British colonists, African slaves, Gullah communities and the modern chefs who interpret old dishes in new ways. Narrowing the list of signature Lowcountry dishes to four was a tall order, so, we collaborated with experts and tastemakers along the coast to help us craft this consummate sampling of Lowcountry cuisine.

M IC S M ITH

According to B.J. Dennis, a Charleston chef, caterer, the culinary director of Lowcountry Fresh in Bluffton, and one of the state’s top experts on Gullah and Lowcountry cuisine, okra soup should be at the top of any list of iconic Lowcountry dishes. “If you were to ask blue-blooded country folks of all backgrounds, they would tell you okra soup,” he says. “It’s signature for us around here.” A cousin of gumbo, okra soup starts with a meat stock, then it’s loaded with okra, tomatoes, butterbeans, corn and shrimp, and stewed to let the flavors marry. For Dennis, he uses whatever smoked meat he has available, and sometimes opts for a vegetarian version by charring the tomatoes or adding in some Liquid Smoke. He also prefers the smallest shrimp he can find. “I like using the creek shrimp we grew up on,” he says. Up for debate is whether to prepare the okra in larger chunks so that it maintains its shape, keeping the soup a bit soupier, or whether you prefer more of a saucy stew consistency by cutting the okra into smaller pieces and breaking it down further. Dennis says that there is no right or wrong and that it’s really a personal preference. uu

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

Okra Soup

B.J. DENNIS’ OKRA SOUP SERVES 4–6

3 to 4 thyme sprigs ½ pound of smoked meat, such as pork or turkey 1 pound okra 2 pounds fresh tomatoes, 1 small onion diced, or one 28-ounce can 2 cobs of corn (optional) diced tomatoes ½ pound fresh butterbeans, 5 cloves garlic shelled 1 hot pepper Salt, to taste 1 bay leaf ½ pound of shrimp, cleaned

Add smoked meat to the pot with tomato, garlic, hot pepper, bay leaf and thyme. Pour water over meat to just cover. Cook over medium-high heat until meat is tender. Slice okra into half-inch pieces. Dice onion. Cut each corn cob into four pieces. Add okra, onions, corn and butterbeans to pot; cook until okra is tender, approximately 10–15 minutes. Salt shrimp and add to pot. Cook shrimp for 2–3 minutes. Salt to taste throughout cooking process. Serve with rice.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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From farm

The tastes of the Lowcountry will be easier to find—and savor— when Lowcountry Fresh Market and Café opens for business in Bluffton. The new concept is a highly anticipated collaboration between the Lowcountry regional farming community, including members of the Gullah Farmers’ Cooperative Association of St. Helena Island, and Andy and Cindy Rolfe, longtime residents of the area who wanted to give back to the community. The Rolfes saw an ­opportunity to partner with local farmers, fishermen and culinary artisans in the area—many of them third- or fourthgeneration—providing them with a way to sell more local goods. “Our hope is that Lowcountry Fresh will expand markets and profit for the next generation of South Carolina growers and makers so that they can continue the long tradition of connection to the land and cuisine of the region and the state,” says Cindy. In addition to local produce and seafood, the 11,000-square-foot market will be stocked with milk, eggs, meat and dry goods from within a 250-mile radius. The cafe will serve breakfast and lunch specialties curated by chef B.J. Dennis, an expert on Gullah and Lowcountry cuisine. The market will also host cooking demonstrations. For updates, visit lowcountryfresh.com and gullahfarmerscoop.org. —CELE AND LYNN SELDON

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K A REN H ERM A N N

to market

GAY’S FROGMORE STEW SERVES 5–6

4 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning or 1 bag crab boil 2 pounds Hillshire sausage 1 large onion 2 pounds medium new red potatoes (optional) Half-dozen crabs, cleaned and halved (optional) 5 ears of corn 3 pounds medium shrimp (40 to 50 per pound) ¼ pound butter (for dipping)

Frogmore Stew

Fill an 8-quart pot half full of water. Add crab boil (or Old Bay seasoning), pieces of sausage, onion, potatoes (optional) and crab (if desired). Bring to a boil. Add corn. Stir and bring to a boil for 4 minutes. Add shrimp and stir for 4–6 minutes or until shrimp start to float to the top of the water. Turn stove off and let ingredients set for 4 minutes. Drain and place ingredients in a large bowl. Serve with hot butter dip or seafood sauce.

Brimming with the state’s peak summer delicacies like shrimp, crabs, corn, onions and red potatoes, Frogmore stew—often referred to as a Lowcountry boil, since the liquid is poured off—is a staple along the coast and pays homage to South Carolina’s bounty. Although many versions abound, most agree that the legit Frogmore stew was created just outside of Beaufort in the tiny town of Frogmore, which today is known as St. Helena Island. It started out as a weekend throw-together dish imagined by John Henry Gay—known to all as Buster—the owner of Gay Fish Company, which has been in the same location on St. Helena since 1948. According to Buster’s son, Charles, who still owns Gay Fish Company (facebook.com/GayFishCo) along with his son, Tim, and brother, Richard, Buster cooked it for friends and family as far back as the early 1950s. “It didn’t have a name then,” Charles Gay says. “He just called it supper. They put newspaper on a wooden table and just dumped everything on it and ate.” Richard first coined the name in the early 1960s. Since the name of the town was Frogmore, he just called it Frogmore stew. To this day, when people come into the shop and say they want to make Lowcountry boil, Charles Gay corrects them and tells them it’s called Frogmore stew. “It’s just a part of the area,” he says. “When folks ask me what’s in Frogmore stew, I tell them, ‘Whatever you want, whatever’s fresh.’”

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP


A TASTE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY

Chicken Bog

NO ONE LIKES CRUNCHY RICE 2019 Loris Bog-Off winner Murphy Skipper skips the measuring and never rushes the cooking.

M I LTON MORRIS

A list of the Lowcountry’s greatest hits would be remiss without a perloo of some sort. Also known as pirleau, perlo or the original spelling of pilau, perloos represent a multitude of coastal rice dishes. They come in almost 30 varieties like Charleston red rice, Hoppin’ John, okra rice, Limpin’ Susan, crab rice and one of the more familiar versions—chicken bog. Chicken bog starts with sauteed vegetables and spices and the slow boil of a chicken for just the right amount of time to create juicy and tender meat. Rice is then cooked in the savory broth low and slow, Southern style, so that the grains do not stick together. The dish is a particularly big deal in Horry County, where local cooks compete each fall in the annual Loris Bog-Off, scheduled this year for Oct. 16 (lorischamber.com/loris-bog-off-festival-1). Murphy Skipper, the 2019 winner, is a lifelong connoisseur of chicken bog. Competing for the first time, Skipper took top honors for his cream of mushroom and white and yellow rice version of what he calls his “pot.” His secret? “I never measure anything, I never let anyone touch my pot once it gets going, and I never rush because no one likes a pot of crunchy rice.” uu

BIG M’S CHICKEN BOG RECIPE SERVES 10–12

1 pound Hillshire Farms smoked sausage, sliced 2 large onions 5 pounds boneless chicken thighs 1 10½-ounce can cream of mushroom soup 2 cups Blue Ribbon long grain white rice 2 cups Par Excellence yellow rice with saffron

In a 12-quart pot (preferably cast iron), brown sausage well. Remove and set aside. Dice onions. Wash chicken. Place chicken in pot skin down and add onions. Turn heat to medium and allow chicken to make its own broth. When chicken is rendered, add can of cream of mushroom soup. Add sausage back to the pot.

Reduce heat, cover and cook until rice is tender and liquid has absorbed (30–40 minutes).

G I N A MOO RE

Add 8 cups of water. Salt and pepper to taste. Stir and mix well. Allow pot to simmer for 15–20 minutes. Bring pot to a boil and add 4 cups of rice, stir to combine. Bring pot back to a boil.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


A TASTE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY

M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

82 QUEEN AWARD-WINNING SHE-CRAB SOUP SERVES 12

¼ pound butter ¼ pound flour 3 cups milk 1 cup heavy cream ¼ cup chopped carrots

1 cup chopped celery ¼ cup chopped onion 2 cups fish stock or water and fish base 1 pound crab meat

¼ pound crab roe 1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce Sherry for garnish

PHOTOS COU RTESY O F 82 QU EEN

In a saucepan, melt butter over low heat. Add flour and whisk until it makes a pasty roux. Add milk and cream; bring to a boil. Add lightly sauteed carrots, celery, onions and remaining ingredients. Simmer for 20 minutes. Garnish with sherry.

ROE TO VICTORY 82 Queen’s founding chef and current owner Steve Kish, above, put his version of she-crab soup on the menu when the restaurant opened in 1982. Executive Chef Steve Stone, left, “tweaked it just a bit in 1991” and the recipe hasn’t changed since.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

She-Crab Soup

The bisque-like she-crab soup is a signature Lowcountry dish that typically shows up on everyone’s list of favorites. Rich and velvety, she-crab soup is the perfect blend of butter, cream, fresh crabmeat, the red-orange roe from the female crab—which is how it got its name—and a splash of sherry. Although versions of it can be traced to Scottish settlers in the South as far back as the 1700s, legend has it that the she-crab soup we think of today was created by the butler of Charleston’s mayor, Robert Goodwyn Rhett, at the John Rutledge House in the 1920s. It seems that President William Howard Taft was scheduled to visit, and Mayor Rhett asked his butler, William Deas, to “dress up” their typical crab soup. Adding in the orange eggs of a female crab, the soup took on a bright color and added a new depth of flavor. Many longtime Charleston residents swear by the she-crab soup served up at 82 Queen (82queen.com). Created by the founding chef and now-owner, Steve Kish, and on the menu since they opened their doors in 1982, the recipe hasn’t changed much. “I tweaked it just a bit in 1991 just before the first Charleston She-Crab Cook-Off,” says Executive Chef Steve Stone. “We won first place in the People’s Choice Award, and it has never changed since.”


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SC   stories

She shoots, she scores

Debbie Antonelli Mount Pleasant. Played basketball for N.C. State, then began a 33-year (and counting) career as a college basketball analyst for ESPN and other networks. LITTLE-KNOWN FACT: Antonelli can sing all the girl parts to High School Musical. She leaves the boy parts for her son Frankie. PASSION PROJECT: Raising money for Special Olympics South Carolina with her 24 Hours of Nothing but Net shoot-athon, scheduled this year for May 15–16 (24hoursnbn.com). HOME COURT:

CLAIMS TO FAME:

A stand-out guard for N.C. State in the mid-1980s—including trips to the NCAA Tournament and two appearances in the Sweet Sixteen—Debbie Antonelli is now at the top of her game as an analyst calling basketball for ESPN, CBS, Fox, Big Ten Network and Westwood One, where one of her signature sayings is, “Shoot until your arm falls off.” As honored as she is to be one of the few female voices for men’s basketball, she’s even more humbled by fans who support her annual fundraiser for Special Olympics South Carolina—24 Hours of Nothing but Net. Antonelli’s middle son, Frankie, was born with Down syndrome. “As a parent of a child with special needs who participates in Special Olympics competitions, I know how important the programming is and what sports means to his overall development,” she says. She launched the event in 2019, shooting 100 free throws every hour for 24 hours, with people donating—as little as a penny per free throw—for the cause. Held at a Mount Pleasant gym and streamed live, the event raised $85,000. In 2020, the pandemic forced Antonelli to host the event in her driveway— and she raised $125,000 for her trouble. “The driveway provided such a grassroots feel, which is exactly what Special Olympics is all about,” says Antonelli. On May 15–16, Antonelli will be back in “Team Antonelli home court,” streaming on multiple platforms, and working to raise even more. Between free throw action, she will conduct virtual conversations with sports figures and celebrities, host friendly competitions and even have closing ceremonies. Eventually, she wants to take the event nationwide. “I want to raise $1 million dollars for Special Olympics,” dreams Antonelli. “I want to shoot until my arm falls off.” —CELE AND LYNN SELDON | PHOTO BY MIC SMITH

STEP UP To make a donation, visit24hoursnbn.com, then tune in to watch all the 2021 action starting at noon on May 15. Livestreams will be available on Facebook (@24hoursnothingbutnet) and YouTube (­24hoursnothingbutnet.com).

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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|

SC   travels

Enchanted garden BY DENA J. DIORIO

GET THERE Moore Farms Botanical Garden is located at 100 New Zion Road in Lake City. HOURS: Open by appointment Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and during special events. ADMISSION: $10 per person for tours. Ticket prices vary for annual events. For a complete roster of upcoming events, visit moorefarmsbg.org/featured-events. GETTING AROUND: Most of the garden is wheelchair accessible with some areas requiring assistance. Golf carts can be provided with prior notice. Garden visits are approximately 2 hours in length. Pets are not allowed. DETAILS: (843) 210-7582; moorefarmsbg.org.

18

DEN A J. DIO RIO

SITUATED IN THE NORTHEASTERN

we turned off New Zion Road and onto the winding gravel driveway. Deciduous and evergreen trees flanked the route, and to the left we could glimpse the pristine Swimming Pond with garden art sprouting up from the surrounding grass. We were ushered to park on a fresh field, and from there, photo ops with blooming plants presented themselves along the way as we checked in and entered the garden at the Fire Tower and Visitor Center. Our self-guided tour commenced in the enchanted alley commonly referred to as Pine Bay, mimicking a natural pine savanna typical to the Carolinas. The first stop was to the Vegetable Garden. Buds popping in the beds were a sure sign that spring was near. The Formal Garden followed, with its water fountain adorned with daffodils as the focal point. Next came the Bog Garden, showcasing carnivorous plants native to the Carolinas. There was not a lot of action in the Bog on this day; however, when in full bloom, many cute, bucket-like pitcher plants are out on display, catching water and live insects to feast on. Continuing our tour, we traversed a lovely wooden walking path lined with crepe myrtles dripping with Spanish moss. This landed us back on the gravel path leading to one of my favorite spots

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

TRU E LIG HT PH OTOG R A PH Y

Pee Dee region just west of Lake City, Moore Farms Botanical Garden may be one of the state’s best-kept secrets. A burgeoning botanical oasis with 65 cultivated acres of lush gardens, pine forests and emerald-green pastures, the garden is open to the public Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.—but only during tours that must be booked in advance, says marketing manager Haley Hughes. The reason? The garden is a passion project of philanthropist and investor Darla Moore, who still lives on the land that was once her family’s farm. “Because we respect her privacy, we respectfully ask that you call to make an appointment for a guided tour,” Hughes says. The garden is also open during special events and festivals, including the season-opening day cheekily coined Bulbapalooza—a rare chance to see one of the state’s most impressive botanical gardens blossoming into spring. During my family’s visit to Bulba­ palooza 2021, the garden enveloped us in a tranquil state of natural bliss as soon as

p Formal gardens coexist

with forests and pastures at Moore Farms Botanical Garden. t Shady Rodgers greets visitors at this year’s Easter egg hunt.

on the grounds, the Spring House. A thatched roof hut calling on Moore’s travels through Asia, its revolving doors and wicker chairs beckoned weary visitors to sit and stay awhile. We took the opportunity for repose and to enjoy the gentle breeze. Enchanted Moore Farms Botanical Garden is well worth the trip. Guided tours can be pre-arranged for a nominal fee of $10 per person. Other annual events include the May Days plant sale (scheduled for May 15), the only day when visitors can purchase plants directly from the nursery. The Beer Fest, scheduled for Sept. 18, is the largest annual program, typically drawing a crowd of 700, says Shady Rodgers, director of events and education. For a complete roster of upcoming events, visit the garden website. True to the garden’s mission “to promote research and education in horticulture, agriculture and forestry for the benefit of the people of South Carolina and beyond,” Rodgers says the ­proceeds from ticketed events support Lake City community organizations. “It’s very special, and a part of Ms. Moore’s contribution.”


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SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


COME JOIN US at the SC FESTIVAL OF STARS

Patriotic Fireworks Celebration! One of the Top 4 Firework Shows in the Palmetto State in Historic Downtown Ninety Six. Saturday, June 26, 2021 10 a.m. - 10 p.m.

• FIREWORKS DISPLAY @ 9:45 p.m. • FREE ADMISSION • CRAFT VENDORS • FOOD VENDORS • CAR SHOW • PATRIOTIC PARADE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN NINETY SIX 89 Saluda Street, Ninety Six, SC

20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP


Cogongrass

is invading SC forests! We build all kinds of buildings for all kinds of needs.

REPORT COGONGRASS:

864-646-2140 or invasives@clemson.edu

Check into Hoover!

www.hooverbuildings.com 1.800.922.3934 Lexington & Greer, SC

Learn more at clemson.edu/invasives Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org

HuNGEr rEAds tHE MorNING pApEr, too. 1 IN 6 AMErIcANs struGGlEs WItH HuNGEr.

toGEtHEr WE’rE

Hunger is closer than you think. reach out to your local food bank for ways to do your part. Visit FeedingAmerica.org today.

Soak up the stories behind the creation of the Springs of Achievement Statues. Fort Mill History Museum is proud to present our guided outdoor walking tour to learn more about the Springs Industry legacy, the history and people the statues represent. Springs Industry commissioned famous sculptor Bruno Lucchesi to create life-size bronze sculptures located throughout the Springs campus and in Walter Y. Elisha Park. Each sculpture symbolizes the values that comprise the Springs of Achievements philosophy.

Thursdays & Saturdays in June 2021 Tickets $17 per person For tickets and more information about Fort Mill History Museum and all of our events visit our site at FMHM.org.

FMHM.org

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   recipe

Chicken, chicken and more chicken! M ICH A E L PH I LLI P S

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

CHICKEN CUTLETS IN A LEMON BUTTER PARSLEY SAUCE SERVES 4

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts N cup all-purpose flour Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 1 egg 3 tablespoons milk G cup olive oil 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 lemon, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour H cup white wine I cup chicken stock, more if needed 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley

Place chicken between two pieces of plastic on a hard surface. Pound with a meat mallet or bottom of a clean, small cast-iron skillet until each cutlet is about ¼-inch thick. In a medium bowl, combine flour, salt and pepper. In another medium bowl, whisk egg and milk until smooth. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil. Dredge each cutlet in the flour, then the egg/milk mixture. Place in the skillet in a single layer. Cook for 4 minutes on each side or until golden brown and cooked through. Remove to a platter and keep warm. Wipe out skillet with a paper towel.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop Get more recipes and these handy how-to cooking videos exclusively at

SCLiving.coop/​food/​chefbelinda CAST-IRON CLEANING Don’t shy away from your cast-iron skillet because it’s hard to clean. Chef Belinda has a surefire cleanup solution.

22

HOW TO CUT UP A CHICKEN Stretch your food budget by buying whole chickens and cutting them up at home. Chef Belinda shows you how in this video.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

It is so easy to fall into a rut when it comes to preparing and se rving chicken. W e all have our “goto” chicken recip es that we gravitate to when time is of the essence. Here ar e a few quick, ea sy and healthy options to add to your re cip e collection. Pair th ese with your fa vo rit e veggie and salad , and dinner is on the table before you can say “mo’ chicken!”

Using the same skillet, heat 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat. Add the lemon slices and cook for 2–3 minutes or until lemons brown. Remove from skillet. Add the remaining butter and melt. Add flour and cook 1 minute, whisking constantly. Pour in white wine and simmer—still whisking—for 2 minutes. Add chicken stock and continue to whisk and simmer for an additional 4–5 minutes or until sauce thickens slightly. Sauce should be the consistency of thin gravy; add additional stock if needed. Stir in lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Return chicken to the skillet and spoon sauce over chicken. Top with lemon slices and sprinkle with parsley. Serve immediately. Why flatten boneless, skinless chicken breasts? This allows the cutlets to cook evenly and requires less cooking time.

CHEF’S TIP


Turn the page for more chicken!

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

BRAISED GARLIC CHICKEN WITH POTATOES, MUSHROOMS AND PEAS GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

SERVES 4–6

1 whole chicken, cut up (or bone-in chicken pieces) 2 tablespoons all-purpose seasoning Canola/vegetable oil, as needed for browning 6–8 red new potatoes, cut into wedges Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper

6 garlic cloves, minced 1H cups white wine 1H cups chicken stock 2 bay leaves H pound mushrooms, cleaned and quartered 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 cup frozen peas

Preheat oven to 425 F. Season chicken with all-purpose seasoning. (Cut breasts and larger pieces in half for even cooking.) In a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, heat oil and brown chicken on all sides. Remove to a platter and keep warm. Add potato wedges to the pot and season with salt and pepper; cook until brown, about 8–10 minutes. Once potatoes are brown, add garlic and saute an additional minute. Deglaze with wine, scraping up bits on the bottom of pot until liquid is reduced by half. Add chicken stock and place chicken back into the pot. Bring to a boil and add the bay leaves. Cover and place pot in the oven; let cook for 20 minutes. While chicken cooks, prepare mushrooms. In a large skillet or saucepan, over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter and saute until golden brown and all liquid has evaporated. Check doneness of chicken with a meat thermometer—165 F on an instantread thermometer—and remove pot from oven to medium-low heat on the stovetop. Stir in remaining butter, then mushrooms. Remove from heat and add peas. Let sit covered about 10 minutes to allow peas to warm up, and serve immediately.

CHICKEN WITH OLIVES, ARTICHOKES AND LEMONS SERVES 6

3 tablespoons olive oil 6 whole chicken legs, cut into thigh and drumstick (or chicken breasts cut in half) Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 2 large yellow onions, sliced 2 tablespoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons ground white pepper 2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground turmeric

H teaspoon crushed saffron threads (optional, or increase turmeric) 1 H cups chicken stock 1 cup halved green olives (preferably Castelvetrano) 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 tablespoon minced parsley 2 teaspoons minced cilantro 1 15-ounce jar artichoke hearts, quartered 1 lemon, cut into slices

Heat oven to 350 F. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Season chicken with salt and pepper; add to pot and cook, turning, until browned, 12–15 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate. Add onions to the pot; cook until golden, 10–12 minutes. Add spices (coriander, white pepper, ginger, turmeric and saffron); cook for 2 minutes. Return chicken to pot with stock and bring to a boil. Move pot to oven and bake, covered, until tender, 35–40 minutes. Stir in olives, butter, parsley, cilantro, artichoke hearts and lemons; cook for an additional 6 minutes. Serve over couscous, rice or mashed potatoes.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2021   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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|

SC   recipe

CHICKEN STUFFED WITH PROSCIUTTO, MOZZARELLA AND OLIVES SERVES 6–8

Flour each package so it is dusted on all sides. Beat egg slightly, adding milk. Dip chicken cutlets into mixture on both sides. Then dip into breadcrumbs. Chill for at least 30 minutes.

On one half of the cut side of each breast cutlet, place a piece of prosciutto, a piece of mozzarella and two olive halves. Sprinkle with fresh ground pepper. Fold over the other side to cover filling and press edges firmly together to enclose filling or roll and secure with toothpicks.

Melt ¼ cup butter in a small saucepan. Add half the chopped garlic and parsley. Keep warm until chicken is cooked. Over medium heat, in a large skillet, heat remaining butter and olive oil with remaining garlic and parsley until fats are hot but not smoking. Place breaded chicken in skillet

K A REN H ERM A N N

6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, butterflied 6 slices of prosciutto, folded in half 6 pieces mozzarella cheese, ½-inch thick rectangles 12 olives, pitted and halved (green or black or both) Fresh ground black pepper H cup all-purpose flour 1 egg 3 tablespoons milk 2 cups seasoned breadcrumbs H cup unsalted butter, divided 2 garlic cloves, minced, divided H cup chopped parsley, divided G cup olive oil

and turn heat to medium high. Saute chicken quickly, only until golden. Turn once to cook the other side. Remove to heated serving dish. Remove toothpicks, if using. Pour warm garlic parsley butter on top and garnish with remaining olive halves. If there is an egg allergy in the household, use buttermilk instead of the egg and milk mixture.

CHEF’S TIP

WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

Make Mom’s day! R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone* My electric cooperative is:

South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by May 31, 2021, to be eligible. *Winner will be contacted to verify mailing address.

SEND COUPON TO:

Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. You can use the extra spending cash to treat Mom to a special day out and maybe some flowers. She’s your Mom. She deserves it. To register, use the mail-in form at left or visit online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. We’ll draw the name of one lucky reader from all entries received by May 31, 2021. By entering, you may receive messages from these great sponsors and you agree to join the South Carolina Living email list. j Alpine Helen, White County, Ga. j Cheraw Visitors Bureau j City of Aiken Parks, Recreation and Tourism j Experience Columbia SC CVB j Fort Mill History Museum j Olde English District j S.C. Festival of Stars j South Carolina Living magazine

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply 24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   gardener

Flat-faced flowers such as dahlias are the bee’s knees to pollinators.

MAY IN THE GARDEN n Air temperatures heat up much faster than ground temps. That’s why you should hold off mulching around new annual plantings until at least the middle to end of this month. This will allow the sun to warm your garden’s soil up to more comfy temperatures that will help stimulate stronger root growth.

BY L.A. JACKSON

WANT TO ATTRACT MORE BEES into your garden? Below are tips and plant suggestions to help make your growing spaces more bee-coming for these ­beneficial buzzers.

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH Whether mild flavored or unholy hot, peppers are one of the more popular veggies grown by home gardeners. Many selections can now be found locally as transplants or seeds, but also check out peppers from these South Carolina-based online retailers for the odd, the unusual, the insanely scorching: Seeds ’n Such, Graniteville (seedsnsuch.com). Park Seed, Hodges (parkseed.com). PuckerButt Pepper Company, Fort Mill (puckerbuttpeppercompany.com). Want one more option? My “secret” e-source for both cutting-edge pepper research and cultivar intros is the Chile Pepper Institute (cpi.nmsu.edu) in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

26

L . A . JACKSO N

Plan bee

n Rising temperatures this month also mean it’s prime time to add heat-loving bulbs such as caladiums, cannas, dahlias and gladioli to the ornamental garden.

Go wild. Bees naturally love native plants, and many from the wild can also double as pleasant visual additions to cultivated landscapes. Including indigenous eye-catchers such as foxglove, yarrow, liatris, goldenrod, ironweed, turtlehead, Joe Pye weed, penstemon, swamp milkweed, purple coneflower, salvia, coral honeysuckle, black-eyed Susans or gaillardia is a good way to enjoy a two-fer—beauty and the bees. The right rose. Not all roses are rosy for bees. For instance, if a rose isn’t fragrant, it has less appeal to bees, and if its petals are tight and closed, bees can’t get into it, so single-flowered and semi-double selections are better. Also, many modern cultivars are long on looks while short in pollen production, but species roses are more bee-friendly in this department. Flat note. Being busy, bees would rather not spend their time maneuvering in and through a blossom to get at its pollen-laden center. That’s why they buzz at the sight of flowers with flat faces such as dahlias, zinnias, Queen Anne’s lace, daisies, sunflowers, cosmos, marigolds and asters. Make scents. Like people, bees are attracted to sweet smells, so think about

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

adding nose-pleasing flowers such as forget-me-nots, heliotrope, nasturtium, phlox, four o’clocks, soapwort or nicotiana. Blooming herbs can be helpers as well, especially pleasantly scented ones like hyssop, basil, rosemary, sage, catnip, lavender, borage, chamomile, thyme and marjoram. Color their world. Bees are attracted to certain hues, with yellow being their favorite, followed by blue, purple and white. Interestingly, bees are colorblind when it comes to red—to them, it’s a shadowy black that fades into the surrounding foliage. However, some plants with red blooms have ultra­ violet coloring mixed in, making them appear to be an agreeable blue to bees. These include pansies, corn poppy and bee balm. Bee safe. Why invite bees into your garden and then kill them? Go easy on using broad-spectrum insecticides that nuke anything with six legs. Systemic pesticides can also make flowers poisonous to bees. Contact insecticides, when sprayed directly only on unwanted insects late in the day when bee activity is at a minimum, are a better option if you must resort to bug-boppers. Actually, a sharp squirt of water from the garden hose will dispatch numerous bothersome creepy-crawlers. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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PALMETTO STATE    marketplace

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SC   calendar MAY 15–JUNE 30

Upstate M AY

15–16  South Carolina Chili Cook-

Off Championship, Belton Community Center, Belton. (864) 958‑5264. 17  Assaults on Mount Mitchell and Marion cycling races, starting at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 414‑6581 or director@theassaults.com. 20  Converge Autism Summit, Greenville Convention Center, Greenville. (864) 834‑8013. 20–30  The Fair at Heritage Park, Heritage Park, Simpsonville. (864) 296‑6601 or ray@trzmanagement.com. 22  Beauty and Bounty Spring Garden Tour, downtown, McCormick. (864) 391‑2130 or maheim85@gmail.com. 27–29  Plum Hollow Bluegrass Festival, Plum Hollow, Campobello. info@moonshiners.com. 29  8th Annual Take Flight 5K, Runway Park at Greenville Downtown Airport, Greenville. (864) 270‑6660. JU NE

5  Sparkle City Rhythm &

Ribs, Barnet Park, Spartanburg. (864) 680‑6674. 7–13  BMW Charity Pro-Am, Thornblade Club and The Cliffs, Greenville. (864) 297‑1660. 11–13  Festival of Flowers (main weekend), uptown, Greenwood. (864) 889‑9315 or info@scfestivalofflowers.org. 11–13  Mountain View Americana Art Show, Dacusville Community Center, Easley. (715) 416‑1559 or wvaartshow@yahoo.com. 18–20  Juneteenth Celebration, Abbeville Town Square, Abbeville. abbevillefriendsoffreedom@gmail.com.

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. EDITOR’S NOTE: As this issue went to press, many South Carolina communities were still following COVID-19 protocols. Please check with organizers if you plan to attend these events, and follow current health recommendations to stop the spread of the coronavirus. For updates on the pandemic, visit scdhec.gov/covid19.

15  Mt. Joy, Columbia Speedway

Entertainment Center, Columbia. contact@colaconcerts.com. 15  Watercolor Textures and Surfaces with Marcia Kort Buike, Center for the Arts, (803) 328‑2787 or arts@yorkcountyarts.org. 21  Taste of Newberry, downtown, Newberry. (803) 321‑1015 or prt@cityofnewberry.com. 21  Virtual Lunch and Learn: Finding Fish Weirs in East North America, USC–Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172 or usclnasp@mailbox.sc.edu. 22  Carolina Cup, Springdale Race Course, Camden. (803) 432‑6513 or jena@carolinacup.org. 28–29  Flopeye Fish Festival, William States Lee Park, Great Falls. (803) 482‑6029. 29  Aiken Memorial Day Parade, downtown, Aiken. aikenmemorialdayparade@gmail.com. J UNE

5  Drift Jam Flotilla Music Festival,

Spence Island on Lake Murray, Columbia. driftjamfestival@gmail.com. 5–6  Columbia International Festival, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3452 or festival@ifmusa.org. 10–12  Party in the Pines Festival, Main Street, Whitmire. whitmirejaycees@gmail.com.

12–20  Southeastern Piano Festival, University of South Carolina campus and surrounding venues, Columbia. (803) 777‑1209 or mlomazov@mozart.sc.edu or jrackers@mozart.sc.edu. 18  Virtual Lunch and Learn: Indigenous Languages of the Southeastern United States, USC– Lancaster Native American Studies Center, Lancaster. (803) 313‑7172 or usclnasp@mailbox.sc.edu. 18–19  Juneteenth Rock Hill, virtual event, based in Rock Hill. (803) 322‑5798 or juneteenthrockhill@gmail.com. ONGOING

Daily through June 11  Aiken Artist Guild Annual Member Show, Aiken Center for the Arts, Aiken. (803) 641‑9094.

Lowcountry MAY

15  11th Annual Dancing with the

Ark’s Stars, Lowcountry Conference Center at the Hilton Garden Inn, Summerville. (843) 471‑1360. 15–16  World Famous Blue Crab Festival, Historic Little River Waterfront, Little River. (843) 249‑6604 or info@littleriverchamber.org.

O NG O I N G

Third Thursdays  ArtWalk,

downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 542‑2787. First Fridays  First Fridays Open Studios, Mayfair Art Studios, Spartanburg. (864) 278‑3228 or aheckel@spartanarts.org.

JU NE

4–5  Colleton County Rice

Festival, Civic Center, Walterboro. (843) 549‑1079. 5  Virtual Performance: “Symphonic Swing: Jazz Meets the Classics,” virtual event, based in Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or jazz@charlestonjazz.com. 19–26  Society of Stranders Spring Safari, Ocean Drive Beach & Golf Resort and various other venues, North Myrtle Beach. (803) 371‑4731. Various dates through Aug. 27 

Festival of Houses and Gardens, Morning History Walks, Old & Historic District, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405 or (843) 723‑1623.

M AY

14–15  St. Philip Neri Italian

28

Swing: Jazz Meets the Classics,” Firefly Distillery, North Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or jazz@charlestonjazz.com. 21  Festival of Houses and Gardens, Glorious Garden Tours, multiple garden locations, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405 or (843) 723‑1623. 22  “Symphonic Swing: Jazz Meets the Classics,” Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or jazz@charlestonjazz.com. 23–26  Veterans Classic, multiple golf courses, Myrtle Beach. (800) 506‑8588 or vclassic@golfholiday.com. 28–June 13  Piccolo Spoleto Festival, various venues, Charleston. (843) 724‑7305 or culturalaffairs@charleston-sc.gov. 28–June 13  Spoleto Festival USA, various venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑2764 or info@spoletousa.org. 29  Original Gullah Festival, virtual event, based in Beaufort. (843) 525‑0628 or info@originalgullahfestival.org.

ONGOING

Midlands Marketplace, St. Philip Neri Church, Fort Mill. (803) 548‑7282. 15  Bethel Baptist Church Auto Show, Bethel Baptist Church, Columbia. (803) 631‑0072.

21  Live at Firefly: “Symphonic

Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays through Nov. 30 

GHOST STORY Tickets are available in “safe seating pods” to The Woman in Black, a play that will be presented as part of this year’s Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

St. Phillips Island Excursion, Pier Nature Center at Hunting Island State Park, Hunting Island. (843) 838‑2011.

South Carolina Ag + Art Tour Various local farms clemson.edu/extension/ agandarttour

Midlands JU NE

5–6 

Kershaw County ssale@camdensc.org Lancaster County stuart@ivyplaceevents.com Lexington County vickie@lakemurraycountry.com Eastern York County mcooper@yorkcountyarts.org 12–13 

Newberry County michelle@newberrycounty.org Richland County jmnplanning@outlook.com Western York County mcooper@yorkcountyarts.org 19–20 

Fairfield County gypsywindfarms@gmail.com 26–27 

Chester County ccl@g.clemson.edu

Lowcountry MAY

29–30

Colleton County scartisanscenter@gmail.com JU NE

5–6

Charleston County thegoateryatkiawahriver@gmail.com 26–27

Chesterfield County chesterfieldcotourism@outlook.com Wednesdays  Arts & Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Thursdays through December  First Thursdays Gullah

Spirituals (part of the Festival of Houses and Gardens Live Like a Local event series), Unitarian Church, Charleston. (843) 722‑3405 or (843) 723‑1623.


|

SC   humor me

Fitness is a few steps away BY JAN A. IGOE

THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR

when I most envy bears. After months of hibernation​​—without moving so much as one furry muscle—bears all over the world are waking up skinny and ready for the National Geographic swimsuit edition. No gyms, no Zumba, no spin bikes and no cellulite. Human females are not so fortunate, especially the ones who bid goodbye to their youth several grandkids ago. For us (I mean “for them”), fighting flab is a nonstop battle fought year-round. It’s pretty amazing how mature women can put on weight eating nothing but celery stalks. The fat fairy hears us crunching and waits till sundown to sprinkle a few pounds of night flab on every female over 40. Unlike bears, we have no trouble gaining weight in our sleep. Fitness has been a challenge for mankind pretty much since dinosaurs stopped chasing us. Cave men (and women) didn’t have to worry about logging 10,000 steps-a-day, but now everyone does— from Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson to the Pillsbury Doughboy. Does that seem fair to you? I’d advocate for deducting 1,000 steps for every decade you’ve survived past 30. Maybe knock off another 500 for every kid you’ve hatched, 250 for grands and 750 for each prescription drug you take. (Pretty soon, they’ll end up owing us steps.) Beyond the step thing, the biggest challenge for mature women is finding the right exercise program. You need one you’ll stick to that will get you moving without dislodging any titanium parts. And I found it. 30

Fitness has been a challenge for mankind pretty much since dinosaurs stopped chasing us. The class is not fancy. It’s your basic thong-free zone where polyester pants and loose, long-sleeve blouses are the predominant fashion statement, although a couple of us refuse to give up leggings no matter who they frighten. Most of the women could go straight to the lunch buffet at Golden Corral without changing outfits. It’s not like anybody moves fast enough to sweat. We use light, wussy weights and resistance bands. There’s music and cardio, stretching and kvetching. The moves are designed to improve balance so we won’t tip over when we’re out waddling around Target. Somewhere along the line, remaining upright becomes a worthy fitness goal. One minute you’re mastering

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2021 | SCLIVING.COOP

Bruce Lee’s Dragon Flag move, the next, you’re struggling to touch your knee with your hand. And it doesn’t count if you can do it with other body parts. Last week, our class moved outside to the pavilion, where we attracted something no one expected: an audience. A couple of Korean War veterans (they had the ball caps) brought their brown bag breakfasts to the picnic area, where they had a great view of the show. A few minutes later, it seemed like they’d multiplied. Every picnic table was packed with elderly, easily amused males. Remember that scene from The Birds when all the crows gathered around the school? It was like that. Rattled by our new fan club, especially the guys who were taking videos, some women mumbled about “perverts” while others checked to see who drove up in a Mercedes. From a distance, with a hint of dementia and severe cataracts, they might have mistaken us for the Rockettes. Anyway, they applauded. I kind of like our new fan club. As long as my legging seams hold (another Pillsbury Dough reference) and we don’t end up going viral on TikTok, I remain committed to my fitness plan. According to my calculations, today’s goal is 35 steps. avoided exercise and hibernated during most of the pandemic, so her return to fitness is very humbling. Exercise tips and horror stories are always welcome at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop. JAN A. IGOE


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Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living May 2021  

Enjoy this tasting menu of South Carolina’s signature coastal cuisine and learn the stories behind some of your favorite meals.

South Carolina Living May 2021  

Enjoy this tasting menu of South Carolina’s signature coastal cuisine and learn the stories behind some of your favorite meals.

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